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Sample records for 2d inversion results

  1. Multiple Frequency Contrast Source Inversion Method for Vertical Electromagnetic Profiling: 2D Simulation Results and Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghe; Song, Linping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous multiple frequency contrast source inversion (CSI) method is applied to reconstructing hydrocarbon reservoir targets in a complex multilayered medium in two dimensions. It simulates the effects of a salt dome sedimentary formation in the context of reservoir monitoring. In this method, the stabilized biconjugate-gradient fast Fourier transform (BCGS-FFT) algorithm is applied as a fast solver for the 2D volume integral equation for the forward computation. The inversion technique with CSI combines the efficient FFT algorithm to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication and the stable convergence of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI in the iteration process. As a result, this method is capable of making quantitative conductivity image reconstruction effectively for large-scale electromagnetic oil exploration problems, including the vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEP) survey investigated here. A number of numerical examples have been demonstrated to validate the effectiveness and capacity of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI method for a limited array view in VEP.

  2. Magnetotelluric measurements across the southern Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa: data improving strategies and 2-D inversion results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, S.; Chen, X.; Weckmann, U.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in areas with electromagnetic (EM) noise sources such as electric fences, power and railway lines pose severe challenges to the standard processing procedures. In order to significantly improve the data quality advanced filtering and processing techniques need to be applied. The presented 5-component MT data set from two field campaigns in 2009 and 2010 in the Barberton/Badplaas area, South Africa, was acquired within the framework of the German-South African geo-scientific research initiative Inkaba yeAfrica. Approximately 200 MT sites aligned along six profiles provide a good areal coverage of the southern part of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB). Since it is one of the few remaining well-preserved geological formations from the Archean, it presents an ideal area to study the tectonic evolution and the role of plate tectonics on Early Earth. Comparing the electric properties, the surrounding high and low grade metamorphic rocks are characteristically resistive whereas mineralized shear zones are possible areas of higher electrical conductivity. Mapping their depth extension is a crucial step towards understanding the formation and the evolution of the BGB. Unfortunately, in the measurement area numerous noise sources were active, producing severe spikes and steps in the EM fields. These disturbances mainly affect long periods which are needed for resolving the deepest structures. The Remote Reference technique as well as two filtering techniques are applied to improve the data in different period ranges. Adjusting their parameters for each site is necessary to obtain the best possible results. The improved data set is used for two-dimensional inversion studies for the six profiles applying the RLM2DI algorithm by Rodi and Mackie (2001, implemented in WinGlink). In the models, areas with higher conductivity can be traced beneath known faults throughout the entire array along different profiles. Resistive zones seem to correlate

  3. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  4. Efficient 2d full waveform inversion using Fortran coarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Donghyun; Kim, ahreum; Ha, Wansoo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a time-domain seismic inversion program using the coarray feature of the Fortran 2008 standard to parallelize the algorithm. We converted a 2d acoustic parallel full waveform inversion program with Message Passing Interface (MPI) to a coarray program and examined performance of the two inversion programs. The results show that the speed of the waveform inversion program using the coarray is slightly faster than that of the MPI version. The standard coarray lacks features for collective communication; however, it can be improved in following standards since it is introduced recently. The parallel algorithm can be applied for 3D seismic data processing.

  5. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  6. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  7. Resistivity inversion in 2-D anisotropic media: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, Timothy; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Zhou, Bing; Greenhalgh, Mark; Marescot, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Many rocks and layered/fractured sequences have a clearly expressed electrical anisotropy although it is rare in practice to incorporate anisotropy into resistivity inversion. In this contribution, we present a series of 2.5-D synthetic inversion experiments for various electrode configurations and 2-D anisotropic models. We examine and compare the image reconstructions obtained using the correct anisotropic inversion code with those obtained using the false but widely used isotropic assumption. Superior reconstruction in terms of reduced data misfit, true anomaly shape and position, and anisotropic background parameters were obtained when the correct anisotropic assumption was employed for medium to high coefficients of anisotropy. However, for low coefficient values the isotropic assumption produced better-quality results. When an erroneous isotropic inversion is performed on medium to high level anisotropic data, the images are dominated by patterns of banded artefacts and high data misfits. Various pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole data sets were investigated and evaluated for the accuracy of the inversion result. The eigenvalue spectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix and the formal resolution matrix were also computed to determine the information content and goodness of the results. We also present a data selection strategy based on high sensitivity measurements which drastically reduces the number of data to be inverted but still produces comparable results to that of the comprehensive data set. Inversion was carried out using transversely isotropic model parameters described in two different co-ordinate frames for the conductivity tensor, namely Cartesian versus natural or eigenframe. The Cartesian frame provided a more stable inversion product. This can be simply explained from inspection of the eigenspectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix for the two model descriptions.

  8. Constriant inversion of 2D magnetotelluric data with anisotropic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Weckmann, U.

    2011-12-01

    Within the framework of the German - South African geo-scientific research initiative Inkaba yeAfrica a series of magnetotelluric (MT) field experiments were conducted along the Agulhas-Karoo Transect in South Africa. This transect crosses several continental collision zones between the Cape Fold Belt, the Namaqua Natal Mobile Belt and the Kaapvaal Craton. Along the Cape Fold Belt (CFB) profile we can identify areas (>10 km) where MT sites exhibit phases over 90°. This phenomenon usually occurs in presence of electrical anisotropy. Due to the dense site spacing we are able to observe this behaviour consistently at several sites. The anisotropy of electrical conductivity is essentially a scale effect: Even if the conductivity is isotropic on the micro scale, it will become anisotropic on a larger scale if, in the averaging volume, preferred orientation (e.g., layering or lamination) exist. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the electrical anisotropy in more details and furthermore electrical anisotropy offers new degrees of freedom, which should allow a better interpretation of data. In 2D MT case with considering of electrical anisotropy, computing of impedance tensor requires two independent electric field solutions computed for two different source polarisations. Based on the forward problem formulation and its numerical approximation we derive partial differential equations for the sensitivities of the magnetotelluric fields with respect to the elements of the conductivity tensor within the medium. For illustration a sensitivity study for a simple synthetic model is shown. We present an algorithm for the inversion of 2D magnetotelluric data with anisotropic conductivities which is a extension of the well-known NLCG minimization algorithm to anisotropic model. To constrain the structure complexity, a penalty function consists of datamisfit, standard model roughness and quadratic variation of the conductivity tensor elements is minimized. To demonstrate the

  9. An inverse design method for 2D airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi-Yong; Cui, Peng; Zhang, Gen-Bao

    2010-03-01

    The computational method for aerodynamic design of aircraft is applied more universally than before, in which the design of an airfoil is a hot problem. The forward problem is discussed by most relative papers, but inverse method is more useful in practical designs. In this paper, the inverse design of 2D airfoil was investigated. A finite element method based on the variational principle was used for carrying out. Through the simulation, it was shown that the method was fit for the design.

  10. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  11. ELRIS2D: A MATLAB Package for the 2D Inversion of DC Resistivity/IP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, Irfan

    2016-04-01

    ELRIS2D is an open source code written in MATLAB for the two-dimensional inversion of direct current resistivity (DCR) and time domain induced polarization (IP) data. The user interface of the program is designed for functionality and ease of use. All available settings of the program can be reached from the main window. The subsurface is discretized using a hybrid mesh generated by the combination of structured and unstructured meshes, which reduces the computational cost of the whole inversion procedure. The inversion routine is based on the smoothness constrained least squares method. In order to verify the program, responses of two test models and field data sets were inverted. The models inverted from the synthetic data sets are consistent with the original test models in both DC resistivity and IP cases. A field data set acquired in an archaeological site is also used for the verification of outcomes of the program in comparison with the excavation results.

  12. Full-waveform inversion in 2D VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, Nishant

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique designed to produce a high-resolution model of the subsurface by using information contained in entire seismic waveforms. This thesis presents a methodology for FWI in elastic VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical axis of symmetry) media and discusses synthetic results for heterogeneous VTI models. First, I develop FWI for multicomponent data from a horizontally layered VTI model. The reflectivity method, which permits computation of only PP reflections or a combination of PP and PSV events, is employed to model the data. The Gauss-Newton technique is used to invert for the interval Thomsen parameters, while keeping the densities fixed at the correct values. Eigenvalue/eigenvector decompostion of the Hessian matrix helps analyze the sensitivity of the objective function to the model parameters. Whereas PP data alone are generally sufficient to constrain all four Thomsen parameters even for conventional spreads, including PS reflections provides better constraints, especially for the deeper part of the model. Next, I derive the gradients of the FWI objective function with respect to the stiffness coefficients of arbitrarily anisotropic media by employing the adjoint-state method. From these expressions, it is straightforward to compute the gradients for parameters of 2D heterogeneous VTI media. FWI is implemented in the time domain with the steepest-descent method used to iteratively update the model. The algorithm is tested on transmitted multicomponent data generated for Gaussian anomalies in Thomsen parameters embedded in homogeneous VTI media. To test the sensitivity of the objective function to different model parameters, I derive an an- alytic expression for the Frechet kernel of FWI for arbitrary anisotropic symmetry by using the Born approximation and asymptotic Green's functions. The amplitude of the kernel, which represents the radiation pattern of a secondary source (that source describes a perturbation

  13. Image appraisal for 2D and 3D electromagnetic inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. The columns of the model resolution matrix are shown to yield empirical estimates of the horizontal and vertical resolution throughout the imaging region. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how the estimated data noise maps into parameter error. When the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion), an iterative method can be applied to statistically estimate the model covariance matrix, as well as a regularization covariance matrix. The latter estimates the error in the inverted results caused by small variations in the regularization parameter. A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on a synthetic cross well EM data set.

  14. Efficiency of Pareto joint inversion of 2D geophysical data using global optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Katarzyna; Bogacz, Adrian; Kozubal, Adam; Danek, Tomasz; Wojdyła, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Pareto joint inversion of two or more sets of data is a promising new tool of modern geophysical exploration. In the first stage of our investigation we created software enabling execution of forward solvers of two geophysical methods (2D magnetotelluric and gravity) as well as inversion with possibility of constraining solution with seismic data. In the algorithm solving MT forward solver Helmholtz's equations, finite element method and Dirichlet's boundary conditions were applied. Gravity forward solver was based on Talwani's algorithm. To limit dimensionality of solution space we decided to describe model as sets of polygons, using Sharp Boundary Interface (SBI) approach. The main inversion engine was created using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm adapted to handle two or more target functions and to prevent acceptance of solutions which are non - realistic or incompatible with Pareto scheme. Each inversion run generates single Pareto solution, which can be added to Pareto Front. The PSO inversion engine was parallelized using OpenMP standard, what enabled execution code for practically unlimited amount of threads at once. Thereby computing time of inversion process was significantly decreased. Furthermore, computing efficiency increases with number of PSO iterations. In this contribution we analyze the efficiency of created software solution taking under consideration details of chosen global optimization engine used as a main joint minimization engine. Additionally we study the scale of possible decrease of computational time caused by different methods of parallelization applied for both forward solvers and inversion algorithm. All tests were done for 2D magnetotelluric and gravity data based on real geological media. Obtained results show that even for relatively simple mid end computational infrastructure proposed solution of inversion problem can be applied in practice and used for real life problems of geophysical inversion and interpretation.

  15. 2D resistivity inversion using conjugate gradients for a finite element discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, C. A.; Santos, F. M.; Porsani, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present a DC 2D inversion algorithm using conjugate gradients relaxation to solve the maximum likelihood inverse equations. We apply, according to Zhang (1995), the maximum likelihood inverse theory developed by Tarantola and Valette (1982) to our 2D resistivity inversion. This algorithm was chosen to this research because it doesn't need to calculate the field's derivatives. Since conjugate gradient techniques only need the results of the sensitivity matrix à or its transpose ÃT multiplying a vector, the actual computation of the sensitivity matrix are not performed, according to the methodology described in Zhang (1995). In Zhang (1995), the terms Ãx and ÃTy, are dependent of the stiffness matrix K and its partial derivative ∂K⁄∂ρ. The inversion methodology described in Zhang (1995) is for the case of 3D electrical resistivity by finite differences discretization. So it was necessary to make a series of adjustments to obtain a satisfactory result for 2D electrical inversion using finite element method. The difference between the modeling of 3D resistivity with finite difference and the 2D finite element method are in the integration variable, used in the 2D case. In the 2D case the electrical potential are initially calculated in the transformed domain, including the stiffness matrix, and only in the end is transformed in Cartesian domain. In the case of 3D, described by Zhang (1995) this is done differently, the calculation is done directly in the Cartesian domain. In the literature was not found any work describing how to deal with this problem. Because the calculations of Ãx and ÃTy must be done without having the real stiffness matrix, the adaptation consist in calculate the stiffness matrix and its partial derivative using a set of integration variables. We transform those matrix in the same form has in the potential case, but with different sets of variables. The results will be presented and are very promising.

  16. Skyrmions in quasi-2D chiral magnets with broken bulk and surface inversion symmetry (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeria, Mohit; Banerjee, Sumilan; Rowland, James

    2015-09-01

    Most theoretical studies of chiral magnetism, and the resulting spin textures, have focused on 3D systems with broken bulk inversion symmetry, where skyrmions are stabilized by easy-axis anisotropy. In this talk I will describe our results on 2D and quasi-2D systems with broken surface inversion, where we find [1] that skyrmion crystals are much more stable than in 3D, especially for the case of easy-plane anisotropy. These results are of particular interest for thin films, surfaces, and oxide interfaces [2], where broken surface-inversion symmetry and Rashba spin-orbit coupling naturally lead to both the chiral Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction and to easy-plane compass anisotropy. I will then turn to systems that break both bulk and surface inversion, resulting in two distinct DM terms arising from Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. I will describe [3] the evolution of the skyrmion structure and of the phase diagram as a function of the ratio of Dresselhaus and Rashba terms, which can be tuned by varying film thickness and strain. [1] S. Banerjee, J. Rowland, O. Erten, and M. Randeria, PRX 4, 031045 (2014). [2] S. Banerjee, O. Erten, and M. Randeria, Nature Phys. 9, 626 (2013). [3] J. Rowland, S. Banerjee and M. Randeria, (unpublished).

  17. Almost but not quite 2D, Non-linear Bayesian Inversion of CSEM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Key, K.; Bodin, T.

    2013-12-01

    efficiently evaluate the forward response using 1D profiles extracted from the model at the common-midpoints of the EM source-receiver pairs. Since the 1D approximation is locally valid at different midpoint locations, the computation time is far lower than is required by a full 2D or 3D simulation. We have applied this method to both synthetic and real CSEM survey data from the Scarborough gas field on the Northwest shelf of Australia, resulting in a spatially variable quantification of resistivity and its uncertainty in 2D. This Bayesian approach results in a large database of 2D models that comprise a posterior probability distribution, which we can subset to test various hypotheses about the range of model structures compatible with the data. For example, we can subset the model distributions to examine the hypothesis that a resistive reservoir extends overs a certain spatial extent. Depending on how this conditions other parts of the model space, light can be shed on the geological viability of the hypothesis. Since tackling spatially variable uncertainty and trade-offs in 2D and 3D is a challenging research problem, the insights gained from this work may prove valuable for subsequent full 2D and 3D Bayesian inversions.

  18. Analytic Differentiation of Barlat's 2D Criteria for Inverse Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Endelt, Benny; Nielsen, Karl Brian; Danckert, Joachim

    2005-08-05

    The demand for alternative identification schemes for identification of constitutive parameters is getting more pronounced as the complexity of the constitutive equations increases, i.e. the number of parameters subject to identification. A general framework for inverse identification of constitutive parameters associated with sheet metal forming is proposed in the article. The inverse problem is solved, through minimization of the least square error between an experimental punch force sampled from a deep drawing and a predicted punch force produced from a coherent finite element model.

  19. 2-D acoustic VTI full waveform inversion for CCS monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, S.; Kim, W. K.; Min, D. J.; Jeong, W.; OH, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    These days many geophysicists have been working not only for oil and gas exploration but also for CO2 monitoring for CCS (Carbon Capture and storage). When CO2 is injected and stored to the target layer, it changes the physical properties of subsurface media like p-wave velocity, density and so on. Seismic method is one of the most widely used geophysical methods for CO2 monitoring, because it can delineate physical properties of subsurface media. To prevent CO2 from leaking out of reservoirs, most target areas require caprocks, and shale often acts as a caprock. However, shale has a strong anisotropic property. Without considering the anisotropic property of subsurface media, interpretations of seismic monitoring data can distort the CO2distribution or movement in the subsurface media. For computational efficiency, seismic data interpretation based on acoustic VTI (Vertical Transversely Isotropic) wave equations has been commonly done although it does not consider the shear waves. To investigate the importance of considering anisotropic properties in acoustic FWI (full waveform inversion) for CO2 monitoring, we compare results obtained by the acoustic VTI FWI with those of the conventional acoustic FWI for isotropic case in the frequency domain. Both methods are based on the node-based finite-element method. Numerical examples show that neglecting anisotropic properties of subsurface media can distort distribution of CO2 and degrade reliability of subsurface image obtained by FWI. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Human Resources Development program (No. 20134010200510) of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korean government Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy and by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" grant funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries of Korea.

  20. Interpretation of gravity data using 2-D continuous wavelet transformation and 3-D inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandel Kahoo, Amin; Nejati Kalateh, Ali; Salajegheh, Farshad

    2015-10-01

    Recently the continuous wavelet transform has been proposed for interpretation of potential field anomalies. In this paper, we introduced a 2D wavelet based method that uses a new mother wavelet for determination of the location and the depth to the top and base of gravity anomaly. The new wavelet is the first horizontal derivatives of gravity anomaly of a buried cube with unit dimensions. The effectiveness of the proposed method is compared with Li and Oldenburg inversion algorithm and is demonstrated with synthetics and real gravity data. The real gravity data is taken over the Mobrun massive sulfide ore body in Noranda, Quebec, Canada. The obtained results of the 2D wavelet based algorithm and Li and Oldenburg inversion on the Mobrun ore body had desired similarities to the drill-hole depth information. In all of the inversion algorithms the model non-uniqueness is the challenging problem. Proposed method is based on a simple theory and there is no model non-uniqueness on it.

  1. Skyrmions in quasi-2D chiral magnets with broken bulk and surface inversion symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, James; Banerjee, Sumilan; Randeria, Mohit

    2015-03-01

    Most theoretical studies of skyrmions have focused on chiral magnets with broken bulk inversion symmetry, stabilized by easy-axis anisotropy. Recently, we considered 2D systems with broken surface inversion and showed that skyrmion crystals are more stable than in 3D, pointing out the importance of easy-plane anisotropy. In the present work we investigate quasi-2D systems which break both bulk and surface inversion symmetry. The Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional thus contains two Dzyloshinskii-Moriya terms of strength DD and DR arising from Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit coupling respectively. We trace the evolution of the phase diagram as DD /DR is varied, and find that skyrmions are increasingly destabilized with respect to the cone phase as DD increases relative to DR. We find an evolution from vortex-like skyrmions in the pure Dresselhaus limit to hedgehog-like skyrmions in the pure Rashba limit. We discuss the relevance of these results to existing experiments and the prospects of tuning the ratio of Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit coupling via film thickness and strain. Supported by NSF DMR-1410364 (J.R. and M.R.) and DOE-BES DE-SC0005035 (S.B.)

  2. A 2-D dynamical model of mesospheric temperature inversions in winter

    SciTech Connect

    Hauchecorne, A.; Maillard, A. )

    1990-11-01

    A 2-D stratospheric and mesospheric dynamical model including drag and diffusion due to gravity wave breaking is used to simulate winter mesospheric temperature inversions similar to those observed by Rayleigh lidar. It is shown that adiabatic heating associated to descending velocities in the mesosphere is the main mechanism involved in the formation of such inversions. Sensitivity tests are performed with the model and confirm this assumption. It is also explained why other previous similar studies with 2-D models did not show mesospheric inversion layers.

  3. Infarct quantification using 3D inversion recovery and 2D phase sensitive inversion recovery; validation in patients and ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular-MR (CMR) is the gold standard for quantifying myocardial infarction using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique. Both 2D- and 3D-LGE-sequences are used in clinical practise and in clinical and experimental studies for infarct quantification. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate if image acquisitions with 2D- and 3D-LGE show the same infarct size in patients and ex vivo. Methods Twenty-six patients with previous myocardial infarction who underwent a CMR scan were included. Images were acquired 10-20 minutes after an injection of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-based contrast agent. Two LGE-sequences, 3D-inversion recovery (IR) and 2D-phase-sensitive (PS) IR, were used in all patients to quantify infarction size. Furthermore, six pigs with reperfused infarction in the left anterior descending artery (40 minutes occlusion and 4 hours of reperfusion) were scanned with 2D- and 3D-LGE ex vivo. A high resolution T1-sequence was used as reference for the infarct quantification ex vivo. Spearman’s rank-order correlation, Wilcoxon matched pairs test and bias according to Bland-Altman was used for comparison of infarct size with different LGE-sequences. Results There was no significant difference between the 2D- and 3D-LGE sequence in left ventricular mass (LVM) (2D: 115 ± 25 g; 3D: 117 ± 24 g: p = 0.35). Infarct size in vivo using 2D- and 3D-LGE showed high correlation and low bias for both LGE-sequences both in absolute volume of infarct (r = 0.97, bias 0.47 ± 2.1 ml) and infarct size as part of LVM (r = 0.94, bias 0.16 ± 2.0%). The 2D- and 3D-LGE-sequences ex vivo correlated well (r = 0.93, bias 0.67 ± 2.4%) for infarct size as part of the LVM. The IR LGE-sequences overestimated infarct size as part of the LVM ex vivo compared to the high resolution T1-sequence (bias 6.7 ± 3.0%, 7.3 ± 2.7% for 2D-PSIR and 3D-IR respectively, p < 0.05 for both). Conclusions Infarct quantification with

  4. Study on 2D random medium inversion algorithm based on Fuzzy C-means Clustering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Zhu, P.; Gu, Y.; Yang, X.; Jiang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: In seismic exploration for metal deposits, the traditional seismic inversion method based on layered homogeneous medium theory seems difficult to inverse small scale inhomogeneity and spatial variation of the actual medium. The reason is that physical properties of actual medium are more likely random distribution rather than layered. Thus, it is necessary to investigate a random medium inversion algorithm. The velocity of 2D random medium can be described as a function of five parameters: the background velocity (V0), the standard deviation of velocity (σ), the horizontal and vertical autocorrelation lengths (A and B), and the autocorrelation angle (θ). In this study, we propose an inversion algorithm for random medium based on the Fuzzy C-means Clustering (FCM) theory, whose basic idea is that FCM is used to control the inversion process to move forward to the direction we desired by clustering the estimated parameters into groups. Our method can be divided into three steps: firstly, the three parameters (A, B, θ) are estimated from 2D post-stack seismic data using the non-stationary random medium parameter estimation method, and then the estimated parameters are clustered to different groups according to FCM; secondly, the initial random medium model is constructed with clustered groups and the rest two parameters (V0 and σ) obtained from the well logging data; at last, inversion of the random medium are conducted to obtain velocity, impedance and random medium parameters using the Conjugate Gradient Method. The inversion experiments of synthetic seismic data show that the velocity models inverted by our algorithm are close to the real velocity distribution and the boundary of different media can be distinguished clearly.Key words: random medium, inversion, FCM, parameter estimation

  5. Simultaneous elastic parameter inversion in 2-D/3-D TTI medium combined later arrival times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-ying; Wang, Tao; Yang, Shang-bei; Li, Xing-wang; Huang, Guo-jiao

    2016-04-01

    Traditional traveltime inversion for anisotropic medium is, in general, based on a "weak" assumption in the anisotropic property, which simplifies both the forward part (ray tracing is performed once only) and the inversion part (a linear inversion solver is possible). But for some real applications, a general (both "weak" and "strong") anisotropic medium should be considered. In such cases, one has to develop a ray tracing algorithm to handle with the general (including "strong") anisotropic medium and also to design a non-linear inversion solver for later tomography. Meanwhile, it is constructive to investigate how much the tomographic resolution can be improved by introducing the later arrivals. For this motivation, we incorporated our newly developed ray tracing algorithm (multistage irregular shortest-path method) for general anisotropic media with a non-linear inversion solver (a damped minimum norm, constrained least squares problem with a conjugate gradient approach) to formulate a non-linear inversion solver for anisotropic medium. This anisotropic traveltime inversion procedure is able to combine the later (reflected) arrival times. Both 2-D/3-D synthetic inversion experiments and comparison tests show that (1) the proposed anisotropic traveltime inversion scheme is able to recover the high contrast anomalies and (2) it is possible to improve the tomographic resolution by introducing the later (reflected) arrivals, but not as expected in the isotropic medium, because the different velocity (qP, qSV and qSH) sensitivities (or derivatives) respective to the different elastic parameters are not the same but are also dependent on the inclination angle.

  6. 2D Seismic Imaging of Elastic Parameters by Frequency Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2008-12-01

    Thanks to recent advances in parallel computing, full waveform inversion is today a tractable seismic imaging method to reconstruct physical parameters of the earth interior at different scales ranging from the near- surface to the deep crust. We present a massively parallel 2D frequency-domain full-waveform algorithm for imaging visco-elastic media from multi-component seismic data. The forward problem (i.e. the resolution of the frequency-domain 2D PSV elastodynamics equations) is based on low-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method (P0 and/or P1 interpolations). Thanks to triangular unstructured meshes, the DG method allows accurate modeling of both body waves and surface waves in case of complex topography for a discretization of 10 to 15 cells per shear wavelength. The frequency-domain DG system is solved efficiently for multiple sources with the parallel direct solver MUMPS. The local inversion procedure (i.e. minimization of residuals between observed and computed data) is based on the adjoint-state method which allows to efficiently compute the gradient of the objective function. Applying the inversion hierarchically from the low frequencies to the higher ones defines a multiresolution imaging strategy which helps convergence towards the global minimum. In place of expensive Newton algorithm, the combined use of the diagonal terms of the approximate Hessian matrix and optimization algorithms based on quasi-Newton methods (Conjugate Gradient, LBFGS, ...) allows to improve the convergence of the iterative inversion. The distribution of forward problem solutions over processors driven by a mesh partitioning performed by METIS allows to apply most of the inversion in parallel. We shall present the main features of the parallel modeling/inversion algorithm, assess its scalability and illustrate its performances with realistic synthetic case studies.

  7. 2-D traveltime and waveform inversion for improved seismic imaging: Naga Thrust and Fold Belt, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Zelt, Colin A.; Bally, Albert W.; Dasgupta, Rahul

    2008-05-01

    Exploration along the Naga Thrust and Fold Belt in the Assam province of Northeast India encounters geological as well as logistic challenges. Drilling for hydrocarbons, traditionally guided by surface manifestations of the Naga thrust fault, faces additional challenges in the northeast where the thrust fault gradually deepens leaving subtle surface expressions. In such an area, multichannel 2-D seismic data were collected along a line perpendicular to the trend of the thrust belt. The data have a moderate signal-to-noise ratio and suffer from ground roll and other acquisition-related noise. In addition to data quality, the complex geology of the thrust belt limits the ability of conventional seismic processing to yield a reliable velocity model which in turn leads to poor subsurface image. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of traveltime and waveform inversion as supplements to conventional seismic imaging and interpretation processes. Both traveltime and waveform inversion utilize the first arrivals that are typically discarded during conventional seismic processing. As a first step, a smooth velocity model with long wavelength characteristics of the subsurface is estimated through inversion of the first-arrival traveltimes. This velocity model is then used to obtain a Kirchhoff pre-stack depth-migrated image which in turn is used for the interpretation of the fault. Waveform inversion is applied to the central part of the seismic line to a depth of ~1 km where the quality of the migrated image is poor. Waveform inversion is performed in the frequency domain over a series of iterations, proceeding from low to high frequency (11-19 Hz) using the velocity model from traveltime inversion as the starting model. In the end, the pre-stack depth-migrated image and the waveform inversion model are jointly interpreted. This study demonstrates that a combination of traveltime and waveform inversion with Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration is a promising approach

  8. Bayesian inversion of marine CSEM data from the Scarborough gas field using a transdimensional 2-D parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Anandaroop; Key, Kerry; Bodin, Thomas; Myer, David; Constable, Steven

    2014-12-01

    We apply a reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo method to sample the Bayesian posterior model probability density function of 2-D seafloor resistivity as constrained by marine controlled source electromagnetic data. This density function of earth models conveys information on which parts of the model space are illuminated by the data. Whereas conventional gradient-based inversion approaches require subjective regularization choices to stabilize this highly non-linear and non-unique inverse problem and provide only a single solution with no model uncertainty information, the method we use entirely avoids model regularization. The result of our approach is an ensemble of models that can be visualized and queried to provide meaningful information about the sensitivity of the data to the subsurface, and the level of resolution of model parameters. We represent models in 2-D using a Voronoi cell parametrization. To make the 2-D problem practical, we use a source-receiver common midpoint approximation with 1-D forward modelling. Our algorithm is transdimensional and self-parametrizing where the number of resistivity cells within a 2-D depth section is variable, as are their positions and geometries. Two synthetic studies demonstrate the algorithm's use in the appraisal of a thin, segmented, resistive reservoir which makes for a challenging exploration target. As a demonstration example, we apply our method to survey data collected over the Scarborough gas field on the Northwest Australian shelf.

  9. Comparison of 1D, 2D and 2.5D Constrained Inversion of Electrical Resistivity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catt, L. M.; West, J.; Clark, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    Clay-rich till plains cover much of the UK. Such sites are attractive locations for landfills, since the till cover lowers the risk of landfill leachate entering groundwater. However, such tills often contain discrete sand and gravel bodies that can act as leachate flow routes. Such bodies may not be detected by conventional site investigation techniques such as drilling boreholes and trial pitting. A combined geoelectrical survey was carried out at a study site typical of such till plains and close to cliff exposures, which allowed direct mapping of sand bodies. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), resistivity cone penetrometry (RCPT) and frequency-domain electromagnetic data were collected. In a previous study, the electromagnetic and RCPT data were used to construct reference models for 2D inversion of the ERT data. The use of these reference models improved the solution models produced by inversion. We showed that the best solution model produced by inversion with a range of reference models could be determined without a priori knowledge of the true geoelectrical structure. This was done by using the area-weighted L2 norm between the solution models and associated reference models as a proxy for the misfit between the solution models and the true geoelectrical structure of the ground. In order to assess the most suitable method for combining invasive and non-invasive measurements, we compare both constrained and unconstrained 1D, 2D and 2.5D inversions of resistivity data collected at the study site. Preliminary results suggest that for 2.5D inversion the true 3D geoelectrical structure of the ground at the field study site is not sufficiently well known for comparison between the solution models and the true geoelectrical structure of the ground to be made. The results of work in progress evaluating layer-depth- constrained 1D inversion will be presented at the meeting.

  10. Takes Electric or Magnetic field data through Inversion process a 2D Distributon

    2008-05-01

    Program images 2D distributions in electrical conductivity for geophysical applications. The program can treat surface based and cross well measurement geometries, including inductive and grounded source antennas in the quasi-static limit. The algorithm using Krylov iterative methods to solve for the predicted data and model sensitivities. The model update is achieved using a Gauss-newton optimization process for stability. A new line search capability is now included in the algorithm to insure global convergence of themore » inversion iteration.« less

  11. 2D and 3D separate and joint inversion of airborne ZTEM and ground AMT data: Synthetic model studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Choi, Jihyang

    2014-05-01

    The ZTEM (Z-axis Tipper Electromagnetic) method measures naturally occurring audio-frequency magnetic fields and obtains the tipper function that defines the relationship among the three components of the magnetic field. Since the anomalous tipper responses are caused by the presence of lateral resistivity variations, the ZTEM survey is most suited for detecting and delineating conductive bodies extending to considerable depths, such as graphitic dykes encountered in the exploration of unconformity type uranium deposit. Our simulations shows that inversion of ZTEM data can detect reasonably well multiple conductive dykes placed 1 km apart. One important issue regarding ZTEM inversion is the effect of the initial model, because homogeneous half-space and (1D) layered structures produce no responses. For the 2D model with multiple conductive dykes, the inversion results were useful for locating the dykes even when the initial model was not close to the true background resistivity. For general 3D structures, however, the resolution of the conductive bodies can be reduced considerably depending on the initial model. This is because the tipper magnitudes from 3D conductors are smaller due to boundary charges than the 2D responses. To alleviate this disadvantage of ZTEM surveys, we combined ZTEM and audio-frequency magnetotelluric (AMT) data. Inversion of sparse AMT data was shown to be effective in providing a good initial model for ZTEM inversion. Moreover, simultaneously inverting both data sets led to better results than the sequential approach by enabling to identify structural features that were difficult to resolve from the individual data sets.

  12. Time lapse inversion of 2D ERT data for monitoring river water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, E. L.; Johnson, T. C.; Greenwood, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    Uranium transport in the 300 area is driven by both the chemical and physical effects of stage fluctuations in the Columbia River and resulting river water, ground water interaction. Because river water is less conductive than groundwater, it serves as a natural tracer that can be imaged using surface ERT. We've monitored 4 lines for 4 months over the high stage spring runoff interval to identify preferred flowpaths for river water intrusion. The four lines overlay former waste disposal sites including the processing ponds and sanitary leach trenches. We have used this ERT data set to investigate two methods of time lapse inversion, sequential and all-at-once. Each technique is a model difference approach as opposed to a data difference inversion approach. Both use a regularized inversion with model constraints that regularize spatially and temporally. For the sequential inversion, the starting and reference models are taken from the previous inversion. Both starting and reference models are taken from the first inversion for the all-at-once method. In either case an inversion is triggered if data misfit from the starting model exceeds the chi-squared convergence criteria. It was found that starting with a relatively smooth model provided better visualization of temporal conductivity changes when inverting all data sets with the same initial model, while an initial model exhibiting smaller data misfit may be used successfully as the starting point for sequential inversion. Inland conductivity changes within model cells were found to be highly correlated with river stage, and when paired with the characterization model, provide evidence of waste trenches, the processing pond, as well as the existence of a paleo-channel incised into the Ringold Formation and dipping structures on the Hanford-Ringold contact that provide preferred pathways for river water intrusion.

  13. Calibration of an Ultrasound Tomography System for Medical Imaging with 2D Contrast-Source Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, Gabriel Paul

    This dissertation describes two possible methods for the calibration of an ultrasound tomography system developed at University of Manitoba's Electromagnetic Imaging Laboratory for imaging with the contrast-source inversion algorithm. The calibration techniques are adapted from existing procedures employed for microwave tomography. A theoretical model of these calibration principles is developed in order to provide a rationale for the effectiveness of the proposed procedures. The applicability of such an imaging algorithm and calibration methods in the context of ultrasound are discussed. Also presented are 2D and 3D finite-difference time-domain update equations for the simulation of acoustic wave propagation in inhomogeneous media. Details regarding the application of an absorbing boundary-condition, point-source modelling and the treatment of penetrable objects are included in this document.

  14. Structure-approximating inverse protein folding problem in the 2D HP model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arvind; Manuch, Ján; Stacho, Ladislav

    2005-12-01

    The inverse protein folding problem is that of designing an amino acid sequence which has a particular native protein fold. This problem arises in drug design where a particular structure is necessary to ensure proper protein-protein interactions. In this paper, we show that in the 2D HP model of Dill it is possible to solve this problem for a broad class of structures. These structures can be used to closely approximate any given structure. One of the most important properties of a good protein (in drug design) is its stability--the aptitude not to fold simultaneously into other structures. We show that for a number of basic structures, our sequences have a unique fold. PMID:16379538

  15. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many schools. Substituting marbles on a table for air pucks introduces angular momentum and sliding friction so that simple video analysis will demonstrate that linear momentum is not conserved.1,2 Nevertheless, these labs offer students insights into the real-world application of physics. During a recent classroom trial, an unexpected result forced my students to think creatively and critically about what happened in the experiment.

  16. Numerical solution of 2D-vector tomography problem using the method of approximate inverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetov, Ivan; Maltseva, Svetlana; Polyakova, Anna

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical solution of reconstruction problem of a two-dimensional vector field in a unit disk from the known values of the longitudinal and transverse ray transforms. The algorithm is based on the method of approximate inverse. Numerical simulations confirm that the proposed method yields good results of reconstruction of vector fields.

  17. Development of a Geocryologic Model of Permafrost From 2D Inversion of IP Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, R.; Leblanc, A.

    2004-05-01

    Non-invasive investigation of permafrost along a planned route of pipeline, road or airstrip in cold regions involves the use of effective methods for detecting, characterizing, mapping and monitoring permafrost conditions on various spatial and temporal scales. Among the available near-surface geophysical methods, the electrical resistivity imaging is probably the most suitable method since the resistivity contrast between unfrozen and frozen ground can be one or two orders of magnitude. Induced polarization (IP) profiling was carried out to study the spatial distribution of ground ice in two permafrost mounds near Umiujaq in Nunavik, Canada. A dipole-dipole array was used to perform the IP profiling. Pseudo-sections of electrical resistivity and chargeability giving a misrepresented cross-section of the sub-surface were first draw. The inversion of IP profiling was also performed using DCIP2D developed by UBC-GIF for estimating the spatial distribution of electrical properties in the ground to create realistic models of sub-surface resistivity and chargeability cross-section. The inverse models show clearly the presence of ice-rich core in the permafrost mounds. The ice-rich cores are underlined by high resistivity values while the unfrozen zones show low resistivity values. The localisation of the permafrost table is highlighted by a strong contrast of resistivity while the permafrost base is marked by a transitional change in resistivity. In the hollow between the permafrost mounds, the models show low resistivity values characteristic of unfrozen zone. A synthetic resistivity sounding built from the most acceptable inverse model correlates well with electrical resistivity logging carried out in the permafrost mound during cone penetration tests. The inversion of IP profiling is fundamental for defining realistic models of sub-surface resistivity and chargeability. Electrical resistivity imaging is a appropriate near-surface geophysical method for permafrost

  18. Even more inversion formulas for the 2D Radon Transform of functions of compact and convex support.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, M-S Ould; Mennessier, C; Clackdoyle, R

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, Clackdoyle and Noo published a class of inversion formulas for the 2D Radon Transform which depends on the known radius of support of the unknown function. In this work, we extend this class of inversion formulas from functions of circular support to functions with any compact and convex support. We point out the potential benefits of these new inversion formulas in the context of reconstruction from truncated projections. A preliminary implementation of these new inversion formulas is also presented. PMID:18002982

  19. A 2D inverse problem of predicting boiling heat transfer in a long fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz

    2015-12-01

    A method for the determination of local values of the heat transfer coefficient on non-isothermal surfaces was analyzed on the example of a long smooth-surfaced fin made of aluminium. On the basis of the experimental data, two cases were taken into consideration: one-dimensional model for Bi < 0.1 and two-dimensional model for thicker elements. In the case when the drop in temperature over the thickness could be omitted, the rejected local values of heat fluxes were calculated from the integral of the equation describing temperature distribution on the fin. The corresponding boiling curve was plotted on the basis of temperature gradient distribution as a function of superheat. For thicker specimens, where Bi > 0.1, the problem was modelled using a 2-D heat conduction equation, for which the boundary conditions were posed on the surface observed with a thermovision camera. The ill-conditioned inverse problem was solved using a method of heat polynomials, which required validation.

  20. An analytical approach to estimate the number of small scatterers in 2D inverse scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazli, Roohallah; Nakhkash, Mansor

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an analytical method to estimate the location and number of actual small targets in 2D inverse scattering problems. This method is motivated from the exact maximum likelihood estimation of signal parameters in white Gaussian noise for the linear data model. In the first stage, the method uses the MUSIC algorithm to acquire all possible target locations and in the next stage, it employs an analytical formula that works as a spatial filter to determine which target locations are associated to the actual ones. The ability of the method is examined for both the Born and multiple scattering cases and for the cases of well-resolved and non-resolved targets. Many numerical simulations using both the coincident and non-coincident arrays demonstrate that the proposed method can detect the number of actual targets even in the case of very noisy data and when the targets are closely located. Using the experimental microwave data sets, we further show that this method is successful in specifying the number of small inclusions.

  1. 2D multi-parameter elastic seismic imaging by frequency-domain L1-norm full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, Romain; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is becoming a powerful and efficient tool to derive high-resolution quantitative models of the subsurface. In the frequency-domain, computationally efficient FWI algorithms can be designed for wide-aperture acquisition geometries by limiting inversion to few discrete frequencies. However, FWI remains an ill-posed and highly non-linear data-fitting procedure that is sensitive to noise, inaccuracies of the starting model and definition of multiparameter classes. The footprint of the noise in seismic imaging is conventionally mitigated by stacking highly redundant multifold data. However, when the data redundancy is decimated in the framework of efficient frequency-domain FWI, it is essential to assess the sensitivity of the inversion to noise. The impact of the noise in FWI, when applied to decimated data sets, has been marginally illustrated in the past and least-squares minimisation has remained the most popular approach. We investigate in this study the sensitivity of frequency-domain elastic FWI to noise for realistic onshore and offshore synthetic data sets contaminated by ambient random white noise. Four minimisation functionals are assessed in the framework of frequency domain FWI of decimated data: the classical least-square norm (L2), the least-absolute-values norm (L1), and some combinations of both (the Huber and the so-called Hybrid criteria). These functionals are implemented in a massively-parallel, 2D elastic frequency-domain FWI algorithm. A two-level hierarchical algorithm is implemented to mitigate the non-linearity of the inversion in complex environments. The first outer level consists of successive inversions of frequency groups of increasing high-frequency content. This level defines a multi-scale approach while preserving some data redundancy by means of simultaneous inversion of multiple frequencies. The second inner level used complex-valued frequencies for data preconditioning. This preconditioning controls the

  2. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

  3. An inversion method of 2D NMR relaxation spectra in low fields based on LSQR and L-curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guanqun; Zhou, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijia; Wang, Yuanjun; Nie, Shengdong

    2016-04-01

    The low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) inversion method based on traditional least-squares QR decomposition (LSQR) always produces some oscillating spectra. Moreover, the solution obtained by traditional LSQR algorithm often cannot reflect the true distribution of all the components. Hence, a good solution requires some manual intervention, for especially low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data. An approach based on the LSQR algorithm and L-curve is presented to solve this problem. The L-curve method is applied to obtain an improved initial optimal solution by balancing the residual and the complexity of the solutions instead of manually adjusting the smoothing parameters. First, the traditional LSQR algorithm is used on 2D NMR T1-T2 data to obtain its resultant spectra and corresponding residuals, whose norms are utilized to plot the L-curve. Second, the corner of the L-curve as the initial optimal solution for the non-negative constraint is located. Finally, a 2D map is corrected and calculated iteratively based on the initial optimal solution. The proposed approach is tested on both simulated and measured data. The results show that this algorithm is robust, accurate and promising for the NMR analysis.

  4. Monitoring of injected CO2 using the seismic full waveform inversion for 2-D elastic VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. K.; Min, D. J.; KIM, S.; Shin, Y.; Moon, S.

    2014-12-01

    To monitor the injected CO2 in the subsurface, seismic monitoring techniques are extensively applied because of its high resolution. Among the seismic monitoring techniques, seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) has high applicability because it can delineate parameter changes by injected CO2. When seismic FWIs are applied, subsurface media can be generally assumed to be isotropic. However, most subsurface media are not isotropic, and shale is a representative anisotropic medium, particularly vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) medium, which is often encountered as a barrier to injected CO2. Thus, anisotropic properties of subsurface media are important for monitoring of injected CO2. For these issues, we need to consider anisotropy of subsurface media when seismic FWIs are applied as a monitoring tool for CO2 sequestration. In this study, we performed seismic FWI for 2-D elastic VTI media to investigate the effects of anisotropic properties in CO2 monitoring. For this numerical test, we assumed a geological model, which copies after one of CO2 storage prospects in Korea. We also applied seismic FWI algorithm for 2-D elastic isotropic media for comparison. From this comparison, we noticed that we can obtain more reliable results when we apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm. Numerical examples indicate that we should apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm rather than the isotropic FWI algorithm when we interpret seismic monitoring data acquired in anisotropic media to increase the success of monitoring for injected CO2. Our numerical results can also be used as references for real seismic monitoring of the Korea CO2 sequestration projects in the near future. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Human Resources Development program (No. 20134010200510) of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korean government Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy and by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine

  5. Creating bio-inspired hierarchical 3D-2D photonic stacks via planar lithography on self-assembled inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ian B; Aizenberg, Joanna; Lončar, Marko

    2013-12-01

    Structural hierarchy and complex 3D architecture are characteristics of biological photonic designs that are challenging to reproduce in synthetic materials. Top-down lithography allows for designer patterning of arbitrary shapes, but is largely restricted to planar 2D structures. Self-assembly techniques facilitate easy fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but controllable defect-integration is difficult. In this paper we combine the advantages of top-down and bottom-up fabrication, developing two techniques to deposit 2D-lithographically-patterned planar layers on top of or in between inverse-opal 3D photonic crystals and creating hierarchical structures that resemble the architecture of the bright green wing scales of the butterfly, Parides sesostris. These fabrication procedures, combining advantages of both top-down and bottom-up fabrication, may prove useful in the development of omnidirectional coloration elements and 3D-2D photonic crystal devices. PMID:24263010

  6. Inversion Method for Evapotranspiration from 2D Measurements of Water Vapor Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, W. E.; Barnhart, B. L.; Plenner, S.; Thompson, A.; Winsky, B.

    2011-12-01

    A method has been developed to use 2D measurements of water vapor concentration to make spatial estimates of evapotranspiration. The method is based on theoretical solutions to the conservation of water vapor equation (similar to Sutton, Sienfeld) and is related to methods used to generate footprints. The method uses a diffusion coefficient to close the conservation equation and assumes uniformity of the surface with respect to turbulent processes. This solution allows the development of a transfer coefficient between each location at the surface and each of the water vapor measurements. The problem has been constrained to two dimensions for development, but is easily expanded to three. The method assumes water vapor concentration measurements in a plane at arbitrary positions above the field. Evapotranspiration is allowed to vary in increments across the field. This geometry and the transfer coefficients allow the water vapor concentration at each of the measured locations to be expressed as the sum of the contributions from the entire surface. A least squares solution is found that estimates the evapotranspiration across the field as a function of position. To evaluate the accuracy of the approach in solving for evaporation rates two artificial data sets of water vapor concentration (with varying amounts of artificial noise added) for known evaporation rates were generated and used to estimate the surface evaporation. The method is sensitive to the assumptions made near the edges of field. Results and details of the methods used to resolve edge effects will be shown.

