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Sample records for 2d interferometric radiometer

  1. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometers : an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; McKague, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes 1) the progress of the work of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) Instrumentation and Future Technologies Technical Committee (IFT-TC) Microwave Radiometer Working Group and 2) an overview of the development of interferometric synthetic aperture microwave radiometers as an introduction to a dedicated session.

  2. Analog-digital conversion signal-to-noise ratio analysis for synthetic aperture interferometric radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Zhiping; Zheng, Cheng; Yao, Xianxun; Yang, Baohua; Shang, Xiaozhou; Miao, Jungang

    2014-01-01

    A nontrivial analog-digital conversion (ADC) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis for synthetic aperture interferometric radiometers for microwave remote sensing is presented. Correlation uncertainty is a key issue in the digital processing of radiometric signals. The ADC digitizes the analog intermediate frequency signal to perform digital correlations, hence the ADC noise is critical for radiometric performance, but this effect has lacked sufficient analysis. First, the ADC SNR requirement is drawn, and ADC SNR degradation is attributed to input noise, quantization noise, and sampling jitter. Second, it is proved that the input and the quantization noise have negligible effects on visibility uncertainty. Third, it is shown that the sampling jitter should be stringently controlled by Gaussian noise digitization SNR requirement. The sampling clock jitter is the dominant contributor in jitter caused SNR, and is evaluated by the long-term statistical time interval error jitter. Finally, the sampling jitter, the realized ADC SNR ratio and visibility uncertainties are tested on BHU-2D-U radiometer to verify the demonstrations. The analysis results can be used as a guideline in the digital correlation design of polarimetric or synthetic aperture radiometric systems.

  3. PAU-SA: a synthetic aperture interferometric radiometer test bed for potential improvements in future missions.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Perez, Isaac; Camps, Adriano; Bosch-Lluis, Xavi; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Nereida; Valencia-Domènech, Enric; Park, Hyuk; Forte, Giuseppe; Vall-Llosera, Merce

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is an Earth Explorer Opportunity mission from the European Space Agency (ESA). Its goal is to produce global maps of soil moisture and ocean salinity using the Microwave Imaging Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS). The purpose of the Passive Advanced Unit Synthetic Aperture (PAU-SA) instrument is to study and test some potential improvements that could eventually be implemented in future missions using interferometric radiometers such as the Geoestacionary Atmosferic Sounder (GAS), the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) and the Geostationary Interferometric Microwave Sounder (GIMS). Both MIRAS and PAU-SA are Y-shaped arrays with uniformly distributed antennas, but the receiver topology and the processing unit are quite different. The purpose of this work is to identify the elements in the MIRAS's design susceptible of improvement and apply them in the PAU-SA instrument demonstrator, to test them in view of these future interferometric radiometer missions.

  4. PAU-SA: A Synthetic Aperture Interferometric Radiometer Test Bed for Potential Improvements in Future Missions

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Perez, Isaac; Camps, Adriano; Bosch-Lluis, Xavi; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Nereida; Valencia-Domènech, Enric; Park, Hyuk; Forte, Giuseppe; Vall-llosera, Merce

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is an Earth Explorer Opportunity mission from the European Space Agency (ESA). Its goal is to produce global maps of soil moisture and ocean salinity using the Microwave Imaging Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS). The purpose of the Passive Advanced Unit Synthetic Aperture (PAU-SA) instrument is to study and test some potential improvements that could eventually be implemented in future missions using interferometric radiometers such as the Geoestacionary Atmosferic Sounder (GAS), the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) and the Geostationary Interferometric Microwave Sounder (GIMS). Both MIRAS and PAU-SA are Y-shaped arrays with uniformly distributed antennas, but the receiver topology and the processing unit are quite different. The purpose of this work is to identify the elements in the MIRAS's design susceptible of improvement and apply them in the PAU-SA instrument demonstrator, to test them in view of these future interferometric radiometer missions. PMID:22969371

  5. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout. PMID:27464908

  6. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout.

  7. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X-L

    2016-07-28

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout.

  8. Interferometric 2D Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Reveals Structural Heterogeneity of Catalytic Monolayers on Transparent Materials.

    PubMed

    Vanselous, Heather; Stingel, Ashley M; Petersen, Poul B

    2017-02-16

    Molecular monolayers exhibit structural and dynamical properties that are different from their bulk counterparts due to their interaction with the substrate. Extracting these distinct properties is crucial for a better understanding of processes such as heterogeneous catalysis and interfacial charge transfer. Ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopic techniques such as 2D infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy are powerful tools for understanding molecular dynamics in complex bulk systems. Here, we build on technical advancements in 2D IR and heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to study a CO2 reduction catalyst on nanostructured TiO2 with interferometric 2D SFG spectroscopy. Our method combines phase-stable heterodyne detection employing an external local oscillator with a broad-band pump pulse pair to provide the first high spectral and temporal resolution 2D SFG spectra of a transparent material. We determine the overall molecular orientation of the catalyst and find that there is a static structural heterogeneity reflective of different local environments at the surface.

  9. Differential Radiometers Using Fabry-Perot Interferometric Technique for Remote Sensing of Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgieva, Elena M.; Heaps,William S.; Wilson, Emily L.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of remote sensing radiometer based upon the Fabry-Perot interferometric technique has been developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and tested from both ground and aircraft platform. The sensor uses direct or reflected sunlight and has channels for measuring column concentration of carbon dioxide at 1570 nm, oxygen lines sensitive to pressure and temperature at 762 and 768 nm, and water vapor (940 nm). A solid Fabry-Perot etalon is used as a tunable narrow bandpass filter to restrict the measurement to the gas of interest's absorption bands. By adjusting the temperature of the etalon, which changes the index of refraction of its material, the transmission fringes can be brought into nearly exact correspondence with absorption lines of the particular species. With this alignment between absorption lines and fringes, changes in the amount of a species in the atmosphere strongly affect the amount of light transmitted by the etalon and can be related to gas concentration. The technique is applicable to different chemical species. We have performed simulations and instrument design studies for CH4, "Cot isotope, and CO detection. Index Terms- Absorbing media, Atmospheric measurements, Fabry-Perot interferometers, Optical interferometry, Remote sensing.

  10. Interferometric Approach to Measuring Band Topology in 2D Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanin, Dmitry A.; Kitagawa, Takuya; Bloch, Immanuel; Demler, Eugene

    2013-04-01

    Recently, optical lattices with nonzero Berry’s phases of Bloch bands have been realized. New approaches for measuring Berry’s phases and topological properties of bands with experimental tools appropriate for ultracold atoms need to be developed. In this Letter, we propose an interferometric method for measuring Berry’s phases of two-dimensional Bloch bands. The key idea is to use a combination of Ramsey interference and Bloch oscillations to measure Zak phases, i.e., Berry’s phases for closed trajectories corresponding to reciprocal lattice vectors. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to measure the Berry curvature of Bloch bands, the π Berry’s phase of Dirac points, and the first Chern number of topological bands. We discuss several experimentally feasible realizations of this technique, which make it robust against low-frequency magnetic noise.

  11. LIRAS mission for lunar exploration by microwave interferometric radiometer: Moon's subsurface characterization, emission model and numerical simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompili, Sara; Silvio Marzano, Frank; Di Carlofelice, Alessandro; Montopoli, Mario; Talone, Marco; Crapolicchio, Raffaele; L'Abbate, Michelangelo; Varchetta, Silvio; Tognolatti, Piero

    2013-04-01

    The "Lunar Interferometric Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis" (LIRAS) mission is promoted by the Italian Space Agency and is currently in feasibility phase. LIRAS' satellite will orbit around the Moon at a height of 100 km, with a revisiting time period lower than 1 lunar month and will be equipped with: a synthetic aperture radiometer for subsurface sounding purposes, working at 1 and 3 GHz, and a real aperture radiometer for near-surface probing, working at 12 and 24 GHz. The L-band payload, representing a novel concept for lunar exploration, is designed as a Y-shaped thinned array with three arms less than 2.5 m long. The main LIRAS objectives are high-resolution mapping and vertical sounding of the Moon subsurface by applying the advantages of the antenna aperture synthesis technique to a multi-frequency microwave passive payload. The mission is specifically designed to achieve spatial resolutions less than 10 km at surface and to retrieve thermo-morphological properties of the Moon subsurface within 5 m of depth. Among LIRAS products are: lunar near-surface brightness temperature, subsurface brightness temperature gross profile, subsurface regolith thickness, density and average thermal conductivity, detection index of possible subsurface discontinuities (e.g. ice presence). The following study involves the preliminary design of the LIRAS payload and the electromagnetic and thermal characterization of the lunar subsoil through the implementation of a simulator for reproducing the LIRAS measurements in response to observations of the Moon surface and subsurface layers. Lunar physical data, collected after the Apollo missions, and LIRAS instrument parameters are taken as input for the abovementioned simulator, called "LIRAS End-to-end Performance Simulator" (LEPS) and obtained by adapting the SMOS End-to-end Performance Simulator to the different instrumental, orbital, and geophysical LIRAS characteristics. LEPS completely simulates the behavior of the satellite

  12. Interferometric method for in-situ monitoring of fiber insertion in 2D fiber connectors fabricated through Deep Proton Writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakula, Anna; Lukaszewski, Dariusz; Tomczewski, Slawomir; Salbut, Leszek; Van Erps, Jürgen; Gomez, Virginia; Thienpont, Hugo

    2008-08-01

    Deep Proton Writing (DPW) is a rapid prototyping technology allowing for the fabrication of micro-optical and micro-mechanical components in PMMA, which are compatible with low-cost replication technologies. Using DPW, a high-precision 2D fiber connector featuring conically-shaped micro-holes for easy fiber insertion, was realized. When populating these fiber connectors by fiber insertion and fixation, a critical issue is the accurate control of the fiber protrusion. The use of laser interferometry to measure the fiber's facet position with respect to the connector surface to within a few micrometers, is inconvenient in view of the measurement range as compared to the fiber dimensions. In this paper, we propose an interferometric method for in-situ monitoring of the fiber insertion depth, based on the phenomenon of low temporal coherence light interference in a Twyman - Green setup. In addition, achieving a few micrometers measurement range with low coherence light requires vertical scanning of the sample under test. The design of the experimental setup and the achieved measurement results are shown and discussed.

  13. Multiangular L-band Datasets for Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Salinity Retrieval Measured by Airborne HUT-2D Synthetic Aperture Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Seppänen, J.; Hallikainen, M.

    2009-04-01

    SMOS is the European Space Agency's next Earth Explorer satellite due for launch in 2009. It aims for global monitoring of soil moisture and ocean salinity utilizing a new technology concept for remote sensing: two-dimensional aperture synthesis radiometry. The payload of SMOS is Microwave Imaging Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis, or MIRAS. It is a passive instrument that uses 72 individual L-band receivers for measuring the brightness temperature of the Earth. From each acquisition, i.e. integration time or snapshot, MIRAS provides two-dimensional brightness temperature of the scene in the instrument's field of view. Thus, consecutive snapshots provide multiangular measurements of the target once the instrument passes over it. Depending on the position of the target in instrument's swath, the brightness temperature of the target at incidence angles from zero up to 50 degrees can be measured with one overpass. To support the development MIRAS instrument, its calibration, and soil moisture and sea surface salinity retrieval algorithm development, Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) has designed, manufactured and tested a radiometer which operates at L-band and utilizes the same two-dimensional methodology of interferometery and aperture synthesis as MIRAS does. This airborne instrument, called HUT-2D, was designed to be used on board the University's research aircraft. It provides multiangular measurements of the target in its field of view, which spans up to 30 degrees off the boresight of the instrument, which is pointed to the nadir. The number of independent measurements of each target point depends on the flight speed and altitude. In addition to the Spanish Airborne MIRAS demonstrator (AMIRAS), HUT-2D is the only European airborne synthetic aperture radiometer. This paper presents the datasets and measurement campaigns, which have been carried out using the HUT-2D radiometer and are available for the scientific community. In April 2007 HUT-2D participated

  14. The Radiometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, David P.

    1970-01-01

    The often observed and misunderstood phenomenon of movement of black and white vanes in toy radiometers under illumination is discussed in a generalized non-mathematical manner. Effects of light pressure, low gas density, friction, heat, and motion are illustrated. (JM)

  15. PHOCUS radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, O.; Murtagh, D.; Belitsky, V.

    2012-06-01

    PHOCUS - Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer Mesosphere is a Swedish sounding rocket experiment, launched in July 2011, with the main goal of investigating the upper atmosphere in the altitude range 50-110 km. This paper describes the SondRad instrument in the PHOCUS payload, a radiometer comprising two frequency channels (183 GHz and 557 GHz) aimed at exploring the water vapour concentration distribution in connection with the appearance of noctilucent (night shining) clouds. The design of the radiometer system has been done in a collaboration between Omnisys Instruments AB and the Group for Advanced Receiver Development (GARD) at Chalmers University of Technology where Omnisys was responsible for the overall design, implementation, and verification of the radiometers and backend, whereas GARD was responsible for the radiometer optics and calibration systems. The SondRad instrument covers the water absorption lines at 183 GHz and 557 GHz. The 183 GHz channel is a side-looking radiometer, while the 557 GHz radiometer is placed along the rocket axis looking in the forward direction. Both channels employ sub-harmonically pumped Schottky mixers and Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FFTS) backends with 67 kHz resolution. The radiometers include novel calibration systems specifically adjusted for use with each frequency channel. The 183 GHz channel employs a continuous wave CW pilot signal calibrating the entire receiving chain, while the intermediate frequency chain (the IF-chain) of the 557 GHz channel is calibrated by injecting a signal from a reference noise source through a directional coupler. The instrument collected complete spectra for both the 183 GHz and the 557 GHz with 300 Hz data rate for the 183 GHz channel and 10 Hz data rate for the 557 GHz channel for about 60 s reaching the apogee of the flight trajectory and 100 s after that. With lossless data compression using variable resolution over the spectrum, the data set was

  16. PHOCUS radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, O.; Murtagh, D.; Belitsky, V.

    2012-01-01

    PHOCUS - Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer Mesosphere is a Swedish sounding rocket experiment, launched in July 2011, with the main goal of investigating the upper atmosphere in the altitude range 50-110 km. This paper describes the SondRad instrument in the PHOCUS payload, the radiometer comprising two frequency channels, 183 GHz and 557 GHz, aimed at exploring the water vapour concentration distribution in connection with the appearance of noctilucent (night shining) clouds. The design of the radiometer system has been done in a collaboration between Omnisys Instruments AB and the Group for Advanced Receiver Development (GARD) at Chalmers University of Technology where Omnisys was responsible for the overall design, implementation, and verification of the radiometers and backend whereas GARD was responsible for the radiometer optics and calibration systems. The SondRad instrument covers the water absorption lines at 183 GHz and 557 GHz. The 183 GHz channel is a side-looking radiometer while the 557 GHz radiometer is placed along the rocket axis looking in the forward direction. Both channels employ sub-harmonically pumped Schottky mixers and FFT spectrometer backends with 67 kHz resolution. The radiometers include novel calibration systems specifically adjusted for use with each frequency channel. The 183 GHz channel employs a CW-pilot signal calibrating the entire receiving chain while the IF-chain of the 557 GHz channel is calibrated by injecting a signal from a reference noise source through a directional coupler. The instrument collected complete spectra for both the 183 GHz and the 557 GHz with 300 Hz data rate for the 183 GHz channel and 10 Hz data rate for the 557 GHz channel for about 60 s reaching the apogee of the flight trajectory and 100 s after that. With lossless data compression using variable resolution over the spectrum, the data set was reduced to 2 × 12 MByte. The first results indicate that the instrument has

  17. Broadband radiometer

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, T.W.

    1994-07-26

    A broadband radiometer is disclosed including (a) an optical integrating sphere having generally spherical integrating chamber and an entry port for receiving light (e.g., having visible and ultraviolet fractions), (b) a first optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to broadband radiation, (c) a second optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to a predetermined wavelength fraction of the broadband radiation, and (d) an output for producing an electrical signal which is proportional to the difference between the two electrical output signals. The radiometer is very useful, for example, in measuring the absolute amount of ultraviolet light present in a given light sample. 8 figs.

  18. Broadband radiometer

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, Theodore W.

    1994-01-01

    A broadband radiometer including (a) an optical integrating sphere having a enerally spherical integrating chamber and an entry port for receiving light (e.g., having visible and ultraviolet fractions), (b) a first optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to broadband radiation, (c) a second optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to a predetermined wavelength fraction of the broadband radiation, and (d) an output for producing an electrical signal which is proportional to the difference between the two electrical output signals. The radiometer is very useful, for example, in measuring the absolute amount of ultraviolet light present in a given light sample.

  19. Calibration of Correlation Radiometers Using Pseudo-Random Noise Signals

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Isaac Ramos; Bosch-Lluis, Xavi; Camps, Adriano; Alvarez, Nereida Rodriguez; Hernandez, Juan Fernando Marchán; Domènech, Enric Valencia; Vernich, Carlos; de la Rosa, Sonia; Pantoja, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    The calibration of correlation radiometers, and particularly aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers, is a critical issue to ensure their performance. Current calibration techniques are based on the measurement of the cross-correlation of receivers’ outputs when injecting noise from a common noise source requiring a very stable distribution network. For large interferometric radiometers this centralized noise injection approach is very complex from the point of view of mass, volume and phase/amplitude equalization. Distributed noise injection techniques have been proposed as a feasible alternative, but are unable to correct for the so-called “baseline errors” associated with the particular pair of receivers forming the baseline. In this work it is proposed the use of centralized Pseudo-Random Noise (PRN) signals to calibrate correlation radiometers. PRNs are sequences of symbols with a long repetition period that have a flat spectrum over a bandwidth which is determined by the symbol rate. Since their spectrum resembles that of thermal noise, they can be used to calibrate correlation radiometers. At the same time, since these sequences are deterministic, new calibration schemes can be envisaged, such as the correlation of each receiver’s output with a baseband local replica of the PRN sequence, as well as new distribution schemes of calibration signals. This work analyzes the general requirements and performance of using PRN sequences for the calibration of microwave correlation radiometers, and particularizes the study to a potential implementation in a large aperture synthesis radiometer using an optical distribution network. PMID:22454576

  20. Development of UHF radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. M.; Blume, H. J. C.; Cross, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wideband multifrequency UHF radiometer was initially developed to operate in the 500 to 710 MHz frequency range for the remote measurement of ocean water salinity. However, radio-frequency interference required a reconfiguration to operate in the single-frequency radio astronomy band of 608 to 614 MHz. Details of the radiometer development and testing are described. Flight testing over variable terrain provided a performance comparison of the UHF radiometer with an L-band radiometer for remote sensing of geophysical parameters. Although theoretically more sensitive, the UHF radiometer was found to be less desirable in practice than the L-band radiometer.

  1. 180-GHz Interferometric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lim, Boon H.; O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Gaier, Todd C.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn, H.; Tanner, Alan B.; Ruf, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A 180-GHz interferometric imager uses compact receiver modules, combined high- and low-gain antennas, and ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) correlator technology, enabling continuous, all-weather observations of water vapor with 25-km resolution and 0.3-K noise in 15 minutes of observation for numerical weather forecasting and tropical storm prediction. The GeoSTAR-II prototype instrument is broken down into four major subsystems: the compact, low-noise receivers; sub-array modules; IF signal distribution; and the digitizer/correlator. Instead of the single row of antennas adopted in GeoSTAR, this version has four rows of antennas on a coarser grid. This dramatically improves the sensitivity in the desired field of view. The GeoSTAR-II instrument is a 48-element, synthetic, thinned aperture radiometer operating at 165-183 GHz. The instrument has compact receivers integrated into tiles of 16 elements in a 4x4 arrangement. These tiles become the building block of larger arrays. The tiles contain signal distribution for bias controls, IF signal, and local oscillator signals. The IF signals are digitized and correlated using an ASIC correlator to minimize power consumption. Previous synthetic aperture imagers have used comparatively large multichip modules, whereas this approach uses chip-scale modules mounted on circuit boards, which are in turn mounted on the distribution manifolds. This minimizes the number of connectors and reduces system mass. The use of ASIC technology in the digitizers and correlators leads to a power reduction close to an order of magnitude.

  2. ESTAR - A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer for measuring soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Griffis, A.; Swift, C. T.; Jackson, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of soil moisture from space requires putting relatively large microwave antennas in orbit. Aperture synthesis, an interferometric technique for reducing the antenna aperture needed in space, offers the potential for a practical means of meeting these requirements. An aircraft prototype, electronically steered thinned array L-band radiometer (ESTAR), has been built to develop this concept and to demonstrate its suitability for the measurement of soil moisture. Recent flights over the Walnut Gulch Watershed in Arizona show good agreement with ground truth and with measurements with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR).

  3. Interferometric radiometer for in-flight detection of aviation hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, William L.; Kireev, Stanislav; West, Leanne L.; Gimmestad, Gary G.; Cornman, Larry; Feltz, Wayne; Perram, Glen; Daniels, Taumi

    2008-08-01

    The Forward-Looking Interferometer (FLI) is a new instrument concept for obtaining the measurements required to alert flight crews to potential weather hazards to safe flight. To meet the needs of the commercial fleet, such a sensor should address multiple hazards to warrant the costs of development, certification, installation, training, and maintenance. The FLI concept is based on high-resolution Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometry (FTS) technologies that have been developed for ground based, airborne, and satellite remote sensing. The FLI concept is being evaluated for its potential to address multiple hazards including clear air turbulence (CAT), volcanic ash, wake vortices, low slant range visibility, dry wind shear, and icing, during all phases of flight. This project has three major elements: further sensitivity studies and applications of EOF (Empirical Orthogonal Function) Regression; development of algorithms to estimate the hazard severity; and field measurements to provide an empirical demonstration of the FLI aviation hazard detection and display capability. These theoretical and experimental studies will lead to a specification for a prototype airborne FLI instrument for use in future in-flight validation. The research team includes the Georgia Tech Research Institute, Hampton University, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the Air Force Institute of Technology, and the University of Wisconsin.

  4. High solar intensity radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Silicon solar cells are used to measure visible radiant energy and radiation intensities to 20 solar constants. Future investigations are planned for up to 100 solar constants. Radiometer is small, rugged, accurate and inexpensive.

  5. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; James, Mark W.; Roberts, J. Brent; Bisawas, Sayak K.; Jones, W. Linwood; Johnson, James; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem; Ruf, Christopher S.; Morris, Mary; Black, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a synthetic thinned array passive microwave radiometer designed to allow retrieval of surface wind speed in hurricanes, up through category five intensity. The retrieval technology follows the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which measures surface wind speed in hurricanes along a narrow strip beneath the aircraft. HIRAD has flown in the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiement in 2010 on a WB-57 aircraft, and on a Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in 2012 and 2013 as part of NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) program. The GRIP program included flights over Hurricanes Earl and Karl (2010). The 2012 HS3 deployment did not include any hurricane flights for the UAS carrying HIRAD. Hurricane flights are expected for HIRAD in 2013 during HS3. This presentation will describe the HIRAD instrument, its results from the 2010 hurricane flights, and hopefully results from hurricane flights in August and September 2013.

  6. Aquarius Radiometer Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Dinnat, E. P.; de Matthaeis, P.; Utku, C.; Abraham, S.; Lagerloef, G.S.E.; Meissner, T.; Wentz, F.

    2014-01-01

    Aquarius was launched on June 10, 2011 as part of the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory and the instrument has been operating continuously since being turned on in August of the same year. The initial map of sea surface salinity was released one month later (September) and the quality of the retrieval has continuously improved since then. The Aquarius radiometers include several special features such as measurement of the third Stokes parameter, fast sampling, and careful thermal control, and a combined passive/active instrument. Aquarius is working well and in addition to helping measure salinity, the radiometer special features are generating new results.

  7. Stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates

    DOEpatents

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Gestin, Jean-Francois

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to new rigid chelating structures, to methods for preparing these materials, and to their use in preparing radiometal labeled immunoconjugates. These new chelates include cyclohexyl EDTA monohydride, the trans forms of cyclohexyl DTPA and TTHA, and derivatives of these cyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate materials.

  8. Stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates

    DOEpatents

    Mease, R.C.; Srivastava, S.C.; Gestin, J.F.

    1994-08-02

    The present invention relates to new rigid chelating structures, to methods for preparing these materials, and to their use in preparing radiometal labeled immunoconjugates. These new chelates include cyclohexyl EDTA monohydride, the trans forms of cyclohexyl DTPA and TTHA, and derivatives of these cyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate materials. No Drawings

  9. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  10. Coherence versus interferometric resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo

    2010-06-15

    We examine the relation between second-order coherence and resolution in the interferometric detection of phase shifts. While for classical thermal light resolution and second-order coherence are synonymous, we show that for quantum light beams reaching optimum precision second-order coherence and resolution become antithetical.

  11. Millimeter radiometer system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Swanson, P. N.

    1989-01-01

    JPL has had a large amount of experience with spaceborne microwave/millimeter wave radiometers for remote sensing. All of the instruments use filled aperture antenna systems from 5 cm diameter for the microwave Sounder Units (MSU), 16 m for the microwave limb sounder (MLS) to 20 m for the large deployable reflector (LDR). The advantages of filled aperture antenna systems are presented. The requirements of the 10 m Geoplat antenna system, 10 m multified antenna, and the MLS are briefly discussed.

  12. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Biswas, Sayak K.; James, Mark W.; Roberts, J. Brent; Jones, W. Linwood; Johnson, James; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem; Ruf, Christopher S.; Morris, Mary; Black, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a synthetic thinned array passive microwave radiometer designed to allow retrieval of surface wind speed in hurricanes, up through category five intensity. The retrieval technology follows the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which measures surface wind speed in hurricanes along a narrow strip beneath the aircraft. HIRAD maps wind speeds in a swath below the aircraft, about 50-60 km wide when flown in the lower stratosphere. HIRAD has flown in the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in 2010 on a WB-57 aircraft, and on a Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in 2012 and 2013 as part of NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) program. The GRIP program included flights over Hurricanes Earl and Karl (2010). The 2012 HS3 deployment did not include any hurricane flights for the UAS carrying HIRAD. The 2013 HS3 flights included one flight over the predecessor to TS Gabrielle, and one flight over Hurricane Ingrid. This presentation will describe the HIRAD instrument, its results from the 2010 and 2013 flights, and potential future developments.

  13. Precision Interferometric Dilatometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-23

    reference mirrors on a ULE glass or Zerodur block in a thermally insulated - part of the system. Since the BIP, (or B2P2) paths are in air, mounting...into the vacuum chamber. The reference mirror support (e.g., Zerodur ) is shielded from temperature excursion, and a conservative error is ALu - aL... Mirror (1000 V B 15 pm motion)s............s.. 24 10. Interferometric Counter Output vs. Voltage Applied to PZT-Driven Mirror (fine scale

  14. Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, L.; Aristidi, E.; Vakili, F.; Domiciano, A.

    We present an interferometric beam recombination technique which allows achromatic and direct true imaging of targets at very high angular resolution. This technique intrinsically overcomes the main problems of Labeyrie's hypertelescope design, and can be used in a nulling configuration. It is thus particularly well suited for high contrast imaging in the context of exo-planet search and characterization especially for future space-borne arrays. We present the concept on a formal basis, and discuss its instrumental implementation.

  15. Steady state thermal radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loose, J. D. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A radiometer is described operating in a vacuum under steady state conditions. The front element is an aluminum sheet painted on the outer side with black or other absorptive material of selected characteristics. A thermocouple is bonded to the inner side of the aluminum sheet. That is backed by highly insulative layers of glass fiber and crinkled, aluminized Mylar polyester. Those layers are backed with a sturdy, polyester sheet, and the entire lamination is laced together by nylon cords. The device is highly reliable in that it does not drift out of calibration, and is significantly inexpensive.

  16. Portable Diagnostic Radiometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    noise. The single-throw-double-pole switch is usually realized with an electronically- switched , latching ferrite circulator; however, at these...R2. Dl, D2 and R2 are then displayed on the liquid crystal display. The Q lines are next set to switch the latching switches into the 800 MHz...operation is basically as follows: On start- up, the CPU resets the Q line (P1-6) which sets the latching switches (see Fig. 18) to the 4 GHz radiometer

  17. Wideband Agile Digital Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd C.; Brown, Shannon T.; Ruf, Christopher; Gross, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to take the initial steps needed to develop a field programmable gate array (FPGA)- based wideband digital radiometer backend (>500 MHz bandwidth) that will enable passive microwave observations with minimal performance degradation in a radiofrequency-interference (RFI)-rich environment. As manmade RF emissions increase over time and fill more of the microwave spectrum, microwave radiometer science applications will be increasingly impacted in a negative way, and the current generation of spaceborne microwave radiometers that use broadband analog back ends will become severely compromised or unusable over an increasing fraction of time on orbit. There is a need to develop a digital radiometer back end that, for each observation period, uses digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms to identify the maximum amount of RFI-free spectrum across the radiometer band to preserve bandwidth to minimize radiometer noise (which is inversely related to the bandwidth). Ultimately, the objective is to incorporate all processing necessary in the back end to take contaminated input spectra and produce a single output value free of manmade signals to minimize data rates for spaceborne radiometer missions. But, to meet these objectives, several intermediate processing algorithms had to be developed, and their performance characterized relative to typical brightness temperature accuracy re quirements for current and future microwave radiometer missions, including those for measuring salinity, soil moisture, and snow pack.

  18. Nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging.

    PubMed

    Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2004-03-26

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) processes are "coherent," but the phase of the anti-Stokes radiation is lost by most incoherent spectroscopic CARS measurements. We propose a Raman microscopy imaging method called nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging, which measures Raman spectra by obtaining the temporal anti-Stokes signal through nonlinear interferometry. With a more complete knowledge of the anti-Stokes signal, we show through simulations that a high-resolution Raman spectrum can be obtained of a molecule in a single pulse using broad band radiation. This could be useful for identifying the three-dimensional spatial distribution of molecular species in tissue.

  19. Miniature Extreme Ultraviolet Solar Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, D. R.; Seely, J. F.; Bremer, J.; Jones, A. R.; Vest, R.; Sakdinawat, A.

    2015-12-01

    Free-standing zone plates for use in EUV solar radiometers have been fabricated using electron beam lithography and calibrated at the NIST SURF synchrotron facility. The radiometers that we are developing use zone plates (ZPs) to focus the total solar irradiance in narrow EUV spectral bands and measure it with negligible sensitivity to field angle and polarization, and with greater accuracy and greater long-term stability than radiometers that have alternative architectures. These radiometers are easy to accommodate on spacecraft due to their small size, low mass, low power requirements, low data rates, and modest pointing requirements. A proto-type instrument will be presented with performance characteristics and spacecraft resource requirements for hosting these new instruments. The compact size of the optical train make these zone plates attractive for small CubeSats. The robustness of the compact design makes these radiometers available for a large variety of applications.

  20. Soil Moisture Retrieval Using a Two-Dimenional L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radiometer in a Semi-Arid Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface soil moisture was retrieved from L-band radiometer data collected in semi-arid regions during the Soil Moisture Experiment in 2004 (SMEX04). The two-dimensional synthetic aperture radiometer (2D-STAR) was flown over regional-scale study sites located in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. The s...

  1. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair. PMID:22736961

  2. Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, F.; Aristidi, E.; Abe, L.; Lopez, B.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by reconfiguring images instead of pupils. Imaging is performed in a combined pupil-plane where the point-source intensity distribution (PSID by comparison to the more commonly quoted point-spread function, PSF) tends towards a pseudo Airy disc for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field limited to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance. We also discuss the application of IRAN to improve the performances of imaging and/or nulling interferometers like the full-fledged VLTI array or the DARWIN space-borne mission.

  3. Interferometric fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  4. Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A self-calibrating nulling radiometer for non-contact temperature measurement of an object, such as a body of water, employs a black body source as a temperature reference, an optomechanical mechanism, e.g., a chopper, to switch back and forth between measuring the temperature of the black body source and that of a test source, and an infrared detection technique. The radiometer functions by measuring radiance of both the test and the reference black body sources; adjusting the temperature of the reference black body so that its radiance is equivalent to the test source; and, measuring the temperature of the reference black body at this point using a precision contact-type temperature sensor, to determine the radiative temperature of the test source. The radiation from both sources is detected by an infrared detector that converts the detected radiation to an electrical signal that is fed with a chopper reference signal to an error signal generator, such as a synchronous detector, that creates a precision rectified signal that is approximately proportional to the difference between the temperature of the reference black body and that of the test infrared source. This error signal is then used in a feedback loop to adjust the reference black body temperature until it equals that of the test source, at which point the error signal is nulled to zero. The chopper mechanism operates at one or more Hertz allowing minimization of l/f noise. It also provides pure chopping between the black body and the test source and allows continuous measurements.

  5. Multiband radiometer for field research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, B. F.; Bauer, M. E.; Dewitt, D. P.; Silva, L. F.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1979-01-01

    A multiband radiometer for field research with 8 bands between 0.4 and 12.5 micrometers is described. The data acquisition system will record the results from the radiometer, a precision radiation thermometer, and ancillary sources. The radiometer and data handling systems will be adaptable to helicopter, truck, to tripod platforms; the system will also be suitable for portable hand-held operation. The general characteristics of this system are that it will be (1) inexpensive to acquire, maintain, and operate, (2) simple to calibrate, (3) complete with data handling hardware and software, and (4) well-documented for use by researchers.

  6. Radiometers Optimize Local Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Radiometrics Corporation, headquartered in Boulder, Colorado, engaged in Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements with Glenn Research Center that resulted in a pencil-beam radiometer designed to detect supercooled liquid along flight paths -- a prime indicator of dangerous icing conditions. The company has brought to market a modular radiometer that resulted from the SBIR work. Radiometrics' radiometers are used around the world as key tools for detecting icing conditions near airports and for the prediction of weather conditions like fog and convective storms, which are known to produce hail, strong winds, flash floods, and tornadoes. They are also employed for oceanographic research and soil moisture studies.

  7. Digital signal processing in microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, R. W.; Stanley, W. D.; Harrington, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    A microprocessor based digital signal processing unit has been proposed to replace analog sections of a microwave radiometer. A brief introduction to the radiometer system involved and a description of problems encountered in the use of digital techniques in radiometer design are discussed. An analysis of the digital signal processor as part of the radiometer is then presented.

  8. Interferometric tomography of fuel cells for monitoring membrane water content.

    PubMed

    Waller, Laura; Kim, Jungik; Shao-Horn, Yang; Barbastathis, George

    2009-08-17

    We have developed a system that uses two 1D interferometric phase projections for reconstruction of 2D water content changes over time in situ in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system. By modifying the filtered backprojection tomographic algorithm, we are able to incorporate a priori information about the object distribution into a fast reconstruction algorithm which is suitable for real-time monitoring.

  9. HELIOS dual swept frequency radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The HELIOS dual swept frequency radiometer, used in conjunction with a dipole antenna, was designed to measure electromagnetic radiation in space. An engineering prototype was fabricated and tested on the HELIOS spacecraft. Two prototypes and two flight units were fabricated and three of the four units were integrated into the HELIOS spacecraft. Two sets of ground support equipment were provided for checkout of the radiometer.

  10. GPM Plans for Radiometer Intercalibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Stout, John; Chou, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    The international Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission led by NASA and JAXA is planned as a multi-radiometer constellation mission. A key mission component is the ability to intercalibrate the Tb from the partner constellation radiometers and create inter-calibrated, mission consistent Tc. One of the enabling strategies for this approach is the launching of a joint NASA/JAXA core satellite which contains a JAXA/NICT provided dual precipitation radar and a NASA provided Microwave Imaging passive radiometer. The observations from these instruments on the core satellite provide the opportunity to develop a transfer reference standard that can then be applied across the partner provided constellation radiometers that enables the creation of mission consistent brightness temperatures. The other aspect of the strategy is the development of a community consensus intercalibration algorithm that will be applied to the Tb observations from partner radiometers and create the best calibrated Tc. Also described is the development of the framework in which the inter-calibration is included in the final algorithm. A part of the latter effort has been the development of a generic, logical structure which can be applied across radiometer types and which guarantees the user community that key information for using Tc properly is recorded. Key

  11. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  12. Nonclassical light in interferometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, N. A.; Difiore, L.; Romano, R.; Solimeno, S.; Zaccaria, F.; Manko, Margarita A.; Manko, Vladimir I.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the even and odd coherent light and other nonclassical states of light like superposition of coherent states with different phases may replace the squeezed light in an interferometric gravitational wave detector to increase its sensitivity.

  13. A One-Dimensional Synthetic-Aperture Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doiron, Terence; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A proposed one-dimensional synthetic- aperture microwave radiometer could serve as an alternative to either the two-dimensional synthetic-aperture radiometer described in the immediately preceding article or to a prior one-dimensional one, denoted the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR), mentioned in that article. The proposed radiometer would operate in a pushbroom imaging mode, utilizing (1) interferometric cross-track scanning to obtain cross-track resolution and (2) the focusing property of a reflector for along-track resolution. The most novel aspect of the proposed system would be the antenna (see figure), which would include a cylindrical reflector of offset parabolic cross section. The reflector could be made of a lightweight, flexible material amenable to stowage and deployment. Other than a stowage/deployment mechanism, the antenna would not include moving parts, and cross-track scanning would not entail mechanical rotation of the antenna. During operation, the focal line, parallel to the cylindrical axis, would be oriented in the cross-track direction, so that placement of receiving/radiating elements at the focal line would afford the desired along-track resolution. The elements would be microwave feed horns sparsely arrayed along the focal line. The feed horns would be oriented with their short and long cross-sectional dimensions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the cylindrical axis to obtain fan-shaped beams having their broad and narrow cross-sectional dimensions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the cylindrical axis. The interference among the beams would be controlled in the same manner as in the ESTAR to obtain along-cylindrical- axis (cross-track) resolution and cross-track scanning.

  14. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  15. Interferometric radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ronald A.; Shipman, Mark; Holder, E. J.; Williams, James K.

    2002-08-01

    The United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command (USASMDC) has interest in a technology demonstration that capitalizes on investment in fire control and smart interceptor technologies that have matured beyond basic research. The concept SWORD (Short range missile defense With Optimized Radar Distribution) consists of a novel approach utilizing a missile interceptor and interferometric fire control radar. A hit-to-kill, closed-loop, command guidance scheme is planned that takes advantage of extremely accurate target and interceptor state vectors derived via the fire control radar. The fire control system has the capability to detect, track, and classify multiple threats in a tactical regime as well as simultaneously provide command guidance updates to multiple missile interceptors. The missile interceptor offers a cost reduction potential as well as an enhancement to the kinematics range and lethality over existing SHORAD systems. Additionally, the Radio Frequency (RF) guidance scheme offers increased battlefield weather performance. The Air Defense (AD) community, responding to current threat capabilities and trends, has identified an urgent need to have a capability to counter proliferated, low cost threats with a low cost-per-kill weapon system. The SWORD system will offer a solution that meets this need. The SWORD critical technologies will be identified including a detailed description of each. Validated test results and basic principles of operation will be presented to prove the merit of past investments. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology (DAS(R&T) has a three- year Science and Technology Program to evaluate the errors and proposed mitigation techniques associated with target spectral dispersion and range gate straddle. Preliminary bench-top experiment results will be presented in this paper.

  16. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  17. Radiometer Testbed Development for SWOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Brown, Shannon; Gaier, Todd; Dawson, Douglas; Harding, Dennis; Fu, Lee-Lueng; Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Conventional altimeters include nadir looking colocated 18-37 GHz microwave radiometer to measure wet tropospheric path delay. These have reduced accuracy in coastal zone (within 50 km from land) and do not provide wet path delay over land. The addition of high frequency channels to Jason-class radiometer will improve retrievals in coastal regions and enable retrievals over land. High-frequency window channels, 90, 130 and 166 GHz are optimum for improving performance in coastal region and channels on 183 GHz water vapor line are ideal for over-land retrievals.

  18. Mobile radio interferometric geodetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Niell, A. E.; Ong, K. M.; Resch, G. M.; Morabito, D. D.; Claflin, E. S.; Lockhart, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying (ARIES) in a proof of concept mode is discussed. Accuracy demonstrations over a short baseline, a 180 km baseline, and a 380 km baseline are documented. Use of ARIES in the Sea Slope Experiment of the National Geodetic Survey to study the apparent differences between oceanographic and geodetic leveling determinations of the sea surface along the Pacific Coast is described. Intergration of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System and a concept called SERIES (Satellite Emission Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) is briefly reviewed.

  19. High intensity solar cell radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Device can be employed under high intensity illumination conditions such as would occur in a close-solar-approach space mission or in monitoring high intensity lamps. Radiometer consists of silicon solar cells with thin semi-transparent coatings of aluminum deposited on the front surfaces to permit transmission of small percentage of light and reflect the remainder.

  20. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  1. Calibration and Image Reconstruction for the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Christopher; Roberts, J. Brent; Biswas, Sayak; James, Mark W.; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new airborne passive microwave synthetic aperture radiometer designed to provide wide swath images of ocean surface wind speed under heavy precipitation and, in particular, in tropical cyclones. It operates at 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz and uses interferometric signal processing to synthesize a pushbroom imager in software from a low profile planar antenna with no mechanical scanning. HIRAD participated in NASA s Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) mission during Fall 2010 as its first science field campaign. HIRAD produced images of upwelling brightness temperature over a aprox 70 km swath width with approx 3 km spatial resolution. From this, ocean surface wind speed and column averaged atmospheric liquid water content can be retrieved across the swath. The calibration and image reconstruction algorithms that were used to verify HIRAD functional performance during and immediately after GRIP were only preliminary and used a number of simplifying assumptions and approximations about the instrument design and performance. The development and performance of a more detailed and complete set of algorithms are reported here.