  7. 2D inverse modeling for potential fields on rugged observation surface using constrained Delaunay triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Hu, Xiangyun; Xi, Yufei; Liu, Tianyou

    2015-03-01

    The regular grid discretization is prevalent in the inverse modeling for gravity and magnetic data. However, this subdivision strategy performs lower precision to represent the rugged observation surface. To deal with this problem, we evaluate a non-structured discretization method in which the subsurface with rolling terrain is divided into numbers of Delaunay triangular cells and each mesh has the uniform physical property distributions. The gravity and magnetic anomalies of a complex-shaped anomalous body are represented as the summaries of the single anomaly produced by each triangle field source. When inverting for the potential field data, we specify a minimization objective function composed of data constraints and then use the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm to iteratively solve the matrix minimization equations, where the preconditioner is determined by the distances between triangular cells and surface observers. We test our method using synthetic data; all tests return favorable results. In the case studies involving the gravity and magnetic anomalies of the Mengku and Pobei deposits in Xinjiang, northwest China, the inferred magnetite orebodies and ultrabasic rocks distributions are verified by the additional drilling and geological information. The discretization of constrained Delaunay triangulation provides an useful approach of computing and inverting the potential field data on the situations of undulate topography and complicated objects.

  8. A multiple-scale Pascal polynomial for 2D Stokes and inverse Cauchy-Stokes problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chein-Shan; Young, D. L.

    2016-05-01

    The polynomial expansion method is a useful tool for solving both the direct and inverse Stokes problems, which together with the pointwise collocation technique is easy to derive the algebraic equations for satisfying the Stokes differential equations and the specified boundary conditions. In this paper we propose two novel numerical algorithms, based on a third-first order system and a third-third order system, to solve the direct and the inverse Cauchy problems in Stokes flows by developing a multiple-scale Pascal polynomial method, of which the scales are determined a priori by the collocation points. To assess the performance through numerical experiments, we find that the multiple-scale Pascal polynomial expansion method (MSPEM) is accurate and stable against large noise.

  9. A 2D forward and inverse code for streaming potential problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.

    2013-12-01

    The self-potential method corresponds to the passive measurement of the electrical field in response to the occurrence of natural sources of current in the ground. One of these sources corresponds to the streaming current associated with the flow of the groundwater. We can therefore apply the self- potential method to recover non-intrusively some information regarding the groundwater flow. We first solve the forward problem starting with the solution of the groundwater flow problem, then computing the source current density, and finally solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential. We use the finite-element method to solve the relevant partial differential equations. In order to reduce the number of (petrophysical) model parameters required to solve the forward problem, we introduced an effective charge density tensor of the pore water, which can be determined directly from the permeability tensor for neutral pore waters. The second aspect of our work concerns the inversion of the self-potential data using Tikhonov regularization with smoothness and weighting depth constraints. This approach accounts for the distribution of the electrical resistivity, which can be independently and approximately determined from electrical resistivity tomography. A numerical code, SP2DINV, has been implemented in Matlab to perform both the forward and inverse modeling. Three synthetic case studies are discussed.

  10. Impact of the Born approximation on the estimation error in 2D inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diong, M. L.; Roueff, A.; Lasaygues, P.; Litman, A.

    2016-06-01

    The aim is to quantify the impact of the Born approximation on the estimation error for a simple inverse scattering problem, while taking into account the noise measurement features. The proposed method consists of comparing two estimation errors: the error obtained with the Born approximation and the error obtained without it. The first error is characterized by the mean and variance of the maximum likelihood estimator, which are straightforward to compute with the Born approximation because the corresponding estimator is linear. The second error is evaluated with the Cramer–Rao bound (CRB). The CRB is a lower bound on the variance of unbiased estimators and thus does not depend on the choice of the estimation method. Beyond the conclusions that will be established under the Born approximation, this study lays out a general methodology that can be generalized to any other approximation.

  11. Precision analysis based on Cramer-Rao bound for 2D acoustics and electromagnetic inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diong, M. L.; Roueff, A.; Lasaygues, P.; Litman, A.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present article is to predict the expected precision quantitatively in inverse scattering when one tries to determine the intrinsic properties of a given target from its scattered field. To conduct such a study, we analyze the precision of contrast estimators with the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) when the target is homogeneous, infinitely-long and with a circular cross-section and with an additive complex circular gaussian noise at the receivers. An unified framework is derived to handle acoustic or electromagnetic imaging configurations equally. Numerical tests enable to quantitatively appraise the variations of the CRB with respect to the considered physical situation parameters: transmission/reflexion, antennas arrangement, weak/strong scatterers, noise level and source frequency. These analyzes are performed with respect to the real and imaginary parts of the contrast.

  12. 2-D and 3-D joint inversion of loop-loop electromagnetic and electrical data for resistivity and magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Myeong-Jong; Sasaki, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-domain loop-loop electromagnetic (EM) methods are sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility of the Earth as well as its resistivity. Thus, inversion techniques have been used to simultaneously reconstruct both resistivity and susceptibility models from EM data. However, to take full advantage of inversion methods, calibration errors must be assessed and removed because ignoring them can result in misleading models. We present a multidimensional inversion method that jointly inverts EM and direct current (DC) resistivity data to derive offset errors as well as resistivity and susceptibility models, assuming that calibration errors can be represented by in-phase and quadrature offsets at each frequency. Addition of independent data such as DC data is effective for more accurately estimating the offsets, resulting in more reliable subsurface models. Synthetic examples involving small-loop EM data show that simultaneous inversion for resistivity and susceptibility is not stable, because of strong correlations between in-phase offset parameters and background susceptibility, but that the offsets are well determined when the data misfit is reduced rapidly in the early iteration step. Improvements achieved by joint inversion are mainly on the resistivity model. For airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data, the inversion process is stable, because AEM data are acquired using more loop-loop geometries and a wider range of frequencies. As a result, both the resistivity and susceptibility models are significantly improved by joint inversion.

  13. HT2DINV: A 2D forward and inverse code for steady-state and transient hydraulic tomography problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography is a technique used to characterize the spatial heterogeneities of storativity and transmissivity fields. The responses of an aquifer to a source of hydraulic stimulations are used to recover the features of the estimated fields using inverse techniques. We developed a 2D free source Matlab package for performing hydraulic tomography analysis in steady state and transient regimes. The package uses the finite elements method to solve the ground water flow equation for simple or complex geometries accounting for the anisotropy of the material properties. The inverse problem is based on implementing the geostatistical quasi-linear approach of Kitanidis combined with the adjoint-state method to compute the required sensitivity matrices. For undetermined inverse problems, the adjoint-state method provides a faster and more accurate approach for the evaluation of sensitivity matrices compared with the finite differences method. Our methodology is organized in a way that permits the end-user to activate parallel computing in order to reduce the computational burden. Three case studies are investigated demonstrating the robustness and efficiency of our approach for inverting hydraulic parameters.

  14. Application of 2-D Inversion, to Magnetotelluric data on the Newberry Caldera, Oregon, for Potential Geothermal Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. P.; Schultz, A.

    2012-12-01

    understand the existing baseline subsurface resistivity structure at the Newberry site prior to well stimulation, magnetotelluric (MT) data will be collected in late July 2012 using two long period (1 Hz sampling) Narod Geophysics NIMS MT instruments along with EarthScope MT data aligned in a ~210 km long N-S profile centered on the stimulation zone. A 2-D inverse model will be obtained from the MT data set. The goal of this investigation is to determine the variations in the electrical resistivity in the mid-to-lower crust beneath the western flank of the caldera, providing a deeper view of putative heat sources than existing studies in this

  15. OpenHVSR: imaging the subsurface 2D/3D elastic properties through multiple HVSR modeling and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignardi, S.; Mantovani, A.; Abu Zeid, N.

    2016-08-01

    OpenHVSR is a computer program developed in the Matlab environment, designed for the simultaneous modeling and inversion of large Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR or H/V) datasets in order to construct 2D/3D subsurface models (topography included). The program is designed to provide a high level of interactive experience to the user and still to be of intuitive use. It implements several effective and established tools already present in the code ModelHVSR by Herak (2008), and many novel features such as: -confidence evaluation on lateral heterogeneity -evaluation of frequency dependent single parameter impact on the misfit function -relaxation of Vp/Vs bounds to allow for water table inclusion -a new cost function formulation which include a slope dependent term for fast matching of peaks, which greatly enhances convergence in case of low quality HVSR curves inversion -capability for the user of editing the subsurface model at any time during the inversion and capability to test the changes before acceptance. In what follows, we shall present many features of the program and we shall show its capabilities on both simulated and real data. We aim to supply a powerful tool to the scientific and professional community capable of handling large sets of HSVR curves, to retrieve the most from their microtremor data within a reduced amount of time and allowing the experienced scientist the necessary flexibility to integrate into the model their own geological knowledge of the sites under investigation. This is especially desirable now that microtremor testing has become routinely used. After testing the code over different datasets, both simulated and real, we finally decided to make it available in an open source format. The program is available by contacting the authors.

  16. Inverse synthetic aperture radar: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eerland, K. K.

    1982-06-01

    Theory and results of simulations, associated with inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging are discussed. A radar signal processing algorithm was developed which derives an ISAR image of an aircraft model. This algorithm assumes a straight unaccelerated flight path and an accurate measurement of the flight path parameters in order to perform proper imaging. However, in practice an aircraft may be maneuvering during the observation and also some flight path parameters may be measured in-accurately. In order to compensate for the two most frequent disturbing effects, the algorithm makes use of two specific correction methods. First, a measurement error in the target velocity is removed by means of an optimization procedure and, secondly, a compensation for a curved flight path is performed. Attention is also given to the influence of observation noise. The noise is assumed to be stationary, Gaussian and white (a uniform spectrum).

  17. Modeling Coastal Salinity in Quasi 2D and 3D Using a DUALEM-421 and Inversion Software.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gareth; Huang, Jingyi; Monteiro Santos, Fernando Acacio; Triantafilis, John

    2015-01-01

    Rising sea levels, owing to climate change, are a threat to fresh water coastal aquifers. This is because saline intrusions are caused by increases and intensification of medium-large scale influences including sea level rise, wave climate, tidal cycles, and shifts in beach morphology. Methods are therefore required to understand the dynamics of these interactions. While traditional borehole and galvanic contact resistivity (GCR) techniques have been successful they are time-consuming. Alternatively, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FEM) induction is potentially useful as physical contact with the ground is not required. A DUALEM-421 and EM4Soil inversion software package are used to develop a quasi two- (2D) and quasi three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic conductivity images (EMCI) across Long Reef Beach located north of Sydney Harbour, New South Wales, Australia. The quasi 2D models discern: the dry sand (<10 mS/m) associated with the incipient dune; sand with fresh water (10 to 20 mS/m); mixing of fresh and saline water (20 to 500 mS/m), and; saline sand of varying moisture (more than 500 mS/m). The quasi 3D EMCIs generated for low and high tides suggest that daily tidal cycles do not have a significant effect on local groundwater salinity. Instead, the saline intrusion is most likely influenced by medium-large scale drivers including local wave climate and morphology along this wave-dominated beach. Further research is required to elucidate the influence of spring-neap tidal cycles, contrasting beach morphological states and sea level rise. PMID:25053423

  18. Estimation of Random Medium Parameters from 2D Post-Stack Seismic Data and Its Application in Seismic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Zhu, P.; Gu, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Small scale heterogeneities of subsurface medium can be characterized conveniently and effectively using a few simple random medium parameters (RMP), such as autocorrelation length, angle and roughness factor, etc. The estimation of these parameters is significant in both oil reservoir prediction and metallic mine exploration. Poor accuracy and low stability existed in current estimation approaches limit the application of random medium theory in seismic exploration. This study focuses on improving the accuracy and stability of RMP estimation from post-stacked seismic data and its application in the seismic inversion. Experiment and theory analysis indicate that, although the autocorrelation of random medium is related to those of corresponding post-stacked seismic data, the relationship is obviously affected by the seismic dominant frequency, the autocorrelation length, roughness factor and so on. Also the error of calculation of autocorrelation in the case of finite and discrete model decreases the accuracy. In order to improve the precision of estimation of RMP, we design two improved approaches. Firstly, we apply region growing algorithm, which often used in image processing, to reduce the influence of noise in the autocorrelation calculated by the power spectrum method. Secondly, the orientation of autocorrelation is used as a new constraint in the estimation algorithm. The numerical experiments proved that it is feasible. In addition, in post-stack seismic inversion of random medium, the estimated RMP may be used to constrain inverse procedure and to construct the initial model. The experiment results indicate that taking inversed model as random medium and using relatively accurate estimated RMP to construct initial model can get better inversion result, which contained more details conformed to the actual underground medium.

  19. An Inverse Model for TETRAD: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, George Michael; Renner, Joel Lawrence

    2002-09-01

    A model-independent parameter estimation model known as PEST has been linked to the reservoir simulator TETRAD. The method of inverse modeling is briefly reviewed, and the link between PEST and TETRAD is discussed. A single example is presented that illustrates the power of parameter estimation from well observations.

  20. Different scenarios for inverse estimation of soil hydraulic parameters from double-ring infiltrometer data using HYDRUS-2D/3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, Parisa; Ghorbani-Dashtaki, Shoja; Mosaddeghi, Mohammad Reza; Shirani, Hossein; Nodoushan, Ali Reza Mohammadi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, HYDRUS-2D/3D was used to simulate ponded infiltration through double-ring infiltrometers into a hypothetical loamy soil profile. Twelve scenarios of inverse modelling (divided into three groups) were considered for estimation of Mualem-van Genuchten hydraulic parameters. In the first group, simulation was carried out solely using cumulative infiltration data. In the second group, cumulative infiltration data plus water content at h = -330 cm (field capacity) were used as inputs. In the third group, cumulative infiltration data plus water contents at h = -330 cm (field capacity) and h = -15 000 cm (permanent wilting point) were used simultaneously as predictors. The results showed that numerical inverse modelling of the double-ring infiltrometer data provided a reliable alternative method for determining soil hydraulic parameters. The results also indicated that by reducing the number of hydraulic parameters involved in the optimization process, the simulation error is reduced. The best one in infiltration simulation which parameters α, n, and Ks were optimized using the infiltration data and field capacity as inputs. Including field capacity as additional data was important for better optimization/definition of soil hydraulic functions, but using field capacity and permanent wilting point simultaneously as additional data increased the simulation error.

  1. Lipid suppression via double inversion recovery with symmetric frequency sweep for robust 2D-GRAPPA-accelerated MRSI of the brain at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Hangel, Gilbert; Strasser, Bernhard; Považan, Michal; Gruber, Stephan; Chmelík, Marek; Gajdošík, Martin; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bogner, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a new approach for high-resolution MRSI of the brain at 7 T in clinically feasible measurement times. Two major problems of MRSI are the long scan times for large matrix sizes and the possible spectral contamination by the transcranial lipid signal. We propose a combination of free induction decay (FID)-MRSI with a short acquisition delay and acceleration via in-plane two-dimensional generalised autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (2D-GRAPPA) with adiabatic double inversion recovery (IR)-based lipid suppression to allow robust high-resolution MRSI. We performed Bloch simulations to evaluate the magnetisation pathways of lipids and metabolites, and compared the results with phantom measurements. Acceleration factors in the range 2-25 were tested in a phantom. Five volunteers were scanned to verify the value of our MRSI method in vivo. GRAPPA artefacts that cause fold-in of transcranial lipids were suppressed via double IR, with a non-selective symmetric frequency sweep. The use of long, low-power inversion pulses (100 ms) reduced specific absorption rate requirements. The symmetric frequency sweep over both pulses provided good lipid suppression (>90%), in addition to a reduced loss in metabolite signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), compared with conventional IR suppression (52-70%). The metabolic mapping over the whole brain slice was not limited to a rectangular region of interest. 2D-GRAPPA provided acceleration up to a factor of nine for in vivo FID-MRSI without a substantial increase in g-factors (<1.1). A 64 × 64 matrix can be acquired with a common repetition time of ~1.3 s in only 8 min without lipid artefacts caused by acceleration. Overall, we present a fast and robust MRSI method, using combined double IR fat suppression and 2D-GRAPPA acceleration, which may be used in (pre)clinical studies of the brain at 7 T. PMID:26370781

  2. Initial results with a multisource inverse-geometry CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jongduk; Pelc, Norbert J.; Deman, Bruno; Uribe, Jorge; Harrison, Daniel; Reynolds, Joseph; Neculaes, Bogdan; Inzinna, Louis; Caiafa, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    The multi-source inverse-geometry CT(MS-IGCT) system is composed of multiple sources and a small 2D detector array. An experimental MS-IGCT system was built and we report initial results with 2×4 x-ray sources, a 75 mm inplane field-of-view (FOV) and 160 mm z-coverage in a single gantry rotation. To evaluate the system performance, experimental data were acquired from several phantoms and a post-mortem rat. Before image reconstruction, geometric calibration, data normalization, beam hardening correction and detector spectral calibration were performed. For reconstruction, the projection data were rebinned into two full cone beam data sets, and the FDK algorithm was used. The reconstructed volumes from the upper and lower source rows shared an overlap volume which was combined in image space. The reconstructed images of the uniform cylinder phantom showed good uniformity of the reconstructed values without any artifacts. The rat data were also reconstructed reliably. The initial experimental results from this rotating-gantry MS-IGCT system demonstrated its ability to image a complex anatomical object without any significant image artifacts and to ultimately achieve large volumetric coverage in a single gantry rotation.

  3. A critical appraisal of asymptotic 3D-to-2D data transformation filters and the potential of complex frequency 2.5-D modeling in seismic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, L.; Greenhalgh, S. A.; Maurer, H. R.; Marelli, S.; Nuber, A.

    2012-04-01

    inversion schemes, we performed complementary inversion experiments, using an acoustic frequency domain waveform inversion algorithm. Purely acoustic waveform inversions in the frequency-domain seem to be negligibly affected, because the waveform discrepancy is only significant at small distance-to-wavelength ratios which occur in the early (low frequency) iterations. In the later high frequency stages the asymptotic filters are adequate. Work is underway to extend our inversion study to the elastic case, where a more significant S-wave influence is expected to exacerbate the effect. The alternative to performing 3D-to-2D data transformation is to carry out 2.5-D modeling, which entails spatial Fourier transforming the 3-D wave equation along the invariant axis to the wavenumber domain and solving the resulting equation for many wavenumber components, thus breaking down the 3-D problem to a high number of 2-D problems. When performed in the frequency domain, which is attractive for full waveform inversion purposes, singularities in the wavenumber spectra arise at various critical wavenumbers. We show in this study how such problems can be circumvented through the use of complex frequency. The reconstructed finite-element 2.5-D seismograms compare very well to the reference finite-difference 3-D seismograms, and outperform the asymptotic 3D-to-2D transformation filter approach.

  4. First results from the Swarm Dedicated Ionospheric Field Inversion chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulliat, A.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.

    2016-06-01

    Data-based modeling of the magnetic field originating in the Earth's ionosphere is challenging due to the multiple timescales involved and the small spatial scales of some of the current systems, especially the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) that flows along the magnetic dip equator. The Dedicated Ionospheric Field Inversion (DIFI) algorithm inverts a combination of Swarm satellite and ground observatory data at mid- to low latitudes and provides models of the solar-quiet (Sq) and EEJ magnetic fields on the ground and at satellite altitude. The basis functions of these models are spherical harmonics in quasi-dipole coordinates and Fourier series describing the 24-, 12-, 8- and 6-h periodicities, as well as the annual and semiannual variations. A 1-D conductivity model of the Earth and a 2-D conductivity model of the oceans and continents are used to separate the primary ionospheric field from its induced counterpart. First results from the DIFI algorithm confirm several well-known features of the seasonal variability and westward drift speed of the Sq current systems. They also reveal a peculiar seasonal variability of the Sq field in the Southern hemisphere and a longitudinal variability reminiscent of the EEJ wave-4 structure in the same hemisphere. These observations suggest that the Sq and EEJ currents might be electrically coupled, but only for some seasons and longitudes and more so in the Southern hemisphere than in the Northern hemisphere.

  5. Analysis results from the Los Alamos 2D/3D program

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Cappiello, M.W.; Harmony, S.C.; Shire, P.R.; Siebe, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the 2D/3D program. Activities conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of 2D/3D program goals include analysis support of facility design, construction, and operation; provision of boundary and initial conditions for test-facility operations based on analysis of pressurized water reactors; performance of pretest and posttest predictions and analyses; and use of experimental results to validate and assess the single- and multi-dimensional, nonequilibrium features in the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). During fiscal year 1987, Los Alamos conducted analytical assessment activities using data from the Slab Core Test Facility, The Cylindrical Core Test Facility, and the Upper Plenum Test Facility. Finally, Los Alamos continued work to provide TRAC improvements. In this paper, Los Alamos activities during fiscal year 1987 will be summarized; several significant accomplishments will be described in more detail to illustrate the work activities at Los Alamos.

  6. Global approach for transient shear wave inversion based on the adjoint method: a comprehensive 2D simulation study.

    PubMed

    Arnal, B; Pinton, G; Garapon, P; Pernot, M; Fink, M; Tanter, M

    2013-10-01

    Shear wave imaging (SWI) maps soft tissue elasticity by measuring shear wave propagation with ultrafast ultrasound acquisitions (10 000 frames s(-1)). This spatiotemporal data can be used as an input for an inverse problem that determines a shear modulus map. Common inversion methods are local: the shear modulus at each point is calculated based on the values of its neighbour (e.g. time-of-flight, wave equation inversion). However, these approaches are sensitive to the information loss such as noise or the lack of the backscattered signal. In this paper, we evaluate the benefits of a global approach for elasticity inversion using a least-squares formulation, which is derived from full waveform inversion in geophysics known as the adjoint method. We simulate an acoustic waveform in a medium with a soft and a hard lesion. For this initial application, full elastic propagation and viscosity are ignored. We demonstrate that the reconstruction of the shear modulus map is robust with a non-uniform background or in the presence of noise with regularization. Compared to regular local inversions, the global approach leads to an increase of contrast (∼+3 dB) and a decrease of the quantification error (∼+2%). We demonstrate that the inversion is reliable in the case when there is no signal measured within the inclusions like hypoechoic lesions which could have an impact on medical diagnosis. PMID:24018867

  7. Electrical 2D Section of a Continental Break-up Region, Gulf of Aden - Results From the ANC Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, H.; Goto, T.; d'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S.

    2001-12-01

    Seafloor magnetotelluric (MT) array study was conducted in the western part of Sheba Ridge, Gulf of Aden. Five ocean bottom electromagnetometers were deployed along a 200 km long profile perpendicular to a mature ridge segment over the continental break-up region. All these instruments were successfully recovered during the Aden New Century Cruise (ANCC). Temporal EM variations were measured for about three weeks at a sampling rate of 0.1 Hz in order to delineate the electrical structure beneath the continental break-up region. The magnetic and electric resolutions were 10 pT and 60 nV/m, respectively. The time- and tilt-corrected EM time series were processed by the robust remote reference method (Chave et al., 1987) to yield MT impedance tensors at each site for 12 periods ranging from 480s to 40960s. The MT tensors were then rotated toward a direction perpendicular to the mean geological strike of the ridge segment (N27E). The ridge-parallel and ridge-perpendicular components of the tensors were used as TM and TE modes in subsequent two-dimensional (2D) MT inversions (Uchida, 1993) using Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). A joint 2D ABIC inversion using both modes and incorporating the 2D bathymetry along the profile yielded a model that showed a shallow conductor in the south of the ridge crest centered at a depth of approximately 30 km. The joint model also implies the presence of deeper (>125 km) conductor in the northern side. The bathymetry and the mantle bougurer anomly across the ridge segment are known to show asymmetry (Leroy et al., 2000). Volcanic seamounts seem to be abundant in the south of the ridge crest and the mean depth close to each margin is deeper in the north. The mantle bouguer anomaly extends more in the south-southwest direction as well. These features can be explained by the presence of shallow conductor in the south. It is possible that a hot melt body in the southern conductor supports the relatively intensive volcanic

  8. Smooth 2-D ocean sound speed from Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion of seismic oceanography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, Tanya M.; Jun, Hyunggu; Rosado, Hayley; Shin, Changsoo

    2016-02-01

    In seismic oceanography, processed images highlight small temperature changes, but inversion is needed to obtain absolute temperatures. Local search-based full waveform inversion has a lower computational cost than global search but requires accurate starting models. Unfortunately, most marine seismic data have little associated hydrographic data and the band-limited nature of seismic data makes extracting the long wavelength sound speed trend directly from seismic data inherently challenging. Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion (LDI) can use rudimentary starting models without prior information about the medium. Data are transformed to the Laplace domain, and a smooth sound speed model is extracted by examining the zero and low frequency components of the damped wavefield. We applied LDI to five synthetic data sets based on oceanographic features and recovered smoothed versions of our synthetic models, showing the viability of LDI for creating starting models suitable for more detailed inversions.

  9. Updated Results for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, Robert E.; Lai, David Y.; Delisi, Donald P.; Mellman, George R.

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an Inverse Model for inverting aircraft wake vortex data. The objective of the inverse modeling is to obtain estimates of the vortex circulation decay and crosswind vertical profiles, using time history measurements of the lateral and vertical position of aircraft vortices. The Inverse Model performs iterative forward model runs using estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Outputs from an Inverse Model run are the best estimates of the time history of the vortex circulation derived from the observed data, the vertical crosswind profile, and several vortex parameters. The forward model, named SHRAPA, used in this inverse modeling is a modified version of the Shear-APA model, and it is described in Section 2 of this document. Details of the Inverse Model are presented in Section 3. The Inverse Model was applied to lidar-observed vortex data at three airports: FAA acquired data from San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and Denver International Airport (DEN), and NASA acquired data from Memphis International Airport (MEM). The results are compared with observed data. This Inverse Model validation is documented in Section 4. A summary is given in Section 5. A user's guide for the inverse wake vortex model is presented in a separate NorthWest Research Associates technical report (Lai and Delisi, 2007a).

  10. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  11. Analysis results from the Los Alamos 2D/3D program

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Cappiello, M.W.; Stumpf, H.; Shire, P.; Gilbert, J.; Hedstrom, J.

    1986-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the 2D/3D program. Activities conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of 2D/3D program goals include analysis support of facility design, construction, and operation; provision of boundary and initial conditions for test facility operations based on analysis of pressurized water reactors; performance of pretest and posttest predictions and analyses; and use of experimental results to validate and assess the single- and multidimensional nonequilibrium features in the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). During Fiscal Year 1986, Los Alamos conducted analytical assessment activities using data from the Cylindrical Core Test Facility and the Slab Core Test Facility. Los Alamos also continued to provide support analysis for the planning of Upper Plenum Test Facility experiments. Finally, Los Alamos either completed or is currently working on three areas of TRAC modeling improvement. In this paper, Los Alamos activities during Fiscal Year 1986 are summarized; several significant accomplishments are described in more detail to illustrate the work activities at Los Alamos.

  12. Two Eyes, 3D Early Results: Stereoscopic vs 2D Representations of Highly Spatial Scientific Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    "Two Eyes, 3D" is a 3-year NSF funded research project to study the educational impacts of using stereoscopic representations in informal settings. The first study conducted as part of the project tested children 5-12 on their ability to perceive spatial elements of slides of scientific objects shown to them in either stereoscopic or 2D format. Children were also tested for prior spatial ability. Early results suggest that stereoscopy does not have a major impact on perceiving spatial elements of an image, but it does have a more significant impact on how the children apply that knowledge when presented with a common sense situation. The project is run by the AAVSO and this study was conducted at the Boston Museum of Science.

  13. Serum lipoprotein (a) concentrations are inversely associated with T2D, prediabetes, and insulin resistance in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population[S

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lin; Song, An; Dai, Meng; Xu, Min; Sun, Wanwan; Xu, Baihui; Sun, Jichao; Wang, Tiange; Xu, Yu; Lu, Jieli; Wang, Weiqing; Bi, Yufang; Ning, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], an LDL-like particle, has been proposed as a causal risk factor for CVD among general populations. Meanwhile, both serum Lp(a) and diabetes increase the risk of CVD. However, the relationship between serum Lp(a) and T2D is poorly characterized, especially in the Asian population. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study in 10,122 participants aged 40 years or older in Jiading District, Shanghai, China. Our study found that the prevalence of T2D was decreased from 20.9% to 15.0% from the lowest quartile to the highest quartile of serum Lp(a) concentrations (P for trend <0.0001). Logistic regression analyses showed that the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of prevalent T2D for quartiles 2–4 versus quartile 1 were 0.86 (0.73–1.01), 0.88 (0.75–1.04), and 0.76 (0.64–0.90) (P for trend = 0.0002), after adjustment for traditional confounding factors. Moreover, the risks for prevalent prediabetes, insulin resistance, and hyperinsulinemia were also decreased from the lowest to the top quartile. This inverse association between serum Lp(a) and T2D was not appreciably changed after we adjusted hypoglycemic medications or excluded the subjects with hypoglycemic and/or lipid-lowering agents and/or a history of self-reported CVD. PMID:25649924

  14. A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lu, Jiangfeng; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan

    2009-09-25

    We present an efficient parallel algorithm and its implementation for computing the diagonal of $H^-1$ where $H$ is a 2D Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian discretized on a rectangular domain using a standard second order finite difference scheme. This type of calculation can be used to obtain an accurate approximation to the diagonal of a Fermi-Dirac function of $H$ through a recently developed pole-expansion technique \\cite{LinLuYingE2009}. The diagonal elements are needed in electronic structure calculations for quantum mechanical systems \\citeHohenbergKohn1964, KohnSham 1965,DreizlerGross1990. We show how elimination tree is used to organize the parallel computation and how synchronization overhead is reduced by passing data level by level along this tree using the technique of local buffers and relative indices. We analyze the performance of our implementation by examining its load balance and communication overhead. We show that our implementation exhibits an excellent weak scaling on a large-scale high performance distributed parallel machine. When compared with standard approach for evaluating the diagonal a Fermi-Dirac function of a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian associated a 2D electron quantum dot, the new pole-expansion technique that uses our algorithm to compute the diagonal of $(H-z_i I)^-1$ for a small number of poles $z_i$ is much faster, especially when the quantum dot contains many electrons.

  15. MARE2DEM: an open-source code for anisotropic inversion of controlled-source electromagnetic and magnetotelluric data using parallel adaptive 2D finite elements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, K.

    2013-12-01

    This work announces the public release of an open-source inversion code named MARE2DEM (Modeling with Adaptively Refined Elements for 2D Electromagnetics). Although initially designed for the rapid inversion of marine electromagnetic data, MARE2DEM now supports a wide variety of acquisition configurations for both offshore and onshore surveys that utilize electric and magnetic dipole transmitters or magnetotelluric plane waves. The model domain is flexibly parameterized using a grid of arbitrarily shaped polygonal regions, allowing for complicated structures such as topography or seismically imaged horizons to be easily assimilated. MARE2DEM efficiently solves the forward problem in parallel by dividing the input data parameters into smaller subsets using a parallel data decomposition algorithm. The data subsets are then solved in parallel using an automatic adaptive finite element method that iterative solves the forward problem on successively refined finite element meshes until a specified accuracy tolerance is met, thus freeing the end user from the burden of designing an accurate numerical modeling grid. Regularized non-linear inversion for isotropic or anisotropic conductivity is accomplished with a new implementation of Occam's method referred to as fast-Occam, which is able to minimize the objective function in much fewer forward evaluations than the required by the original method. This presentation will review the theoretical considerations behind MARE2DEM and use a few recent offshore EM data sets to demonstrate its capabilities and to showcase the software interface tools that streamline model building and data inversion.

  16. E2GPR - Edit your geometry, Execute GprMax2D and Plot the Results!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrone, Daniele; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    In order to predict correctly the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) response from a particular scenario, Maxwell's equations have to be solved, subject to the physical and geometrical properties of the considered problem and to its initial conditions. Several techniques have been developed in computational electromagnetics, for the solution of Maxwell's equations. These methods can be classified into two main categories: differential and integral equation solvers, which can be implemented in the time or spectral domain. All of the different methods present compromises between computational efficiency, stability, and the ability to model complex geometries. The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique has several advantages over alternative approaches: it has inherent simplicity, efficiency and conditional stability; it is suitable to treat impulsive behavior of the electromagnetic field and can provide either ultra-wideband temporal waveforms or the sinusoidal steady-state response at any frequency within the excitation spectrum; it is accurate and highly versatile; and it has become a mature and well-researched technique. Moreover, the FDTD technique is suitable to be executed on parallel-processing CPU-based computers and to exploit the modern computer visualisation capabilities. GprMax [1] is a very well-known and largely validated FDTD software tool, implemented by A. Giannopoulos and available for free public download on www.gprmax.com, together with examples and a detailled user guide. The tool includes two electromagnetic wave simulators, GprMax2D and GprMax3D, for the full-wave simulation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional GPR models. In GprMax, everything can be done with the aid of simple commands that are used to define the model parameters and results to be calculated. These commands need to be entered in a simple ASCII text file. GprMax output files can be stored in ASCII or binary format. The software is provided with MATLAB functions, which

  17. E2GPR - Edit your geometry, Execute GprMax2D and Plot the Results!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrone, Daniele; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    In order to predict correctly the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) response from a particular scenario, Maxwell's equations have to be solved, subject to the physical and geometrical properties of the considered problem and to its initial conditions. Several techniques have been developed in computational electromagnetics, for the solution of Maxwell's equations. These methods can be classified into two main categories: differential and integral equation solvers, which can be implemented in the time or spectral domain. All of the different methods present compromises between computational efficiency, stability, and the ability to model complex geometries. The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique has several advantages over alternative approaches: it has inherent simplicity, efficiency and conditional stability; it is suitable to treat impulsive behavior of the electromagnetic field and can provide either ultra-wideband temporal waveforms or the sinusoidal steady-state response at any frequency within the excitation spectrum; it is accurate and highly versatile; and it has become a mature and well-researched technique. Moreover, the FDTD technique is suitable to be executed on parallel-processing CPU-based computers and to exploit the modern computer visualisation capabilities. GprMax [1] is a very well-known and largely validated FDTD software tool, implemented by A. Giannopoulos and available for free public download on www.gprmax.com, together with examples and a detailled user guide. The tool includes two electromagnetic wave simulators, GprMax2D and GprMax3D, for the full-wave simulation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional GPR models. In GprMax, everything can be done with the aid of simple commands that are used to define the model parameters and results to be calculated. These commands need to be entered in a simple ASCII text file. GprMax output files can be stored in ASCII or binary format. The software is provided with MATLAB functions, which

  18. A 2D optomechanical focused laser spot scanner: analysis and experimental results for microstereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, P. S.; Deshmukh, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes and analyzes a 2D optomechanical-focused laser spot scanning system (patent pending) which allows uniform intensity focused spot scanning with high speed and high resolution over a large range of scan. Such scanning is useful where variation of focused spot characteristics affects the performance of applications such as micro-/nano-stereolithography, laser micro-machining, scanning optical tweezers, optical scanning microscopy, and so on. Proposed scanning is achieved by using linear movement of mirrors and lens maintaining the alignment of motion and optical axis of laser. Higher speed and high resolution at the same time are achieved by use of two serial double parallelogram flexural mechanisms with mechatronics developed around them. Optical analysis is carried out to demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed system numerically and is further supported by the experimental results. Additional analysis is carried out to demonstrate robustness of the scanner in the case of small misalignment errors incurred in actual practice. Although the proposed scanner is useful in general in several applications mentioned above, discussion in this paper is focused on microstereolithography.

  19. Recombinant chromosome 18 resulting from a maternal pericentric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ayukawa, Hiroshi; Tsukahara, Masato; Fukuda, Masamichi; Kondoh, Osamu

    1994-05-01

    We report on a newborn girl with duplication of 18q12.2{yields}18 qter and deficiency of 18p11.2{yields}18pter which resulted from meiotic recombination of the maternal pericentric inversion, inv(18)(p11.2q12.2). Her clinical manifestations were compatible with those of partial trisomy 18q syndrome. We review the previously reported 9 cases in 8 families of rec(18) resulting from recombination of a parental pericentric inversion. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. National Prociency Testing Result of CYP2D6*10 Genotyping for Adjuvant Tamoxifen Therapy in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guigao; Zhang, Kuo; Yi, Lang; Han, Yanxi; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been successfully used for treating breast cancer and preventing cancer recurrence. Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) plays a key role in the process of metabolizing tamoxifen to its active moiety, endoxifen. Patients with variants of the CYP2D6 gene may not receive the full benefit of tamoxifen treatment. The CYP2D6*10 variant (the most common variant in Asians) was analyzed to optimize the prescription of tamoxifen in China. To ensure referring clinicians have accurate information for genotype-guided tamoxifen treatment, the Chinese National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL) organized a national proficiency testing (PT) to evaluate the performance of laboratories providing CYP2D6*10 genotyping. Ten genomic DNA samples with CYP2D6 wild-type or CYP2D6*10 variants were validated by PCR-sequencing and sent to 28 participant laboratories. The genotyping results and pharmacogenomic test reports were submitted and evaluated by NCCL experts. Additional information regarding the number of samples tested, the accreditation/certification status, and detecting technology was also requested. Thirty-one data sets were received, with a corresponding analytical sensitivity of 98.2% (548/558 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 96.7-99.1%) and an analytic specificity of 96.5% (675/682; 95% confidence interval: 97.9-99.5%). Overall, 25/28 participants correctly identified CYP2D6*10 status in 10 samples; however, two laboratories made serious genotyping errors. Most of the essential information was included in the 20 submitted CYP2D6*10 test reports. The majority of Chinese laboratories are reliable for detecting the CYP2D6*10 variant; however, several issues revealed in this study underline the importance of PT schemes in continued external assessment and provision of guidelines. PMID:27603206

  1. Interpreting the CYP2D6 Results From the International Tamoxifen Pharmacogenetics Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Province, MA; Altman, RB; Klein, TE

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analysis of the entire analyzable cohort of 4,935 tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients by the International Tamoxifen Pharmacogenetics Consortium (ITPC) (criterion 3) revealed no CYP2D6 effect on outcomes but strong heterogeneity across sites.1 However, a post hoc–defined subgroup (criterion 1: postmenopausal, estrogen receptor positive, receiving 20 mg/day tamoxifen for 5 years; n = 1,996) did find statistically significant effect of CYP2D6 on both invasive disease–free survival as well as breast cancer–free interval, with little site heterogeneity. How should we interpret these discrepant findings? PMID:25056393

  2. Fracture mode analysis and related surface deformation during dyke intrusion: Results from 2D experimental modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, M.; Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of surface deformation in response to approaching intrusion is important for assessing volcanic hazards. In this paper, we present results from 2D scaled models of magma intrusion, in which we discuss the propagation mode and related surface deformation during dyke growth. Our experiments consist in the injection of analogue magma (Golden syrup) into cohesive fine-grained silica powder, simulating the brittle upper crust. Using an optical image correlation technique (Particle Imaging Velocimetry), we were able to follow the surface deformation, the displacements within the country rock and to calculate strains induced by the magma emplacement. We identified two kinds of intrusion morphologies resulting from different interactions between the dyke and plastic deformations occurring in the country rock near the surface. In both morphologies, the dyke is vertical at depth. Our analysis demonstrates that both hydraulic tensile opening and shear-related propagation operate during this first stage of vertical growth. At the same time, the surface lifted up and formed a smooth symmetrical dome. Both types of morphologies differ in the upper part. During a second stage of evolution, the first type of intrusion inclined at a dip between 45 to 65°. This inclination is not caused by shear deformations and is attributed to stress rotation near the tip. Closer to the surface, the growth of the inclined sheet creates shear bands which conduct the fluid toward the surface. The surface uplift becomes asymmetric. The second type of intrusion does not rotate at depth and continues its vertical propagation by catching vertical tensile cracks. The intrusion of magma in these cracks creates horizontal stresses which are responsible for the closure of fractures and the formation of reverse faults. At the surface the dome remains symmetrical. For both intrusions, the surface uplift accelerates during the second stage and it is strongly influenced by the presence or the

  3. 3D inversion of lunar gravity data and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Q.; Chen, C.; Li, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Gravity anomaly tells how the subsurface density varies or where the mass concentrations are located at. Inversion of gravity data gives a way to directly recover the density distributions. It has been demonstrated that the inversion is capable of retrieving density structures in resources exploration on the Earth. With increasing interests in interior structures of the Moon, scientists have obtained its gravity field with improved resolution on the lunar far side. We may thus utilize the inverse method to recover the lunar density structures beneath mascon basins or the density inhomogeneities in the crust and mantle. However, if considering the spherical gravity data in global scale, there are limitations in the previous inversion because the methods were based on the Cartesian coordinates system. In order to solve the problems, we developed a new 3D inverse method with three aspects involved: 1) A new model objective function adaptive to spherical coordinate system was established in the light of the Backus-Gilbert model appraisal theory. 2) A depth weighting function in inversion was also developed to approximately compensate for the kernel’s natural decay in potential field. And, 3) Non-uniqueness was suppressed by using model constraints and Tikhonov regularization tool. With the above developments and techniques, our method can quantitatively interpret the spherical gravity data. We firstly performed the inversion of synthetic data and confirmed that the locations of anomaly bodies were well defined, and then applied this method to the Bouguer gravity anomaly of the Moon which has been previously calculated based on the Chang'E-1 topography data and the SELENE gravity field model. Results showed that, on the one hand, the positive density anomalies beneath the mascon basins concentrated at the depth of 20-50km. Their residual densities are larger than 0.3g/cm^3 close to the density difference between lunar mantle and crust. Density structures along radial

  4. Earthquake Source Inversion Blindtest: Initial Results and Further Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P.; Burjanek, J.; Delouis, B.; Festa, G.; Francois-Holden, C.; Monelli, D.; Uchide, T.; Zahradnik, J.

    2007-12-01

    Images of earthquake ruptures, obtained from modelling/inverting seismic and/or geodetic data exhibit a high degree in spatial complexity. This earthquake source heterogeneity controls seismic radiation, and is determined by the details of the dynamic rupture process. In turn, such rupture models are used for studying source dynamics and for ground-motion prediction. But how reliable and trustworthy are these earthquake source inversions? Rupture models for a given earthquake, obtained by different research teams, often display striking disparities (see http://www.seismo.ethz.ch/srcmod) However, well resolved, robust, and hence reliable source-rupture models are an integral part to better understand earthquake source physics and to improve seismic hazard assessment. Therefore it is timely to conduct a large-scale validation exercise for comparing the methods, parameterization and data-handling in earthquake source inversions.We recently started a blind test in which several research groups derive a kinematic rupture model from synthetic seismograms calculated for an input model unknown to the source modelers. The first results, for an input rupture model with heterogeneous slip but constant rise time and rupture velocity, reveal large differences between the input and inverted model in some cases, while a few studies achieve high correlation between the input and inferred model. Here we report on the statistical assessment of the set of inverted rupture models to quantitatively investigate their degree of (dis-)similarity. We briefly discuss the different inversion approaches, their possible strength and weaknesses, and the use of appropriate misfit criteria. Finally we present new blind-test models, with increasing source complexity and ambient noise on the synthetics. The goal is to attract a large group of source modelers to join this source-inversion blindtest in order to conduct a large-scale validation exercise to rigorously asses the performance and

  5. The Spitzer c2d Legacy Results: Star-Formation Rates and Efficiencies; Evolution and Lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Neal J., II; Dunham, Michael M.; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Enoch, Melissa L.; Merín, Bruno; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Alcalá, Juan M.; Myers, Philip C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Huard, Tracy L.; Allen, Lori E.; Harvey, Paul M.; van Kempen, Tim; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Koerner, David W.; Mundy, Lee G.; Padgett, Deborah L.; Sargent, Anneila I.

    2009-04-01

    The c2d Spitzer Legacy project obtained images and photometry with both IRAC and MIPS instruments for five large, nearby molecular clouds. Three of the clouds were also mapped in dust continuum emission at 1.1 mm, and optical spectroscopy has been obtained for some clouds. This paper combines information drawn from studies of individual clouds into a combined and updated statistical analysis of star-formation rates and efficiencies, numbers and lifetimes for spectral energy distribution (SED) classes, and clustering properties. Current star-formation efficiencies range from 3% to 6%; if star formation continues at current rates for 10 Myr, efficiencies could reach 15-30%. Star-formation rates and rates per unit area vary from cloud to cloud; taken together, the five clouds are producing about 260 M sun of stars per Myr. The star-formation surface density is more than an order of magnitude larger than would be predicted from the Kennicutt relation used in extragalactic studies, reflecting the fact that those relations apply to larger scales, where more diffuse matter is included in the gas surface density. Measured against the dense gas probed by the maps of dust continuum emission, the efficiencies are much higher, with stellar masses similar to masses of dense gas, and the current stock of dense cores would be exhausted in 1.8 Myr on average. Nonetheless, star formation is still slow compared to that expected in a free-fall time, even in the dense cores. The derived lifetime for the Class I phase is 0.54 Myr, considerably longer than some estimates. Similarly, the lifetime for the Class 0 SED class, 0.16 Myr, with the notable exception of the Ophiuchus cloud, is longer than early estimates. If photometry is corrected for estimated extinction before calculating class indicators, the lifetimes drop to 0.44 Myr for Class I and to 0.10 for Class 0. These lifetimes assume a continuous flow through the Class II phase and should be considered median lifetimes or half

  6. Cross Gradient Based Joint Inversion of 2D Wide Angle Seismic Reflection/Refraction and Gravity Data Along the Profile Through the 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, S.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    2D wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction survey has been widely used to investigate crustal structure and Moho topography. Similarly gravity survey is also very important in the study of local and regional earth features. Seismic survey is sensitive to the seismic velocity parameters and interface variations. For gravity survey, it is sensitive to density parameters of the medium but the resolution along the vertical direction is relatively poor. In this study, we have developed a strategy to jointly invert for seismic velocity model, density model and interface positions using the gravity observations and seismic arrival times from different phases. For the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data, it often relies on the empirical relationship between seismic velocity and density. In comparison, our joint inversion strategy also includes the cross-gradient based structure constraint for seismic velocity and density models in addition to the empirical relationship between them. The objective function for the joint inversion includes data misfit terms for seismic travel times and gravity observations, the cross-gradient constraint, the smoothness terms for two models, and the data misfit term between predicted gravity data based on density model converted from velocity model using the empirical relationship. Each term has its respective weight. We have applied the new joint inversion method to the Riwoqe-Yushu-Maduo profile in northwest China. The profile crosses through the Qiangtang block and Bayan Har block from southwest to northeast, respectively. The 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu earthquake is located on the profile, around the Ganzi-Yushu fault zone. The joint inversion produces the velocity and density models that are similar in structure and at the same time fit their respective data sets well. Compared to separate seismic inversion using seismic travel times, the joint inversion with gravity data gives a velocity model that better delineates the fault zones. Low

  7. A parallel algorithm for 2D visco-acoustic frequency-domain full-waveform inversion: application to a dense OBS data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbier, F.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a distributed-memory parallel algorithm for 2D visco-acoustic full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. Our code is written in fortran90 and use MPI for parallelism. The algorithm was applied to real wide-angle data set recorded by 100 OBSs with a 1-km spacing in the eastern-Nankai trough (Japan) to image the deep structure of the subduction zone. Full-waveform inversion is applied sequentially to discrete frequencies by proceeding from the low to the high frequencies. The inverse problem is solved with a classic gradient method. Full-waveform modeling is performed with a frequency-domain finite-difference method. In the frequency-domain, solving the wave equation requires resolution of a large unsymmetric system of linear equations. We use the massively parallel direct solver MUMPS (http://www.enseeiht.fr/irit/apo/MUMPS) for distributed-memory computer to solve this system. The MUMPS solver is based on a multifrontal method for the parallel factorization. The MUMPS algorithm is subdivided in 3 main steps: a symbolic analysis step that performs re-ordering of the matrix coefficients to minimize the fill-in of the matrix during the subsequent factorization and an estimation of the assembly tree of the matrix. Second, the factorization is performed with dynamic scheduling to accomodate numerical pivoting and provides the LU factors distributed over all the processors. Third, the resolution is performed for multiple sources. To compute the gradient of the cost function, 2 simulations per shot are required (one to compute the forward wavefield and one to back-propagate residuals). The multi-source resolutions can be performed in parallel with MUMPS. In the end, each processor stores in core a sub-domain of all the solutions. These distributed solutions can be exploited to compute in parallel the gradient of the cost function. Since the gradient of the cost function is a weighted stack of the shot and residual solutions of MUMPS, each processor

  8. Deep-crustal magma reservoirs beneath the Nicaraguan volcanic arc, revealed by 2-D and semi 3-D inversion of magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasse, Heinrich; Schäfer, Anja; Díaz, Daniel; Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Muñoz, Angélica; Mütschard, Lutz

    2015-11-01

    A long-period magnetotelluric (MT) experiment was conducted in early 2009 in western Nicaragua to study the electrical resistivity and thus fluid/melt distribution at the Central American continental margin where the Cocos plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate. Strike analysis yields a preference direction perpendicular to the profile, with moderate deviation from two-dimensionality, however. Two-dimensional modeling maps the sediments of the Nicaraguan Depression and a high-conductivity zone in the mid-crust, slightly offset from the arc. Further conductors are modeled in the backarc. However, these features are probably artifacts when a 2-D program is applied to data which show moderate 3-D characteristics. 3-D inversion clarifies the situation, and the major remaining conductive structure is now quasi directly beneath the volcanic chain and interpreted as a deep-seated magma deposit. Conductivity in the backarc is also relatively high and may either be caused by still existing partial melts beneath the Paleocene to Miocene volcanic arcs or by related metallic deposits in the aureoles of hydrothermal alteration.

  9. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  10. Basement blocks and basin inversion structures mapped using reprocessed Gulfrex 2D seismic data, Caribbean-South American oblique collisional zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalona, A.; Sena, A.; Mann, P.

    2003-12-01

    We have reprocessed and reinterpreted more than 10,000 km of "Gulfrex" multi-channel 2D seismic reflection lines collected by Gulf Oil Corporation in 1972 along the northern margin of South America (offshore Venezuela and Trinidad). These digital data were donated to the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics and represent the largest single, digital reflection survey of the region. Reprocessing of these data included: format correction, filtering, post-stack multiple suppression, and fk migration. Reprocessed data were loaded and interpreted on a workstation. The data straddle a 2,000,000 km2 zone of Paleocene-Recent, time-transgressive, oblique collision between the Caribbean arc system and the passive continental margin of northern South America. Free-air, satellite gravity data shows the remarkable 1000-km-scale continuity of four basement ridges between the uncollided part of the Caribbean arc system (NS-trending Lesser Antilles arc) and the EW-trending collisional area north of Venezuela. The basement ridges involved in the Venezuelan collisional zone include: 1) Aruba-Bonaire-Curacao ridge that can be traced as a continuous feature to the Aves ridge remnant arc of the Lesser Antilles; 2) the partially inverted Blanquilla-Bonaire basin that can be traced into the Grenada back-arc basin; 3) Margarita-Los Testigos platform that can be traced to the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc; and 4) foreland basins and fold-thrust belts of eastern Venezuela (Serrania del Interior and Maturin basin) that can be traced to the Tobago forearc basin and Barbados accretionary prism. Gulfrex data document the progressive change of basinal fault systems from NS-striking normal faults formed in extensional, Lesser Antilles intra-arc settings to rotated and inverted, NE and EW-striking normal faults deformed in the collisional area north of Venezuela. Age of initial shortening of basinal areas and inversion of normal faults setting does not follow the simple, expected pattern of

  11. Familial 10p trisomy resulting from a maternal pericentric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, C.; Meck, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    The authors report a familial recombination of a pericentric inversion of chromosome 10 resulting in 2 affected relatives who had 10p trisomy and 10q monosomy with the karyotypic abnormality designated rec(10) dup p,inv(10) (p11.2q26). Both of these individuals had the typical characteristics of 10p trisomy, however, at birth the proposita had mild facial anomalies suggesting that the distinct facial characteristics may be of postnatal onset in some cases. In addition, the proposita had gastroesophageal reflux causing severe anemia. The phenotype of the patients is compared to 41 patients with 10p trisomy reported in the literature. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann methods for some 2-D nonlinear diffusion equations:Computational results

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, B.H.; Rodrigue, G.H. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Levermore, C.D. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we examine two lattice Boltzmann methods (that are a derivative of lattice gas methods) for computing solutions to two two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations of the form {partial derivative}/{partial derivative}t u = v ({partial derivative}/{partial derivative}x D(u){partial derivative}/{partial derivative}x u + {partial derivative}/{partial derivative}y D(u){partial derivative}/{partial derivative}y u), where u = u({rvec x},t), {rvec x} {element of} R{sup 2}, v is a constant, and D(u) is a nonlinear term that arises from a Chapman-Enskog asymptotic expansion. In particular, we provide computational evidence supporting recent results showing that the methods are second order convergent (in the L{sub 1}-norm), conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Solutions computed via the lattice Boltzmann methods are compared with those computed by other explicit, second order, conservative, monotone finite difference methods. Results are reported for both the L{sub 1}- and L{sub {infinity}}-norms.

  13. Nanotribology Results Show that DNA Forms a Mechanically Resistant 2D Network in Metaphase Chromatin Plates

    PubMed Central

    Gállego, Isaac; Oncins, Gerard; Sisquella, Xavier; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Daban, Joan-Ramon

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that metaphase chromosomes are formed by thin plates, and here we have applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) and friction force measurements at the nanoscale (nanotribology) to analyze the properties of these planar structures in aqueous media at room temperature. Our results show that high concentrations of NaCl and EDTA and extensive digestion with protease and nuclease enzymes cause plate denaturation. Nanotribology studies show that native plates under structuring conditions (5 mM Mg2+) have a relatively high friction coefficient (μ ≈ 0.3), which is markedly reduced when high concentrations of NaCl or EDTA are added (μ ≈ 0.1). This lubricant effect can be interpreted considering the electrostatic repulsion between DNA phosphate groups and the AFM tip. Protease digestion increases the friction coefficient (μ ≈ 0.5), but the highest friction is observed when DNA is cleaved by micrococcal nuclease (μ ≈ 0.9), indicating that DNA is the main structural element of plates. Whereas nuclease-digested plates are irreversibly damaged after the friction measurement, native plates can absorb kinetic energy from the AFM tip without suffering any damage. These results suggest that plates are formed by a flexible and mechanically resistant two-dimensional network which allows the safe storage of DNA during mitosis. PMID:21156137

  14. Realizing 2D magnetotelluric inversion in the case of divergent geoelectric strike directions in the crust and mantle - Case study using synthetic models and real data from the Tajo Basin (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoldt, J.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Kiyan, D.; Hogg, C.; Rosell, O.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) inversions of magnetotelluric (MT) data are presently far more commonly used than three-dimensional (3D) inversions as they still significantly outperform 3D inversions in terms of speed, thus allowing for much better resolution of the subsurface through a larger feasible number of grid cells. The suitability of 2D inversion needs thereby to be tested for cases where the electric resistivity structure of the subsurface is potentially 3D to some extent. One particular case of a 3D subsurface structure consists of lateral interfaces with varying orientations at crustal and mantle depths. Such a case might emerge, for instance, where crustal faulting, originating from present day tectonics, is situated above a mantle where structures are dominated by earlier or current plate tectonic processes. Those plate tectonic processes could comprise continental collision from an oblique direction, or lattice preferred orientation in the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition zone due to an oblique relative motion between lithosphere and asthenosphere. Whereas recovery of crustal structures can usually be achieved in a straightforward manner by confining the modelled frequency range to the crustal depths, deriving mantle structures is more challenging. Different approaches for this case have been investigated here using synthetic model studies as well as inversion of a real MT dataset collected in southern Spain as part of the PICASSO fieldwork campaign. The PICASSO project intends to enhance knowledge about the geological setting of the Alboran Domain beneath the western Mediterranean Sea and its surrounding regions, and through that knowledge to understand processes related to continent-continent collision. The Iberian Peninsula is the focus of the first phase of DIAS’s PICASSO efforts, and comprised a magnetotelluric profile crossing the Tajo Basin and Betics Cordillera. Analyses of MT responses and seismic tomography data indicate varying geologic strike

  15. The Plasma Wake Downstream of Lunar Topographic Obstacles: Preliminary Results from 2D Particle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Michael I.; Farrell, W. M.; Snubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Anticipating the plasma and electrical environments in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) of the moon is critical in understanding local processes of space weathering, surface charging, surface chemistry, volatile production and trapping, exo-ion sputtering, and charged dust transport. In the present study, we have employed the open-source XOOPIC code [I] to investigate the effects of solar wind conditions and plasma-surface interactions on the electrical environment in PSRs through fully two-dimensional pattic1e-in-cell simulations. By direct analogy with current understanding of the global lunar wake (e.g., references) deep, near-terminator, shadowed craters are expected to produce plasma "mini-wakes" just leeward of the crater wall. The present results (e.g., Figure I) are in agreement with previous claims that hot electrons rush into the crater void ahead of the heavier ions, fanning a negative cloud of charge. Charge separation along the initial plasma-vacuum interface gives rise to an ambipolar electric field that subsequently accelerates ions into the void. However, the situation is complicated by the presence of the dynamic lunar surface, which develops an electric potential in response to local plasma currents (e.g., Figure Ia). In some regimes, wake structure is clearly affected by the presence of the charged crater floor as it seeks to achieve current balance (i.e. zero net current to the surface).

  16. First results from ideal 2-D MHD reconstruction: magnetopause reconnection event seen by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, W.-L.; Ã-. Sonnerup, B. U.

    2008-09-01

    We have applied a new reconstruction method (Sonnerup and Teh, 2008), based on the ideal single-fluid MHD equations in a steady-state, two-dimensional geometry, to a reconnection event observed by the Cluster-3 (C3) spacecraft on 5 July 2001, 06:23 UT, at the dawn-side Northern-Hemisphere magnetopause. The event has been previously studied by use of Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction, performed in the deHoffmann-Teller frame, and using the assumption that the flow effects were either negligible or the flow was aligned with the magnetic field. Our new method allows the reconstruction to be performed in the frame of reference moving with the reconnection site (the X-line). In the event studied, this motion is tailward/equatorward at 140 km/s. The principal result of the study is that the new method functions well, generating a magnetic field map that is qualitatively similar to those obtained in the earlier GS-based reconstructions but now includes the reconnection site itself. In comparison with the earlier map by Hasegawa et al. (2004), our new map has a slightly improved ability (cc=0.979 versus cc=0.975) to predict the fields measured by the other three Cluster spacecraft, at distances from C3 ranging from 2132 km (C1) to 2646 km (C4). The new field map indicates the presence of a magnetic X-point, located some 5300 km tailward/equatorward of C3 at the time of its traversal of the magnetopause. In the immediate vicinity of the X-point, the ideal-MHD assumption breaks down, i.e. resistive and/or other effects should be included. We have circumvented this problem by an ad-hoc procedure in which we allow the axial part of convection electric field to be non-constant near the reconnection site. The new reconstruction method also provides a map of the velocity field, in which the inflow into the wedge of reconnected field lines and the plasma jet within it can be seen, and maps of the electric potential and of the electric current distribution. Even though the

  17. Emission-Line Galaxies from the PEARS Hubble Ultra Deep Field: A 2-D Detection Method and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Straughn, Amber N.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Cohen, Seth H.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, james; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Xu, Chun; Gronwall, Caryl; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Walsh, Jeremy; diSeregoAlighieri, Sperello

    2007-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism PEARS (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) survey provides a large dataset of low-resolution spectra from thousands of galaxies in the GOODS North and South fields. One important subset of objects in these data are emission-line galaxies (ELGs), and we have investigated several different methods aimed at systematically selecting these galaxies. Here we present a new methodology and results of a search for these ELGs in the PEARS observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) using a 2D detection method that utilizes the observation that many emission lines originate from clumpy knots within galaxies. This 2D line-finding method proves to be useful in detecting emission lines from compact knots within galaxies that might not otherwise be detected using more traditional 1D line-finding techniques. We find in total 96 emission lines in the HUDF, originating from 81 distinct "knots" within 63 individual galaxies. We find in general that [0 1111 emitters are the most common, comprising 44% of the sample, and on average have high equivalent widths (70% of [0 1111 emitters having rest-frame EW> 100A). There are 12 galaxies with multiple emitting knots; several show evidence of variations in H-alpha flux in the knots, suggesting that the differing star formation properties across a single galaxy can in general be probed at redshifts approximately greater than 0.2 - 0.4. The most prevalent morphologies are large face-on spirals and clumpy interacting systems, many being unique detections owing to the 2D method described here, thus highlighting the strength of this technique.

  18. The reaction H2+D2 ⇆ 2HD. A long history of erroneous interpretation of shock tube results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifshitz, Assa; Bidani, Menashe; Carroll, Harvey F.

    1983-09-01

    An ultraclean 2 in. i.d. single pulse shock tube coupled to an atomic resonance absorption system was constructed in order to determine hydrogen atom concentration by Lyman-α absorption. The tube was baked to 300 °C and pumped down to ˜10-7 Torr. Ultrapure argon could be shock heated to ˜2500 K with no spurious H atom absorption. The system was constructed in order to study the kinetics of chemical reactions which are strongly catalyzed by H atoms, under the conditions where no such atoms are present. Specifically, the role of H atoms in the H2+D2→2HD exchange reaction was studied. Mixtures of hydrogen and deuterium diluted in argon were shock heated to 1375-1760 K; samples were then taken from the tube and analyzed mass spectrometrically for the ratio [HD]/[D2]. 1400 K was the highest temperature at which no spurious H atom absorption was observed in a shocked mixture of 1% H2-1% D2. At 1400 K, under the conditions of no absorption, no, or ≤1%HD conversion was obtained. At higher temperatures Lyman-α absorption was detected and more HD conversion was observed. A comparison between these results and results obtained previously in conventional systems suggests that the high HD conversion observed in the past was caused by hydrogen atoms generated from impurities. The existence of a molecular mechanism in the H2-D2 exchange reaction is highly doubtful.

  19. The tectonostratigraphic evolution of the offshore Gippsland Basin, Victoria, Australia---results from 3D seismic interpretation and 2D section restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Mitchell

    The Gippsland Basin is located primarily offshore Victoria, Australia (between the Australian mainland and Tasmania) approximately 200 km east of Melbourne. The formation of the east-west trending Gippsland Basin is associated with the break-up of Gondwana during the late Jurassic/early Cretaceous and the basin has endured multiple rifting and inversion events. Strong tectonic control on the sedimentary development of the basin is reflected in the deposition of several major, basin scale sequences ranging in age from the early Cretaceous to Neogene, which are usually bounded by angular unconformities. Schlumberger's Petrel software package has been used to structurally and stratigraphically interpret a basin-wide 3D seismic data set provided by the Australian Government (Geoscience Australia) and four 2D kinematic reconstruction/restorations through the basin have been completed with Midland Valley's Move software to achieve a better understanding of the structural evolution of the Gippsland Basin. Rift phase extension calculated from the restorations (5.0--10.5%) appears anomalously low to accommodate the amount of sediment that has been deposited in the basin (>10km). Distributed extension on small faults and subsidence history from backstripping are employed to answer this anomaly. The 2D restorations completed illustrate structural time relationships across the basin and allow for a minimum estimate of erosion that has occurred along the inverted northern basin margin. Differences between previous work completed by Power et al. (2001) and this study as well as several extension models and associated implications are discussed as they relate to the interpretation carried out in this study. Extension calculated from section restorations ranged from approximately 5.0--10.5%. These measured extensional values appear too low to wholly accommodate the accumulated sediment thickness in the basin. Subsidence modelling and backstripping estimates approximately 50

  20. Comparative Results from a CFD Challenge Over a 2D Three-Element High-Lift Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausmeyer, Steven M.; Lin, John C.

    1997-01-01

    A high-lift workshop was held in May of 1993 at NASA Langley Research Center. A major part of the workshop centered on a blind test of various computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods in which the flow about a two- dimensional (2D) three-element airfoil was computed without prior knowledge of the experimental data. The results of this 'blind' test revealed: (1) The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods generally showed less variability among codes than did potential/Euler solvers coupled with boundary-layer solution techniques. However, some of the coupled methods still provided excellent predictions. (2) Drag prediction using coupled methods agreed more closely with experiment than the RANS methods. Lift was more accurately predicted than drag for both methods. (3) The CFD methods did well in predicting lift and drag changes due to changes in Reynolds number, however, they did not perform as well when predicting lift and drag increments due to changing flap gap, (4) Pressures and skin friction compared favorably with experiment for most of the codes. (5) There was a large variability in most of the velocity profile predictions. Computational results predict a stronger siat wake than measured suggesting a missing component in turbulence modeling, perhaps curvature effects.

  1. Global CO2 flux estimation using GOSAT: An inter-comparison of inversion results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houweling, S.; Basu, S.; Chevallier, F.; Feng, L.; Ganshin, A.; Maksyutov, S.; Palmer, P. I.; Peylin, P.; Poussi, Z.; Takagi, H.; Zhuravlev, R.

    2012-12-01

    A unique global data archive is under construction of total column CO2 measurements retrieved from the Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite, currently spanning more than three years of data. Several groups are investigating the application of these data to global atmospheric inverse modelling for studying the global carbon cycle. It is known from inverse modeling using surface measurements that the robustness of the inversion-estimated fluxes is best analyzed using a multi-model approach. So far, this has not been demonstrated for inversions using satellite data, but but some of the known sources of uncertainty are difficult to account for in a single inversion, such as transport model uncertainties and differences between retrieval methods. We have organized an inversion inter-comparison experiment to investigate whether, despite these uncertainties, robust signals of sources and sinks can be inferred from the GOSAT data. The current experiment allows full freedom in inversion set-up in order to avoid limiting the range of possible outcomes. Each participating group is free to use their preferred inversion set-up, transport model, and measurements, but is asked to report in a common format and for a common time period of one year to allow one-to-one comparison. We will present an overview of the status of the experiment, including a preliminary synthesis of large-scale CO2 fluxes from a statistical analysis of the ensemble of inversion results and verification of the performance of the inversions using independent measurements.

  2. Terrace Zone Structure in the Chicxulub Impact Crater Based on 2-D Seismic Reflection Profiles: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Gorney, D. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Barton, P. J.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Melosh, H. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Surendra, A. T.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    Terrace zones, central peaks, and flat floors characterize complex craters like the Chicxulub impact crater located near the northeast coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The subsurface crater structure was studied using seismic reflection surveying in Jan/Feb 2005 by the R/V Maurice Ewing. We present 2-D seismic profiles including constant radius, regional, and grid profiles encompassing the 195 km width of the crater. These diversely oriented lines clearly show the terrace zones and aid in the search for crater ejecta as we investigate the formation of the crater including the incidence angle and direction of the extraterrestrial object that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 65 million years ago (K-T boundary). Terrace zones form in complex craters after the modification stage as a result of the gravitational collapse of overextended sediment back into the crater cavity. The terrace zone is clearly imaged on seismic profiles confirming the complex structure of the Chixculub crater. Recent work on reprocessed 1996 profiles found different sizes and spacing of the terraces and concluded that the variations in radial structure are a result of an oblique impact. A SW-NE profile from this study was the only line to show a concentration of deformation near the crater rim hinting that the northeast was the downrange direction of impact. We confirm this narrowing in terrace spacing using a profile with a similar orientation in the 2005 images. Through integration of the new dense grid of profiles and radial lines from the 1996 and 2005 surveys we map the 3-D variability of the terrace zones to further constrain impact direction and examine the formative processes of the Chixculub and other large impact craters.

  3. Progress Towards Well-Constrained Regional Inversions: Results from the NACP Midcontinent Intensive Regional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. J.; Diaz Isaac, L. I.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Andrews, A. E.; Jacobson, A. R.; Sweeney, C.; Ogle, S. M.; Schuh, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric inversions for ecosystem carbon fluxes have traditionally been limited both by sparse atmospheric data and by uncertainty regarding atmospheric transport. These two limits have proven difficult to disentangle in past studies. The NACP Midcontinent Intensive regional study provides both unprecedented measurement density and prior knowledge of regional fluxes, thus presents a unique opportunity to examine the impacts of measurement density, atmospheric transport uncertainty, and assumptions underlying the inversion process. We present results from a regional inversion system that includes the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model, the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM), a Bayesian matrix inversion, and boundary and initial conditions from NOAA's Carbon Tracker (CT) system. We show that the regional inversion produces an estimated flux that, for 2007, is quite similar both in magnitude and spatial distribution to the results from agricultural inventory. We show that this result in robust to most of the assumptions (coherence of the flux correction in space, prior flux estimate, boundary conditions, model-data mismatch) required for this inverse system. We show also that the magnitude of the regional flux, but not the spatial pattern, is relatively robust with respect to the removal of data from the inversion, suggesting different network design requirements depending on the goals of a regional inversion. Finally, we explore comparisons between the forwards simulations of WRF and CT to examine the impact of atmospheric transport on simulation of regional CO2, thus, indirectly, on the regional inversions. We find that, given the same surface fluxes and boundary conditions, CT's transport model (TM5) simulates a more spatially uniform mixing ratio field than WRF. We hypothesize that this is due to a combination of limited horizontal resolution and overestimated vertical mixing in TM5. The WRF model, in contrast, shows errors in its forwards

  4. Comparison of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions with Results From 3D Analysis for Composite Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isbelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane-strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with delamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  5. THE 2D HEISENBERG ANTIFERROMAGNET IN HIGH-Tc SUPERCONDUCTIVITY:. A Review of Numerical Techniques and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, T.

    In this article we review numerical studies of the quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a square lattice, which is a model of the magnetic properties of the undoped “precursor insulators” of the high temperature superconductors. We begin with a brief pedagogical introduction and then discuss zero and nonzero temperature properties and compare the numerical results to analytical calculations and to experiment where appropriate. We also review the various algorithms used to obtain these results, and discuss algorithm developments and improvements in computer technology which would be most useful for future numerical work in this area. Finally we list several outstanding problems which may merit further investigation.

  6. Preliminary clinical results: an analyzing tool for 2D optical imaging in detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi Aizudin Bin Radin Nasirudin, Radin; Meier, Reinhard; Ahari, Carmen; Sievert, Matti; Fiebich, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; No"l, Peter B.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging (OI) is a relatively new method in detecting active inflammation of hand joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). With the high number of people affected by this disease especially in western countries, the availability of OI as an early diagnostic imaging method is clinically highly relevant. In this paper, we present a newly in-house developed OI analyzing tool and a clinical evaluation study. Our analyzing tool extends the capability of existing OI tools. We include many features in the tool, such as region-based image analysis, hyper perfusion curve analysis, and multi-modality image fusion to aid clinicians in localizing and determining the intensity of inflammation in joints. Additionally, image data management options, such as the full integration of PACS/RIS, are included. In our clinical study we demonstrate how OI facilitates the detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. The preliminary clinical results indicate a sensitivity of 43.5%, a specificity of 80.3%, an accuracy of 65.7%, a positive predictive value of 76.6%, and a negative predictive value of 64.9% in relation to clinical results from MRI. The accuracy of inflammation detection serves as evidence to the potential of OI as a useful imaging modality for early detection of active inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. With our in-house developed tool we extend the usefulness of OI imaging in the clinical arena. Overall, we show that OI is a fast, inexpensive, non-invasive and nonionizing yet highly sensitive and accurate imaging modality.-

  7. Age, Gender and Normalization Covariates for Spinal Cord Gray Matter and Total Cross-Sectional Areas at Cervical and Thoracic Levels: A 2D Phase Sensitive Inversion Recovery Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Papinutto, Nico; Schlaeger, Regina; Panara, Valentina; Zhu, Alyssa H.; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Stern, William A.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Henry, Roland G.

    2015-01-01

    The source of inter-subject variability and the influence of age and gender on morphometric characteristics of the spinal cord, such as the total cross-sectional area (TCA), the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) areas, currently remain under investigation. Understanding the effect of covariates such as age, gender, brain volumes, and skull- and vertebra-derived metrics on cervical and thoracic spinal cord TCA and GM areas in healthy subjects would be fundamental for exploring compartment specific changes in neurological diseases affecting the spinal cord. Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T we investigated 32 healthy subjects using a 2D phase sensitive inversion recovery sequence and we measured TCA, GM and WM areas at 4 cervical and thoracic levels of the spinal cord. We assessed age and gender relationships of cord measures and explored associations between cord measures and a) brain volumes and b) skull- and vertebra-derived metrics. Age and gender had a significant effect on TCA, WM and GM areas (with women and elderly having smaller values than men and younger people respectively), but not on the GM area/TCA ratio. The total intracranial volume and C3 vertebra dimensions showed the highest correlations with cord measures. When used in multi-regression models, they reduced cord areas group variability by approximately a third. Age and gender influences on cord measures and normalization strategies here presented might be of use in the study of compartment specific changes in various neurological diseases affecting the spinal cord. PMID:25781178

  8. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-05: Preliminary Results On a 2D Dosimetry System Based On the Optically Stimulated Luminescence of Al2O3

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M; Eller, S; Yukihara, E; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; Akselrod, M; Hanson, O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a precise 2D dose mapping technique based on the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films for medical applications. Methods: A 2D laser scanning reader was developed using fast F{sup +}-center (lifetime of <7 ns) and slow F-center (lifetime of 35 ms) OSL emission from newly developed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films (Landauer Inc.). An algorithm was developed to correct images for both material and system properties. Since greater contribution of the F??-center emission in the recorded signal increases the readout efficiency and robustness of image corrections, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C,Mg film samples are being investigated in addition to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C samples. Preliminary investigations include exposure of the films to a 6 MV photon beam at 10 cm depth in solid water phantom with an SSD of 100 cm, using a 10 cm × 10 cm flat field or a 4 cm × 4 cm field with a 60° wedge filter. Kodak EDR2 radiographic film and EBT2 Gafchromic film were also exposed for comparison. Results: The results indicate that the algorithm is able to correct images and calculate 2D dose. For the wedge field irradiation, the calculated dose at the center of the field was 0.9 Gy for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 0.87 Gy for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C,Mg, whereas, the delivered dose was 0.95 Gy. A good qualitative agreement of the dose profiles was obtained between the OSL films and EDR2 and EBT2 films. Laboratory tests using a beta source suggest that a large dynamic range (10{sup −2}−10{sup 2} Gy) can be achieved using this technique. Conclusion: A 2D dosimetry system and an in-house image correction algorithm were developed for 2D film dosimetry in medical applications. The system is in the preliminary stage of development, but the data demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. This work was supported by Landauer, Inc.

  9. Ecological Controls on Biogeochemical Fluxes in the Western Antarctic Peninsula: Long-Term Observations and Inverse Food Web Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducklow, H. W.; Sailley, S. F.; Stammerjohn, S. E.; Saba, G. K.; Doney, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Sea ice in the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) region is both highly variable and rapidly changing. In the Palmer Station region, the ice season duration has decreased by 92 days since 1978. The sea-ice changes affect ocean stratification and freshwater balance; and in turn impact every component of the polar marine ecosystem. Long-term observations from the WAP shelf region show a pattern of chlorophyll (Chl) variability with three to five years of negative Chl anomalies interrupted by one or two years of positive anomalies. Observations and results from an inverse food-web model show that these low and high Chl regimes differed significantly from each other, with high primary productivity and net community production (NCP) associated with the high Chl years and vice-versa. Gross primary production averaged 40 mmolC m-2 d-1 in the low Chl years and 100 mmolC m-2 d-1 in the high Chl years, with 30-40% going to NCP across regimes. Only the food web in the southern region in high Chl years was dominated by large phytoplankton and krill, whereas in in all other cases, foodwebs were dominated by small phytoplankton and microzooplankton. These contrasts were strongest between the northern, low Chl years and southern, high Chl years, consistent with earlier north to south observations of sea ice and ecosystem change along the WAP. The relative importance of major bulk carbon flows did not differ substantially between high and low Chl years. Both the northern/low Chl and southern/high Chl regimes had roughly equal proportions of NCP, although its composition reflected shifts in dominance by large versus small plankton. These results suggest that food webs dominated by smaller phytoplankton and grazers have pathways that funnel production into NCP, and likely, export.

  10. Comparison of Analysis Results Between 2D/1D Synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G in the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung Lim, Mi; Maeng, Young Jae; Fero, Arnold H.; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2016-02-01

    The 2D/1D synthesis methodology has been used to calculate the fast neutron (E > 1.0 MeV) exposure to the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel. This method uses the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinates code and the BUGLE-96 cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI. RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation-Multiple 3D Geometries) which performs full 3D calculations was developed and is based on domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architecture. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor. Both methods are applied to surveillance test results for the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)-OPR (Optimized Power Reactor) 1000 MW. The objective of this paper is to compare the results of the KSNP surveillance program between 2D/1D synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G. Each operating KSNP has a reactor vessel surveillance program consisting of six surveillance capsules located between the core and the reactor vessel in the downcomer region near the reactor vessel wall. In addition to the In-Vessel surveillance program, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry (EVND) program has been implemented. In order to estimate surveillance test results, cycle-specific forward transport calculations were performed by 2D/1D synthesis and by RAPTOR-M3G. The ratio between measured and calculated (M/C) reaction rates will be discussed. The current plan is to install an EVND system in all of the Korea PWRs including the new reactor type, APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400 MW. This work will play an important role in establishing a KSNP-specific database of surveillance test results and will employ RAPTOR-M3G for surveillance dosimetry location as well as positions in the KSNP reactor vessel.

  11. Comparison and analysis of 2-D simulation results with two implosion radiation experiments on the Los Alamos Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Lebeda, C.F.; Matuska, W.; Benage, J.; Idzorek, G.; Oona, H.; Stokes, J.; Roderick, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    Two experiments, PegI-41, conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus I capacitor bank, and PegII-25, on the Pegasus II bank, consisted of the implosions of 13 mg (nominal), 5 cm radius, 2 cm high thin cylindrical aluminum foils resulting in soft x-ray radiation pulses from the plasma thermalization on axis. The implosions were conducted in direct-drive (no intermediate switching) mode with peak currents of about 4 MA and 5 MA respectively, and implosion times of about 2.5 {micro}s and 2.0 {micro}s. A radiation yield of about 250 kJ was measured for PegII-25. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the physics of the implosion and relate this physics to the production of the radiation pulse and to provide detailed experimental data which could be compared with 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. Included in the experimental diagnostic suites were faraday rotation and dB/dt current measurements, a visible framing camera, an x-ray stripline camera, time-dependent spectroscopy, bolometers and XRD`S. A comparison of the results from these experiments shows agreement with 2-D simulation results in the instability development, current, and radiation pulse data, including the pulsewidth, shape, peak power and total radiation yield as measured by bolometry. Instabilities dominate the behavior of the implosion and largely determine the properties of the resulting radiation pulse. The 2-D simulations can be seen to be an important tool in understanding the implosion physics.

  12. Stability Result For Dynamic Inversion Devised to Control Large Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.

    2001-01-01

    High performance aircraft of the future will be designed lighter, more maneuverable, and operate over an ever expanding flight envelope. One of the largest differences from the flight control perspective between current and future advanced aircraft is elasticity. Over the last decade, dynamic inversion methodology has gained considerable popularity in application to highly maneuverable fighter aircraft, which were treated as rigid vehicles. This paper is an initial attempt to establish global stability results for dynamic inversion methodology as applied to a large, flexible aircraft. This work builds on a previous result for rigid fighter aircraft and adds a new level of complexity that is the flexible aircraft dynamics, which cannot be ignored even in the most basic flight control. The results arise from observations of the control laws designed for a new generation of the High-Speed Civil Transport aircraft.

  13. 3D face reconstruction from 2D pictures: first results of a web-based computer aided system for aesthetic procedures.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Santos, Thiago; Baumberger, Christian; Constantinescu, Mihai; Olariu, Radu; Nolte, Lutz-Peter; Alaraibi, Salman; Reyes, Mauricio

    2013-05-01

    The human face is a vital component of our identity and many people undergo medical aesthetics procedures in order to achieve an ideal or desired look. However, communication between physician and patient is fundamental to understand the patient's wishes and to achieve the desired results. To date, most plastic surgeons rely on either "free hand" 2D drawings on picture printouts or computerized picture morphing. Alternatively, hardware dependent solutions allow facial shapes to be created and planned in 3D, but they are usually expensive or complex to handle. To offer a simple and hardware independent solution, we propose a web-based application that uses 3 standard 2D pictures to create a 3D representation of the patient's face on which facial aesthetic procedures such as filling, skin clearing or rejuvenation, and rhinoplasty are planned in 3D. The proposed application couples a set of well-established methods together in a novel manner to optimize 3D reconstructions for clinical use. Face reconstructions performed with the application were evaluated by two plastic surgeons and also compared to ground truth data. Results showed the application can provide accurate 3D face representations to be used in clinics (within an average of 2 mm error) in less than 5 min. PMID:23319167

  14. Velocity structure of a bottom simulating reflector offshore Peru: Results from full waveform inversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pecher, I.A.; Minshull, T.A.; Singh, S.C.; Von Huene, R.

    1996-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of the worldwide distribution of submarine gas hydrates comes from seismic observations of Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs). Full waveform inversion has proven to be a reliable technique for studying the fine structure of BSRs using the compressional wave velocity. We applied a non-linear full waveform inversion technique to a BSR at a location offshore Peru. We first determined the large-scale features of seismic velocity variations using a statistical inversion technique to maximise coherent energy along travel-time curves. These velocities were used for a starting velocity model for the full waveform inversion, which yielded a detailed velocity/depth model in the vicinity of the BSR. We found that the data are best fit by a model in which the BSR consists of a thin, low-velocity layer. The compressional wave velocity drops from 2.15 km/s down to an average of 1.70 km/s in an 18m thick interval, with a minimum velocity of 1.62 km/s in a 6 m interval. The resulting compressional wave velocity was used to estimate gas content in the sediments. Our results suggest that the low velocity layer is a 6-18 m thick zone containing a few percent of free gas in the pore space. The presence of the BSR coincides with a region of vertical uplift. Therefore, we suggest that gas at this BSR is formed by a dissociation of hydrates at the base of the hydrate stability zone due to uplift and subsequently a decrease in pressure.

  15. Effective CO2 sequestration monitoring using joint inversion result of seismic and electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, K.; Jeong, S.; Seol, S. J.; Byun, J.; Kwon, T.

    2015-12-01

    Man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere is a significant contributor to the greenhouse gas effect and related global warming. Sequestration of CO2 into saline aquifers has been proposed as one of the most practical options of all geological sequestration possibilities. During CO2 geological sequestration, monitoring is indispensable to delineate the change of CO2 saturation and migration of CO2 in the subsurface. Especially, monitoring of CO2 saturation in aquifers provides useful information for determining amount of injected CO2. Seismic inversion can provide the migration of CO2 plume with high resolution because velocity is reduced when CO2 replaces the pore fluid during CO2 injection. However, the estimation of CO2 saturation using the seismic method is difficult due to the lower sensitivity of the velocity to the saturation when the CO2 saturation up to 20%. On the other hand, marine controlled-source EM (mCSEM) inversion is sensitive to the resistivity changes resulting from variations in CO2 saturation, even though it has poor resolution than seismic method. In this study, we proposed an effective CO2 sequestration monitoring method using joint inversion of seismic and mCSEM data based on a cross-gradient constraint. The method was tested with realistic CO2 injection models in a deep brine aquifer beneath a shallow sea which is selected with consideration for the access convenience for the installation of source and receiver and an environmental safety. Resistivity images of CO2 plume by the proposed method for different CO2 injection stages have been significantly improved over those obtained from individual EM inversion. In addition, we could estimate a reliable CO2 saturation by rock physics model (RPM) using the P-wave velocity and the improved resistivity. The proposed method is a basis of three-dimensional estimation of reservoir parameters such as porosity and fluid saturation, and the method can be also applied for detecting a

  16. A multi-source inverse-geometry CT system: initial results with an 8 spot x-ray source array.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jongduk; De Man, Bruno; Uribe, Jorge; Longtin, Randy; Harrison, Daniel; Reynolds, Joseph; Neculaes, Bogdan; Frutschy, Kristopher; Inzinna, Louis; Caiafa, Antonio; Senzig, Robert; Pelc, Norbert J

    2014-03-01

    We present initial experimental results of a rotating-gantry multi-source inverse-geometry CT (MS-IGCT) system. The MS-IGCT system was built with a single module of 2 × 4 x-ray sources and a 2D detector array. It produced a 75 mm in-plane field-of-view (FOV) with 160 mm axial coverage in a single gantry rotation. To evaluate system performance, a 2.5 inch diameter uniform PMMA cylinder phantom, a 200 µm diameter tungsten wire, and a euthanized rat were scanned. Each scan acquired 125 views per source and the gantry rotation time was 1 s per revolution. Geometric calibration was performed using a bead phantom. The scanning parameters were 80 kVp, 125 mA, and 5.4 µs pulse per source location per view. A data normalization technique was applied to the acquired projection data, and beam hardening and spectral nonlinearities of each detector channel were corrected. For image reconstruction, the projection data of each source row were rebinned into a full cone beam data set, and the FDK algorithm was used. The reconstructed volumes from upper and lower source rows shared an overlap volume which was combined in image space. The images of the uniform PMMA cylinder phantom showed good uniformity and no apparent artifacts. The measured in-plane MTF showed 13 lp cm(-1) at 10% cutoff, in good agreement with expectations. The rat data were also reconstructed reliably. The initial experimental results from this rotating-gantry MS-IGCT system demonstrated its ability to image a complex anatomical object without any significant image artifacts and to achieve high image resolution and large axial coverage in a single gantry rotation. PMID:24556567

  17. A Multi-Source Inverse-Geometry CT system: Initial results with an 8 spot x-ray source array

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jongduk; De Man, Bruno; Uribe, Jorge; Longtin, Randy; Harrison, Daniel; Reynolds, Joseph; Neculaes, Bogdan; Frutschy, Kristopher; Inzinna, Louis; Caiafa, Antonio; Senzig, Robert; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    We present initial experimental results of a rotating-gantry multi-source inverse-geometry CT (MS-IGCT) system. The MS-IGCT system was built with a single module of 2×4 x-ray sources and a 2D detector array. It produced a 75 mm in-plane field-of-view (FOV) with 160 mm axial coverage in a single gantry rotation. To evaluate system performance, a 2.5 inch diameter uniform PMMA cylinder phantom, a 200 μm diameter tungsten wire, and a euthanized rat were scanned. Each scan acquired 125 views per source and the gantry rotation time was 1 second per revolution. Geometric calibration was performed using a bead phantom. The scanning parameters were 80 kVp, 125 mA, and 5.4 us pulse per source location per view. A data normalization technique was applied to the acquired projection data, and beam hardening and spectral nonlinearities of each detector channel were corrected. For image reconstruction, the projection data of each source row were rebinned into a full cone beam data set, and the FDK algorithm was used. The reconstructed volumes from upper and lower source rows shared an overlap volume which was combined in image space. The images of the uniform PMMA cylinder phantom showed good uniformity and no apparent artefacts. The measured in-plane MTF showed 13 lp/cm at 10% cutoff, in good agreement with expectations. The rat data were also reconstructed reliably. The initial experimental results from this rotating-gantry MS-IGCT system demonstrated its ability to image a complex anatomical object without any significant image artefacts and to achieve high image resolution and large axial coverage in a single gantry rotation. PMID:24556567

  18. A multi-source inverse-geometry CT system: initial results with an 8 spot x-ray source array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jongduk; De Man, Bruno; Uribe, Jorge; Longtin, Randy; Harrison, Daniel; Reynolds, Joseph; Neculaes, Bogdan; Frutschy, Kristopher; Inzinna, Louis; Caiafa, Antonio; Senzig, Robert; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    We present initial experimental results of a rotating-gantry multi-source inverse-geometry CT (MS-IGCT) system. The MS-IGCT system was built with a single module of 2 × 4 x-ray sources and a 2D detector array. It produced a 75 mm in-plane field-of-view (FOV) with 160 mm axial coverage in a single gantry rotation. To evaluate system performance, a 2.5 inch diameter uniform PMMA cylinder phantom, a 200 µm diameter tungsten wire, and a euthanized rat were scanned. Each scan acquired 125 views per source and the gantry rotation time was 1 s per revolution. Geometric calibration was performed using a bead phantom. The scanning parameters were 80 kVp, 125 mA, and 5.4 µs pulse per source location per view. A data normalization technique was applied to the acquired projection data, and beam hardening and spectral nonlinearities of each detector channel were corrected. For image reconstruction, the projection data of each source row were rebinned into a full cone beam data set, and the FDK algorithm was used. The reconstructed volumes from upper and lower source rows shared an overlap volume which was combined in image space. The images of the uniform PMMA cylinder phantom showed good uniformity and no apparent artifacts. The measured in-plane MTF showed 13 lp cm-1 at 10% cutoff, in good agreement with expectations. The rat data were also reconstructed reliably. The initial experimental results from this rotating-gantry MS-IGCT system demonstrated its ability to image a complex anatomical object without any significant image artifacts and to achieve high image resolution and large axial coverage in a single gantry rotation.

  19. Rare earth element variations resulting from inversion of pigeonite and subsolidus reequilibration in lunar ferroan anorthosites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, O.B.; Floss, C.; McGee, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    We present results of a secondary ion mass spectrometry study of the rare earth elements (REEs) in the minerals of two samples of lunar ferroan anorthosite, and the results are applicable to studies of REEs in all igneous rocks, no matter what their planet of origin. Our pyroxene analyses are used to determine solid-solid REE distribution coefficients (D = CREE in low-Ca pyroxene/CREE in augite) in orthopyroxene-augite pairs derived by inversion of pigeonite. Our data and predictions from crystal-chemical considerations indicate that as primary pigeonite inverts to orthopyroxene plus augite and subsolidus reequilibration proceeds, the solid-solid Ds for orthopyroxene-augite pairs progressively decrease for all REEs; the decrease is greatest for the LREEs. The REE pattern of solid-solid Ds for inversion-derived pyroxene pairs is close to a straight line for Sm-Lu and turns upward for REEs lighter than Sm; the shape of this pattern is predicted by the shapes of the REE patterns for the individual minerals. Equilibrium liquids calculated for one sample from the compositions of primary phases, using measured or experimentally determined solid-liquid Ds, have chondrite-normalized REE patterns that are very slightly enriched in LREEs. The plagioclase equilibrium liquid is overall less rich in REEs than pyroxene equilibrium liquids, and the discrepancy probably arises because the calculated plagioclase equilibrium liquid represents a liquid earlier in the fractionation sequence than the pyroxene equilibrium liquids. "Equilibrium" liquids calculated from the compositions of inversion-derived pyroxenes or orthopyroxene derived by reaction of olivine are LREE depleted (in some cases substantially) in comparison with equilibrium liquids calculated from the compositions of primary phases. These discrepancies arise because the inversion-derived and reaction-derived pyroxenes did not crystallize directly from liquid, and the use of solid-liquid Ds is inappropriate. The LREE

  20. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  1. Sea level measurements from inverse modelling of GNSS SNR data - initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandberg, Joakim; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    The idea that sea level measurements could be done passively using available GNSS signals was proposed already over two decades ago. Since then several methods of using GNSS signals for measuring sea level have been proposed, using various degrees of specialized equipment. We present a new method to retrieve sea level from GNSS SNR data that relies upon inverse modelling of the detrended SNR data from a single off-the-shelf geodetic GNSS receiver. This method can simultaneously use SNR data from both GPS and GLONASS, and both L1 and L2 frequencies, in order to improve the performance with respect to prior studies. Results from the GNSS-R installation at the Onsala Space Observatory are presented and the retrieved sea level results are compared with data collected by a co-located pressure mareograph. The new method is found to give an RMS error of 1.8 cm. The results are also compared against previous implementations of GNSS tide gauges and found to have lower RMS than both the earlier SNR algorithm and also the dual receiver, phase delay method. This shows that inverse modelling for sea level retrieval has a potential to increase the precision of GNSS-R tide gauges, without the need for specialized equipment. Furthermore, since the method is based on SNR analysis, it can continue to operate during high winds and large sea roughness, in which the dual-receiver phase delay algorithm fails since the receiver connected to the nadir looking antenna does not succeed to lock on the satellites signals. This leads to a more stable and reliable operation. The ability to simultaneously use SNR data from different GNSS systems is also seen as a factor to increase the performance, further reducing the RMS. Therefore, in the future it is of interest to add further GNSS systems, such as Galileo and BeiDou.