  2. Columnar water vapor retrievals from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer data

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Turner, David D.; Cairns, Brian; Oinas, Valdar; Lacis, Andrew A.; Gutman, S.; Westwater, Ed R.; Smirnov, A.; Eilers, J.

    2009-01-26

    The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measures direct and diffuse irradiances in the visible and near IR spectral range. In addition to characteristics of atmospheric aerosols, MFRSR data also allow retrieval of precipitable water vapor (PWV) column amounts, which are determined from the direct normal irradiances in the 940 nm spectral channel. The HITRAN 2004 spectral database was used in our retrievals to model the water vapor absorption. We present a detailed error analysis describing the influence of uncertainties in instrument calibration and spectral response, as well as those in available spectral databases, on the retrieval results. The results of our PWV retrievals from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operated by the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program were compared with correlative standard measurements by Microwave Radiometers (MWRs) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) water vapor sensor, as well as with retrievals from other solar radiometers (AERONET’s CIMEL, AATS-6). Some of these data are routinely available at the SGP’s Central Facility, however, we also used measurements from a wider array of instrumentation deployed at this site during the Water Vapor Intensive Observation Period (WVIOP2000) in September – October 2000. The WVIOP data show better agreement between different solar radiometers or between different microwave radiometers (both groups showing relative biases within 4%) than between these two groups of instruments, with MWRs values being consistently higher (up to 14%) than those from solar instruments. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using MFRSR network data for creation of 2D datasets comparable with the MODIS satellite water vapor product.

  3. Two-Wavelength Interferometric Keratometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric; Page, Norman

    1991-01-01

    Proposed interferometric keratometer measures shapes of corneas without touching them. Used to test strongly aspherical optics. Resembling present commercial lens-testing interferometers, generates interferograms representative of deviation of surfaces under test from sphericity. Such interferograms used to generate contour maps of surfaces. Measures corneal topography to diameters as large as 12 mm.

  4. Digital simulation of dynamic processes in radiometer systems. [microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    The development and application of several computer programs for simulating different classes of microwave radiometers are described. The programs are dynamic in nature, and they may be used to determine the instantaneous behavior of system variables as a function of time. Some of the programs employ random variable models in the simulations so that the statistical nature of the results may be investigated. The programs have been developed to utilize either the Continuous System Modeling Program or the Advanced Continuous System Language. The validity of most of the programs was investigated using statistical tests, and the results show excellent correlation with theoretical predictions. The programs are currently being used in the investigation of new design techniques for microwave radiometers.

  5. BESST: A Miniature, Modular Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert; Good, William; Baldwin-Stevens, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A new radiometer assembly has been developed that incorporates modular design principles in order to provide flexibility and versatility. The assembly, shown in Figure 1, is made up of six modules plus a central cubical frame. A small thermal imaging detector is used to determine the temperature of remote objects. To improve the accuracy of the temperature reading, frequent calibration is required. The detector must view known temperature targets before viewing the remote object. Calibration is achieved by using a motorized fold mirror to select the desired scene the detector views. The motor steps the fold mirror through several positions, which allows the detector to view the calibration targets or the remote object. The details, features, and benefits of the radiometer are described in this paper.

  6. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  7. Registration of interferometric SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is a new way of performing topography mapping. Among the factors critical to mapping accuracy is the registration of the complex SAR images from repeated orbits. A new algorithm for registering interferometric SAR images is presented. A new figure of merit, the average fluctuation function of the phase difference image, is proposed to evaluate the fringe pattern quality. The process of adjusting the registration parameters according to the fringe pattern quality is optimized through a downhill simplex minimization algorithm. The results of applying the proposed algorithm to register two pairs of Seasat SAR images with a short baseline (75 m) and a long baseline (500 m) are shown. It is found that the average fluctuation function is a very stable measure of fringe pattern quality allowing very accurate registration.

  8. IRAN: interferometric remapped array nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristidi, Eric; Vakili, Farrokh; Abe, Lyu; Belu, Adrian; Lopez, Bruno; Lanteri, Henri; Schutz, A.; Menut, Jean-Luc

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by observing in a combined pupil plane instead of an image plane. The point-source intensity distribution (PSID) of this interferometric "image" tends towards a psuedo Airy disc (similar to that of a giant monolithic telescope) for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field comparable to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions, circumstellar nebulosities or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance.

  9. Photoacoustic microtomography using optical interferometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuster, Robert; Holotta, Markus; Kremser, Christian; Grossauer, Harald; Burgholzer, Peter; Paltauf, Günther

    2010-03-01

    A device for three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic tomography with resolution in the range of tens of micrometers is presented that uses a light beam for interferometric detection of acoustic waves. Reconstruction of the 3-D initial pressure distribution from the signals representing line integrals of the acoustic field is a two-step process. It uses an inversion of 2-D wave propagation to obtain line projections of the initial pressure distribution and the inverse Radon transform. The light beam, propagating freely in a water bath, is scanned either in an arc- or box-shaped curve around the object. Simulations are performed to compare the two scanning procedures. The projection images are obtained either using the filtered back projection algorithm for the π-arc scanning mode or the frequency domain algorithm for the box scanning mode. While the former algorithm provides slightly better image quality, the latter is about 20 times faster. The ability of the photoacoustic tomography device to create 3-D images with constant resolution throughout the reconstruction volume is demonstrated experimentally using a human hair phantom. These measurements revealed a 3-D resolution below 100 μm. In a second experiment, 3-D imaging of an isolated mouse heart is demonstrated to show the applicability for preclinical and biological research.

  10. Radiometric correction of atmospheric path length fluctuations in interferometric experiments. [in radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Hogg, D. E.; Napier, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    To support very long baseline interferometric experiments, a system has been developed for estimating atmospheric water vapor path delay. The system consists of dual microwave radiometers, one operating at 20.7 GHz and the other at 31.4 GHz. The measured atmospheric brightness temperatures at these two frequencies yield the estimate of the precipitable water present in both vapor and droplets. To determine the accuracy of the system, a series of observations were undertaken, comparing the outputs of two water vapor radiometers with the phase variation observed with two connected elements of the very large array (VLA). The results show that: (1) water vapor fluctuations dominate the residual VLA phase and (2) the microwave radiometers can measure and correct these effects. The rms phase error after correction is typically 15 deg at a wavelength of 6 cm, corresponding to an uncertainty in the path delay of 0.25 cm. The residual uncertainty is consistent with the stability of the microwave radiometer but is still considerably larger than the stability of the VLA. The technique is less successful under conditions of heavy cloud.

  11. Superresolved spatially multiplexed interferometric microscopy.

    PubMed

    Picazo-Bueno, José Ángel; Zalevsky, Zeev; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2017-03-01

    Superresolution capability by angular and time multiplexing is implemented onto a regular microscope. The technique, named superresolved spatially multiplexed interferometric microscopy (S2MIM), follows our previously reported SMIM technique [Opt. Express22, 14929 (2014)OPEXFF1094-408710.1364/OE.22.014929, J. Biomed. Opt.21, 106007 (2016)JBOPFO1083-366810.1117/1.JBO.21.10.106007] improved with superresolved imaging. All together, S2MIM updates a commercially available non-holographic microscope into a superresolved holographic one. Validation is presented for an Olympus BX-60 upright microscope with resolution test targets.

  12. Interferometric optical vortex array generator

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented.These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs.

  13. Improved Interferometric Photorefractive Optical Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Liu, Tsuen-Hsi

    1991-01-01

    Processing speed increased substantially. Improved optical interferometric image-processing scheme based on four-wave mixing via photorefractive effect in GaAs or InP. Gives rise to index-of-refraction gratings acting as phase-conjugate mirrors: interactions among four input beams generate wave-front-reversed replicas of two of these beams. Each phase-conjugate beam travels precisely back along path of corresponding input beam, regardless of angle of incidence. Any distortions introduced into input beam during forward propagation removed from phase-conjugate beam during backward propagation.

  14. Measuring the instrument function of radiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.; Littlejohn, R.G.

    1997-12-31

    The instrument function is a function of position and angle, the knowledge of which allows one to compute the response of a radiometer to an incident wave field in any state of coherence. The instrument function of a given radiometer need not be calculated; instead, it may be measured by calibration with incident plane waves.

  15. Portable Radiometer Identifies Minerals in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Machida, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Hand-held optical instrument aids in identifying minerals in field. Can be used in exploration for minerals on foot or by aircraft. The radiometer is especially suitable for identifying clay and carbonate minerals. Radiometer measures reflectances of mineral at two wavelengths, computes ratio of reflectances, and displays ratio to user.

  16. A Radiometer for Precision Coherent Radiation Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Douglas B.; Zalewski, Edward F.

    1992-01-01

    A radiometer has been designed for precision colierent radiation measurements and tested for long-term repeatability at wavelengths of 488 and 633 nm. The radiometer consists of a pn silicon photodiode maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere with a quartz window designed to eliminate interference problems. Ratio measurements between the radiometer and an absolute type detector were made over a period of 215 d. At 0.5 mW, the standard deviations were 0.008% and 0.009% at 488 and 633 nm, respectively. The maximum deviations from the mean were 0.016% and 0.015% at the respective wavelengths. Measurements were also made on the radiometer with respect to angular and spatial uniformity and linearity. The high precision, simplicity, and portability of the radiometer suggest it for use as a transfer standard for radiometric measurements. PMID:28053435

  17. Radiometer Design Analysis Based Upon Measurement Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, Paul E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for predicting the performance of a radiometer design based on calculating the measurement uncertainty. The variety in radiometer designs and the demand for improved radiometric measurements justify the need for a more general and comprehensive method to assess system performance. Radiometric resolution, or sensitivity, is a figure of merit that has been commonly used to characterize the performance of a radiometer. However when evaluating the performance of a calibration design for a radiometer, the use of radiometric resolution has limited application. These limitations are overcome by considering instead the measurement uncertainty. A method for calculating measurement uncertainty for a generic radiometer design including its calibration algorithm is presented. The result is a generalized technique by which system calibration architectures and design parameters can be studied to optimize instrument performance for given requirements and constraints. Example applications demonstrate the utility of using measurement uncertainty as a figure of merit.

  18. A multifrequency microwave radiometer of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D.; Wilheit, T.; Murphy, R.; Swift, C.

    1987-01-01

    The design of the High-Resolution Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (HMMR), which is to be installed on EOS, is described. The HMMR is to consist of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), the Advanced Mechanically Scanned Radiometer (AMSR), and the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR). The AMSU is a 20-channel microwave radiometer system designed to measure profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity and the AMSR is a microwave imager with channels at 6, 10, 18, 21, 37, and 90 GHz for measuring snow cover over land, the age and areal extent of sea ice, the intensity of precipitation over oceans and land, and the amount of water in the atmosphere. ESTAR is an imaging radiometer operating near 1.4 GHz capable of obtaining global maps of surface soil moisture with a spatial resolution of about 10 km. The antenna and signal processing utilized in the ESTAR to achieve the real aperture resolution are examined.

  19. The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, B.; Bryk, M.; Clark, J.; Donahue, K.; Ellyin, R.; Misra, S.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Statham, S.; Steinkraus, J.; Lightsey, E. G.; Fear, A.; Francis, P.; Kjellberg, H.; McDonald, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing the Radiometer Atmospheric CubeSat Experiment (RACE) since 2012, which consists of a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform. RACE will measure 2 channels of the 183 GHz water vapor line, and will be used to validate new low noise amplifier (LNA) technology and a novel amplifier based internal calibration subsystem. The 3U spacecraft is provided by the University of Texas at Austin's Satellite Design Laboratory. RACE will advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and a CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7. Measurements at 183 GHz are used to retrieve integrated products and vertical profiles of water vapor. Current full scale satellite missions that can utilize the technology include AMSU, ATMS, SSMIS and Megha-Tropiques. The LNAs are designed at JPL, based on a 35 nm indium phosphide (InP) high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMT) technology developed by Northrop Grumman. The resulting single chip LNAs require only 25 mW of power. Current pre-launch instrument performance specifications include an RF gain of over 30 dB and a room noise figure of < 9.5 dB. The noise figure is dominated by the insertion loss of the Dicke switch which at these frequencies are > 5dB. If a coupler based calibration system is shown to be sufficient, future receiver systems will have noise figures < 4 dB. The gain and noise figure variation over temperature is approximately 0.55 dB/K. The NEDT of the system is < 1K, and on orbit performance is expected to improve due to the thermal environment. The current system is configured for direct detection to reduce power consumption by eliminating the need for a local oscillator. A 2012 NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) selection, RACE is manifested for launch on the Orbital 3 (Orb-3) mission scheduled for October 2014. RACE will be deployed from the International Space Station (ISS) by NanoRacks.

  20. Distributed-switch Dicke radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levis, C. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A radiometer on an orbiting spacecraft is described which derives high spatial resolution information from terrestrial and atmospheric regions. The N elements or subapertures on the spacecraft transduce electromagnetic energy into electric signals. Many or all of the elements are simultaneously illuminated by electromagnetic energy radiated from the same region. Identical, parallel processing channels are responsive to the N elements. Each of the channels includes a variable gain amplifier responsive to the signal transduced by its corresponding array elements. The gain of each amplifier is controlled as a function of the output difference when the channel is connected periodically to each of a pair of Dicke noise sources, such as resistors maintained at predetermined temperatures.

  1. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  2. Matching chelators to radiometals for radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Price, Eric W; Orvig, Chris

    2014-01-07

    Radiometals comprise many useful radioactive isotopes of various metallic elements. When properly harnessed, these have valuable emission properties that can be used for diagnostic imaging techniques, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, e.g.(67)Ga, (99m)Tc, (111)In, (177)Lu) and positron emission tomography (PET, e.g.(68)Ga, (64)Cu, (44)Sc, (86)Y, (89)Zr), as well as therapeutic applications (e.g.(47)Sc, (114m)In, (177)Lu, (90)Y, (212/213)Bi, (212)Pb, (225)Ac, (186/188)Re). A fundamental critical component of a radiometal-based radiopharmaceutical is the chelator, the ligand system that binds the radiometal ion in a tight stable coordination complex so that it can be properly directed to a desirable molecular target in vivo. This article is a guide for selecting the optimal match between chelator and radiometal for use in these systems. The article briefly introduces a selection of relevant and high impact radiometals, and their potential utility to the fields of radiochemistry, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging. A description of radiometal-based radiopharmaceuticals is provided, and several key design considerations are discussed. The experimental methods by which chelators are assessed for their suitability with a variety of radiometal ions is explained, and a large selection of the most common and most promising chelators are evaluated and discussed for their potential use with a variety of radiometals. Comprehensive tables have been assembled to provide a convenient and accessible overview of the field of radiometal chelating agents.

  3. Retrieval of Ocean Surface Windspeed and Rainrate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Brightness Temperature Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Sayak K.; Jones, Linwood; Roberts, Jason; Ruf, Christopher; Ulhorn, Eric; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new airborne synthetic aperture passive microwave radiometer capable of wide swath imaging of the ocean surface wind speed under heavy precipitation e.g. in tropical cyclones. It uses interferometric signal processing to produce upwelling brightness temperature (Tb) images at its four operating frequencies 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz [1,2]. HIRAD participated in NASA s Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) mission during 2010 as its first science field campaign. It produced Tb images with 70 km swath width and 3 km resolution from a 20 km altitude. From this, ocean surface wind speed and column averaged atmospheric liquid water content can be retrieved across the swath. The column averaged liquid water then could be related to an average rain rate. The retrieval algorithm (and the HIRAD instrument itself) is a direct descendant of the nadir-only Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer that is used operationally by the NOAA Hurricane Research Division to monitor tropical cyclones [3,4]. However, due to HIRAD s slant viewing geometry (compared to nadir viewing SFMR) a major modification is required in the algorithm. Results based on the modified algorithm from the GRIP campaign will be presented in the paper.

  4. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  5. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  6. Interferometric biochemical and chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauglitz, Guenter; Brecht, Andreas; Kraus, Gerolf

    1995-09-01

    Interferometric principles have gained wide acceptance in the field of chemical and biochemical sensing. Reflectometric interference spectrometry sensors using white light multiple reflections at thin layers, structures of polymers, or monolayers of biochemicals are discussed in a survey. These are compared to other techniques, especially methods using surface plasmon resonance and grating couplers. Applications in the area of environmental monitoring in public safety are given, demonstrating the results for halogenated hydrocarbons in air and water as well as pesticides in ground water. Calibration curves, limits of decision, of detection, and of determination are specified and discussed with respect to EU limits. The application of multivariate data analysis is considered including artificial neuronal networks for multisensor systems and referencing in the case of gas sensors.

  7. IRAN: Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristidi, E.; Vakili, F.; Schutz, A.; Lanteri, H.; Abe, L.; Belu, A.; Gori, P. M.; Lardière, O.; Lopez, B.; Menut, J. L.; Patru, F.

    IRAN is a method of beam-combination in the hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. We propose to observe the interferometric image in the pupil plane, performing multi-axial pupil plane interferometry. Imaging is performed in a combined pupil-plane where the point-source intensity distribution (PSID) tends towards a pseudo Airy disc for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. The image is concentrated into the limited support of the output pupil of the individual telescopes, in which the object-image convolution relation is conserved. Specific deconvolution algorithms have been developped for IRAN hypertelescope imagery, based upon Lucy-like iterative techniques. We show that the classical (image plane) and IRAN (pupil plane) hypertelescope imaging techniques are equivalent if one uses optical fibers for beam transportation. An application to the VLT/VIDA concept is presented.

  8. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Scott Carney, P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  9. Bayesian 2D Current Reconstruction from Magnetic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Colin B.; Bierbaum, Matthew K.; Nowack, Katja; Sethna, James P.

    We employ a Bayesian image reconstruction scheme to recover 2D currents from magnetic flux imaged with scanning SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interferometric Devices). Magnetic flux imaging is a versatile tool to locally probe currents and magnetic moments, however present reconstruction methods sacrifice resolution due to numerical instability. Using state-of-the-art blind deconvolution techniques we recover the currents, point-spread function and height of the SQUID loop by optimizing the probability of measuring an image. We obtain uncertainties on these quantities by sampling reconstructions. This generative modeling technique could be used to develop calibration protocols for scanning SQUIDs, to diagnose systematic noise in the imaging process, and can be applied to many tools beyond scanning SQUIDs.

  10. ISMAR: an airborne submillimetre radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Stuart; Lee, Clare; Moyna, Brian; Philipp, Martin; Rule, Ian; Rogers, Stuart; King, Robert; Oldfield, Matthew; Rea, Simon; Henry, Manju; Wang, Hui; Chawn Harlow, R.

    2017-02-01

    The International Submillimetre Airborne Radiometer (ISMAR) has been developed as an airborne demonstrator for the Ice Cloud Imager (ICI) that will be launched on board the next generation of European polar-orbiting weather satellites in the 2020s. It currently has 15 channels at frequencies between 118 and 664 GHz which are sensitive to scattering by cloud ice, and additional channels at 874 GHz are being developed. This paper presents an overview of ISMAR and describes the algorithms used for calibration. The main sources of bias in the measurements are evaluated, as well as the radiometric sensitivity in different measurement scenarios. It is shown that for downward views from high altitude, representative of a satellite viewing geometry, the bias in most channels is less than ±1 K and the NEΔT is less than 2 K, with many channels having an NEΔT less than 1 K. In-flight calibration accuracy is also evaluated by comparison of high-altitude zenith views with radiative-transfer simulations.

  11. Galileo Photopolarimeter/Radiometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, E. E.; Brown, F. G.; Chandos, R. A.; Fincher, W. C.; Kubel, L. F.; Lacis, A. A.; Travis, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Photopolarimeter/Radiometer (PPR) is a remote sensing instrument on the Galileo Orbiter designed to measure the degree of linear polarization and the intensity of reflected sunlight in ten spectral channels between 410 and 945 nm to determine the physical properties of Jovian clouds and aerosols, and to characterize the texture and microstructure of satellite surfaces. The PPR also measures thermal radiation in five spectral bands between 15 and 100 microns to sense the upper tropospheric temperature structure. Two additional channels which measure spectrally integrated solar and solar plus thermal radiation are used to determine the planetary radiation budget components. The PPR photopolarimetric measurements utilize previously flown technology for high-precision polarimetry using a calcite Wollaston prism and two silicon photodiodes to enable simultaneous detection of the two orthogonal polarization components. The PPR radiometry measurements are made with a lithium tantalate pyroelectric detector utilizing a unique arrangement of radiometric stops and a scene/space chopper blade to enable a warm instrument to sense accurately the much colder scene temperatures.

  12. NIST-BMDO transfer radiometer (BXR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Timothy M.; Carter, Adriaan C.; Lorentz, Steven R.; Datla, Raju V.

    2000-07-01

    An infrared transfer radiometer has been recently developed at the Low-Background Infrared Calibration (LBIR) facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) program. The BMDO Transfer Radiometer (BXR) is designed to measure the irradiance of a collimated source of infrared light having an angular divergence of less than 1 mrad. It is capable of measuring irradiance levels as low as 10-15 W/cm2 over the spectral range from 2 micrometer to 30 micrometer. The radiometer uses an arsenic-doped silicon blocked impurity band (BIB) detector operated at temperatures below 12 K. Spectral resolution is provided by narrow bandpass interference filters and long-wavelength blocking filters. All the components of the radiometer, which include a mechanical shutter, an internal calibration source and detector, a long baffle section, a spatial filter, two filter wheels and a two- axis detector stage are cooled with an active flow of liquid helium to maintain temperatures below 20 K. A cryogenic vacuum chamber has been built to house the radiometer and to provide mechanical tilt alignment to the source. The radiometer is easily transported to a user site along with its support equipment.

  13. Tangential Velocity Measurement Using Interferometric MTI Radar

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY, ARMIN W.; MILESHOSKY, BRIAN P.; BICKEL, DOUGLAS L.

    2002-11-01

    An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity vector of a target.

  14. Three-dimensional interferometric ISAR imaging for target scattering diagnosis and modeling.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Narayanan, R M

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging has been widely used in target scattering diagnosis, modeling and target identification. A major shortcoming is that a 2-D ISAR image cannot provide information on the relative altitude of each scattering center on the target. In this paper, we present an interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar (IF-ISAR) image processing technique for three-dimensional (3-D) target altitude image formation. The 2-D ISAR images are obtained from the signature data acquired as a function of frequency and azimuthal angle. A 3-D IF-ISAR altitude image can then be derived from two 2-D images reconstructed from the measurements by antennas at different altitudes. 3-D altitude image formation examples from both indoor and outdoor test range data are demonstrated on complex radar targets.

  15. Radio and optical interferometric imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Tim J.

    1992-01-01

    Since diffraction-limited imaging with a single aperture yields angular resolution approx. lambda/D, the attainment of high angular resolution with single apertures requires the construction of correspondingly large monolithic apertures, the whole surface of which must be figured to much less than a wavelength. At the longer wavelengths, it is impossible to build a sufficiently large single aperture: for example, at lambda 21 cm, arcsec resolution requires an aperture of diameter approx. 50 km. At the shorter wavelengths, the atmosphere imposes a natural limit in resolution of about one arcsec. However, another route is possible; that is, using synthetic apertures to image the sky. Synthetic apertures are now in use in many fields, e.g., radio interferometry, radar imaging, and magnetic-resonance imaging. Radio-interferometric techniques developed in radio astronomy over the past 40 years are now being applied to optical and IR astronomical imaging by a number of groups. Furthermore, the problem of figuring synthetic apertures is considerably simpler, and can be implemented in a computer: new 'self-calibration' techniques allow imaging even in the presence of phase errors due to the atmosphere.

  16. Radio and optical interferometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, Tim J.

    1992-11-01

    Since diffraction-limited imaging with a single aperture yields angular resolution approx. lambda/D, the attainment of high angular resolution with single apertures requires the construction of correspondingly large monolithic apertures, the whole surface of which must be figured to much less than a wavelength. At the longer wavelengths, it is impossible to build a sufficiently large single aperture: for example, at lambda 21 cm, arcsec resolution requires an aperture of diameter approx. 50 km. At the shorter wavelengths, the atmosphere imposes a natural limit in resolution of about one arcsec. However, another route is possible; that is, using synthetic apertures to image the sky. Synthetic apertures are now in use in many fields, e.g., radio interferometry, radar imaging, and magnetic-resonance imaging. Radio-interferometric techniques developed in radio astronomy over the past 40 years are now being applied to optical and IR astronomical imaging by a number of groups. Furthermore, the problem of figuring synthetic apertures is considerably simpler, and can be implemented in a computer: new 'self-calibration' techniques allow imaging even in the presence of phase errors due to the atmosphere.

  17. A Radar/Radiometer Instrument for Mapping Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Peter H.; Hilliard, Laurence; Rincon, Rafael; LeVine, David; Mead, James

    2003-01-01

    The RadSTAR instrument combines an L-band, digital beam-forming radar with an L-band synthetic aperture, thinned array (STAR) radiometer. The RadSTAR development will support NASA Earth science goals by developing a novel, L-band scatterometer/ radiometer that measures Earth surface bulk material properties (surface emissions and backscatter) as well as surface characteristics (backscatter). Present, real aperture airborne L-Band active/passive measurement systems such as the JPUPALS (Wilson, et al, 2000) provide excellent sampling characteristics, but have no scanning capabilities, and are extremely large; the huge JPUPALS horn requires a the C-130 airborne platform, operated with the aft loading door open during flight operation. The approach used for the upcoming Aquarius ocean salinity mission or the proposed Hydros soil mission use real apertures with multiple fixed beams or scanning beams. For real aperture instruments, there is no upgrade path to scanning over a broad swath, except rotation of the whole aperture, which is an approach with obvious difficulties as aperture size increases. RadSTAR will provide polarimetric scatterometer and radiometer measurements over a wide swath, in a highly space-efficient configuration. The electronic scanning approaches provided through STAR technology and digital beam forming will enable the large L-band aperture to scan efficiently over a very wide swath. RadSTAR technology development, which merges an interferometric radiometer with a digital beam forming scatterometer, is an important step in the path to space for an L-band scatterometer/radiometer. RadSTAR couples a patch array antenna with a 1.26 GHz digital beam forming radar scatterometer and a 1.4 GHz STAR radiometer to provide Earth surface backscatter and emission measurements in a compact, cross-track scanning instrument with no moving parts. This technology will provide the first L-band, emission and backscatter measurements in a compact aircraft instrument

  18. View-limiting shrouds for insolation radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; Trentelman, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Insolation radiometers (normal incidence pyrheliometers) are used to measure the solar radiation incident on solar concentrators for calibrating thermal power generation measurements. The measured insolation value is dependent on the atmospheric transparency, solar elevation angle, circumsolar radiation, and radiometer field of view. The radiant energy entering the thermal receiver is dependent on the same factors. The insolation value and the receiver input will be proportional if the concentrator and the radiometer have similar fields of view. This report describes one practical method for matching the field of view of a radiometer to that of a solar concentrator. The concentrator field of view can be calculated by optical ray tracing methods and the field of view of a radiometer with a simple shroud can be calculated by using geometric equations. The parameters for the shroud can be adjusted to provide an acceptable match between the respective fields of view. Concentrator fields of view have been calculated for a family of paraboloidal concentrators and receiver apertures. The corresponding shroud parameters have also been determined.

  19. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  20. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  1. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  2. Microwave radiometer for subsurface temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A UHF radiometer, operating at a frequency of 800 MHz, was modified to provide an integral, three frequency voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) circuit in the radio frequency (RF) head. The VSWR circuit provides readings of power transmission at the antenna-material interface with an accuracy of plus or minus 5 percent. The power transmission readings are numerically equal to the emissivity of the material under observation. Knowledge of material emissivity is useful in the interpretation of subsurface apparent temperatures obtained on phantom models of biological tissue. The emissivities of phantom models consisting of lean beefsteak were found to lie in the range 0.623 to 0.779, depending on moisture content. Radiometric measurements performed on instrumented phantoms showed that the radiometer was capable of sensing small temperature changes occurring at depths of at least 19 to 30 mm. This is consistent with previously generated data which showed that the radiometer could sense temperatures at a depth of 38 mm.

  3. Novel Cyclotron-Based Radiometal Production

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrado, Timothy R.

    2013-10-31

    Accomplishments: (1) Construction of prototype solution target for radiometal production; (2) Testing of prototype target for production of following isotopes: a. Zr-89. Investigation of Zr-89 production from Y-89 nitrate solution. i. Defined problems of gas evolution and salt precipitation. ii. Solved problem of precipitation by addition of nitric acid. iii. Solved gas evolution problem with addition of backpressure regulator and constant degassing of target during irradiations. iv. Investigated effects of Y-89 nitrate concentration and beam current. v. Published abstracts at SNM and ISRS meetings; (3) Design of 2nd generation radiometal solution target. a. Included reflux chamber and smaller target volume to conserve precious target materials. b. Included aluminum for prototype and tantalum for working model. c. Included greater varicosities for improved heat transfer; and, (4) Construction of 2nd generation radiometal solution target started.

  4. 2-D weighted least-squares phase unwrapping

    DOEpatents

    Ghiglia, D.C.; Romero, L.A.

    1995-06-13

    Weighted values of interferometric signals are unwrapped by determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for unweighted values of the interferometric signals; and then determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals by preconditioned conjugate gradient methods using the unweighted solutions as preconditioning values. An output is provided that is representative of the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals. 6 figs.

  5. 2-D weighted least-squares phase unwrapping

    DOEpatents

    Ghiglia, Dennis C.; Romero, Louis A.

    1995-01-01

    Weighted values of interferometric signals are unwrapped by determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for unweighted values of the interferometric signals; and then determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals by preconditioned conjugate gradient methods using the unweighted solutions as preconditioning values. An output is provided that is representative of the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals.

  6. Inversion Algorithms for Water Vapor Radiometers Operating at 20.7 and 31.4 Ghz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Eight water vapor radiometers (WVRs) were constructed as research and development tools to support the Advanced System Programs in the Deep Space Network and the Crustal Dynamics Project. These instruments are intended to operate at the stations of the Deep Space Network (DSN), various radio observatories, and obile facilities that participate in very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) experiments. It is expected that the WVRs will operate in a wide range of meteorological conditions. Several algorithms are discussed that are used to estimate the line-of-sight path delay due to water vapor and columnar liquid water rom the observed microwave brightness temperatures provided by the WVRs. In particular, systematic effects due to site and seasonal variations are examined. The accuracy of the estimation as indicated by a simulation calculation is approximately 0.3 cm for a noiseless WVR in clear and moderately cloudy weather. With a realistic noise model of WVR behavior, the inversion accuracy is approximately 0.6 cm.

  7. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  8. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  9. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  10. Low-cost microprocessor controlled shadowband radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalsky, J. J.; Lebaron, B. A.; Harrison, L. C.

    1985-06-01

    This paper describes the second phase in the development of a low-cost microprocessor-controlled rotating shadowband radiometer at PNL. The initial work, to develop a solar photometer, resulted in a mechanical design that is adopted for the solar radiometer with only minor changes. The goals of this effort are: (1) to improve the data acquisition system; and (2) to derive corrections for the silicon cell-based pyranometer that would allow measurements of total horizontal, diffuse horizontal, and direct normal solar radiation approaching first-class instrumentation accuracy at a fraction of the cost. Significant progress on temperature, cosine and spectral corrections is achieved.

  11. Electrically scanning microwave radiometer for Nimbus E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An electronically scanning microwave radiometer system has been designed, developed, and tested for measurement of meteorological, geomorphological and oceanographic parameters from NASA/GSFC's Nimbus E satellite. The system is a completely integrated radiometer designed to measure the microwave brightness temperature of the earth and its atmosphere at a microwave frequency of 19.35 GHz. Calibration and environmental testing of the system have successfully demonstrated its ability to perform accurate measurements in a satellite environment. The successful launch and data acquisition of the Nimbus 5 (formerly Nimbus E) gives further demonstration to its achievement.

  12. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer: Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Biswas, S. K.; Cecil, D.; Jones, W. L.; Johnson, J.; Farrar, S.; Sahawneh, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Morris, M.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Black, P. G.

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an airborne passive microwave radiometer designed to provide high resolution, wide swath imagery of surface wind speed in tropical cyclones from a low profile planar antenna with no mechanical scanning. Wind speed and rain rate images from HIRAD's first field campaign (GRIP, 2010) are presented here followed, by a discussion on the performance of the newly installed thermal control system during the 2012 HS3 campaign. The paper ends with a discussion on the next generation dual polarization HIRAD antenna (already designed) for a future system capable of measuring wind direction as well as wind speed.

  13. Salinity surveys using an airborne microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.; Droppleman, J. D.; Evans, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Barnes PRT-5 infrared radiometer and L-band channel of the multifrequency microwave radiometer are used to survey the distribution of surface water temperature and salinity. These remote sensors were flown repetitively in November 1971 over the outflow of the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico. Data reduction parameters were determined through the use of flight data obtained over a known water area. With these parameters, the measured infrared and microwave radiances were analyzed in terms of the surface temperature and salinity.

  14. Radiometer experiment for the aeroassist flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, W. C.; Park, C.; Arnold, J. O.; Balakrishnan, A.

    1985-06-01

    A forthcoming NASA flight experiment is described that provides an opportunity to obtain a large base of radiometric data for high-altitude, high-velocity thermochemically nonequilibrated-flow conditions. As a preliminary to the design of a radiometer for this experiment, an approximate method for predicting both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiative surface fluxes is described. Spectral results for one trajectory state, a velocity of 10 km/sec at an altitude of 85 km, are presented. These results are then used to develop some of the instrument parameters that will be needed for designing of the three genre of radiometers that are proposed for this experiment.

  15. Low Power Silicon Germanium Electronics for Microwave Radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doiron, Terence A.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Space-based radiometric observations of key hydrological parameters (e.g., soil moisture) at the spatial and temporal scales required in the post-2002 era face significant technological challenges. These measurements are based on relatively low frequency thermal microwave emission (at 1.4 GHz for soil moisture and salinity, 10 GHz and up for precipitation, and 19 and 37 GHz for snow). The long wavelengths at these frequencies coupled with the high spatial and radiometric resolutions required by the various global hydrology communities necessitate the use of very large apertures (e.g., greater than 20 m at 1.4 GHz) and highly integrated stable RF electronics on orbit. Radio-interferometric techniques such as Synthetic Thinned Array Radiometry (STAR), using silicon germanium (SiGe) low power radio frequency integrated circuits (RFIC), is one of the most promising technologies to enable very large non-rotating apertures in space. STAR instruments are composed of arrays of small antenna/receiving elements that are arranged so that the collecting area is smaller than an equivalent real aperture system, allowing very high packing densities for launch. A 20 meter aperture at L-band, for example, will require greater than 1000 of these receiving elements. SiGe RFIC's reduce power consumption enough to make an array like this possible in the power-limited environment of space flight. An overview of the state-of-the-art will be given, and current work in the area of SiGe radiometer development for soil moisture remote sensing will be discussed.

  16. Interferometric sensor for plant fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, E.; Heaps, W. S.; Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Corp, L. A.

    2009-08-01

    We present preliminary design studies and modeling results for a new system for the assessment of vegetation photosynthetic function, especially carbon uptake. Plant health and carbon uptake efficiency are of key consideration in assessing global productivity, biomass, changes in land cover and carbon dioxide flux. Chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) measurements are critical for understanding photosynthetic functioning, plant environmental stress responses and direct assessments of plant health. Plant ChlF occurs predominately in two broad emission bands in the red and infrared regions of the spectrum. Unfortunately, the fluorescence signal from vegetation is much weaker than, and obscured by, the reflected signal. This limitation can be overcome by acquiring ChlF measurements in atmospheric absorption lines. The Interferometric Sensor for Plant Fluorescence (ISPF) will measure plant ChlF using the Fraunhofer Line Discrimination approach. Fabry-Perot (FP) etalons will be used to restrict the measurement to radiation in the Solar Fraunhofer lines (SFL). An advantage of the proposed sensor design is that it will collect measurements using two sets of SFL at the same time. This technique increases the optical throughput producing a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR). The instrument is designed to have two channels for two different spectral regions. Each channel will have two sub-channels, one defined by a prefilter (Reference, Ref) and the other having a tunable FP etalon. The first subchannel (the Ref) will cover a relatively broad spectral range to include at least two Fraunhofer lines but for which the fluorescence signal will represent only a small fraction of total reflected light. The second subchannel will use a FP interferometer to restrict the detected light to include only the selected SFL where the ChlF in-filling is significant. A small change in the fluorescence will then produce an insignificant change in the Ref subchannel but a relatively large change in

  17. Applications of interferometrically derived terrain slopes: Normalization of SAR backscatter and the interferometric correlation coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Charles L.; Wegmueller, Urs; Small, David L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Terrain slopes, which can be measured with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry either from a height map or from the interferometric phase gradient, were used to calculate the local incidence angle and the correct pixel area. Both are required for correct thematic interpretation of SAR data. The interferometric correlation depends on the pixel area projected on a plane perpendicular to the look vector and requires correction for slope effects. Methods for normalization of the backscatter and interferometric correlation for ERS-1 SAR are presented.

  18. An investigation of radiometer design using digital processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The use of digital signal processing techniques in Dicke switching radiometer design was investigated. The general approach was to develop an analytical model of the existing analog radiometer and identify factors which adversly affect its performance. A digital processor was then proposed to verify the feasibility of using digital techniques to minimize these adverse effects and improve the radiometer performance. Analysis and preliminary test results comparing the digital and analog processing approaches in radiometers design were analyzed.

  19. The microwave radiometer spacecraft: A design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    A large passive microwave radiometer spacecraft with near all weather capability of monitoring soil moisture for global crop forecasting was designed. The design, emphasizing large space structures technology, characterized the mission hardware at the conceptual level in sufficient detail to identify enabling and pacing technologies. Mission and spacecraft requirements, design and structural concepts, electromagnetic concepts, and control concepts are addressed.

  20. Blackbody cavity radiometer has rapid response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, F. C.

    1966-01-01

    Fast response, spectrally linear standard detector in the form of a blackbody cavity radiometer calibrates rapidly responding photodetectors against a calibrated standard detector. A power amplifier with maximum available gain reduces error signal without stability loss. It may be used as a blackbody radiator by manipulation of the bridge variable arm.

  1. Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer (AASIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Design information for the Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer is reported, which was developed to determine the configuration of a sensor for IR and visible imaging. The areas of technology reported include: systems design, optics, mechanics, electronics, detectors, radiative cooler, and radiometric calibration.

  2. Accounting For Nonlinearity In A Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, Charles T.

    1991-01-01

    Simple mathematical technique found to account adequately for nonlinear component of response of microwave radiometer. Five prescribed temperatures measured to obtain quadratic calibration curve. Temperature assumed to vary quadratically with reading. Concept not limited to radiometric application; applicable to other measuring systems in which relationships between quantities to be determined and readings of instruments differ slightly from linearity.

  3. Heat capacity mapping radiometer for AEM spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnek, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The operation, maintenance, and integration of the applications explorer mission heat capacity mapping radiometer is illustrated in block diagrams and detail schematics of circuit functions. Data format and logic timing diagrams are included along with radiometric and electronic calibration data. Mechanical and electrical configuration is presented to provide interface details for integration of the HCMR instrument to AEM spacecraft.

  4. LARSPEC spectroradiometer-multiband radiometer data formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    The data base software system, LARSPEC, is discussed and the data base format for agronomic, meteorological, spectroradiometer, and multiband radiometer data is described. In addition, the contents and formats of each record of data and the wavelength tables are listed and the codes used for some of the parameters are described.

  5. Balloon-borne radiometer profiler: Field observations

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Hubbe, J.M.; Scott, K.A.

    1995-03-01

    This project involves the development of the capability of making routine soundings of broadband radiative fluxes and radiative flux divergences to heights of 1500m AGL. Described in this document are radiometers carried on a stabilized platform in a harness inserted in the tetherline of a tethered balloon meteriological sounding system. Field test results are given.

  6. Application of Uncooled Monolithic Thermoelectric Linear Arrays to Imaging Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Paul W.

    Introduction Identification of Incipient Failure of Railcar Wheels Technical Description of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Performance of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Initial Application Summary Imaging Radiometer for Predictive and Preventive Maintenance Description Operation Specifications Summary References INDEX CONTENTS OF VOLUMES IN THIS SERIES

  7. Miniature MMIC Low Mass/Power Radiometer Modules for the 180 GHz GeoSTAR Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Tanner, Alan; Pukala, David; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Lim, Boon; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and demonstrated miniature 180 GHz Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) radiometer modules that have low noise temperature, low mass and low power consumption. These modules will enable the Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) of the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) Mission for atmospheric temperature and humidity profiling. The GeoSTAR instrument has an array of hundreds of receivers. Technology that was developed included Indium Phosphide (InP) MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) and second harmonic MMIC mixers and I-Q mixers, surface mount Multi-Chip Module (MCM) packages at 180 GHz, and interferometric array at 180 GHz. A complete MMIC chip set for the 180 GHz receiver modules (LNAs and I-Q Second harmonic mixer) was developed. The MMIC LNAs had more than 50% lower noise temperature (NT=300K) than previous state-of-art and MMIC I-Q mixers demonstrated low LO power (3 dBm). Two lots of MMIC wafers were processed with very high DC transconductance of up to 2800 mS/mm for the 35 nm gate length devices. Based on these MMICs a 180 GHz Multichip Module was developed that had a factor of 100 lower mass/volume (16x18x4.5 mm3, 3g) than previous generation 180 GHz receivers.

  8. Wideband filter radiometers for blackbody temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, L. P.; Bamber, C.; Gaertner, A. A.; Gerson, R. K.; Woods, D. J.; Woolliams, E. R.

    2010-10-01

    The use of high-temperature blackbody (HTBB) radiators to realize primary spectral irradiance scales requires that the operating temperature of the HTBB be accurately determined. We have developed five filter radiometers (FRs) to measure the temperature of the National Research Council of Canada's HTBB. The FRs are designed to minimize sensitivity to ambient temperature fluctuations. They incorporate air-spaced colored glass filters and a Si photodiode detector that are housed in a cell whose temperature is controlled to ±0.1°C by means of annular thermoelectric elements at the front and rear of the cell. These wideband filter radiometers operate in four different wavelength bands. The spectral responsivity measurements were performed in an underfill geometry for a power-mode calibration that is traceable to NRC's cryogenic radiometer. The spectral temperature sensitivity of each of these FRs has been measured. The apertures for these FRs were cold-formed by swaging machine-cut apertures onto precision dowel pins. A description of the filter radiometer design, fabrication and testing, together with a detailed uncertainty analysis, is presented. We derive the equations that relate the spectral irradiance measured by the FRs to the spectral radiance and temperature of the HTBB, and deal specifically with the change of index of refraction over the path of the radiation from the interior of the HTBB to the FRs. We believe these equations are more accurate than recently published derivations. Our measurements of the operating temperature of our HTBB working at temperatures near 2500 K, 2700 K and 2900 K, together with measurements using a pyrometer, show agreement between the five filter radiometers and with the pyrometer to within the estimated uncertainties.

  9. Langley method of calibrating UV filter radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusser, James; Gibson, James; Bigelow, David; Kolinski, Donald; Disterhoft, Patrick; Lantz, Kathleen; Beaubien, Arthur

    2000-02-01

    The Langley method of calibrating UV multifilter shadow band radiometers (UV-MFRSR) is explored in this paper. This method has several advantages over the traditional standard lamp calibrations: the Sun is a free, universally available, and very constant source, and nearly continual automated field calibrations can be made. Although 20 or so Langley events are required for an accurate calibration, the radiometer remains in the field during calibration. Difficulties arise as a result of changing ozone optical depth during the Langley event and the breakdown of the Beer-Lambert law over the finite filter band pass since optical depth changes rapidly with wavelength. The Langley calibration of the radiometers depends critically upon the spectral characterization of each channel and on the wavelength and absolute calibration of the extraterrestrial spectrum used. Results of Langley calibrations for two UV-MFRSRs at Mauna Loa, Hawaii were compared to calibrations using two National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable lamps. The objectives of this study were to compare Langley calibration factors with those from standard lamps and to compare field-of-view effects. The two radiometers were run simultaneously: one on a Sun tracker and the other in the conventional shadow-band configuration. Both radiometers were calibrated with two secondary 1000 W lamp, and later, the spectral response functions of the channels were measured. The ratio of Langley to lamp calibration factors for the seven channels from 300 nm to 368 nm using the shadow-band configuration ranged from 0.988 to 1.070. The estimated uncertainty in accuracy of the Langley calibrations ranged from ±3.8% at 300 nm to ±2.1% at 368 nm. For all channels calibrated with Central Ultraviolet Calibration Facility (CUCF) lamps the estimated uncertainty was ±2.5% for all channels.

  10. Interferometric study of a machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefling, Roland; Vaclavik, Jaroslav; Neigebauer, Reimund

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes the use of a non-destructive optical technique, digital speckle pattern interferometry, for the deformation analysis of a machine tool. An interferometric set-up has been designed and measurements of the milling head deformation have been made on the horizontal single spindle milling machine center.

  11. Note: Near infrared interferometric silicon wafer metrology.

    PubMed

    Choi, M S; Park, H M; Joo, K N

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation, two near infrared (NIR) interferometric techniques for silicon wafer metrology are described and verified with experimental results. Based on the transparent characteristic of NIR light to a silicon wafer, the fiber based spectrally resolved interferometry can measure the optical thickness of the wafer and stitching low coherence scanning interferometry can reconstruct entire surfaces of the wafer.

  12. Quantum Limits in Interferometric GW Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, R.; Barone, F.; Maddalena, P.; Solimeno, S.; Zaccaria, F.; Manko, M. A.; Manko, V. I.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss a model for interferometric GW antennas illuminated by a laser beam and a vacuum squeezed field. The sensitivity of the antenna will depend on the properties of the radiation entering the two ports and on the optical characteristics of the interferometer components, e.g. mirrors, beam-splitter, lenses.

  13. Interferometric synthetic aperture microwave radiometry for the remote sensing of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Christopher S.; Swift, Calvin T.; Tanner, Alan B.; Le Vine, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Interferometric aperture synthesis is presented as an alternative to real aperture measurements of the earth's brightness temperature from low earth orbit. The signal-to-noise performance of a single interferometric measurement is considered, and the noise characteristics of the brightness temperature image produced from the interferometer measurements are discussed. The sampling requirements of the measurements and the resulting effects of the noise in the measurements on the image are described. The specific case of the electronically steered thinned array radiometer (ESTAR) currently under construction is examined. The ESTAR prototype is described in detail sufficient to permit a performance evaluation of its spatial and temperature resolution. Critical aspects of an extension of the ESTAR sensor to a larger spaceborne system are considered. Of particular importance are the number and placement of antenna elements in the imaging array. A comparison of the implementation methodologies of radio astronomy and earth remote sensing is presented along with the effects of the source brightness distribution, the antenna array configuration and the method used for array scanning.

  14. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  15. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit water vapor radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukamto, L. M.; Cooley, T. W.; Janssen, M. A.; Parks, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) is under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). WVR's are used to remotely sense water vapor and cloud liquid water in the atmosphere and are valuable for meteorological applications as well as for determination of signal path delays due to water vapor in the atmosphere. The high cost and large size of existing WVR instruments motivate the development of miniature MMIC WVR's, which have great potential for low cost mass production. The miniaturization of WVR components allows large scale deployment of WVR's for Earth environment and meteorological applications. Small WVR's can also result in improved thermal stability, resulting in improved calibration stability. Described here is the design and fabrication of a 31.4 GHz MMIC radiometer as one channel of a thermally stable WVR as a means of assessing MMIC technology feasibility.

  16. Nulling Infrared Radiometer for Measuring Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A nulling, self-calibrating infrared radiometer is being developed for use in noncontact measurement of temperature in any of a variety of industrial and scientific applications. This instrument is expected to be especially well-suited to measurement of ambient or near-ambient temperature and, even more specifically, for measuring the surface temperature of a natural body of water. Although this radiometer would utilize the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) portion of the spectrum (wavelengths of 8 to 12 m), its basic principle of operation could also be applied to other spectral bands (corresponding to other temperature ranges) in which the atmosphere is transparent and in which design requirements for sensitivity and temperature-measurement accuracy could be satisfied.

  17. The HYDROS Radiometer/Radar Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael W.; Njoku, Eni; Entekhabi, Dara; Doiron, Terence; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Girard, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    The science objectives of the HYDROS mission are to provide frequent, global measurements of surface soil moisture and surface freeze/thaw state. In order to adequately measure these geophysical quantities, the key instrument requirements were determined by the HYDROS science team to be: 1) Dual-polarization L-Band passive radiometer measurements at 40 km resolution, 2) Dual-polarization L-Band active radar measurements at 3 km resolution, and 3) A wide swath to insure global three day refresh time for these measurements (1000 km swath at the selected orbit altitude of 670 km). As a solution to this challenging set of instrument requirements, a relatively large, 6 meter, conically-scanning reflector antenna architecture was selected for the instrument design. The deployable mesh antenna is shared by both the radiometer and radar electronics by employing a single L-Band feed.

  18. Galileo Net Flux Radiometer Report 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasko, Martin G.

    1997-01-01

    On 7 December 1995, the Galileo probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere. The Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) on board the probe, measured upward and downward fluxes in the visible and infrared. At the University of Arizona, we have analyzed the data from the two visible-light channels, as well as the solar contributions to the thermal channels. The results are being prepared for submission to JGR in early September.

  19. Near-field Interferometric Imaging of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Wu, T.; Akiyama, Y.; Kawasaki, Z.; Ushio, T.

    2015-12-01

    In the past, lightning interferometric mapping systems assumed that a source is very far from the measurement location. The assumption greatly simplifies the mathematics needed to locate the source, but the resulting source positions are limited to two spatial dimensions (azimuth and elevation). For short baseline systems, this assumption is very good because the source is almost always much farther away than the diameter of the array, making three-dimensional location all but impossible. By removing the far-field assumption, if the array is large enough it is possible to locate the source in three spatial dimensions using purely interferometric techniques. The purely interferometric method is quite different from the more typical time-of-arrival method. Instead of measuring arrival times or time differences of the radiation arriving at each station, a volume is imaged over a some integration period and then searched for a source. It is not necessary to know that a source exists in the integration period for the interferometric imaging technique to produce a well defined solution. Interferometric imaging can locate sources buried in noise, can locate both continuous and impulsive emission, and is capable of locating multiple simultaneously radiating sources. If the waveforms are corrected for propagation delay to the search volume, the integration period can be made arbitrarily small (limited only by the frequencies being observed), allowing the progression of lightning to be examined in detail. Near-field interferometry works equally well on a wide range of different signal types, from the LF to VHF bands in radio, or even on acoustic emissions from lightning. Near-field imaging can be used to correct the angular locations of short baseline systems when a source is very close to the array, or to produce full three-dimensional maps of lightning with long baseline arrays. Presented here are preliminary results of applying near-field interferometric imaging to the

  20. Requirements for an Advanced Ocean Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; McClain, Charles R.; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Bailey, Sean W.; Barnes, Robert A.; Brown, Steven; Eplee, Robert E.; Franz, Bryan; Holmes, Alan; Monosmith, W. Bryan; Patt, Frederick S.; Stumpf, Richard P.; Turpie, Kevin R.; Werdell, P. Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This document suggests requirements for an advanced ocean radiometer, such as e.g. the ACE (Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystem) ocean radiometer. The ACE ocean biology mission objectives have been defined in the ACE Ocean Biology white paper. The general requirements presented therein were chosen as the basis for the requirements provided in this document, which have been transformed into specific, testable requirements. The overall accuracy goal for the advanced ocean radiometer is that the total radiometric uncertainties are 0.5% or smaller for all bands. Specific mission requirements of SeaWiFS, MODIS, and VIIRS were often used as a model for the requirements presented here, which are in most cases more demanding than the heritage requirements. Experience with on-orbit performance and calibration (from SeaWiFS and MODIS) and prelaunch testing (from SeaWiFS, MODIS, and VIIRS) were important considerations when formulating the requirements. This document describes requirements in terms of the science data products, with a focus on qualities that can be verified by prelaunch radiometric characterization. It is expected that a more comprehensive requirements document will be developed during mission formulation

  1. A cut cell method for the 3D simulation of Crookes radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dechriste, Guillaume; Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-09

    Devices involved in engineering applications, such as vacuum pumps or MEMS, may be made of several moving parts. This raise the issue of the simulation of rarefied gas flow around moving boundaries. We propose a simple process, known as cut cell method, to treat the motion of a solid body in the framework of the deterministic solving of a kinetic equation. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been used for this kind of simulations. The method is illustrated by the 2D and 3D simulations of a Crookes radiometer.

  2. A cut cell method for the 3D simulation of Crookes radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechriste, Guillaume; Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-01

    Devices involved in engineering applications, such as vacuum pumps or MEMS, may be made of several moving parts. This raise the issue of the simulation of rarefied gas flow around moving boundaries. We propose a simple process, known as cut cell method, to treat the motion of a solid body in the framework of the deterministic solving of a kinetic equation. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been used for this kind of simulations. The method is illustrated by the 2D and 3D simulations of a Crookes radiometer.

  3. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  4. Fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Couture, Charles-André; Légaré, Katherine; Pinsard, Maxime; Rivard, Maxime; Brown, Cameron; Légaré, François

    2016-01-01

    We report the implementation of fast Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation (I-SHG) microscopy to study the polarity of non-centrosymmetric structures in biological tissues. Using a sample quartz plate, we calibrate the spatially varying phase shift introduced by the laser scanning system. Compensating this phase shift allows us to retrieve the correct phase distribution in periodically poled lithium niobate, used as a model sample. Finally, we used fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy to acquire phase images in tendon. Our results show that the method exposed here, using a laser scanning system, allows to recover the polarity of collagen fibrils, similarly to standard I-SHG (using a sample scanning system), but with an imaging time about 40 times shorter. PMID:26977349

  5. Polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Xu, Yang; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional optical microscopy suffers from the well-known compromise between transverse resolution and depth-of-field. This is true for both structural imaging methods and their functional extensions. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) is a solution to the 3D coherent microscopy inverse problem that provides depth-independent transverse resolution. We demonstrate the extension of ISAM to polarization sensitive imaging, termed polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (PS-ISAM). This technique is the first functionalization of the ISAM method and provides improved depth-of-field for polarization-sensitive imaging. The basic assumptions of polarization-sensitive imaging are explored, and refocusing of birefringent structures is experimentally demonstrated. PS-ISAM enables high-resolution volumetric imaging of birefringent materials and tissue. PMID:26648593

  6. Interferometric diagnostics for magnetic spots detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.

    2014-09-01

    The signature of activity in general, and of stellar magnetic spots in particular, is present in every measurements, including interferometric ones. Indeed, stellar spots can be found on many stellar surfaces, their size and number varying according to their host's magnetic field and rotational velocity. To correctly determine stellar parameters, it is thus necessary to determine and extract stellar activity's signals. Interferometric observables are disturbed by activity, and this observing technique thus constitutes a good way of probing stellar surface. However, magnetic spots sometimes mimic other phenomenon, like a transiting exoplanet. In that case, the combination of several observing techniques, like photometry and interferometry, is mandatory to extract the planetary signal from the spot's one, and then characterize the exoplanet.

  7. Analysis of the interferometric Ronchi test.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D

    1990-09-01

    It is well known that the Ronchi test has two equivalent interpretations, Physical, as an interferometer, or geometrical, as if the fringes were just shadows from the fringes on the ruling. The second interpretation is nearly always used in practice because it is simpler. However, the disadvantage is that the irradiance profile of the fringes cannot be calculated with this theory. Here, the interferometric interpretation of the test will be used to obtain the irradiance profile and the sharpness of the fringes.

  8. TE/TM Simulations of Interferometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houshmand, Bijan

    2000-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) measurements at X-, C-, L-, and P-band are used to derive ground topography at meter level resolution. Interpretation of the derived topography requires attention due to the complex interaction of the radar signal with ground cover. The presence of penetrable surfaces such as vegetation, and tree canopies poses a challenge since the depth of penetration depends on a number of parameters such as the operating radar frequency, polarization, incident angle, as well as terrain structure. The dependence of the reconstructed topography on polarization may lead to the characterization of the ground cover. Simulation of interferometric measurements is useful for interpretation of the derived topography (B. Houshmand, Proceedings of URSI, 314, 1997). In this talk , time domain simulations for interferometric measurement for TE- and TM- polarization are presented. Time domain simulation includes the effects of the surface material property as well geometry comparable the radar signal wavelength (B. Houshmand, Proceedings of the URSI, 25, 1998). The IFSAR simulation is carried out in two steps. First, the forward scattering data is generated based on full wave analysis. Next, the electromagnetic information is inverted to generate surface topography. This inversion is based on the well known IFSAR processing technique which is composed of signal compression, and formation of an interferogram. The full wave forward scattering data is generated by the scattered-field formulation of the FDTD algorithm. The simulation is carried out by exciting the computational domain by a radar signal. The scattered field is then computed and translated to the receiving interferometric antennas using the time-domain Huygen's principle. The inversion process starts by compressing the time-domain data. The range compressed data from both receivers are then coregistered to form an interferogram. The resulting interferogram is then related to the

  9. Speckle-interferometric camera for displacement measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, P. A.; Schnack, E.

    1990-12-01

    A simple setup of standard optical elements comparable to a shearographic camera can be used used to record speckle interferograms with a fast lens. Rigid-body translations of the object are compensated for by a reference mirror attached to the object; the method requires only moderate stability and resolution of the storage medium (film). Interferogram reconstruction is possible with white light. Hence the method unites advances of different holographic and speckle-interferometric setups.

  10. Multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Omenetto, F.G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-04-01

    The authors review multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (MI-FROG) as a technique, uniquely suited for pump-probe coherent spectroscopy using amplified visible and near-infrared short-pulse systems and/or emissive targets, for time-resolving ultrafast phase shifts and intensity changes. Application of polarization-gate MI-FROG to the study of ultrafast ionization in gases is presented.

  11. Bayes classification of interferometric TOPSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, T. R.; Rodriguez, E.; Houshmand, B.; Carande, R.

    1995-01-01

    We report the Bayes classification of terrain types at different sites using airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) data. A Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier was applied on multidimensional observations derived from the SAR intensity, the terrain elevation model, and the magnitude of the interferometric correlation. Training sets for forested, urban, agricultural, or bare areas were obtained either by selecting samples with known ground truth, or by k-means clustering of random sets of samples uniformly distributed across all sites, and subsequent assignments of these clusters using ground truth. The accuracy of the classifier was used to optimize the discriminating efficiency of the set of features that was chosen. The most important features include the SAR intensity, a canopy penetration depth model, and the terrain slope. We demonstrate the classifier's performance across sites using a unique set of training classes for the four main terrain categories. The scenes examined include San Francisco (CA) (predominantly urban and water), Mount Adams (WA) (forested with clear cuts), Pasadena (CA) (urban with mountains), and Antioch Hills (CA) (water, swamps, fields). Issues related to the effects of image calibration and the robustness of the classification to calibration errors are explored. The relative performance of single polarization Interferometric data classification is contrasted against classification schemes based on polarimetric SAR data.

  12. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  13. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  14. A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

  15. A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-05-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

  16. Preliminary development of digital signal processing in microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Topics covered involve a number of closely related tasks including: the development of several control loop and dynamic noise model computer programs for simulating microwave radiometer measurements; computer modeling of an existing stepped frequency radiometer in an effort to determine its optimum operational characteristics; investigation of the classical second order analog control loop to determine its ability to reduce the estimation error in a microwave radiometer; investigation of several digital signal processing unit designs; initiation of efforts to develop required hardware and software for implementation of the digital signal processing unit; and investigation of the general characteristics and peculiarities of digital processing noiselike microwave radiometer signals.

  17. Ultra Stable Microwave Radiometers for Future Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.; Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius will measure global sea surface salinity with 100-km spatial resolution every 8 days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than 0.1 K over 8 days. This three-year research program on ultra stable radiometers has addressed the radiometer requirements and configuration necessary to achieve this objective for Aquarius and future ocean salinity missions. The system configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer testbeds at both JPL and GSFC. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature, a procedure for the measurement and correction for radiometer system non-linearity, noise diode calibration versus temperature, low noise amplifier performance over voltage, and temperature control requirements to achieve the required stability. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability. This report also presents the results of the radiometer test program, a detailed radiometer noise model, and details of the operational switching sequence optimization that can be used to achieve the low noise and stability requirements. Many of the results of this research have been incorporated into the Aquarius radiometer design and will allow this instrument to achieve its goals.

  18. Resolution Enhancement of Spaceborne Radiometer Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krim, Hamid

    2001-01-01

    Our progress over the last year has been along several dimensions: 1. Exploration and understanding of Earth Observatory System (EOS) mission with available data from NASA. 2. Comprehensive review of state of the art techniques and uncovering of limitations to be investigated (e.g. computational, algorithmic ...). and 3. Preliminary development of resolution enhancement algorithms. With the advent of well-collaborated satellite microwave radiometers, it is now possible to obtain long time series of geophysical parameters that are important for studying the global hydrologic cycle and earth radiation budget. Over the world's ocean, these radiometers simultaneously measure profiles of air temperature and the three phases of atmospheric water (vapor, liquid, and ice). In addition, surface parameters such as the near surface wind speed, the sea surface temperature, and the sea ice type and concentration can be retrieved. The special sensor microwaves imager SSM/I has wide application in atmospheric remote sensing over the ocean and provide essential inputs to numerical weather-prediction models. SSM/I data has also been used for land and ice studies, including snow cover classification measurements of soil and plant moisture contents, atmospheric moisture over land, land surface temperature and mapping polar ice. The brightness temperature observed by SSM/I is function of the effective brightness temperature of the earth's surface and the emission scattering and attenuation of the atmosphere. Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) is a new instrument that will measure the earth radiation over the spectral range from 7 to 90 GHz. Over the world's ocean, it will be possible to retrieve the four important geographical parameters SST, wind speed, vertically integrated water vapor, vertically integrated cloud liquid water L.

  19. Receivers for the Microwave Radiometer on Juno

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiwald, F.; Russell, D.; Dawson, D.; Hatch, W.; Brown, S.; Oswald, J.; Janssen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Six receivers for the MicroWave Radiometer (MWR) are currently under development at JPL. These receivers cover a frequency range of 0.6 to 22 GHz in approximately octave steps, with 4 % bandwidth. For calibration and diagnosis three noise diodes and a Dicke switch are integrated into each receiver. Each receiver is connected to its own antenna which is mounted with its bore sights perpendicular to the spin axis of the spacecraft. As the spacecraft spins at 2 RPM, the antenna field of view scans Jupiter's atmosphere from limb to nadir to limb, measuring microwave emission down to 1000-bar.

  20. Atmospheric monitoring with an infrared radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, M. K.; Chadwick, P. M.

    2015-03-01

    The molecular atmosphere has a number of windows where it is effectively transparent to electromagnetic radiation, one of these being in the infrared 8-14 micron region. The presence of clouds and aerosols, which are more effective emitters of infrared radiation, in the atmosphere show up as an increase in the effective brightness temperature compared to the clear sky. This talk will cover the results from operating a scanning radiometer at the H.E.S.S. site in Namibia in determining atmospheric conditions.

  1. RF Reference Switch for Spaceflight Radiometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuble, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this technology is to provide improved calibration and measurement sensitivity to the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) radiometer. While RF switches have been used in the past to calibrate microwave radiometers, the switch used on SMAP employs several techniques uniquely tailored to the instrument requirements and passive remote-sensing in general to improve radiometer performance. Measurement error and sensitivity are improved by employing techniques to reduce thermal gradients within the device, reduce insertion loss during antenna observations, increase insertion loss temporal stability, and increase rejection of radar and RFI (radio-frequency interference) signals during calibration. The two legs of the single-pole double-throw reference switch employ three PIN diodes per leg in a parallel-shunt configuration to minimize insertion loss and increase stability while exceeding rejection requirements at 1,413 MHz. The high-speed packaged diodes are selected to minimize junction capacitance and resistance while ensuring the parallel devices have very similar I-V curves. Switch rejection is improved by adding high-impedance quarter-wave tapers before and after the diodes, along with replacing the ground via of one diode per leg with an open circuit stub. Errors due to thermal gradients in the switch are reduced by embedding the 50-ohm reference load within the switch, along with using a 0.25-in. (approximately equal to 0.6-cm) aluminum prebacked substrate. Previous spaceflight microwave radiometers did not embed the reference load and thermocouple directly within the calibration switch. In doing so, the SMAP switch reduces error caused by thermal gradients between the load and switch. Thermal issues are further reduced by moving the custom, highspeed regulated driver circuit to a physically separate PWB (printed wiring board). Regarding RF performance, previous spaceflight reference switches have not employed high-impedance tapers to improve

  2. The Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Jackson, D. M.; Adler, R. F.; Dod, L. R.; Shiue, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) is a new instrument being designed for studies of airborne passive microwave retrieval of tropospheric water vapor, clouds, and precipitation parameters. The MIR is a total-power cross-track scanning radiometer for use on either the NASA ER-2 (high-altitude) or DC-8 (medium altitude) aircraft. The current design includes millimeter-wave (MMW) channels at 90, 166, 183 +/- 1,3,7, and 220 GHz. An upgrade for the addition of submillimeter-wave (SMMW) channels at 325 +/- 1,3,7 and 340 GHz is planned. The nadiral spatial resolution is approximately 700 meters at mid-altitude when operated aboard the NASA ER-2. The MIR consists of a scanhead and data acquisition system, designed for installation in the ER-2 superpod nose cone. The scanhead will house the receivers (feedhorns, mixers, local oscillators, and preamplifiers), a scanning mirror, hot and cold calibration loads, and temperature sensors. Particular attention is being given to the characterization of the hot and cold calibration loads through both laboratory bistatic scattering measurements and analytical modeling. Other aspects of the MIR and the data acquisition system are briefly discussed, and diagrams of the location of the MIR in the ER-2 superpod nosecone and of the data acquisition system are presented.

  3. Scanning and focusing mechanisms of METEOSAT radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jouan, J.

    1977-01-01

    The scanning and focusing mechanisms settled onboard the METEOSAT Radiometer are described. A large camera which will take line by line pictures of the earth from a geostationary satellite in the same manner as a TV picture using both the spin of the spacecraft and the tilt of a telescope is included. The scanning mechanism provides the + or - 9 degrees tilt angle of the telescope through 2,500 elementary steps of 1.256 0.0001 radian. As the radiometer image quality is closely dependent on the characteristics of the scanning law, the mechanism is required to fulfill functional performances specifications particularly severe in terms of linearity of the scan curve, accuracy of each step as well as repeatability of the short-term scanning. The focusing mechanism allows + or - 12 millimeters shift of the telescope focus by step increments of 0.140 mm. The focus adjustment is achieved by moving a dihedral reflector according to a pure straight-line motion. The main requirements of each mechanism are summarized and their design and performances are described in detail.

  4. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  5. COBE differential microwave radiometers - Calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Janssen, M.; Gulkis, S.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Backus, C.; Hauser, M. G.; Mather, J. C.; Rokke, L.

    1992-01-01

    The COBE spacecraft was launched November 18, 1989 UT carrying three scientific instruments into earth orbit for studies of cosmology. One of these instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR), is designed to measure the large-angular-scale temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation at three frequencies (31.5, 53, and 90 GHz). This paper presents three methods used to calibrate the DMR. First, the signal difference between beam-filling hot and cold targets observed on the ground provides a primary calibration that is transferred to space by noise sources internal to the instrument. Second, the moon is used in flight as an external calibration source. Third, the signal arising from the Doppler effect due to the earth's motion around the barycenter of the solar system is used as an external calibration source. Preliminary analysis of the external source calibration techniques confirms the accuracy of the currently more precise ground-based calibration. Assuming the noise source behavior did not change from the ground-based calibration to flight, a 0.1-0.4 percent relative and 0.7-2.5 percent absolute calibration uncertainty is derived, depending on radiometer channel.

  6. Differential interferometric measurement of mirror shape parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Brian

    This project was inspired by the need for a remote method to accurately measure radius of curvature of mirrors tested under the NASA Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator program. Under this program, off axis parabolas (subscale candidates for James Webb Space Telescope optical elements) were tested under cryo-vac conditions. A remote, differential interferometric method is presented for measuring the shape parameters of general aspheric mirrors. The result of measurement is the assignment of best-fit values to a set of parameters that characterize the shape of the surface. If the mirror is nominally a conic of rotation, for example, the measurement yields the radius of curvature and conic constant. The method involves testing the optic in an interferometric center-of-curvature null configuration but can easily be extended to include conjugate null tests. During the measurement, known translational misalignments are introduced and the effects on the optical path length function are measured using a phase-shifting interferometer. Based on the nominal mirror shape, a model function is defined, up to a set of free shape parameters. The mirror shape parameters are regressed, based on the interferometric data, from this model. This differential measurement method works for on- and off-axis mirrors of all shapes and can be applied remotely as long as the mirror is mounted on an actuated stage. Hence, this measurement method would work well in a cryogenic testing situation. We have successfully applied the method to the case of an off-axis parabola with a nominal radius of curvature of 304.8 mm, a diameter of 76.17 mm, and a pupil offset of -89.40 mm.

  7. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  8. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  9. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  10. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  11. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  12. Interferometric observations of an artificial satellite.

    PubMed

    Preston, R A; Ergas, R; Hinteregger, H F; Knight, C A; Robertson, D S; Shapiro, I I; Whitney, A R; Rogers, A E; Clark, T A

    1972-10-27

    Very-long-baseline interferometric observations of radio signals from the TACSAT synchronous satellite, even though extending over only 7 hours, have enabled an excellent orbit to be deduced. Precision in differenced delay and delay-rate measurements reached 0.15 nanosecond ( approximately 5 centimeters in equivalent differenced distance) and 0.05 picosecond per second ( approximately 0.002 centimeter per second in equivalent differenced velocity), respectively. The results from this initial three-station experiment demonstrate the feasibility of using the method for accurate satellite tracking and for geodesy. Comparisons are made with other techniques.

  13. Millimeter-wave interferometric SAR and polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehmsdorff, Stephan; Essen, Helmut; Schimpf, Hartmuf; Wahlen, Alfred

    1998-07-01

    Using synthetic aperture radars with appropriate signal processing algorithms is a recognized technique for remote sensing applications. A wide spectrum of radar frequencies is used and a high degree of sophistication implies polarimetric and further multichannel approaches. Each frequency band used, exhibits special sensitivities to features of the earth's surface or man-made targets. This is mostly due to the coupling of the electromagnetic waves to backscattering geometries which are related to the radarwavelength. A part of the spectrum which has been covered not very intensely is the millimeterwave region. This may be mostly due to the relatively high atmospheric absorption at millimeterwaves which obstructs the use of such sensors for long range applications. On the other hand for military applications IR-imaging sensors are widely used which suffer even more from adverse transmission properties of the atmosphere. Application of multichannel techniques as polarimetry, multifrequency techniques and interferometry are also done with more ease due to compactness of the hardware and simplicity of processing. As there exist no data which would allow to investigate the potential of multifrequency polarimetric and interferometric mmW-SAR the Millimeterwave Experimental Multifrequency Polarimetric High Resolution Interferometric Imaging System was installed into an aircraft C-160 `Transall' to gather respective data over different land scenarios. The off-line evaluation of the radar data starts with off-line track, calibration and reformatting procedures. Afterwards synthetic aperture processing is applied to these data to generate radar images for co- and cross-polarization at 35 GHz and 94 GHz. As already mentioned above, SAR-processing at millimeterwavelengths requires a considerable lower amount of sophistication in comparison with algorithms applied at lower radar-frequencies. This can mainly be attributed to the short aperture length at mm-wave frequencies

  14. Light-pulse atom interferometric device

    DOEpatents

    Biedermann, Grant; McGuinness, Hayden James Evans; Rakholia, Akash; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Schwindt, Peter; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-03-22

    An atomic interferometric device useful, e.g., for measuring acceleration or rotation is provided. The device comprises at least one vapor cell containing a Raman-active chemical species, an optical system, and at least one detector. The optical system is conformed to implement a Raman pulse interferometer in which Raman transitions are stimulated in a warm vapor of the Raman-active chemical species. The detector is conformed to detect changes in the populations of different internal states of atoms that have been irradiated by the optical system.

  15. Conceptual radiometer design studies for Earth observations from low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual radiometer design study was performed to determine the optimum design approach for spaceborne radiometers in low Earth orbit. Radiometric system configurations which included total power radiometers, unbalanced Dicke radiometers, and balanced Dicke, or as known as noise injection, radiometers were studied. Radiometer receiver configurations which were analyzed included the direct detection radiometer receiver, the double sideband homodyne radiometer receiver, and the single sideband heterodyne radiometer receiver. Radiometer system performance was also studied. This included radiometric sensitivity analysis of the three different radiometer system configurations studied. Both external and internal calibration techniques were analyzed. An accuracy analysis with and without mismatch losses was performed. It was determined that the balanced Dicke radiometer system configuration with direct detection receivers and external calibrations was optimum where frequent calibration such as once per minute were not feasible.

  16. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  17. Differential Radiometers Using Fabry-Perot Interferometric Technique for Remote Sensing Determination of Various Atmospheric Trace Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgieva, E. M.; Heaps, W. S.; Wilson, E. L.

    2007-01-01

    New type of remote sensing instrument based upon the Fabry-Perot inte rferometric technique has been developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) is a well known, powerful spectroscopic technique and one of its many applications is to be use d to measure greenhouse gases and also some harmful species in the at mosphere. With this technique, absorption of particular species is me asured and related to its concentration. A solid Fabry-Perot etalon is used as a frequency filter to restrict the measurement to particular absorption bands of the gas of interest. With adjusting the thicknes s of the etalon that separation (in frequency) of the transmitted fri nges can be made equal to the almost constant separation of the gas a bsorption lines. By adjusting the temperature of the etalon, which changes the index of refi-action of its material, the transmission fring es can be brought into nearly exact correspondence with absorption li nes of the particular species. With this alignment between absorption lines and fringes, changes in the amount of a species in the atmosph ere strongly affect the amount of light transmitted by the etalon and can be related to gas concentration. The instrument that we have dev eloped detects the absorption of various atmospheric trace gases in d irect or reflected sunlight. Our instrument employing Fabry-Perot interferometer makes use of two features to achieve high sensitivity. The first is high spectral resolution enabling one to match the width of an atmospheric absorption feature by the instrumental band pass. The second is high optical throughput enabled by using multiple spectral lines simultaneously. For any species that one wishes to measure, thi s first feature is available while the use of multiple spectral features can be employed only for species with suitable spectra and freedom from interfering species in the same wavelength region. We have deve loped an instrument for use as ground based, airborne and satellite s ensor for gases such as carbon dioxide (1570 nm), oxygen (762 nm and 768 nm lines sensitive to changes in oxygen pressure and oxygen temper ature) and water vapor (940 nm). Our current goal is to develop an ul tra precise, inexpensive, ground based device suitable for wide deplo yment as a validation instrument for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) satellite. We show sensitivity measurements for CO2, 02, and H2 O, compare our measurements to those obtained using other types of sensors and discuss some of the peculiarities that must be addressed in order to provide the very high quality column detection required for solving problems about global distribution of greenhouse gases and cl imatological models. In another area of research we are interested in developing a small-size channel for CO2 capable of doing simultaneous measurements with the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) at NASA, God dard to study the hypothesis that atmospheric aerosols affect the reg ional terrestrial carbon cycle. We present recent data from our groun d based measurements of O2, CO2, H2O and (13)CO2 and discuss extensio n of the technique to new species and applications.

  18. The DC-8 Submillimeter-Wave Cloud Ice Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.; Batelaan, Paul; Siegel, Peter; Evans, K. Franklin; Evans, Aaron; Balachandra, Balu; Gannon, Jade; Guldalian, John; Raz, Guy; Shea, James

    2000-01-01

    An airborne radiometer is being developed to demonstrate the capability of radiometry at submillimeter-wavelengths to characterize cirrus clouds. At these wavelengths, cirrus clouds scatter upwelling radiation from water vapor in the lower troposphere. Radiometric measurements made at multiple widely spaced frequencies permit flux variations caused by changes in scattering due to crystal size to be distinguished from changes in cloud ice content. Measurements at dual polarizations can also be used to constrain the mean crystal shape. An airborne radiometer measuring the upwelling submillimeter-wave flux should then able to retrieve both bulk and microphysical cloud properties. The radiometer is being designed to make measurements at four frequencies (183 GHz, 325 GHz, 448 GHz, and 643 GHz) with dual-polarization capability at 643 GHz. The instrument is being developed for flight on NASA's DC-8 and will scan cross-track through an aircraft window. Measurements with this radiometer in combination with independent ground-based and airborne measurements will validate the submillimeter-wave radiometer retrieval techniques. The goal of this effort is to develop a technique to enable spaceborne characterization of cirrus, which will meet a key climate measurement need. The development of an airborne radiometer to validate cirrus retrieval techniques is a critical step toward development of spaced-based radiometers to investigate and monitor cirrus on a global scale. The radiometer development is a cooperative effort of the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, Swales Aerospace, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory and is funded by the NASA Instrument Incubator Program.

  19. Large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. L.

    1980-05-01

    The large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is a high resolution 4 meter aperture scanning radiometer system designed to determine sea surface temperature and wind speed, atmospheric water vapor and liquid water, precipitation, and various sea ice parameters by interpreting brightness temperature images from low Earth orbiting satellites. The LAMMR with dual linear horizontal and vertical polarization radiometer channels from 1.4 to 91 GHZ can provide multidiscipline data with resolutions from 105 to 7 km. The LAMMR baseline radiometer system uses total power radiometers to achieve delta T's in the 0.5 to 1.7 K range and system calibration accuracies in the 1 to 2 deg range. A cold sky horn/ambient load two point calibration technique is used in this baseline concept and the second detector output uses an integrated and dump circuit to sample the scanning cross-tract resolution cells.

  20. Large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is a high resolution 4 meter aperture scanning radiometer system designed to determine sea surface temperature and wind speed, atmospheric water vapor and liquid water, precipitation, and various sea ice parameters by interpreting brightness temperature images from low Earth orbiting satellites. The LAMMR with dual linear horizontal and vertical polarization radiometer channels from 1.4 to 91 GHZ can provide multidiscipline data with resolutions from 105 to 7 km. The LAMMR baseline radiometer system uses total power radiometers to achieve delta T's in the 0.5 to 1.7 K range and system calibration accuracies in the 1 to 2 deg range. A cold sky horn/ambient load two point calibration technique is used in this baseline concept and the second detector output uses an integrated and dump circuit to sample the scanning cross-tract resolution cells.

  1. Non-Scanning Radiometer Results for Earth Radiation Budget Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Green, Richard N.; Lee, Robert B., III; Bess, T. Dale; Rutan, David

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) included non-scanning radiometers (Luther, 1986) flown aboard a dedicated mission of Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, and the NOAA-9 and -10 operational meteorological spacecraft (Barkstrom and Smith, 1986). The radiometers first began providing Earth radiation budget data in November 1984 and have remained operational, providing a record of nearly 8 years of data to date for researchers. Although they do not produce measurements with the resolution given by the scanning radiometers, the results from the non-scanning radiometers are extremely useful for climate research involving long-term radiation data sets. This paper discusses the non-scanning radiometers, their stability, the method of analyzing the data, and brief scientific results from the data.

  2. 1/ f-Type noise in a total power radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybulev, P. G.; Dugin, M. V.; Berlin, A. B.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Kratov, D. V.; Udovitskiy, R. Yu.

    2014-04-01

    We report the experimental results of a study of the sources of 1/ f α type noise (hereafter referred to as 1/ f-type noise for the sake of brevity) in a total power radiometer. We find this noise to have two main sources in the radiometer: microwave amplifiers and the square-law diode detector with a Schottky barrier. We present methods for a substantial reduction of 1/ f-type noise, which allow total power radiometer measurements to be performed with nominal sensitivity on time scales of up to 10 seconds. The sensitivity of the total power radiometer on time scales up to 100 seconds remains higher than that of a Dicke switched radiometer.

  3. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  4. Digital Detection of Exosomes by Interferometric Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Daaboul, George G.; Gagni, Paola; Benussi, Luisa; Bettotti, Paolo; Ciani, Miriam; Cretich, Marina; Freedman, David S.; Ghidoni, Roberta; Ozkumur, Ayca Yalcin; Piotto, Chiara; Prosperi, Davide; Santini, Benedetta; Ünlü, M. Selim; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, which are membranous nanovesicles, are actively released by cells and have been attributed to roles in cell-cell communication, cancer metastasis, and early disease diagnostics. The small size (30–100 nm) along with low refractive index contrast of exosomes makes direct characterization and phenotypical classification very difficult. In this work we present a method based on Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) that allows multiplexed phenotyping and digital counting of various populations of individual exosomes (>50 nm) captured on a microarray-based solid phase chip. We demonstrate these characterization concepts using purified exosomes from a HEK 293 cell culture. As a demonstration of clinical utility, we characterize exosomes directly from human cerebrospinal fluid (hCSF). Our interferometric imaging method could capture, from a very small hCSF volume (20 uL), nanoparticles that have a size compatible with exosomes, using antibodies directed against tetraspanins. With this unprecedented capability, we foresee revolutionary implications in the clinical field with improvements in diagnosis and stratification of patients affected by different disorders. PMID:27853258

  5. MCM Polarimetric Radiometers for Planar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Dawson, Douglas; Gaier, Todd

    2007-01-01

    A polarimetric radiometer that operates at a frequency of 40 GHz has been designed and built as a prototype of multiple identical units that could be arranged in a planar array for scientific measurements. Such an array is planned for use in studying the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All of the subsystems and components of this polarimetric radiometer are integrated into a single multi-chip module (MCM) of substantially planar geometry. In comparison with traditional designs of polarimetric radiometers, the MCM design is expected to greatly reduce the cost per unit in an array of many such units. The design of the unit is dictated partly by a requirement, in the planned CMB application, to measure the Stokes parameters I, Q, and U of the CMB radiation with high sensitivity. (A complete definition of the Stokes parameters would exceed the scope of this article. In necessarily oversimplified terms, I is a measure of total intensity of radiation, while Q and U are measures of the relationships between the horizontally and vertically polarized components of radiation.) Because the sensitivity of a single polarimeter cannot be increased significantly, the only way to satisfy the high-sensitivity requirement is to make a large array of polarimeters that operate in parallel. The MCM includes contact pins that can be plugged into receptacles on a standard printed-circuit board (PCB). All of the required microwave functionality is implemented within the MCM; any required supporting non-microwave ("back-end") electronic functionality, including the provision of DC bias and control signals, can be implemented by standard PCB techniques. On the way from a microwave antenna to the MCM, the incoming microwave signal passes through an orthomode transducer (OMT), which splits the radiation into an h + i(nu) beam and an h - i(nu) beam (where, using complex-number notation, h denotes the horizontal component, nu denotes the vertical component, and +/-i denotes a +/-90deg phase

  6. Microwave integrated circuit radiometer front-ends for the Push Broom Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, R. F.; Hearn, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    Microwave integrated circuit front-ends for the L-band, S-band and C-band stepped frequency null-balanced noise-injection Dicke-switched radiometer to be installed in the NASA Langley airborne prototype Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) are described. These front-ends were developed for the fixed frequency of 1.413 GHz and the variable frequencies of 1.8-2.8 GHz and 3.8-5.8 GHz. Measurements of the noise temperature of these units were made at 55.8 C, and the results of these tests are given. While the overall performance was reasonable, improvements need to be made in circuit losses and noise temperatures, which in the case of the C-band were from 1000 to 1850 K instead of the 500 K specified. Further development of the prototypes is underway to improve performance and extend the frequency range.