  2. A 2D model of axial symmetry for proximal tubule of an average human nephron: indicative results of diffusion, convection and absorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insfrán, J. F.; Ubal, S.; Di Paolo, y. J.

    2016-04-01

    A simplified model of a proximal convoluted tubule of an average human nephron is presented. The model considers the 2D axisymmetric flow of the luminal solution exchanging matter with the tubule walls and the peritubular fluid by means of 0D models for the epithelial cells. The tubule radius is considered to vary along the conduit due to the trans-epithelial pressure difference. The fate of more than ten typical solutes is tracked down by the model. The Navier-Stokes and Reaction-Diffusion-Advection equations (considering the electro-neutrality principle) are solved in the lumen, giving a detailed picture of the velocity, pressure and concentration fields, along with trans-membrane fluxes and tubule deformation, via coupling with the 0D model for the tubule wall. The calculations are carried out numerically by means of the finite element method. The results obtained show good agreement with those published by other authors using models that ignore the diffusive transport and disregard a detailed calculation of velocity, pressure and concentrations. This work should be seen as a first approach towards the development of a more comprehensive model of the filtration process taking place in the kidneys, which ultimately helps in devising a device that can mimic/complement the renal function.

  3. First experimental results of the BNL inverse free electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Steenbergen, A. van; Gallardo, J.; Babzien, M.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, X.J.; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, J.M.; Qiu, X.

    1996-10-01

    A 40 MeV electron beam, using the inverse3e free-electron laser interaction, has been accelerated by {Delta}E/E = 2.5% over a distance of 0.47 m. The electrons interact with a 1--2 GW CO{sub 2} laser beam bounded by a 2.8 mm ID sapphire circular waveguide in the presence of a tapered wiggler with Bmax {approx} 1 T and a period 2.89 cm {le} {lambda}{sub w} {le} 3.14 cm. The experimental results of {Delta}E/E as a function of electron energy E, peak magnetic field Bw and laser power W{sub 1} compare well with analytical and 1-D numerical simulations and permit scaling to higher laser power and electron energy.

  4. Anthropogenic emissions of NOx over China: Reconciling the difference of inverse modeling results using GOME-2 and OMI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Dasa; Wang, Yuhang; Smeltzer, Charles; Boersma, K. Folkert

    2014-06-27

    Inverse modeling using satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns has been extensively used to estimate nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in China. Recently, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provide independent global NO2 column measurements on a nearly daily basis at around 9:30 and 13:30 local time across the equator, respectively. Anthropogenic NOx emission estimates by applying previously developed monthly inversion (MI) or daily inversion (DI) methods to these two sets of measurements show substantial differences. We improve the DI method by conducting model simulation, satellite retrieval, and inverse modeling sequentially on a daily basis. After each inversion, we update anthropogenic NOx emissions in the model simulation with the newly obtained a posteriori results. Consequently, the inversion-optimized emissions are used to compute the a priori NO2 profiles for satellite retrievals. As such, the a priori profiles used in satellite retrievals are now coupled to inverse modeling results. The improved procedure was applied to GOME-2 and OMI NO2 measurements in 2011. The new daily retrieval-inversion (DRI) method estimates an average NOx emission of 6.9 Tg N/yr over China, and the difference between using GOME-2 and OMI measurements is 0.4 Tg N/yr, which is significantly smaller than the difference of 1.3 Tg N/yr using the previous DI method. Using the more consistent DRI inversion results, we find that anthropogenic NOx emissions tend to be higher in winter and summer than spring (and possibly fall) and the weekday-to-weekend emission ratio tends to increase with NOx emission in China.

  5. Long Term Seismic Observation in Mariana by OBSs : Results of the DD inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, H.; Sugioka, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Oki, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Fukao, Y.; Suyehiro, K.

    2004-12-01

    In order to obtain the deep arc structural image of Mariana, a large-scale seismic observation by using 58 long-term ocean bottom seismometers (LTOBS) had been performed from June 2003 until April 2004, which is a part of the MARGINS program funded by the NSF. Prior to this observation, a pilot long-term seismic array observation was conducted in the same area by using 10 LTOBSs from Oct. 2001 until Feb. 2003. By using seven LTOBS's data, those are about 11 months long, hypocenter determination was performed at first and more than 3000 local events were found, although the PDE list contains only 59. A 1D velocity structure based on the iasp91 model was used, and a systematic shift of epicenters between the PDE list and this study was seen. To investigate the detail of hypocenter distribution and the 3D velocity structure, the DD inversion (tomoDD: Zhang and Thurber, 2003) was applied for this data set with a 1D structure initial model except for the crust, which has been surveyed by using a dense airgun-OBS system (Takahashi et al., 2003). The result of relocated hypocenters shows double seismic zones until about 200km depth and a lined focuses along the current ridge axis in the back-arc basin, and the result of the tomographic inversion shows a image of subducting slab and a low-Vs region below the Pagan island erupted in 1981 at 80km depth. The mantle structure beneath the back-arc basin was not clearly resolved due to the inadequate source-receiver coverage, which is cleared in the recent experiment.

  6. Comparison of 2D and 3D navigation techniques for percutaneous screw insertion into the scaphoid: results of an experimental cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Nüchtern, Jakob V; Briem, Daniel; Klink, Thorsten; Rueger, Johannes M; Lehmann, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Navigation in hand surgery is still in the process of development. Initial studies have demonstrated the feasibility of 2D and 3D navigation for the palmar approach in scaphoid fractures, but a comparison of the possibilities of 2D and 3D navigation for the dorsal approach is still lacking. The aim of the present work was to test navigation for the dorsal approach in the scaphoid using cadaver bones. After development of a special radiolucent resting splint for the dorsal approach, we performed 2D- and 3D-navigated scaphoid osteosynthesis in 12 fresh-frozen cadaver forearms using a headless compression screw (Synthes). The operation time, radiation time, number of trials for screw insertion, and screw positions were analyzed. In six 2D-navigated screw osteosyntheses, we found two false positions with an average radiation time of 5 ± 2 seconds. Using 3D navigation, we detected one false position. A false position indicates divergence from the ideal line of the axis of the scaphoid but without penetration of the cortex. The initial scan clearly increased overall radiation time in the 3D-navigated group, and for both navigation procedures operating time was longer than in our clinical experience without navigation. Nonetheless, 2D and 3D navigation for non-dislocated scaphoid fractures is feasible, and navigation might reduce the risk of choosing an incorrect screw length, thereby possibly avoiding injury to the subtending cortex. The 3D navigation is more difficult to interpret than 2D fluoroscopic navigation but shows greater precision. Overall, navigation is costly, and the moderate advantages it offers for osteosynthesis of scaphoid fractures must be considered critically in comparisons with conventional operating techniques. PMID:21991920

  7. Development of the Borehole 2-D Seismic Tomography Software Using MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, A. D.; Syahputra, A.; Fatkhan, F.; Sule, R.; Hendriyana, A.

    2011-12-01

    We developed 2-D borehole seismic tomography software that we called "EARTHMAX-2D TOMOGRAPHY" to image subsurface physical properties including P-wave and S-wave velocities between two boreholes. We used Graphic User Interface (GUI) facilities of MATLAB programming language to create the software. In this software, we used travel time of seismic waves from source to receiver by using pseudo bending ray tracing method as input for tomography inversion. We can also set up a model parameterization, initial velocity model, ray tracing processes, conduct borehole seismic tomography inversion, and finally visualize the inversion results. The LSQR method was applied to solve of tomography inversion solution. We provided the Checkerboard Test Resolution (CTR) to evaluate the model resolution of the tomography inversion. As validation of this developed software, we tested it for geotechnical purposes. We then conducted data acquisition in the "ITB X-field" that is located on ITB campus. We used two boreholes that have a depth of 39 meters. Seismic wave sources were generated by impulse generator and sparker and then they were recorded by borehole hydrophone string type 3. Later on, we analyzed and picked seismic arrival time as input for tomography inversion. As results, we can image the estimated weathering layer, sediment layer, and basement rock in the field depicted by seismic wave structures. More detailed information about the developed software will be presented. Keywords: borehole, tomography, earthmax-2D, inversion

  8. GRAV2D: an interactive 2-1/2 dimensional gravity modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, C.

    1980-11-01

    GRAV2D is an interactive computer program used for modeling 2-1/2 dimensional gravity data. A forward algorithm is used to give the theoretical attraction of gravity intensity at a station due to a perturbing body given by the initial model. The resultant model can then be adjusted for a better fit by a combination of manual adjustment, one-dimensional automatic search, and Marquardt inversion. GRAV2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around subroutines to do a forward problem, a one-dimensional direct search and an inversion. This is a user's guide and documentation for GRAV2D.

  9. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  10. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375

  11. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  12. Results of an attempt to measure increased rates of the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n in a nonelectrochemical cold fusion experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Decker, Arthur J.; Blue, James W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to look for evidence of deuterium fusion in palladium. The experiment, which involved introducing deuterium into the palladium filter of a hydrogen purifier, was designed to detect neutrons produced in the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n as well as heat production. The neutron counts for deuterium did not differ significantly from background or from the counts for a hydrogen control. Heat production was detected when deuterium, but not hydrogen, was pumped from the purifier.

  13. Numerical simulation of ( T 2, T 1) 2D NMR and fluid responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mao-Jin; Zou, You-Long; Zhang, Jin-Yan; Zhao, Xin

    2012-12-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology is limited for fluid typing, while two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) logging can provide more parameters including longitudinal relaxation time ( T 1) and transverse relaxation time ( T 2) relative to fluid types in porous media. Based on the 2D NMR relaxation mechanism in a gradient magnetic field, echo train simulation and 2D NMR inversion are discussed in detail. For 2D NMR inversion, a hybrid inversion method is proposed based on the damping least squares method (LSQR) and an improved truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) algorithm. A series of spin echoes are first simulated with multiple waiting times ( T W s) in a gradient magnetic field for given fluid models and these synthesized echo trains are inverted by the hybrid method. The inversion results are consistent with given models. Moreover, the numerical simulation of various fluid models such as the gas-water, light oil-water, and vicious oil-water models were carried out with different echo spacings ( T E s) and T W s by this hybrid method. Finally, the influences of different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) on inversion results in various fluid models are studied. The numerical simulations show that the hybrid method and optimized observation parameters are applicable to fluid typing of gas-water and oil-water models.

  14. Constitutional mosaicism for a chromosome 9 inversion resulting in recombinant aneusomy in an offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, S.K.; Gagos, S.; Shaffer, L.G.

    1997-04-14

    We report on a case of constitutional mosaicism for a large pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 in a man whose daughter had recombinant aneusomy resulting in partial 9q duplication and partial 9p deletion. At age 6 months, the girl was evaluated because of dysmorphic congenital animal features and developmental delay. Chromosomal analysis on this infant showed a derivative chromosome 9 which was later determined to be a recombinant chromosome with trisomy of 9q34.1{r_arrow}qter and monosomy of pter{r_arrow}9p24. Chromosomal analysis in her father showed the presence of two cell lines; 75% of lymphocytes had a 46,XY pattern, and 25% had a 46,XY,inv(9)(p24q34.1) karyotype. The infant`s physical findings represent a composite of the reported cases of both trisomy 9q34.1{r_arrow}qter and monosomy pter{r_arrow}p24. The infant`s father was phenotypically and cognitively normal. This case broadens the spectrum of reported cases of mosaicism for an autosomal structural rearrangement generating unbalanced gametes, and further supports the tenet that constitutional mosaicism has clinical relevance for genetic counseling. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  16. Glacitectonic rafting and associated deformation of mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments, near Central Graben, central North Sea; results of a 2D High-Resolution Geophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan-Hirsch, David

    2013-04-01

    Glacitectonic rafts are defined as dislocated slabs of bedrock or unconsolidated sediments, transported from their original position by glacial action. These relatively thin, slab-like bodies feature transport distances ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers. They occur as either single rafts, or multiple stacked bodies associated with a variety of ice-pushed landforms. Internally, rafts frequently appear undeformed although at a larger scale, they may be folded or cut by shear zones and brittle faults. However, the processes leading to the detachment, transport and subsequent emplacement of the rafts remain uncertain. This work describes the results of a geophysical 2D seismic survey of thrust-bound glacitectonic rafts and associated deformation structures, occurring within mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments of the Central Graben, central North Sea. The total shortened length of the rafted section is 2.4km, comprising a series of nine discrete rafts which individually range from 235m to 1018m in length. The principle basal detachment occurs at the erosive contact between Aberdeen Ground Formation and overlying Ling Bank Formation. The ice-proximal (northern) limit of rafting is defined by the presence of a large-scale palaeo-channel oriented perpendicular to the direction of rafting, composed of sediments of the Ling Bank Formation and the Forth Formation. The observed deformation structures infer a mean tectonic direction of 178°, indicating that they are associated with an active glacial advance from the north. The resulting deformation creates a minimum lateral shortening throughout the observed sequence of 35%, typifying a strongly compressional regieme associated with rafting. Throughout the surveyed area, structurally younger rafts are found to be emplaced towards the south, compared to the structurally older rafts which are emplaced towards the south-east. This distinction is suggested to be caused by early rafts creating an obstacle to

  17. General fusion approaches for the age determination of latent fingerprint traces: results for 2D and 3D binary pixel feature fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Ronny; Gruhn, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Bräutigam, Anja

    2012-03-01

    Determining the age of latent fingerprint traces found at crime scenes is an unresolved research issue since decades. Solving this issue could provide criminal investigators with the specific time a fingerprint trace was left on a surface, and therefore would enable them to link potential suspects to the time a crime took place as well as to reconstruct the sequence of events or eliminate irrelevant fingerprints to ensure privacy constraints. Transferring imaging techniques from different application areas, such as 3D image acquisition, surface measurement and chemical analysis to the domain of lifting latent biometric fingerprint traces is an upcoming trend in forensics. Such non-destructive sensor devices might help to solve the challenge of determining the age of a latent fingerprint trace, since it provides the opportunity to create time series and process them using pattern recognition techniques and statistical methods on digitized 2D, 3D and chemical data, rather than classical, contact-based capturing techniques, which alter the fingerprint trace and therefore make continuous scans impossible. In prior work, we have suggested to use a feature called binary pixel, which is a novel approach in the working field of fingerprint age determination. The feature uses a Chromatic White Light (CWL) image sensor to continuously scan a fingerprint trace over time and retrieves a characteristic logarithmic aging tendency for 2D-intensity as well as 3D-topographic images from the sensor. In this paper, we propose to combine such two characteristic aging features with other 2D and 3D features from the domains of surface measurement, microscopy, photography and spectroscopy, to achieve an increase in accuracy and reliability of a potential future age determination scheme. Discussing the feasibility of such variety of sensor devices and possible aging features, we propose a general fusion approach, which might combine promising features to a joint age determination scheme

  18. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: Results from 2013 high-resolution 2D and multicomponent seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.; Agena, W.; Miller, J. J.; Ruppel, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the spring of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a 16-day seismic acquisition cruise aboard the R/V Pelican in the Gulf of Mexico to survey two established gas hydrate study sites. We used a pair of 105/105 cubic inch generator/injector airguns as the seismic source, and a 450-m 72-channel hydrophone streamer to record two-dimensional (2D) data. In addition, we also deployed at both sites an array of 4-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) to record P- and S-wave energy at the seafloor from the same seismic source positions as the streamer data. At lease block Green Canyon 955 (GC955), we acquired 400 km of 2-D streamer data, in a 50- to 250-m-spaced grid augmented by several 20-km transects that provide long offsets for the OBS. The seafloor recording at GC955 was accomplished by a 2D array of 21 OBS at approximately 400-m spacing, including instruments carefully positioned at two of the three boreholes where extensive logging-while-drilling data is available to characterize the presence of gas hydrate. At lease block Walker Ridge 313 (WR313), we acquired 450 km of streamer data in a set of 11-km, 150- to 1,000-m-spaced, dip lines and 6- to 8-km, 500- to 1000-m-spaced strike lines. These were augmented by a set of 20-km lines that provide long offsets for a predominantly linear array of 25 400- to 800-m spaced OBS deployed in the dip direction in and around WR313. The 2D data provide at least five times better resolution of the gas hydrate stability zone than the available petroleum industry seismic data from the area; this enables considerably improved analysis and interpretation of stratigraphic and structural features including previously unseen faults and gas chimneys that may have considerable impact on gas migration. Initial processing indicates that the OBS data quality is good, and we anticipate that these data will yield estimates of P- and S-wave velocities, as well as PP (reflected) and PS (converted wave) images beneath each sensor location.

  19. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  20. Preliminary results of 3D inversion of the EarthScope Oregon MT data using the integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A.; Gribenko, A.; Cuma, M.; Zhdanov, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we apply 3D inversion to MT data collected in Oregon as a part of the EarthScope project. We use the integral equation method as a forward modeling engine. Quasi-analytical approximation with a variable background (QAVB) method of Frechet derivative calculation is applied. This technique allows us to simplify the inversion algorithm and to use just one forward modeling on every iteration step. The receiver footprint approach considerably reduces the computational resources needed to invert the large volumes of data covering vast areas. The data set, which was used in the inversion, was obtained through the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). The long-period MT data was collected in Eastern Oregon in 2006. The inverted electrical conductivity distribution agrees reasonably well with geological features of the region as well as with 3D MT inversion results obtained by other researchers. The geoelectrical model of the Oregon deep interior produced by 3D inversion indicates several lithospheres' electrical conductivity anomalies, including a linear zone marked by low-high conductivity transition along the Klamath Blue Mountain Lineament associated with a linear trend of gravity minima. High electrical conductivity values occur in the upper crust under the accreted terrains in the Blue Mountains region.

  1. Inversion of vegetation canopy reflectance models for estimating agronomic variables. I - Problem definition and initial results using the Suits model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, N.; Strebel, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    An important but relatively uninvestigated problem in remote sensing is the inversion of vegetative canopy reflectance models to obtain agrophysical parameters, given measured reflectances. The problem is here formally defined and its solution outlined. Numerical nonlinear optimization techniques are used to implement this inversion to obtain the leaf area index using Suits' canopy reflectance model. The results for a variety of cases indicate that this can be done successfully using infrared reflectances at different views or azimuth angles or a combination thereof. The other parameters of the model must be known, although reasonable measurement errors can be tolerated without seriously degrading the accuracy of the inversion. The application of the technique to ground based remote-sensing experiments is potentially useful, but is limited to the degree to which the canopy reflectance model can accurately predict observed reflectances.

  2. The Western Alps lithospheric structure, preliminary results from Full-Waveform Inversion of CIFALPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, Stephen; Monteiller, Vadim; Operto, Stéphane; Nolet, Guust; Virieux, Jean; Paul, Anne; Zhao, Liang

    2015-04-01

    The Western Alps, although being intensively investigated, remains elusive when it comes to determine its lithospheric and sublithospheric structures. Such information are crucial for the understanding of processes and mechanisms of orogeny as well as the evolution of the dynamics of the Alps. In this context, the CIFALPS experiment was conducted to address the lack of seismological data amenable to high-resolution seismic imaging of the crust and the mantle. This experiment was based on a temporary network (from August 2012 to September 2013) composed of 55 broadband seismic stations deployed along a 350 km long WSW-ENE profile across the Alps from the Rhone valley (France) to the Pô plain (Italy). The average inter-station spacing of 5 km makes the array amenable to high-resolution lithospheric imaging by Full-Waveform Inversion (FWI) of teleseismic data. We develop a FWI method that is suitable for teleseismic configuration. A simulation in an axisymmetric global earth performed with the AxiSEM software provides a background wavefield that is injected at the edges of the computational domain to perform full wavefield simulation in the lithospheric target. The misfit between the resulting synthetic wavefield and the recorded wavefield is iteratively minimized with gradient-based method to update the P and S wave velocities of the lithospheric model. The gradient of the misfit is computed with the matrix-free adjoint state method. We apply FWI to the CIFALPS data to identify the promise and pitfalls of this technology compared to more conventional traveltime tomography or receiver function analysis. Of particular interest is the careful analysis of the respective role of the forward-scattering and backward-scattering regimes in the spatial resolution of the imaging. Potential difficulties are related the footprint of the source effects in the FWI, the sensitivity of the FWI to the accuracy of the initial model and the computational burden resulting multi

  3. Relationships of Obesity and Fat Distribution With atherothrombotic Risk Factors: Baseline Results From the Bypass angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BaRI 2D) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine B.; Lu, Jiang; Mooradian, Arshag D.; Krone, Ronald J.; Nesto, Richard W.; Porter, Marty H.; Rana, Jamal S.; Rogers, William J.; Sobel, Burton E.; Gottlieb, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of obesity on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and established coronary artery disease (CAD) is controversial; whether BMI and/or waist circumference correlate with atherothrombotic risk factors in such patients is uncertain. We sought to evaluate whether higher BMI or waist circumference are associated with specific risk factors among 2,273 Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) study participants with T2DM and documented CAD (baseline data, mean age 62 years, 66% non-Hispanic white, 71% men). Multiple linear regression models were constructed after adjusting for sex, age, race/ ethnicity, US vs. non-US site, diabetes duration, exercise, smoking, alcohol, and relevant medication use. First-order partial correlations of BMI with risk factors after controlling for waist circumference and of waist circumference with risk factors after controlling for BMI were also evaluated. Ninety percent of the patients were overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m2); 68% of men and 89% of women had high-risk waist circumference measures (≥102 and ≥88 cm, respectively). BMI and waist circumference, in separate models, explained significant variation in metabolic (insulin, lipids, blood pressure (BP)) and inflammatory/procoagulation (C-reactive protein, PAI-1 activity and antigen, and fibrinogen) risk factors. In partial correlation analyses BMI was independently associated with BP and inflammatory/procoagulation factors, waist circumference with lipids, and both BMI and waist circumference with insulin. We conclude that, in cross-sectional analyses, both BMI and waist circumference, independently, are associated with increased atherothrombotic risk in centrally obese cohorts such as the BARI 2D patients with T2DM and CAD. PMID:19875998

  4. An inverse stability result for non-compactly supported potentials by one arbitrary lateral Neumann observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellassoued, M.; Kian, Y.; Soccorsi, E.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the inverse problem of determining the time independent scalar potential of the dynamic Schrödinger equation in an infinite cylindrical domain, from partial measurement of the solution on the boundary. Namely, if the potential is known in a neighborhood of the boundary of the spatial domain, we prove that it can be logarithmic stably determined in the whole waveguide from a single observation of the solution on any arbitrary strip-shaped subset of the boundary.

  5. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  6. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  7. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions derived from regional measurement networks and atmospheric inversions: Results from the MCI and INFLUX experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. J.; Andrews, A. E.; Cambaliza, M.; Denning, A.; Gurney, K. R.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N. L.; Ogle, S. M.; Possolo, A.; Richardson, S.; Schuh, A. E.; Shepson, P. B.; Sweeney, C.; Turnbull, J. C.; West, T. O.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric evaluation of emissions inventories is increasingly envisioned as a critical element of greenhouse gas emissions regulation. Atmospheric inversions utilizing dense regional networks of greenhouse gas measurements, however, are scarce. Discussions of the measurements and methods required to infer fluxes at spatial and temporal resolutions sufficient to meet the needs of policy makers, therefore, remain largely hypothetical. We present results from one past field experiment, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) Midcontinent Intensive (MCI) regional study, and preliminary results from a new experiment, the Indianapolis Flux project (INFLUX), both of which include high density regional greenhouse gas measurement networks. Both studies also include detailed regional inventory assessments of greenhouse gas sources and sinks. The MCI results show large amplitude, spatially coherent synoptic and seasonal patterns in boundary layer CO2 mixing ratios correlated with cropping patterns. Regional atmospheric inversions utilizing these data show corrections that tend towards the inventory estimates regardless of the prior flux estimates utilized in the inversion, and the region appears to have been slightly oversampled by the instrument density deployed. The uncertainty bounds associated with the inverted fluxes, however, remain fairly large despite the high density of atmospheric data, and the true uncertainty is difficult to assess. The INFLUX experiment will utilize a similar number of sensors deployed over a spatial domain two to three orders of magnitude smaller in area than the MCI domain, and will attempt to utilize similar techniques to infer anthropogenic emissions at high spatial resolution. We will present the experimental design for this project including the unique challenges of multi-species inversions and the need to deconvolve biological and fossil fuel fluxes. We anticipate that this experiment will serve as a benchmark regarding the accuracy and

  9. Full seismic waveform inversion of the African crust and Mantle - Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Michael; Ermert, Laura; Staring, Myrna; Trampert, Jeannot; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We report on the progress of a continental-scale full-waveform inversion (FWI) of Africa. From a geodynamic perspective, Africa presents an especially interesting case. This interest stems from the presence of several anomalous features such as a triple junction in the Afar region, a broad region of high topography to the south, and several smaller surface expressions such as the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Congo Basin. The mechanisms behind these anomalies are not fully clear, and debate on their origin spans causative mechanisms from isostatic forcing, to the influence of localized asthenospheric upwelling, to the presence of deep mantle plumes. As well, the connection of these features to the African LLSVP is uncertain. Tomographic images of Africa present unique challenges due to uneven station coverage: while tectonically active areas such as the Afar rift are well sampled, much of the continent exhibits a severe dearth of seismic stations. As well, while mostly surrounded by tectonically active spreading plate boundaries (a fact which contributes to the difficulties in explaining the South's high topography), sizeable seismic events (M > 5) in the continent's interior are relatively rare. To deal with these issues, we present a combined earthquake and ambient noise full-waveform inversion of Africa. The noise component serves to boost near-surface sensitivity, and aids in mitigating issues related to the sparse source / station coverage. The earthquake component, which includes local and teleseismic sources, aims to better resolve deeper structure. This component also has the added benefit of being especially useful in the search for mantle plumes: synthetic tests have shown that the subtle scattering of elastic waves off mantle plumes makes the plumes an ideal target for FWI [1]. We hope that this new model presents a fresh high-resolution image of sub-African geodynamic structure, and helps advance the debate regarding the causative mechanisms of its surface

  10. Three cases of dup(10p)/del(10q) syndrome resulting from maternal pericentric inversion.

    PubMed

    Kulharya, A S; Schneider, N R; Wilson, G N

    1993-11-01

    Two families and 3 patients with dup(10p)/del(10q) syndrome segregating from a maternal pericentric inversion are described, including a stillborn female with Potter sequence and multicystic renal dysplasia. Comparison of 32 dup(10p) patients to 11 del(10)(q25) patients emphasized dolichocephaly, wide sutures, frontal bossing, micrognathia, and renal defects as distinguishing characteristics of the dup(10p) syndrome. The 3 new and 6 previously reported dup(10p)/del(10q) patients had several manifestations in common with the dup(10p) and del(10q) syndromes, but were more typical of dup(10p) syndrome with respect to all 5 distinguishing characters. PMID:8279477

  11. Gradient Correlation Method for the Stabilization of Inversion Results of Aerosol Microphysical Properties Retrieved from Profiles of Optical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolgotin, Alexei; Müller, Detlef; Romanov, Anton; Chemyakin, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    Correlation relationships between aerosol microphysical parameters and optical data are investigated. The results show that surface-area concentrations and extinction coefficients are linearly correlated with a correlation coefficient above 0.99 for arbitrary particle size distribution. The correlation relationships that we obtained can be used as constraints in our inversion of optical lidar data. Simulation studies demonstrate a significant stabilization of aerosol microphysical data products if we apply the gradient correlation method in our traditional regularization technique.

  12. 3D constrained inversion of geophysical and geological information applying Spatial Mutually Constrained Inversion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Ploug, C.; Mendoza, J. A.; Martínez, K.

    2009-05-01

    -soundings. The SMCI here combines the capability of the DC- resistivity method to map resistive areas with the capability of the EM method to map conductive zones in order to produce models that are more in agreement with the expected geological formations. Furthermore, the results from the SMCI inversion are compared with traditional inversion methods. The comparison is made from resistivity maps where the resolution of the method can be evaluated with known lithology, water levels, etc. The results from SMCI inversion demonstrate significant improvement over those derived from standard 2D constrained inversion. The SMCI is applicable in general geological mapping, groundwater surveys, mineral exploration or other surveys where geophysical information of different types can be combined or where geological information is available.

  13. 3-D EM inversion of ground based geomagnetic Sq data. Results from the analysis of Australian array (AWAGS) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Stephan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    We present the first inversion of geomagnetic Sq data in a framework of 3-D conductivity models. This problem has been considered as immensely difficult due to the complex spatial structure of the Sq source which, in addition, varies with season and solar activity. Recently, we developed a 3-D electromagnetic (EM) inversion solution that allows one to work in a consistent manner with data that originates from sources, irrespective of their spatial complexity. In this paper, we apply our 3-D EM inversion scheme to Sq data collected during the Australian Wide Array of Geomagnetic Stations project. Within this project, three components of the geomagnetic field were recorded between 1989 November and 1990 December with the use of 53 portable vector magnetometers. The instruments were distributed over the Australian mainland with an average spacing of 275 km between sites. Inverting this unique-in a sense of its spatial regularity, density and long operational time-data set, we recovered the 3-D conductivity distribution beneath Australia at upper mantle depths (100-520 km). This depth range was justified in the paper from resolution studies using checkerboard tests. In addition, we performed extensive modelling to estimate quantitatively the influence of various factors on Sq signals, namely from hypothetical anomalies, inaccuracy in the source, ocean, and model discretization. As expected, the ocean (coastal) effect appeared to be the largest so that it has to be accounted for during 3-D inversion as accurately as possible. Our 3-D inversions-of data from either single or multiple days-revealed a strong offshore conductor near the south-east coast of Australia, which persists at all considered depths. Varying in details, this anomaly is remarkably robust irrespective of the considered day(s). We compared our results to those obtained from a different inversion scheme and an independent induction data set, and observed encouraging similarity. Combination of the two

  14. Sub-Daily to Interannual Geocenter Motion - Direct and Inverse GPS Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Heflin, M. B.; Jefferson, D. C.; Webb, F. H.

    2003-12-01

    The motion of center-of-mass (CM) of the entire Earth system with respect to the surface of the solid Earth is a consequence of mass redistribution on the surface and in the interior. Understanding of such motion is important for the definition and maintenance of the origin of global geodetic reference frames. Accurate measurements of such motion can also provide us with a window of opportunity to infer a global mode of mass variation with the largest spatial scale. In certain cases, determination of geocenter motion is essential when the goal is to know the complete mass variation spectrum. Driven by surface mass variation, the motion of CM with respect to the center-of-figure (CF) of the solid Earth surface has a one-to-one correspondence with degree 1 surface mass load. However, geodetic tracking networks have only finite number of stations, and can be very sparse in many cases. The motions of CM with respect to various networks therefore will be different from that with respect to CF and different among themselves. The network-based measurements will be further complicated by higher degree surface load induced deformation. These issues will be examined as we report our direct and inverse measurements of sub-daily to interannual geocenter motions through GPS orbit dynamics and relative surface deformation. We will also discuss implications of geocenter motion on the study of surface mass variations using time-variable gravity data.

  15. Joint inversion of displacement and gravity changes at Mt. Etna volcano during the 1995-2000 period: results and conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Jose; Camacho, Antonio; Carbone, Daniele; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Persistent inflation and long-period gravity fluctuations were observed at Mt. Etna (Italy) during the time interval bounded by the 1991-93 and 2001 main flank eruptions. Past studies suggest that, since 1993 and before the 2001 eruption, a large amount of magma was stored at depth. Until now, a joint inversion of displacement and gravity data has not been performed. We carry out simultaneous inversion of gravity, GNSS and Advanced Differential InSAR displacement data covering the 1995-2000 period. Our inversion scheme uses bodies with a 3D free geometry to determine the best-fitting configuration of pressure and density sources. Results provide new insight into the shallow plumbing system of Etna. Inflation pressure sources are located below the northwestern flank, at depths of 4-6 km, while a mass source is located in a shallower position below the SE flank. Mass increases and decreases are observed without significant associated deformation. The neat separation between mass and pressure sources is a key feature to understand the processes which controlled the activity of Mt Etna during the studied period.

  16. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  17. Stab injury and device implantation within the brain results in inversely multiphasic neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative responses.

    PubMed

    Potter, Kelsey A; Buck, Amy C; Self, Wade K; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2012-08-01

    An estimated 25 million people in the US alone rely on implanted medical devices, ∼2.5 million implanted within the nervous system. Even though many devices perform adequately for years, the host response to medical devices often severely limits tissue integration and long-term performance. This host response is believed to be particularly limiting in the case of intracortical microelectrodes, where it has been shown that glial cell encapsulation and localized neuronal cell loss accompany intracortical microelectrode implantation. Since neuronal ensembles must be within ∼50 µm of the electrode to obtain neuronal spikes and local field potentials, developing a better understanding of the molecular and cellular environment at the device-tissue interface has been the subject of significant research. Unfortunately, immunohistochemical studies of scar maturation in correlation to device function have been inconclusive. Therefore, here we present a detailed quantitative study of the cellular events and the stability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following intracortical microelectrode implantation and cortical stab injury in a chronic survival model. We found two distinctly inverse multiphasic profiles for neuronal survival in device-implanted tissue compared to stab-injured animals. For chronically implanted animals, we observed a biphasic paradigm between blood-derived/trauma-induced and CNS-derived inflammatory markers driving neurodegeneration at the interface. In contrast, stab injured animals demonstrated a CNS-mediated neurodegenerative environment. Collectively these data provide valuable insight to the possibility of multiple roles of chronic neuroinflammatory events on BBB disruption and localized neurodegeneration, while also suggesting the importance to consider multiphasic neuroinflammatory kinetics in the design of therapeutic strategies for stabilizing neural interfaces. PMID:22832283

  18. Stab injury and device implantation within the brain results in inversely multiphasic neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Kelsey A.; Buck, Amy C.; Self, Wade K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2012-08-01

    An estimated 25 million people in the US alone rely on implanted medical devices, ˜2.5 million implanted within the nervous system. Even though many devices perform adequately for years, the host response to medical devices often severely limits tissue integration and long-term performance. This host response is believed to be particularly limiting in the case of intracortical microelectrodes, where it has been shown that glial cell encapsulation and localized neuronal cell loss accompany intracortical microelectrode implantation. Since neuronal ensembles must be within ˜50 µm of the electrode to obtain neuronal spikes and local field potentials, developing a better understanding of the molecular and cellular environment at the device-tissue interface has been the subject of significant research. Unfortunately, immunohistochemical studies of scar maturation in correlation to device function have been inconclusive. Therefore, here we present a detailed quantitative study of the cellular events and the stability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following intracortical microelectrode implantation and cortical stab injury in a chronic survival model. We found two distinctly inverse multiphasic profiles for neuronal survival in device-implanted tissue compared to stab-injured animals. For chronically implanted animals, we observed a biphasic paradigm between blood-derived/trauma-induced and CNS-derived inflammatory markers driving neurodegeneration at the interface. In contrast, stab injured animals demonstrated a CNS-mediated neurodegenerative environment. Collectively these data provide valuable insight to the possibility of multiple roles of chronic neuroinflammatory events on BBB disruption and localized neurodegeneration, while also suggesting the importance to consider multiphasic neuroinflammatory kinetics in the design of therapeutic strategies for stabilizing neural interfaces.

  19. Hydrogen bonding induced distortion of CO3 units and kinetic stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate: results from 2D (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Kaseman, Derrick C; Colas, Bruno; Jacob, Dorrit E; Clark, Simon M

    2016-07-27

    Systematic correlation in alkaline-earth carbonate compounds between the deviation of the CO3 units from the perfect D3h symmetry and their (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters is established. The (13)C NMR CSA parameters of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) are measured using two-dimensional (13)C phase adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) NMR spectroscopy and are analyzed on the basis of this correlation. The results indicate a distortion of the CO3 units in ACC in the form of an in-plane displacement of the C atom away from the centroid of the O3 triangle, resulting from hydrogen bonding with the surrounding H2O molecules, without significant out-of-plane displacement. Similar distortion for all C atoms in the structure of ACC suggests a uniform spatial disposition of H2O molecules around the CO3 units forming a hydrogen-bonded amorphous network. This amorphous network is stabilized against crystallization by steric frustration, while additives such as Mg presumably provide further stabilization by increasing the energy of dehydration. PMID:27276013

  20. Tomographic imaging of Central Java, Indonesia: Preliminary result of joint inversion of the MERAMEX and MCGA earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohadi, Supriyanto; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Masturyono

    2013-09-01

    The realization of local earthquake tomography is usually conducted by removing distant events outside the study region, because these events may increase errors. In this study, tomographic inversion has been conducted using the travel time data of local and regional events in order to improve the structural resolution, especially for deep structures. We used the local MERapi Amphibious EXperiments (MERAMEX) data catalog that consists of 292 events from May to October 2004. The additional new data of regional events in the Java region were taken from the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) of Indonesia, which consist of 882 events, having at least 10 recording phases at each seismographic station from April 2009 to February 2011. We have conducted joint inversions of the combined data sets using double-difference tomography to invert for velocity structures and to conduct hypocenter relocation simultaneously. The checkerboard test results of Vp and Vs structures demonstrate a significantly improved spatial resolution from the shallow crust down to a depth of 165 km. Our tomographic inversions reveal a low velocity anomaly beneath the Lawu - Merapi zone, which is consistent with the results from previous studies. A strong velocity anomaly zone with low Vp, low Vs and low Vp/Vs is also identified between Cilacap and Banyumas. We interpret this anomaly as a fluid content material with large aspect ratio or sediment layer. This anomaly zone is in a good agreement with the existence of a large dome containing sediment in this area as proposed by previous geological studies. A low velocity anomaly zone is also detected in Kebumen, where it may be related to the extensional oceanic basin toward the land.

  1. Tomographic imaging of Central Java, Indonesia: Preliminary result of joint inversion of the MERAMEX and MCGA earthquake data

    SciTech Connect

    Rohadi, Supriyanto; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Masturyono

    2013-09-09

    The realization of local earthquake tomography is usually conducted by removing distant events outside the study region, because these events may increase errors. In this study, tomographic inversion has been conducted using the travel time data of local and regional events in order to improve the structural resolution, especially for deep structures. We used the local MERapi Amphibious EXperiments (MERAMEX) data catalog that consists of 292 events from May to October 2004. The additional new data of regional events in the Java region were taken from the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) of Indonesia, which consist of 882 events, having at least 10 recording phases at each seismographic station from April 2009 to February 2011. We have conducted joint inversions of the combined data sets using double-difference tomography to invert for velocity structures and to conduct hypocenter relocation simultaneously. The checkerboard test results of Vp and Vs structures demonstrate a significantly improved spatial resolution from the shallow crust down to a depth of 165 km. Our tomographic inversions reveal a low velocity anomaly beneath the Lawu - Merapi zone, which is consistent with the results from previous studies. A strong velocity anomaly zone with low Vp, low Vs and low Vp/Vs is also identified between Cilacap and Banyumas. We interpret this anomaly as a fluid content material with large aspect ratio or sediment layer. This anomaly zone is in a good agreement with the existence of a large dome containing sediment in this area as proposed by previous geological studies. A low velocity anomaly zone is also detected in Kebumen, where it may be related to the extensional oceanic basin toward the land.

  2. The energy of waves in the photosphere and lower chromosphere. IV. Inversion results of Ca II H spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, C.; Rezaei, R.; Puschmann, K. G.

    2013-05-01

    Context. Most semi-empirical static one-dimensional (1D) models of the solar atmosphere in the magnetically quiet Sun (QS) predict an increase in temperature at chromospheric layers. Numerical simulations of the solar chromosphere with a variable degree of sophistication, i.e. from 1D to three-dimensional (3D) simulations; assuming local thermal equilibrium (LTE) or non-LTE (NLTE), on the other hand, only yielded an increase in the brightness temperature without any stationary increase in the gas temperature. Aims: We investigate the thermal structure in the solar chromosphere as derived from an LTE inversion of observed Ca ii H spectra in QS and active regions (ARs). Methods: We applied an inversion strategy based on the SIR (Stokes inversion by response functions) code to Ca ii H spectra to obtain 1D temperature stratifications. We investigated the temperature stratifications on differences between magnetic and field-free regions in the QS, and on differences between QS and ARs. We determined the energy content of individual calcium bright grains (BGs) as specific candidates of chromospheric heating events. We compared observed with synthetic NLTE spectra to estimate the significance of the LTE inversion results. Results: The fluctuations of observed intensities yield a variable temperature structure with spatio-temporal rms fluctuations below 100 K in the photosphere and between 200 and 300 K in the QS chromosphere. The average temperature stratification in the QS does not exhibit a clear chromospheric temperature rise, unlike the AR case. We find a characteristic energy content of about 7 × 1018 J for BGs that repeat with a cadence of about 160 s. The precursors of BGs have a vertical extent of about 200 km and a horizontal extent of about 1 Mm. The comparison of observed with synthetic NLTE profiles partly confirms the results of the LTE inversion that the solar chromosphere in the QS oscillates between an atmosphere in radiative equilibrium and one with a

  3. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  4. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques based on inverse modelling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly distributed homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an outstanding opportunity to compare the solution techniques because of the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution of known structure, and the availability of detailed measurements with which to compare simulated concentrations. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results-simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values-change in this heterogeneous situation, given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The results show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity analysis results were robust in that they were independent of the solution technique. They revealed extreme correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity, and that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information about the dispersivities to estimate individual values for the five sands. However, estimated hydraulic conductivity values are significantly influenced by both the large possible variations in model dispersion and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique.Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly

  5. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  6. [Inversion of results upon using an "integral index" from an ostensibly authoritative source].

    PubMed

    Galkin, A V

    2012-01-01

    General results and conclusions of Nesterenko et al. [Biofizika 57(4)] have been distorted by uncritically applying an invalid "unifying formula" from a recent monograph [ISBN 978-5-02-035593-4]. Readers are asked to ignore the Russian publication but take the fully revised English version [Biophysics 57(4)] or contact the authors (tv-nesterenko@mail.ru, ubflab@ibp.ru). Here I briefly show the basic defects in the quasi-quantitative means of data analysis offered in that book, and mention some more problems regarding erroneous information in ostensibly authoritative sources. PMID:23136787

  7. Inverse Comptonization in a Two Component Advective Flow: Results of a Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Himadri; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Laurent, Philippe

    2008-10-08

    We compute the resultant spectrum due to multiple scattering of soft photons emitted from a Keplerian disk by thermal electrons inside a torus axisymmetrically placed around a black hole. In a two component advective flow model, the post-shock region is similar to a thick accretion disk and the pre-shock sub-keplerian flow is highly optically thin. As a preliminary run of the Monte Carlo simulation of the system, we assume the CENBOL to be a small (2-14r{sub g}) thick accretion disk without a cusp to allow bulk motion of the flow. Bulk Motion Comptonization (BMC) has also been added. We show that the spectral behaviour is very similar to what is predicted in Chakrabarti and Titarchuk (1995)

  8. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  9. Towards 2D Bayesian Tomography of Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Bodin, T.; Key, K.

    2014-12-01

    Receiver function analysis is a powerful tool widely used to isolate and interpret receiver-side structure effects in teleseismic records. The idea is to deconvolve the vertical component from the horizontal components to produce a time series, thus eliminating the influence of the source and distant path effects. The receiver function is usually migrated and directly interpreted by visual inspection. However, deconvolution is a numerically unstable procedure that needs to be stabilized, and the solution depends on the choice of regularization parameters (e.g. water level and the width of a low pass filter). Since the solution is blurred with multiple reflections from the subsurface that produce apparent discontinuities, qualitative interpretation of receiver functions is subjective. Alternatively, waveforms can be directly inverted for a 1D S-wave velocity model beneath the receiver. An inversion procedure is more quantitative, as a forward model will take into account all possible reflections and conversions. If cast in a Bayesian framework, an inversion also enables one to assess model uncertainties and quantify parameter trade-offs. However, seismologists have preferred migration techniques as they are easier to implement, computationally cheaper, and allow construction of 2D or 3D sections. Inversions have been limited thus far to the 1D case. In this work we present a method for inversion of converted waveforms measured at a number of aligned stations. The unknown model is a 2D vertical cross section parameterized with a variable number of discontinuities, although the forward model used to compute synthetics under individual stations is 1D. Body waves are inverted jointly with surface wave dispersion measurements to reduce the range of possible solutions. The problem is solved with a fully non linear Bayesian inversion scheme where the posterior velocity distribution is sampled with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo Algorithm. Our approach uses the 'trans

  10. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  11. Tomosynthesis imaging with 2D scanning trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Kedar; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Eberhard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-03-01

    Tomosynthesis imaging in chest radiography provides volumetric information with the potential for improved diagnostic value when compared to the standard AP or LAT projections. In this paper we explore the image quality benefits of 2D scanning trajectories when coupled with advanced image reconstruction approaches. It is intuitively clear that 2D trajectories provide projection data that is more complete in terms of Radon space filling, when compared with conventional tomosynthesis using a linearly scanned source. Incorporating this additional information for obtaining improved image quality is, however, not a straightforward problem. The typical tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms are based on direct inversion methods e.g. Filtered Backprojection (FBP) or iterative algorithms that are variants of the Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART). The FBP approach is fast and provides high frequency details in the image but at the same time introduces streaking artifacts degrading the image quality. The iterative methods can reduce the image artifacts by using image priors but suffer from a slow convergence rate, thereby producing images lacking high frequency details. In this paper we propose using a fast converging optimal gradient iterative scheme that has advantages of both the FBP and iterative methods in that it produces images with high frequency details while reducing the image artifacts. We show that using favorable 2D scanning trajectories along with the proposed reconstruction method has the advantage of providing improved depth information for structures such as the spine and potentially producing images with more isotropic resolution.

  12. Unitary quantum lattice gas representation of 2D quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Soe, Min

    2011-05-01

    Quantum vortex structures and energy cascades are examined for two dimensional quantum turbulence (2D QT) using a special unitary evolution algorithm. The qubit lattice gas (QLG) algorithm, is employed to simulate the weakly-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) governed by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation. A parameter regime is uncovered in which, as in 3D QT, there is a very short Poincare recurrence time. This short recurrence time is destroyed as the nonlinear interaction energy is increased. Energy cascades for 2D QT are considered to examine whether 2D QT exhibits the inverse cascades of 2D classical turbulence. In the parameter regime considered, the spectra analysis reveals no such dual cascades---dual cascades being a hallmark of 2D classical turbulence.

  13. Contribution of 3D inversion of Electrical Resistivity Tomography data applied to volcanic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for geological structures imaging. Such structures can present complex characteristics that conventional 2D inversion processes cannot perfectly integrate. Here we present a new 3D inversion algorithm named EResI, firstly developed for levee investigation, and presently applied to the study of a complex lava dome (the Puy de Dôme volcano, France). EResI algorithm is based on a conventional regularized Gauss-Newton inversion scheme and a 3D non-structured discretization of the model (double grid method based on tetrahedrons). This discretization allows to accurately model the topography of investigated structure (without a mesh deformation procedure) and also permits a precise location of the electrodes. Moreover, we demonstrate that a complete 3D unstructured discretization limits the number of inversion cells and is better adapted to the resolution capacity of tomography than a structured discretization. This study shows that a 3D inversion with a non-structured parametrization has some advantages compared to classical 2D inversions. The first advantage comes from the fact that a 2D inversion leads to artefacts due to 3D effects (3D topography, 3D internal resistivity). The second advantage comes from the fact that the capacity to experimentally align electrodes along an axis (for 2D surveys) depends on the constrains on the field (topography...). In this case, a 2D assumption induced by 2.5D inversion software prevents its capacity to model electrodes outside this axis leading to artefacts in the inversion result. The last limitation comes from the use of mesh deformation techniques used to accurately model the topography in 2D softwares. This technique used for structured discretization (Res2dinv) is prohibed for strong topography (>60 %) and leads to a small computational errors. A wide geophysical survey was carried out

  14. Extended 2D generalized dilaton gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, R. O.

    2008-09-01

    We show that an anomaly-free description of matter in (1+1) dimensions requires a deformation of the 2D relativity principle, which introduces a non-trivial centre in the 2D Poincaré algebra. Then we work out the reduced phase space of the anomaly-free 2D relativistic particle, in order to show that it lives in a noncommutative 2D Minkowski space. Moreover, we build a Gaussian wave packet to show that a Planck length is well defined in two dimensions. In order to provide a gravitational interpretation for this noncommutativity, we propose to extend the usual 2D generalized dilaton gravity models by a specific Maxwell component, which guages the extra symmetry associated with the centre of the 2D Poincaré algebra. In addition, we show that this extension is a high energy correction to the unextended dilaton theories that can affect the topology of spacetime. Further, we couple a test particle to the general extended dilaton models with the purpose of showing that they predict a noncommutativity in curved spacetime, which is locally described by a Moyal star product in the low energy limit. We also conjecture a probable generalization of this result, which provides strong evidence that the noncommutativity is described by a certain star product which is not of the Moyal type at high energies. Finally, we prove that the extended dilaton theories can be formulated as Poisson Sigma models based on a nonlinear deformation of the extended Poincaré algebra.

  15. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  16. 2D seismic data processing for straight lines in the loess plateaus in Fuxian of Shanbei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minjie; Chen, Yequan; Zhang, Hai; Pang, Shangming; Deng, Guozhen

    2005-01-01

    The crooked seismic lines along valleys were irregular previously in Fuxian of Shanbei, showing an irregular branch in plane, and hard to complete close grids. Therefore, it’s difficult to conduct reservoir inversion of 2D seismic data. In 2001, Zhongyuan Oilfield Company carried out the study on field acquisition methods and seismic processing technology in Fuxian. Straight lines were passing through plateaus and formed seismic grids by using flexible geometry with variable linear bins. Data processing involved model-inversion based refraction static correction, surface consistent amplitude compensation, deconvolution, and pre-stack noise attenuation. As the result, seismic data with a high fidelity was provided for the subsequent reservoir predictions, small-amplitude structure interpretation and integrative geologic study. Because all lines were jointed to form grids, comprehensive interpretation of reservoir inversion could be finally implemented by using the pseudo logging method to control lines without wells.

  17. From subduction to collision: Results from seismic profiling, gravity modeling, and earthquake finite fault inversions in Taiwan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Wu-Cheng

    This study used (1) 132-channel reflection profiles, forward gravity modeling, and (2) finite source inversions of earthquakes to analyze crustal evolution from Subduction to collision in the region of Taiwan. Reflection and gravity data in the offshore region shows that the accretionary prism in the Subduction zone is mainly sedimentary; however, due to tectonic wedging in the initial collision zone, high-density basement materials are incorporated into the rear of the accretionary prism and may extend northward to compose a portion of high-density rocks that underly southeastern Taiwan. Further to the north in the mature collision zone was the site of the 1999, Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake. For this earthquake and its large aftershocks, we inverted strong motion data for finite source processes to study the deep fault structures. The mainshock ruptured on a shallow eastward-dipping fault possibly rooted in the proposed decollement of thin-skin deformation model. Several aftershocks either nucleated in or ruptured the basement indicating active deformation below the decollement, suggesting basement-involved deformation. Interpreting finite-source results requires a thorough understanding of the uncertainty in the parameters. Further more, near-realtime applications of finite-source inversions for estimation of near-fault strong ground motion requires well constrained fault orientation and hypocentral parameters. With this in mind, we tested a wide range of hypocenters and focal mechanisms, and the corresponding fits of the synthetics to the observed waveforms when studying the aftershock source parameters. As a result, we obtained optimal waveform fits and determined how the errors reported in hypocenters and focal mechanisms affected the inverted waveforms and the sensitivity of the waveform fits. For example, if the hypocenter was within 5 km of the optimal hypocenter and the focal mechanism was within 20 degrees of optimal strike, dip, and rake, the waveform fits

  18. Inverse Association Between Serum Free Thyroxine Levels and Hepatic Steatosis: Results from the Study of Health in Pomerania

    PubMed Central

    Haring, Robin; Wallaschofski, Henri; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Nauck, Matthias; Dörr, Marcus; Lerch, Markus; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E.; Rosskopf, Dieter; Völzke, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Background Associations between thyroid function and hepatic steatosis defined by enzymatic and sonographic criteria are largely unknown in the general population. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between thyroid function tests and sonographic as well as enzymatic criteria of liver status in a large population-based study, the Study of Health in Germany (SHIP). Methods Data from 3661 SHIP participants without a self-reported history of thyroid or liver disease were analyzed. Hepatic steatosis was defined as the presence of a hyperechogenic ultrasound pattern of the liver and increased serum alanine transferase concentrations. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and free thyroxine (FT4) concentrations were associated with hepatic steatosis using multinomial regression models adjusted for sex, age, physical activity, alcohol consumption, waist circumference, and food intake pattern. Results We detected no consistent association of serum TSH and FT3 concentrations with hepatic steatosis. In contrast, serum FT4 concentrations were inversely associated with hepatic steatosis in men (odds ratio (OR)=0.04 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.01; 0.17]) and women (OR=0.06 [95% CI=0.01; 0.42]). Conclusions Results from the present cross-sectional study suggest that low FT4 concentrations are associated with hepatic steatosis. Longitudinal and intervention studies are warranted to investigate whether hypothyroidism increases the risk of hepatic steatosis or vice versa. PMID:22574630

  19. New results on the resistivity structure of Merapi Volcano(Indonesia), derived from 3D restricted inversion of long-offsettransient electromagnetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan, L.; Hordt, Andreas; Scholl,Carsten; Tezkan, Bulent

    2006-06-14

    Three long-offset transient electromagnetic (LOTEM) surveyswerecarried out at the active volcano Merapi in Central Java (Indonesia)during the years 1998, 2000, and 2001. The measurements focused on thegeneral resistivity structure of the volcanic edifice at depths of 0.5-2km and the further investigation of a southside anomaly. The measurementswere insufficient for a full 3D inversion scheme, which could enable theimaging of finely discretized resistivity distributions. Therefore, astable, damped least-squares joint-inversion approach is used to optimize3D models with a limited number of parameters. The mode ls feature therealistic simulation of topography, a layered background structure, andadditional coarse 3D blocks representing conductivity anomalies.Twenty-eight LOTEM transients, comprising both horizontal and verticalcomponents of the magnetic induction time derivative, were analyzed. Inview of the few unknowns, we were able to achieve reasonable data fits.The inversion results indicate an upwelling conductor below the summit,suggesting hydrothermal activity in the central volcanic complex. Ashallow conductor due to a magma-filled chamber, at depths down to 1 kmbelow the summit, suggested by earlier seismic studies, is not indicatedby the inversion results. In conjunction with an anomalous-density model,derived from arecent gravity study, our inversion results provideinformation about the southern geological structure resulting from amajor sector collapse during the Middle Merapi period. The density modelallows to assess a porosity range andthus an estimated vertical salinityprofile to explain the high conductivities on a larger scale, extendingbeyond the foothills of Merapi.

  20. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion relaxation data—2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T.; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T2- D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T2- D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T2- D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D = 3 × 10 -12 m 2 s -1 and T2 = 180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D = 10 -9 m 2 s -1, T2 = 10 ms and D = 3 × 10 -13 m 2 s -1, T2 = 13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  1. Stacking up 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Graphene might be the most famous example, but there are other 2D materials and compounds too. Louise Mayor explains how these atomically thin sheets can be layered together to create flexible “van der Waals heterostructures”, which could lead to a range of novel applications.

  2. Inversion for the statistical structure of subsurface water content from ground-penetrating radar reflection data: Initial results and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, J.; Knight, R.; Holliger, K.

    2007-12-01

    The distribution of subsurface water content can be an excellent indicator of soil texture, which strongly influences the unsaturated hydraulic properties controlling vadose zone contaminant transport. Characterizing the heterogeneity in subsurface water content for use in numerical transport models, however, is an extremely difficult task as conventional hydrological measurement techniques do not offer the combined high spatial resolution and coverage required for accurate simulations. A number of recent studies have shown that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) reflection images may contain useful information regarding the statistical structure of subsurface water content. Comparisons of the horizontal correlation structures of radar images and those obtained from water content measurements have shown that, in some cases, the statistical characteristics are remarkably similar. However, a key issue in these studies is that a reflection GPR image is primarily related to changes in subsurface water content, and not the water content distribution directly. As a result, statistics gathered on the reflection image have a very complex relationship with the statistics of the underlying water content distribution, this relationship depending on a number of factors including the frequency of the GPR antennas used. In this work, we attempt to address the above issue by posing the estimation of the statistical structure of water content from reflection GPR data as an inverse problem. Using a simple convolution model for a radar image, we first derive a forward model relating the statistical structure of a radar image to that of the underlying water content distribution. We then use this forward model to invert for the spatial statistics of the water content distribution, given the spatial statistics of the GPR reflection image as data. We do this within a framework of uncertainty, such that realistic statistical bounds can be placed on the information that is inferred. In other

  3. Homologous recombination among three intragene Alu sequences causes an inversion-deletion resulting in the hereditary bleeding disorder glanzmann thrombasthenia

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Bray, P.F. )

    1993-07-01

    The crucial role of the human platelet fibrinogen receptor in maintaining normal hemostasis is best exemplified by the autosomal recessive bleeding disorder Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT). The platelet fibrinogen receptor is a heterodimer composed of glycoproteins IIb (GPIIb) and IIIa (GPIIIa). Platelets from patients with GT have a quantitative or qualitative abnormality in GPIIb and GPIIIa and can neither bind fibrinogen nor aggregate. Very few genetic defects have been identified that cause this disorder. The authors describe a kindred with GT in which the affected individuals have a unique inversion-deletion mutation in the gene for GPIIIa. Patient platelets lacked both GPIIIa protein and mRNA. Southern blots of patient genomic DNA probed with an internal 1.0-kb GPIIIa cDNA suggested a large rearrangement of this gene but were normal when probed with small GPIIIa cDNA fragments that were outside the mutation. Cytogenetics and pulsed-field gel analysis of the GPIIIa gene were normal, making a translocation or a very large rearrangement unlikely. Additional Southern analyses suggested that the abnormality was not a small insertion. The authors constructed a patient genomic DNA library and isolated fragments containing the 5' and 3' breakpoints of the mutation. The nucleotide sequence from these genomic clones was determined and revealed that, relative to the normal gene, the mutant allele contained a 1-kb deletion immediately preceding a 15-kb inversion. The DNA breaks occurred in two inverted and one forward Alu sequence within the gene for GPIIIa and in the left, right, and left arms, respectively, of these sequences. There was a 5-bp repeat at the 3 terminus of the inversion. One copy of the repeat remained in the mutant allele breakpoint junction. The alignment and orientation of the different Alu sequences, as well as the position of the breakpoints, suggest that the inversion preceded the deletion in this complex rearrangement. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  5. A Tower-based Prototype VHF/UHF Radar for Subsurface Sensing: System Description and Data Inversion Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Pierce, Leland; Tabatabaeenejad, Alireza; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of subsurface characteristics such as permittivity variations and layering structure could provide a breakthrough in many terrestrial and planetary science disciplines. For Earth science, knowledge of subsurface and subcanopy soil moisture layers can enable the estimation of vertical flow in the soil column linking surface hydrologic processes with that in the subsurface. For planetary science, determining the existence of subsurface water and ice is regarded as one of the most critical information needs for the study of the origins of the solar system. The subsurface in general can be described as several near-parallel layers with rough interfaces. Each homogenous rough layer can be defined by its average thickness, permittivity, and rms interface roughness assuming a known surface spectral distribution. As the number and depth of layers increase, the number of measurements needed to invert for the layer unknowns also increases, and deeper penetration capability would be required. To nondestructively calculate the characteristics of the rough layers, a multifrequency polarimetric radar backscattering approach can be used. One such system is that we have developed for data prototyping of the Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (MOSS) mission concept. A tower-mounted radar makes backscattering measurements at VHF, UHF, and L-band frequencies. The radar is a pulsed CW system, which uses the same wideband antenna to transmit and receive the signals at all three frequencies. To focus the beam at various incidence angles within the beamwidth of the antenna, the tower is moved vertically and measurements made at each position. The signals are coherently summed to achieve focusing and image formation in the subsurface. This requires an estimate of wave velocity profiles. To solve the inverse scattering problem for subsurface velocity profile simultaneously with radar focusing, we use an iterative technique based on a forward numerical solution of

  6. Mechanisms of Air Pollution Transport in Urban Valleys as a Result of the Interplay Between the Temperature Inversion and the Urban Heat Island Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendón, A.; Wirth, V.; Salazar, J. F.; Palacio, C. A.; Brötz, B.

    2014-12-01

    Urban valleys can experience serious air pollution problems of concern for public health. The venting of pollution out of an urban valley is limited by the topography and can be further restricted by low-level temperature inversions and/or local circulations such as those induced by the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. The combined effects of a temperature inversion and a UHI on the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer and the associated mechanisms of air pollution transport in urban valleys were studied through idealized simulations performed with the EULAG model. Three different aspects were considered: the expansion of the urban area, variations in surface heating owing to topographic shading, and variations of the topography. The results show that different mechanisms of air pollution transport may arise in urban valleys as a result of the interplay between the temperature inversion, the slope flows, and the UHI. Three types of interrelated mechanisms of air pollution transport were identified. Type A describes the transport of pollutants by the slope winds, which can reduce pollution in the lower levels or reinforce the trapping of pollutants below the inversion layer depending on the UHI effect on weakening or reversing the upslope winds. Type B describes closed slope-flow circulations that are likely to occur below an inversion layer near the base of the sidewalls of valleys where an urban area is concentrated on the valley floor. These circulations can develop when upslope winds are detrained toward the center due to the inversion layer, or when the UHI forces downslope winds linked to ascending flows that are also restricted by the inversion layer. Pollutants can remain trapped within these circulation cells that have been termed smog traps. Type C describes a low-level UHI-induced circulation that tends to concentrate pollutants in the valley center and may cause the development of elevated polluted layers below the inversion layer. The persistence

  7. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  8. Influence of surface termination on inverse Goos–Hänchen shift of negatively refractive photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinbing; Liang, Binming; Chen, Jiabi; Cai, Xiaoshu; Jiang, Qiang; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-07-01

    The effect of surface termination on the inverse Goos–Hänchen (GH) shift of two-dimensional (2D) negatively refractive photonic crystals (NRPhCs) containing air holes arranged in a hexagonal lattice in a dielectric background is investigated for transverse magnetic (TM) polarization. Results show that the magnitude of the inverse GH shift of 2D-NRPhCs strongly depends on surface termination even for an incident beam with a fixed frequency and incidence angle. Calculation of dispersion of surface mode as a function of termination reveals that large inverse GH shift of 2D-NRPhCs results from the excitation of backward surface mode. In addition, the coupling coefficient of the incident field into the field of surface mode and energy flux around the interface are studied and demonstrate the above conclusion. This paper will provide technical information regarding the combination of various functional photonic elements in the design of integrated optical circuits.

  9. Nanoimprint lithography: 2D or not 2D? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is more than a planar high-end technology for the patterning of wafer-like substrates. It is essentially a 3D process, because it replicates various stamp topographies by 3D displacement of material and takes advantage of the bending of stamps while the mold cavities are filled. But at the same time, it keeps all assets of a 2D technique being able to pattern thin masking layers like in photon- and electron-based traditional lithography. This review reports about 20 years of development of replication techniques at Paul Scherrer Institut, with a focus on 3D aspects of molding, which enable NIL to stay 2D, but at the same time enable 3D applications which are "more than Moore." As an example, the manufacturing of a demonstrator for backlighting applications based on thermally activated selective topography equilibration will be presented. This technique allows generating almost arbitrary sloped, convex and concave profiles in the same polymer film with dimensions in micro- and nanometer scale.

  10. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  11. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  12. Dark matter versus modifications of the gravitational inverse-square law: results from planetary motion in the Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, M.; Jetzer, Ph.

    2006-09-01

    Dark matter or modifications of the Newtonian inverse-square law in the Solar system are studied with accurate planetary astrometric data. From extraperihelion precession and possible changes in the third Kepler's law, we get an upper limit on the local dark matter density, ρDM <~ 3 × 10-16kgm-3 at the 2σ confidence level. Variations in the 1/r2 behaviour are considered in the form of either a possible Yukawa-like interaction or a modification of gravity of Milgrom's modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) type. Up to scales of 1011m, scale-dependent deviations in the gravitational acceleration are really small. We examined the MOND interpolating function μ in the regime of strong gravity. Gradually varying μ suggested by fits of rotation curves are excluded, whereas the standard form μ(x) = x/(1 + x2)1/2 is still compatible with data. In combination with constraints from galactic rotation curves and theoretical considerations on the external field effect, the absence of any significant deviation from inverse square attraction in the Solar system makes the range of acceptable interpolating functions significantly narrow. Future radio ranging observations of outer planets with an accuracy of few tenths of a metre could either give positive evidence of dark matter or disprove modifications of gravity.

  13. 2D Quantum Mechanical Study of Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density-gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions and oxide tunneling are treated on an equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. Surprisingly, the self-consistent potential profile shows lower injection barrier in the channel in quantum case. These results are qualitatively consistent with ID Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  14. Anisotropy effects on 3D waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekl, I.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the recent years 3D waveform inversion has become achievable procedure for seismic data processing. A number of datasets has been inverted and presented (Warner el al 2008, Ben Hadj at all, Sirgue et all 2010) using isotropic 3D waveform inversion. However the question arises will the results be affected by isotropic assumption. Full-wavefield inversion techniques seek to match field data, wiggle-for-wiggle, to synthetic data generated by a high-resolution model of the sub-surface. In this endeavour, correctly matching the travel times of the principal arrivals is a necessary minimal requirement. In many, perhaps most, long-offset and wide-azimuth datasets, it is necessary to introduce some form of p-wave velocity anisotropy to match the travel times successfully. If this anisotropy is not also incorporated into the wavefield inversion, then results from the inversion will necessarily be compromised. We have incorporated anisotropy into our 3D wavefield tomography codes, characterised as spatially varying transverse isotropy with a tilted axis of symmetry - TTI anisotropy. This enhancement approximately doubles both the run time and the memory requirements of the code. We show that neglect of anisotropy can lead to significant artefacts in the recovered velocity models. We will present inversion results of inverting anisotropic 3D dataset by assuming isotropic earth and compare them with anisotropic inversion result. As a test case Marmousi model extended to 3D with no velocity variation in third direction and with added spatially varying anisotropy is used. Acquisition geometry is assumed as OBC with sources and receivers everywhere at the surface. We attempted inversion using both 2D and full 3D acquisition for this dataset. Results show that if no anisotropy is taken into account although image looks plausible most features are miss positioned in depth and space, even for relatively low anisotropy, which leads to incorrect result. This may lead to

  15. Risperidone-associated adverse drug reactions and CYP2D6 polymorphisms in a South African cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dodgen, Tyren M.; Eloff, Arinda; Mataboge, Connie; Roos, Louw (.J.L.).; van Staden, Werdie (.C.W.).; Pepper, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Contradictory information exists regarding the influence of CYP2D6 polymorphisms on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and weight gain) related to risperidone treatment. This prompted us to evaluate the influence of CYP2D6 genetic variation in a cohort of South African patients who presented with marked movement disorders and/or weight gain while on risperidone treatment. Methods Patients who were experiencing marked risperidone ADRs were recruited from Weskoppies Public Psychiatric Hospital. As poor or intermediate metabolism was expected, comprehensive CYP2D6 sequence variations were evaluated using XL-PCR + Sequencing. Results No statistically significant association was found between CYP2D6 poor metabolism and risperidone ADRs. An inverse relationship between EPS and weight gain was however identified. A novel CYP2D6 allele was identified which is unlikely to affect metabolism based on in silico evaluation. Conclusion CYP2D6 variation appeared not to be a good pharmacogenetic marker for predicting risperidone-related ADRs in this naturalistic South African cohort. Evaluation of a larger cohort would be needed to confirm these observations, including an examination of the role of potential intermediaries between the hypothesised genetic and clinical phenotypes. PMID:26937359

  16. Joint inversions of three types of electromagnetic data explicitly constrained by seismic observations: results from the central Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalscheuer, Thomas; Blake, Sarah; Podgorski, Joel E.; Wagner, Frederic; Green, Alan G.; Maurer, Hansruedi; Jones, Alan G.; Muller, Mark; Ntibinyane, Ongkopotse; Tshoso, Gomotsang

    2015-09-01

    The Okavango Delta of northern Botswana is one of the world's largest inland deltas or megafans. To obtain information on the character of sediments and basement depths, audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric (CSAMT) and central-loop transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were collected on the largest island within the delta. The data were inverted individually and jointly for 1-D models of electric resistivity. Distortion effects in the AMT and CSAMT data were accounted for by including galvanic distortion tensors as free parameters in the inversions. By employing Marquardt-Levenberg inversion, we found that a 3-layer model comprising a resistive layer overlying sequentially a conductive layer and a deeper resistive layer was sufficient to explain all of the electromagnetic data. However, the top of the basal resistive layer from electromagnetic-only inversions was much shallower than the well-determined basement depth observed in high-quality seismic reflection images and seismic refraction velocity tomograms. To resolve this discrepancy, we jointly inverted the electromagnetic data for 4-layer models by including seismic depths to an interface between sedimentary units and to basement as explicit a priori constraints. We have also estimated the interconnected porosities, clay contents and pore-fluid resistivities of the sedimentary units from their electrical resistivities and seismic P-wave velocities using appropriate petrophysical models. In the interpretation of our preferred model, a shallow ˜40 m thick freshwater sandy aquifer with 85-100 Ωm resistivity, 10-32 per cent interconnected porosity and <13 per cent clay content overlies a 105-115 m thick conductive sequence of clay and intercalated salt-water-saturated sands with 15-20 Ωm total resistivity, 1-27 per cent interconnected porosity and 15-60 per cent clay content. A third ˜60 m thick sandy layer with 40-50 Ωm resistivity, 10-33 per cent interconnected porosity and <15

  17. An Improved Analytic Signal Technique for the Depth and Structural Index from 2D Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guoqing; Du, Xiaojuan

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a new inversion method for the interpretation of 2D magnetic anomaly data, which uses the combination of the analytic signal and its total gradient to estimate the depth and the nature (structural index) of an isolated magnetic source. However, our proposed method is sensitive to noise. In order to lower the effect of noise, we apply upward continuation technique to smooth the anomaly. Tests on synthetic noise-free and noise corrupted magnetic data show that the new method can successfully estimate the depth and the nature of the causative source. The practical application of the technique is applied to measured magnetic anomaly data from Jurh area, northeast China, and the inversion results are in agreement with the inversion results from Euler deconvolution of the analytic signal.

  18. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  19. PPARγ suppresses the proliferation of cardiac myxoma cells through downregulation of MEF2D in a miR-122-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu; Chen, Guozhu; Yu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a multiple functional transcription factor, has been reported to have anti-tumor effects through inhibition of cells proliferation. However, its effects on cardiac myxoma (CM) cells and the underlying signaling mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that the level of PPARγ is inversely correlated with that of myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), a biomarker of CM. We found that activation of PPARγ inhibit MEF2D expression via upregulation of miR-122, which can target the 3'-UTR of MEF2D and inhibit MEF2D expression, by directly binding to the PPRE in the miR-122 promoter region. Functional experiments further showed that miR-122-dependent downregulation of MEF2D by PPARγ suppress the proliferation of CM cells. These results suggest that PPARγ may exert its antiproliferative effects by negatively regulating the MEF2D in CM cells, which through upregulation of miR-122, and PPARγ/miR-122/MEF2D signaling pathway may be a novel target for treatment of CM. PMID:27109478

  20. 2D Turbulence with Complicated Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullet, G.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the consequences of lateral viscous boundary layers on the 2D turbulence that arises in domains with complicated boundaries (headlands, bays etc). The study is carried out numerically with LES. The numerics are carefully designed to ensure all global conservation laws, proper boundary conditions and a minimal range of dissipation scales. The turbulence dramatically differs from the classical bi-periodic case. Boundary layer separations lead to creation of many small vortices and act as a continuing energy source exciting the inverse cascade of energy throughout the domain. The detachments are very intermittent in time. In free decay, the final state depends on the effective numerical resolution: laminar with a single dominant vortex for low Re and turbulent with many vortices for large enough Re. After very long time, the turbulent end-state exhibits a striking tendency for the emergence of shielded vortices which then interact almost elastically. In the forced case, the boundary layers allow the turbulence to reach a statistical steady state without any artificial hypo-viscosity or other large-scale dissipation. Implications are discussed for the oceanic mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence.

  1. A "voice inversion effect?".

    PubMed

    Bédard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-07-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an "auditory face" rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a "voice inversion effect," by analogy to the classical "face inversion effect," which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted of a gender identification task on two syllables pronounced by 90 speakers (boys, girls, men, and women). Experiment 2 consisted of a speaker discrimination task on pairs of syllables (8 men and 8 women). Experiment 3 consisted of an instrument discrimination task on pairs of melodies (8 string and 8 wind instruments). In all three experiments, stimuli were presented in 4 conditions: (1) no inversion; (2) temporal inversion (e.g., backwards speech); (3) frequency inversion centered around 4000 Hz; and (4) around 2500 Hz. Results indicated a significant decrease in performance caused by sound inversion, with a much stronger effect for frequency than for temporal inversion. Interestingly, although frequency inversion markedly affected timbre for both voices and instruments, subjects' performance was still above chance. However, performance at instrument discrimination was much higher than for voices, preventing comparison of inversion effects for voices vs. non-vocal stimuli. Additional experiments will be necessary to conclude on the existence of a possible "voice inversion effect." PMID:15177788

  2. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells. PMID:25602462

  3. 2dF mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg; Lankshear, Allan

    1998-07-01

    2dF is a multi-object instrument mounted at prime focus at the AAT capable of spectroscopic analysis of 400 objects in a single 2 degree field. It also prepares a second 2 degree 400 object field while the first field is being observed. At its heart is a high precision robotic positioner that places individual fiber end magnetic buttons on one of two field plates. The button gripper is carried on orthogonal gantries powered by linear synchronous motors and contains a TV camera which precisely locates backlit buttons to allow placement in user defined locations to 10 (mu) accuracy. Fiducial points on both plates can also be observed by the camera to allow repeated checks on positioning accuracy. Field plates rotate to follow apparent sky rotation. The spectrographs both analyze light from the 200 observing fibers each and back- illuminate the 400 fibers being re-positioned during the observing run. The 2dF fiber position and spectrograph system is a large and complex instrument located at the prime focus of the Anglo Australian Telescope. The mechanical design has departed somewhat from the earlier concepts of Gray et al, but still reflects the audacity of those first ideas. The positioner is capable of positioning 400 fibers on a field plate while another 400 fibers on another plate are observing at the focus of the telescope and feeding the twin spectrographs. When first proposed it must have seemed like ingenuity unfettered by caution. Yet now it works, and works wonderfully well. 2dF is a system which functions as the result of the combined and coordinated efforts of the astronomers, the mechanical designers and tradespeople, the electronic designers, the programmers, the support staff at the telescope, and the manufacturing subcontractors. The mechanical design of the 2dF positioner and spectrographs was carried out by the mechanical engineering staff of the AAO and the majority of the manufacture was carried out in the AAO workshops.

  4. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  5. A comprehensive method to identify the kinetics of static recrystallization using the hot torsion test results with an inverse solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoddam, S.; Hodgson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Many difficulties exist in directly following the static recrystallization of metals, particularly during hot working. Indirect measurement of static recrystallization has been extensively performed in the literature where, for example, the recrystallization behavior of austenite in steels has commonly been measured indirectly using the fractional softening method. This method relies on the yield stress changes during recrystallization which are physically simulated by hot torsion or compression tests. However, the inherent heterogeneity of deformation during a mechanical test leads to a non-uniform static recrystallization distribution in the test sample. This, in turn, poses a serious question concerning the reliability of the measurement since the stress calculation techniques during recrystallization are not adequately developed in the existing literature. This paper develops a computer-based method to account for heterogeneous deformation during fractional softening measurements based on the hot torsion test data. The importance of the fractional softening gradient in determining the kinetics is emphasized and deficiencies in our understanding of the basic mechanisms are highlighted. A computer-based method is introduced to generate the experimental and computational components in a cost function. The cost function is then utilized by an inverse solution to calibrate the design parameters in a static recrystallization model.A

  6. Differential Cytochrome P450 2D Metabolism Alters Tafenoquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Chau; Xie, Lisa H.; Potter, Brittney M. J.; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Nanayakkara, N. P. Dhammika; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.; Smith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D metabolism is required for the liver-stage antimalarial efficacy of the 8-aminoquinoline molecule tafenoquine in mice. This could be problematic for Plasmodium vivax radical cure, as the human CYP 2D ortholog (2D6) is highly polymorphic. Diminished CYP 2D6 enzyme activity, as in the poor-metabolizer phenotype, could compromise radical curative efficacy in humans. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism for tafenoquine liver-stage efficacy, the exact role that CYP 2D metabolism plays in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of tafenoquine and other 8-aminoquinoline molecules has not been extensively studied. In this study, a series of tafenoquine pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with different CYP 2D metabolism statuses, including wild-type (WT) (reflecting extensive metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) and CYPmouse 2D knockout (KO) (reflecting poor metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single 20-mg/kg of body weight dose of tafenoquine differed between the strains; however, the differences were less striking than previous results obtained for primaquine in the same model. Additionally, the presence of a 5,6-ortho-quinone tafenoquine metabolite was examined in both mouse strains. The 5,6-ortho-quinone species of tafenoquine was observed, and concentrations of the metabolite were highest in the WT extensive-metabolizer phenotype. Altogether, this study indicates that CYP 2D metabolism in mice affects tafenoquine pharmacokinetics and could have implications for human tafenoquine pharmacokinetics in polymorphic CYP 2D6 human populations. PMID:25870069

  7. 2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

    2007-10-17

    A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral

  8. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C.; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. PMID:25381333

  9. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples. PMID:27378648

  10. 2D stepping drive for hyperspectral systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrödy, Csaba; Mehner, Hannes; Grewe, Adrian; Sinzinger, Stefan; Hoffmann, Martin

    2015-07-01

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of a compact 2D stepping microdrive for pinhole array positioning. The miniaturized solution enables a highly integrated compact hyperspectral imaging system. Based on the geometry of the pinhole array, an inch-worm drive with electrostatic actuators was designed resulting in a compact (1 cm2) positioning system featuring a step size of about 15 µm in a 170 µm displacement range. The high payload (20 mg) as required for the pinhole array and the compact system design exceed the known electrostatic inch-worm-based microdrives.

  11. In situ fluid typing and quantification with 1D and 2D NMR logging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqin

    2007-05-01

    In situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fluid typing has recently gained momentum due to data acquisition and inversion algorithm enhancement of NMR logging tools. T(2) distributions derived from NMR logging contain information on bulk fluids and pore size distributions. However, the accuracy of fluid typing is greatly overshadowed by the overlap between T(2) peaks arising from different fluids with similar apparent T(2) relaxation times. Nevertheless, the shapes of T(2) distributions from different fluid components are often different and can be predetermined. Inversion with predetermined T(2) distributions allows us to perform fluid component decomposition to yield individual fluid volume ratios. Another effective method for in situ fluid typing is two-dimensional (2D) NMR logging, which results in proton population distribution as a function of T(2) relaxation time and fluid diffusion coefficient (or T(1) relaxation time). Since diffusion coefficients (or T(1) relaxation time) for different fluid components can be very different, it is relatively easy to separate oil (especially heavy oil) from water signal in a 2D NMR map and to perform accurate fluid typing. Combining NMR logging with resistivity and/or neutron/density logs provides a third method for in situ fluid typing. We shall describe these techniques with field examples. PMID:17466778

  12. A robust inverse inviscid method for airfoil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaviaropoulos, P.; Dedoussis, V.; Papailiou, K. D.

    An irrotational inviscid compressible inverse design method for two-dimensional airfoil profiles is described. The method is based on the potential streamfunction formulation, where the physical space on which the boundaries of the airfoil are sought, is mapped onto the (phi, psi) space via a body-fitted coordinate transformation. A novel procedure based on differential geometry arguments is employed to derive the governing equations for the inverse problem, by requiring the curvature of the flat 2-D Euclidean space to be zero. An auxiliary coordinate transformation permits the definition of C-type computational grids on the (phi, psi) plane resulting to a more accurate description of the leading edge region. Geometry is determined by integrating Frenet equations along the grid lines. To validate the method inverse calculation results are compared to direct, `reproduction', calculation results. The design procedure of a new airfoil shape is also presented.

  13. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  14. Interpretation of Magnetic Phase Anomalies over 2D Tabular Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, phase angle (inverse tangent of the ratio of the horizontal to vertical gradients of magnetic anomalies) profile over two-dimensional tabular bodies has been subjected to detailed analysis for determining the source parameters. Distances between certain characteristic positions on this phase curve are related to the parameters of two-dimensional tabular magnetic sources. In this paper, I have derived the mathematical expressions for these relations. It has been demonstrated here that for locating the origin of the 2D tabular source, knowledge on the type of the model (contact, sheet, dyke, and fault) is not necessary. A procedure is evolved to determine the location, depth, width and magnetization angle of the 2D sources from the mathematical expressions. The method is tested on real field data. The effect of the overlapping bodies is also discussed with two synthetic examples. The interpretation technique is developed for contact, sheet, dike and inclined fault bodies.

  15. Inverse structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Bruce R.; Water, Willem van de

    2005-03-01

    While the ordinary structure function in turbulence is concerned with the statistical moments of the velocity increment {delta}u measured over a distance r, the inverse structure function is related to the distance r where the turbulent velocity exits the interval {delta}u. We study inverse structure functions of wind-tunnel turbulence which covers a range of Reynolds numbers Re{sub {lambda}}=400-1100. We test a recently proposed relation between the scaling exponents of the ordinary structure functions and those of the inverse structure functions [S. Roux and M. H. Jensen, Phys. Rev. E 69, 16309 (2004)]. The relatively large range of Reynolds numbers in our experiment also enables us to address the scaling with Reynolds number that is expected to highlight the intermediate dissipative range. While we firmly establish the (relative) scaling of inverse structure functions, our experimental results fail both predictions. Therefore, the question of the significance of inverse structure functions remains open.

  16. Overexpression of Dsk2/dUbqln results in severe developmental defects and lethality in Drosophila melanogaster that can be rescued by overexpression of the p54/Rpn10/S5a proteasomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Lipinszki, Zoltán; Pál, Margit; Nagy, Olga; Deák, Péter; Hunyadi-Gulyas, Eva; Udvardy, Andor

    2011-12-01

    Polyubiquitin receptors execute the targeting of polyubiquitylated proteins to the 26S proteasome. In vitro studies indicate that disturbance of the physiological balance among different receptor proteins impairs the proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated proteins. To study the physiological consequences of shifting the in vivo equilibrium between the p54/Rpn10 proteasomal and the Dsk2/dUbqln extraproteasomal polyubiquitin receptors, transgenic Drosophila lines were constructed in which the overexpression or RNA interference-mediated silencing of these receptors can be induced. Flies overexpressing Flag-p54 were viable and fertile, without any detectable morphological abnormalities, although detectable accumulation of polyubiquitylated proteins demonstrated a certain level of proteolytic disturbance. Flag-p54 was assembled into the 26S proteasome and could fully complement the lethal phenotype of a p54 null mutant Drosophila line. The overexpression of Dsk2 caused severe morphological abnormalities in the late pupal stages, leading to pharate adult lethality, accompanied by a huge accumulation of highly polyubiquitylated proteins. The lethal phenotype of Dsk2 overexpression could be rescued in a double transgenic line coexpressing Flag-Dsk2 and Flag-p54. Although the double transgenic line was viable and fertile, it did not restore the proteolytic defects; the accumulation of the highly polyubiquitylated proteins was even more severe in the double transgenic line. Significant differences were found in the Dsk2-26S proteasome interaction in Drosophila melanogaster as compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In yeast, Dsk2 can interact only with ΔRpn10 proteasomes and not with the wild-type one. In Drosophila, Dsk2 does not interact with Δp54 proteasomes, but the interaction can be fully restored by complementing the Δp54 deletion with Flag-p54. PMID:21973017

  17. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  18. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  19. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques and their effect on sensitivity analysis and inverse modeling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques for solving the advection-dispersion equation (finite difference, predictor corrector, total variation diminishing, method of characteristics, and modified method of characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using discrete, randomly distributed, homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an opportunity to compare the solution techniques: the heterogeneous hydraulic-conductivity distribution of known structure can be accurately represented by a numerical model, and detailed measurements can be compared with simulated concentrations and total flow through the tank. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results - simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values - change in this heterogeneous situation given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The breakthrough curves show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied between the techniques because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity-analysis results revealed: (1) a high correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity given the concentration and flow observations used, so that both could not be estimated; and (2) that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information to estimate individual values of dispersivity for the five sands. This study demonstrates that the choice of assigned dispersivity and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique influence estimated hydraulic conductivity values to a surprising degree.

  20. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  1. Inverse problem in ionospheric science: prediction of solar soft-X-ray spectrum from very low frequency radiosonde results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, S.; Ray, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    X-rays and gamma-rays from astronomical sources such as solar flares are mostly absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere. Resulting electron-ion production rate as a function of height depends on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectrum and therefore the effects vary from one source to another. In other words, the ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. In this paper, we investigate whether we can invert the problem uniquely by deconvolution of the VLF amplitude signal to obtain the details of the injected spectrum. We find that it is possible to do this up to a certain accuracy. This leads us to the possibility of uninterrupted observation of X-ray photon spectra of solar flares that are often hindered by the restricted observation window of space satellites to avoid charge particle damages. Such continuous means of observation are essential in deriving information on time evolution of physical processes related to electron acceleration and interaction with plasma in solar atmosphere. Our method is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the spectra of more energetic events such as the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) etc., by probing even the lower part of the Earth's atmosphere. We thus show that to certain extent, the Earth's atmosphere could be used as a gigantic detector of relatively strong astronomical events.

  2. Inverse Problem in Nondestructive Testing Using Arrayed Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zaoui, Abdelhalim; Menana, Hocine; Feliachi, Mouloud; Berthiau, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    A fast crack profile reconstitution model in nondestructive testing is developed using an arrayed eddy current sensor. The inverse problem is based on an iterative solving of the direct problem using genetic algorithms. In the direct problem, assuming a current excitation, the incident field produced by all the coils of the arrayed sensor is obtained by the translation and superposition of the 2D axisymmetric finite element results obtained for one coil; the impedance variation of each coil, due to the crack, is obtained by the reciprocity principle involving the dyadic Green’s function. For the inverse problem, the surface of the crack is subdivided into rectangular cells, and the objective function is expressed only in terms of the depth of each cell. The evaluation of the dyadic Green’s function matrix is made independently of the iterative procedure, making the inversion very fast. PMID:22163680

  3. Inverse problem in nondestructive testing using arrayed eddy current sensors.

    PubMed

    Zaoui, Abdelhalim; Menana, Hocine; Feliachi, Mouloud; Berthiau, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    A fast crack profile reconstitution model in nondestructive testing is developed using an arrayed eddy current sensor. The inverse problem is based on an iterative solving of the direct problem using genetic algorithms. In the direct problem, assuming a current excitation, the incident field produced by all the coils of the arrayed sensor is obtained by the translation and superposition of the 2D axisymmetric finite element results obtained for one coil; the impedance variation of each coil, due to the crack, is obtained by the reciprocity principle involving the dyadic Green's function. For the inverse problem, the surface of the crack is subdivided into rectangular cells, and the objective function is expressed only in terms of the depth of each cell. The evaluation of the dyadic Green's function matrix is made independently of the iterative procedure, making the inversion very fast. PMID:22163680

  4. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  5. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  6. 3D multiple-point statistics simulation using 2D training images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comunian, A.; Renard, P.; Straubhaar, J.

    2012-03-01

    One of the main issues in the application of multiple-point statistics (MPS) to the simulation of three-dimensional (3D) blocks is the lack of a suitable 3D training image. In this work, we compare three methods of overcoming this issue using information coming from bidimensional (2D) training images. One approach is based on the aggregation of probabilities. The other approaches are novel. One relies on merging the lists obtained using the impala algorithm from diverse 2D training images, creating a list of compatible data events that is then used for the MPS simulation. The other (s2Dcd) is based on sequential simulations of 2D slices constrained by the conditioning data computed at the previous simulation steps. These three methods are tested on the reproduction of two 3D images that are used as references, and on a real case study where two training images of sedimentary structures are considered. The tests show that it is possible to obtain 3D MPS simulations with at least two 2D training images. The simulations obtained, in particular those obtained with the s2Dcd method, are close to the references, according to a number of comparison criteria. The CPU time required to simulate with the method s2Dcd is from two to four orders of magnitude smaller than the one required by a MPS simulation performed using a 3D training image, while the results obtained are comparable. This computational efficiency and the possibility of using MPS for 3D simulation without the need for a 3D training image facilitates the inclusion of MPS in Monte Carlo, uncertainty evaluation, and stochastic inverse problems frameworks.

  7. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  8. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  9. Application of high resolution 2D/3D spectral induced polarization (SIP) in metalliferous ore exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Zhao, X.; Yao, H.; He, X.; Zeng, P.; Chang, F.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Xi, X.; He, L.

    2015-12-01

    Induced polarization (IP) is a powerful tool in metalliferous ore exploration. However, there are many sources, such as clay and graphite, which can generate IP anomaly. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) measures IP response on a wide frequency range. This method provides a way to discriminate IP response generated by metalliferous ore or other objects. The best way to explore metalliferous ore is 3D SIP exploration. However, if we consider the exploration cost and efficiency, we can use SIP profiling to find an anomaly, and then use 2D/3D SIP sounding to characterize the anomaly. Based on above idea, we used a large-scale distributed SIP measurement system which can realize 800 sounding sites in one direction at the same time. This system can be used for SIP profiling, 2D/3D SIP sounding with high efficiency, high resolution, and large depth of investigation (> 1000 m). Qiushuwan copper - molybdenum deposit is located in Nanyang city, Henan province, China. It is only a middle-size deposit although over 100 holes were drilled and over 40 years of exploration were spent because of very complex geological setting. We made SIP measurement over 100 rock and ore samples to discriminate IP responses of ore and rock containing graphite. Then we carried out 7 lines of 2D SIP exploration with the depth of investigation great than 1000 m. The minimum electode spacing for potential difference is only 20 m. And we increase the spacing of current electodes at linear scale. This acquisition setting ensures high density data acquired and high quality data acquisition. Modeling and inversion result proves that we can get underground information with high resolution by our method. Our result shows that there exists a strong SIP response related to ore body in depth > 300 m. Pseudo-3D inversion of five 2D SIP sounding lines shows the location and size of IP anomaly. The new drillings based our result found a big copper-molybdenum ore body in new position with depth > 300 m and

  10. Imaging in 2D media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    Stacking by CDP technique is inapplicable for processing of data from bottom seismic stations or acoustic sonobuoys. In addition, big amount of unknown velocity and structural parameters of the real layered medium do not allow these parameters to be defined by standard processing methods. Local sloped stacking is proposed for simultaneous obtaining the stacked tracks, travel time curve of a chosen wave, and the first derivative of this travel time curve. The additionally defined parameters are second derivative of this travel time curve and integrated average of squared travel time curve. These data are sufficient to reduce the amount of unknown parameters (down to one-two for each boundary) when layer-by-layer top-to-bottom processing. As a result, the stable estimates of velocity parameters of the layered (isotropic or anisotropic) medium can be obtained and stacked tracks obtained by local sloped staking can be transformed into boundaries in the time and depth sections.