  7. The Use of Rotating Shadowband Radiometers and Microwave Radiometers to Obtain Cloud Properties in Arctic Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, James C. ); Liljegren, James C.; Min, Qilong; Doran, J Christopher )

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the use of rotating shadowband radiometers and microwave radiometers to find shortwave cloud optical depth and cloud effective radius at two Arctic sites. These sites are the SHEBA ice camp site (a field study undertaken in 1997 and 1998) and the ARM Barrow (AK) site. Special measures are necessary to process the data from the SHEBA site to account for the harsh environment in which the instruments reside. The analysis shows that, over the summer of 1998, the median cloud optical depth at the SHEBA site is greater than the median cloud optical depth at the Barrow site. The cloud droplet effective radius is less at the SHEBA site than the Barrow site.

  8. Ozone height profiles using laser heterodyne radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The monitoring of vertical profiles of ozone and related minor constituents in the atmosphere are of great significance to understanding the complex interaction between atmospheric dynamics, chemistry and radiation budget. An ultra high spectral resolution tunable CO2 laser heterodyne radiometer has been designed, developed and set up at the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi to obtain vertical profiles of various minor constituents the characteristic absorption lines in 9 to 11 micron spectral range. Due to its high spectral resolution the lines can be resolved completely and data obtained are inverted to get vertical profiles using an inversion technique developed by the author. In the present communication the salient features of the laser heterodyne system and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  9. Stable Targets for Spaceborne Microwave Radiometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.; Chan, S. K.; Armstrong, R. L.; Brodzik, M. J.; Savoie, M. H.; Knowles, K.

    2006-01-01

    Beginning in the 1970s, continuous observations of the Earth have been made by spaceborne microwave radiometers. Since these instruments have different observational characteristics, care must be taken in combining their data to form consistent long term records of brightness temperatures and derived geophysical quantities. To be useful for climate studies, data from different instruments must be calibrated relative to each other and to reference targets on the ground whose characteristics are stable and can be monitored continuously. Identifying such targets over land is not straightforward due to the heterogeneity and complexity of the land surface and cover. In this work, we provide an analysis of multi-sensor brightness temperature statistics over ocean, tropical forest, and ice sheet locations, spanning the period from 1978 to the present, and indicate the potential of these sites as continuous calibration monitoring targets.

  10. Solid-state spectral transmissometer and radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Steward, R. G.; Payne, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An in situ instrument designed to measure the spectral attenuation coefficient of seawater and the ocean remote-sensing reflectance from 400 to 750 nm is in the test and development stage. It employs a 256 channel, charge-coupled type of linear array measuring the spectral intensities diffracted by a grating. Examples of the types of data delivered by this instrument have been simulated using a breadboard laboratory instrument and an above-water, solid-state radiometer. Algorithms developed using data from these instruments provide measures of chlorophyll a plus phaeophytin a concentrations from less than 0.1 to 77.0 mg/cu m, gelbstoff spectral absorption coefficients, and detrital spectral backscattering coefficients for waters of the west Florida shelf.

  11. Advanced microwave radiometer antenna system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummer, W. H.; Villeneuve, A. T.; Seaton, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    The practicability of a multi-frequency antenna for spaceborne microwave radiometers was considered in detail. The program consisted of a comparative study of various antenna systems, both mechanically and electronically scanned, in relation to specified design goals and desired system performance. The study involved several distinct tasks: definition of candidate antennas that are lightweight and that, at the specified frequencies of 5, 10, 18, 22, and 36 GHz, can provide conical scanning, dual linear polarization, and simultaneous multiple frequency operation; examination of various feed systems and phase-shifting techniques; detailed analysis of several key performance parameters such as beam efficiency, sidelobe level, and antenna beam footprint size; and conception of an antenna/feed system that could meet the design goals. Candidate antennas examined include phased arrays, lenses, and optical reflector systems. Mechanical, electrical, and performance characteristics of the various systems were tabulated for ease of comparison.

  12. Prototype Cryospheric Experimental Synthetic Aperture Radiometer (CESAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, Lawrence M.; Phelps, Norman L.; Riley, J. Thomas; Markus, Thorsten M.; Bland, Geoffrey L.; Ruf, Christopher; Lawrence, Roland W.; Reising, Steven C.; Pichel, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Present satellite microwave radiometers typically have a coarse spatial resolution of several kilometers or more. This is only adequate only over homogenous areas. Significantly enhanced spatial resolution is critically important to reduce the uncertainty of estimated cryospheric parameters in heterogeneous and climatically-sensitive areas. Examples include: (1) dynamic sea ice areas with frequent lead and polynya developments and variable ice thicknesses, (2) mountainous areas that require improved retrieval of snow water equivalent, and (3) melting outlet glacier or ice shelf areas along the coast of Greenland and Antarctica. For these situations and many others, an Earth surface spot size of no more than 100 m is necessary to retrieve the information needed for significant new scientific progress, including the synthesis of field observations with satellite observations with high confidence.

  13. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  14. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  15. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  16. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  17. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  18. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  19. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  1. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  2. Localising fast radio bursts and other transients using interferometric arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrocka, M.; Stappers, B.; Wilkinson, P.

    2015-07-01

    A new population of sources emitting fast and bright transient radio bursts (FRBs) has recently been identified. Their observed high dispersion measures suggests an extragalactic origin, and accurately determining their positions and distances will provide an opportunity to study the magneto-ionic properties of the intergalactic medium. So far, FRBs have all been found using large dishes equipped with multi-pixel arrays. While these dishes are well-suited to discovering transient sources, they are poor at providing accurate localisations. A 2D snapshot image of the sky, made with a correlation interferometer array, can accurately localise many compact radio sources simultaneously. However, the required time resolution and the need to detect them in real time makes this currently impractical. In a beam-forming approach many narrow tied-array beams (TABs) are produced and the advantages of single dishes and interferometers can be combined. We present a proof-of-concept analysis of a new non-imaging method that utilises the additional spectral and comparative spatial information obtained from multiply overlapping TABs to estimate a transient source location with up to arcsecond accuracy in almost real time. We demonstrate this for a variety of interferometric configurations, that is LOFAR and MeerKAT, and show that the estimated angular position may be sufficient for identifying a host galaxy or other related object, without reference to other simultaneous or follow-up observations. In cases where the position is less accurately determined, we can still significantly reduce the area that needs to be searched for associated emission at other wavelengths and from potential host galaxies.

  3. Interferometric data for a shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Brown, James L.; Miles, John B.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the axisymmetric shock-wave / boundary-layer strong interaction flow generated in the vicinity of a cylinder-cone intersection was conducted. The study data are useful in the documentation and understanding of compressible turbulent strong interaction flows, and are part of a more general effort to improve turbulence modeling for compressible two- and three-dimensional strong viscous/inviscid interactions. The nominal free stream Mach number was 2.85. Tunnel total pressures of 1.7 and 3.4 atm provided Reynolds number values of 18 x 10(6) and 36 x 10(6) based on model length. Three cone angles were studied giving negligible, incipient, and large scale flow separation. The initial cylinder boundary layer upstream of the interaction had a thickness of 1.0 cm. The subsonic layer of the cylinder boundary layer was quite thin, and in all cases, the shock wave penetrated a significant portion of the boundary layer. Owing to the thickness of the cylinder boundary layer, considerable structural detail was resolved for the three shock-wave / boundary-layer interaction cases considered. The primary emphasis was on the application of the holographic interferometry technique. The density field was deduced from an interferometric analysis based on the Able transform. Supporting data were obtained using a 2-D laser velocimeter, as well as mean wall pressure and oil flow measurements. The attached flow case was observed to be steady, while the separated cases exhibited shock unsteadiness. Comparisons with Navier-Stokes computations using a two-equation turbulence model are presented.

  4. Research on interferometric photonic crystal fiber hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hong; Zhang, Zhen-hui; Wang, Fu-yin; Xiong, Shui-dong

    2013-08-01

    Current research on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) for acoustic sensing was focused on the PCF's pressure sensitivity enhancement. However, whether the enhancement of the PCF's pressure sensitivity can be actually realized is still controversial. Practical hydrophone, utilizing PCFs, to manifest its superior sensitivity to normal single mode fibers (SMFs) for acoustic sensing, should be made. Account to this point of view, actual hydrophone was fabricated. Index guiding PCF was used, the fiber core is solid silicon dioxide (SiO2), and the cladding is SiO2 filled with lots of periodical transverse circular air hollows. The PCF, mounted on an air-backed mandrel for structural sensitivity enhancement, was used as a sensing arm of the fiber Michelson interferometer. The other arm, so called reference arm, was made of SMF. Faraday rotator mirrors (FRM) were spliced in the end of each interferometric arm account for polarization induced phase fading, which is a common scheme in fiber interferometric sensing systems. A similar hydrophone, with all the same structure except that the PCF was exchanged into SMF, was also fabrication to make the contrast. The narrowlinewidth and frequency-tunable optical fiber laser was used to achieve high accuracy optical interferometric measurement. Meanwhile, the phase generated carrier (PGC) modulation-demodulation scheme was adopted to interrogate the measurand signal. Experiment was done by using acoustic standing-wave test apparatus. Linearity characteristics of the two hydrophones were measured at frequency 100Hz, 500Hz, and 1000Hz, experimental results showed that the maximum error of the linearity was 10%, a little larger than the theoretical results. Pressure sensitivities of the PCF hydrophone and the SMF hydrophone were measured using a reference standard PZT hydrophone in the frequency range from 20 Hz to 1600 Hz, the measurement data showed that the sensitivity of the PCF hydrophone was about -162.8 dB re. rad/μPa, with a

  5. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD): Instrument Status and Performance Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Christopher; Bailey, M. C.; Gross, Steven; Hood, Robbie; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Miller, Timothy; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an innovative radiometer which offers new and unique remotely sensed observations of both extreme oceanic wind events and strong precipitation. It is based on the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) [Uhlhorn and Black, 2004]. The HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer (STAR) technology [Ruf et al., 1988]. This sensor operates over 4-7 GHz, where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometer [Bettenhausen et al., 2006; Brown et al., 2006]. HIRAD incorporates a new and unique array antenna design along with several technologies successfully demonstrated by the Lightweight Rain Radiometer instrument [Ruf et al., 2002; Ruf and Principe, 2003]. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce wide-swath imagery of ocean winds and rain in hurricane conditions. Accurate observations of surface ocean vector winds (OVW) with high spatial and temporal resolution are required for understanding and predicting tropical cyclones. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an innovative architecture which offers new and unique remotely sensed observations of both extreme oceanic wind events and strong precipitation. It is based on the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a proven remote sensing technique for observing tropical cyclone (TC) ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer (STAR) technology combined with a a unique array antenna design. The overarching design concept of HIRAD is to combine the multi-frequency C-band observing strategy of the SFMR with STAR technology to

  6. Interferometric investigation of a diode laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Creath, K.

    1985-05-01

    Diode lasers provide a coherent light source in the near IR. They have many desirable characteristics such as small size, high efficiency, a single-longitudinal mode output as large as 15 mW, and can be modulated at high pulse rates. An AlGaAs diode laser operating at 840 nm with an output of 5 mW was evaluated with a Smartt point diffraction interferometer. The wave front observed had astigmatism of approx.2 lambda present over the output beam divergence angle. In a modified Twyman-Green interferometer, the coherence length measured was >15 m with high visibility fringes. This source was found to be stable and highly linearly polarized. When used as an interferometric source, many possibilities for small scale interferometers and test equipment are now viable.

  7. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  8. The 2012 interferometric imaging beauty contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Fabien; Cotton, William D.; Lawson, Peter R.; Ridgway, Steve T.; Aarnio, Alicia; Monnier, John D.; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Thiébaut, Eric; Soulez, Férréol; Mary, David; Millour, Florentin; Vannier, Martin; Young, John; Elias, Nicholas M.; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Rengaswamy, Sridharan

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of the fifth Interferometric Imaging Beauty Contest. The contest consists in blind imaging of test data sets derived from model sources and distributed in the OIFITS format. Two scenarios of imaging with CHARA/MIRC-6T were offered for reconstruction: imaging a T Tauri disc and imaging a spotted red supergiant. There were eight different teams competing this time: Monnier with the software package MACIM; Hofmann, Schertl and Weigelt with IRS; Thiebaut and Soulez with MiRA ; Young with BSMEM; Mary and Vannier with MIROIRS; Millour and Vannier with independent BSMEM and MiRA entries; Rengaswamy with an original method; and Elias with the radio-astronomy package CASA. The contest model images, the data delivered to the contestants and the rules are described as well as the results of the image reconstruction obtained by each method. These results are discussed as well as the strengths and limitations of each algorithm.

  9. Interferometric atmospheric refractive-index environmental monitor.

    PubMed

    Ludman, J E; Ludman, J J; Callahan, H; Caulfield, H J; Watt, D; Sampson, J L; Robinson, J; Davis, S; Hunt, A

    1995-06-20

    Long, open-path, outdoor interferometric measurement of the index of refraction as a function of wavelength (spectral refractivity) requires a number of innovations. These include active compensation for vibration and turbulence. The use of electronic compensation produces an electronic signal that is ideal for extracting data. This allows the appropriate interpretation of those data and the systematic and fast scanning of the spectrum by the use of bandwidths that are intermediate between lasers (narrow bandwidth) and white light (broad bandwidth). An Environmental Interferometer that incorporates these features should be extremely valuable in both pollutant detection and pollutant identification. Spectral refractivity measurements complement the information available from spectral absorption instruments (e.g., a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer). The Environmental Interferometer currently uses an electronic compensating device with a 1-kHz response time, and therefore rapid spectral scans are feasibe so that it is possible to monitor the time evolution of pollutant events.

  10. VCSELs for interferometric readout of MEMS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkland, Darwin K.; Geib, Kent M.; Peake, Gregory M.; Keeler, Gordon A.; Shaw, Michael J.; Baker, Michael S.; Okandan, Murat

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development of single-frequency VCSELs (vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers) for sensing the position of a moving MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) object with resolution much less than 1nm. Position measurement is the basis of many different types of MEMS sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure sensors. Typically, by switching from a traditional capacitive electronic readout to an interferometric optical readout, the resolution can be improved by an order of magnitude with a corresponding improvement in MEMS sensor performance. Because the VCSEL wavelength determines the scale of the position measurement, laser wavelength (frequency) stability is desirable. This paper discusses the impact of VCSEL amplitude and frequency noise on the position measurement.

  11. Molecular histopathology by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-07-01

    A rapid label-free approach for molecular histopathology is presented and reviewed. Broadband vibrational spectra are generated by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging (NIVI), a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS)- based technique that uses interferometry and signal processing approaches to acquire Raman-like profiles with suppression of the non-resonant background. This allows for the generation of images that provide contrast based on quantitative chemical composition with high spatial and spectral resolution. Algorithms are demonstrated for reducing the diagnostic spectral information into color-coded composite images for the rapid identification of chemical constituents in skin, as well as differentiating normal from abnormal tissue in a pre-clinical tumor model for human breast cancer. This technology and methodology could result in an alternative method to the traditional histological staining and subjective interpretation procedure currently used in the diagnosis of disease, and has the potential for future in vivo molecular histopathology.

  12. uvmcmcfit: Parametric models to interferometric data fitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann, Shane; Leung, Tsz Kuk (Daisy); Conley, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Uvmcmcfit fits parametric models to interferometric data. It is ideally suited to extract the maximum amount of information from marginally resolved observations with interferometers like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Submillimeter Array (SMA), and Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). uvmcmcfit uses emcee (ascl:1303.002) to do Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and can measure the goodness of fit from visibilities rather than deconvolved images, an advantage when there is strong gravitational lensing and in other situations. uvmcmcfit includes a pure-Python adaptation of Miriad’s (ascl:1106.007) uvmodel task to generate simulated visibilities given observed visibilities and a model image and a simple ray-tracing routine that allows it to account for both strongly lensed systems (where multiple images of the lensed galaxy are detected) and weakly lensed systems (where only a single image of the lensed galaxy is detected).

  13. Sensitivity errors in interferometric deformation metrology.

    PubMed

    Farrant, David I; Petzing, Jon N

    2003-10-01

    Interferometric measurement techniques such as holographic interferometry and electronic speckle-pattern interferometry are valuable for measuring the deformation of objects. Conventional theoretical models of deformation measurement assume collimated illumination and telecentric imaging, which are usually only practical for small objects. Large objects often require divergent illumination, for which the models are valid only when the object is planar, and then only in the paraxial region. We present an analysis and discussion of the three-dimensional systematic sensitivity errors for both in-plane and out-of-plane interferometer configurations, where it is shown that the errors can be significant. A dimensionless approach is adopted to make the analysis generic and hence scalable to a system of any size.

  14. Interferometric Plasmonic Lensing with Nanohole Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G; El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Hess, Wayne P

    2014-12-18

    Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) of nanohole arrays in gold films is used to map propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from lithographically patterned structures. Strong near-field photoemission patterns are observed in the PEEM images, recorded following low angle of incidence irradiation of nanohole arrays with sub-15 fs laser pulses centered at 780 nm. The recorded photoemission patterns are attributed to constructive and destructive interference between PSPs launched from the individual nanoholes which comprise the array. By exploiting the wave nature of PSPs, we demonstrate how varying the array geometry (hole diameter, pitch, and number of rows/columns) ultimately yields intense localized photoemission. Through a combination of PEEM experiments and finite-difference time-domain simulations, we identify the optimal array geometry for efficient light coupling and interferometric plasmonic lensing. We show a preliminary application of inteferometric plasmonic lensing by enhancing the photoemission from the vertex of a gold triangle using a nanohole array.

  15. Interferometric Plasmonic Lensing with Nanohole Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-18

    Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) of nanohole arrays in gold films maps propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from lithographically patterned structures. Strong near field photoemission patterns are observed in the PEEM images, recorded following low angle of incidence irradiation of nanohole arrays with sub-15 fs laser pulses centered at 780 nm. The recorded photoemission patterns are attributed to constructive and destructive interferences between PSPs launched from the individual nanoholes which comprise the array. By exploiting the wave nature of PSPs, we demonstrate how varying the array geometry (hole diameter, pitch, and number of rows/columns) ultimately yields intense localized photoemission. Through a combination of PEEM and finite-difference time-domain simulations, we identify the optimal array geometry for efficient light coupling and interferometric plasmonic lensing. We show a preliminary application of inteferometric plasmonic lensing by enhancing the photoemission from the vertex of a gold triangle using nanohole array.

  16. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) is a candidate NASA Origins Probe Mission. SPIRIT is a two-telescope Michelson interferometer covering wavelengths from 25-400 microns, providing simultaneously high spectral resolution and high angular resolution. With comparable sensitivity to Spitzer, but two orders of magnitude improvement in angular resolution, SPIRIT will enable us to address a wide array of compelling scientific questions, including how planetary systems form in disks and how new planets interact with the disk. Further, SPIRIT will lay the technological groundwork for an array of future interferometry missions with ambitious scientific goals, including the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer / Darwin, and the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure.

  17. Interferometric phase microscopy of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Tang, Xian; Wang, Yin; Wang, Shouyu

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative phase imaging of cells with high accuracy in a completely noninvasive manner is a challenging task. To provide a proper solution to this important need, interferometric phase microscopy is described which relies on the off-axis interferometry, confocal microscopy and high-speed image capture technology. Phase retrieval from the single interferogram is done by algorithms based on the fast Fourier transform, traditional Hilbert transform and two-step Hilbert transform, respectively. Furthermore, a phase aberrations compensation approach is applied to correct the phase distribution of the red blood cells obtained via the three methods mentioned before without the pre-known knowledge for removing the wave front curvature introduced by the microscope objectives, off-axis imaging, etc., which otherwise hinders the phase reconstruction. The improved results reveal the better inner structures of the red blood cells. The development of quantitative phase imaging technique is shedding light on their future directions and applications for basic and clinical research.

  18. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The far-infrared astrophysics community is eager to follow up Spitzer and Herschel observations with sensitive, high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, for such measurements are needed to understand merger-driven star formation and chemical enrichment in galaxies, star and planetary system formation, and the development and prevalence of water-bearing planets. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) is a wide field-of-view space-based spatio-spectral interferometer designed to operate in the 25 to 400 micron wavelength range. This talk will summarize the SPIRIT mission concept, with a focus on the science that motivates it and the technology that enables it. Without mentioning SPIRIT by name, the astrophysics community through the NASA Astrophysics Roadmap Committee recently recommended this mission as the first in a series of space-based interferometers. Data from a laboratory testbed interferometer will be used to illustrate how the spatio-spectral interferometry technique works.

  19. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) is a candidate NASA Origins Probe Mission. SPIRIT is a two-telescope Michelson interferometer covering wavelengths from 25-400 microns, providing simultaneously high spectral resolution and high angular resolution. With comparable sensitivity to Spitzer, but two orders of magnitude improvement in angular resolution, SPIRIT will enable us to address a wide array of compelling scientific questions, including how planetary systems form in disks and how new planets interact with the disk. Further, SPIRIT will lay the technological groundwork for an array of future interferometry missions with ambitious scientific goals, including the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer/Darwin, and the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure.

  20. Simultaneous CARS and Interferometric Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Danehy, Paul M.; Grinstead, Keith D., Jr.; Tedder, Sarah; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports for the first time the combination of a dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering system with an interferometric Rayleigh scattering system (CARS - IRS) to provide time-resolved simultaneous measurement of multiple properties in combustion flows. The system uses spectrally narrow green (seeded Nd:YAG at 532 nm) and yellow (552.9 nm) pump beams and a spectrally-broad red (607 nm) beam as the Stokes beam. A spectrometer and a planar Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the imaging mode are used to record the spectrally broad CARS spectra and the spontaneous Rayleigh scattering spectra, respectively. Time-resolved simultaneous measurement of temperature, absolute mole fractions of N2, O2, and H2, and two components of velocity in a Hencken burner flame were performed to demonstrate the technique.

  1. Microstructured optical fiber interferometric breathing sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favero, Fernando C.; Villatoro, Joel; Pruneri, Valerio

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a simple photonic crystal fiber (PCF) interferometric breathing sensor is introduced. The interferometer consists of a section of PCF fusion spliced at the distal end of a standard telecommunications optical fiber. Two collapsed regions in the PCF caused by the splicing process allow the excitation and recombination of a core and a cladding PCF mode. As a result, the reflection spectrum of the device exhibits a sinusoidal interference pattern that instantly shifts when water molecules, present in exhaled air, are adsorbed on or desorbed from the PCF surface. The device can be used to monitor a person's breathing whatever the respiration rate. The device here proposed could be particularly important in applications where electronic sensors fail or are not recommended. It may also be useful in the evaluation of a person's health and even in the diagnosis and study of the progression of serious illnesses such as sleep apnea syndrome.

  2. Combined optical micromanipulation and interferometric topography (COMMIT)

    PubMed Central

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Lu, Thompson; Anvari, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Optical tweezers have emerged as a prominent light-based tool for pico-Newton (pN) force microscopy in mechanobiological studies. However, the efficacy of optical tweezers are limited in applications where concurrent metrology of the nano-sized structures under interrogation is essential to the quantitative analysis of its mechanical properties and various mechanotransduction events. We have developed an all-optical platform delivering pN force resolution in parallel with nano-scale structural imaging of the biological sample by combining optical tweezers with interferometric quantitative phase microscopy. These capabilities allow real-time micromanipulation and label-free measurement of sample’s nanostructures and nanomechanical responses, opening avenues to a wide range of new research possibilities and applications in biology. PMID:27446661

  3. Radar Interferometric Observations of Destabilized Rockglaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Tazio; Delaloye, Reynald; Raetzo, Hugo; Wegmuller, Urs

    2010-03-01

    Analysis of ERS-1/2 Tandem SAR interferograms for inventorying mass wasting in the periglacial belt of the Valais Alps (Switzerland) has evidenced - what was not expected before - that at least 10 rockglaciers were affected by very rapid movements of about 1 cm/day in 1995-1999. Currently, the detection of the state of activity of these very rapidly moving rockglaciers is hardly feasible with satellite SAR data, because of signal decorrelation after the 35, 46 and 11 days repeat intervals of the ENVISAT, ALOS and TerraSAR-X satellites, respectively. The role of space-borne radar interferometry as an element in a warning system is thus insignificant for these very rapid landslides, but an in- situ radar imaging system can overcome some of the limitations of satellite systems. In this contribution we present results from terrestrial radar interferometric measurements of two destabilized rockglaciers performed in August 2009.

  4. Characterizations of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanning radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Avis, Lee M.; Halyo, Nesim; Gibson, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Experiment employs the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite and the NOAA 9 and 10 spacecraft to obtain absolute measurements of incoming solar radiation, shortwave earth-reflected solar radiation, and longwave earth-emitted radiation, using both scanning and nonscanning radiometers. Each of the three remote-sensing spacecraft carry narrow FOV scanning radiometers whose detection sensors are thermistor bolometers. Attention is presently given to the calibration models and methods employed in characterizing the scanning radiometers' output signals; the design features of the scanners and flight calibration systems are presented.

  5. Aerosol physical properties in the stratosphere (APPS) radiometer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Woodin, E. A.; Anderson, T. J.; Magee, R. J.; Karthas, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The measurement concepts and radiometer design developed to obtain earth-limb spectral radiance measurements for the Aerosol Physical Properties in the Stratosphere (APPS) measurement program are presented. The measurements made by a radiometer of this design can be inverted to yield vertical profiles of Rayleigh scatterers, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, aerosol extinction, and aerosol physical properties, including a Junge size-distribution parameter, and a real and imaginary index of refraction. The radiometer design provides the capacity for remote sensing of stratospheric constituents from space on platforms such as the space shuttle and satellites, and therefore provides for global measurements on a daily basis.

  6. Infrared radiometer for measuring thermophysical properties of wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corwin, R. R.; Moorman, S. L.; Becker, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    An infrared radiometer is described which was developed to measure temperature rises of wind tunnel models undergoing transient heating over a temperature range of -17.8 C to 260 C. This radiometer interfaces directly with a system which measures the effective thermophysical property square root of rho ck. It has an output temperature fluctuation of 0.26 C at low temperatures and 0.07 C at high temperatures, and the output frequency response of the radiometer is from dc to 400 hertz.

  7. Aquarius L-Band Radiometers Calibration Using Cold Sky Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.; Hong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the calibration plan for the Aquarius radiometers is to look at the cold sky. This involves rotating the satellite 180 degrees from its nominal Earth viewing configuration to point the main beams at the celestial sky. At L-band, the cold sky provides a stable, well-characterized scene to be used as a calibration reference. This paper describes the cold sky calibration for Aquarius and how it is used as part of the absolute calibration. Cold sky observations helped establish the radiometer bias, by correcting for an error in the spillover lobe of the antenna pattern, and monitor the long-term radiometer drift.

  8. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  9. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  10. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  11. Two microstrip arrays for interferometric SAR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Two types of C-band aircraft interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) are being developed at JPL to measure the ocean wave characteristics. Each type requires two identical antennas with each having a long rectangular aperture to radiate fan-shaped beam(s). One type of these radars requires each of its antennas to radiate a broadside beam that will measure the target's cross-track velocity. The other type, having each of its antennas to radiate two off-broadside pointed beams, will allow the measurement of both the cross-track and the along-track velocities of the target. Because flush mounting of the antenna on the aircraft fuselage is desirable, microstrip patch array is selected for these interferometric SAR antennas. To meet the radar system requirement, each array needs a total of 76 microstrip patches which are arranged in a 38 x 2 rectangular aperture with a physical size of 1.6m x 16.5cm. To minimize the insertion loss and physical real estate of this relatively long array, a combined series/parallel feed technique is used. Techniques to suppress cross-pol radiation and to effectively utilize the RF power are also implemented. Cross-pol level of lower than -30 dB from the co-pol peak and low insertion loss of 0.36 dB have been achieved for both types of arrays. For the type of radar that requires two off-braodside pointed beams, a simple phasing technique is used to achieve this dual-beam capability with adequate antenna gain (20 dBi) and sidelobe level (-14 dB). Both radar arrays have been flight tested on aircraft with excellent antenna performance demonstrated.

  12. The 2014 interferometric imaging beauty contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, John D.; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Le Bouquin, Jean-Baptiste; Tuthill, Peter G.; Wittkowski, Markus; Grellmann, Rebekka; Müller, André; Renganswany, Sridhar; Hummel, Christian; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Young, John; Buscher, David; Sanchez-Bermudez, Joel; Alberdi, Antxon; Schoedel, Rainer; Köhler, Rainer; Soulez, Ferréol; Thiébaut, Éric; Kluska, Jacques; Malbet, Fabien; Duvert, Gilles; Kraus, Stefan; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Baron, Fabien; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Rivinius, Thomas; Merand, Antoine

    2014-07-01

    Here we present the results of the 6th biennial optical interferometry imaging beauty contest. Taking advantage of a unique opportunity, the red supergiant VY CMa and the Mira variable R Car were observed in the astronomical H-band with three 4-telescope configurations of the VLTI-AT array using the PIONIER instrument. The community was invited to participate in the subsequent image reconstruction and interpretation phases of the project. Ten groups submitted entries to the beauty contest, and we found reasonable consistency between images obtained from independent workers using quite different algorithms. We also found that significant differences existed between the submitted images, much greater than in past beauty contests that were all based on simulated data. A novel crowd-sourcing" method allowed consensus median images to be constructed, filtering likely artifacts and retaining real features." We definitively detect strong spots on the surfaces of both stars as well as distinct circumstellar shells of emission (likely water/CO) around R Car. In a close contest, Joel Sanchez (IAA-CSIC/Spain) was named the winner of the 2014 interferometric imaging beauty contest. This process has shown that new comers" can use publicly-available imaging software to interpret VLTI/PIONIER imaging data, as long as sufficient observations are taken to have complete uv coverage { a luxury that is often missing. We urge proposers to request adequate observing nights to collect sufficient data for imaging and for time allocation committees to recognise the importance of uv coverage for reliable interpretation of interferometric data. We believe that the result of the proposed broad international project will contribute to inspiring trust in the image reconstruction processes in optical interferometry.

  13. Fresnel Interferometric Imager: ground-based prototype.

    PubMed

    Serre, Denis; Deba, Paul; Koechlin, Laurent

    2009-05-20

    The Fresnel Interferometric Imager is a space-based astronomical telescope project yielding milli-arcsecond angular resolution and high contrast images with loose manufacturing constraints. This optical concept involves diffractive focusing and formation flying: a first "primary optics" space module holds a large binary Fresnel array, and a second "focal module" holds optical elements and focal instruments that allow for chromatic dispersion correction. We have designed a reduced-size Fresnel Interferometric Imager prototype and made optical tests in our laboratory in order to validate the concept for future space missions. The primary module of this prototype consists of a square, 8 cm side, 23 m focal length Fresnel array. The focal module is composed of a diaphragmed small telescope used as "field lens," a small cophased diverging Fresnel zone lens that cancels the dispersion, and a detector. An additional module collimates the artificial targets of various shapes, sizes, and dynamic ranges to be imaged. We describe the experimental setup, different designs of the primary Fresnel array, and the cophased Fresnel zone lens that achieves rigorous chromatic correction. We give quantitative measurements of the diffraction limited performances and dynamic range on double sources. The tests have been performed in the visible domain, lambda = 400-700 nm. In addition, we present computer simulations of the prototype optics based on Fresnel propagation that corroborate the optical tests. This numerical tool has been used to simulate the large aperture Fresnel arrays that could be sent to space with diameters of 3 to 30 m, foreseen to operate from Lyman alpha (121 nm) to mid IR (25 microm).

  14. Recent developments of interferometric wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Chen, Xiaoyu; Ling, Tong; Zhang, Lei; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Recent trends of interferometric wavefront sensing tend to focus on high precision, anti-vibration, compact, along with much more involved of electric and computer technology. And the optical principles employed not only limit to interference but also include diffraction, scattering, polarization, etc. In this paper, some selected examples basing on the research works in our group will be given to illustrate the trends mentioned above. To achieve extra high accuracy, phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry (PS-PDI) is believed to be a good candidate as it employs a nearly perfect point diffraction spherical wavefront as the reference and also takes advantage of the high precision of phase-shifting algorithms. Cyclic radial shearing interferometry (C-RSI) successively demonstrate the anti-vibration characteristic and can diagnose transient wavefront with only one single shot by employing a three-mirror common-path configuration and a synchronizing system. In contrast sharply with those early interferometers, interferometers with very compact configuration are more suitable to develop portable wavefront sensing instruments. Cross-grating lateral shearing interferometer (CG-LSI) is a very compact interferometer that adopts a cross-grating of millimeters to produce lateral shearing of the diffraction wave of the test wavefront. Be aware that, computer technique has been used a lot in all of the above interferometers but the non-null annual sub-aperture stitching interferometer (NASSI) for general aspheric surface testing mostly relies on the computer model of the physical interferometer setup and iterative ray-tracing optimization. The principles of the above mentioned interferometric wavefront sensing methods would be given in detail.

  15. Validation of Rain Rate Retrievals for the Airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Maria Marta; Salemirad, Matin; Jones, W. Linwood; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission is an aircraft field measurements program using NASA's unmanned Global Hawk aircraft system for remote sensing and in situ observations of Atlantic and Caribbean Sea hurricanes. One of the principal microwave instruments is the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), which measures surface wind speeds and rain rates. For validation of the HIRAD wind speed measurement in hurricanes, there exists a comprehensive set of comparisons with the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) with in situ GPS dropwindsondes [1]. However, for rain rate measurements, there are only indirect correlations with rain imagery from other HS3 remote sensors (e.g., the dual-frequency Ka- & Ku-band doppler radar, HIWRAP), which is only qualitative in nature. However, this paper presents results from an unplanned rain rate measurement validation opportunity that occurred in 2013, when HIRAD flew over an intense tropical squall line that was simultaneously observed by the Tampa NEXRAD meteorological radar (Fig. 1). During this experiment, Global Hawk flying at an altitude of 18 km made 3 passes over the rapidly propagating thunderstorm, while the TAMPA NEXRAD perform volume scans on a 5-minute interval. Using the well-documented NEXRAD Z-R relationship, 2D images of rain rate (mm/hr) were obtained at two altitudes (3 km & 6 km), which serve as surface truth for the HIRAD rain rate retrievals. A preliminary comparison of HIRAD rain rate retrievals (image) for the first pass and the corresponding closest NEXRAD rain image is presented in Fig. 2 & 3. This paper describes the HIRAD instrument, which 1D synthetic-aperture thinned array radiometer (STAR) developed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center [2]. The rain rate retrieval algorithm, developed by Amarin et al. [3], is based on the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) technique, which compares the observed Tb's at the HIRAD operating frequencies of 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz with

  16. Next generation along track scanning radiometer - SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerick, J.; Nieke, J.; Mavrocordatos, C.; Berruti, B.; Donlon, C.; Cosi, M.; Engel, W.; Bianchi, S.; Smith, Dave

    2012-10-01

    Since 1991, along track scanning radiometers (A)ATSR have been flown on a series of satellite platforms. These instruments use an along-track scanning design that provides two views of the same earth target through different atmospheric paths. Dual-view multispectral measurements can be used to derive an accurate atmospheric correction when retrieving geophysical parameters such as Sea Surface Temperature (SST). In addition, the (A)ATSR family of instruments use actively cooled detector systems and two precision calibration blackbody targets to maintain and manage on-board calibration. Visible channel calibration is implemented using a solar diffuser viewed once per orbit. As a consequence of these design features, resulting data derived from (A)ATSR instruments is both accurate and well characterized. After 10 years of Service the ENVISAT platform was lost in early 2012 asnd AATSR operations stopped. The Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) Sentinel-3 "Sea Land Surface Temperature Radiometer" (SLSTR) instrument is the successor to the AATSR family of instruments and is expected to launch in April 2014. The challenge for SLSTR is to develop and deliver a new instrument with identical or improved performance to that of the (A)ATSR family. The SLSTR design builds on the heritage features of the (A)ATSR with important extensions to address GMES requirements. SLSTR maintains the main instrument principles (along-track scanning, a two point infrared on-board radiometric calibration, actively cooled detectors, solar diffuser). The design also includes more spectral channels including additional bands at 1.3 and 2.2 μm providing enhanced cloud detection, dedicated fire channels, an increase of dual view swath from 500 to 740 km, an increase in the nadir swath of 1400 km. The increase in swath has led to, a new optical front-end design incorporating two rotating scan mirrors (with encoders to provide pointing knowledge) and an innovative flip mechanism to

  17. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  18. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  19. Errors in scatterometer-radiometer wind measurement due to rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Chaudhry, A. H.; Birrer, I. J.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of radiometer corrections for the scatterometer is investigated by simulating simple situations using footprint sizes comparable with those used in the SEASAT-1 experiment and also actual footprints and rain rates from a hurricane observed by the SEASAT-1 system. The effects on correction due to attenuation and wind speed gradients are examined independently and jointly. It is shown that the error in the wind-speed estimate can be as large as 200% at higher wind speeds. The worst error occurs when the scatterometer footprint overlaps two or more radiometer footprints and the attenuation in the scatterometer footprint differs greatly from those in parts of the radiometer footprints. This problem could be overcome by using a true radiometer-scatterometer system having identical coincident footprints comparable in size with typical rain cells.

  20. The Cloud Absorption Radiometer HDF Data User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jason Y.; Arnold, G. Thomas; Meyer, Howard G.; Tsay, Si-Chee; King, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) Instrument, methods used in the CAR Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) data processing, the structure and format of the CAR HDF data files, and methods for accessing the data. Examples of CAR applications and their results are also presented. The CAR instrument is a multiwavelength scanning radiometer that measures the angular distributions of scattered radiation.

  1. AVHRR/1-FM Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer is discussed. The program covers design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical/structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was developed for use on the program. The flight model program objectives were to fabricate, assemble and test four of the advanced very high resolution radiometers along with a bench cooler and collimator.

  2. Multibeam 1.4-GHz Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Roland W.; Bailey, Marion C.; Harrington, Richard F.; Hearn, Chase P.; Wells, John G., Jr.; Stanley, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Airborne prototype of multiple-beam pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR) developed to advance radiometric technology necessary for remote sensing of geophysical parameters. Instrument used in several joint Langley Research Center/United States Department of Agriculture soil-moisture flight experiments in Virginia, Texas, and California. Data from experiments used to modify, develop, and verify algorithms used to predict soil moisture from remote-sensing measurements. Image data useful in study of effects of characters of beams on radiometer imaging data.

  3. A low-noise beta-radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, G.I.; Savina, V.I.

    1995-12-01

    The two-channel detector for a low-noise (down to 0.06 sec{sup -1}) beta-radiometer for measuring the mass concentration of {sup 90}Sr in the environment after the chemical extraction of strontium by the oxalate-nitrate method was certified at the D.I. Mendeleev Institute of Metrology (certificate No. 137/93). A detector unit using two end-window self-quenching counters with thin input windows (8 {mu}m thick and 60 mm in diameter) operating as a Geiger-Mueller counter and filled with a mixture of 90% helium (atomic gas) and 10% ethanol (organic molecules) can measure the beta-activity of two substrates concurrently. It is often used to detect the beta-radiation of {sup 90}Sr. This isotope produces particles with energies ranging from 180 to 1000 keV, and the detection efficiency is 50% at a level of 0.1 Bq after measuring for 20 min with an uncertainty of 25%.

  4. Pioneer Saturn infrared radiometer - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, A. P.; Neugebauer, G.; Orton, G. S.; Muench, G.; Chase, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary results of the infrared radiometer experiment on Pioneer Saturn are reported. The instrument made use of two broadband channels centered at 20 and 45 microns which scan at a fixed 75-deg angle with respect to the spacecraft spin axis to acquire 10,000 image pairs of Saturn and its rings in the 2.5 h before closest approach, as well as several observations of Titan. The intensities of radiation observed in both bands indicate an effective temperature of 94.4 + or - 3 K for the planet, implying a total emission greater than twice the absorbed sunlight. Infrared data also indicates a molecular abundance of 0.85 for H2 relative to H2 + He, which can be improved by comparing the derived temperature profiles and radio occultation data. Planetary temperatures are found to range from a minimum of 83 to 140 K at the 1 bar level, with differences of 2.5 K between belts and zones up to the 0.06-bar level, while ring temperatures range from 60 to 70 K on the illuminated side and from less than 60 to 67 K in the planet's shadow and average 55 K on the unilluminated side. Preliminary estimates indicate a 45-micron brightness temperature of 80 + or - 10 K for Titan.

  5. A segmented mirror antenna for radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Houshmand, B.; Zimmerman, M.; Acosta, R.