  11. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevector aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of inertial ranged magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between perpendicular and parallel reduced power spectra which is expected for the 2D component but not for the slab component. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant (approximately 85 percent by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  12. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1996-07-20

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevectors aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of mid-inertial range magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between reduced magnetic power spectra in the two different directions perpendicular to the mean field. Such a difference is expected for 2D geometry but not for slab geometry. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant ({approx}85% by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  13. Modelling Study at Kutlular Copper FIELD with Spat This Study, Evaluation Steps of Copper Mine Field SP Data Are Shown How to Reach More Accurate Results for SP Inversion Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, O. K.; Asci, M.

    2014-12-01

    At this study, determination of theoretical parameters for inversion process of Trabzon-Sürmene-Kutlular ore bed anomalies was examined. Making a decision of which model equation can be used for inversion is the most important step for the beginning. It is thought that will give a chance to get more accurate results. So, sections were evaluated with sphere-cylinder nomogram. After that, same sections were analyzed with cylinder-dike nomogram to determine the theoretical parameters for inversion process for every single model equations. After comparison of results, we saw that only one of them was more close to parameters of nomogram evaluations. But, other inversion result parameters were different from their nomogram parameters.

  14. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  15. The Pyrenean inversion phase in northern Belgium: an example of a relaxation inversion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, Jef; Vandenberghe, Noël; Lanckacker, Timothy; De Koninck, Roel

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of 2D seismic and well data provides new insights into the late Eocene to earliest Oligocene dynamics along the southern border of the North Sea area, Belgium. From the start of the Priabonian onwards, the northwestern part of the Campine Basin and the London-Brabant Massif to its west experienced subsidence and developed into a shallow trough. Simultaneously, several other southern North Sea basins, including the central and eastern part of the Campine Basin and the Roer Valley Graben, were inverted by what is generally referred to as the Pyrenean inversion phase. Inversion caused broad flexural uplift and minor reverse fault movements. The characteristics of inversions in the southern North Sea basins are very similar to each other and to those described for a phase of intraplate stress relaxation. The results of this study therefore suggest that the Pyrenean inversion phase was triggered by a regional stress relaxation that started around the Bartonian/Priabonian boundary and ended before the onset of the Oligocene.

  16. Light field morphing using 2D features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Lin, Stephen; Lee, Seungyong; Guo, Baining; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2005-01-01

    We present a 2D feature-based technique for morphing 3D objects represented by light fields. Existing light field morphing methods require the user to specify corresponding 3D feature elements to guide morph computation. Since slight errors in 3D specification can lead to significant morphing artifacts, we propose a scheme based on 2D feature elements that is less sensitive to imprecise marking of features. First, 2D features are specified by the user in a number of key views in the source and target light fields. Then the two light fields are warped view by view as guided by the corresponding 2D features. Finally, the two warped light fields are blended together to yield the desired light field morph. Two key issues in light field morphing are feature specification and warping of light field rays. For feature specification, we introduce a user interface for delineating 2D features in key views of a light field, which are automatically interpolated to other views. For ray warping, we describe a 2D technique that accounts for visibility changes and present a comparison to the ideal morphing of light fields. Light field morphing based on 2D features makes it simple to incorporate previous image morphing techniques such as nonuniform blending, as well as to morph between an image and a light field. PMID:15631126

  17. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  18. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  19. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The study of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a succession of extrusion phases, dome explosions and collapse events. Lava dome eruptive activity may last from days to decades. Therefore, their internal structure, at the end of the eruption, is complex and includes massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits as well as hydrothermal alteration. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for volcano structure imaging. Because a large range of resistivity values is often observed in volcanic environments, the method is well suited to study the internal structure of volcanic edifices. We performed an ERT survey on an 11ka years old trachytic lava dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central). The analysis of a recent high resolution DEM (LiDAR 0.5 m), as well as other geophysical data, strongly suggest that the Puy de Dôme is a composite dome. 11 ERT profiles have been carried out, both at the scale of the entire dome (base diameter of ~2 km and height of 400 m) on the one hand, and at a smaller scale on the summit part on the other hand. Each profile is composed of 64 electrodes. Three different electrode spacing have been used depending on the study area (35 m for the entire dome, 10 m and 5 m for its summit part). Some profiles were performed with half-length roll-along acquisitions, in order to keep a good trade-off between depth of investigation and resolution. Both Wenner-alpha and Wenner-Schlumberger protocols were used. 2-D models of the electrical resistivity distribution were computed using RES2DINV software. In order to constrain inversion models interpretation, the depth of investigation (DOI) method was applied to those results. It aims to compute a sensitivity index on inversion results, illustrating how the data influence the model and constraining models

  20. Investigation of 2D-Trace Gas Field Reconstruction Techniques From Tomographic AMAX-DOAS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laepple, T.; Heue, K.; Friedeburg, C. V.; Wang, P.; Knab, V.; Pundt, I.

    2002-12-01

    Tomographic-Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectroscopy (Tom-DOAS) is a new application of the DOAS method designed to measure 2-3-dimensional concentration fields of different trace gases (e.g. NO2, HCHO, Ozone) in the troposphere. Numerical reconstruction techniques are used to obtain spatially resolved data from the slant column densities provided by DOAS instruments. We discuss the detection of emission plumes by AMAX (Airborne Multi AXis) DOAS Systems which measure sunlight by telescopes pointing in different directions. 2D distributions are reconstructed from slant columns by using airmass factor matrices and inversion techniques. We discuss possibilities and limitations of this technique gained with the use of simulated test fields. Therefore the effect of the parameter choice (e.g. flight track, algorithm changes) and measurement errors is investigated. Further, first results from the Partenavia aircraft measurements over Milano (Italy) during the European FORMAT campaign will be presented.

  1. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  2. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  3. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  4. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  5. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  6. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  7. Inhibitory effects of phytochemicals on metabolic capabilities of CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 using cell-based models in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Qiang; Qu, Jian; Han, Lu; Zhan, Min; Wu, Lan-xiang; Zhang, Yi-wen; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hong-hao

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Herbal products have been widely used, and the safety of herb-drug interactions has aroused intensive concerns. This study aimed to investigate the effects of phytochemicals on the catalytic activities of human CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 in vitro. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 expression vectors. The metabolic kinetics of the enzymes was studied using HPLC and fluorimetry. Results: HepG2-CYP2D6*1 and HepG2-CYP2D6*10 cell lines were successfully constructed. Among the 63 phytochemicals screened, 6 compounds, including coptisine sulfate, bilobalide, schizandrin B, luteolin, schizandrin A and puerarin, at 100 μmol/L inhibited CYP2D6*1- and CYP2D6*10-mediated O-demethylation of a coumarin compound AMMC by more than 50%. Furthermore, the inhibition by these compounds was dose-dependent. Eadie-Hofstee plots demonstrated that these compounds competitively inhibited CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10. However, their Ki values for CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 were very close, suggesting that genotype-dependent herb-drug inhibition was similar between the two variants. Conclusion: Six phytochemicals inhibit CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10-mediated catalytic activities in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Thus herbal products containing these phytochemicals may inhibit the in vivo metabolism of co-administered drugs whose primary route of elimination is CYP2D6. PMID:24786236

  8. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Baseline Control Law: Flight-Test Results for the Full-scale Advanced Systems Testbed F/A-18 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    A model reference nonlinear dynamic inversion control law has been developed to provide a baseline controller for research into simple adaptive elements for advanced flight control laws. This controller has been implemented and tested in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation and in flight. The flight results agree well with the simulation predictions and show good handling qualities throughout the tested flight envelope with some noteworthy deficiencies highlighted both by handling qualities metrics and pilot comments. Many design choices and implementation details reflect the requirements placed on the system by the nonlinear flight environment and the desire to keep the system as simple as possible to easily allow the addition of the adaptive elements. The flight-test results and how they compare to the simulation predictions are discussed, along with a discussion about how each element affected pilot opinions. Additionally, aspects of the design that performed better than expected are presented, as well as some simple improvements that will be suggested for follow-on work.

  10. On the contribution of G20 and G30 in the Time-Averaged Paleomagnetic Field: First results from a new Giant Gaussian Process inverse modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlov, A.; Hulot, G.; Johnson, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that the geometry of the recent time-averaged paleomagnetic field (TAF) is very close to that of a geocentric axial dipole (GAD). However, many TAF models recovered from averaging lava flow paleomagnetic directional data (the most numerous and reliable of all data) suggest that significant additional terms, in particular quadrupolar (G20) and octupolar (G30) zonal terms, likely contribute. The traditional way in which most such TAF models are recovered uses an empirical estimate for paleosecular variation (PSV) that is subject to limitations imposed by the limited age information available for such data. In this presentation, we will report on a new way to recover the TAF, using an inverse modeling approach based on the so-called Giant Gaussian Process (GGP) description of the TAF and PSV, and various statistical tools we recently made available (see Khokhlov and Hulot, Geophysical Journal International, 2013, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggs118). First results based on high quality data published from the Time-Averaged Field Investigations project (see Johnson et al., G-cubed, 2008, doi:10.1029/2007GC001696) clearly show that both the G20 and G30 terms are very well constrained, and that optimum values fully consistent with the data can be found. These promising results lay the groundwork for use of the method with more extensive data sets, to search for possible additional non-zonal departures of the TAF from the GAD.

  11. 2D Radiative Processes Near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, T.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance and complexity of dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes taking place near cloud edges, the transition zone between clouds and cloud free air has been the subject of intense research both in the ASR program and in the wider community. One challenge in this research is that the one-dimensional (1D) radiative models widely used in both remote sensing and dynamical simulations become less accurate near cloud edges: The large horizontal gradients in particle concentrations imply that accurate radiative calculations need to consider multi-dimensional radiative interactions among areas that have widely different optical properties. This study examines the way the importance of multidimensional shortwave radiative interactions changes as we approach cloud edges. For this, the study relies on radiative simulations performed for a multiyear dataset of clouds observed over the NSA, SGP, and TWP sites. This dataset is based on Microbase cloud profiles as well as wind measurements and ARM cloud classification products. The study analyzes the way the difference between 1D and 2D simulation results increases near cloud edges. It considers both monochromatic radiances and broadband radiative heating, and it also examines the influence of factors such as cloud type and height, and solar elevation. The results provide insights into the workings of radiative processes and may help better interpret radiance measurements and better estimate the radiative impacts of this critical region.

  12. Optical imaging systems analyzed with a 2D template.

    PubMed

    Haim, Harel; Konforti, Naim; Marom, Emanuel

    2012-05-10

    Present determination of optical imaging systems specifications are based on performance values and modulation transfer function results carried with a 1D resolution template (such as the USAF resolution target or spoke templates). Such a template allows determining image quality, resolution limit, and contrast. Nevertheless, the conventional 1D template does not provide satisfactory results, since most optical imaging systems handle 2D objects for which imaging system response may be different by virtue of some not readily observable spatial frequencies. In this paper we derive and analyze contrast transfer function results obtained with 1D as well as 2D templates. PMID:22614498

  13. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  14. A comparison of geostatistically based inverse techniques for use in performance assessment analysis at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Results from Test Case No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, D.A.; Gallegos, D.P.

    1993-10-01

    The groundwater flow pathway in the Culebra Dolomite aquifer at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been identified as a potentially important pathway for radionuclide migration to the accessible environment. Consequently, uncertainties in the models used to describe flow and transport in the Culebra need to be addressed. A ``Geostatistics Test Problem`` is being developed to evaluate a number of inverse techniques that may be used for flow calculations in the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The Test Problem is actually a series of test cases, each being developed as a highly complex synthetic data set; the intent is for the ensemble of these data sets to span the range of possible conceptual models of groundwater flow at the WIPP site. The Test Problem analysis approach is to use a comparison of the probabilistic groundwater travel time (GWTT) estimates produced by each technique as the basis for the evaluation. Participants are given observations of head and transmissivity (possibly including measurement error) or other information such as drawdowns from pumping wells, and are asked to develop stochastic models of groundwater flow for the synthetic system. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of groundwater flow (computed via particle tracking) are constructed using the head and transmissivity data generated through the application of each technique; one semi-analytical method generates the CDFs of groundwater flow directly. This paper describes the results from Test Case No. 1.

  15. Effect of different transport observations on inverse modeling results: case study of a long-term groundwater tracer test monitored at high resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rasa, Ehsan; Foglia, Laura; Mackay, Douglas M.; Scow, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    Conservative tracer experiments can provide information useful for characterizing various subsurface transport properties. This study examines the effectiveness of three different types of transport observations for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of a three-dimensional site-specific groundwater flow and transport model: conservative tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), first temporal moments of BTCs (m1), and tracer cumulative mass discharge (Md) through control planes combined with hydraulic head observations (h). High-resolution data obtained from a 410-day controlled field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California (USA), have been used. In this experiment, bromide was injected to create two adjacent plumes monitored at six different transects (perpendicular to groundwater flow) with a total of 162 monitoring wells. A total of 133 different observations of transient hydraulic head, 1,158 of BTC concentration, 23 of first moment, and 36 of mass discharge were used for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of nine flow and transport parameters. The importance of each group of transport observations in estimating these parameters was evaluated using sensitivity analysis, and five out of nine parameters were calibrated against these data. Results showed the advantages of using temporal moment of conservative tracer BTCs and mass discharge as observations for inverse modeling. PMID:24672283

  16. Saturation of superstorms and finite compressibility of the magnetosphere: Results of the magnetogram inversion technique and global PPMLR-MHD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, V. V.; Mishin, V. M.; Karavaev, Yu.; Han, J. P.; Wang, C.

    2016-07-01

    We report on novel features of the saturation process of the polar cap magnetic flux and Poynting flux into the magnetosphere from the solar wind during three superstorms. In addition to the well-known effect of the interplanetary electric (Esw) and southward magnetic (interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz) fields, we found that the saturation depends also on the solar wind ram pressure Pd. By means of the magnetogram inversion technique and a global MHD numerical model Piecewise Parabolic Method with a Lagrangian Remap, we explore the dependence of the magnetopause standoff distance on ram pressure and the southward IMF. Unlike earlier studies, in the considered superstorms both Pd and Bz achieve extreme values. As a result, we show that the compression rate of the dayside magnetosphere decreases with increasing Pd and the southward Bz, approaching very small values for extreme Pd ≥ 15 nPa and Bz ≤ -40 nT. This dependence suggests that finite compressibility of the magnetosphere controls saturation of superstorms.

  17. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  18. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  19. 2-D wavelet with position controlled resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Andrzej; Puzio, Leszek

    2005-09-01

    Wavelet transformation localizes all irregularities in the scene. It is most effective in the case when intensities in the scene have no sharp details. It is the case often present in a medical imaging. To identify the shape one has to extract it from the scene as typical irregularity. When the scene does not contain sharp changes then common differential filters are not efficient tool for a shape extraction. The new 2-D wavelet for such task has been proposed. Described wavelet transform is axially symmetric and has varied scale in dependence on the distance from the centre of the wavelet symmetry. The analytical form of the wavelet has been presented as well as its application for details extraction in the scene. Most important feature of the wavelet transform is that it gives a multi-scale transformation, and if zoom is on the wavelet selectivity varies proportionally to the zoom step. As a result, the extracted shape does not change during zoom operation. What is more the wavelet selectivity can be fit to the local intensity gradient properly to obtain best extraction of the irregularities.

  20. Evolution of the CYP2D gene cluster in humans and four non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Yasukochi, Yoshiki; Satta, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a primary enzyme involved in the metabolism of about 25% of commonly used therapeutic drugs. CYP2D6 belongs to the CYP2D subfamily, a gene cluster located on chromosome 22, which comprises the CYP2D6 gene and pseudogenes CYP2D7P and CYP2D8P. Although the chemical and physiological properties of CYP2D6 have been extensively studied, there has been no study to date on molecular evolution of the CYP2D subfamily in the human genome. Such knowledge could greatly contribute to the understanding of drug metabolism in humans because it makes us to know when and how the current metabolic system has been constructed. The knowledge moreover can be useful to find differences in exogenous substrates in a particular metabolism between human and other animals such as experimental animals. Here, we conducted a preliminary study to investigate the evolution and gene organization of the CYP2D subfamily, focused on humans and four non-human primates (chimpanzees, orangutans, rhesus monkeys, and common marmosets). Our results indicate that CYP2D7P has been duplicated from CYP2D6 before the divergence between humans and great apes, whereas CYP2D6 and CYP2D8P have been already present in the stem lineages of New World monkeys and Catarrhini. Furthermore, the origin of the CYP2D subfamily in the human genome can be traced back to before the divergence between amniotes and amphibians. Our analyses also show that reported chimeric sequences of the CYP2D6 and CYP2D7 genes in the chimpanzee genome appear to be exchanged in its genome database. PMID:21670550

  1. Experimental validation of equations for 2D DIC uncertainty quantification.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) equations have been derived for predicting matching uncertainty in two-dimensional image correlation a priori. These equations include terms that represent the image noise and image contrast. Researchers at the University of South Carolina have extended previous 1D work to calculate matching errors in 2D. These 2D equations have been coded into a Sandia National Laboratories UQ software package to predict the uncertainty for DIC images. This paper presents those equations and the resulting error surfaces for trial speckle images. Comparison of the UQ results with experimentally subpixel-shifted images is also discussed.

  2. 2D:4D Asymmetry and Gender Differences in Academic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Nye, John V. C.; Androuschak, Gregory; Desierto, Desirée; Jones, Garett; Yudkevich, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal androgens affects both future behavior and life choices. However, there is still relatively limited evidence on its effects on academic performance. Moreover, the predicted effect of exposure to prenatal testosterone (T)–which is inversely correlated with the relative length of the second to fourth finger lengths (2D:4D)–would seem to have ambiguous effects on academic achievement since traits like aggressiveness or risk-taking are not uniformly positive for success in school. We provide the first evidence of a non-linear, quadratic, relationship between 2D:4D and academic achievement using samples from Moscow and Manila. We also find that there is a gender differentiated link between various measures of academic achievement and measured digit ratios. These effects are different depending on the field of study, choice of achievement measure, and use of the right hand or left digit ratios. The results seem to be asymmetric between Moscow and Manila where the right (left) hand generates inverted-U (U-shaped) curves in Moscow while the pattern for hands reverses in Manila. Drawing from unusually large and detailed samples of university students in two countries not studied in the digit literature, our work is the first to have a large cross country comparison that includes two groups with very different ethnic compositions. PMID:23056282

  3. Calculating tissue shear modulus and pressure by 2D Log-Elastographic methods

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Joyce R; Zhang, Ning; Manduca, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Shear modulus imaging, often called elastography, enables detection and characterization of tissue abnormalities. In this paper the data is two displacement components obtained from successive MR or ultrasound data sets acquired while the tissue is excited mechanically. A 2D plane strain elastic model is assumed to govern the 2D displacement, u. The shear modulus, μ, is unknown and whether or not the first Lamé parameter, λ, is known the pressure p = λ∇ · u which is present in the plane strain model cannot be measured and is unreliably computed from measured data and can be shown to be an order one quantity in the units kPa. So here we present a 2D Log-Elastographic inverse algorithm that: (1) simultaneously reconstructs the shear modulus, μ, and p, which together satisfy a first order partial differential equation system, with the goal of imaging μ; (2) controls potential exponential growth in the numerical error; and (3) reliably reconstructs the quantity p in the inverse algorithm as compared to the same quantity computed with a forward algorithm. This work generalizes the Log-Elastographic algorithm in [20] which uses one displacement component, is derived assuming the component satisfies the wave equation, and is tested on synthetic data computed with the wave equation model. The 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm is tested on 2D synthetic data and 2D in-vivo data from Mayo Clinic. We also exhibit examples to show that the 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm improves the quality of the recovered images as compared to the Log-Elastographic and Direct Inversion algorithms. PMID:21822349

  4. Real-time 2-D temperature imaging using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2010-01-01

    We have previously introduced methods for noninvasive estimation of temperature change using diagnostic ultrasound. The basic principle was validated both in vitro and in vivo by several groups worldwide. Some limitations remain, however, that have prevented these methods from being adopted in monitoring and guidance of minimally invasive thermal therapies, e.g., RF ablation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). In this letter, we present first results from a real-time system for 2-D imaging of temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound. The front end of the system is a commercially available scanner equipped with a research interface, which allows the control of imaging sequence and access to the RF data in real time. A high-frame-rate 2-D RF acquisition mode, M2D, is used to capture the transients of tissue motion/deformations in response to pulsed HIFU. The M2D RF data is streamlined to the back end of the system, where a 2-D temperature imaging algorithm based on speckle tracking is implemented on a graphics processing unit. The real-time images of temperature change are computed on the same spatial and temporal grid of the M2D RF data, i.e., no decimation. Verification of the algorithm was performed by monitoring localized HIFU-induced heating of a tissue-mimicking elastography phantom. These results clearly demonstrate the repeatability and sensitivity of the algorithm. Furthermore, we present in vitro results demonstrating the possible use of this algorithm for imaging changes in tissue parameters due to HIFU-induced lesions. These results clearly demonstrate the value of the real-time data streaming and processing in monitoring, and guidance of minimally invasive thermotherapy. PMID:19884075

  5. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  6. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  7. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  8. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  9. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  10. 2D-Crystal-Based Functional Inks.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bartolotta, Antonino; Coleman, Jonathan N; Backes, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to produce and process graphene, related 2D crystals, and heterostructures in the liquid phase makes them promising materials for an ever-growing class of applications as composite materials, sensors, in flexible optoelectronics, and energy storage and conversion. In particular, the ability to formulate functional inks with on-demand rheological and morphological properties, i.e., lateral size and thickness of the dispersed 2D crystals, is a step forward toward the development of industrial-scale, reliable, inexpensive printing/coating processes, a boost for the full exploitation of such nanomaterials. Here, the exfoliation strategies of graphite and other layered crystals are reviewed, along with the advances in the sorting of lateral size and thickness of the exfoliated sheets together with the formulation of functional inks and the current development of printing/coating processes of interest for the realization of 2D-crystal-based devices. PMID:27273554

  11. Probabilistic two-dimensional water-column and seabed inversion with self-adapting parameterizations.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E

    2013-05-01

    This paper develops a probabilistic two-dimensional (2D) inversion for geoacoustic seabed and water-column parameters in a strongly range-dependent environment. Range-dependent environments in shelf and shelf-break regions are of increasing importance to the acoustical-oceanography community, and recent advances in nonlinear inverse theory and sampling methods are applied here for efficient probabilistic range-dependent inversion. The 2D seabed and water column are parameterized using highly efficient, self-adapting irregular grids which intrinsically match the local resolving power of the data and provide parsimonious solutions requiring few parameters to capture complex environments. The self-adapting parameterization is achieved by implementing the irregular grid as a trans-dimensional hierarchical Bayesian model with an unknown number of nodes which is sampled with the Metropolis-Hastings-Green algorithm. To improve sampling, population Monte Carlo is applied with a large number of interacting parallel Markov chains with adaptive proposal distributions. The inversion is applied to simulated data for a vertical-line array and several source locations to several kilometers range. Complex acoustic-pressure fields are computed using a parabolic equation model and results are considered in terms of 2D ensemble parameter estimates and credibility intervals. PMID:23654369

  12. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  13. Spin splitting in 2D monochalcogenide semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Do, Dat T.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations of the spin splitting of the uppermost valence band (UVB) and the lowermost conduction band (LCB) in bulk and atomically thin GaS, GaSe, GaTe, and InSe. These layered monochalcogenides appear in four major polytypes depending on the stacking order, except for the monoclinic GaTe. Bulk and few-layer ε-and γ -type, and odd-number β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe crystals are noncentrosymmetric. The spin splittings of the UVB and the LCB near the Γ-point in the Brillouin zone are finite, but still smaller than those in a zinc-blende semiconductor such as GaAs. On the other hand, the spin splitting is zero in centrosymmetric bulk and even-number few-layer β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe, owing to the constraint of spatial inversion symmetry. By contrast, GaTe exhibits zero spin splitting because it is centrosymmetric down to a single layer. In these monochalcogenide semiconductors, the separation of the non-degenerate conduction and valence bands from adjacent bands results in the suppression of Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism. Therefore, the electron- and hole-spin relaxation times in these systems with zero or minimal spin splittings are expected to exceed those in GaAs when the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation mechanism is also suppressed. PMID:26596907

  14. Spin splitting in 2D monochalcogenide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Dat T.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-11-01

    We report ab initio calculations of the spin splitting of the uppermost valence band (UVB) and the lowermost conduction band (LCB) in bulk and atomically thin GaS, GaSe, GaTe, and InSe. These layered monochalcogenides appear in four major polytypes depending on the stacking order, except for the monoclinic GaTe. Bulk and few-layer ε-and γ -type, and odd-number β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe crystals are noncentrosymmetric. The spin splittings of the UVB and the LCB near the Γ-point in the Brillouin zone are finite, but still smaller than those in a zinc-blende semiconductor such as GaAs. On the other hand, the spin splitting is zero in centrosymmetric bulk and even-number few-layer β-type GaS, GaSe, and InSe, owing to the constraint of spatial inversion symmetry. By contrast, GaTe exhibits zero spin splitting because it is centrosymmetric down to a single layer. In these monochalcogenide semiconductors, the separation of the non-degenerate conduction and valence bands from adjacent bands results in the suppression of Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism. Therefore, the electron- and hole-spin relaxation times in these systems with zero or minimal spin splittings are expected to exceed those in GaAs when the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation mechanism is also suppressed.

  15. The 2D lingual appliance system.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio

    2013-09-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) lingual bracket system represents a valuable treatment option for adult patients seeking a completely invisible orthodontic appliance. The ease of direct or simplified indirect bonding of 2D lingual brackets in combination with low friction mechanics makes it possible to achieve a good functional and aesthetic occlusion, even in the presence of a severe malocclusion. The use of a self-ligating bracket significantly reduces chair-side time for the orthodontist, and the low-profile bracket design greatly improves patient comfort. PMID:24005953

  16. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  17. Measurement of 2D birefringence distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Masato; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Masahiro; Tachihara, Satoru

    1992-10-01

    A new measuring method of 2-D birefringence distribution has been developed. It has not been an easy job to get a birefringence distribution in an optical element with conventional ellipsometry because of its lack of scanning means. Finding an analogy between the rotating analyzer method in ellipsometry and the phase-shifting method in recently developed digital interferometry, we have applied the phase-shifting algorithm to ellipsometry, and have developed a new method that makes the measurement of 2-D birefringence distribution easy and possible. The system contains few moving parts, assuring reliability, and measures a large area of a sample at one time, making the measuring time very short.

  18. A Geophysical Inversion Model Enhancement Technique Based on the Blind Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, B.; Hu, X.; Li, H.

    2011-12-01

    A model-enhancement technique is proposed to enhance the geophysical inversion model edges and details without introducing any additional information. Firstly, the theoretic correctness of the proposed geophysical inversion model-enhancement technique is discussed. An inversion MRM (model resolution matrix) convolution approximating PSF (Point Spread Function) method is designed to demonstrate the correctness of the deconvolution model enhancement method. Then, a total-variation regularization blind deconvolution geophysical inversion model-enhancement algorithm is proposed. In previous research, Oldenburg et al. demonstrate the connection between the PSF and the geophysical inverse solution. Alumbaugh et al. propose that more information could be provided by the PSF if we return to the idea of it behaving as an averaging or low pass filter. We consider the PSF as a low pass filter to enhance the inversion model basis on the theory of the PSF convolution approximation. Both the 1D linear and the 2D magnetotelluric inversion examples are used to analyze the validity of the theory and the algorithm. To prove the proposed PSF convolution approximation theory, the 1D linear inversion problem is considered. It shows the ratio of convolution approximation error is only 0.15%. The 2D synthetic model enhancement experiment is presented. After the deconvolution enhancement, the edges of the conductive prism and the resistive host become sharper, and the enhancement result is closer to the actual model than the original inversion model according the numerical statistic analysis. Moreover, the artifacts in the inversion model are suppressed. The overall precision of model increases 75%. All of the experiments show that the structure details and the numerical precision of inversion model are significantly improved, especially in the anomalous region. The correlation coefficient between the enhanced inversion model and the actual model are shown in Fig. 1. The figure

  19. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  20. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  1. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.; Vronsky, Tomas; Gaudern, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils.

  2. Integration of 2-D hydraulic model and high-resolution LiDAR-derived DEM for floodplain flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, D.; Wang, J.; Cheng, X.; Rui, Y.; Ye, S.

    2015-02-01

    The rapid progress of Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) technology has made acquirement and application of high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data increasingly popular, especially with regards to the study of floodplain flow modeling. High-resolution DEM data include many redundant interpolation points, needs a high amount of calculation, and does not match the size of computational mesh. These disadvantages are a common problem for floodplain flow modeling studies. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydraulic modeling, a popular method of analyzing floodplain flow, offers high precision of elevation parameterization for computational mesh while ignoring much micro-topographic information of the DEM data itself. We offer a flood simulation method that integrates 2-D hydraulic model results and high-resolution DEM data, enabling the calculation of flood water levels in DEM grid cells through local inverse distance weighted interpolation. To get rid of the false inundation areas during interpolation, it employs the run-length encoding method to mark the inundated DEM grid cells and determine the real inundation areas through the run-length boundary tracing technique, which solves the complicated problem of the connectivity between DEM grid cells. We constructed a 2-D hydraulic model for the Gongshuangcha polder, a flood storage area of Dongting Lake, using our integrated method to simulate the floodplain flow. The results demonstrate that this method can solve DEM associated problems efficiently and simulate flooding processes with greater accuracy than DEM only simulations.

  3. Comparison of seismic waveform inversion results for the rupture history of a finite fault: application to the 1986 North Palm Springs, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.

    1989-01-01

    The July 8, 1986, North Palm Strings earthquake is used as a basis for comparison of several different approaches to the solution for the rupture history of a finite fault. The inversion of different waveform data is considered; both teleseismic P waveforms and local strong ground motion records. Linear parametrizations for slip amplitude are compared with nonlinear parametrizations for both slip amplitude and rupture time. Inversions using both synthetic and empirical Green's functions are considered. In general, accurate Green's functions are more readily calculable for the teleseismic problem where simple ray theory and flat-layered velocity structures are usually sufficient. However, uncertainties in the variation in t* with frequency most limit the resolution of teleseismic inversions. A set of empirical Green's functions that are well recorded at teleseismic distances could avoid the uncertainties in attenuation. In the inversion of strong motion data, the accurate calculation of propagation path effects other than attenuation effects is the limiting factor in the resolution of source parameters. -from Author

  4. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  5. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits. PMID:26813882

  6. Baby universes in 2d quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, Jan; Jain, Sanjay; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1993-06-01

    We investigate the fractal structure of 2d quantum gravity, both for pure gravity and for gravity coupled to multiple gaussian fields and for gravity coupled to Ising spins. The roughness of the surfaces is described in terms of baby universes and using numerical simulations we measure their distribution which is related to the string susceptibility exponent γstring.

  7. Creation of a scalar potential in 2D dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Behrndt, K.

    1994-09-01

    The authors investigate quantum corrections of the 2-d dilaton gravity near the singularity. Their motivation comes from a s-wave reduced cosmological solution which is classically singular in the scalar fields (dilaton and moduli). As a result they find, that the singularity disappears and a dilaton/moduli potential is created.

  8. On Regularity Criteria for the 2D Generalized MHD System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zaihong; Wang, Yanan; Zhou, Yong

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of regularity criteria for the 2D generalized MHD system with fractional dissipative terms {-Λ^{2α}u} for the velocity field and {-Λ^{2β}b} for the magnetic field respectively. Various regularity criteria are established to guarantee smoothness of solutions. It turns out that our regularity criteria imply previous global existence results naturally.

  9. RADMC: A 2-D Continuum Radiative Transfer Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullemond, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    RADMC is a 2-D Monte-Carlo code for dust continuum radiative transfer circumstellar disks and envelopes. It is based on the method of Bjorkman & Wood (ApJ 2001, 554, 615), but with several modifications to produce smoother results with fewer photon packages.

  10. Strain-driven band inversion and topological aspects in Antimonene

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingwen; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Linyang

    2015-01-01

    Searching for the two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs) with large bulk band gaps is the key to achieve room-temperature quantum spin Hall effect (QSHE). Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrated that the recently-proposed antimonene [Zhang et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 54, 3112–3115 (2015)] can be tuned to a 2D TI by reducing the buckling height of the lattice which can be realized under tensile strain. The strain-driven band inversion in the vicinity of the Fermi level is responsible for the quantum phase transition. The buckled configuration of antimonene enables it to endure large tensile strain up to 18% and the resulted bulk band gap can be as large as 270 meV. The tunable bulk band gap makes antimonene a promising candidate material for achieving quantum spin Hall effect (QSH) at high temperatures which meets the requirement of future electronic devices with low power consumption. PMID:26537994

  11. Integrated inversion using combined wave-equation tomography and full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyang; Singh, Satish C.; Calandra, Henri

    2014-07-01

    Wave-equation tomography (WT) and full waveform inversion (FWI) are combined through a hybrid misfit function to estimate high-resolution subsurface structures starting from a poorly constrained initial velocity model. Both methods share the same wavefield forward modelling and inversion schemes, while they differ only on the ways to calculate misfit functions and hence the ways to sample in the model space. Aiming at minimizing the cross-correlation phase delay between synthetic and real data, WT can be used to retrieve the long- and middle-wavelength model components, which are essential to FWI. Compared to ray-based traveltime tomography that is based on asymptotic high-frequency approximation, WT provides a better resolution by exploring the band-limited feature of seismic wavefield. On the other hand, FWI is capable of resolving the short-wavelength model component, complementing the WT. In this study, we apply WT to surface first-arrival refraction data, and apply FWI to both refraction and reflection data. We assign adaptive weights to the two different misfit measurements and build a progressive inversion strategy. To illustrate the advantage of our strategy over conventional `ray tomography + FWI' approach, we show in a synthetic lens test that WT can provide extra subsurface information that is critical for a successful FWI application. To further show the efficiency, we test our strategy on the 2-D Marmousi model where satisfactory inversion results are achieved without much manual intervention. Finally, we apply the inversion strategy to a deep-water seismic data set acquired offshore Sumatra with a 12-km-long streamer. In order to alleviate several practical problems posed by the deep-water setting, we apply downward continuation (DC) to generate a virtual ocean bottom experiment data set prior to inversion. The new geometry after DC boosts up the shallow refractions, as well as avoiding cumbersome modelling through the thick water column, thus

  12. Gravity and Seismic Tomography Joint Inversion: A synthetic study modelling magmatic massive sulphide type bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter-McAuslan, Angela; Lelievre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin

    2013-04-01

    Gravity methods have long been used in mineral exploration. However, gravity methods have difficulty resolving small details. Seismic methods provide high resolving potential for use in mineral exploration. However, complicated hard-rock geology can make seismic data processing and interpretation difficult. By jointly inverting seismic tomography data with gravity data these difficulty may be overcome. We investigated the viability of deterministic minimum-structure style joint inversion of seismic traveltime and gravity data for the delineation of magmatic massive sulphide type geological targets. These tests also assessed the potential of employing borehole gravity. A number of synthetic Earth models were created. These models were built on triangular unstructured meshes, allowing for efficient generation of complicated, realistic geological structures. 2D models were based on conceptualized models of the magmatic massive sulphide body similar to the Eastern Deeps of the Voisey's Bay, Labrador, Canada. Single property and joint inversions were performed with seismic traveltimes and both ground-based and borehole gravity. There is a known relationship between seismic velocity and density for both silicate rocks and sulphide minerals for the models constructed; this lithological relationship was used to design an appropriate coupling strategy in the joint inversions. Joint inversions were able to successfully locate a buried high contrast target with a variety of survey designs. 2D inversions results provided guidance to 3D inversion. Experimentation with noise levels, mesh design, and various inversion parameters has led to a better understanding of how to practically apply joint inversion of traveltimes and gravity data to this and similar exploration problems.

  13. Inverse Floatation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Anish; Chatterjee, Souvick; Ganguly, Ranjan; Sen, Swarnendu; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    We have observed that capillarity forces may cause floatation in a few non-intuitive configurations. These may be divided into 2 categories: i) floatation of heavier liquid droplets on lighter immiscible ones and ii) fully submerged floatation of lighter liquid droplets in a heavier immiscible medium. We call these counter-intuitive because of the inverse floatation configuration. For case (i) we have identified and studied in detail the several factors affecting the shape and maximum volume of the floating drop. We used water and vegetable oil combinations as test fluids and established the relation between Bond Number and maximum volume contained in a floating drop (in the order of μL). For case (ii), we injected vegetable oil drop-wise into a pool of water. The fully submerged configuration of the drop is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number establishes the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also shows the temporal variation of the gap thickness. Jadavpur University, Jagadis Bose Centre of Excellence, Virginia Tech.

  14. A new sequence for shaped voxel spectroscopy in the human brain using 2D spatially selective excitation and parallel transmission.

    PubMed

    Waxmann, Patrick; Mekle, Ralf; Schubert, Florian; Brühl, Rüdiger; Kuehne, Andre; Lindel, Tomasz D; Seifert, Frank; Speck, Oliver; Ittermann, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Spatially selective excitation in two dimensions (2D-SSE) utilizing parallel transmission was applied as a means to acquire signal from voxels adapted to the anatomy of interest for in vivo (1) H MR spectroscopy. A novel method to select spectroscopy voxels with arbitrary shapes in two dimensions was investigated. An on-off scheme with an adiabatic slice selective inversion pulse preceding a 2D-SSE pulse together with a segmented inward spiral excitation k-space trajectory enabled rapid free induction decay acquisitions. Performance of the sequence was evaluated in simulations, phantom experiments, and in vivo measurements at 3 T. High spatial fidelity of the excitation profile was achieved for different target shapes and with little off-resonance deterioration. Metabolite concentrations in human brain determined with the new sequence were quantified with Cramér-Rao lower bounds less than 20%. They were in the physiological range and did not deviate systematically from results acquired with a conventional SPECIAL sequence. In conclusion, a new approach for shaped voxel MRS in the human brain is presented, which complements existing sequences. Simulations show that 2D-SSE pulses yield reduced chemical shift artifact when compared with conventional localization methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27254102

  15. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  16. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  17. Calculating tissue shear modulus and pressure by 2D Log-Elastographic methods.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Joyce R; Zhang, Ning; Manduca, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Shear modulus imaging, often called elastography, enables detection and characterization of tissue abnormalities. In this paper the data is two displacement components obtained from successive MR or ultrasound data sets acquired while the tissue is excited mechanically. A 2D plane strain elastic model is assumed to govern the 2D displacement, u. The shear modulus, μ, is unknown and whether or not the first Lamé parameter, λ, is known the pressure p = λ∇ · u which is present in the plane strain model cannot be measured and is unreliably computed from measured data and can be shown to be an order one quantity in the units kPa. So here we present a 2D Log-Elastographic inverse algorithm that: (1) simultaneously reconstructs the shear modulus, μ, and p, which together satisfy a first order partial differential equation system, with the goal of imaging μ; (2) controls potential exponential growth in the numerical error; and (3) reliably reconstructs the quantity p in the inverse algorithm as compared to the same quantity computed with a forward algorithm. This work generalizes the Log-Elastographic algorithm in [20] which uses one displacement component, is derived assuming the component satisfies the wave equation, and is tested on synthetic data computed with the wave equation model. The 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm is tested on 2D synthetic data and 2Din-vivo data from Mayo Clinic. We also exhibit examples to show that the 2D Log-Elastographic algorithm improves the quality of the recovered images as compared to the Log-Elastographic and Direct Inversion algorithms. PMID:21822349

  18. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  19. A Parallel Processing Algorithm for Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasheri, Neki; Bushati, Salvatore; Frasheri, Alfred

    2013-04-01

    The paper presents results of using MPI parallel processing for the 3D inversion of gravity anomalies. The work is done under the FP7 project HP-SEE (http://www.hp-see.eu/). The inversion of geophysical anomalies remains a challenge, and the use of parallel processing can be a tool to achieve better results, "compensating" the complexity of the ill-posed problem of inversion with the increase of volume of calculations. We considered the gravity as the simplest case of physical fields and experimented an algorithm based in the methodology known as CLEAN and developed by Högbom in 1974. The 3D geosection was discretized in finite cuboid elements and represented by a 3D array of nodes, while the ground surface where the anomaly is observed as a 2D array of points. Starting from a geosection with mass density zero in all nodes, iteratively the algorithm defines the 3D node that offers the best anomaly shape that approximates the observed anomaly minimizing the least squares error; the mass density in the best 3D node is modified with a prefixed density step and the related effect subtracted from the observed anomaly; the process continues until some criteria is fulfilled. Theoretical complexity of he algorithm was evaluated on the basis of iterations and run-time for a geosection discretized in different scales. We considered the average number N of nodes in one edge of the 3D array. The order of number of iterations was evaluated O(N^3); and the order of run-time was evaluated O(N^8). We used several different methods for the identification of the 3D node which effect offers the best least squares error in approximating the observed anomaly: unweighted least squares error for the whole 2D array of anomalous points; weighting least squares error by the inverted value of observed anomaly over each 3D node; and limiting the area of 2D anomalous points where least squares are calculated over shallow 3D nodes. By comparing results from the inversion of single body and two

  20. 2-D nonlinear IIR-filters for image processing - An exploratory analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P. H.; Sartori, M.

    1991-01-01

    A new nonlinear IIR filter structure is introduced and its deterministic properties are analyzed. It is shown to be better suited for image processing applications than its linear shift-invariant counterpart. The new structure is obtained from causality inversion of a 2D quarterplane causal linear filter with respect to the two directions of propagation. It is demonstrated, that by using this design, a nonlinear 2D lowpass filter can be constructed, which is capable of effectively suppressing Gaussian or impulse noise without destroying important image information.

  1. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  2. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  3. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  4. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  5. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  6. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  7. TACO (2D AND 3D). Taco

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1983-03-01

    A set of finite element codes for the solution of nonlinear, two-dimensional (TACO2D) and three-dimensional (TACO3D) heat transfer problems. Performs linear and nonlinear analyses of both transient and steady state heat transfer problems. Has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties. Materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, radiation, and internal heat generation.

  8. Gravity inversion and uncertainty assessment of basement relief via Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallero, J. L. G.; Fernández-Martínez, J. L.; Bonvalot, S.; Fudym, O.

    2015-05-01

    Gravity inversion is a classical tool in applied geophysics that corresponds, both, to a linear (density unknown) or nonlinear (geometry unknown) inverse problem depending on the model parameters. Inversion of basement relief of sedimentary basins is an important application among the nonlinear techniques. A common way to approach this problem consists in discretizing the basin using polygons (or other geometries), and iteratively solving the nonlinear inverse problem by local optimization. Nevertheless, this kind of approach is highly dependent of the prior information that is used and lacks from a correct solution appraisal (nonlinear uncertainty analysis). In this paper, we present the application of a full family Particle Swarm Optimizers (PSO) to the 2D gravity inversion and model appraisal (uncertainty assessment) of basement relief in sedimentary basins. The application of these algorithms to synthetic and real cases (a gravimetric profile from Atacama Desert in north Chile) shows that it is possible to perform a fast inversion and uncertainty assessment of the gravimetric model using a sampling while optimizing procedure. Besides, the parameters of these exploratory PSO optimizers are automatically tuned and selected based on stability criteria. We also show that the result is robust to the presence of noise in data. The fact that these algorithms do not require large computational resources makes them very attractive to solve this kind of gravity inversion problems.

  9. 3D Motion Planning Algorithms for Steerable Needles Using Inverse Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Duindam, Vincent; Xu, Jijie; Alterovitz, Ron; Sastry, Shankar; Goldberg, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Steerable needles can be used in medical applications to reach targets behind sensitive or impenetrable areas. The kinematics of a steerable needle are nonholonomic and, in 2D, equivalent to a Dubins car with constant radius of curvature. In 3D, the needle can be interpreted as an airplane with constant speed and pitch rate, zero yaw, and controllable roll angle. We present a constant-time motion planning algorithm for steerable needles based on explicit geometric inverse kinematics similar to the classic Paden-Kahan subproblems. Reachability and path competitivity are analyzed using analytic comparisons with shortest path solutions for the Dubins car (for 2D) and numerical simulations (for 3D). We also present an algorithm for local path adaptation using null-space results from redundant manipulator theory. Finally, we discuss several ways to use and extend the inverse kinematics solution to generate needle paths that avoid obstacles. PMID:21359051

  10. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Rheological Properties of Quasi-2D Fluids in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Trittel, Torsten; Eremin, Alexey; Harth, Kirsten; Clark, Noel; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Park, Cheol; Hall, Nancy; Tin, Padetha

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research on complex fluids and fluids in restricted geometries has attracted much attention in the scientific community. This can be attributed not only to the development of novel materials based on complex fluids but also to a variety of important physical phenomena which have barely been explored. One example is the behavior of membranes and thin fluid films, which can be described by two-dimensional (2D) rheology behavior that is quite different from 3D fluids. In this study, we have investigated the rheological properties of freely suspended films of a thermotropic liquid crystal in microgravity experiments. This model system mimics isotropic and anisotropic quasi 2D fluids [46]. We use inkjet printing technology to dispense small droplets (inclusions) onto the film surface. The motion of these inclusions provides information on the rheological properties of the films and allows the study of a variety of flow instabilities. Flat films have been investigated on a sub-orbital rocket flight and curved films (bubbles) have been studied in the ISS project OASIS. Microgravity is essential when the films are curved in order to avoid sedimentation. The experiments yield the mobility of the droplets in the films as well as the mutual mobility of pairs of particles. Experimental results will be presented for 2D-isotropic (smectic-A) and 2D-nematic (smectic-C) phases.

  12. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  13. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Sagiv, Adi; Burton, Dominick G A; Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  14. On the edge of an inverse cascade.

    PubMed

    Seshasayanan, Kannabiran; Benavides, Santiago Jose; Alexakis, Alexandros

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate that systems with a parameter-controlled inverse cascade can exhibit critical behavior for which at the critical value of the control parameter the inverse cascade stops. In the vicinity of such a critical point, standard phenomenological estimates for the energy balance will fail since the energy flux towards large length scales becomes zero. We demonstrate this using the computationally tractable model of two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamics in a periodic box. In the absence of any external magnetic forcing, the system reduces to hydrodynamic fluid turbulence with an inverse energy cascade. In the presence of strong magnetic forcing, the system behaves as 2D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with forward energy cascade. As the amplitude of the magnetic forcing is varied, a critical value is met for which the energy flux towards the large scales becomes zero. Close to this point, the energy flux scales as a power law with the departure from the critical point and the normalized amplitude of the fluctuations diverges. Similar behavior is observed for the flux of the square vector potential for which no inverse flux is observed for weak magnetic forcing, while a finite inverse flux is observed for magnetic forcing above the critical point. We conjecture that this behavior is generic for systems of variable inverse cascade. PMID:25493730

  15. Human tumor-derived exosomes down-modulate NKG2D expression.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Aled; Mitchell, J Paul; Court, Jacquelyn; Linnane, Seamus; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2008-06-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor for NK, NKT, CD8(+), and gammadelta(+) T cells, whose aberrant loss in cancer is a key mechanism of immune evasion. Soluble NKG2D ligands and growth factors, such as TGFbeta1 emanating from tumors, are mechanisms for down-regulating NKG2D expression. Cancers thereby impair the capacity of lymphocytes to recognize and destroy them. In this study, we show that exosomes derived from cancer cells express ligands for NKG2D and express TGFbeta1, and we investigate the impact of such exosomes on CD8(+) T and NK cell NKG2D expression and on NKG2D-dependent functions. Exosomes produced by various cancer cell lines in vitro, or isolated from pleural effusions of mesothelioma patients triggered down-regulation of surface NKG2D expression by NK cells and CD8(+) T cells. This decrease was rapid, sustained, and resulted from direct interactions between exosomes and NK cells or CD8(+) T cells. Other markers (CD4, CD8, CD56, CD16, CD94, or CD69) remained unchanged, indicating the selectivity and nonactivatory nature of the response. Exosomal NKG2D ligands were partially responsible for this effect, as down-modulation of NKG2D was slightly attenuated in the presence of MICA-specific Ab. In contrast, TGFbeta1-neutralizing Ab strongly abrogated NKG2D down-modulation, suggesting exosomally expressed TGFbeta as the principal mechanism. Lymphocyte effector function was impaired by pretreatment with tumor exosomes, as these cells exhibited poor NKG2D-dependent production of IFN-gamma and poor NKG2D-dependent killing function. This hyporesponsiveness was evident even in the presence of IL-15, a strong inducer of NKG2D. Our data show that NKG2D is a likely physiological target for exosome-mediated immune evasion in cancer. PMID:18490724

  16. 2D/3D Image Registration using Regression Learning

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Rui; Frederick, Brandon; Mageras, Gig; Chang, Sha; Pizer, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In computer vision and image analysis, image registration between 2D projections and a 3D image that achieves high accuracy and near real-time computation is challenging. In this paper, we propose a novel method that can rapidly detect an object’s 3D rigid motion or deformation from a 2D projection image or a small set thereof. The method is called CLARET (Correction via Limited-Angle Residues in External Beam Therapy) and consists of two stages: registration preceded by shape space and regression learning. In the registration stage, linear operators are used to iteratively estimate the motion/deformation parameters based on the current intensity residue between the target projec-tion(s) and the digitally reconstructed radiograph(s) (DRRs) of the estimated 3D image. The method determines the linear operators via a two-step learning process. First, it builds a low-order parametric model of the image region’s motion/deformation shape space from its prior 3D images. Second, using learning-time samples produced from the 3D images, it formulates the relationships between the model parameters and the co-varying 2D projection intensity residues by multi-scale linear regressions. The calculated multi-scale regression matrices yield the coarse-to-fine linear operators used in estimating the model parameters from the 2D projection intensity residues in the registration. The method’s application to Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) requires only a few seconds and yields good results in localizing a tumor under rigid motion in the head and neck and under respiratory deformation in the lung, using one treatment-time imaging 2D projection or a small set thereof. PMID:24058278

  17. The physics of 2D microfluidic droplet ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatus, Tsevi; Bar-Ziv, Roy H.; Tlusty, Tsvi

    2012-07-01

    We review non-equilibrium many-body phenomena in ensembles of 2D microfluidic droplets. The system comprises of continuous two-phase flow with disc-shaped droplets driven in a channel, at low Reynolds number of 10-4-10-3. The basic physics is that of an effective potential flow, governed by the 2D Laplace equation, with multiple, static and dynamic, boundaries of the droplets and the walls. The motion of the droplets induces dipolar flow fields, which mediate 1/r2 hydrodynamic interaction between the droplets. Summation of these long-range 2D forces over droplet ensembles converges, in contrast to the divergence of the hydrodynamic forces in 3D. In analogy to electrostatics, the strong effect of boundaries on the equations of motion is calculated by means of image dipoles. We first consider the dynamics of droplets flowing in a 1D crystal, which exhibits unique phonon-like excitations, and a variety of nonlinear instabilities-all stemming from the hydrodynamic interactions. Narrowing the channel results in hydrodynamic screening of the dipolar interactions, which changes salient features of the phonon spectra. Shifting from a 1D ordered crystal to 2D disordered ensemble, the hydrodynamic interactions induce collective density waves and shocks, which are superposed on single-droplet randomized motion and dynamic clustering. These collective modes originate from density-velocity coupling, whose outcome is a 1D Burgers equation. The rich observational phenomenology and the tractable theory render 2D droplet ensembles a suitable table-top system for studying non-equilibrium many-body physics with long-range interactions.

  18. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  19. Effect of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) metabolism in vitamin D-deficient rats infused with 1,25-(OH)2D3

    SciTech Connect

    Yamato, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Fukumoto, S.; Ikeda, K.; Ishizuka, S.; Ogata, E.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that administration of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24,25-(OH)2D3) to calcium (Ca)-deficient rats causes a dose-dependent reduction in markedly elevated serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 level. Although the results suggested that the metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 was accelerated by 24,25-(OH)2D3, those experiments could not define whether the enhanced metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 played a role in the reduction in the serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 level. In the present study, in order to address this issue more specifically, serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 was maintained solely by exogenous administration through miniosmotic pumps of 1,25-(OH)2D3 into vitamin D-deficient rats. Thus, by measuring the serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 concentration, the effect of 24,25-(OH)2D3 on the MCR of 1,25-(OH)2D3 could be examined. Administration of 24,25-(OH)2D3 caused a dose-dependent enhancement in the MCR of 1,25-(OH)2D3, and 1 microgram/100 g rat.day 24,25-(OH)2D3, which elevated serum 24,25-(OH)2D3 to 8.6 +/- 1.3 ng/ml, significantly increased MCR and suppressed serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3. The effect of 24,25-(OH)2D3 on 1,25-(OH)2D3 metabolism developed with a rapid time course, and the recovery of iv injected (1 beta-3H)1,25-(OH)2D3 in blood was significantly reduced within 1 h. In addition, there was an increase in radioactivity in the water-soluble fraction of serum as well as in urine, suggesting that 1,25-(OH)2D3 is rapidly degraded to a water-soluble metabolite(s). Furthermore, the reduction in serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 was associated with a reduction in both serum and urinary Ca levels. Because the conversion of (3H)24,25-(OH)2D3 to (3H)1,24,25-(OH)2D3 or other metabolites was minimal in these rats, 24,25-(OH)2D3 appears to act without being converted into other metabolites. These results demonstrate that 24,25-(OH)2D3 rapidly stimulates the metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and reduces its serum level.

  20. Fast Computation of Wideband Beam Pattern for Designing Large-Scale 2-D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Chi, Cheng; Li, Zhaohui

    2016-06-01

    For real-time and high-resolution 3-D ultrasound imaging, the design of sparse distribution and weights of elements of a large-scale wideband 2-D array is needed to reduce hardware cost and achieve better directivity. However, due to the high time consumption of computing the wideband beam pattern, the design methods that need massive iterations have rarely been applied to design large-scale wideband 2-D arrays by directly computing the wideband beam pattern. In this paper, a fast method is proposed to realize the computation of a wideband beam pattern of arbitrary 2-D arrays in the far field in order to design large-scale wideband 2-D arrays. The proposed fast method exploits two important techniques: 1) nonuniform fast Fourier transform (FFT) and 2) short inverse FFT. Compared with the commonly used ultrasound simulator Field II, two orders of magnitude improvement in computation speed is achieved with comparable accuracy. The proposed fast method enables massive iterations of direct wideband beam pattern computation of arbitrary large-scale 2-D arrays. A design example in this paper demonstrates that the proposed fast method can help achieve better performance in designing large-scale wideband 2-D arrays. PMID:27046870

  1. NKG2D Signaling Leads to NK Cell Mediated Lysis of Childhood AML

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Patrick; Ditthard, Kerstin; Lang, Peter; Mezger, Markus; Michaelis, Sebastian; Handgretinger, Rupert; Pfeiffer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells have been shown to be relevant in the recognition and lysis of acute myeloid leukemia. In childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, it was shown that HLA I expression and KIR receptor-ligand mismatch significantly impact ALL cytolysis. We characterized 14 different primary childhood AML blasts by flow cytometry including NKG2D ligands. Further HLA I typing of blasts was performed and HLA I on the AML blasts was quantified. In two healthy volunteer NK cell donors HLA I typing and KIR genotyping were done. Blasts with high NKG2D ligand expression had significantly higher lysis by isolated NK cells. Grouping the blasts by NKG2D ligand expression led to a significant inverse correlation of HLA I expression and cytolysis in NKG2D low blasts. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation of NKG2D ligand expression and blast cytolysis was shown. No impact of KIR ligand-ligand mismatch was found but a significantly increased lysis of homozygous C2 blasts by KIR2DL1 negative NK cells (donor B) was revealed. In conclusion, NKG2D signaling leads to NK cell mediated lysis of childhood AML despite high HLA I expression. PMID:26236752

  2. PC-based artificial neural network inversion for airborne time-domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kai-Guang; Ma, Ming-Yao; Che, Hong-Wei; Yang, Er-Wei; Ji, Yan-Ju; Yu, Sheng-Bao; Lin, Jun

    2012-03-01

    Traditionally, airborne time-domain electromagnetic (ATEM) data are inverted to derive the earth model by iteration. However, the data are often highly correlated among channels and consequently cause ill-posed and over-determined problems in the inversion. The correlation complicates the mapping relation between the ATEM data and the earth parameters and thus increases the inversion complexity. To obviate this, we adopt principal component analysis to transform ATEM data into orthogonal principal components (PCs) to reduce the correlations and the data dimensionality and simultaneously suppress the unrelated noise. In this paper, we use an artificial neural network (ANN) to approach the PCs mapping relation with the earth model parameters, avoiding the calculation of Jacobian derivatives. The PC-based ANN algorithm is applied to synthetic data for layered models compared with data-based ANN for airborne time-domain electromagnetic inversion. The results demonstrate the PC-based ANN advantages of simpler network structure, less training steps, and better inversion results over data-based ANN, especially for contaminated data. Furthermore, the PC-based ANN algorithm effectiveness is examined by the inversion of the pseudo 2D model and comparison with data-based ANN and Zhody's methods. The results indicate that PC-based ANN inversion can achieve a better agreement with the true model and also proved that PC-based ANN is feasible to invert large ATEM datasets.

  3. Three-dimensional transient elastodynamic inversion using the modified error in constitutive relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Marc; Aquino, Wilkins

    2014-10-01

    This work is concerned with large-scale three-dimensional inversion under transient elastodynamic conditions by means of the modified error in constitutive relation (MECR), an energy-based cost functional. A peculiarity of time-domain MECR formulations is that each evaluation involves the computation of two elastodynamic states (one forward, one backward) which moreover are coupled. This coupling creates a major computational bottleneck, making MECR-based inversion difficult for spatially 2D or 3D configurations. To overcome this obstacle, we propose an approach whose main ingredients are (a) setting the entire computational procedure in a consistent time-discrete framework that incorporates the chosen time-stepping algorithm, and (b) using an iterative SOR-like method for the resulting stationarity equations. The resulting MECR-based inversion algorithm is demonstrated on a 3D transient elastodynamic example involving over 500,000 unknown elastic moduli.

  4. Interparticle Attraction in 2D Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-03-01

    Complex (dusty) plasmas allow experimental studies of various physical processes occurring in classical liquids and solids by directly observing individual microparticles. A major problem is that the interaction between microparticles is generally not molecularlike. In this Letter, we propose how to achieve a molecularlike interaction potential in laboratory 2D complex plasmas. We argue that this principal aim can be achieved by using relatively small microparticles and properly adjusting discharge parameters. If experimentally confirmed, this will make it possible to employ complex plasmas as a model system with an interaction potential resembling that of conventional liquids.

  5. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  6. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  7. A scalable 2-D parallel sparse solver

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, S.C.; Mitra, S.

    1995-12-01

    Scalability beyond a small number of processors, typically 32 or less, is known to be a problem for existing parallel general sparse (PGS) direct solvers. This paper presents a parallel general sparse PGS direct solver for general sparse linear systems on distributed memory machines. The algorithm is based on the well-known sequential sparse algorithm Y12M. To achieve efficient parallelization, a 2-D scattered decomposition of the sparse matrix is used. The proposed algorithm is more scalable than existing parallel sparse direct solvers. Its scalability is evaluated on a 256 processor nCUBE2s machine using Boeing/Harwell benchmark matrices.

  8. Formulation of soil hydraulic conductivity from water retention curve, based on data inversion results, interpreted in terms of tortuosity, connectivity and flow turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Gardin, Béryl; Lucas, Yves

    2014-05-01

    In order to refine hydraulic conductivity determination from soil water retention curve, we calculated the correcting factors, by data inversion, using a generalised formulation issued from Burdine or Mualem hydraulic conductivity. These formulations use the laminar flow, obeying Poiseuille law, through a bundle of cylinders of different radii, and correcting factors traducing the gap with real flow and real soil geometry. A general correcting factor is supposed to be proportional to water content, with an exponent a. An inner correcting factor is a function of pore size and/or water content and is inside the integral. We did not presuppose any analytical form for this inner correcting function. We used soil data obtained from clayey Amazonian tropical ferralsols composed of around 7/8 of clay fraction and fine silt (mainly kaolinite with some gibbsite and goethite) and 1/8 of coarse sand (quartz and kaolinite aggregates), with 0,2 to 1,5 % organic carbon content. Data were obtained using three different techniques : high pressurized water extraction disposal, evaporation experiment (Wind method) and in situ infiltration. The explored pore size domain was very large, ranging from 2 micrometers to 2 mm, completed by some data around 0,1 micrometer, so three to four orders of magnitude. We precised pore distribution in the range from 4 nm to 2 micrometers with mercury injection porosimetry corrected from drying effects. The pore distribution is bimodal, with a very small pore volume around 0,25 micrometer pore size. Such pore distribution allows observing separately the effects of pore size and water content on hydraulic conductivity, as water content is not a regularly increasing function of largest filled pores size. The results showed that a general correcting factor as an exponent of water content over all the described domain is inappropriate, as we encountered the smallest spreading of the inner correcting function when the exponent a is zero. The general

  9. A hierarchically porous anatase TiO2 coated-WO3 2D IO bilayer film and its photochromic properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Wu, Huazhong; Xiao, Jiajia; Su, Yanli; Robichaud, Jacques; Brüning, Ralf; Djaoued, Yahia

    2016-01-18

    A hierarchically porous anatase TiO2 coated-WO3 2D inverse opal (IO) bilayer film was fabricated on ITO glass using a layer by layer route with a hierarchically porous TiO2 top layer and an ordered super-macroporous WO3 2D IO bottom layer. This novel TiO2 coated-WO3 2D IO bilayer film was evaluated for photochromic applications. PMID:26576930

  10. A new stationary gridline artifact suppression method based on the 2D discrete wavelet transform

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Hui; Tong, Dan; Dong Bao, Xu; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In digital x-ray radiography, an antiscatter grid is inserted between the patient and the image receptor to reduce scattered radiation. If the antiscatter grid is used in a stationary way, gridline artifacts will appear in the final image. In most of the gridline removal image processing methods, the useful information with spatial frequencies close to that of the gridline is usually lost or degraded. In this study, a new stationary gridline suppression method is designed to preserve more of the useful information. Methods: The method is as follows. The input image is first recursively decomposed into several smaller subimages using a multiscale 2D discrete wavelet transform. The decomposition process stops when the gridline signal is found to be greater than a threshold in one or several of these subimages using a gridline detection module. An automatic Gaussian band-stop filter is then applied to the detected subimages to remove the gridline signal. Finally, the restored image is achieved using the corresponding 2D inverse discrete wavelet transform. Results: The processed images show that the proposed method can remove the gridline signal efficiently while maintaining the image details. The spectra of a 1D Fourier transform of the processed images demonstrate that, compared with some existing gridline removal methods, the proposed method has better information preservation after the removal of the gridline artifacts. Additionally, the performance speed is relatively high. Conclusions: The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. Compared with some existing gridline removal methods, the proposed method can preserve more information within an acceptable execution time.

  11. Graphical representations of DNA as 2-D map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan

    2004-03-01

    We describe a modification of the compact representation of DNA sequences which transforms the sequence into a 2-D diagram in which the 'spots' have integer coordinates. As a result the accompanying numerical characterization of DNA is quite simple and straightforward. This is an important advantage, particularly when considering DNA sequences having thousands of nucleic bases. The approach starts with the compact representation of DNA based on zigzag spiral template used for placing 'spots' associated with binary codes of the nucleic acids and subsequent suppression of the underlying zigzag curve. As a result, a 2-D map is formed in which all 'spots' have integer coordinates. By using only distances between spots having the same x or the same y coordinate one can construct a 'map profile' using integer arithmetic. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin.

  12. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  13. Photocurrent spectroscopy of 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, David

    Confocal photocurrent measurements provide a powerful means of studying many aspects of the optoelectronic and electrical properties of a 2D device or material. At a diffraction-limited point they can provide a detailed absorption spectrum, and they can probe local symmetry, ultrafast relaxation rates and processes, electron-electron interaction strengths, and transport coefficients. We illustrate this with several examples, once being the photo-Nernst effect. In gapless 2D materials, such as graphene, in a perpendicular magnetic field a photocurrent antisymmetric in the field is generated near to the free edges, with opposite sign at opposite edges. Its origin is the transverse thermoelectric current associated with the laser-induced electron temperature gradient. This effect provides an unambiguous demonstration of the Shockley-Ramo nature of long-range photocurrent generation in gapless materials. It also provides a means of investigating quasiparticle properties. For example, in the case of graphene on hBN, it can be used to probe the Lifshitz transition that occurs due to the minibands formed by the Moire superlattice. We also observe and discuss photocurrent generated in other semimetallic (WTe2) and semiconducting (WSe2) monolayers. Work supported by DoE BES and NSF EFRI grants.

  14. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  15. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyaev, Yurii V.; Chertova, Nadezhda V.; Psakhie, Sergei G.

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  16. Multicolor symbology for remotely scannable 2D barcodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, Alexander D.; Sullivan, Timothy M.

    2008-03-01

    There has been much recent interest in mobile systems for augmented reality. However, existing visual tagging solutions are not robust at the low resolutions typical of current camera phones or at the low solid angles needed for "across-the-room" reality augmentation. In this paper, we propose a new 2D barcode symbology that uses multiple colors in order to address these challenges. We present preliminary results, showing the detection of example barcodes in this scheme over a range of angles.

  17. Baby universes and fractal structure of 2d gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1994-04-01

    We extract the string susceptibility exponent γstr by measuring the distribution of baby universes on surfaces in the case of various matter fields coupled to discrete 2d quantum gravity. For c <= 1 the results are in good agreement with the KPZ-formula, if logarithmic corrections are taken into account for c = 1. For c > 1 it is not as clear how to extract γstr but universality with respect to c is observed in the fractal structure.

  18. Collision statistics of inertial particles in two-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence with an inverse cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, Ryo; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the collision statistics of inertial particles in inverse-cascading 2D homogeneous isotropic turbulence by means of a direct numerical simulation (DNS). A collision kernel model for particles with small Stokes number (St) in 2D flows is proposed based on the model of Saffman & Turner (1956) (ST56 model). The DNS results agree with this 2D version of the ST56 model for St < 0.1. It is then confirmed that our DNS results satisfy the 2D version of the spherical formulation of the collision kernel. The fact that the flatness factor stays around 3 in our 2D flow confirms that the present 2D turbulent flow is nearly intermittency-free. Collision statistics for St = 0.1, 0.4 and 0.6, i.e. for St <1, are obtained from the present 2D DNS and compared with those obtained from the three-dimensional (3D) DNS of Onishi et al. (2013). We have observed that the 3D radial distribution function at contact (g(R), the so-called clustering effect) decreases for St = 0.4 and 0.6 with increasing Reynolds number, while the 2D g(R) does not show a significant dependence on Reynolds number. This observation supports the view that the Reynolds-number dependence of g(R) observed in three dimensions is due to internal intermittency of the 3D turbulence. We have further investigated the local St, which is a function of the local flow strain rates, and proposed a plausible mechanism that can explain the Reynolds-number dependence of g(R).

  19. On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, M. B.; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Commer, Michael; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Englert, Andreas L.; Steefel, Carl I.; Hubbard, Susan

    2012-06-11

    We consider a field-scale tracer experiment conducted in 2007 in a shallow uranium-contaminated aquifer at Rifle, Colorado. In developing a reliable approach for inferring hydrological properties at the site through inverse modeling of the tracer data, decisions made on how to parameterize heterogeneity (i.e., how to represent a heterogeneous distribution using a limited number of parameters that are amenable to estimation) are of paramount importance. We present an approach for hydrological inversion of the tracer data and explore, using a 2D synthetic example at first, how parameterization affects the solution, and how additional characterization data could be incorporated to reduce uncertainty. Specifically, we examine sensitivity of the results to the configuration of pilot points used in a geostatistical parameterization, and to the sampling frequency and measurement error of the concentration data. A reliable solution of the inverse problem is found when the pilot point configuration is carefully implemented. In addition, we examine the use of a zonation parameterization, in which the geometry of the geological facies is known (e.g., from geophysical data or core data), to reduce the non-uniqueness of the solution and the number of unknown parameters to be estimated. When zonation information is only available for a limited region, special treatment in the remainder of the model is necessary, such as using a geostatistical parameterization. Finally, inversion of the actual field data is performed using 2D and 3D models, and results are compared with slug test data.

  20. Obtaining T1-T2 distribution functions from 1-dimensional T1 and T2 measurements: The pseudo 2-D relaxation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Nathan H.; Röding, Magnus; Galvosas, Petrik; Miklavcic, Stanley J.; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-08-01

    We present the pseudo 2-D relaxation model (P2DRM), a method to estimate multidimensional probability distributions of material parameters from independent 1-D measurements. We illustrate its use on 1-D T1 and T2 relaxation measurements of saturated rock and evaluate it on both simulated and experimental T1-T2 correlation measurement data sets. Results were in excellent agreement with the actual, known 2-D distribution in the case of the simulated data set. In both the simulated and experimental case, the functional relationships between T1 and T2 were in good agreement with the T1-T2 correlation maps from the 2-D inverse Laplace transform of the full 2-D data sets. When a 1-D CPMG experiment is combined with a rapid T1 measurement, the P2DRM provides a double-shot method for obtaining a T1-T2 relationship, with significantly decreased experimental time in comparison to the full T1-T2 correlation measurement.

  1. Obtaining T1-T2 distribution functions from 1-dimensional T1 and T2 measurements: The pseudo 2-D relaxation model.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Nathan H; Röding, Magnus; Galvosas, Petrik; Miklavcic, Stanley J; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-08-01

    We present the pseudo 2-D relaxation model (P2DRM), a method to estimate multidimensional probability distributions of material parameters from independent 1-D measurements. We illustrate its use on 1-D T1 and T2 relaxation measurements of saturated rock and evaluate it on both simulated and experimental T1-T2 correlation measurement data sets. Results were in excellent agreement with the actual, known 2-D distribution in the case of the simulated data set. In both the simulated and experimental case, the functional relationships between T1 and T2 were in good agreement with the T1-T2 correlation maps from the 2-D inverse Laplace transform of the full 2-D data sets. When a 1-D CPMG experiment is combined with a rapid T1 measurement, the P2DRM provides a double-shot method for obtaining a T1-T2 relationship, with significantly decreased experimental time in comparison to the full T1-T2 correlation measurement. PMID:27344611

  2. Comparison of 1,25(OH)2D3 and 24,25(OH)2D3 in the long-term treatment of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Muirhead, N; Catto, G R; Edward, N; Fraser, R A; O'Riordan, J L; Papapoulos, S E; Adami, S

    1980-01-01

    24,25(OH)2D3 has been compared with 1,25(OH)2D3 in the treatment of renal osteodystrophy. Treatment with 24, 25(OH)2D3 2 micrograms/day for 5-7 months was accompanied by deterioration in clinical, biochemical, radiological and histological features of osteodystrophy with no increase in Ca absorption. In contrast, treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 0.25--1 microgram/day for 6-15 months resulted in rapid improvement in clinical, biochemical, radiological and histological features and a return of Ca absorption to normal. It is concluded that in the dose used 24,25(OH)2D3 alone is not an effective treatment for renal osteodystrophy. PMID:6972529

  3. Disorder-driven loss of phase coherence in a quasi-2D cold atom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, M. C.; Reed, M. E. W.; Hong, T.; Rolston, S. L.

    2012-07-01

    We study the order parameter of a quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) gas of ultracold atoms trapped in an optical potential in the presence of controllable disorder. Our results show that disorder drives phase fluctuations without significantly affecting the amplitude of the quasi-condensate order parameter. This is evidence that disorder can drive phase fluctuations in 2D systems, relevant to the phase-fluctuation mechanism for the superconductor-to-insulator phase transition (SIT) in disordered 2D superconductors.

  4. A super-resolution framework for 3-D high-resolution and high-contrast imaging using 2-D multislice MRI.

    PubMed

    Shilling, Richard Z; Robbie, Trevor Q; Bailloeul, Timothée; Mewes, Klaus; Mersereau, Russell M; Brummer, Marijn E

    2009-05-01

    A novel super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) framework in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is proposed. Its purpose is to produce images of both high resolution and high contrast desirable for image-guided minimally invasive brain surgery. The input data are multiple 2-D multislice inversion recovery MRI scans acquired at orientations with regular angular spacing rotated around a common frequency encoding axis. The output is a 3-D volume of isotropic high resolution. The inversion process resembles a localized projection reconstruction problem. Iterative algorithms for reconstruction are based on the projection onto convex sets (POCS) formalism. Results demonstrate resolution enhancement in simulated phantom studies, and ex vivo and in vivo human brain scans, carried out on clinical scanners. A comparison with previously published SRR methods shows favorable characteristics in the proposed approach. PMID:19272995

  5. Does gravity help to improve seismic inversion for density?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Nienke; Böhm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Density is one of the most important material properties that influence the dynamics of our planet's interior, and knowledge of it alongside with knowledge of seismic velocities will help constrain composition more directly. However, the variation of density inside the Earth is poorly known. The travel times of seismic waves, the classical tool to probe the Earth's interior, are barely sensitive to density (with large tradeoffs) and gravity is so extremely non-unique that very little information can be extracted from it without placing very strong prior constraints. As a result, density has, up until now, usually only been regarded as a derived quantity, which may lead to erroneous interpretations. Here, we aim to determine to what extent it is possible to image density as an independent parameter using modern geophysical techniques. The main technique is seismic (full) waveform inversion, which is more sensitive to density than travel-times alone, for the simple reason that more information of the seismogram is being used: basically the amplitude and phase of every wiggle. We construct synthetic tests in 2-D where density is a completely independent parameter from S-wave velocity and P-wave velocity - this setup (albeit physically unrealistic) has the advantage that our ability to image density independently is assessed in an unbiased way. We find that it is indeed possible to image density using waveform inversion. If prior information, such as constraints on S- and P-velocity structure, is included in the inversion, the results for density are markedly improved. The use of gravity data as an additional observable, however, deteriorates the inversion results. This is because of the significant non-uniqueness of potential field measurements, so that an unconstrained update based on gravity will only almost definitely work to push the inversion in the wrong direction.

  6. Fully automated 2D-3D registration and verification.

    PubMed

    Varnavas, Andreas; Carrell, Tom; Penney, Graeme

    2015-12-01

    Clinical application of 2D-3D registration technology often requires a significant amount of human interaction during initialisation and result verification. This is one of the main barriers to more widespread clinical use of this technology. We propose novel techniques for automated initial pose estimation of the 3D data and verification of the registration result, and show how these techniques can be combined to enable fully automated 2D-3D registration, particularly in the case of a vertebra based system. The initialisation method is based on preoperative computation of 2D templates over a wide range of 3D poses. These templates are used to apply the Generalised Hough Transform to the intraoperative 2D image and the sought 3D pose is selected with the combined use of the generated accumulator arrays and a Gradient Difference Similarity Measure. On the verification side, two algorithms are proposed: one using normalised features based on the similarity value and the other based on the pose agreement between multiple vertebra based registrations. The proposed methods are employed here for CT to fluoroscopy registration and are trained and tested with data from 31 clinical procedures with 417 low dose, i.e. low quality, high noise interventional fluoroscopy images. When similarity value based verification is used, the fully automated system achieves a 95.73% correct registration rate, whereas a no registration result is produced for the remaining 4.27% of cases (i.e. incorrect registration rate is 0%). The system also automatically detects input images outside its operating range. PMID:26387052

  7. Frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion using encoded simultaneous sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, W.; Son, W.; Pyun, S.; Min, D.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, numerous studies have endeavored to develop robust full waveform inversion and migration algorithms. These processes require enormous computational costs, because of the number of sources in the survey. To avoid this problem, the phase encoding technique for prestack migration was proposed by Romero (2000) and Krebs et al. (2009) proposed the encoded simultaneous-source inversion technique in the time domain. On the other hand, Ben-Hadj-Ali et al. (2011) demonstrated the robustness of the frequency-domain full waveform inversion with simultaneous sources for noisy data changing the source assembling. Although several studies on simultaneous-source inversion tried to estimate P- wave velocity based on the acoustic wave equation, seismic migration and waveform inversion based on the elastic wave equations are required to obtain more reliable subsurface information. In this study, we propose a 2-D frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion technique using phase encoding methods. In our algorithm, the random phase encoding method is employed to calculate the gradients of the elastic parameters, source signature estimation and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix. The crosstalk for the estimated source signature and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix are suppressed with iteration as for the gradients. Our 2-D frequency-domain elastic waveform inversion algorithm is composed using the back-propagation technique and the conjugate-gradient method. Source signature is estimated using the full Newton method. We compare the simultaneous-source inversion with the conventional waveform inversion for synthetic data sets of the Marmousi-2 model. The inverted results obtained by simultaneous sources are comparable to those obtained by individual sources, and source signature is successfully estimated in simultaneous source technique. Comparing the inverted results using the pseudo Hessian matrix with previous inversion results

  8. Nut consumption is inversely associated with both cancer and total mortality in a Mediterranean population: prospective results from the Moli-sani study.

    PubMed

    Bonaccio, Marialaura; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; De Curtis, Amalia; Costanzo, Simona; Bracone, Francesca; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2015-09-14

    Nut intake has been associated with reduced inflammatory status and lower risk of CVD and mortality. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between nut consumption and mortality and the role of inflammation. We conducted a population-based prospective investigation on 19 386 subjects enrolled in the Moli-sani study. Food intake was recorded by the Italian version of the European Project Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition FFQ. C-reactive protein, leucocyte and platelet counts and the neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio were used as biomarkers of low-grade inflammation. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using multivariable Cox proportional hazard models. During a median follow-up of 4·3 years, 334 all-cause deaths occurred. As compared with subjects who never ate nuts, rare intake (≤2 times/month) was inversely associated with mortality (multivariable HR=0·68; 95 % CI 0·54, 0·87). At intake ≥8 times/month, a greater protection was observed (HR=0·53; 0·32, 0·90). Nut intake (v. no intake) conveyed a higher protection to individuals poorly adhering to the Mediterranean diet (MD). A significant reduction in cancer deaths (HR=0·64; 95 % CI 0·44, 0·94) was also observed, whereas the impact on CVD deaths was limited to an inverse, but not significant, trend. Biomarkers of low-grade inflammation were reduced in nut consumers but did not account for the association with mortality. In conclusion, nut intake was associated with reduced cancer and total mortality. The protection was stronger in individuals with lower adherence to MD, whereas it was similar in high-risk groups (diabetics, obese, smokers or those with the metabolic syndrome), as compared with low-risk subjects. Inflammation did not explain the observed relationship. PMID:26313936

  9. 2-D and 3-D computations of curved accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to save computer memory, a long accelerator magnet may be computed by treating the long central region and the end regions separately. The dipole magnets for the injector synchrotron of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), employ magnet iron consisting of parallel laminations, stacked with a uniform radius of curvature of 33.379 m. Laplace's equation for the magnetic scalar potential has a different form for a straight magnet (x-y coordinates), a magnet with surfaces curved about a common center (r-{theta} coordinates), and a magnet with parallel laminations like the APS injector dipole. Yet pseudo 2-D computations for the three geometries give basically identical results, even for a much more strongly curved magnet. Hence 2-D (x-y) computations of the central region and 3-D computations of the end regions can be combined to determine the overall magnetic behavior of the magnets. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  10. A 2D MEMS stage for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataman, Caglar; Petremand, Yves; Noell, Wilfried; Ürey, Hakan; Epitaux, Marc; de Rooij, Nico F.

    2006-04-01

    A 2D MEMS platform for a microlens scanner application is reported. The platform is fabricated on an SOI wafer with 50 μm thick device layer. Entire device is defined with a single etching step on the same layer. Through four S-shaped beams, the device is capable of producing nonlinear 2D motion from linear 1D translation of two pairs of comb actuator sets. The device has a clear aperture of 2mm by 2mm, which is hallowed from the backside for micro-optics assembly. In this paper, a numerical device model and its validation via experimental characterization results are presented. Integration of the micro-optical components with the stage is also discussed. Additionally, a new driving scheme to minimize the settling time of the device in DC operation is explored.

  11. Grid Cell Responses in 1D Environments Assessed as Slices through a 2D Lattice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, KiJung; Lewallen, Sam; Kinkhabwala, Amina A; Tank, David W; Fiete, Ila R

    2016-03-01

    Grid cells, defined by their striking periodic spatial responses in open 2D arenas, appear to respond differently on 1D tracks: the multiple response fields are not periodically arranged, peak amplitudes vary across fields, and the mean spacing between fields is larger than in 2D environments. We ask whether such 1D responses are consistent with the system's 2D dynamics. Combining analytical and numerical methods, we show that the 1D responses of grid cells with stable 1D fields are consistent with a linear slice through a 2D triangular lattice. Further, the 1D responses of comodular cells are well described by parallel slices, and the offsets in the starting points of the 1D slices can predict the measured 2D relative spatial phase between the cells. From these results, we conclude that the 2D dynamics of these cells is preserved in 1D, suggesting a common computation during both types of navigation behavior. PMID:26898777

  12. Improved SOLA Inversions of MDI Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, R. M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Schou, J.

    We present a new version of 2d-SOLA, where the target functions have been modified to match the behavior of the mode kernels near the rotation axis and to minimize near-surface contributions. Inversion of artificial data show that these modifications significantly improve the effective resolution near the pole, which allows us to assess the reliability of the high-latitude features seen by other inversion methods. Most importantly, our new inversions seem to confirm the detection of a submerged polar jet previously seen in the 2d-RLS inversions reported by Schou et al. 1998. A test of the robustness of the improved method is carried out by inverting artificial data from the MDI Hare and Hounds exercise. We analyze the averaging kernels and error propagation of the method, and also describe the error-correlation between different points in the solution, the latter being a potential source of spurious features in the solutions as pointed out by Howe and Thompson, 1996. So far, helioseismic datasets given in the form of a-coefficients have been inverted under the assumption that the errors in different a-coefficients are uncorrelated. The MDI peak-bagging procedure, however, does produce estimates of the error-correlation between a-coefficients within the same multiplet. Here we investigate the effect of including this knowledge in the inversions.

  13. Coupled inverse geochemical and microbial reactive transport models in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samper, J.; Yang, C.

    2007-12-01

    Microbial processes play a major role in controlling geochemical conditions in subsurface systems. Various laboratory and in situ experiments have been performed to evaluate the relevance of microbial processes and derive key microbial parameters. Such experiments are often interpreted by suboptimal trial-and-error curve fitting. Here we present an inverse model for coupled flow, reactive solute transport, geochemical and microbial processes which overcomes the limitations of trial-and-error methods by making data interpretation in a systematic, objective, and efficient manner. It extends the capabilities of existing inverse models which deal mostly with flow and chemically-reactive solute transport. Our inverse model relies on the microbial reactive transport code BIOCORE of Samper et al. (2006a) and improves the inverse reactive transport model INVERSE- CORE of Dai and Samper (2004) by allowing the simultaneous estimation of geochemical and microbial parameters. The inverse model has been implemented in a finite element code, INVERSE-BIOCORE2D and its capabilities have been verified and tested with a synthetic experiment involving equilibrium speciation, kinetic sorption/desorption and kinetic biodegradation reactions. Model results indicate that both chemical and microbial parameters can be estimated accurately for error-free data. Estimation errors of microbial parameters are larger than those of kinetic sorption parameters and generally increase with increasing standard deviation of data noise. Estimation error of yield coefficient is the smallest among all microbial parameter and which does not depend on data noise. The inverse model has been used also to estimate microbial parameters of a laboratory experiment involving sucrose fermentation by yeast. Inverse estimation improves significantly the fit to measured data.

  14. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  15. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  16. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  17. Duality Between Spin Networks and the 2D Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Costantino, Francesco; Livine, Etera R.

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to exhibit a deep relation between the partition function of the Ising model on a planar trivalent graph and the generating series of the spin network evaluations on the same graph. We provide respectively a fermionic and a bosonic Gaussian integral formulation for each of these functions and we show that they are the inverse of each other (up to some explicit constants) by exhibiting a supersymmetry relating the two formulations. We investigate three aspects and applications of this duality. First, we propose higher order supersymmetric theories that couple the geometry of the spin networks to the Ising model and for which supersymmetric localization still holds. Secondly, after interpreting the generating function of spin network evaluations as the projection of a coherent state of loop quantum gravity onto the flat connection state, we find the probability distribution induced by that coherent state on the edge spins and study its stationary phase approximation. It is found that the stationary points correspond to the critical values of the couplings of the 2D Ising model, at least for isoradial graphs. Third, we analyze the mapping of the correlations of the Ising model to spin network observables, and describe the phase transition on those observables on the hexagonal lattice. This opens the door to many new possibilities, especially for the study of the coarse-graining and continuum limit of spin networks in the context of quantum gravity.

  18. 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transform for ESPI phase-maps denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante, Nivia; Villa, Jesús; de la Rosa, Ismael; de la Rosa, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Efrén; Gutiérrez, Osvaldo; Olvera, Carlos; Araiza, María

    2013-09-01

    In this work we introduce a 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transform (2-D CWT) method for denoising ESPI phase-maps. Multiresolution analysis with 2-D wavelets can provide high directional sensitivity and high anisotropy which are proper characteristics for this task. In particular, the 2-D CWT method using Gabor atoms (Gabor mother wavelets) which can naturally model phase fringes, has a good performance against noise and can preserve phase fringes. We describe the theoretical basis of the proposed technique and show some experimental results with real and simulated ESPI phase-maps. As can be verified the proposal is robust and effective.

  19. Short wavelength chemical laser demonstration based on N({sup 2}D) chemistry. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-19

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate lasing on the NCl(b{yields}x) transition at 665 nm. Our scheme is based on chemical production of excited nitrogen atoms in the {sup 2}D metastable state and subsequent reaction of N({sup 2}D) with Cl{sub 2} to produce NCl(b). Our intermediate objectives were: (1) demonstrate chemical generation of N({sup 2}D), (2) identify and measure rate constants important to the chemical scheme, and (3) demonstrate production of NCl(b) from the N({sup 2}D) + Cl{sub 2} reaction. The program results and accomplishments are summarized in this report.

  20. The mouse ruby-eye 2(d) (ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) ) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-09-01

    The novel mutation named ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) , characterized by light-colored coats and ruby-eyes, prohibits differentiation of melanocytes by inhibiting tyrosinase (Tyr) activity, expression of Tyr, Tyr-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), Tyrp2, and Kit. However, it is not known whether the ru2(d) allele affects pheomelanin synthesis in recessive yellow (e/Mc1r(e) ) or in pheomelanic stage in agouti (A) mice. In this study, effects of the ru2(d) allele on pheomelanin synthesis were investigated by chemical analysis of melanin present in dorsal hairs of 5-week-old mice from F2 generation between C57BL/10JHir (B10)-co-isogenic ruby-eye 2(d) and B10-congenic recessive yellow or agouti. Eumelanin content was decreased in ruby-eye 2(d) and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice, whereas pheomelanin content in ruby-eye 2(d) recessive yellow and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice did not differ from the corresponding Ru2(d) /- mice, suggesting that the ru2(d) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis. PMID:23672590

  1. Probabilistic inversion in the context of EM studies: Where we are and avenues for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Niklas; Rosas-Carbajal, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Modern Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms can explore the posterior distribution of highly non-linear inverse problems in moderately high dimensions. For instance, 2-D magnetotelluric inversion is feasible for several hundreds of independent model parameters. At present, 3-D applications are limited to a few tenths of model parameters, but even such low dimensions make MCMC useful in time-lapse inversions when using appropriate model parameterizations. It is straightforward to invert for the noise level of the data (i.e., hierarchical Bayes) and the appropriate strength of the prior constraints (i.e., empirical Bayes). It is even possible to consider the dimension of the problem as an unknown (i.e., reversible-jump or transdimensional inversion). Nevertheless, persistent problems that plague MCMC inversions in geophysics include the choice of the prior probability density function, overly simplistic descriptions of data and modeling errors in the likelihood function, as well as truncation errors or spectral leakage that are inevitable when describing the Earth by a finite number of parameters. This leads to uncertainty estimates that often are overly optimistic (or alternatively limited by a too restrictive set of hypotheses) and final results that at times are only vaguely more informative than those obtained by classical Occam inversions. We argue that formal model selection, multiple-point statistics and approximate Bayesian computation may offer solutions to overcome some of these outstanding issues.

  2. Development of 2D SIP Data Processing Software for a Metallic Mineral Deposit Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARK, M.; Kim, K. S.; Seo, H. K.; Son, J.; Park, S.; Kim, C.; Kim, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    algorithm, we could get more reliable inversion result for the time-domain IP data. Therefore, it is expected the SIP method should be more popular if the developed 2D SIP processing software is widely used.

  3. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  4. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  5. F-theory and 2d (0, 2) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura; Weigand, Timo

    2016-05-01

    F-theory compactified on singular, elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau five-folds gives rise to two-dimensional gauge theories preserving N = (0 , 2) supersymmetry. In this paper we initiate the study of such compactifications and determine the dictionary between the geometric data of the elliptic fibration and the 2d gauge theory such as the matter content in terms of (0 , 2) superfields and their supersymmetric couplings. We study this setup both from a gauge-theoretic point of view, in terms of the partially twisted 7-brane theory, and provide a global geometric description based on the structure of the elliptic fibration and its singularities. Global consistency conditions are determined and checked against the dual M-theory compactification to one dimension. This includes a discussion of gauge anomalies, the structure of the Green-Schwarz terms and the Chern-Simons couplings in the dual M-theory supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Furthermore, by interpreting the resulting 2d (0 , 2) theories as heterotic worldsheet theories, we propose a correspondence between the geometric data of elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau five-folds and the target space of a heterotic gauged linear sigma-model (GLSM). In particular the correspondence between the Landau-Ginsburg and sigma-model phase of a 2d (0 , 2) GLSM is realized via different T-branes or gluing data in F-theory.

  6. Dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability and venturesomeness.

    PubMed

    Bernow, Nina; Yakushev, Igor; Landvogt, Christian; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Smolka, Michael N; Bartenstein, Peter; Lieb, Klaus; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Fehr, Christoph

    2011-08-30

    The construct of impulsivity is considered as a major trait of personality. There is growing evidence that the mesolimbic dopamine system plays an important role in the modulation of impulsivity and venturesomeness, the two key components within the impulsivity-construct. The aim of the present study was to explore an association between trait impulsivity measured with self-assessment and the dopaminergic neurotransmission as measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in a cohort of healthy male subjects. In vivo D2/D3 receptor availability was determined with [(18)F]fallypride PET in 18 non-smoking healthy subjects. The character trait impulsivity was measured using the Impulsiveness-Venturesomeness-Empathy questionnaire (I7). Image processing and statistical analysis was performed on a voxel-by-voxel basis using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software. The I7 subscale venturesomeness correlated positively with the D2/D3 receptor availability within the left temporal cortex and the thalamus. Measures on the I7 subscale impulsiveness and empathy did not correlate with the D2/D3 receptor availability in any brain region investigated. Our results suggest the involvement of extrastriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission in venturesomeness, a component of impulsivity. PMID:21689908

  7. Characterization of Porous Medium Properties Using 2D NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Boqin; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2003-03-01

    We have successfully applied the concept of 2D NMR to the characterization of properties of fluid-saturated porous medium. Using a two-windowed modified CPMG pulse sequence, we were able to explore the magnetic internal filed gradient distribution within the pore space of a fluid-saturated porous medium due to magnetic susceptibility contrast between the solid matrix and pore fluid. Similar scheme is used to identify and quantify different types of pore fluids, such as oil, water, and gas, based on the contrast in their diffusion coefficients. The magic angle spinning technique (MAS) can also be applied in the 2D NMR framework for delineating the chemical shift spectra of the pore fluids in a porous medium at different T1 or T2 relaxation times. The results can be displayed in a two-dimensional plot, with one axis being the T1 or T2 relaxation times, the other axis being the internal field gradient, diffusion coefficient, or chemical shift, and the third axis being the proton population. Our preliminary laboratory work indicates that the 2D NMR approach can be a powerful tool for the characterization of properties of fluid-saturated porous medium, such as fluid typing, oil viscosity determination, surface wettability, etc.