    1989-01-01

    An antenna is designed for the radiometer application of the planned NASA Earth Science Geostationary Platforms in the 1990's. The antenna consists of two parts: a regular parabolic dish of 5 meters in diameter which converts the radiation from feeds into a collimated beam, and a movable mirror that redirects the beam to a prescribed scan direction. The mirror is composed of 28 segmented planar conducting plates, mostly one square meter in size. The secondary pattern of the antenna was analyzed based on a physical optics analysis. For frequencies between 50 and 230 GHz, and for a scan range of + or -8 deg (270 beamwidths scan at 230 GHz), the worst calculated beam efficiency is 95 percent. To cover such a wide frequency and scan range, each of the 28 plates is individually controlled for a tilting less than 4 deg, and for a sliding less than 0.5 cm. The sliding is done at discrete steps. At 230 GHz, a step size of 2 mil is sufficient. The plate positions must be reset for each frequency and for each scan direction. Once the position is set, the frequency bandwidth of the antenna is very narrow.

  6. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, GB; Michalsky, JJ

    2011-02-07

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using the diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  7. Global irradiance calibration of multifilter UV radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedehierro, A. A.; Cancillo, M. L.; Serrano, A.; Antón, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the amount of ultraviolet solar radiation (UV) reaching the Earth's surface is governed by stratospheric ozone, which has exhibited notable variations since the late 1970s. A thorough monitoring of UV radiation requires long-term series of accurate measurements worldwide, and to keep track of its evolution, it is essential to use high-quality instrumentation with an excellent long-term performance capable of detecting low UV signal. There are several UV monitoring networks worldwide based on multifilter UV radiometers; however, there is no general agreement about the most suitable methodology for the global irradiance calibration of these instruments. This paper aims to compare several calibration methods and to analyze their behavior for different ranges of solar zenith angle (SZA). Four methods are studied: the two currently most frequently used methods referred to in the literature and two new methods that reduce systematic errors in calibrated data at large solar zenith angles. The results evidence that proposed new methods show a clear improvement compared to the classic approaches at high SZA, especially for channels 305 and 320 nm. These two channels are of great interest for calculating the total ozone column and other products such as dose rates of biological interest in the UV range (e.g., the erythemal dose).

  8. Ultrahigh-speed, phase-sensitive full-field interferometric confocal microscopy for quantitative microscale physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sencan, Ikbal; Huang, Brendan K.; Bian, Yong; Mis, Emily; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Cao, Hui; Choma, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We developed ultra-high-speed, phase-sensitive, full-field reflection interferometric confocal microscopy (FFICM) for the quantitative characterization of in vivo microscale biological motions and flows. We demonstrated 2D frame rates in excess of 1 kHz and pixel throughput rates up to 125 MHz. These fast FFICM frame rates were enabled by the use of a low spatial coherence, high-power laser source. Specifically, we used a dense vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) array that synthesized low spatial coherence light through a large number of narrowband, mutually-incoherent emitters. Off-axis interferometry enabled single-shot acquisition of the complex-valued interferometric signal. We characterized the system performance (~2 μm lateral resolution, ~8 μm axial gating depth) with a well-known target. We also demonstrated the use of this highly parallelized confocal microscopy platform for visualization and quantification of cilia-driven surface flows and cilia beat frequency in an important animal model (Xenopus embryos) with >1 kHz frame rate. Such frame rates are needed to see large changes in local flow velocity over small distance (high shear flow), in this case, local flow around a single ciliated cell. More generally, our results are an important demonstration of low-spatial coherence, high-power lasers in high-performance, quantitative biomedical imaging. PMID:27896006

  9. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  10. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  11. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  12. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  13. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  14. Spectroscopic and Interferometric Measurements of Nine K Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Döllinger, Michaela P.; Guenther, Eike W.; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hrudkovu, Marie; van Belle, Gerard T.

    2016-09-01

    We present spectroscopic and interferometric measurements for a sample of nine K giant stars. These targets are of particular interest because they are slated for stellar oscillation observations. Our improved parameters will directly translate into reduced errors in the final masses for these stars when interferometric radii and asteroseismic densities are combined. Here, we determine each star’s limb-darkened angular diameter, physical radius, luminosity, bolometric flux, effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and mass. When we compare our interferometric and spectroscopic results, we find no systematic offsets in the diameters and the values generally agree within the errors. Our interferometric temperatures for seven of the nine stars are hotter than those determined from spectroscopy with an average difference of about 380 K.

  15. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  16. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  17. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  18. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  19. Radiometer system requirements for microwave remote sensing from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jeng-Nan

    1990-01-01

    An area of increasing interest is the establishment of a significant research program in microwave remote sensing from satellites, particularly geosynchronous satellites. Due to the relatively small resolution cell sizes, a severe requirement is placed on beam efficiency specifications for the radiometer antenna. Geostationary satellite microwave radiometers could continuously monitor several important geophysical parameters over the world's oceans. These parameters include the columnar content of atmospheric liquid water (both cloud and rain) and water vapor, air temperature profiles, and possibly sea surface temperature. Two principle features of performance are of concern. The first is the ability of the radiometer system to resolve absolute temperatures with a very small absolute error, a capability that depends on radiometer system stability, on frequency bandwidth, and on footprint dwell time. The second is the ability of the radiometer to resolve changes in temperature from one resolution cell to the next when these temperatures are subject to wide variation over the overall field-of-view of the instrument. Both of these features are involved in the use of the radiometer data to construct high-resolution temperature maps with high absolute accuracy.

  20. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  1. Irreversibility-inversions in 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We consider a recent theoretical prediction that for inertial particles in 2D turbulence, the nature of the irreversibility of their pair dispersion inverts when the particle inertia exceeds a certain value. In particular, when the particle Stokes number, St , is below a certain value, the forward-in-time (FIT) dispersion should be faster than the backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion, but for St above this value, this should invert so that BIT becomes faster than FIT dispersion. This non-trivial behavior arises because of the competition between two physically distinct irreversibility mechanisms that operate in different regimes of St . In 3D turbulence, both mechanisms act to produce faster BIT than FIT dispersion, but in 2D, the two mechanisms have opposite effects because of the inverse energy cascade in the turbulent velocity field. We supplement the qualitative argument given by Bragg et al. by deriving quantitative predictions of this effect in the short-time dispersion limit. These predictions are then confirmed by results of inertial particle dispersion in a direct numerical simulation of 2D turbulence.

  2. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  3. Rapid raw data simulation for fixed-receiver bistatic interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Feifei; Chang, Wenge; Li, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Raw data simulation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is useful for system designing, mission planning, and testing of imaging algorithms. According to the two-dimensional (2-D) frequency spectrum of the fixed-receiver bistatic SAR system, a rapid raw data simulation approach is proposed. With the combination of 2-D inverse Stolt transform in the 2-D frequency domain and phase compensation in the range-Doppler frequency domain, our approach can significantly reduce the simulation time. Therefore, simulations of extended scenes can be performed much more easily. Moreover, the proposed algorithm offers high accuracy of phase distribution, therefore, it can be used for single-pass fixed-receiver bistatic interferometric usage. The proposal is verified by extensive simulations of point targets and extended scene, in which the results indicate the feasibility as well as the effectiveness of our approach. In the end, the accuracy of phase distribution of the proposed algorithm is further examined with simulations of synthetic aperture radar interferometry.

  4. Validation of Rain Rate Retrievals for the Airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Maria; Salemirad, Matin; Jones, W. Linwood; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    On board of the NASA's Global Hawk (AV1) aircraft there are two microwave, namely: the passive microwave Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), and the active microwave High-altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP). This paper presents results from an unplanned rain rate measurement validation opportunity that occurred in 2013, when the Global Hawk aircraft flew over an intense tropical squall-line that was simultaneously observed, by the Tampa NEXRAD meteorological radar. During this experiment, Global Hawk flying at an altitude of 18 km made 3 passes over the rapidly propagating thunderstorm, while the TAMPA NEXRAD perform volume scans on a 5-minute interval. NEXRAD 2D images of rain rate (mm/hr) were obtained at two altitudes (3 km & 6 km), which serve as surface truth for the HIRAD rain rate retrievals. In this paper, results are presented of the three-way inter-comparison of HIRAD Tb, HIWRAP dbZ and NEXRAD rain rate imagery.

  5. Prototype Development of a Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer, GeoSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Alan B.; Wilson, William J.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lambrigsten, Bjorn H.; Dinardo, Steven J.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Rogacki, Steven; Gross, S. M.; Musko, Steve

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary details of a 2-D synthetic aperture radiometer prototype operating from 50 to 58 GHz will be presented. The instrument is being developed as a laboratory testbed, and the goal of this work is to demonstrate the technologies needed to do atmospheric soundings with high spatial resolution from Geostationary orbit. The concept is to deploy a large sparse aperture Y-array from a geostationary satellite, and to use aperture synthesis to obtain images of the earth without the need for a large mechanically scanned antenna. The laboratory prototype consists of a Y-array of 24 horn antennas, MMIC receivers, and a digital cross-correlation sub-system. System studies are discussed, including an error budget which has been derived from numerical simulations. The error budget defines key requirements, such as null offsets, phase calibration, and antenna pattern knowledge. Details of the instrument design are discussed in the context of these requirements.

  6. Millimeter-wave Radiometer for High Sensitivity Water Vapor Profiling in Arid Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Pazmany, Andrew

    2006-11-09

    Abstract - ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for long-term, unattended measurements of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Precipitable water vapor and liquid water path are estimated from zenith brightness temperatures measured from four double-sideband receiver channels, centered at 183.31 1, 3 and 7, and 14 GHz. A prototype ground-based version of the instrument was deployed at the DOE ARM program?s North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow AK in April 2005, where it collected data continuously for one year. A compact, airborne version of this instrument, packaged to operate from a standard 2-D PMS probe canister, has been tested on the ground and is scheduled for test flights in the summer of 2006. This paper presents design details, laboratory test results and examples of retrieved precipitable water vapor and liquid water path from measured brightness temperature data.

  7. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  8. Weighting interferometric data for direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    The new generation interferometric arrays such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) are composed of a large number of telescopes and their configurations are optimized for Fourier plane (a.k.a. uv-plane) coverage. As a consequence, solving for the missing information in the uv-plane is becoming less critical and the imaging algorithms can be revisited. The situation is getting similar to that encountered with single filled aperture telescopes and it is becoming possible to make images in a direct way. In this article a new weighting method is introduced to obtain "pseudo-clean" images without using prior information to solve for the Fourier transform of the source. This method is similar but not equivalent to the successive application of robust weighting and tapering at different scales. The idea is to weight the data to compensate for the imperfect distribution of natural weights in the uv-plane. The price to pay for this direct imaging technique is that the final point spread function (PSF or beam) may not follow a simple analytical shape such as a Gaussian (but this is also the case in optical astronomy) and some sensitivity is lost (but this is the case with any imaging algorithm in interferometry). Two parameters are introduced to control the trade-off between imaging quality and sensitivity, namely a threshold parameter and a coupling parameter. This method is applied to simulated ALMA observations with 16, 32 and 50 antennas. As expected this method is found to be more efficient with more antennas and for more compact configurations because the uv-plane coverage is more complete. With 50 antennas in compact configuration it is possible to reduce the amplitude of the inner sidelobes (outer sidelobes) by a factor >6 (>2) compared to natural weighting for ~10 % loss in sensitivity, leading to sidelobes lower than 1.6 % of the main lobe peak value. With 16 antennas only, the method can still be used to reduce the inner sidelobes of a

  9. BAYESIAN SEMI-BLIND COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR FOREGROUND REMOVAL IN INTERFEROMETRIC 21 cm OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Le; Timbie, Peter T.; Bunn, Emory F.; Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S.; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we present a new Bayesian semi-blind approach for foreground removal in observations of the 21 cm signal measured by interferometers. The technique, which we call H i Expectation–Maximization Independent Component Analysis (HIEMICA), is an extension of the Independent Component Analysis technique developed for two-dimensional (2D) cosmic microwave background maps to three-dimensional (3D) 21 cm cosmological signals measured by interferometers. This technique provides a fully Bayesian inference of power spectra and maps and separates the foregrounds from the signal based on the diversity of their power spectra. Relying only on the statistical independence of the components, this approach can jointly estimate the 3D power spectrum of the 21 cm signal, as well as the 2D angular power spectrum and the frequency dependence of each foreground component, without any prior assumptions about the foregrounds. This approach has been tested extensively by applying it to mock data from interferometric 21 cm intensity mapping observations under idealized assumptions of instrumental effects. We also discuss the impact when the noise properties are not known completely. As a first step toward solving the 21 cm power spectrum analysis problem, we compare the semi-blind HIEMICA technique to the commonly used Principal Component Analysis. Under the same idealized circumstances, the proposed technique provides significantly improved recovery of the power spectrum. This technique can be applied in a straightforward manner to all 21 cm interferometric observations, including epoch of reionization measurements, and can be extended to single-dish observations as well.

  10. Understanding magnetic structures in permanent magnets via in situ Lorentz microscopy, interferometric and non-interferometric phase-reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Volkov, V V; De Graef, M

    2001-01-01

    We present our observations of field- and orientation-dependence of magnetic domains and their reversal nucleation at grain boundaries in polycrystalline Nd2Fe14B, using Fresnel- and Foucault-Lorentz microscopy. The local magnetization associated with the domain and domain-wall in Nd2Fe14B and in precipitated Fe particles was mapped using an interferometric holography as well as a novel non-interferometric method based on the 'transport of intensity' equation.

  11. Response of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Lee Samuel

    2009-01-15

    The derivation of the response function of an interferometric gravitational wave detector is a paradigmatic calculation in the field of gravitational wave detection. Surprisingly, the standard derivation of the response wave detectors makes several unjustifiable assumptions, both conceptual and quantitative, regarding the coordinate trajectory and coordinate velocity of the null geodesic the light travels along. These errors, which appear to have remained unrecognized for at least 35 years, render the standard derivation inadequate and misleading as an archetype calculation. Here we identify the flaws in the existing derivation and provide, in full detail, a correct derivation of the response of a single-bounce Michelson interferometer to gravitational waves, following a procedure that will always yield correct results; compare it to the standard, but incorrect, derivation; show where the earlier mistakes were made; and identify the general conditions under which the standard derivation will yield correct results. By a fortuitous set of circumstances, not generally so, the final result is the same in the case of Minkowski background spacetime, synchronous coordinates, transverse-traceless gauge metric perturbations, and arm mirrors at coordinate rest.

  12. Design and characterization of MEMS interferometric sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, R.; Siahmakoun, A.

    2010-02-01

    A MEMS-based interferometric sensor is produced using the multi-user MEMS processing standard (MUMPS) micromirrors, movable by thermal actuation. The interferometer is comprised of gold reflection surfaces, polysilicon thermal actuators, hinges, latches and thin film polarization beam splitters. A polysilicon film of 3.5 microns reflects and transmits incident polarized light from an external laser source coupled to a multi-mode optical fiber. The input beam is shaped to a diameter of 10 to 20 microns for incidence upon the 100 micron mirrors. Losses in the optical path include diffraction effects from etch holes created in the manufacturing process, surface roughness of both gold and polysilicon layers, and misalignment of micro-scale optical components. Numerous optical paths on the chip vary by length, number of reflections, and mirror subsystems employed. Subsystems include thermal actuator batteries producing lateral position displacement, angularly tunable mirrors, double reflection surfaces, and static vertical mirrors. All mirror systems are raised via manual stimulation using two micron, residue-free probe tips and some may be aligned using electrical signals causing resistive heating in thermal actuators. The characterization of thermal actuator batteries includes maximum displacement, deflection, and frequency response that coincides with theoretical thermodynamic simulations using finite-element analysis. Maximum deflection of 35 microns at 400 mW input electrical power is shown for three types of actuator batteries as is deflection dependent frequency response data for electrical input signals up to 10 kHz.

  13. Interferometric phase reconstruction using simplified coherence network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kui; Song, Ruiqing; Wang, Hui; Wu, Di; Wang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Interferometric time-series analysis techniques, which extend the traditional differential radar interferometry, have demonstrated a strong capability for monitoring ground surface displacement. Such techniques are able to obtain the temporal evolution of ground deformation within millimeter accuracy by using a stack of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. In order to minimize decorrelation between stacked SAR images, the phase reconstruction technique has been developed recently. The main idea of this technique is to reform phase observations along a SAR stack by taking advantage of a maximum likelihood estimator which is defined on the coherence matrix estimated from each target. However, the phase value of a coherence matrix element might be considerably biased when its corresponding coherence is low. In this case, it will turn to an outlying sample affecting the corresponding phase reconstruction process. In order to avoid this problem, a new approach is developed in this paper. This approach considers a coherence matrix element to be an arc in a network. A so-called simplified coherence network (SCN) is constructed to decrease the negative impact of outlying samples. Moreover, a pointed iterative strategy is designed to resolve the transformed phase reconstruction problem defined on a SCN. For validation purposes, the proposed method is applied to 29 real SAR images. The results demonstrate that the proposed method has an excellent computational efficiency and could obtain more reliable phase reconstruction solutions compared to the traditional method using phase triangulation algorithm.

  14. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  15. The 2016 interferometric imaging beauty contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Thiébaut, E.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Heininger, M.; Schertl, D.; Weigelt, G.; Millour, F.; Schutz, A.; Ferrari, A.; Vannier, M.; Mary, D.; Young, J.

    2016-08-01

    Image reconstruction in optical interferometry has gained considerable importance for astrophysical studies during the last decade. This has been mainly due to improvements in the imaging capabilities of existing interferometers and the expectation of new facilities in the coming years. However, despite the advances made so far, image synthesis in optical interferometry is still an open field of research. Since 2004, the community has organized a biennial contest to formally test the different methods and algorithms for image reconstruction. In 2016, we celebrated the 7th edition of the "Interferometric Imaging Beauty Contest". This initiative represented an open call to participate in the reconstruction of a selected set of simulated targets with a wavelength-dependent morphology as they could be observed by the 2nd generation of VLTI instruments. This contest represents a unique opportunity to benchmark, in a systematic way, the current advances and limitations in the field, as well as to discuss possible future approaches. In this contribution, we summarize: (a) the rules of the 2016 contest; (b) the different data sets used and the selection procedure; (c) the methods and results obtained by each one of the participants; and (d) the metric used to select the best reconstructed images. Finally, we named Karl-Heinz Hofmann and the group of the Max-Planck-Institut f ur Radioastronomie as winners of this edition of the contest.

  16. Interferometric optical fiber microcantilever beam biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wavering, Thomas A.; Meller, Scott A.; Evans, Mishell K.; Pennington, Charles; Jones, Mark E.; VanTassell, Roger; Murphy, Kent A.; Velander, William H.; Valdes, E.

    2000-12-01

    With the proliferation of biological weapons, the outbreak of food poisoning occurrences, and the spread of antibiotic resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria, the demand has arisen for portable systems capable of rapid, specific, and quantitative target detection. The ability to detect minute quantities of targets will provide the means to quickly assess a health hazardous situation so that the appropriate response can be orchestrated. Conventional test results generally require hours or even several days to be reported, and there is no change for real-time feedback. An interferometric optical fiber microcantilever beam biosensor has successfully demonstrated real time detection of target molecules. The microcantilever biosensor effectively combines advanced technology from silicon micromachining, optical fiber sensor, and biochemistry to create a novel detection device. This approach utilizes affinity coatings on micromachiend cantilever beams to attract target molecules. The presence of the target molecule causes bending in the cantilever beam, which is monitored using an optical displacement system. Dose-response trials have shown measured responses at nanogram/ml concentrations of target molecules. Sensitivity is expected to extend from the nanogram to the picogram range of total captured mass as the microcantilever sensors are optimized.

  17. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  18. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  19. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  20. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  1. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  2. A Concept of Dark Age Interferometric Array (DAIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jingye

    After the epoch of recombination the Universe remained in neutral state until the large scale formation of galaxies released a sufficient number of ionizing photons to lightning the universe. In this period, the only emission is from the 21cm wavelength neutral hydrogen that may be observed today at 0.5-30MHz after the red shift. However, due to the ionosphere block and human/industrial RFI in this band, to observe the space from ground and also in the LOE is not possible. The concept of Dark Age Interferometric Array (DAIA) is aimed to place a linear array of nano-satellite with low noise receivers at the 10-1000m wavelength band in a lunar orbit. The distances between the nano-satellites are designed to form 1D uniformly distributed base lines in the uv-plane. A full coverage is then obtained after half rotation of the array in the orbit. The measurements are taken in the far side of the moon in order to have the lowest RFI from the earth. The thinned synthetic aperture linear array composed of ~15 elements (one small mother satellite and 14 nano daughter satellites) with the longest baseline over 100km. There are 3 dipoles antennas on each satellite in perpendicular to each other. Each of the antenna connected with a low-noise and periodically calibrated digital receiver. The received signals from each element are all sent to the mother satellite and processed onboard to generate the visibility functions for image processing. The mission composed of a mother satellite and 14 daughter satellites. The mass of the mother is ~110kg, and the mass of each daughter is <10kg. The complete set may be launched by CZ-2D carrier plus an upper stage or Vega. The mother satellite and 14 daughter satellites are bound onto a single structure during launch. When they arrive at the lunar orbit, the mother will release the daughters one by one according to the designs of the element spacing of the array with a controlled period of time. During the operation, daughters receive

  3. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  4. Integrated circuit tester using interferometric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, W.R.; Michaels, E.M.R.; Akowuah, K.

    1997-04-01

    An interferometric imaging technique can provide time-resolved diagnostics of semiconductor integrated circuits. The semiconductor device is placed in one arm of an interferometer and illuminated with a picosecond pulse from a sub-bandgap infrared laser. As the laser passes through the semiconductor, it samples local variations in the index of refraction. These variations are caused by a number of physical phenomena including dopants in the material such as those used to form device structures, heating due to the flow of electrical currents, and changes in carrier concentration due to injection. These variations have both static and dynamic components. The dynamic components are associated with the normal device operation and are the most interesting. To separate the components, the device is first imaged in a quiescent state, and then a second image is taken after the device enters a known voltage state. Differences between the two images determine where the local index of refraction has changed and by how much. A third image taken with the reference arm of the interferometer blocked, allows device structures to be associated with particular changes in the index of refraction. Activation of the voltage state is synchronized with the pulsed illumination source, and the time delay between the application of the voltage and the laser probe pulse allows us to take a series of images that map the time evolution of the interferogram. This technique offers an exciting new diagnostic for semiconductor integrated circuits. The technique is noninvasive and compatible with high-speed operation of integrated circuits. The picosecond resolution enables us to either characterize specific logic states or watch an individual device turn on. This imaging technique is sensitive to all of the index of refraction changes that can be associated with IC`s. These include heating due to current flowing through narrow wires and charge injection into the depletion region of a transistor.

  5. Calibration of Interferometric Envisat/ASAR Image Mode Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzner, J.; Eineder, M.; Schättler, B.

    2003-03-01

    Interferometric data processing requires careful calibration and validation of the complex input products. Interferometric calibration comprises geometric and phase accuracy aspects. With respect to geometry, orbit and timing parameter have to be calibrated in order to allow accurate geo-coding and optimal processing of the interferometric products. Phase accuracy of the input complex products is an important prerequisite for the interferometric measurement technique. This paper describes methods for location accuracy determination and reports the preliminary results obtained during the ongoing calibration/ validation phase of ENVISAT/ASAR. The paper includes the first ENVISAT/ASAR interferogram over Berlin, Germany. It was obtained with DLR~@~Ys interferometric processor GENESIS. This interferogram is compared to the result from ERS-2 for the same season of year. In addition, for verification of timing parameters two methods are described in this paper. The conventional method relies on precisely known ground control points (transponders or corner reflectors) and compares predicted and measured position in the slant range co-ordinate system. The new method relies on the precisely known geometry of ERS and a strong target visible in the ERS and ENVISAT/ASAR data. This cross-calibration method only requires a coarse height estimate of the considered target. Both methods are used to derive preliminary results for the location accuracy of ENVISAT/ASAR.

  6. Transition to turbulence: 2D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Matthew; Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2016-11-01

    The transition to turbulence in simple shear flows has been studied for well over a century, yet in the last few years has seen major leaps forward. In pipe flow, this transition shows the hallmarks of (1 + 1) D directed percolation, a universality class of continuous phase transitions. In spanwisely confined Taylor-Couette flow the same class is found, suggesting the phenomenon is generic to shear flows. However in plane Couette flow the largest simulations and experiments to-date find evidence for a discrete transition. Here we study a planar shear flow, called Waleffe flow, devoid of walls yet showing the fundamentals of planar transition to turbulence. Working with a quasi-2D yet Navier-Stokes derived model of this flow we are able to attack the (2 + 1) D transition problem. Going beyond the system sizes previously possible we find all of the required scalings of directed percolation and thus establish planar shears flow in this class.

  7. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  8. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse.

  9. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  10. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  11. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  12. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  13. Radiometer effect in space missions to test the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Comandi, G.; Toncelli, R.; Polacco, E.; Catastini, G.

    2001-05-01

    Experiments to test the equivalence principle in space by testing the universality of free fall in the gravitational field of the Earth have to take into account the radiometer effect, caused by temperature differences in the residual gas inside the spacecraft as it is exposed to the infrared radiation from Earth itself. We report the results of our evaluation of this effect for the three proposed experiments currently under investigation by space agencies: μSCOPE, STEP, and GG. It is found that in μSCOPE, which operates at room temperature, and even in STEP, where the effect is greatly reduced by means of very low temperatures, the radiometer effect is a serious limitation to the achievable sensitivity. Instead, by axially spinning the whole spacecraft and with an appropriate choice of the sensitivity axes-as proposed in GG-the radiometer effect averages out and becomes unimportant even at room temperature.

  14. Progress in Low-Power Digital Microwave Radiometer Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Kim, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    Three component technologies were combined into a digital correlation microwave radiometer. The radiometer comprises a dual-channel X-band superheterodyne receiver, low-power high-speed cross-correlator (HSCC), three-level ADCs, and a correlated noise source (CNS). The HSCC dissipates 10 mW and operates at 500 MHz clock speed. The ADCs are implemented using ECL components and dissipate more power than desired. Thus, a low-power ADC development is underway. The new ADCs arc predicted to dissipated less than 200 mW and operate at 1 GSps with 1.5 GHz of input bandwidth. The CNS provides different input correlation values for calibration of the radiometer. The correlation channel had a null offset of 0.0008. Test results indicate that the correlation channel can be calibrated with 0.09% error in gain.

  15. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  16. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-06-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  17. Mineral discrimination using a portable ratio-determining radiometer.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.; Abrams, M.J.; Goetz, A.F.H.

    1983-01-01

    A portable ratio-determining radiometer has been tested in the laboratory to evaluate the use of narrow band filters for separating geologically important minerals. The instrument has 10 bands in the visible and near-infrared portion of the spectrum (0.5-2.4mm), positioned to sample spectral regions having absorption bands characteristic of minerals in this wavelength region. Measurements and statistical analyses were performed on 66 samples, which were characterized by microscopic and X-ray diffraction analyses. Comparison with high-resolution laboratory spectral reflectance curves indicated that the radiometer's raw values faithfully reproduced the shapes of the spectra. -from Authors

  18. Specular UV reflectance measurements for cavity radiometer design.

    PubMed

    Booker, R L

    1982-01-01

    Specular reflectance measurements were made on a black paint used in a solar constant monitoring cavity radiometer. Interference filters peaking at 180, 200, and 220 nm were used in conjunction with a deuterium lamp source and a silicon photodiode detector. Results showed that the black paint was specular for light incident 60 degrees from normal and it reflected ~8% of the light at these wavelengths. We conclude that the high absorptance of the radiometer calculated for visible wavelengths should remain valid down to ~190-nm UV wavelengths.

  19. Remote monitoring of soil moisture using airborne microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    The current status of microwave radiometry is provided. The fundamentals of the microwave radiometer are reviewed with particular reference to airborne operations, and the interpretative procedures normally used for the modeling of the apparent temperature are presented. Airborne microwave radiometer measurements were made over selected flight lines in Chickasha, Oklahoma and Weslaco, Texas. Extensive ground measurements of soil moisture were made in support of the aircraft mission over the two locations. In addition, laboratory determination of the complex permittivities of soil samples taken from the flight lines were made with varying moisture contents. The data were analyzed to determine the degree of correlation between measured apparent temperatures and soil moisture content.

  20. Experimental characterization of edge force on the Crookes radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ventura, Austin L.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Gimelshein, Natalia E.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.

    2014-12-09

    The contribution of edge force on the Crookes radiometer is experimentally investigated with three vane geometries. This work examines increasing the force per unit weight of a radiometer vane for applications such as near-space propulsion by increasing the vane’s perimeter while decreasing the total surface area of the vane by means of machined holes in the vanes. Experimental results are given for three vane geometries. These results indicate that although force to vane weight ratios can be improved, the maximum force is achieved by a vane geometry that contains no hole features.

  1. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  2. Active radiometer for self-calibrated furnace temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Wittle, J. Kenneth; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1996-01-01

    Radiometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The radiometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/submillimeter-wave receiver including a millimeter/submillimeter-wave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement.

  3. Interpreting measurements obtained with the cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The software developed for the analysis of data from the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is discussed. The CAR is a multichannel radiometer designed to measure the radiation field in the middle of an optically thick cloud (the diffusion domain). It can also measure the surface albedo and escape function. The instrument currently flies on a C-131A aircraft operated by the University of Washington. Most of this data was collected during the First International satellite cloud climatology project Regional Experiment (FIRE) Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field Observation program off San Diego during July 1987. Earlier flights of the CAR have also been studied.

  4. Refractive Index Compensation in Over-Determined Interferometric Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Čížek, Martin; Hrabina, Jan; Buchta, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    We present an interferometric technique based on a differential interferometry setup for measurement under atmospheric conditions. The key limiting factor in any interferometric dimensional measurement are fluctuations of the refractive index of air representing a dominating source of uncertainty when evaluated indirectly from the physical parameters of the atmosphere. Our proposal is based on the concept of an over-determined interferometric setup where a reference length is derived from a mechanical frame made from a material with a very low thermal coefficient. The technique allows one to track the variations of the refractive index of air on-line directly in the line of the measuring beam and to compensate for the fluctuations. The optical setup consists of three interferometers sharing the same beam path where two measure differentially the displacement while the third evaluates the changes in the measuring range, acting as a tracking refractometer. The principle is demonstrated in an experimental setup. PMID:23202037

  5. Measurement of Pancharatnam's phase by robust interferometric and polarimetric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Loredo, J. C.; Ortiz, O.; De Zela, F.; Weingaertner, R.

    2009-07-15

    We report on theoretical calculations and experimental observations of Pancharatnam's phase originating from arbitrary SU(2) transformations applied to polarization states of light. We have implemented polarimetric and interferometric methods, which allow us to cover the full Poincare sphere. As a distinctive feature, our interferometric array is robust against mechanical and thermal disturbances, showing that the polarimetric method is not inherently superior over the interferometric one, as previously assumed. Our strategy effectively amounts to feeding an interferometer with two copropagating beams that are orthogonally polarized with respect to each other. It can be applied to different types of standard arrays, such as a Michelson, a Sagnac, or a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We exhibit the versatility of our arrangement by performing measurements of Pancharatnam's phases and fringe visibilities that closely fit the theoretical predictions. Our approach can be easily extended to deal with mixed states and to study decoherence effects.

  6. Refractive index compensation in over-determined interferometric systems.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Čížek, Martin; Hrabina, Jan; Buchta, Zdeněk

    2012-10-19

    We present an interferometric technique based on a differential interferometry setup for measurement under atmospheric conditions. The key limiting factor in any interferometric dimensional measurement are fluctuations of the refractive index of air representing a dominating source of uncertainty when evaluated indirectly from the physical parameters of the atmosphere. Our proposal is based on the concept of an over-determined interferometric setup where a reference length is derived from a mechanical frame made from a material with a very low thermal coefficient. The technique allows one to track the variations of the refractive index of air on-line directly in the line of the measuring beam and to compensate for the fluctuations. The optical setup consists of three interferometers sharing the same beam path where two measure differentially the displacement while the third evaluates the changes in the measuring range, acting as a tracking refractometer. The principle is demonstrated in an experimental setup.

  7. Automatic aircraft landing using interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging.

    PubMed

    Soumekh, M

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an interferometric processing of an aircraft's monostatic and bistatic inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) signatures for automatic landing. The aircraft's squint angle in this ISAR imaging problem is near 90 degrees . We show that this extreme squint angle does not pose any problem for the ISAR Fourier-based (wavefront) reconstruction algorithm. In fact, the aircraft can be imaged accurately, and without any erroneous shifts in the cross-range domain, within the imposed theoretical resolution. Moreover, the algorithm is accurate enough such that one can utilize the phase of the ISAR monostatic and bistatic measurements for interferometric processing. The resultant interferometric ISAR image is used to detect undesirable rotations in the aircraft's orientation.

  8. Cloud Absorption Radiometer Autonomous Navigation System - CANS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Duncan; Gatebe, Charles; McCune, Bill; Hellwig, Dustan

    2013-01-01

    CAR (cloud absorption radiometer) acquires spatial reference data from host aircraft navigation systems. This poses various problems during CAR data reduction, including navigation data format, accuracy of position data, accuracy of airframe inertial data, and navigation data rate. Incorporating its own navigation system, which included GPS (Global Positioning System), roll axis inertia and rates, and three axis acceleration, CANS expedites data reduction and increases the accuracy of the CAR end data product. CANS provides a self-contained navigation system for the CAR, using inertial reference and GPS positional information. The intent of the software application was to correct the sensor with respect to aircraft roll in real time based upon inputs from a precision navigation sensor. In addition, the navigation information (including GPS position), attitude data, and sensor position details are all streamed to a remote system for recording and later analysis. CANS comprises a commercially available inertial navigation system with integral GPS capability (Attitude Heading Reference System AHRS) integrated into the CAR support structure and data system. The unit is attached to the bottom of the tripod support structure. The related GPS antenna is located on the P-3 radome immediately above the CAR. The AHRS unit provides a RS-232 data stream containing global position and inertial attitude and velocity data to the CAR, which is recorded concurrently with the CAR data. This independence from aircraft navigation input provides for position and inertial state data that accounts for very small changes in aircraft attitude and position, sensed at the CAR location as opposed to aircraft state sensors typically installed close to the aircraft center of gravity. More accurate positional data enables quicker CAR data reduction with better resolution. The CANS software operates in two modes: initialization/calibration and operational. In the initialization/calibration mode

  9. Dynamics of laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmanov, Malik

    2000-11-01

    Dynamics of fields and mirrors in the new laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors is described. The dynamics of fields is formulated in terms of difference equations, which take into account the large delay due to the light transit time in the interferometer arm cavities. Solutions of these field equations are found in both transient and steady-state regimes. The solutions for fields in the transient regime can be used for the measurement of the parameters of Fabry-Perot cavities. The solutions for fields in the steady-state regime can be used for the analysis of noise performance of Fabry-Perot cavities. The dynamics of the mirrors is described in terms of two normal coordinates: the cavity length and its center of mass. Such dynamics is strongly affected by the radiation pressure of light circulating in the cavity. The forces of radiation pressure are nonlinear and nonconservative. These two effects introduce instabilities and give rise to a violation of conservation of energy for the motion of the suspended mirrors. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations of the dynamics are done with applications to the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). The dynamics of signal recycling and power recycling interferometers is analyzed using the field equations. The response of the interferometers to the input laser field and motion of its mirrors is calculated. Several basic transfer functions are found. These correspond to either a single or a nested cavity. A nested cavity appears either in the dynamics of the differential mode in signal recycling interferometers or in the dynamics of the common mode of power recycling interferometers. The poles of transfer functions of these nested cavities are found. The response of the interferometers to gravitational waves is described: the analysis is done in the rest frame of a local observer which is a natural coordinate system of the detector. This response is given by the interferometer

  10. Compression of interferometric radio-astronomical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, A. R.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The volume of radio-astronomical data is a considerable burden in the processing and storing of radio observations that have high time and frequency resolutions and large bandwidths. For future telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the data volume will be even larger. Aims: Lossy compression of interferometric radio-astronomical data is considered to reduce the volume of visibility data and to speed up processing. Methods: A new compression technique named "Dysco" is introduced that consists of two steps: a normalization step, in which grouped visibilities are normalized to have a similar distribution; and a quantization and encoding step, which rounds values to a given quantization scheme using a dithering scheme. Several non-linear quantization schemes are tested and combined with different methods for normalizing the data. Four data sets with observations from the LOFAR and MWA telescopes are processed with different processing strategies and different combinations of normalization and quantization. The effects of compression are measured in image plane. Results: The noise added by the lossy compression technique acts similarly to normal system noise. The accuracy of Dysco is depending on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the data: noisy data can be compressed with a smaller loss of image quality. Data with typical correlator time and frequency resolutions can be compressed by a factor of 6.4 for LOFAR and 5.3 for MWA observations with less than 1% added system noise. An implementation of the compression technique is released that provides a Casacore storage manager and allows transparent encoding and decoding. Encoding and decoding is faster than the read/write speed of typical disks. Conclusions: The technique can be used for LOFAR and MWA to reduce the archival space requirements for storing observed data. Data from SKA-low will likely be compressible by the same amount as LOFAR. The same technique can be used to compress data from

  11. Interferometric fiber optic sensors for biomedical applications of optoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Lamela, Horacio; Gallego, Daniel; Gutierrez, Rebeca; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    We present a non-metallic interferometric silica optical fiber ultrasonic wideband sensor for optoacoustic imaging applications. The ultrasonic sensitivity of this sensor has been characterized over the frequency range from 1 to 10 MHz. A comparative analysis has been carried out between this sensor and an array of piezoelectric transducers using optoacoustic signals generated from an optical absorbent embedded in a tissue mimicking phantom. Also, a two dimensional reconstructed image of the phantom using the fiber interferometric sensor is presented and compared to the image obtained using the Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-64B. The feasibility of our fiber optic based sensor for wideband ultrasonic detection is demonstrated.

  12. Adaptive interferometric null testing for unknown freeform optics metrology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Choi, Heejoo; Zhao, Wenchuan; Graves, Logan R; Kim, Dae Wook

    2016-12-01

    We report an adaptive interferometric null testing method for overcoming the dynamic range limitations of conventional null testing approaches during unknown freeform optics metrology or optics manufacturing processes that require not-yet-completed surface measurements to guide the next fabrication process. In the presented adaptive method, a deformable mirror functions as an adaptable null component for an unknown optical surface. The optimal deformable mirror's shape is determined by the stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm and controlled by a deflectometry system. An adaptive interferometric null testing setup was constructed, and its metrology data successfully demonstrated superb adaptive capability in measuring an unknown surface.

  13. Terahertz interferometric synthetic aperture tomography for confocal imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Heimbeck, M S; Marks, D L; Brady, D; Everitt, H O

    2012-04-15

    Terahertz (THz) interferometric synthetic aperture tomography (TISAT) for confocal imaging within extended objects is demonstrated by combining attributes of synthetic aperture radar and optical coherence tomography. Algorithms recently devised for interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy are adapted to account for the diffraction-and defocusing-induced spatially varying THz beam width characteristic of narrow depth of focus, high-resolution confocal imaging. A frequency-swept two-dimensional TISAT confocal imaging instrument rapidly achieves in-focus, diffraction-limited resolution over a depth 12 times larger than the instrument's depth of focus in a manner that may be easily extended to three dimensions and greater depths.

  14. PP and PS interferometric images of near-seafloor sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    I present interferometric processing examples from an ocean-bottom cable OBC dataset collected at a water depth of 800 m in the Gulf of Mexico. Virtual source and receiver gathers created through cross-correlation of full wavefields show clear PP reflections and PS conversions from near-seafloor layers of interest. Virtual gathers from wavefield-separated data show improved PP and PS arrivals. PP and PS brute stacks from the wavefield-separated data compare favorably with images from a non-interferometric processing flow. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  15. Validation of Orthorectified Interferometric Radar Imagery and Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith Charles M.

    2004-01-01

    This work was performed under NASA's Verification and Validation (V&V) Program as an independent check of data supplied by EarthWatch, Incorporated, through the Earth Science Enterprise Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) Program. This document serves as the basis of reporting results associated with validation of orthorectified interferometric interferometric radar imagery and digital elevation models (DEM). This validation covers all datasets provided under the first campaign (Central America & Virginia Beach) plus three earlier missions (Indonesia, Red River: and Denver) for a total of 13 missions.

  16. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  17. SEM signal emulation for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Evgenii; Muelders, Thomas; Klostermann, Ulrich; Gao, Weimin; Braylovska, Mariya

    2016-03-01

    The application of accurate and predictive physical resist simulation is seen as one important use model for fast and efficient exploration of new patterning technology options, especially if fully qualified OPC models are not yet available at an early pre-production stage. The methodology of using a top-down CD-SEM metrology to extract the 3D resist profile information, such as the critical dimension (CD) at various resist heights, has to be associated with a series of presumptions which may introduce such small, but systematic CD errors. Ideally, the metrology effects should be carefully minimized during measurement process, or if possible be taken into account through proper metrology modeling. In this paper we discuss the application of a fast SEM signal emulation describing the SEM image formation. The algorithm is applied to simulated resist 3D profiles and produces emulated SEM image results for 1D and 2D patterns. It allows estimating resist simulation quality by comparing CDs which were extracted from the emulated and from the measured SEM images. Moreover, SEM emulation is applied for resist model calibration to capture subtle error signatures through dose and defocus. Finally, it should be noted that our SEM emulation methodology is based on the approximation of physical phenomena which are taking place in real SEM image formation. This approximation allows achieving better speed performance compared to a fully physical model.

  18. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  19. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  20. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) User's Manual: Windows Version 4.0

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, Afshin M.; Wilcox, Stephen M.

    2016-02-29

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating broadband atmospheric longwave and solar shortwave radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer's response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument's responsivity. This is a user's manual and guide to the RCC software.

  1. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  2. Inflatable Antenna Microwave Radiometer for Soil Moisture Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Schroeder, Lyle C.; Harrington, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave measurements of soil moisture are not being obtained at the required spatial Earth resolution with current technology. Recently, new novel designs for lightweight reflector systems have been developed using deployable inflatable antenna structures which could enable lightweight real-aperture radiometers. In consideration of this, a study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to determine the feasibility of developing a microwave radiometer system using inflatable reflector antenna technology to obtain high spatial resolution radiometric measurements of soil moisture from low Earth orbit and which could be used with a small and cost effective launch vehicle. The required high resolution with reasonable swath width coupled with the L-band measurement frequency for soil moisture dictated the use of a large (30 meter class) real aperture antenna in conjunction with a pushbroom antenna beam configuration and noise-injection type radiometer designs at 1.4 and 4.3 GHz to produce a 370 kilometer cross-track swath with a 10 kilometer resolution that could be packaged for launch with a Titan 2 class vehicle. This study includes design of the inflatable structure, control analysis, structural and thermal analysis, antenna and feed design, radiometer design, payload packaging, orbital analysis, and electromagnetic losses in the thin membrane inflatable materials.

  3. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  4. A 94/183 GHz multichannel radiometer for Convair flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliano, J. A.; Stratigos, J. A.; Forsythe, R. E.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A multichannel 94/183 GHz radiometer was designed, built, and installed on the NASA Convair 990 research aircraft to take data for hurricane penetration flights, SEASAT-A underflights for measuring rain and water vapor, and Nimbus-G underflights for new sea ice signatures and sea surface temperature data (94 GHz only). The radiometer utilized IF frequencies of 1, 5, and 8.75 GHz about the peak of the atmospheric water vapor absorption line, centered at 183.3 GHz, to gather data needed to determine the shape of the water molecule line. Another portion of the radiometer operated at 94 GHz and obtained data on the sea brightness temperature, sea ice signatures, and on areas of rain near the ocean surface. The radiometer used a multiple lens antenna/temperature calibration technique using 3 lenses and corrugated feed horns at 94 GHz and 183 GHz. Alignment of the feed beams at 94 GHz and 183 GHz was accomplished using a 45 deg oriented reflecting surface which permitted simultaneous viewing of the feeds on alternate cycles of the chopping intervals.

  5. Calibration plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.

    2013-10-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on ESA's Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21-year datasets of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of <0.3K traced to international standards. To achieve these low uncertainties requires an end to end instrument calibration strategy that includes pre-launch calibration at subsystem and instrument level, on-board calibration systems and sustained post launch activities. The authors describe the preparations for the pre-launch calibration activities including the spectral response, instrument level alignment tests, solar and infrared radiometric calibration. A purpose built calibration rig has been designed and built at RAL space that will accommodate the SLSTR instrument, infrared calibration sources and alignment equipment. The calibration rig has been commissioned and results of these tests will be presented. Finally the authors will present the planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions, and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  6. Topographic Signatures in Aquarius Radiometer/Scatterometer Response: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, C.; LeVine, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of topography on remote sensing at L-band is examined using the co-located Aquarius radiometer and scatterometer observations over land. A correlation with slope standard deviation is demonstrated for both the radiometer and scatterometer at topographic scales. Although the goal of Aquarius is remote sensing of sea surface salinity, the radiometer and scatterometer are on continuously and collect data for remote sensing research over land. Research is reported here using the data over land to determine if topography could have impact on the passive remote sensing at L-band. In this study, we report observations from two study regions: North Africa between 15 deg and 30 deg Northern latitudes and Australia less the Tasmania Island. Common to these two regions are the semi-arid climate and low population density; both favorable conditions to isolate the effect of topography from other sources of scatter and emission such as vegetation and urban areas. Over these study regions, topographic scale slopes within each Aquarius pixel are computed and their standard deviations are compared with Aquarius scatterometer and radiometer observations over a 36 day period between days 275 and 311 of 2011.

  7. High Frequency PIN-Diode Switches for Radiometer Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Reising, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Internally calibrated radiometers are needed for ocean topography and other missions. Typically internal calibration is achieved with Dicke switching as one of the techniques. We have developed high frequency single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) that can be easily integrated into Dicke switched radiometers that utilize microstrip technology. In particular, the switches we developed can be used for a radiometer such as the one proposed for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Satellite Mission whose three channels at 92, 130, and 166 GHz would allow for wet-tropospheric path delay correction near coastal zones and over land. This feat is not possible with the current Jason-class radiometers due to their lower frequency signal measurement and thus lower resolution. The MMIC chips were fabricated at NGST using their InP PIN diode process and measured at JPL using high frequency test equipment. Measurement and simulation results will be presented.

  8. Radiometer calibration procedure and beacon attenuation estimation reference level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objectives are to compare radiometer attenuation with beacon attenuation and to compare sky temperature estimates with calculations using simultaneous meteorological data. Secondary objectives are: (1) noise diode and reference load measurements and (2) to adjust for outside temperature and component temperature changes.

  9. The MASCOT Radiometer MARA for the Hayabusa 2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grott, M.; Knollenberg, J.; Hänschke, F.; Helberg, J.; Kührt, E.

    2012-09-01

    The MASCOT radiometer MARA is a multispectral instrument to radiatively measure the surface temperature of the Hayabusa 2 target asteroid 1999JU3. MARA uses 5 bandpass and one longpass channel to determine the surface temperature, emissivity, and thermal inertia. In addition, surface mineralogy can be constrained.

  10. High resolution soil moisture radiometer. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T. T.

    1978-01-01

    An electrically scanned pushbroom phased antenna array is described for a microwave radiometer which can provide agriculturally meaningful measurements of soil moisture. The antenna size of 100 meters at 1400 MHz or 230 meters at 611 MHz requires several shuttle launches and orbital assembly. Problems inherent to the size of the structure and specific instrument problems are discussed as well as the preliminary design.

  11. Global measurements of air pollution from satellites. [employing radiometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. L.; Bartle, E. R.; Griggs, M.; Hall, G. D.; Hesketh, W. D.; Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reichle, H.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual design of an FOV nadir radiometer was examined for its applicability to monitoring the radiation process in the atmosphere as it relates to aerosol behavior. The instrument employs a gas filter correlation technique and is suitable for transportation onboard satellite.

  12. Radio-frequency interference mitigating hyperspectral L-band radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toose, Peter; Roy, Alexandre; Solheim, Frederick; Derksen, Chris; Watts, Tom; Royer, Alain; Walker, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Radio-frequency interference (RFI) can significantly contaminate the measured radiometric signal of current spaceborne L-band passive microwave radiometers. These spaceborne radiometers operate within the protected passive remote sensing and radio-astronomy frequency allocation of 1400-1427 MHz but nonetheless are still subjected to frequent RFI intrusions. We present a unique surface-based and airborne hyperspectral 385 channel, dual polarization, L-band Fourier transform, RFI-detecting radiometer designed with a frequency range from 1400 through ≈ 1550 MHz. The extended frequency range was intended to increase the likelihood of detecting adjacent RFI-free channels to increase the signal, and therefore the thermal resolution, of the radiometer instrument. The external instrument calibration uses three targets (sky, ambient, and warm), and validation from independent stability measurements shows a mean absolute error (MAE) of 1.0 K for ambient and warm targets and 1.5 K for sky. A simple but effective RFI removal method which exploits the large number of frequency channels is also described. This method separates the desired thermal emission from RFI intrusions and was evaluated with synthetic microwave spectra generated using a Monte Carlo approach and validated with surface-based and airborne experimental measurements.

  13. ENVISAT-1 Microwave Radiometer (MWR): validation campaign achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, Ornella; L'Abbate, Michele; Svara, Carlo; Caltagirone, Francesco; Guijarro, J.

    1998-12-01

    Alenia Aerospazio Remote Sensing Division started in 1986 the study of microwave radiometers under Italian Space Agency fundings, and since 1989 the definition and development of radiometric systems under European Space Agency (ESA) contracts. In particular the Multifrequency Imaging Microwave Radiometer (MIMR) and the ENVISAT Microwave Radiometer (MWR) were both developed by the European Industry, with Alenia Aerospazio as Prime Contractor. MWR is an instrument designed and developed as part of the Envisat-1 satellite scientific payload, with Alenia Spazio engaged in the phase C-D as instrument Prime Contractor, leading an industrial consortium of European and American companies. The Flight Model of the Instrument has been delivered to ESA at the end of July 1997, after completion of test and calibration activities. Given the MWR in-flight calibration concept, a specific pre-flight calibration and characterization activity was performed to define a radiometer mathematical model and a relevant ground characterization database including all model coefficients. The model and its database will be used by on-ground processing during instrument in-flight operation to retrieve the antenna-measured temperature. Standing its complexity and iterative measurement concept, the pre-flight characterization and calibration of the instrument is the key aspect of its development phase. Within this paper the key instrument design topics are summarized, and after a summary overview of the overall flight model qualification campaign, emphasis will be on the pre-flight calibration and characterization activities and radiometric performance achievements among several test phases.

  14. A cavity radiometer for Earth albedo measurement, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiometric measurements of the directional albedo of the Earth requires a detector with a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns, a response time of about 2 seconds, a sensitivity of the order of 0.02 mw/sq cm, and a measurement uncertainty of less than 5 percent. Absolute cavity radiometers easily meet the spectral response and accuracy requirements for Earth albedo measurements, but the radiometers available today lack the necessary sensitivity and response time. The specific innovations addressed were the development of a very low thermal mass cavity and printed/deposited thermocouple sensing elements which were incorporated into the radiometer design to produce a sensitive, fast response, absolute radiometer. The cavity is applicable to the measurement of the reflected and radiated fluxes from the Earth surface and lower atmosphere from low Earth orbit satellites. The effort consisted of requirements and thermal analysis; design, construction, and test of prototype elements of the black cavity and sensor elements to show proof-of-concept. The results obtained indicate that a black body cavity sensor that has inherently a flat response from 0.2 to 50 microns can be produced which has a sensitivity of at least 0.02 mw/sq cm per micro volt ouput and with a time constant of less than two seconds. Additional work is required to develop the required thermopile.

  15. Mapping the sky with the COBE differential microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, M. A.; Gulkis, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument on COBE is designed to determine the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background by providing all-sky maps of the diffuse sky brightness at microwave frequencies. The principal intent of this lecture is to show how these maps are generated from differential measurements.

  16. A New Way to Demonstrate the Radiometer as a Heat Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladkouski, V. I.; Pinchuk, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    While the radiometer is readily available as a toy, A. E. Woodruff notes that it is also a very useful tool to help us understand how to resolve certain scientific problems. Many physicists think they know how the radiometer works, but only a few actually understand it. Here we present a demonstration that shows that a radiometer can be thought of…

  17. Radiometer effect in the μSCOPE space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Comandi, G. L.; Toncelli, R.; Polacco, E.

    2002-12-01

    Space experiments to test the Equivalence Principle (EP) are affected by a systematic radiometer effect having the same signature as the target signal. In [PhRvD 63 (2001) 101101(R)] we have investigated this effect for the three proposed experiments currently under study by space agencies: μSCOPE, STEP and GG, setting the requirements to be met—on temperature gradients at the level of the test masses—for each experiment to reach its goal. We have now re-examined the radiometer effect in the case of μSCOPE and carried out a quantitative comparative analysis, on this issue, with the proposed heliocentric LISA mission for the detection of gravity waves. We find that, even assuming that the μSCOPE spacecraft and payload be built to meet all the challenging requirements of LISA, temperature gradients along its test masses would still make the radiometer effect larger than the target signal of an EP violation because of flying in the low geocentric orbit required for EP testing. We find no way to separate with certainty the radiometer systematic disturbance from the signal. μSCOPE is designed to fly a second accelerometer whose test masses have the same composition, in order to separate out systematic effects which—not being composition dependent like the signal—must be detected by both accelerometers. We point out that this accelerometer is in fact insensitive to the radiometer effect, just as it is to an EP violation signal, and therefore even having it onboard will not allow this disturbance to be separated out. μSCOPE is under construction and it is scheduled to fly in 2004. If it will detect a signal to the expected level, it will be impossible to establish with certainty whether it is due to the well known classical radiometer effect or else to a violation of the equivalence principle—which would invalidate General Relativity. The option to increase the rotation speed of the spacecraft (now set at about 10 -3 Hz) so as to average out the temperature

  18. 2D discrete Fourier transform on sliding windows.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-03-01

    Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is the most widely used method for determining the frequency spectra of digital signals. In this paper, a 2D sliding DFT (2D SDFT) algorithm is proposed for fast implementation of the DFT on 2D sliding windows. The proposed 2D SDFT algorithm directly computes the DFT bins of the current window using the precalculated bins of the previous window. Since the proposed algorithm is designed to accelerate the sliding transform process of a 2D input signal, it can be directly applied to computer vision and image processing applications. The theoretical analysis shows that the computational requirement of the proposed 2D SDFT algorithm is the lowest among existing 2D DFT algorithms. Moreover, the output of the 2D SDFT is mathematically equivalent to that of the traditional DFT at all pixel positions.

  19. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  20. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculation assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  1. Design and Development of the SMAP Microwave Radiometer Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Medeiros, James J.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Brambora, Clifford K.; Estep, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer will measure land surface brightness temperature at L-band (1413 MHz) in the presence of radio frequency interference (RFI) for soil moisture remote sensing. The radiometer design was driven by the requirements to incorporate internal calibration, to operate synchronously with the SMAP radar, and to mitigate the deleterious effects of RFI. The system design includes a highly linear super-heterodyne microwave receiver with internal reference loads and noise sources for calibration and an innovative digital signal processor and detection system. The front-end comprises a coaxial cable-based feed network, with a pair of diplexers and a coupled noise source, and radiometer front-end (RFE) box. Internal calibration is provided by reference switches and a common noise source inside the RFE. The RF back-end (RBE) downconverts the 1413 MHz channel to an intermediate frequency (IF) of 120 MHz. The IF signals are then sampled and quantized by high-speed analog-to-digital converters in the radiometer digital electronics (RDE) box. The RBE local oscillator and RDE sampling clocks are phase-locked to a common reference to ensure coherency between the signals. The RDE performs additional filtering, sub-band channelization, cross-correlation for measuring third and fourth Stokes parameters, and detection and integration of the first four raw moments of the signals. These data are packetized and sent to the ground for calibration and further processing. Here we discuss the novel features of the radiometer hardware particularly those influenced by the need to mitigate RFI.

  2. A Climate Record of Enhanced Spatial Resolution Radiometer Data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paget, A. C.; Long, D. G.; Brodzik, M.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite radiometers, such SMMR, SSM/I, SSMIS, and AMSR, provide a multi-decadal time series of observations of the globe to support studies of climate change. Unfortunately, spatial resolution and sampling characteristics differ between sensors, which complicate compiling a single climate record. Resolution concerns can be ameliorated by reconstructing radiometer brightness temperature measurement (Tb) data onto daily-averaged compatible grids. We consider and contrast two widely used methods for image reconstruction: a radiometer version of the scatterometer image reconstruction (SIR) algorithm and Backus-Gilbert (BG). Both require detailed information about the spatial response function (antenna gain pattern) and the sampling geometry. We discuss considerations for an optimum gridding scheme based on the EASE-Grid 2.0 map projection. The EASE-Grid 2.0 simplifies the application of the Tb images in derived products since the reconstruction for each radiometer channel is implement on the same grid. This has the effect of optimally interpolating low-resolution measurements to locations of the highest resolution measurements. By employing reconstruction techniques rather than 'drop in the bucket' (dib) gridding, the effective resolution of the images is spatially enhanced compared to dib images, at the expense of additional computation required for the reconstruction processing. We evaluate the sensitivity of the radiometric accuracy of the resulting Tb images to uncertainties in the antenna gain pattern as well as variations in local-time-of-day. We briefly consider a number of applications of reconstructed Tb images. As part of the NASA-MEASUREs project 'An improved, enhanced-resolution, gridded passive microwave ESDR for monitoring cryospheric and hydrologic time series' we are processing all available satellite radiometer data to generate a consistently calibrated and processed time series of gridded images spanning from the 1970's to the present.

  3. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  4. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  5. NIKE2D96. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.; Engelmann, B.; Halquist, J.O.

    1992-01-24

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  6. Corrections for Wavelength Variations in Precision Interferometric Displacement Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack; Phillips, Steven D.; Mandolfo, Gary A.

    1996-01-01

    Precision interferometric displacement measurements require deadpath corrections to account for variations in wavelength during the course of the measurement. This paper discusses common errors in applying deadpath corrections and describes the correction necessary to fully account for variations in wavelength. PMID:27805085

  7. Interferometric field of view measurements at the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Christian A.; Le Bouquin, Jean-Baptiste; Merand, Antoine

    2016-07-01

    In August 2014 we performed technical observations at the VLTI with the AMBER and PIONIER beam combiners to measure the interferometric field of view (FOV). As targets we included binaries with component separations between 100 and 300 mas, for which orbits and/or interferometric speckle measurements are available from the Washington Double Star databases or from the literature. The analysis included effects such as bandwidth and time smearing of the interferograms, and photometric attenuation due to the seeing and image quality based on a new formalism of the ESO Exposure Time Calculators. We also consulted the literature for results of interferometric surveys such as the SMASH survey.1 to estimate the effective FOV for these instruments. Based on our analysis, we conclude that emission outside a FOV diameter of 160 mas will be significantly suppressed if not completely invisible. These results provide important information as to the size of the source structure to be included when modeling interferometric data obtained with these instruments.

  8. Extrinsic Michelson interferometric fibre optic sensor with bend insensitive downlead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, D. P.; Carolan, T. A.; Barton, J. S.; Jones, J. D. C.

    1993-04-01

    A novel optical arrangement is described for an interferometric optical fibre sensor of the extrinsic type. Based on a Michelson interferometer, it combines a bend insensitive downlead with the availability of antiphase outputs without insertion loss, and provides isolation of the source.

  9. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  10. Interferometric observations of large biologically interesting interstellar and cometary molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Lewis E.

    2006-01-01

    Interferometric observations of high-mass regions in interstellar molecular clouds have revealed hot molecular cores that have substantial column densities of large, partly hydrogen-saturated molecules. Many of these molecules are of interest to biology and thus are labeled “biomolecules.” Because the clouds containing these molecules provide the material for star formation, they may provide insight into presolar nebular chemistry, and the biomolecules may provide information about the potential of the associated interstellar chemistry for seeding newly formed planets with prebiotic organic chemistry. In this overview, events are outlined that led to the current interferometric array observations. Clues that connect this interstellar hot core chemistry to the solar system can be found in the cometary detection of methyl formate and the interferometric maps of cometary methanol. Major obstacles to understanding hot core chemistry remain because chemical models are not well developed and interferometric observations have not been very sensitive. Differentiation in the molecular isomers glycolaldehdye, methyl formate, and acetic acid has been observed, but not explained. The extended source structure for certain sugars, aldehydes, and alcohols may require nonthermal formation mechanisms such as shock heating of grains. Major advances in understanding the formation chemistry of hot core species can come from observations with the next generation of sensitive, high-resolution arrays. PMID:16894168

  11. (abstract) Studies of Interferometric Penetration into Vegetation Canopies using Multifrequency Interferometry Data at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Truhafft, Bob; van Zyl, Jakob; Rosen, Paul; Werner, Charles; Madsen, Sren; Chapin, Elaine

    1997-01-01

    Radar interferometric observations both from spaceborne and airborne platforms have been used to generate accurate topographic maps, measure milimeter level displacements from earthquakes and volcanoes, and for making land cover classification and land cover change maps. Interferometric observations have two basic measurements, interferometric phase, which depends upon the path difference between the two antennas and the correlation. One of the key questions concerning interferometric observations of vegetated regions is where in the canopy does the interferometric phase measure the height. Results for two methods of extracting tree heights and other vegetation parameters based upon the amount of volumetric decorrelation will be presented.

  12. The Correlation Radiometer - A New Application in MM-Wave Total Power Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Tanner, Alan; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a 180 GHz correlation radiometer suitable for remote sensing. The radiometer provides continuous comparisons between a the observed signal and a reference load to provide stable radiometric baselines. The radiometer was assembled and tested using parts from the GeoSTAR-II instrument and is fully compatible with operation in a synthetic aperture radiometer or as a standalone technology for use in microwave sounding and imaging. This new radiometer was tested over several days easily demonstrating the required 6 hour stability requirement for observations of mean brightness temperature for a geostationary instrument.

  13. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) L-Band Microwave Radiometer Post-Launch Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Misra, Sidharth; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Hudson, Derek; Le Vine, David M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Yueh, Simon H.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM/ 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude. Since April, 2015, the radiometer is under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibration methods including the SMAP L1B TA2TB (from Antenna Temperature (TA) to the Earth's surface Brightness Temperature (TB)) algorithm and TA forward models are outlined, and validation approaches to calibration stability/quality are described in this paper including future work. Results show that the current radiometer L1B data satisfies its requirements.

  14. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, Aron; Wilcox, Stephen; Stoffel, Thomas

    2015-12-23

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  15. An evaluation of water vapor radiometer data for calibration of the wet path delay in very long baseline interferometry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, C. E.; Himwich, W. E.; Clark, T. A.; Ma, C.

    1991-01-01

    The internal consistency of the baseline-length measurements derived from analysis of several independent VLBI experiments is an estimate of the measurement precision. The paper investigates whether the inclusion of water vapor radiometer (WVR) data as an absolute calibration of the propagation delay due to water vapor improves the precision of VLBI baseline-length measurements. The paper analyzes 28 International Radio Interferometric Surveying runs between June 1988 and January 1989; WVR measurements were made during each session. The addition of WVR data decreased the scatter of the length measurements of the baselines by 5-10 percent. The observed reduction in the scatter of the baseline lengths is less than what is expected from the behavior of the formal errors, which suggest that the baseline-length measurement precision should improve 10-20 percent if WVR data are included in the analysis. The discrepancy between the formal errors and the baseline-length results can be explained as the consequence of systematic errors in the dry-mapping function parameters, instrumental biases in the WVR and the barometer, or both.

  16. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  17. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  18. Precipitation from the GPM Microwave Imager and Constellation Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Randel, David; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Kulie, Mark; Wang, Nai-Yu

    2014-05-01

    Satellite precipitation retrievals from microwave sensors are fundamentally underconstrained requiring either implicit or explicit a-priori information to constrain solutions. The radiometer algorithm designed for the GPM core and constellation satellites makes this a-priori information explicit in the form of a database of possible rain structures from the GPM core satellite and a Bayesian retrieval scheme. The a-priori database will eventually come from the GPM core satellite's combined radar/radiometer retrieval algorithm. That product is physically constrained to ensure radiometric consistency between the radars and radiometers and is thus ideally suited to create the a-priori databases for all radiometers in the GPM constellation. Until a robust product exists, however, the a-priori databases are being generated from the combination of existing sources over land and oceans. Over oceans, the Day-1 GPM radiometer algorithm uses the TRMM PR/TMI physically derived hydrometer profiles that are available from the tropics through sea surface temperatures of approximately 285K. For colder sea surface temperatures, the existing profiles are used with lower hydrometeor layers removed to correspond to colder conditions. While not ideal, the results appear to be reasonable placeholders until the full GPM database can be constructed. It is more difficult to construct physically consistent profiles over land due to ambiguities in surface emissivities as well as details of the ice scattering that dominates brightness temperature signatures over land. Over land, the a-priori databases have therefore been constructed by matching satellite overpasses to surface radar data derived from the WSR-88 network over the continental United States through the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ) initiative. Databases are generated as a function of land type (4 categories of increasing vegetation cover as well as 4 categories of increasing snow depth), land surface temperature and

  19. DESIGN OF MEDICAL RADIOMETER FRONT-END FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE.

    PubMed

    Klemetsen, O; Birkelund, Y; Jacobsen, S K; Maccarini, P F; Stauffer, P R

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of building a singleband Dicke radiometer that is inexpensive, small-sized, stable, highly sensitive, and which consists of readily available microwave components. The selected frequency band is at 3.25-3.75 GHz which provides a reasonable compromise between spatial resolution (antenna size) and sensing depth for radiometry applications in lossy tissue. Foreseen applications of the instrument are non-invasive temperature monitoring for breast cancer detection and temperature monitoring during heating. We have found off-the-shelf microwave components that are sufficiently small (< 5 mm × 5 mm) and which offer satisfactory overall sensitivity. Two different Dicke radiometers have been realized: one is a conventional design with the Dicke switch at the front-end to select either the antenna or noise reference channels for amplification. The second design places a matched pair of low noise amplifiers in front of the Dicke switch to reduce system noise figure.Numerical simulations were performed to test the design concepts before building prototype PCB front-end layouts of the radiometer. Both designs provide an overall power gain of approximately 50 dB over a 500 MHz bandwidth centered at 3.5 GHz. No stability problems were observed despite using triple-cascaded amplifier configurations to boost the thermal signals. The prototypes were tested for sensitivity after calibration in two different water baths. Experiments showed superior sensitivity (36% higher) when implementing the low noise amplifier before the Dicke switch (close to the antenna) compared to the other design with the Dicke switch in front. Radiometer performance was also tested in a multilayered phantom during alternating heating and radiometric reading. Empirical tests showed that for the configuration with Dicke switch first, the switch had to be locked in the reference position during application of microwave heating to avoid damage to the active components

  20. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  1. Phased Array Radiometer Calibration Using a Radiated Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutoch S.; Laymon, Charles A.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic beam steering capability of phased array antenna systems offer significant advantages when used in real aperture imaging radiometers. The sensitivity of such systems is limited by the ability to accurately calibrate variations in the antenna circuit characteristics. Passive antenna systems, which require mechanical rotation to scan the beam, have stable characteristics and the noise figure of the antenna can be characterized with knowledge of its physical temperature [1],[2]. Phased array antenna systems provide the ability to electronically steer the beam in any desired direction. Such antennas make use of active components (amplifiers, phase shifters) to provide electronic scanning capability while maintaining a low antenna noise figure. The gain fluctuations in the active components can be significant, resulting in substantial calibration difficulties [3]. In this paper, we introduce two novel calibration techniques that provide an end-to-end calibration of a real-aperture, phased array radiometer system. Empirical data will be shown to illustrate the performance of both methods.

  2. Linear response of an instrument entitled Sky Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Zhe; Wang, Dong; Xu, Wen-qing; Fan, Ren-jie

    2016-11-01

    In order to validate the good linear response of an instrument entitled Sky Radiometer(abbreviated to DTL-1) and check the great accuracy of radiance, the experiments which checked the DTL-1 using the large diameter integrating sphere system verified that the instrument had fine linearity and working stability. At the same time, the sky radiance in Hefei was measured, and the validity and correctness of DTL-1 were verified using fibre-optical spectrometer. The results indicated that the instrument had fine work ability, including good linear response, and could satisfy the scientific research and the actual application. However, the linear response of the instrument entitled Sky Radiometer in different region will be validated.

  3. Rotating shadowband radiometer development and analysis of spectral shortwave data

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.; Min, Q.

    1996-04-01

    Our goals in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are improved measurements of spectral shortwave radiation and improved techniques for the retrieval of climatologically sensitive parameters. The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) that was developed during the first years of the ARM program has become a workhorse at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. We have spent most of our effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had some success in calculating shortwave surface diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, we have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, we have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. The rest of the text will provide some detail regarding each of these efforts.

  4. Active radiometer for self-calibrated furnace temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, P.P.; Cohn, D.R.; Titus, C.H.; Wittle, J.K.; Surma, J.E.

    1996-11-12

    A radiometer is described with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The radiometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/submillimeter-wave receiver including a millimeter/submillimeter-wave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. 5 figs.

  5. Optical fibre-coupled cryogenic radiometer with carbon nanotube absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livigni, David J.; Tomlin, Nathan A.; Cromer, Christopher L.; Lehman, John H.

    2012-04-01

    A cryogenic radiometer was constructed for direct-substitution optical-fibre power measurements. The cavity is intended to operate at the 3 K temperature stage of a dilution refrigerator or 4.2 K stage of a liquid cryostat. The optical fibre is removable for characterization. The cavity features micromachined silicon centring rings to thermally isolate the optical fibre as well as an absorber made from micromachined silicon on which vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown. Measurements of electrical substitution, optical absorption and temperature change indicate that the radiometer is capable of measuring a power level of 10 nW with approximate responsivity of 155 nW K-1 and 1/e time constant of 13 min. An inequivalence between optical and electrical power of approximately 10% was found, but the difference was largely attributable to unaccounted losses in the optical fibre.

  6. Calibration analysis for a multi-channel infrared scanning radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, H.; Hurley, E. J.; Korb, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure for calibrating an infrared scanning spectroradiometer by a computerized parametric error analysis technique was developed. The uncertainties in the radiometric measurements of scene radiance and (for the case of a blackbody scene) temperature due to possible uncertainties in the calibration target temperature, calibration target emissivity, and instrument temperature were calculated for a range of uncertainty levels in the parameters, as well as for a gamut of scent temperatures corresponding to a given spectral channel. This technique is applicable to the radiometric calibration of any infrared radiometer. It was applied specifically to the Cloud-Top Scanning (C.T.S) Radiometer, a three-channel instrument designed for aircraftborne cloud radiance measurements in the 6.75 and 11.5 micron thermal emission spectral regions.

  7. Thermoelectric temperature control system for the pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Averill, R. D.

    1984-06-01

    A closed loop thermoelectric temperature control system is developed for stabilizing sensitive RF integrated circuits within a microwave radiometer to an accuracy of + or - 0.1 C over a range of ambient conditions from -20 C to +45 C. The dual mode (heating and cooling) control concept utilizes partial thermal isolation of the RF units from an instrument deck which is thermally controlled by thermoelectric coolers and thin film heaters. The temperature control concept is simulated with a thermal analyzer program (MITAS) which consists of 37 nodes and 61 conductors. A full scale thermal mockup is tested in the laboratory at temperatures of 0 C, 21 C, and 45 C to confirm the validity of the control concept. A flight radiometer and temperature control system is successfully flight tested on the NASA Skyvan aircraft.

  8. Thermoelectric temperature control system for the pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Averill, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A closed loop thermoelectric temperature control system is developed for stabilizing sensitive RF integrated circuits within a microwave radiometer to an accuracy of + or - 0.1 C over a range of ambient conditions from -20 C to +45 C. The dual mode (heating and cooling) control concept utilizes partial thermal isolation of the RF units from an instrument deck which is thermally controlled by thermoelectric coolers and thin film heaters. The temperature control concept is simulated with a thermal analyzer program (MITAS) which consists of 37 nodes and 61 conductors. A full scale thermal mockup is tested in the laboratory at temperatures of 0 C, 21 C, and 45 C to confirm the validity of the control concept. A flight radiometer and temperature control system is successfully flight tested on the NASA Skyvan aircraft.

  9. Solar-Reflectance-Based Calibration of Spectral Radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattrall, Christopher; Carder, Kendall L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Gordon, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    A method by which to calibrate a spectral radiometer using the sun as the illumination source is discussed. Solar-based calibrations eliminate several uncertainties associated with applying a lamp-based calibration to field measurements. The procedure requires only a calibrated reflectance panel, relatively low aerosol optical depth, and measurements of atmospheric transmittance. Further, a solar-reflectance-based calibration (SRBC), by eliminating the need for extraterrestrial irradiance spectra, reduces calibration uncertainty to approximately 2.2% across the solar-reflective spectrum, significantly reducing uncertainty in measurements used to deduce the optical properties of a system illuminated by the sun (e.g., sky radiance). The procedure is very suitable for on-site calibration of long-term field instruments, thereby reducing the logistics and costs associated with transporting a radiometer to a calibration facility.

  10. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  11. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  12. A combined radar-radiometer with variable polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument is described that provides both radar and radiometer data at the same time. The antenna and receiver are time shared for the two sensor functions. The antenna polarization can be electronically scanned at rates up to 5000 changes for both the transmit and receive signal paths. This equipment is to investigate target signatures for remote sensing applications. The function of the equipment is described and the results for observations of asphalt, grass, and gravel surfaces are presented.

  13. Analysis of Anechoic Chamber Testing of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenigstein, David; Ruf, Chris; James, Mark; Simmons, David; Miller, Timothy; Buckley, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer System (HIRAD) is a new airborne passive microwave remote sensor developed to observe hurricanes. HIRAD incorporates synthetic thinned array radiometry technology, which use Fourier synthesis to reconstruct images from an array of correlated antenna elements. The HIRAD system response to a point emitter has been measured in an anechoic chamber. With this data, a Fourier inversion image reconstruction algorithm has been developed. Performance analysis of the apparatus is presented, along with an overview of the image reconstruction algorithm

  14. Multifrequency Aperture-Synthesizing Microwave Radiometer System (MFASMR). Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, C. A.; Chang, M. U.

    1981-01-01

    Background material and a systems analysis of a multifrequency aperture - synthesizing microwave radiometer system is presented. It was found that the system does not exhibit high performance because much of the available thermal power is not used in the construction of the image and because the image that can be formed has a resolution of only ten lines. An analysis of image reconstruction is given. The system is compared with conventional aperture synthesis systems.

  15. Ozone profiles above Kiruna from two ground-based radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Raffalski, Uwe; Kivi, Rigel; Gross, Jochen; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new atmospheric ozone concentration profiles retrieved from measurements made with two ground-based millimetre-wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden. The instruments are the Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA) and the Millimeter wave Radiometer 2 (MIRA 2). The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, and they cover an altitude range of ˜ 16-54 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. The KIMRA and MIRA 2 measurements are compared to each other, to measurements from balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, and to measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. KIMRA has a correlation of 0.82, but shows a low bias, with respect to the ozonesonde data, and MIRA 2 shows a smaller magnitude low bias and a 0.98 correlation coefficient. Both radiometers are in general agreement with each other and with MLS data, showing high correlation coefficients, but there are differences between measurements that are not explained by random errors. An oscillatory bias with a peak of approximately ±1 ppmv is identified in the KIMRA ozone profiles over an altitude range of ˜ 18-35 km, and is believed to be due to baseline wave features that are present in the spectra. A time series analysis of KIMRA ozone for winters 2008-2013 shows the existence of a local wintertime minimum in the ozone profile above Kiruna. The measurements have been ongoing at Kiruna since 2002 and late 2012 for KIMRA and MIRA 2, respectively.

  16. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hodges, Gary

    1993-07-04

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  17. Color coded data obtained by JPL's Shuttle Multispectral Infrared radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Color coded data obtained from Baja California, Mexico to Texas by JPL's Shuttle Multispectral Infrared radiometer is pictured. The map shows where data was obtained on the 19th orbit of the mission. Yellow and green areas represent water. The first brown segment at left is Baja California, and the second begins at the coast of mainland Mexico and extends into Texas. The dark brown strips at the right are clouds.

  18. The DC-8 Submillimeter-Wave Cloud Ice Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven; Batelaan, Paul; Siegel, Peter; Evans, K. Franklin; Evans, Aaron; Balachandra, Balu; Gannon, Jade; Guldalian, John; Raz, Guy; Shea, James; Smith, Christopher; Thomassen, John

    2000-01-01

    Submillimeter-wave cloud ice radiometry is an innovative technique for determining the amount of ice present in cirrus clouds, measuring median crystal size, and constraining crystal shape. The radiometer described in this poster is being developed to acquire data to validate radiometric retrievals of cloud ice at submillimeter wavelengths. The goal of this effort is to develop a technique to enable spaceborne characterization of cirrus, meeting key climate modeling and NASA measurement needs.

  19. A Low-Cost, Compact, Moored Spectral Radiometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    spectral irradiance over time at prescribed depths. Data from a mooring in the Arabian Sea are presented, and clearly show the change in spectral quality...after the onset of the SW monsoon. The operation of the moored spectral radiometer (MSR) agrees closely with the data from an MER-2040, once a... data collected during a six-month deployment during the Forced Upper Ocean Dynamics Experiment in the Arabian Sea(Trask et. al., 1995), and a

  20. Development and application of an automated precision solar radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Gang-gang; Li, Xin; Zhang, Quan; Zheng, Xiao-bing; Yan, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Automated filed vicarious calibration is becoming a growing trend for satellite remote sensor, which require a solar radiometer have to automatic measure reliable data for a long time whatever the weather conditions and transfer measurement data to the user office. An automated precision solar radiometer has been developed. It is used in measuring the solar spectral irradiance received at the Earth surface. The instrument consists of 8 parallel separate silicon-photodiode-based channels with narrow band-pass filters from the visible to near-IR regions. Each channel has a 2.0° full-angle Filed of View (FOV). The detectors and filters are temperature stabilized using a Thermal Energy Converter at 30+/-0.2°. The instrument is pointed toward the sun via an auto-tracking system that actively tracks the sun within a +/-0.1°. It collects data automatically and communicates with user terminal through BDS (China's BeiDou Navigation Satellite System) while records data as a redundant in internal memory, including working state and error. The solar radiometer is automated in the sense that it requires no supervision throughout the whole process of working. It calculates start-time and stop-time every day matched with the time of sunrise and sunset, and stop working once the precipitation. Calibrated via Langley curves and simultaneous observed with CE318, the different of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is within 5%. The solar radiometer had run in all kinds of harsh weather condition in Gobi in Dunhuang and obtain the AODs nearly eight months continuously. This paper presents instrument design analysis, atmospheric optical depth retrievals as well as the experiment result.

  1. Scanning mechanism study for multi-frequency microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, I.

    1976-01-01

    Scanning mode for a microwave radiometer having large aperture antenna is determined from scientific needs by engineering tradeoffs. Two configurations of the scan drive mechanism with an integral momentum compensation are formulated for 1.OM and 1.4M diameter antennas. As the formulation is based on currently available components, it is possible to design and fabricate the formulated mechanism without new hardware development. A preliminary specification for major components of formulated drives is also included in the report.

  2. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Muller, R. A.; Smoot, G. F.; Tyson, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A 33-GHz airborne radiometer system has been developed to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 deg apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of plus or minus 1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 deg, reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, Calif.

  3. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, S. M.; Woods, S. I.; Jung, T. M.; Carter, A. C.; Datla, R. U.

    2014-07-15

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/√(Hz) for the measured experimental parameters.

  4. Remote sensing of soil moisture with microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.; Wilheit, T.; Webster, W., Jr.; Gloerson, P.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented that were derived from measurements made by microwave radiometers during the March 1972 and February 1973 flights of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Convair-9900 aircraft over agricultural test sites in the southwestern part of United States. The purpose of the missions was to study the use of microwave radiometers for the remote sensing of soil moisture. The microwave radiometers covered the 0.8- to 21-cm wavelength range. The results show a good linear correlation between the observed microwave brightness temperature and moisture content of the 0- to 1-cm layer of the soil. The results at the largest wavelength (21 cm) show the greatest sensitivity to soil moisture variations and indicate the possibility of sensing these variations through a vegetative canopy. The effect of soil texture on the emission from the soil was also studied and it was found that this effect can be compensated for by expressing soil moisture as a percent of field capacity for the soil. The results were compared with calculations based on a radiative transfer model for layered dielectrics and the agreement is very good at the longer wavelengths. At the shorter wavelengths, surface roughness effects are larger and the agreement becomes poorer.

  5. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation.

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, M V; Muller, R A; Smoot, G F; Tyson, J A

    1978-04-01

    We have developed a 33-GHz airborne radiometer system to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 degrees apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of +/-1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 degrees , reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, CA.

  6. A millimeter-wave radiometer for detecting microbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a millimeter-wave radiometer for the detection of wind shear from airborne platforms or at airport terminals. This proposed instrument will operate near the group of atmospheric oxygen absorptions centered near 60 GHz, which it will use to sense temperature from a distance. The instrument will use two channels to provide two different temperature measurements, providing the basis for solution of two equations in two unknowns, which are range to the wind shear plume and its temperature. A third channel will measure ambient atmospheric temperature. Depending on the temperature difference between the wind-shear plume and ambient, the standard deviation of range measurement accuracy is expected to be about 1 km at 5 km range, while the temperature measurement standard deviation will be about one-fourth the temperature difference between plume and ambient at this range. The instrument is expected to perform usefully at ranges up to 10 km, giving adequate warning of the presence of wind shear even for high performance jet aircraft. Other atmospheric hazards which might be detected by this radiometer include aircraft wakes and vortices, clear-air turbulence, and wind rotors, although the latter two phenomena would be detected by an airborne version of the instrument. A separate radiometer channel will be provided in the proposed instrument to detect aircraft wakes and vortices based on perturbation of the spectrum of microscopic atmospheric temperature fluctuations caused by the passage of large aircraft.

  7. Examples of recent ground based L-band radiometer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwank, Mike; Voelksch, I.; Maetzler, Ch.; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Kerr, Y. H.; Antolin, M. C.; Coll, A.; Millan-Scheiding, C.; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto

    L-band (1 -2 GHz) microwave radiometry is a remote sensing technique to monitor soil mois-ture over land surfaces. The European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) radiometer mission aims at providing global maps of soil moisture, with accuracy bet-ter than 0.04 m3 m-3 every 3 days, with a spatial resolution of approximately 40 km. Monitoring the large scale moisture dynamics at the boundary between the deep bulk soil and the atmo-sphere provides essential information both for terrestrial and atmospheric modellers. Perform-ing ground based radiometer campaigns before the mission launch, during the commissioning phase and during the operative SMOS mission is important for validating the satellite data and for the further improvement of the used radiative transfer models. This presentation starts with an outline of the basic concepts behind remote moisture retrieval from passive L-band radiation. Then the results from a selection of ground based microwave campaigns performed ü with the ELBARA radiometer and its successor models (JULBARA, ELBARAII) are pre-sented. Furthermore, some of the most important technical features, which were implemented in ELBARAII as the result of the experiences made with the forerunner, are outlined.

  8. Microwave radiometer observations of soil moisture in HAPEX-SAHEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmugge, Thomas J.; Chanzy, Andre; Kerr, Yann H.; van Oevelen, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Water stored in the soil serves as the reservoir for the evapotranspiration process, thus the interest in trying to map its spatial and temporal variations in experiments studying the soil- plant-atmosphere interactions at the GCM grid scale. During the 8 week intensive observation period (IOP) of HAPEX-Sahel (Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in the Sahel), this was done with two airborne microwave radiometer systems. The five frequency (5 to 90 GHz) PORTOS radiometer on the French ARAT aircraft and the single frequency (1.42 GHz) multibeam pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR) on the NASA C-130 were used. These aircraft measurements were supported by ground based observations at the central sites and, because of several rains during the IOP, covered a good range of soil wetness conditions that existed. The PBMR and the 5.05 GHz PORTOS channel in H polarization show a large dynamic range of TB on each day and between different days in response to variations in rainfall and drying conditions ranging from low TBs of 210 to 220 K for the wettest conditions to values of 280 to 290 K for the driest.

  9. Source analysis of spaceborne microwave radiometer interference over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Li; Zhang, Sibo

    2016-03-01

    Satellite microwave thermal emissions mixed with signals from active sensors are referred to as radiofrequency interference (RFI). Based on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) observations from June 1 to 16, 2011, RFI over Europe was identified and analyzed using the modified principal component analysis algorithm in this paper. The X band AMSR-E measurements in England and Italy are mostly affected by the stable, persistent, active microwave transmitters on the surface, while the RFI source of other European countries is the interference of the reflected geostationary TV satellite downlink signals to the measurements of spaceborne microwave radiometers. The locations and intensities of the RFI induced by the geostationary TV and communication satellites changed with time within the observed period. The observations of spaceborne microwave radiometers in ascending portions of orbits are usually interfered with over European land, while no RFI was detected in descending passes. The RFI locations and intensities from the reflection of downlink radiation are highly dependent upon the relative geometry between the geostationary satellite and the measuring passive sensor. Only these fields of view of a spaceborne instrument whose scan azimuths are close to the azimuth relative to the geostationary satellite are likely to be affected by RFI.

  10. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  11. Two-wavelength full-field heterodyne interferometric profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hung-Chih; Chen, Yen-Liang; Jian, Zhi-Chen; Wu, Wang-Tsung; Su, Der-Chin

    2009-02-01

    An alternative full-field interferometric profilometry is proposed by combining two-wavelength interferometry and heterodyne interferometry. A collimated heterodyne light is introduced into a modified Twyman-Green interferometer, the full-field interference signals are taken by a fast CMOS camera. The sampled intensities recorded by each pixel are fitted to derive a sinusoidal signal with the least-square sine wave fitting algorithm, and its phase can be obtained. Comparing the phase of the reference point, the relative phase of the pixel can be calculated. Next, the same measurement is made again at a different wavelength. The relative phase with respect to the effective wavelength can be calculated and the profile of the tested sample can be derived with the two-wavelength interferometric technique. Its validity is demonstrated. It has merits of both two-wavelength interferometry and heterodyne interferometry.

  12. Present status and applications of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shubo; Li, Jinling; Sun, Fuping; Bian, Shaofeng

    2003-03-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a newly developed space geodetic technique, which provides the three dimensional information of targets on the Earth by interferometric processing of the Single Look Complex Images (SLC-Image) of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Because of the outstanding characteristics in all-weather and 24-hour continuous surveying, as well as the ability to penetrate into some substances on the Earth, the latent application fields of InSAR are rather broad, which becomes one of the foci in Earth science study. Hereby the principles and general status of SAR and InSAR are briefly introduced. The limitations in the precision of the height determination of targets on the Earth by InSAR are analyzed. The applications of InSAR and the mutual relation for promotion between InSAR and astro-geodynamics study are highlighted discussed.

  13. Common-Path Interferometric Wavefront Sensing for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an optical configuration for a common-path phase-shifting interferometric wavefront sensor.1 2 This sensor has a host of attractive features which make it well suited for space-based adaptive optics. First, it is strictly reflective and therefore operates broadband, second it is common mode and therefore does not suffer from systematic errors (like vibration) that are typical in other interferometers, third it is a phase-shifting interferometer and therefore benefits from both the sensitivity of interferometric sensors as well as the noise rejection afforded by synchronous detection. Unlike the Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor, it has nearly uniform sensitivity to all pupil modes. Optical configuration, theory and simulations for such a system will be discussed along with predicted performance.

  14. Quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer based on regularized optical flow algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Vargas, Javier; Wang, Shouyu; Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Fei

    2015-09-01

    Cell detections and analysis are important in various fields, such as medical observations and disease diagnoses. In order to analyze the cell parameters as well as observe the samples directly, in this paper, we present an improved quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer, which can monitor the quantitative phase distributions of bio-samples and realize cellular parameter statistics. The proposed system is able to recover the phase imaging of biological samples in the expanded field of view via a regularized optical flow demodulation algorithm. This algorithm reconstructs the phase distribution with high accuracy with only two interferograms acquired at different time points simplifying the scanning system. Additionally, the method is totally automatic, and therefore it is convenient for establishing a quantitative phase cytometer. Moreover, the phase retrieval approach is robust against noise and background. Excitingly, red blood cells are readily investigated with the quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer system.

  15. Interferometric Evidence for Warm Dust in the DQ Tau System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, Andrew F.; Sargent, A.; Akeson, R.; Carpenter, J.

    2007-12-01

    We report on near-IR interferometric observations of the double-lined pre-main sequence (PMS) binary system DQ Tau. With these observations and the previous spectroscopic orbit & analysis by Mathieu et al 1997 we have estimated a preliminary visual orbit of the DQ Tau system. DQ Tau exhibits a significant near-IR excess, so modeling our interferometric data requires the inclusion of near-IR light from an 'excess' source. Remarkably this excess source appears compact in our data, similar in physical scale to the binary itself, rather than a significantly larger circumbinary disk. This compact emission appears to support arguments by Mathieu et al 1997 and Carr et al 2001 that there is significant near-IR flux from warm gas and dust near the DQ Tau binary, and that dynamical clearing expected in a binary system has not been completely successful in dispersing this material.

  16. Low-cost interferometric TDM technology for dynamic sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Jeff; Cekorich, Allen

    2004-12-01

    A low-cost design approach for Time Division Multiplexed (TDM) fiber-optic interferometric interrogation of multi-channel sensor arrays is presented. This paper describes the evolutionary design process of the subject design. First, the requisite elements of interferometric interrogation are defined for a single channel sensor. The concept is then extended to multi-channel sensor interrogation implementing a TDM multiplex scheme where "traditional" design elements are utilized. The cost of the traditional TDM interrogator is investigated and concluded to be too high for entry into many markets. A new design approach is presented which significantly reduces the cost for TDM interrogation. This new approach, in accordance with the cost objectives, shows promise to bring this technology to within the threshold of commercial acceptance for a wide range of distributed fiber sensing applications.

  17. Nanohertz gravitational wave searches with interferometric pulsar timing experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinto, Massimo

    2011-05-13

    We estimate the sensitivity to nano-Hertz gravitational waves of pulsar timing experiments in which two highly stable millisecond pulsars are tracked simultaneously with two neighboring radio telescopes that are referenced to the same timekeeping subsystem (i.e., "the clock"). By taking the difference of the two time-of-arrival residual data streams we can exactly cancel the clock noise in the combined data set, thereby enhancing the sensitivity to gravitational waves. We estimate that, in the band (10(-9)-10(-8))  Hz, this "interferometric" pulsar timing technique can potentially improve the sensitivity to gravitational radiation by almost 2 orders of magnitude over that of single-telescopes. Interferometric pulsar timing experiments could be performed with neighboring pairs of antennas of the NASA's Deep Space Network and the forthcoming large arraying projects.

  18. System Engineering the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Tristram T.; Leisawitz, David T.; Rinehart, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) was designed to accomplish three scientific objectives: (1) learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks and how they acquire their inhomogeneous chemical composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. SPIRIT will accomplish these objectives through infrared observations with a two aperture interferometric instrument. This paper gives an overview of SPIRIT design and operation, and how the three design cycle concept study was completed. The error budget for several key performance values allocates tolerances to all contributing factors, and a performance model of the spacecraft plus instrument system demonstrates meeting those allocations with margin.

  19. Metawaveguide for Asymmetric Interferometric Light-Light Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Han; Fegadolli, William S.; Yu, Jiakai; Zhang, Zhifeng; Ge, Li; Scherer, Axel; Feng, Liang

    2016-11-01

    Light-light switching typically requires strong nonlinearity where intense laser fields route and direct data flows of weak power, leading to a high power consumption that limits its practical use. Here we report an experimental demonstration of a metawaveguide that operates exactly in the opposite way in a linear regime, where an intense laser field is interferometrically manipulated on demand by a weak control beam with a modulation extinction ratio up to approximately 60 dB. This asymmetric control results from operating near an exceptional point of the scattering matrix, which gives rise to intrinsic asymmetric reflections of the metawaveguide through delicate interplay between index and absorption. The designed metawaveguide promises low-power interferometric light-light switching for the next generation of optical devices and networks.

  20. The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) - precision infrared radiometer (PIR) platform in Fairbanks: Scientific objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Stamnes, K.; Leontieva, E.

    1996-04-01

    The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and precision infrared radiometer (PIR) have been employed at the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks to check their performance under arctic conditions. Drawing on the experience of the previous measurements in the Arctic, the PIR was equipped with a ventilator to prevent frost and moisture build-up. We adopted the Solar Infrared Observing Sytem (SIROS) concept from the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) to allow implementation of the same data processing software for a set of radiation and meteorological instruments. To validate the level of performance of the whole SIROS prior to its incorporation into the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site instrumental suite for flux radiatin measurements, the comparison between measurements and model predictions will be undertaken to assess the MFRSR-PIR Arctic data quality.

  1. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  2. An Overview of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Accurate observations of ocean surface vector winds (OSVW) with high spatial and temporal resolution are critically important to improve both our understanding and predictability of tropical cyclones. As the successful NASA QuikSCAT satellite continues to age beyond its planned life span, many members of the tropical cyclone research and operational community recognize the need to develop new observational technologies and strategies to meet the essential need for OSVW information. This concern has been expressed in both the "Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond" developed by the National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space and the "Interagency Strategic Research Plan for Tropical Cyclone The Way Ahead" developed by the Joint Action Group for Tropical Cyclone Research (JAG-TCR) sponsored by the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology. One innovative technology development which offers the potential for new, unique remotely sensed observations of tropical cyclone OSVW and precipitation is the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD). This new instrument is passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center that will operate at the C-Band frequencies of 4, 5, 6, and 7 GHz. These frequencies have been successfully demonstrated by the NOAA nadir-staring Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) as useful for monitoring tropical cyclone ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates from low altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The HIRAD design incorporates a unique antenna design as well as several technologies that have been successfully demonstrated by the University of Michigan Lightweight Rain Radiometer sponsored by NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce imagery of ocean wind surface

  3. A Microwave Radiometer for Internal Body Temperature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Robert Patterson

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a microwave radiometer for internal body temperature measurements. There is currently no available method for non-invasive temperature measurement inside the human body. However, knowledge of both relative and absolute temperature variations over time is important to a number of medical applications. The research presented in this thesis details a proof-of-concept near-field microwave radiometer demonstrating relative thermometry of a multi-layer phantom. There are a number of technical challenges addressed in this thesis for radiometric determination of sub-degree temperature variations in the human body. A theoretical approach is developed for determining sensing depth from known complex layered tissues, which is defined as a figure of merit, and is shown to be dependent on frequency, electrical properties of the tissues, and the near-field probe. In order to obtain depth resolution, multiple frequency operation can be used, so multi-frequency probes are designed and demonstrated in this work. The choice of frequencies is determined not only by the tissue material properties, but also by the ever increasing radio interference in the environment. In this work, quiet bands allocated to radio astronomy are investigated. The radiometer and probe need to be compact to be wearable, and several advancements are made towards a fully wearable device: multi-frequency low-profile probes are designed and fabricated on a flexible substrate and the process of on-chip integration is demonstrated by a GaAs MMIC cold noise source for radiometer calibration. The implemented proof-of-concept device consists of two radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 2.7 GHz, designed with commercial inexpensive devices that can enable sufficient sensitivity. The device is tested on a phantom with two water layers whose temperatures are varied in a controlled manner, and focused on the human body temperature range. Measured results are discussed qualitatively

  4. UVMULTIFIT: A versatile tool for fitting astronomical radio interferometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Muller, S.; Casey, S.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The analysis of astronomical interferometric data is often performed on the images obtained after deconvolving the interferometer's point spread function. This strategy can be understood (especially for cases of sparse arrays) as fitting models to models, since the deconvolved images are already non-unique model representations of the actual data (i.e., the visibilities). Indeed, the interferometric images may be affected by visibility gridding, weighting schemes (e.g., natural vs. uniform), and the particulars of the (non-linear) deconvolution algorithms. Fitting models to the direct interferometric observables (i.e., the visibilities) is preferable in the cases of simple (analytical) sky intensity distributions. Aims: We present UVMULTIFIT, a versatile library for fitting visibility data, implemented in a Python-based framework. Our software is currently based on the CASA package, but can be easily adapted to other analysis packages, provided they have a Python API. Methods: The user can simultaneously fit an indefinite number of source components to the data, each of which depend on any algebraic combination of fitting parameters. Fits to individual spectral-line channels or simultaneous fits to all frequency channels are allowed. Results: We have tested the software with synthetic data and with real observations. In some cases (e.g., sources with sizes smaller than the diffraction limit of the interferometer), the results from the fit to the visibilities (e.g., spectra of close by sources) are far superior to the output obtained from the mere analysis of the deconvolved images. Conclusions: UVMULTIFIT is a powerful improvement of existing tasks to extract the maximum amount of information from visibility data, especially in cases close to the sensitivity/resolution limits of interferometric observations.

  5. Rapid Development of Interferometric Software Using MIRIAD and Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Law, Casey J.; Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2012-06-01

    State-of-the-art radio interferometers are complex systems that unleash torrents of data. If current and planned instruments are to routinely meet their performance goals, standard analysis techniques must be significantly improved, becoming simultaneously more sophisticated, more automatic, and more scalable. While there is no shortage of ideas for next-generation algorithms, there is a shortage of development resources, so it is vital that programming environments for interferometric software allow for rapid, flexible development. We present an open-source software package, miriad-python, that provides access to the MIRIAD interferometric reduction system in the Python programming language. The modular design of MIRIAD and the high productivity and accessibility of Python provide an excellent foundation for rapid development of interferometric software. Several other projects with similar goals exist, and we describe them and compare miriad-python with them in detail. Along with an overview of the package design, we present sample code and applications, including the detection of millisecond astrophysical transients, determination and application of nonstandard calibration parameters, interactive data visualization, and a reduction pipeline using a directed acyclic graph dependency model analogous to that of the traditional UNIX tool make. The key aspects of the miriad-python software project are documented. We find that miriad-python provides an extremely effective environment for prototyping new interferometric software, though certain existing packages provide far more infrastructure for some applications. While equivalent software written in compiled languages can be much faster than Python, there are many situations in which execution time is profitably exchanged for speed of development, code readability, accessibility to nonexpert programmers, quick interlinking with foreign software packages, and other virtues of the Python language.

  6. Practical Issues Related to the Interferometric Imaging of Geosats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    telescope in the interferometer, and how this influences the amount of light coupled into a fiber and the observed interferometric visibility amplitude. We...geostationary satellites, optical interferometry imaging, telescope arrays 1. INTRODUCTION A critical gap in the Space Situational Awareness capability is the...55 milli arcsec), equivalent to the resolving power of a 3.6 m telescope observing at 800 nm. In order to obtain high-resolution (∼10 cm) ground based

  7. Passive millimeter-wave camera with interferometric processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohmi, Hitoshi; Ohnishi, Seiki; Kujubu, Osamu

    2006-05-01

    A proto-type passive millimeter-wave (MMW) camera with interferometric processing has been developed. The purpose is to confirm the feasibility of the interferometric MMW camera and to study the characteristics of MMW images. In this paper, the principle and the feature of the interferometric MMW camera is described. Also, the hardware configuration and the image processing algorithm are presented. This proto-type camera is comprised of the minimum configuration as an interferometric imager which consists of two sets of a W-band front end with a horn antenna, a receiver, and an A/D converter, a high-speed processing hardware, and a computer. The position of these two antennas with W-band front-end moves on the precision linear slider in horizontal and vertical axis. The coherently amplified two channel signals are digitized and processed in the hardware processor. The process is comprised of phase error compensation, correlation of all combination of each axis data, and integration to improve the signal to noise ratio. The computer input the integrated data to make an image by matched filter processing. The integration time is from 1mS to 10S depending on required integration gain. The maximum synthesized antenna aperture size is 1m for horizontal axis and 50cm for vertical axis. Because it takes certain time to receive by the moving antennas, only the targets without motion are imaged by this proto-type camera. The processed images will be shown. Also, future plan for a real-time camera using this technique is presented.

  8. CANDID: Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, A.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.; Monnier, J. D.; Schaefer, G. H.; Baron, F.; Breitfelder, J.; Le Bouquin, J. B.; Roettenbacher, R. M.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzynski, G.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Ridgway, S.; Kraus, S.

    2015-05-01

    CANDID finds faint companion around star in interferometric data in the OIFITS format. It allows systematically searching for faint companions in OIFITS data, and if not found, estimates the detection limit. The tool is based on model fitting and Chi2 minimization, with a grid for the starting points of the companion position. It ensures all positions are explored by estimating a-posteriori if the grid is dense enough, and provides an estimate of the optimum grid density.

  9. Studies of multi-baseline spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, F.; Goldstein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A set of Seasat SAR data that were obtained in nearly repeat ground track orbits is utilized to simulate the performance of spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) systems. A qualitative assessment of the topography measurement capability is presented. A phase measurement error model is described and compared with the data obtained at various baseline separations and signal-to-noise ratios. Finally, the implications of these results on the future spaceborne ISAR design are discussed.

  10. In-line interferometric femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dobner, Sven; Groß, Petra; Fallnich, Carsten

    2013-06-28

    We present in-line interferometric femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (II-FSRS), a new method to measure the spectral Raman intensity and phase over a broad spectral range, potentially in a single shot. An analytic model is developed, that excellently reproduces the measured spectra. Additionally, the performance of II-FSRS is directly compared in experiments to two established techniques, namely femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering and femtosecond Raman induced Kerr-effect spectroscopy.

  11. Low-cost solar array project: Four absolute cavity radiometer (pyrheliometer) intercomparisons at New River, Arizona: Radiometer standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estey, R. S.; Seaman, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Four detailed intercomparisons were made for a number of models of cavity-type self-calibrating radiometers (pyrheliometers). Each intercomparison consisted of simultaneous readings of pyrheliometers at 30-second intervals in runs of 10 minutes, with at least 15 runs per intercomparison. Twenty-seven instruments were in at least one intercomparison, and five were in all four. Summarized results and all raw data are provided from the intercomparisons.

  12. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-07

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs.

  13. Interferometric IR observations: a diversity of dusty AGN tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtscher, Leonard

    Interferometric observations in the infrared have resolved dusty structures on parsec and sub-parsec scales in more than two dozen AGNs by now -- a giant leap when considering that the first infrared interferometric observation of an extragalactic object is only about 10 years old. Since then, studies have confirmed the existence of dust in AGNs at its sublimation radius and have clearly dismissed models of very extended tori. Individual, well studied sources have been instrumental to reveal the complexity of these parsec-scale structures and statistical studies have shown a perplexing diversity in the population as a whole. Surprisingly, the diversity does not seem to follow the expected bimodality between optical type 1 and type 2 AGNs -- which are thought to be just face-on and edge-on tori. This central premise of viewing-angle dependent unified models is challenged if not dismissed by interferometric observations. The next step in understanding the AGN phenomenon -- beyond unification aspects -- is now to combine multi-scale observations with multi-scale simulations to constrain the physical processes driving the feeding and feedback of AGNs.

  14. Iterated unscented Kalman filter for phase unwrapping of interferometric fringes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianming

    2016-08-22

    A fresh phase unwrapping algorithm based on iterated unscented Kalman filter is proposed to estimate unambiguous unwrapped phase of interferometric fringes. This method is the result of combining an iterated unscented Kalman filter with a robust phase gradient estimator based on amended matrix pencil model, and an efficient quality-guided strategy based on heap sort. The iterated unscented Kalman filter that is one of the most robust methods under the Bayesian theorem frame in non-linear signal processing so far, is applied to perform simultaneously noise suppression and phase unwrapping of interferometric fringes for the first time, which can simplify the complexity and the difficulty of pre-filtering procedure followed by phase unwrapping procedure, and even can remove the pre-filtering procedure. The robust phase gradient estimator is used to efficiently and accurately obtain phase gradient information from interferometric fringes, which is needed for the iterated unscented Kalman filtering phase unwrapping model. The efficient quality-guided strategy is able to ensure that the proposed method fast unwraps wrapped pixels along the path from the high-quality area to the low-quality area of wrapped phase images, which can greatly improve the efficiency of phase unwrapping. Results obtained from synthetic data and real data show that the proposed method can obtain better solutions with an acceptable time consumption, with respect to some of the most used algorithms.

  15. Interferometric swath processing of Cryosat data for glacial ice topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, L.; Burgess, D.; Copland, L.; Cullen, R.; Galin, N.; Hawley, R.; Helm, V.

    2013-12-01

    We have derived digital elevation models (DEMs) over the western part of the Devon Ice Cap in Nunavut, Canada, using "swath processing" of interferometric data collected by Cryosat between February 2011 and January 2012. With the standard ESA (European Space Agency) SARIn (synthetic aperture radar interferometry) level 2 (L2) data product, the interferometric mode is used to map the cross-track position and elevation of the "point-of-closest-approach" (POCA) in sloping glacial terrain. However, in this work we explore the extent to which the phase of the returns in the intermediate L1b product can also be used to map the heights of time-delayed footprints beyond the POCA. We show that there is a range of average cross-track slopes (~ 0.5 to ~ 2°) for which the returns will be dominated by those beneath the satellite in the main beam of the antenna so that the resulting interferometric phase allows mapping of heights in the delayed range window beyond the POCA. In this way a swath of elevation data is mapped, allowing the creation of DEMs from a sequence of L1b SARIn Cryosat data takes. Comparison of the Devon results with airborne scanning laser data showed a mean difference of order 1 m with a standard deviation of about 1 m. The limitations of swath processing, which generates almost 2 orders of magnitude more data than traditional radar altimetry, are explored through simulation, and the strengths and weaknesses of the technique are discussed.

  16. Lensless single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granero, Luis; Ferreira, Carlos; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Single Exposure Super Resolved Interferometric Microscopy (SESRIM) has been recently proposed as a way to achieve one dimensional super resolved imaging in digital holographic microscopy. SESRIM uses Red-Green-Blue (RGB) multiplexing for illuminating the sample having different propagation angles for each one of the three illumination wavelengths and it has been experimentally validated considering color (A. Calabuig, V. Mico, J. Garcia, Z. Zalevsky, and C. Ferreira, "Single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy by red-green-blue multiplexing," Opt. Lett. 36, 885-887, 2011) and monochrome (A. Calabuig, J. Garcia, C. Ferreira, Z. Zalevsky, and V. Mico, "Resolution improvement by single-exposure superresolved interferometric microscopy with a monochrome sensor," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 28, 2346-2358, 2011) digital sensors for holographic recording. In this contribution, we will first review some of the characteristics of the previously reported SESRIM approaches and second, we will present preliminary results for the extension of SESRIM to the field of lensless holographic microscopy. Experimental results are reported validating this new kind of superresolution imaging method named as lensless SESRIM (L-SESRIM).

  17. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar imagery of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, T. L.; Cannella, M. E.; Jansen, R. W.; Chubb, S. R.; Carande, R. E.; Foley, E. W.; Goldstein, R. M.; Valenzuela, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) imagery brought to the ocean remote sensing field techniques used in radio astronomy. Whilst details of the interferometry differ between the two fields, the basic idea is the same: Use the phase information arising from positional differences of the radar receivers and/or transmitters to probe remote structures. The interferometric image is formed from two complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. These two images are of the same area but separated in time. Typically the time between these images is very short -- approximately 50 msec for the L-band AIRSAR (Airborne SAR). During this short period the radar scatterers on the ocean surface do not have time to significantly decorrelate. Hence the two SAR images will have the same amplitude, since both obtain the radar backscatter from essentially the same object. Although the ocean surface structure does not significantly decorrelate in 50 msec, surface features do have time to move. It is precisely the translation of scattering features across the ocean surface which gives rise to phase differences between the two SAR images. This phase difference is directly proportional to the range velocity of surface scatterers. The constant of proportionality is dependent upon the interferometric mode of operation.

  18. Adaptive interferometric velocity measurements using a laser guide star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarske, J.; Radner, H.; Büttner, L.

    2015-07-01

    We have harnessed the power of programmable photonics devices for an interferometric measurement technique. Laser interferometers are widely used for flow velocity measurements, since they offer high temporal and spatial resolutions. However, often optical wavefront distortions deteriorate the measurement properties. In principle, adaptive optics enables the correction of these disturbances. One challenge is to generate a suitable reference signal for the closed loop operation of the adaptive optics. An adaptive Mach Zehnder interferometer is presented to measure through a dynamic liquid-gas phase boundary, which can lead to a misalignment of the interfering laser beams. In order to generate the reference signal for the closed loop control, the Fresnel reflex of the phase boundary is used as Laser Guide Star (LGS) for the first time to the best of the authors' knowledge. The concept is related to the generation of artificial stars in astronomy, where the light transmitted by the atmosphere is evaluated. However, the adaptive interferometric flow velocity measurements at real world experiments require a different concept, since only the reflected light can be evaluated. The used LGS allows to measure the wavefront distortions induced by the dynamic phase boundary. Two biaxial electromagnetically driven steering mirrors are employed to correct the wavefront distortions. This opens up the possibility for accurate flow measurements through a dynamic phase boundary using only one optical access. Our work represents a paradigm shift in interferometric velocity measurement techniques from using static to dynamic optical elements.

  19. Demodulating interferometric and FBG sensors in the spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaudi, Daniele; Posenato, Daniele; Glisic, Branko; Miller, Jeff; Haber, Todd; Graver, Tom

    2005-05-01

    Long-gauge SOFO sensors have been in use for the last 10 years for the monitoring of civil, geotechnical, oil & Fiber optic sensing systems are increasingly recognized as a very attractive choice for structural health monitoring. Moving form demonstration project to industrial applications requires an integrated approach where the most appropriate technologies are combined to meet the user's requirements. In this context it is often necessary and desirable to combine different sensing technologies in the same project. A bridge-monitoring project might for example require long-gauge interferometric sensors to monitor the concrete deck, interferometric inclinometers for the piles and fiber Bragg grating sensors for the monitoring of the strains in the steel beams and for measuring temperatures. Although fiber optic sensors relying on different technologies can easily be combined at the packaging and cable levels, they often require dedicated instruments to be demodulated. A unified demodulation system would therefore be very attractive. This paper describes a technique relying on the analysis of reflected spectra and allowing the demodulation of interferometric (Michelson or Faby-Perot) sensors and fiber Bragg grating sensors with a single measurement system. It also compares the obtained performance in terms of resolution and dynamic range with the available dedicated systems.

  20. Magnonic interferometric switch for multi-valued logic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balynsky, Michael; Kozhevnikov, Alexander; Khivintsev, Yuri; Bhowmick, Tonmoy; Gutierrez, David; Chiang, Howard; Dudko, Galina; Filimonov, Yuri; Liu, Guanxiong; Jiang, Chenglong; Balandin, Alexander A.; Lake, Roger; Khitun, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a possible use of the magnonic interferometric switches in multi-valued logic circuits. The switch is a three-terminal device consisting of two spin channels where input, control, and output signals are spin waves. Signal modulation is achieved via the interference between the source and gate spin waves. We report experimental data on a micrometer scale prototype based on the Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 structure. The output characteristics are measured at different angles of the bias magnetic field. The On/Off ratio of the prototype exceeds 13 dB at room temperature. Experimental data are complemented by the theoretical analysis and the results of micro magnetic simulations showing spin wave propagation in a micrometer size magnetic junction. We also present the results of numerical modeling illustrating the operation of a nanometer-size switch consisting of just 20 spins in the source-drain channel. The utilization of spin wave interference as a switching mechanism makes it possible to build nanometer-scale logic gates, and minimize energy per operation, which is limited only by the noise margin. The utilization of phase in addition to amplitude for information encoding offers an innovative route towards multi-state logic circuits. We describe possible implementation of the three-value logic circuits based on the magnonic interferometric switches. The advantages and shortcomings inherent in interferometric switches are also discussed.

  1. Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GeoCAPE) Filter Radiometer (FR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotecki, Carl; Chu, Martha; Wilson, Mark; Clark, Mike; Nanan, Bobby; Matson, Liz; McBirney, Dick; Smith, Jay; Earle, Paul; Choi, Mike; Stoneking, Eric; Luu, Kequan; Swinski, J. P.; Secunda, Mark; Brall, Aron; Verma, Sanjay; Hartman, Kathy R.

    2014-01-01

    The GeoCAPE Filter Radiometer (FR) Study is a different instrument type than all of the previous IDL GeoCape studies. The customer primary goals are to keep mass, volume and cost to a minimum while meeting the science objectives and maximizing flight opportunities by fitting on the largest number of GEO accommodations possible. Minimize total mission costs by riding on a commercial GEO satellite. For this instrument type, the coverage rate, km 2 min, was significantly increased while reducing the nadir ground sample size to 250m. This was accomplished by analyzing a large 2d area for each integration period. The field of view will be imaged on a 4k x 4k detector array of 15 micrometer pixels. Each ground pixel is spread over 2 x 2 detector pixels so the instantaneous field of view (IFOV) is 2048 X 2048 ground pixels. The baseline is, for each field of view 50 sequential snapshot images are taken, each with a different filter, before indexing the scan mirror to the next IFOV. A delta would be to add additional filters.

  2. Circular photogalvanic effect caused by the transitions between edge and 2D states in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, L. I.; Entin, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron absorption and the edge photocurrent of a 2D topological insulator are studied for transitions between edge states to 2D states. The circular polarized light is found to produce the edge photocurrent, the direction of which is determined by light polarization and edge orientation. It is shown that the edge-state current is found to exceed the 2D current owing to the topological protection of the edge states.

  3. Automated interferometric system for bulge and blister test measurements of micromachined membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiaoui, Reda; Danaie, Kamran; Petitgrand, Sylvain; Bosseboeuf, Alain

    2001-10-01

    An experimental set-up designed for the mechanical characterization of small-size membranes by the bulge test and blister test techniques is described. The differential pressure (0-10 bars) is applied to the membrane with a motorized microsyringe pump filled with water to minimize stored elastic energy in the system. An interferometric microscope equipped with a quasi monochromatic Na discharge lamp, a CCD camera and an apertured photomultiplier is used to get simultaneously full field interferograms of the membrane deformed shape and a point measurement of the membrane central height variation. Phase extraction by FFT and unwrapping of the photomultiplier output signal, and processing of some pixels corresponding to the substrate in the set of interferograms images allows to get, with an accuracy in the 3-30 nm range, the true membrane maximum deflection corrected from substrate bending, vertical drift and tilting. 2D or 3D profiles of the membrane deformed shape can as well be obtained with a similar accuracy and a spatial resolution of 3micrometers . The good performances of the system are illustrated from measurements on micromachined Si3N4 and Mo membranes on silicon.

  4. Diffractive optical variable image devices generated by maskless interferometric lithography for optical security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, José M.

    2011-05-01

    In optical security (protection against forgery and counterfeit of products and documents) the problem is not exact reproduction but the production of something sufficiently similar to the original. Currently, Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVID), that create dynamic chromatic effects which may be easily recognized but are difficult to reproduce, are often used to protect important products and documents. Well known examples of DOVID for security are 3D or 2D/3D holograms in identity documents and credit cards. Others are composed of shapes with different types of microstructures yielding by diffraction to chromatic dynamic effects. A maskless interferometric lithography technique to generate DOVIDs for optical security is presented and compared to traditional techniques. The approach can be considered as a self-masking focused holography on planes tilted with respect to the reference optical axes of the system, and is based on the Scheimpflug and Hinge rules. No physical masks are needed to ensure optimum exposure of the photosensitive film. The system built to demonstrate the technique relies on the digital mirrors device MOEMS technology from Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing. The technique is linear on the number of specified colors and does not depend either on the area of the device or the number of pixels, factors that drive the complexity of dot-matrix based systems. The results confirmed the technique innovation and capabilities in the creation of diffractive optical elements for security against counterfeiting and forgery.

  5. Single-Pole Double-Throw MMIC Switches for a Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.

    2012-01-01

    In order to reduce the effect of gain and noise instabilities in the RF chain of a microwave radiometer, a Dicke radiometer topology is often used, as in the case of the proposed surface water and ocean topography (SWOT) radiometer instrument. For this topology, a single-pole double-throw (SPDT) microwave switch is needed, which must have low insertion loss at the radiometer channel frequencies to minimize the overall receiver noise figure. Total power radiometers are limited in accuracy due to the continuous variation in gain of the receiver. High-frequency SPDT switches were developed in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) using 75 micron indium phosphide (InP) PIN-diode technology. These switches can be easily integrated into Dicke switched radiometers that utilize microstrip technology.

  6. Energy Efficiency of D2D Multi-User Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zufan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-28

    The Device-to-Device (D2D) communication system is an important part of heterogeneous networks. It has great potential to improve spectrum efficiency, throughput and energy efficiency cooperation of multiple D2D users with the advantage of direct communication. When cooperating, D2D users expend extraordinary energy to relay data to other D2D users. Hence, the remaining energy of D2D users determines the life of the system. This paper proposes a cooperation scheme for multiple D2D users who reuse the orthogonal spectrum and are interested in the same data by aiming to solve the energy problem of D2D users. Considering both energy availability and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of each D2D user, the Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is introduced in the cooperation scheme to solve relay selection problems. Thus, the cooperation issue is transformed into a maximum weighted matching (MWM) problem. In order to enhance energy efficiency without the deterioration of Quality of Service (QoS), the link outage probability is derived according to the Shannon Equation by considering the data rate and delay. The simulation studies the relationships among the number of cooperative users, the length of shared data, the number of data packets and energy efficiency.

  7. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  8. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  9. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  10. Regulation of ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.; Gasser, Stephan; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Deng, Weiwen; Jung, Heiyoun

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by all NK cells and subsets of T cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of transformed and infected cells and participates in the genesis of several inflammatory diseases. The ligands for NKG2D are self-proteins that are induced by pathways that are active in certain pathophysiological states. NKG2D ligands are regulated transcriptionally, at the level of mRNA and protein stability, and by cleavage from the cell surface. In some cases, ligand induction can be attributed to pathways that are activated specifically in cancer cells or infected cells. We review the numerous pathways that have been implicated in the regulation of NKG2D ligands, discuss the pathologic states in which those pathways are likely to act, and attempt to synthesize the findings into general schemes of NKG2D ligand regulation in NK cell responses to cancer and infection. PMID:23298206

  11. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  12. New generation transistor technologies enabled by 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of graphene opened the door to 2D crystal materials. The lack of a bandgap in 2D graphene makes it unsuitable for electronic switching transistors in the conventional field-effect sense, though possible techniques exploiting the unique bandstructure and nanostructures are being explored. The transition metal dichalcogenides have 2D crystal semiconductors, which are well-suited for electronic switching. We experimentally demonstrate field effect transistors with current saturation and carrier inversion made from layered 2D crystal semiconductors such as MoS2, WS2, and the related family. We also evaluate the feasibility of such semiconducting 2D crystals for tunneling field effect transistors for low-power digital logic. The article summarizes the current state of new generation transistor technologies either proposed, or demonstrated, with a commentary on the challenges and prospects moving forward.

  13. Microwave radiometer and scatterometer design for the aquarius sea surface Salinity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon H.; Pellerano, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of sea surface salinity with L-band microwave radiometers is a very challenging task. Since the L-band brightness temperature variations associated with salinity changes are small, it is necessary to have a very sensitive and stable radiometer. In addition, the corrections for the ocean surface roughness require real time scatterometer measurements. The designs of the Aquarius radiometer and scatterometer are described in this paper.

  14. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xian; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-07-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼ 50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter.

  15. Comparison of Profiling Microwave Radiometer, Aircraft, and Radiosonde Measurements From the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements from a profiling microwave radiometer are compared to measurements from a research aircraft and radiosondes. Data compared is temperature, water vapor, and liquid water profiles. Data was gathered at the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS) at Mirabel Airport outside Montreal, Canada during December 1999 and January 2000. All radiometer measurements were found to lose accuracy when the radome was wet. When the radome was not wetted, the radiometer was seen to indicate an inverted distribution of liquid water within a cloud. When the radiometer measurements were made at 15 deg. instead of the standard zenith, the measurements were less accurate.

  16. Design and development of a multibeam 1.4 GHz pushbroom microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, R. W.; Bailey, M. C.; Harrington, R. F.; Hearn, C. P.; Wells, J. G.; Stanley, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    The design and operation of a multiple beam, digital signal processing radiometer are discussed. The discussion includes a brief description of each major subsystem and an overall explanation of the hardware requirements and operation. A series of flight tests was conducted in which sea-truth sites, as well as an existing radiometer were used to verify the Pushbroom Radiometer performance. The results of these tests indicate that the Pushbroom Radiometer did meet the sensitivity design goal of 1.0 kelvin, and exceeded the accuracy requirement of 2.0 kelvin. Additional performance characteristics and test results are also presented.

  17. Ground registration of data from an airborne Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (MfMR). [Colby, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The agricultural soil moisture experiment was conducted near Colby, Kansas, in July and August 1978. A portion of the data collected was taken with a five band microwave radiometer. A method of locating the radiometer footprints with respect to a ground based coordinate system is documented. The procedure requires that the airplane's flight parameters along with aerial photography be acquired simultaneously with the radiometer data. The software which documented reads in data from the precision radiation thermometer (PRT Model 5) and attaches the scene temperature to the corresponding multifrequency microwave radiometer data. Listings of the programs used in the registration process are included.

  18. Integrating a Microwave Radiometer into Radar Hardware for Simultaneous Data Collection Between the Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Matthew; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The conventional method for integrating a radiometer into radar hardware is to share the RF front end between the instruments, and to have separate IF receivers that take data at separate times. Alternatively, the radar and radiometer could share the antenna through the use of a diplexer, but have completely independent receivers. This novel method shares the radar's RF electronics and digital receiver with the radiometer, while allowing for simultaneous operation of the radar and radiometer. Radars and radiometers, while often having near-identical RF receivers, generally have substantially different IF and baseband receivers. Operation of the two instruments simultaneously is difficult, since airborne radars will pulse at a rate of hundreds of microseconds. Radiometer integration time is typically 10s or 100s of milliseconds. The bandwidth of radar may be 1 to 25 MHz, while a radiometer will have an RF bandwidth of up to a GHz. As such, the conventional method of integrating radar and radiometer hardware is to share the highfrequency RF receiver, but to have separate IF subsystems and digitizers. To avoid corruption of the radiometer data, the radar is turned off during the radiometer dwell time. This method utilizes a modern radar digital receiver to allow simultaneous operation of a radiometer and radar with a shared RF front end and digital receiver. The radiometer signal is coupled out after the first down-conversion stage. From there, the radar transmit frequencies are heavily filtered, and the bands outside the transmit filter are amplified and passed to a detector diode. This diode produces a DC output proportional to the input power. For a conventional radiometer, this level would be digitized. By taking this DC output and mixing it with a system oscillator at 10 MHz, the signal can instead be digitized by a second channel on the radar digital receiver (which typically do not accept DC inputs), and can be down-converted to a DC level again digitally. This

  19. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-04

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  20. A Novel Miniature Wide-band Radiometer for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykulska-Lawrence, Hanna

    2016-10-01

    Design, development and testing of a novel miniaturised infrared radiometer is described. The instrument opens up new possibilities in planetary science of deployment on smaller platforms - such as unmanned aerial vehicles and microprobes - to enable study of a planet's radiation balance, as well as terrestrial volcano plumes and trace gases in planetary atmospheres, using low-cost long-term observations. Thus a key enabling development is that of miniaturised, low-power and well-calibrated instrumentation.The paper reports advances in miniature technology to perform high accuracy visible / IR remote sensing measurements. The infrared radiometer is akin to those widely used for remote sensing for earth and space applications, which are currently either large instruments on orbiting platforms or medium-sized payloads on balloons. We use MEMS microfabrication techniques to shrink a conventional design, while combining the calibration benefits of large (>1kg) type radiometers with the flexibility and portability of a <10g device. The instrument measures broadband (0.2 to 100um) upward and downward radiation fluxes, with built-in calibration capability, incorporating traceability to temperature standards such as ITS-90.The miniature instrument described here was derived from a concept developed for a European Space Agency study, Dalomis (Proc. of 'i-SAIRAS 2005', Munich, 2005), which involved dropping multiple probes into the atmosphere of Venus from a balloon to sample numerous parts of the complex weather systems on the planet. Data from such an in-situ instrument would complement information from a satellite remote sensing instrument or balloon radiosonde. Moreover, the addition of an internal calibration standard facilitates comparisons between datasets.One of the main challenges for a reduced size device is calibration. We use an in-situ method whereby a blackbody source is integrated within the device and a micromirror switches the input to the detector between

  1. Conversion of sunflower multiband radiometer polarization measurements to polarization parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, Larry L.

    1995-01-01

    The data processing analysis and conversion of polarization measurements to polarization parameters from the Sunflower multiband radiometer is presented in this final report. Included is: (1) the actual data analysis; (2) the comparison of the averaging techniques and the percent polarization derived from the original and averaged I, Q, U parameters; (3) the polarizer angles used in conversion; (4) the Matlab files; (5) the relative ground size, field of view location, and view zenith angles, and (6) the summary of all the sky data for all dates.

  2. Controller for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zomberg, Brian G.; Chren, William A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype controller for the ESTAR (electronically scanned thinned array radiometer) instrument has been designed and tested. It manages the operation of the digital data subsystem (DDS) and its communication with the Small Explorer data system (SEDS). Among the data processing tasks that it coordinates are FEM data acquisition, noise removal, phase alignment and correlation. Its control functions include instrument calibration and testing of two critical subsystems, the output data formatter and Walsh function generator. It is implemented in a Xilinx XC3064PC84-100 field programmable gate array (FPGA) and has a maximum clocking frequency of 10 MHz.

  3. Application of microwave radiometers for wetlands and estuaries monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Shutko, A.; Haldin, A.; Novichikhin, E.

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents the examples of experimental data obtained with airborne microwave radiometers used for monitoring of wetlands and estuaries located in coastal environments. The international team of researchers has successfully worked in Russia, Ukraine and USA. The data presented relate to a period of time between 1990 and 1995. They have been collected in Odessa Region, Black Sea coast, Ukraine, in Regions of Pittsville and Winfield, Maryland, USA, and in Region of St. Marks, Florida, USA. The parameters discussed are a soil moisture, depth to a shallow water table, vegetation index, salinity of water surface.

  4. Diagnosis Of A Pressure-Modulator-Radiometer Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.; Mccleese, Daniel J.; Rider, David M.; Schofield, John T.; Webster, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Spectral response of pressure-modulator-radiometer cell measured with help of lead-salt tunable diode laser. Laser chosen because of narrow bandwidths {2 x 10 to negative 4th power (cm) to negative 1st power} and relatively high powers (up to 1 mW continuous) of such lasers and because available for wavelengths from 3 to 30 micrometers. Direct measurement of spectral response enables formulation of more-precise atmospheric-transmission functions, enabling extraction of better information from readings taken with instrument.

  5. Clear air turbulence avoidance using an airborne microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    The avoidance of Clear Air Turbulence (CAT) is theoretically possible by selecting flight levels that are a safe distance from the tropopause and inversion layers. These favored sites for CAT generation can be located by an 'airborne microwave radiometer' (AMR) passive sensor system that measures altitude temperature profiles. A flight evaluation of the AMR sensor shows that most CAT could be avoided by following sensor-based advisories. Some limitations still exist for any hypothetical use of the sensor. The principal need is to augment the sensor's 'where' advisories to include useful 'when' forecasts.

  6. Multichannel infrared fiber optic radiometer for controlled microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drizlikh, S.; Zur, Albert; Katzir, Abraham

    1990-07-01

    An infrared fiberoptic multichannel radiometer was used for monitoring and controlling the temperature of samples in a microwave heating system. The temperature of water samples was maintained at about 40 °C, with a standard deviation of +/- 0.2°C and a maximum deviation of +/- 0.5°C. The temperature was monitored on the same time at several points on the surface and inside the sample. This novel controlled system is reliable and precise. Such system would be very useful for medical applications such as hypothermia and hyperthermi a.

  7. Aquarius Radiometer Performance: Early On-Orbit Calibration and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; LeVine, David M.; Yueh, Simon H.; Wentz, Frank; Ruf, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D observatory was launched into a 657-km altitude, 6-PM ascending node, sun-synchronous polar orbit from Vandenberg, California, USA on June 10, 2011. The Aquarius instrument was commissioned two months after launch and began operating in mission mode August 25. The Aquarius radiometer meets all engineering requirements, exhibited initial calibration biases within expected error bars, and continues to operate well. A review of the instrument design, discussion of early on-orbit performance and calibration assessment, and investigation of an on-going calibration drift are summarized in this abstract.

  8. Landsat-simulating radiometer for agricultural remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemme, G. D.; Westin, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    The reliability of a Landsat-simulating ground-based spectral radiometer for use in agricultural remote sensing was investigated. Significant correlation coefficients in all wavebands except Band 7 were found to exist between Landsat computer compatible tape (CCT) and ground-based radiometric data from several corn fields. No significant correlations were found within data from small grain fields. Combined data from several common agricultural crops yielded significant correlation coefficients in the wavebands most commonly employed in agricultural remote sensing. It was also found that sun angle within certain limits of a given day had minimal effect on ground-based radiometric measurements taken from a fallow and barley field.

  9. Io's thermal emission from the Galileo photopolarimeter-radiometer.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J R; Rathbun, J A; Travis, L D; Tamppari, L K; Barnard, L; Martin, T Z; McEwen, A S

    2000-05-19

    Galileo's photopolarimeter-radiometer instrument mapped Io's thermal emission during the I24, I25, and I27 flybys with a spatial resolution of 2.2 to 300 kilometers. Mapping of Loki in I24 shows uniform temperatures for most of Loki Patera and high temperatures in the southwest corner, probably resulting from an eruption that began 1 month before the observation. Most of Loki Patera was resurfaced before I27. Pele's caldera floor has a low temperature of 160 kelvin, whereas flows at Pillan and Zamama have temperatures of up to 200 kelvin. Global maps of nighttime temperatures provide a means for estimating global heat flow.

  10. Global atmospheric temperature anomaly monitoring with passive microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Christy, John R.

    1990-01-01

    The potential of microwave sounding units (MSU) for augmenting the surface-based thermometer record by providing a measurement representing a significant depth of the troposphere is considered. These radiometers measure the thermal emission by molecular oxygen in the atmosphere at different spectral intervals in the oxygen absorption complex near 60 GHz. Brightness temperature variations measured by NOAA-6 and NOAA-7 MSUs during a near-two year period are analyzed and compared with monthly averaged surface air temperature data. It is demonstrated that MSUs, while of limited use for vertical profiling of the atmosphere, provide stable measurements of vertically average atmospheric temperatures, centered at a constant pressure level.

  11. Controller for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zomberg, Brian G.; Chren, William A., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    A prototype controller for the ESTAR (electronically scanned thinned array radiometer) instrument has been designed and tested. It manages the operation of the digital data subsystem (DDS) and its communication with the Small Explorer data system (SEDS). Among the data processing tasks that it coordinates are FEM data acquisition, noise removal, phase alignment and correlation. Its control functions include instrument calibration and testing of two critical subsystems, the output data formatter and Walsh function generator. It is implemented in a Xilinx XC3064PC84-100 field programmable gate array (FPGA) and has a maximum clocking frequency of 10 MHz.

  12. Color enhancement of nimbus high resolution infrared radiometer data.

    PubMed

    Kreins, E R; Allison, L J

    1970-03-01

    Two examples of Nimbus high resolution infrared radiometer (HRIR) data processed by a color display enhancement system demonstrate possible meteorological, oceanographic, and geomorphological applications of this technique for geophysical research. A commonly used means of displaying radiation temperatures mapped by the HRIR has been a black and white photofacsimile film strip. However, the human eye can distinguish many more colors than shades of gray, and this characteristic permits an analyst to evaluate quantitatively radiation values mapped in color more readily than in black and white.

  13. A new broadband square law detector. [microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. S.; Gardner, R. A.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    A broadband constant law detector was developed for precision power measurements, radio metric measurements, and other applications. It has a wide dynamic range and an accurate square law response. Other desirable characteristics, which are all included in a single compact unit, are: (1) high-level dc output with immunity to ground loop problems; (2) fast response times; (3) ability to insert known time constants; and (4) good thermal stability. The detector and its performance are described in detail. The detector can be operated in a programmable system with a ten-fold increase in accuracy. The use and performance of the detector in a noise-adding radiometer system is also discussed.

  14. Four band differential radiometer for monitoring LNG vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The development by JPL of a four band differential radiometer (FBDR) which is capable of providing a fast rate of response, accurate measurements of methane, ethane, and propane concentrations on the periphery of a dispersing LNG cloud. The FBDR is a small, low power, lightweight, portable instrument system that uses differential absorption of near infrared radiation by the LNG cloud as a technique for the determination of concentration of the three gases as the LNG cloud passes the instrument position. Instrument design and data analysis approaches are described. The data obtained from the FBDR prototype instrument system deployed in an instrument array during two 40 cubic meter spill tests are discussed.

  15. Near-infrared diffractive optical element (DOE) radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Kelvin E.; Codere, J. R. Michel; Verreault, J. J. M.; Fjarlie, Earl J.

    1994-10-01

    A radiometer has been designed that operates at 1064 nanometers using a diffractive element arrangement to focus the energy onto a detector array. The aperture is made up of several elements consisting of both on and off-axis designed elements arranged to provide an overall FOV. The blur circle and the efficiency of the elements have been measured. The advantages of DOEs are weight saving, repetitiveness of design, the making of either off-axis or on-axis elements with the same ease, good efficiency of energy collection, and diffraction limited focusing.

  16. Compositional Ground Truth of Diviner Lunar Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Thomas, I. R.; Bowles, N. E.; Allen, C. C.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Foote, E. J.; Paige, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Moon affords us a unique opportunity to "ground truth" thermal infrared (i.e. 3 to 25 micron) observations of an airless body. The Moon is the most accessable member of the most abundant class of solar system bodies, which includes Mercury, astroids, and icy satellites. The Apollo samples returned from the Moon are the only extraterrestrial samples with known spatial context. And the Diviner Lunar Radiometer (Diviner) is the first instrument to globally map the spectral thermal emission of an airless body. Here we compare Diviner observations of Apollo sites to compositional and spectral measurements of Apollo lunar soil samples in simulated lunar environment (SLE).

  17. Systems design and analysis of the microwave radiometer spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    Systems design and analysis data were generated for microwave radiometer spacecraft concept using the Large Advanced Space Systems (LASS) computer aided design and analysis program. Parametric analyses were conducted for perturbations off the nominal-orbital-altitude/antenna-reflector-size and for control/propulsion system options. Optimized spacecraft mass, structural element design, and on-orbit loading data are presented. Propulsion and rigid-body control systems sensitivities to current and advanced technology are established. Spacecraft-induced and environmental effects on antenna performance (surface accuracy, defocus, and boresight off-set) are quantified and structured material frequencies and modal shapes are defined.

  18. COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) data processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, P. D.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Aymon, J.; Backus, C.; Deamici, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Keegstra, P. B.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) experiment on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite is to make whole-sky maps, at frequencies of 31.5, 53, and 90 GHz, of any departures of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from its mean value of 2.735 K. An elaborate software system is necessary to calibrate and invert the differential measurements, so as to make sky maps free from large scale systematic errors to levels less than a millionth of the CMB.

  19. COBE DMR results and implications. [Differential Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This lecture presents early results obtained from the first six months of measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) by Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) aboard COBE and discusses significant cosmological implications. The DMR maps show the dipole anisotropy and some galactic emission but otherwise a spatially smooth early universe. The measurements are sufficiently precise that we must pay careful attention to potential systematic errors. Maps of galactic and local emission such as those produced by the FIRAS and DIRBE instruments will be needed to identify foregrounds from extragalactic emission and thus to interpret the results in terms of events in the early universe. The current DMR results are significant for Cosmology.

  20. COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers - Preliminary systematic error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Wright, E. L.; Aymon, J.; De Amici, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Jackson, P. D.; Kaita, E.; Keegstra, P.

    1992-01-01

    The techniques available for the identification and subtraction of sources of dynamic uncertainty from data of the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument aboard COBE are discussed. Preliminary limits on the magnitude in the DMR 1 yr maps are presented. Residual uncertainties in the best DMR sky maps, after correcting the raw data for systematic effects, are less than 6 micro-K for the pixel rms variation, less than 3 micro-K for the rms quadruple amplitude of a spherical harmonic expansion, and less than 30 micro-(K-squared) for the correlation function.

  1. COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers - Preliminary systematic error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Wright, E. L.; Aymon, J.; de Amici, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Jackson, P. D.; Kaita, E.; Keegstra, P.; Lineweaver, C.; Loewenstein, K.; Rokke, L.; Tenorio, L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Gulkis, S.; Hauser, M. G.; Janssen, M. A.; Kelsall, T.; Mather, J. C.; Meyer, S.; Moseley, S. H.; Murdock, T. L.; Shafer, R. A.; Silverberg, R. F.; Weiss, R.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1992-12-01

    The techniques available for the identification and subtraction of sources of dynamic uncertainty from data of the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument aboard COBE are discussed. Preliminary limits on the magnitude in the DMR 1 yr maps are presented. Residual uncertainties in the best DMR sky maps, after correcting the raw data for systematic effects, are less than 6 micro-K for the pixel rms variation, less than 3 micro-K for the rms quadruple amplitude of a spherical harmonic expansion, and less than 30 micro-(K-squared) for the correlation function.

  2. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  3. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  4. Joint 2D and 3D phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to 2D echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yuyao; Gibbs, Eric; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) measures tissue magnetic susceptibility and typically relies on time-consuming three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI. Recent studies have shown that two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI), which is commonly used in functional MRI (fMRI) and other dynamic imaging techniques, can also be used to produce data suitable for QSM with much shorter scan times. However, the production of high-quality QSM maps is difficult because data obtained by 2D multi-slice scans often have phase inconsistencies across adjacent slices and strong susceptibility field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. To address these challenges in 2D EPI-based QSM studies, we present a new data processing procedure that integrates 2D and 3D phase processing. First, 2D Laplacian-based phase unwrapping and 2D background phase removal are performed to reduce phase inconsistencies between slices and remove in-plane harmonic components of the background phase. This is followed by 3D background phase removal for the through-plane harmonic components. The proposed phase processing was evaluated with 2D EPI data obtained from healthy volunteers, and compared against conventional 3D phase processing using the same 2D EPI datasets. Our QSM results were also compared with QSM values from time-consuming 3D GRE data, which were taken as ground truth. The experimental results show that this new 2D EPI-based QSM technique can produce quantitative susceptibility measures that are comparable with those of 3D GRE-based QSM across different brain regions (e.g. subcortical iron-rich gray matter, cortical gray and white matter). This new 2D EPI QSM reconstruction method is implemented within STI Suite, which is a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  6. NKG2D Receptor and Its Ligands in Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-06-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T cells, and subsets of CD4(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells (iNKT), and γδ T cells. In humans, NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit, and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least eight genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and posttranslation. In general, healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyperproliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves as a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone "stress." Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system, and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

  7. 2-D Versus 3-D Magnetotelluric Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, the number of publications dealing with the mathematical and physical 3-D aspects of the magnetotelluric method has increased drastically. However, field experiments on a grid are often impractical and surveys are frequently restricted to single or widely separated profiles. So, in many cases we find ourselves with the following question: is the applicability of the 2-D hypothesis valid to extract geoelectric and geological information from real 3-D environments? The aim of this paper is to explore a few instructive but general situations to understand the basics of a 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data and to determine which data subset (TE-mode or TM-mode) is best for obtaining the electrical conductivity distribution of the subsurface using 2-D techniques. A review of the mathematical and physical fundamentals of the electromagnetic fields generated by a simple 3-D structure allows us to prioritise the choice of modes in a 2-D interpretation of responses influenced by 3-D structures. This analysis is corroborated by numerical results from synthetic models and by real data acquired by other authors. One important result of this analysis is that the mode most unaffected by 3-D effects depends on the position of the 3-D structure with respect to the regional 2-D strike direction. When the 3-D body is normal to the regional strike, the TE-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, while the TM-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects. In this case, a 2-D interpretation of the TM-mode is prone to error. When the 3-D body is parallel to the regional 2-D strike the TE-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects and the TM-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, making it more suitable for 2-D interpretation. In general, a wise 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data can be a guide to a reasonable geological interpretation.

  8. How to turn your pump–probe instrument into a multidimensional spectrometer: 2D IR and Vis spectroscopies via pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Sang-Hee; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We have recently developed a new and simple way of collecting 2D infrared and visible spectra that utilizes a pulse shaper and a partly collinear beam geometry. 2D IR and Vis spectroscopies are powerful tools for studying molecular structures and their dynamics. They can be used to correlate vibrational or electronic eigenstates, measure energy transfer rates, and quantify the dynamics of lineshapes, for instance, all with femtosecond time-resolution. As a result, they are finding use in systems that exhibit fast dynamics, such as sub-millisecond chemical and biological dynamics, and in hard-to-study environments, such as in membranes. While powerful, these techniques have been difficult to implement because they require a series of femtosecond pulses to be spatially and temporally overlapped with precise time-resolution and interferometric phase stability. However, many of the difficulties associated with implementing 2D spectroscopies are eliminated by using a pulse shaper and a simple beam geometry, which substantially lowers the technical barriers required for researchers to enter this exciting field while simultaneously providing many new capabilities. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the methods for collecting 2D spectra so that an outsider considering using 2D spectroscopy in their own research can judge which approach would be most suitable for their research aims. This paper focuses primarily on 2D IR spectroscopy, but also includes our recent work on adapting this technology to collecting 2D Vis spectra. We review work that has already been published as well as cover several topics that we have not reported previously, including phase cycling methods to remove background signals, eliminate unwanted scatter, and shift data collection into the rotating frame. PMID:19290321

  9. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  10. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  11. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Pober, J. C.; Ali, Z. S.; Bradley, R. F.; Carilli, C. L.; DeBoer, D. R.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Jacobs, D. C.; Klima, P.; MacMahon, D. H. E.; Manley, J. R.; Moore, D. F.; Parsons, A. R.; Stefan, I. I.; Walbrugh, W. P.

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  12. DETECTION OF FAST TRANSIENTS WITH RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Chengalur, J. N.; Gupta, Y.; Prasad, J.; Roy, J.; Kudale, S. S.; Cox, P. J.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Van Straten, W.

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation radio arrays, including the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its pathfinders, will open up new avenues for exciting transient science at radio wavelengths. Their innovative designs, comprising a large number of small elements, pose several challenges in digital processing and optimal observing strategies. The Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) presents an excellent test-bed for developing and validating suitable observing modes and strategies for transient experiments with future arrays. Here we describe the first phase of the ongoing development of a transient detection system for GMRT that is planned to eventually function in a commensal mode with other observing programs. It capitalizes on the GMRT's interferometric and sub-array capabilities, and the versatility of a new software backend. We outline considerations in the plan and design of transient exploration programs with interferometric arrays, and describe a pilot survey that was undertaken to aid in the development of algorithms and associated analysis software. This survey was conducted at 325 and 610 MHz, and covered 360 deg{sup 2} of the sky with short dwell times. It provides large volumes of real data that can be used to test the efficacies of various algorithms and observing strategies applicable for transient detection. We present examples that illustrate the methodologies of detecting short-duration transients, including the use of sub-arrays for higher resilience to spurious events of terrestrial origin, localization of candidate events via imaging, and the use of a phased array for improved signal detection and confirmation. In addition to demonstrating applications of interferometric arrays for fast transient exploration, our efforts mark important steps in the roadmap toward SKA-era science.

  13. An Innovative Transponder-Based Interferometric Radar for Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, F.; Cerutti, A.; Farina, P.; De Pasquale, G.; Novembrini, G.

    2010-05-28

    Ground-based radar interferometry has recently emerged as an innovative technology of remote sensing, able to accurately measure the static or dynamic displacement of several points of a structure. This technique in the last couple of years has been applied to different types of structures, such as bridges, towers and chimneys. This paper presents a prototype system developed by IDS, originally aimed at measuring the structural vibrations of helicopter rotor blades, based on an interferometric technique and constituted by combination of a radar sensor and a series of transponders installed on the target structure. The main advantages of this solution with respect to conventional interferometric radars, are related to the increased spatial resolution of the system, provided by the possibility to discriminate different transponders installed within the same resolution cell of the radar sensor, and to the reduction of the ambient noise (e.g. multi-path) on the radar measurement. The first feature allows the use of the microwave technology even on target areas with limited dimensions, such as industrial facilities, while the second aspect may extend the use of radar interferometric systems to complex scenarios, where multi-reflections are expected due to the presence of natural targets with high reflectivity to the radar signal. In the paper, the system and its major characteristics are first described; subsequently, application to the measurement of ambient vibration response of a lab set-up is summarized. Then the data acquired on a rotating mock-up are reported and analyzed to identify natural frequencies and mode shapes of the investigated structure.

  14. An Innovative Transponder-Based Interferometric Radar for Vibration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, F.; Cerutti, A.; Farina, P.; De Pasquale, G.; Novembrini, G.

    2010-05-01

    Ground-based radar interferometry has recently emerged as an innovative technology of remote sensing, able to accurately measure the static or dynamic displacement of several points of a structure. This technique in the last couple of years has been applied to different types of structures, such as bridges, towers and chimneys. This paper presents a prototype system developed by IDS, originally aimed at measuring the structural vibrations of helicopter rotor blades, based on an interferometric technique and constituted by combination of a radar sensor and a series of transponders installed on the target structure. The main advantages of this solution with respect to conventional interferometric radars, are related to the increased spatial resolution of the system, provided by the possibility to discriminate different transponders installed within the same resolution cell of the radar sensor, and to the reduction of the ambient noise (e.g. multi-path) on the radar measurement. The first feature allows the use of the microwave technology even on target areas with limited dimensions, such as industrial facilities, while the second aspect may extend the use of radar interferometric systems to complex scenarios, where multi-reflections are expected due to the presence of natural targets with high reflectivity to the radar signal. In the paper, the system and its major characteristics are first described; subsequently, application to the measurement of ambient vibration response of a lab set-up is summarized. Then the data acquired on a rotating mock-up are reported and analyzed to identify natural frequencies and mode shapes of the investigated structure.

  15. Detection of Fast Transients with Radio Interferometric Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Chengalur, J. N.; Cox, P. J.; Gupta, Y.; Prasad, J.; Roy, J.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Kudale, S. S.; van Straten, W.

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation radio arrays, including the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its pathfinders, will open up new avenues for exciting transient science at radio wavelengths. Their innovative designs, comprising a large number of small elements, pose several challenges in digital processing and optimal observing strategies. The Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) presents an excellent test-bed for developing and validating suitable observing modes and strategies for transient experiments with future arrays. Here we describe the first phase of the ongoing development of a transient detection system for GMRT that is planned to eventually function in a commensal mode with other observing programs. It capitalizes on the GMRT's interferometric and sub-array capabilities, and the versatility of a new software backend. We outline considerations in the plan and design of transient exploration programs with interferometric arrays, and describe a pilot survey that was undertaken to aid in the development of algorithms and associated analysis software. This survey was conducted at 325 and 610 MHz, and covered 360 deg2 of the sky with short dwell times. It provides large volumes of real data that can be used to test the efficacies of various algorithms and observing strategies applicable for transient detection. We present examples that illustrate the methodologies of detecting short-duration transients, including the use of sub-arrays for higher resilience to spurious events of terrestrial origin, localization of candidate events via imaging, and the use of a phased array for improved signal detection and confirmation. In addition to demonstrating applications of interferometric arrays for fast transient exploration, our efforts mark important steps in the roadmap toward SKA-era science.

  16. Heterodyne interrogation system for TDM interferometric fiber optic sensors array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Gaosheng; Xu, Tuanwei; Li, Fang

    2015-04-01

    We proposed an interrogation system for time sequenced fiber optic sensors array based on the heterodyne detection and orthogonal demodulation techniques, where the sensors array is a kind of interferometric fiber optic sensors. The techniques are theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated with recovering the sinusoid wave and triangle wave applied to the sensors. The system has a phase resolution about 1×10-4 rad/√Hz, the amplitude consistency and linearity of the demodulated results are 95.275% and 98.379%, respectively with single frequency event applied to the sensors.

  17. Satellite emission radio interferometric earth surveying series - GPS geodetic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    A concept called SERIES (satellite emissions radio interferometric earth surveying) which makes use of GPS (global positioning system) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications, is described. Through the use of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and its calibration methods, 0.5 to 3 cm three dimensional baseline accuracy can be achieved over distances of 2 to 200 km respectively, with only 2 hours of on-site data acquisition. Attention is given to such areas as: the radio flux equivalent of GPS transmissions, synthesized delay precision, transmission and frequency subsystem requirements, tropospheric and ionospheric errors. Applications covered include geodesy and seismic tectonics.

  18. Time frequency requirements for radio interferometric earth physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.; Fliegel, H. F.

    1973-01-01

    Two systems of VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) are now applicable to earth physics: an intercontinental baseline system using antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network, now observing at one-month intervals to determine UTI for spacecraft navigation; and a shorter baseline system called ARIES (Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying), to be used to measure crustal movement in California for earthquake hazards estimation. On the basis of experience with the existing DSN system, a careful study has been made to estimate the time and frequency requirements of both the improved intercontinental system and of ARIES. Requirements for the two systems are compared and contrasted.

  19. Interferometric system for precision imaging of vibrating structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Tang, Tony (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An optical profiler is modified in a way which allows it to image a MEMS device at various points during the movement of the MEMS device. The light source is synchronized with a desired movement of the MEMS device. The light source produces pulse at each synchronization period. During each pulse, an interferometric measurement is carried out. So long as the pulse is short enough such that the device does not move significantly, a detection of the position of the device can be accurately obtained.

  20. Twin mirrors for laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Sassolas, Benoît; Benoît, Quentin; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Danièle; Franc, Janyce; Galimberti, Massimo; Lacoudre, Aline; Michel, Christophe; Montorio, Jean-Luc; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational-wave detectors such as Virgo and the laser interferometric gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) use a long-baseline Michelson interferometer with Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms to search for gravitational waves. The symmetry between the two Fabry-Perot cavities is crucial to reduce the interferometer's sensitivity to the laser amplitude and frequency noise. To this purpose, the transmittance of the mirrors in both cavities should be as close as possible. This paper describes the realization and the characterization of the first twin large low-loss mirrors with transmissions differing by less than 0.01%.

  1. High-speed quantitative interferometric microscopy based phase imaging cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Yan, Keding; Liu, Fei; Wang, Shouyu

    2014-11-01

    The paper proposed a simple large scale bio-sample phase detecting equipment called gravity driven phase detecting cytometer, which is based on quantitative interferometric microscopy to realize flowing red blood cells phase distribution detection. The method has advantages on high throughput phase detecting and statistical analysis with high detecting speed and in real-time. The statistical characteristics of red blood cells are useful for biological analysis and disease detection. We believe this method is shedding more light on quantitatively measurement of the phase distribution of bio-samples.

  2. Abrupt fiber taper based Michelson interferometric deflection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhaobing; Yam, Scott S.-H.

    2008-06-01

    A new compact standard single mode fiber Michelson interferometer deflection sensor was proposed, tested and simulated. The new interferometer consists of a symmetrical abrupt 3 dB taper region with a 40 μm waist diameter, a 700 μm length and a 500nm thick gold layer coating. Compared with similar interferometric devices based on long period gratings that need microfabrication technology and photosensitive fibers, the proposed sensor uses a much simplified fabrication process and normal single mode fiber, and has a linear response of 1.1nm/mm.

  3. Process for combining multiple passes of interferometric SAR data

    DOEpatents

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Yocky, David A.; Hensley, Jr., William H.

    2000-11-21

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) is a promising technology for a wide variety of military and civilian elevation modeling requirements. IFSAR extends traditional two dimensional SAR processing to three dimensions by utilizing the phase difference between two SAR images taken from different elevation positions to determine an angle of arrival for each pixel in the scene. This angle, together with the two-dimensional location information in the traditional SAR image, can be transformed into geographic coordinates if the position and motion parameters of the antennas are known accurately.

  4. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar studies of Alaska volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.; Power, J.; Dzurisin, D.; Thatcher, W.; Masterlark, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging is a recently developed geodetic technique capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter to subcentimeter vertical precision and spatial resolution of tens-of-meter over a relatively large region (~104 km2). The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from InSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic and tectonic processes associated with volcanoes. This paper summarizes our recent InSAR studies of several Alaska volcanoes, which include Okmok, Akutan, Kiska, Augustine, Westdahl, and Peulik volcanoes.

  5. Estimating the ionospheric refraction effect on interferometric GPS - Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Cloppenburg, H.; Lohmar, F. J.

    A method is presented of realistically estimating the effects of missing ionospheric calibration on GPS determined baselines. The method is based on the experience gained with ionospheric path delays derived from Naval Navigation Satellite System Doppler observations. At present, short baseline determinations with the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) in the interferometric or phase differencing mode suffer from lack of ionospheric calibration if only one of the two GPS-frequency bands can be used. The proposed method is expected to permit the use of low-cost clear/acquisition-code receivers for centimeter-accuracy baseline determinations.

  6. Interferometric background reduction for femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dobner, Sven; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Groß, Petra

    2012-11-07

    We present a purely optical method for background suppression in nonlinear spectroscopy based on linear interferometry. Employing an unbalanced Sagnac interferometer, an unprecedented background reduction of 17  dB over a broad bandwidth of 60  THz (2000  cm(-1)) is achieved and its application to femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering loss spectroscopy is demonstrated. Apart from raising the signal-to-background ratio in the measurement of the Raman intensity spectrum, this interferometric method grants access to the spectral phase of the resonant χ(3) contribution. The spectral phase becomes apparent as a dispersive lineshape and is reproduced numerically with a simple oscillator model.

  7. Contact aiming system of 2m laser automatic interferometric comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuanghua; Ye, Xiaoyou; Zou, Lingding; Gao, Hongtang; Gan, Xiaochuan; Shen, Xueping

    2013-01-01

    Composition and principle of 2m laser automatic interferometric comparator were introduced. A novel contact aiming system based on high precision inductance sensor was designed. The zero-cross trigger signal of inductance sensor output voltage was treated as the aiming signal. A rotating mechanism was designed and a segmental shifting motion control model was established. Two key problems, avoiding probe crash and aiming repeatability, were solved. The one dimension end standards such as gauge block, step gauge could be measured directly by this means. The data of test revealed that aiming repeatability was less than 0.2μm.

  8. Interferometric millimeter wave and THz wave doppler radar

    DOEpatents

    Liao, Shaolin; Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Elmer, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    A mixerless high frequency interferometric Doppler radar system and methods has been invented, numerically validated and experimentally tested. A continuous wave source, phase modulator (e.g., a continuously oscillating reference mirror) and intensity detector are utilized. The intensity detector measures the intensity of the combined reflected Doppler signal and the modulated reference beam. Rigorous mathematics formulas have been developed to extract bot amplitude and phase from the measured intensity signal. Software in Matlab has been developed and used to extract such amplitude and phase information from the experimental data. Both amplitude and phase are calculated and the Doppler frequency signature of the object is determined.

  9. Preliminary submillimeter spectroscopic measurements using a submillimeter heterodyne radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safren, H. G.; Stabnow, W. R.; Bufton, J. L.; Peruso, C. J.; Rossey, C. E.; Walker, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    A submillimeter heterodyne radiometer uses a submillimeter laser, pumped by a CO2 laser, as a local oscillator and a room temperature Schottky barrier diode as the first IF mixer. The radiometer can resolve spectral lines in the submillimeter region of the spectrum (arising from pure rotational molecular transitions) to within 0.3 MHz, using acousto-optic spectrum analyzer which measures the power spectrum by simultaneously sampling 0.3 MHz wide channels over a 100 MHz bandwidth spanning the line. Preliminary observations of eight spectral lines of H2O2, CO, NH3 and H2O, all lying in the 434-524 micrometer wavelength range are described. All eight lines were observed using two local oscillator frequencies obtained by operating the submillimeter laser with either methyl fluoride (CH3F) or formic acid (HCOOH) as the lasing gas. Sample calculations of line parameters from the observed data show good agreement with established values. One development goal is the size and weight reduction of the package to make it suitable for balloon or shuttle experiments to detect trace gases in the upper atmosphere.

  10. Infrared Fiber Radiometer For Thermometry In Electromagnetic Induced Therapeutic Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzir, A.; Bowman, F.; Asfour, Y.; Zur, A.; Valeri, C. R.

    1988-06-01

    Hypothermia is a condition which results from prolonged exposure to a cold environment. Rapid and efficient heating is needed to rewarm the patient from 32-35°C to normal body temperature. Hyperthermia in cancer treatment involves heating malignant tumors to 42.5-43.0°C for an extended period (e.g. 30 min.) in an attempt to obtain remission. Microwave or radio frequency heating is often used for rewarming in hypothermia or for temperature elevation in hyperthermia treatment. One severe problem with such heating is the accurate measurement and control of temperature in the presence of a strong electro-magnetic field. For this purpose we have developed a fiberoptic radiometer system which is based on a non-metallic, infrared fiber probe, which can operate either in contact or in non-contact modes. In preliminary investigations the radiometer worked well in a strong microwave or radiofrequency field, with an accuracy of ±0.5°C.

  11. Infrared fibers for radiometer thermometry in hypothermia and hyperthermia treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Katzir, A.; Bowman, H.F.; Asfour, Y.; Zur, A.; Valeri, C.R.

    1989-06-01

    Hypothermia is a condition which results from prolonged exposure to a cold environment. Rapid and efficient heating is needed to rewarm the patient from 32-35 degrees C to normal body temperature. Hyperthermia in cancer treatment involves heating malignant tumors to 42.5-43.0 degrees C for an extended period (e.g., 30 min) in an attempt to obtain remission. Microwave or radio frequency heating is often used for rewarming in hypothermia or for temperature elevation in hyperthermia treatment. One severe problem with such heating is the accurate measurement and control of temperature in the presence of a strong electromagnetic field. For this purpose, we have developed a fiberoptic radiometer system which is based on a nonmetallic, infrared fiber probe, which can operate either in contact or noncontact mode. In preliminary investigations, the radiometer worked well in a strong microwave or radiofrequency field, with an accuracy of +/- 0.5 degrees C. This fiberoptic thermometer was used to control the surface temperature of objects within +/- 2 degrees C.

  12. Knudsen pump inspired by Crookes radiometer with a specular wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen; Shahabi, Vahid; Roohi, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    A rarefied gas is considered in a channel consisting of two infinite parallel plates between which an evenly spaced array of smaller plates is arranged normal to the channel direction. Each of these smaller plates is assumed to possess one ideally specularly reflective and one ideally diffusively reflective side. When the temperature of the small plates differs from the temperature of the sidewalls of the channel, these boundary conditions result in a temperature profile around the edges of each small plate that breaks the reflection symmetry along the channel direction. This in turn results in a force on each plate and a net gas flow along the channel. The situation is analyzed numerically using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method and compared with analytical results where available. The influence of the ideally specularly reflective wall is assessed by comparing with simulations using a finite accommodation coefficient at the corresponding wall. The configuration bears some similarity to a Crookes radiometer, where a nonsymmetric temperature profile at the radiometer vanes is generated by different temperatures on each side of the vane, resulting in a motion of the rotor. The described principle may find applications in pumping gas on small scales driven by temperature gradients.

  13. Spatial sampling errors for a satellite-borne scanning radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manalo, Natividad D.; Smith, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometer is planned as the Earth radiation budget instrument for the Earth Observation System, to be flown in the late 1990's. In order to minimize the spatial sampling errors of the measurements, it is necessary to select design parameters for the instrument such that the resulting point spread function will minimize spatial sampling errors. These errors are described as aliasing and blurring errors. Aliasing errors are due to presence in the measurements of spatial frequencies beyond the Nyquist frequency, and blurring errors are due to attenuation of frequencies below the Nyquist frequency. The design parameters include pixel shape and dimensions, sampling rate, scan period, and time constants of the measurements. For a satellite-borne scanning radiometer, the pixel footprint grows quickly at large nadir angles. The aliasing errors thus decrease with increasing scan angle, but the blurring errors grow quickly. The best design minimizes the sum of these two errors over a range of scan angles. Results of a parameter study are presented, showing effects of data rates, pixel dimensions, spacecraft altitude, and distance from the spacecraft track.

  14. Characterization of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. B., III; Barkstrom, B. R.

    1991-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanning radiometers were used to measure the earth's radiation fields during the period November 1984 through February 1990. The ERBE radiometric packages were placed into orbit aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft platforms. In each radiometric package, thermistor bolometers were used as detection elements for the broadband total (0,2 - 50,0 microns), shortwave (0,2 - 5,0 microns), and longwave (5,0 - 50,0 microns) spectral regions. Flight calibration facilities were built into each of the spacecraft radiometric packages. The flight facilities consisted of black bodies, tungsten lamps, and silicon photodiodes. The black bodies and tungsten lamps were found to be reliable at precision levels approaching 0,5 percent over a five-year period. The photodiodes were found to degrade more than 2 percent during the first year in orbit. In this paper, the flight calibration systems for the ERBE scanning radiometers are described along with the resultant measurements.

  15. Improvement of scanning radiometer performance by digital reference averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bremer, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Most radiometers utilize a calibration technique in which measurements of a known reference are subtracted from measurements of an unknown source so that common-mode bias errors are cancelled. When a radiometer is scanned over a varying scene, it produces a sequence of outputs, each being proportional to the difference between the reference and the corresponding input. A reference averaging technique is presented that employs a simple digital algorithm which exploits the asymmetry between the time-variable scene inputs and the nominally constant reference input by averaging many reference measurements to decrease the statistical uncertainty in the reference value. This algorithm is, therefore, optimized by an asymmetric chopping sequence in which the scene is viewed for more than one-half of the duty cycle (unlike the analog Dicke technique). Reference averaging algorithms are well within the capabilities of small microprocessors. Although this paper develops the technique for microwave radiometry, it may be beneficial for any system which measures a large number of unknowns relative to a known reference in the presence of slowly varying common-mode errors.

  16. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, A.; Roucaries, B.; Williams, B.; Rubin, I.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Meinhold, P.; Lubin, P.; Franceschet, C.; Jahn, S.; Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.

    2010-12-01

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  17. L-Band Radiometer Measurements of Conifer Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.; LeVine, D.; Chauhan, N.; deMatthaeis, P.; Bidwell, S.; Haken, M.

    2000-01-01

    Airborne radiometer measurements have been made at L-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study radiometric response to biomass and soil moisture. The horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer, ESTAR, has been deployed abroad a NASA-P3 aircraft which is based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The instrument has been mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and images data in the cross track direction. Aircraft and surface measurements were made in July, August and November of 1999 over relatively homogeneous conifer stands of varying biomass. The surface measurements included soil moisture measurements in several stands. The soil moisture was low during the July flight and highest in November after heavy rains had occurred. The microwave images clearly distinguished between the different forest stands. Stand age, obtained from International Paper Corporation which owns the stands, showed a strong correlation between brightness temperature and stand age. This agrees with previous simulation studies of conifer forests which show that the brightness temperature increases with increasing stand biomass. Research is continuing to seek a quantitative correlation between the observed brightness temperature of the stands and their biomass and surface soil moisture.

  18. Uncertainties in radiometer intercalibration associated with variability in geophysical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, John Xun; McKague, Darren S.; Ruf, Christopher S.

    2016-10-01

    Spaceborne radiometry plays a major role in weather and climate science and applications. Intercalibrating different radiometers has become an indispensable task for diagnosing instrument performance and integrating constellation data to extend the observational record. Because intercalibration affects both base radiance data and downstream science products, it is critical to examine intercalibration performance. In this study, we use constellation radiometer data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission to detect and characterize a pronounced variability in intercalibration stability with a 40 day periodicity. A regional dependence of the calibration is also found. The variability is related to geophysical parameters including water vapor, surface wind speed, and sea surface temperature. It is found that the variability is caused by periodic variations in the local times and locations of the overlap regions between spacecraft. An analytical orbit model is developed for calculating the period of oscillation and agrees well with observation. Calibration errors show nonlinear and nonmonotonic dependences on geophysical parameters and brightness temperature, which cannot be removed by simple linear regression. The variability affects both base radiance calibration accuracy and retrieved science data products.

  19. ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    AUSTIN, ME; LOHR, J

    2002-08-01

    OAK A271 ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) heterodyne radiometer diagnostic on DIII-D has been upgraded with the addition of eight channels for a total of 40. The new, higher frequency channels allow measurements of electron temperature into the magnetic axis in discharges at maximum field, 2.15 T. The complete set now extends over the full usable range of second harmonic emission frequencies at 2.0 T covering radii from the outer edge inward to the location of third harmonic overlap on the high field side. Full coverage permits the measurement of heat pulses and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations on both sides of the magnetic axis. In addition, the symmetric measurements are used to fix the location of the magnetic axis in tokamak magnetic equilibrium reconstructions. Also, the new higher frequency channels have been used to determine central T{sub e} with good time resolution in low field, high density discharges using third harmonic ECE in the optically gray and optically thick regimes.

  20. Aquarius Radiometer RFI Detection, Mitigation, and Impact Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Christopher; Chen, David; Le Vine, David; de Matthaeis, Paolo; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D satellite was launched on 10 June 2011 into a sun-synchronous polar orbit and the Aquarius microwave radiometers [1] became operational on 25 August 2011. Since that time, it has been measuring brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz with vertical, horizontal and 3rd Stokes polarizations . Beginning well before the launch, there has been the concern that Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) could have an appreciable presence. This concern was initiated by, among other things, its prevalence in both early [2] and more recent [3,4] aircraft field experiments using 1.4 GHz radiometers, as well as by the strong RFI environment encountered during the recent ESA SMOS mission, also at 1.4 GHz [5]. As a result, a number of methods for RFI detection and mitigation have been developed and tested. One in particular, "glitch detection" and "pulse blanking" mitigation has been adapted for use by Aquarius [6, 7]. The early on-orbit performance of the Aquarius RFI detection and mitigation algorithm is presented here, together with an assessment of the global RFI environment at 1.4 GHz which can be derived from the Aquarius results.