  8. Surface origin of quasi-2D Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in Bi2Te2Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, A. A.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Bozhko, S. I.; Borisenko, D. N.; Kolesnikov, N. N.

    2015-08-01

    Transport measurements at liquid helium temperatures were done on a number of Bi2Te2Se samples with thicknesses ranging from 30 to 200 μm in order to detect surface states. In each sample we observed Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations and sublinear dependence of off-diagonal component of magnetoresistance tensor on magnetic field. The periods of SdH oscillations in inverse magnetic field were found to be the same within 15%. The positions of SdH oscillations are determined by the normal to surface component of magnetic field. We found that the measured conductivity can be well described by a model with two groups of electrons, 2D and 3D. The conductivity of 2D electrons was found to be relatively weakly varying from sample to sample and not depending on thickness in a systematic manner. This behavior can be explained only by their localization on the surface. Comparison of the results of magnetotransport measurements with our scanning tunneling spectroscopy results on atomically smooth Bi2Te2Se surface in ultrahigh vacuum led us to conclude that the surface electrons are separated from the bulk electrons by a depletion layer approximately 100 nm thick. This effect could provide the dominant contribution of surface electrons to conductivity in samples with thicknesses less than 200 nm.

  9. The Relationship Between Digit Ratio (2D:4D) and Sexual Orientation in Men from China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yin; Zheng, Yong

    2016-04-01

    We examined the relationship between 2D:4D digit ratio and sexual orientation in men from China and analyzed the influences of the components used to assess sexual orientation and the criteria used to classify individuals as homosexual on this relationship. A total of 309 male and 110 female participants took part in a web-based survey. Our results showed that heterosexual men had a significantly lower 2D:4D than heterosexual women and exclusively homosexual men had a significantly higher left 2D:4D than heterosexual men whereas only exclusively homosexual men had a significantly higher right 2D:4D than heterosexual men when sexual orientation was assessed via sexual attraction. The left 2D:4D showed a significant positive correlation with sexual identity, sexual attraction, and sexual behavior, and the right 2D:4D showed a significant positive correlation with sexual attraction. The effect sizes for differences in 2D:4D between homosexual and heterosexual men varied according to criteria used to classify individuals as homosexual and sexual orientation components; the more stringent the criteria (scores closer to the homosexual category), the larger the effect sizes; further, sexual attraction yielded the largest effect size. There were no significant effects of age and latitude on Chinese 2D:4D. This study contributes to the current understanding of the relationship between 2D:4D and male sexual orientation. PMID:25957135

  10. Thermopower enhancement by fractional layer control in 2D oxide superlattices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Seok; Ohta, Hiromichi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-10-22

    Precise tuning of the 2D carrier density by using fractional δ-doping of d electrons improves the thermoelectric properties of oxide heterostructures. This promising result can be attributed to the anisotropic band structure in the 2D system, indicating that δ-doped oxide superlattices are good candidates for advanced thermoelectrics. PMID:25066105

  11. 3D Inversion of complex resistivity data: Case study on Mineral Exploration Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jeong-Sul; Kim, Jung-ho; Park, Sam-gyu; Park, My-Kyung

    2016-04-01

    Complex resistivity (CR) method is a frequency domain induced polarization (IP) method. It is also known as Spectral IP (SIP) method, if wider frequencies are used in data acquisition and interpretation. Although it takes more times than conventional time domain IP method, its data quality is more stable because its data acquisition which measures amplitude and phase is done when the source current is being injected. Our research group has been studying the modeling and inversion algorithms of complex resistivity (CR) method since several years ago and recently applied developed algorithms to various real field application. Due to tough terrain in our country, Profile survey and 2D interpretation were generally used. But to get more precise interpretation, three dimensional modeling and inversion algorithm is required. We developed three dimensional inversion algorithm for this purpose. In the inversion, we adopt the method of adaptive lagraingian multiplier which is automatically set based on the size of error misfit and model regularization norm. It was applied on the real data acquired for mineral exploration sites. CR data was acquired with the Zeta system, manufactured by Zonge Co. In the inversion, only the lower frequency data is used considering its quality and developed 3D inversion algorithm was applied to the acquired data set. Its results were compared to those of time domain IP data conducted at the same site. Resistivity image sections of CR and conventional resistivity method were almost identical. Phase anomalies were well matched with chargeability anomalies and the mining history of the test site. Each anomalies were well discriminated in 3D interpretation than those of 2D. From those experiments, we know that CR method was very effective for the mineral exploration.

  12. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  13. Finite Element Analysis of 2-D Elastic Contacts Involving FGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhilash, M. N.; Murthy, H.

    2014-05-01

    The response of elastic indenters in contact with Functionally Graded Material (FGM) coated homogeneous elastic half space has been presented in the current paper. Finite element analysis has been used due to its ability to handle complex geometry, material, and boundary conditions. Indenters of different typical surface profiles have been considered and the problem has been idealized as a two-dimensional (2D) plane strain problem considering only normal loads. Initially, indenters were considered to be rigid and the results were validated with the solutions presented in the literature. The analysis has then been extended to the case of elastic indenters on FGM-coated half spaces and the results are discussed.

  14. Electrical conductivity of the Iapetus Suture Zone Scotland, revisited with 3D inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckmann, U.; Toelg, D.; Ritter, O.

    2012-12-01

    The electrical conductivity structure of the crust beneath the Southern Uplands of Scotland has been investigated with electromagnetic and magneto-variational studies since the early 1970ies. The Southern Uplands formed in Ordovician and Silurian times as an accretionary prism on the Laurentian margin of the Iapetus Ocean as overthrusted wedges of sediments bounded by thrust faults. A pronounced zone of high electrical conductivity extending in northeast to southwest direction for at least 150 km was a common feature of many of these studies. The anomaly follows major structural trends of the Caledonian orogeny, such as the Southern Uplands Fault, the Orlock Bridge Fault and the Moniave Shear Zone. Graphite enrichment at mid-crustal levels trapped during the closure of the Iapetus Ocean or in detachment zones was discussed as possible causes for the high conductivity. In 1997, a high resolution MT experiment was conducted in southwestern Scotland across the most prominent faults. The station distribution, with an average spacing of 1-2km, concentrated on three parallel NW-SE profiles perpendicular to the tectonic structures and a strike parallel profile. Strike and dimensionality analyses indicated three-dimensional subsurface structures which also became evident in phases exceeding 90°. Nevertheless, 2D inversion of a sub-set of data revealed good spatial correlation of conductive zones and surface expressions of known faults. The 2D inversion results supported a mid-crustal detachment zone. However, some of the smaller profiles as well as the strike parallel profile could not be interpreted adequately with a 2D approach. Since 3D inversion algorithms are now available, we present a re-interpretation of the MT data set. We reprocessed the time series to improve estimates of the full impedance tensor for subsequent 3D inversion. 3D inversion reproduces the main features found along the published profiles. However, significant deviation from a 2D subsurface can be

  15. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  16. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse. PMID:26988702

  17. Parallel map analysis on 2-D grids

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.; Comiskey, J.; Minser, K.

    1993-12-31

    In landscape ecology, computer modeling is used to assess habitat fragmentation and its ecological iMPLications. Specifically, maps (2-D grids) of habitat clusters must be analyzed to determine number, sizes and geometry of clusters. Models prior to this study relied upon sequential Fortran-77 programs which limited the sizes of maps and densities of clusters which could be analyzed. In this paper, we present more efficient computer models which can exploit recursion or parallelism. Significant improvements over the original Fortran-77 programs have been achieved using both recursive and nonrecursive C implementations on a variety of workstations such as the Sun Sparc 2, IBM RS/6000-350, and HP 9000-750. Parallel implementations on a 4096-processor MasPar MP-1 and a 32-processor CM-5 are also studied. Preliminary experiments suggest that speed improvements for the parallel model on the MasPar MP-1 (written in MPL) and on the CM-5 (written in C using CMMD) can be as much as 39 and 34 times faster, respectively, than the most efficient sequential C program on a Sun Sparc 2 for a 512 map. An important goal in this research effort is to produce a scalable map analysis algorithm for the identification and characterization of clusters for relatively large maps on massively-parallel computers.

  18. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  19. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  20. Integration of 2-D hydraulic model and high-resolution lidar-derived DEM for floodplain flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, D.; Wang, J.; Cheng, X.; Rui, Y.; Ye, S.

    2015-08-01

    The rapid progress of lidar technology has made the acquirement and application of high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data increasingly popular, especially in regards to the study of floodplain flow. However, high-resolution DEM data pose several disadvantages for floodplain modeling studies; e.g., the data sets contain many redundant interpolation points, large numbers of calculations are required to work with data, and the data do not match the size of the computational mesh. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydraulic modeling, which is a popular method for analyzing floodplain flow, offers highly precise elevation parameterization for computational mesh while ignoring much of the micro-topographic information of the DEM data itself. We offer a flood simulation method that integrates 2-D hydraulic model results and high-resolution DEM data, thus enabling the calculation of flood water levels in DEM grid cells through local inverse distance-weighted interpolation. To get rid of the false inundation areas during interpolation, it employs the run-length encoding method to mark the inundated DEM grid cells and determine the real inundation areas through the run-length boundary tracing technique, which solves the complicated problem of connectivity between DEM grid cells. We constructed a 2-D hydraulic model for the Gongshuangcha detention basin, which is a flood storage area of Dongting Lake in China, by using our integrated method to simulate the floodplain flow. The results demonstrate that this method can solve DEM associated problems efficiently and simulate flooding processes with greater accuracy than simulations only with DEM.

  1. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance pancreatography with gadoteridol by heavily T2-weighted three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery: preliminary results in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kojiro; Naganawa, Shinji; Furuhashi, Naohiro; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Kawai, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) pancreatography with intravenously administered gadolinium-based contrast material (GBCM) in healthy subjects. Eight healthy male subjects (age: 29–53 years old, median: 37 years old) were enrolled. Contrast-enhanced MR pancreatography was scanned with heavily T2-weighted three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (hT2W-3D-FLAIR) before and after intravenous GBCM administration. Two radiologists evaluated the images, referring to three-dimensional MR pancreatography by consensus. Scanning was performed five times at 1.5-h intervals (at 0.5, 2, 3.5, 5, and 6.5 h) after GBCM administration. In all subjects, pre-contrast-enhanced hT2W-3D-FLAIR images demonstrated no visualization of the main pancreatic duct. After GBCM administration, the main pancreatic duct was visualized in all subjects at 0.5 h (n=4, 50%) and/or 2 h (n=7, 88%). The mean signal intensity of the main pancreatic duct was 3.17 ± 0.78 at pre-contrast enhancement, 7.96 ± 4.60 at 0.5 h, and 8.08 ± 4.64 at 2 h. The signal intensity ratio of the main pancreatic duct against the pancreatic parenchyma was statistically higher (P < 0.01) at the 0.5-h and 2-h scans than that of pre-contrast-enhanced scan. Intravenously administered GBCM seeped into the pancreatic duct in sufficient concentration to alter the appearance of the main pancreatic duct by hT2W-3D-FLAIR in healthy subjects. PMID:27303104

  2. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  3. A generalized inversion method: Simultaneous source localization and environmental inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Knobles, David P.

    2002-05-01

    The problem of localizing and tracking a source in the shallow ocean is often complicated by uncertainty in the environmental parameters. Likewise, the estimates of environmental parameters in the shallow ocean obtained by inversion methods can be degraded by incorrect information about the source location. To overcome both these common obstacles-environmental mismatch in matched field processing and incorrect source location in geoacoustic inversions-a generalized inversion scheme is developed that includes both source and environmental parameters as unknowns in the inversion. The new technique called systematic decoupling using rotated coordinates (SDRC) expands the original idea of rotated coordinates [M. D. Collins and L. Fishman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 1637-1644 (1995)] by using multiple sets of coherent broadband rotated coordinates, each corresponding to a different set of bounds, to systematically decouple the unknowns in a series of simulated annealing inversions. The results of applying the SDRC inversion method to data from the Area Characterization Test II experiment performed on the New Jersey continental shelf are presented. [Work supported by ONR.

  4. Heritability of digit ratio (2D:4D) in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Nelson, Emma; Voracek, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) is a putative biomarker for prenatal androgen effects, which has been widely employed to study androgenic-programming effects on shaping sex-linked traits and behaviours in humans. This approach is now increasingly applied to non-human species. Heritability studies of 2D:4D in both humans and zebra finches indicate substantial genetic contributions to the expression of this trait. This study examines the heritability of 2D:4D in rhesus macaques, based on the resemblance of mother-infant dyads, to see how these compare with human values. Results suggest that familial resemblance in 2D:4D is also strong in rhesus monkeys. Heritability estimates were within the range of estimates from human studies. These preliminary results suggest that the strength of heritability of 2D:4D may generalize across taxa. PMID:19882209

  5. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  6. On 2D graphical representation of DNA sequence of nondegeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yusen; Liao, Bo; Ding, Kequan

    2005-08-01

    Some two-dimensional (2D) graphical representations of DNA sequences have been given by Gates, Nandy, Leong and Mogenthaler, Randić, and Liao et al., which give visual characterizations of DNA sequences. In this Letter, we introduce a nondegeneracy 2D graphical representation of DNA sequence, which is different from Randić's novel 2D representation and Liao's 2D representation. We also present the nondegeneracy forms corresponding to the representations of Gates, Nandy, Leong and Mogenthaler.

  7. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  8. Fast and stable two-dimensional inversion of magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lugao, Patricia Pastana

    1997-07-01

    The two-dimensional (2-D) magnetotelluric (MT) inverse problem still poses difficult challenges in spite of efforts to develop fast and efficient methods for its solution. In this work, a new approach based on regularization theory and the quasi-analytic calculation of the Frechet derivatives is presented. For the forward solution, a fast and efficient finite difference formulation to the solution of the MT equations in both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes based on the balance method is used. The Frechet derivative matrix is obtained as a solution to simple forward and back substitution of the LU decomposed matrix of coefficients from the forward problem utilizing the principle of reciprocity. The magnetotelluric inverse problem is ill-posed. In order to constrain the solution to a set of acceptable models, Tikhonov regularization is applied based on the minimization of a parametric functional. The regularized cojugate gradient method is then utilized to minimize the parametric functional. Inversion results of a set of synthetic data and of a set of CSAMT data from Kennecott Exploration show that the method is fast, stable and produces geologically reasonable models.

  9. Ultrasonic 2D matrix PVDF transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptchelintsev, A.; Maev, R. Gr.

    2000-05-01

    During the past decade a substantial amount of work has been done in the area of ultrasonic imaging technology using 2D arrays. The main problems arising for the two-dimensional matrix transducers at megahertz frequencies are small size and huge count of the elements, high electrical impedance, low sensitivity, bad SNR and slower data acquisition rate. The major technological difficulty remains the high density of the interconnect. To solve these problems numerous approaches have been suggested. In the present work, a 24×24 elements (24 transmit+24 receive) matrix and a switching board were developed. The transducer consists of two 52 μm PVDF layers each representing a linear array of 24 elements placed one on the top of the other. Electrodes in these two layers are perpendicular and form the grid of 0.5×0.5 mm pitch. The layers are bonded together with the ground electrode being monolithic and located between the layers. The matrix is backed from the rear surface with an epoxy composition. During the emission, a linear element from the emitting layer generates a longitudinal wave pulse propagating inside the test object. Reflected pulses are picked-up by the receiving layer. During one transmit-receive cycle one transmit element and one receive element are selected by corresponding multiplexers. These crossed elements emulate a small element formed by their intersection. The present design presents the following advantages: minimizes number of active channels and density of the interconnect; reduces the electrical impedance of the element improving electrical matching; enables the transmit-receive mode; due to the efficient backing provides bandwidth and good time resolution; and, significantly reduces the electronics complexity. The matrix can not be used for the beam steering and focusing. Owing to this impossibility of focusing, the penetration depth is limited as well by the diffraction phenomena.

  10. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout.

  11. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X-L

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout. PMID:27464908

  12. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout. PMID:27464908

  13. Design and characterization of low-loss 2D grating couplers for silicon photonics integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, C.; Carrol, L.; Bozzola, A.; Marchetti, R.; Minzioni, P.; Cristiani, I.; Fournier, M.; Bernabe, S.; Gerace, D.; Andreani, L. C.

    2016-03-01

    We present the characterization of Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic-crystal based 2D grating-couplers (2D-GCs) fabricated by CEA-Leti in the frame of the FP7 Fabulous project, which is dedicated to the realization of devices and systems for low-cost and high-performance passives-optical-networks. On the analyzed samples different test structures are present, including 2D-GC connected to another 2D-GC by different waveguides (in a Mach-Zehnder like configuration), and 2D-GC connected to two separate 2D-GCs, so as to allow a complete assessment of different parameters. Measurements were carried out using a tunable laser source operating in the extended telecom bandwidth and a fiber-based polarization controlling system at the input of device-under-test. The measured data yielded an overall fiber-to-fiber loss of 7.5 dB for the structure composed by an input 2D-GC connected to two identical 2D-GCs. This value was obtained at the peak wavelength of the grating, and the 3-dB bandwidth of the 2D-GC was assessed to be 43 nm. Assuming that the waveguide losses are negligible, so as to make a worst-case analysis, the coupling efficiency of the single 2D-GC results to be equal to -3.75 dB, constituting, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest value ever reported for a fully CMOS compatible 2D-GC. It is worth noting that both the obtained values are in good agreement with those expected by the numerical simulations performed using full 3D analysis by Lumerical FDTD-solutions.

  14. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  15. 2D induced gravity from the canonically gauged WZNW system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojević, M.; Popović, D. S.; Sazdović, B.

    1999-02-01

    Starting from the Kac-Moody structure of the WZNW model for SL(2,R) and using the general canonical formalism, we formulate a gauge theory invariant under local SL(2,R)×SL(2,R) and diffeomorphisms. This theory represents a gauge extension of the WZNW system, defined by a difference of two simple WZNW actions. By performing a partial gauge fixing and integrating out some dynamical variables, we prove that the resulting effective theory coincides with the induced gravity in 2D. The geometric properties of the induced gravity are obtained out of the gauge properties of the WZNW system with the help of the Dirac brackets formalism.

  16. Anomalous Hall Effect in a 2D Rashba Ferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Ado, I A; Dmitriev, I A; Ostrovsky, P M; Titov, M

    2016-07-22

    Skew scattering on rare impurity configurations is shown to dominate the anomalous Hall effect in a 2D Rashba ferromagnet. The mechanism originates in scattering on rare impurity pairs separated by distances of the order of the Fermi wavelength. The corresponding theoretical description goes beyond the conventional noncrossing approximation. The mechanism provides the only contribution to the anomalous Hall conductivity in the most relevant metallic regime and strongly modifies previously obtained results for lower energies in the leading order with respect to impurity strength. PMID:27494487

  17. Topology-Preserving Rigid Transformation of 2D Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phuc; Passat, Nicolas; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Talbot, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    We provide conditions under which 2D digital images preserve their topological properties under rigid transformations. We consider the two most common digital topology models, namely dual adjacency and well-composedness. This paper leads to the proposal of optimal preprocessing strategies that ensure the topological invariance of images under arbitrary rigid transformations. These results and methods are proved to be valid for various kinds of images (binary, gray-level, label), thus providing generic and efficient tools, which can be used in particular in the context of image registration and warping. PMID:26270925

  18. A parallel splitting wavelet method for 2D conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alex A.; Kozakevicius, Alice J.; Jakobsson, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The current work presents a parallel formulation using the MPI protocol for an adaptive high order finite difference scheme to solve 2D conservation laws. Adaptivity is achieved at each time iteration by the application of an interpolating wavelet transform in each space dimension. High order approximations for the numerical fluxes are computed by ENO and WENO schemes. Since time evolution is made by a TVD Runge-Kutta space splitting scheme, the problem is naturally suitable for parallelization. Numerical simulations and speedup results are presented for Euler equations in gas dynamics problems.

  19. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  20. The 2d MIT: The Pseudogap and Fermi Liquid Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castner, T. G.

    2005-06-01

    Fermi liquid theory for the 2d metal-insulator transition is extended to include the correlation gap in the density-of-states. The results are consistent with the scaling form g=gce[on(To/T)] at T larger than a characteristic T* ∝ xTc (Tc=Ec= mobility edge). The two-component model n1+nloc=n=nc(1+x) for n>nc is required and the theory explains the T-dependence of the data of Hanein et al. for p-type GaAs.

  1. A unified viscous theory of lift and drag of 2-D thin airfoils and 3-D thin wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A unified viscous theory of 2-D thin airfoils and 3-D thin wings is developed with numerical examples. The viscous theory of the load distribution is unique and tends to the classical inviscid result with Kutta condition in the high Reynolds number limit. A new theory of 2-D section induced drag is introduced with specific applications to three cases of interest: (1) constant angle of attack; (2) parabolic camber; and (3) a flapped airfoil. The first case is also extended to a profiled leading edge foil. The well-known drag due to absence of leading edge suction is derived from the viscous theory. It is independent of Reynolds number for zero thickness and varies inversely with the square root of the Reynolds number based on the leading edge radius for profiled sections. The role of turbulence in the section induced drag problem is discussed. A theory of minimum section induced drag is derived and applied. For low Reynolds number the minimum drag load tends to the constant angle of attack solution and for high Reynolds number to an approximation of the parabolic camber solution. The parabolic camber section induced drag is about 4 percent greater than the ideal minimum at high Reynolds number. Two new concepts, the viscous induced drag angle and the viscous induced separation potential are introduced. The separation potential is calculated for three 2-D cases and for a 3-D rectangular wing. The potential is calculated with input from a standard doublet lattice wing code without recourse to any boundary layer calculations. Separation is indicated in regions where it is observed experimentally. The classical induced drag is recovered in the 3-D high Reynolds number limit with an additional contribution that is Reynold number dependent. The 3-D viscous theory of minimum induced drag yields an equation for the optimal spanwise and chordwise load distribution. The design of optimal wing tip planforms and camber distributions is possible with the viscous 3-D wing theory.

  2. Impact of numerical artifact of the forward model in the inverse solution of density-dependent flow problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Mohamed K.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the effect of computational error on the inversion of a density-dependent flow and transport model, using SEAWAT and UCODE-2005 in an inverse identification of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity using head and concentration data from a 2-D laboratory experiment. We investigated inversions using three different solution schemes including variation of number of particles and time step length, in terms of the three aspects: the shape and smoothness of the objective function surface, the consequent impacts to the optimization, and the resulting Pareto analyses. This study demonstrates that the inversion is very sensitive to the choice of the forward model solution scheme. In particular, standard finite difference methods provide the smoothest objective function surface; however, this is obtained at the cost of numerical artifacts that can lead to erroneous warping of the objective function surface. Total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes limit these impacts at the cost of more computation time, while the hybrid method of characteristics (HMOC) approach with increased particle numbers and/or reduced time step gives both smoothed and accurate objective function surface. Use of the most accurate methods (TVD and HMOC) did lead to successful inversion of the two parameters; however, with distinct results for Pareto analyses. These results illuminate the sensitivity of the inversion to a number of aspects of the forward solution of the density-driven flow problem and reveal that parameter values may result that are erroneous but that counteract numerical errors in the solution.

  3. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  4. Inversion of electromagnetic data: An overview of new techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, Doug

    1990-09-01

    This paper explores some of the newer techniques for acquiring and inverting electromagnetic data. Attention is confined primarily to the 2d magnetotelluric (MT) problem but the inverse methods are applicable to all areas of EM induction. The basis of the EMAP technique of Bostick is presented along with examples to illustrate the efficacy of that method in structural imaging and in overcoming the deleterious effects of near-surface distortions of the electric field. Reflectivity imaging methods and the application of seismic migration techniques to EM problems are also explored as imaging tools. Two new approaches to the solution of the inverse problem are presented. The AIM (Approximate Inverse Mapping) inversion of Oldenburg and Ellis uses a new way to estimate a perturbation in an iterative solution which does not involve linearization of the equations. The RRI (Rapid Relaxation Inverse) of Smith and Booker shows how approximate Fréchet derivatives and sequences of 1d inversions can be used to develop a practical inversion algorithm. The overview is structured to provide insight about the latest inversion techniques and also to touch upon most areas of the inverse problem that must be considered to carry out a practical inversion. These include model parameterization, methods of calculating first order sensitivities, and methods for setting up a linearized inversion.

  5. 2D Potential theory using complex functions and conformal mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maire, Pauline; Munschy, Marc

    2016-04-01

    For infinitely horizontally extended bodies, functions that describe potential and field equations (gravity and magnetics) outside bodies are 2D and harmonic. The consequence of this property is that potential and field equations can be written as complex analytic functions. We define these complex functions whose real part is the commonly used real function and imaginary part is its Hilbert transform. Using data or synthetic cases the transformation is easily performed in the Fourier domain by setting to zero all values for negative frequencies. Written as complex functions of the complex variable, equations of potential and field in gravity and magnetics for different kinds of geometries are simple and correspond to powers of the inverse of the distance. For example, it is easily shown that for a tilted dyke, the dip and the apparent inclination have the same effect on the function and consequently that it is not possible, with data, to compute one of both values without knowing the other. Conformal mapping is an original way to display potential field functions. Considering that the complex variable corresponds to the real axis, complex potential field functions resume to a limaçon, a curve formed by the path of the point fixed to a circle when that circle rolls around the outside of another circle. For example, the point corresponding to the maximum distance to the origin of the complex magnetic field due to a cylinder, corresponds to the maximum of the analytic signal as defined by Nabighan in 1972 and its phase corresponds to the apparent inclination. Several applications are shown in different geological contexts using aeromagnetic data.

  6. Detection of an endogenous urinary biomarker associated with CYP2D6 activity using global metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Tay-Sontheimer, Jessica; Shireman, Laura M; Beyer, Richard P; Senn, Taurence; Witten, Daniela; Pearce, Robin E; Gaedigk, Andrea; Fomban, Cletus L Gana; Lutz, Justin D; Isoherranen, Nina; Thummel, Kenneth E; Fiehn, Oliver; Leeder, J Steven; Lin, Yvonne S

    2015-01-01

    Aim We sought to discover endogenous urinary biomarkers of human CYP2D6 activity. Patients & methods Healthy pediatric subjects (n = 189) were phenotyped using dextromethorphan and randomized for candidate biomarker selection and validation. Global urinary metabolomics was performed using liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Candidate biomarkers were tested in adults receiving fluoxetine, a CYP2D6 inhibitor. Results A biomarker, M1 (m/z 444.3102) was correlated with CYP2D6 activity in both the pediatric training and validation sets. Poor metabolizers had undetectable levels of M1, whereas it was present in subjects with other phenotypes. In adult subjects, a 9.56-fold decrease in M1 abundance was observed during CYP2D6 inhibition. Conclusion Identification and validation of M1 may provide a noninvasive means of CYP2D6 phenotyping. PMID:25521354

  7. Simulation of subgrid orographic precipitation with an embedded 2-D cloud-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Joon-Hee; Arakawa, Akio

    2016-03-01

    By explicitly resolving cloud-scale processes with embedded two-dimensional (2-D) cloud-resolving models (CRMs), superparameterized global atmospheric models have successfully simulated various atmospheric events over a wide range of time scales. Up to now, however, such models have not included the effects of topography on the CRM grid scale. We have used both 3-D and 2-D CRMs to simulate the effects of topography with prescribed "large-scale" winds. The 3-D CRM is used as a benchmark. The results show that the mean precipitation can be simulated reasonably well by using a 2-D representation of topography as long as the statistics of the topography such as the mean and standard deviation are closely represented. It is also shown that the use of a set of two perpendicular 2-D grids can significantly reduce the error due to a 2-D representation of topography.

  8. Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist Represses Cytochrome P450 2D6 Expression by Upregulating Small Heterodimer Partner.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xian; Lee, Yoon-Kwang; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a major drug-metabolizing enzyme responsible for eliminating approximately 20% of marketed drugs. Studies have shown that differential transcriptional regulation of CYP2D6 may contribute to large interindividual variability in CYP2D6-mediated drug metabolism. However, the factors governing CYP2D6 transcription are largely unknown. We previously demonstrated small heterodimer partner (SHP) as a novel transcriptional repressor of CYP2D6 expression. SHP is a representative target gene of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The objective of this study is to investigate whether an agonist of FXR, 3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-4-(3'-carboxy-2-chlorostilben-4-yl)oxymethyl-5-isopropylisoxazole (GW4064), alters CYP2D6 expression and activity. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic mice, GW4064 decreased hepatic CYP2D6 expression and activity (by 2-fold) while increasing SHP expression (by 2-fold) and SHP recruitment to the CYP2D6 promoter. CYP2D6 repression by GW4064 was abrogated in Shp(-/-);CYP2D6 mice, indicating a critical role of SHP in CYP2D6 regulation by GW4064. Also, GW4064 decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 2-fold) in primary human hepatocytes, suggesting that the results obtained in CYP2D6-humanized transgenic mice can be translated to humans. This proof of concept study provides evidence for CYP2D6 regulation by an inducer of SHP expression, namely, the FXR agonist GW4064. PMID:25926433

  9. Repression of multiple CYP2D genes in mouse primary hepatocytes with a single siRNA construct.

    PubMed

    Elraghy, Omaima; Baldwin, William S

    2015-01-01

    The Cyp2d subfamily is the second most abun-dant subfamily of hepatic drug-metabolizing CYPs. In mice, there are nine Cyp2d members that are believed to have redundant catalytic activity. We are testing and optimizing the ability of one short interfering RNA (siRNA) construct to knockdown the expression of multiple mouse Cyp2ds in primary hepatocytes. Expression of Cyp2d10, Cyp2d11, Cyp2d22, and Cyp2d26 was observed in the primary male mouse hepatocytes. Cyp2d9, which is male-specific and growth hormone-dependent, was not expressed in male primary hepatocytes, potentially because of its dependence on pulsatile growth hormone release from the anterior pituitary. Several different siRNAs at different concentrations and with different reagents were used to knockdown Cyp2d expression. siRNA constructs designed to repress only one construct often mildly repressed several Cyp2d isoforms. A construct designed to knockdown every Cyp2d isoform provided the best results, especially when incubated with transfection reagents designed specifically for primary cell culture. Interestingly, a construct designed to knockdown all Cyp2d isoforms, except Cyp2d10, caused a 2.5× increase in Cyp2d10 expression, presumably because of a compensatory response. However, while RNA expression is repressed 24 h after siRNA treatment, associated changes in Cyp2d-mediated metabolism are tenuous. Overall, this study provides data on the expression of murine Cyp2ds in primary cell lines, valuable information on designing siRNAs for silencing multiple murine CYPs, and potential pros and cons of using siRNA as a tool for repressing Cyp2d and estimating Cyp2d's role in murine xenobiotic metabolism. PMID:25124873

  10. Generating high peak capacity 2-D maps of complex proteomes using PMMA microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Osiri, John K; Shadpour, Hamed; Park, Sunjung; Snowden, Brandy C; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Soper, Steven A

    2008-12-01

    A high peak capacity 2-D protein separation system combining SDS micro-CGE (SDS micro-CGE) with microchip MEKC (micro-MEKC) using a PMMA microfluidic is reported. The utility of the 2-D microchip was demonstrated by generating a 2-D map from a complex biological sample containing a large number of constituent proteins using fetal calf serum (FCS) as the model system. The proteins were labeled with a thiol-reactive AlexaFluor 633 fluorophore (excitation/emission: 633/652 nm) to allow for ultra-sensitive on-chip detection using LIF following the 2-D separation. The high-resolution separation of the proteins was accomplished based on their size in the SDS micro-CGE dimension and their interaction with micelles in the micro-MEKC dimension. A comprehensive 2-D SDS micro-CGE x micro-MEKC separation of the FCS proteins was completed in less than <30 min using this 2-D microchip format, which consisted of 60 mm and 50 mm effective separation lengths for the first and second separation dimensions, respectively. Results obtained from the microchip separation were compared with protein maps acquired using conventional 2-D IEF and SDS-PAGE of a similar FCS sample. The microchip 2-D separation was found to be approximately 60x faster and yielded an average peak capacity of 2600 (+/- 149), nearly three times larger than that obtained using conventional IEF/SDS-PAGE. PMID:19130578

  11. Coprescription of Tamoxifen and Medications That Inhibit CYP2D6

    PubMed Central

    Sideras, Kostandinos; Ingle, James N.; Ames, Matthew M.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Mrazek, David P.; Black, John L.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Hawse, John R.; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Goetz, Matthew P.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence has emerged that the clinical benefit of tamoxifen is related to the functional status of the hepatic metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). CYP2D6 is the key enzyme responsible for the generation of the potent tamoxifen metabolite, endoxifen. Multiple studies have examined the relationship of CYP2D6 status to breast cancer outcomes in tamoxifen-treated women; the majority of studies demonstrated that women with impaired CYP2D6 metabolism have lower endoxifen concentrations and a greater risk of breast cancer recurrence. As a result, practitioners must be aware that some of the most commonly prescribed medications coadministered with tamoxifen interfere with CYP2D6 function, thereby reducing endoxifen concentrations and potentially increasing the risk of breast cancer recurrence. After reviewing the published data regarding tamoxifen metabolism and the evidence relating CYP2D6 status to breast cancer outcomes in tamoxifen-treated patients, we are providing a guide for the use of medications that inhibit CYP2D6 in patients administered tamoxifen. PMID:20439629

  12. Dynamic sector processing using 2D assignment for rotating radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habtemariam, Biruk K.; Tharmarasa, R.; Pelletier, M.; Kirubarajan, T.

    2011-09-01

    Electronically scanned array radars as well as mechanically steered rotating antennas return measurements with different time stamps during the same scan while sweeping form one region to another. Data association algorithms process the measurements at the end of the scan in order to satisfy the common one measurement per track assumption. Data processing at the end of a full scan resulted in delayed target state update. This issue becomes more apparent while tracking fast moving targets with low scan rate sensors. In this paper, we present new dynamic sector processing algorithm using 2D assignment for continuously scanning radars. A complete scan can be divided into sectors, which could be as small as a single detection, depending on the scanning rate and sparsity of targets. Data association followed by filtering and target state update is done dynamically while sweeping from one end to another. Along with the benefit of immediate track updates, continuous tracking results in challenges such as multiple targets spanning multiple sectors and targets crossing consecutive sectors. Also, associations performed in the current sector may require changes in association done in previous sectors. Such difficulties are resolved by the proposed 2D assignment algorithm that implements an incremental Hungarian assignment technique. The algorithm offers flexibility with respect to assignment variables for fusing of measurements received in consecutive sectors. Furthermore the proposed technique can be extended to multiframe assignment for jointly processing data from multiple scanning radars. Experimental results based on rotating radars are presented.

  13. Inverse Energy Cascades in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D. L.; Marino, R.; Mininni, P.; Pouquet, A.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of rapidly rotating turbulent flows on grids of 20483 grid points that are forced at intermediate scales. Injection of energy at such scales at small Rossby numbers (~0.04) leads to a direct cascade toward small scales and an inverse cascade toward large scales. These results essentially validate those obtained using large eddy simulation (LES) (Sen et al., PRE 86:036319 (2012)): for a (helical) forcing that injects energy largely in 2D modes, the large scale energy spectrum scales as kperp-5/3, consistent with Kolmogorov-Kraichnan-Batchelor-Leith phenomenology; for a nonhelical isotropic forcing, the large scale energy spectrum scales as kperp-3. The (helical) anisotropic forcing DNS solution, like that of the LES models, shows a k-1 isotropic energy spectrum, which Sen et al. attribute to a large scale shear. The higher resolution of the DNS runs allows us to carry out probability distribution and conditional analyses that show that this interpretation may, in fact, be consistent with wall-bounded turbulent shear flow.

  14. Seismic full waveform inversion from compressive measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ana; Arce, Gonzalo R.

    2015-05-01

    Traditional methods in seismic acquisition require sources and geophones that are uniformly located along a spatial line, using the Nyquist sampling rate. Depending on the area to be explored, it can be necessary to use seismic surveys with large offsets, or decrease the separation between adjacent geophones to improve the resolution, which generates very high volumes of data. It makes the exploration process more difficult and particularly expensive. This work presents the reconstruction of a compressive set of seismic traces acquired using the compressive sensing paradigm where the pair of sources and geophones are randomly located along the spatial line. The recovery of the wavefield from compressive measurements is feasible due to the capabilities of Curvelets on representing wave propagators with only a small set of coefficients. The method first uses the compressive samples to find a sparse vector representation of each pixel in a 2-D Curvelet dictionary. The sparse vector representation is estimated by solving a sparsity constrained optimization problem using the Gradient Projection for Sparse Reconstruction (GPSR) method. The estimated vector is then used to compute the seismic velocity profiles via acoustic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI). Simulations of the reconstructed image gathers and the resulting seismic velocity profiles illustrate the performance of the method. An improvement in the resulting images is obtained in comparison with traditional F-K filtering used in seismic data processing when traces are missing.

  15. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  16. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  17. Measurement of sediment and crustal thickness corrected RDA for 2D profiles at rifted continental margins: Applications to the Iberian, Gulf of Aden and S Angolan margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Leanne; Kusznir, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Subsidence analysis of sedimentary basins and rifted continental margins requires a correction for the anomalous uplift or subsidence arising from mantle dynamic topography. Whilst different global model predictions of mantle dynamic topography may give a broadly similar pattern at long wavelengths, they differ substantially in the predicted amplitude and at shorter wavelengths. As a consequence the accuracy of predicted mantle dynamic topography is not sufficiently good to provide corrections for subsidence analysis. Measurements of present day anomalous subsidence, which we attribute to mantle dynamic topography, have been made for three rifted continental margins; offshore Iberia, the Gulf of Aden and southern Angola. We determine residual depth anomaly (RDA), corrected for sediment loading and crustal thickness variation for 2D profiles running from unequivocal oceanic crust across the continental ocean boundary onto thinned continental crust. Residual depth anomalies (RDA), corrected for sediment loading using flexural backstripping and decompaction, have been calculated by comparing observed and age predicted oceanic bathymetries at these margins. Age predicted bathymetric anomalies have been calculated using the thermal plate model predictions from Crosby & McKenzie (2009). Non-zero sediment corrected RDAs may result from anomalous oceanic crustal thickness with respect to the global average or from anomalous uplift or subsidence. Gravity anomaly inversion incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction and sediment thickness from 2D seismic reflection data has been used to determine Moho depth, calibrated using seismic refraction, and oceanic crustal basement thickness. Crustal basement thicknesses derived from gravity inversion together with Airy isostasy have been used to correct for variations of crustal thickness from a standard oceanic thickness of 7km. The 2D profiles of RDA corrected for both sediment loading and non-standard crustal

  18. GEO2D - Two-Dimensional Computer Model of a Ground Source Heat Pump System

    DOE Data Explorer

    James Menart

    2013-06-07

    This file contains a zipped file that contains many files required to run GEO2D. GEO2D is a computer code for simulating ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems in two-dimensions. GEO2D performs a detailed finite difference simulation of the heat transfer occurring within the working fluid, the tube wall, the grout, and the ground. Both horizontal and vertical wells can be simulated with this program, but it should be noted that the vertical wall is modeled as a single tube. This program also models the heat pump in conjunction with the heat transfer occurring. GEO2D simulates the heat pump and ground loop as a system. Many results are produced by GEO2D as a function of time and position, such as heat transfer rates, temperatures and heat pump performance. On top of this information from an economic comparison between the geothermal system simulated and a comparable air heat pump systems or a comparable gas, oil or propane heating systems with a vapor compression air conditioner. The version of GEO2D in the attached file has been coupled to the DOE heating and cooling load software called ENERGYPLUS. This is a great convenience for the user because heating and cooling loads are an input to GEO2D. GEO2D is a user friendly program that uses a graphical user interface for inputs and outputs. These make entering data simple and they produce many plotted results that are easy to understand. In order to run GEO2D access to MATLAB is required. If this program is not available on your computer you can download the program MCRInstaller.exe, the 64 bit version, from the MATLAB website or from this geothermal depository. This is a free download which will enable you to run GEO2D..

  19. Inversion of marine multifrequency electromagnetic profiling data: a new approach to resolve surficial sediment stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasch, B.; Müller, H.; Oberle, F. K. J.; von Dobeneck, T.

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods are widely used on land to map electric conductivity and/or magnetic susceptibility distributions of surficial sediments. In contrast, the application of these methods in marine environments is relatively novel. Based on the recently developed electromagnetic benthic profiler MARUM-NERIDIS III we investigate the potential of concentric-loop EMI methods to recover conductivity and susceptibility of layered marine sediments. Sensitivity analyses based on a data and model normalized Jacobian matrix were performed to compare the influence of conductivity and susceptibility to in-phase and quadrature components at different frequencies. Both parameters substantially affect the EM response. However, the influence of susceptibility decreases more with depth and offers lower depth resolution than that of conductivity. A 1-D inversion algorithm to reconstruct vertical conductivity distributions was developed from existing non-linear inversion methods using apparent conductivity and apparent susceptibility recovered from simultaneous half-space inversion as a priori information. This algorithm was tested on synthetic and real marine EM data from a commercial multifrequency concentric loop EMI system (GEM-3). The results indicate that our inversion algorithm yields meaningful results down to approximately 3 m depth under typical shallow marine conditions. The comparison of inversion results recovered with 1-D and 2-D constraints showed that combining lateral with vertical constraints substantially improves the resolution of the inversion outputs. Field data from the NW Iberian shelf was calibrated according to a processing flow specifically designed for underwater conditions and analysed. Inversion outputs are in good agreement with ground-truthing stratigraphic investigations and deliver relevant clues on past and present sediment dynamics.

  20. 3D track initiation in clutter using 2D measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2001-11-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for initiating 3-D tracks using range and azimuth (bearing) measurements from a 2-D radar on a moving platform. The work is motivated by the need to track possibly low-flying targets, e.g., cruise missiles, using reports from an aircraft-based surveillance radar. Previous work on this problem considered simple linear motion in a flat earth coordinate frame. Our research extends this to a more realistic scenario where the earth"s curvature is also considered. The target is assumed to be moving along a great circle at a constant altitude. After the necessary coordinate transformations, the measurements are nonlinear functions of the target state and the observability of target altitude is severely limited. The observability, quantified by the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), is very sensitive to the sensor-to-target geometry. The paper presents a Maximum Likelihood (ML) estimator for estimating the target motion parameters in the Earth Centered Earth Fixed coordinate frame from 2-D range and angle measurements. In order to handle the possibility of false measurements and missed detections, which was not considered in, we use the Probabilistic Data Association (PDA) algorithm to weight the detections in a frame. The PDA-based modified global likelihood is optimized using a numerical search. The accuracies obtained by the resulting ML-PDA estimator are quantified using the CRLB for different sensor-target configurations. It is shown that the proposed estimator is efficient, that is, it meets the CRLB. Of particular interest is the achievable accuracy for estimating the target altitude, which is not observed directly by the 2-D radar, but can be only inferred from the range and bearing observations.

  1. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made

  2. 3D surface configuration modulates 2D symmetry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Sio, Lok-Teng

    2015-02-01

    We investigated whether three-dimensional (3D) information in a scene can affect symmetry detection. The stimuli were random dot patterns with 15% dot density. We measured the coherence threshold, or the proportion of dots that were the mirror reflection of the other dots in the other half of the image about a central vertical axis, at 75% accuracy with a 2AFC paradigm under various 3D configurations produced by the disparity between the left and right eye images. The results showed that symmetry detection was difficult when the corresponding dots across the symmetry axis were on different frontoparallel or inclined planes. However, this effect was not due to a difference in distance, as the observers could detect symmetry on a slanted surface, where the depth of the two sides of the symmetric axis was different. The threshold was reduced for a hinge configuration where the join of two slanted surfaces coincided with the axis of symmetry. Our result suggests that the detection of two-dimensional (2D) symmetry patterns is subject to the 3D configuration of the scene; and that coplanarity across the symmetry axis and consistency between the 2D pattern and 3D structure are important factors for symmetry detection. PMID:25536469

  3. Frictional drag between two dilute 2D hole layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillarisetty, R.; Noh, H.; Tsui, D. C.; de Poortere, E. P.; Tutuc, E.; Shayegan, M.

    2002-03-01

    We present results of drag measurements on 2D hole systems in the low density limit (rs ranging from 19 to 39), close to their apparent B=0 metal to insulator transitions at p ~ 8.5×10^9 cm-2. The drag resistivity(ρ_D) of our sample, with a 300 Å center to center quantum well separation, is 1.5 kΩ/ Box for 1.5×10^10 cm-2 at 1 K. This is sufficiently large to allow measurements at dilution fridge temperatures to study whether the 2D hole systems show non-Fermi liquid behavior. We find that for Talt0.5T_F, the data exhibit a slightly stronger than T^2 dependence. As the temperature is further increased we find a crossover to a linear dependence, and ρ_D/T^2 vs T exhibits a peak similar to that observed in previous experiments involving phonon mediated electron-electron scattering and plasmon enhancement. Unlike these previous reports, which exhibited a local maxima in ρD around matched densities, our samples show a clearly monotonic dependence upon either layer density. These results will be discussed in light of interaction effects expected in such a large rs regime.

  4. Facial biometrics based on 2D vector geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Obaidul; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios; Androutsos, Dimitrios

    2014-05-01

    The main challenge of facial biometrics is its robustness and ability to adapt to changes in position orientation, facial expression, and illumination effects. This research addresses the predominant deficiencies in this regard and systematically investigates a facial authentication system in the Euclidean domain. In the proposed method, Euclidean geometry in 2D vector space is being constructed for features extraction and the authentication method. In particular, each assigned point of the candidates' biometric features is considered to be a 2D geometrical coordinate in the Euclidean vector space. Algebraic shapes of the extracted candidate features are also computed and compared. The proposed authentication method is being tested on images from the public "Put Face Database". The performance of the proposed method is evaluated based on Correct Recognition (CRR), False Acceptance (FAR), and False Rejection (FRR) rates. The theoretical foundation of the proposed method along with the experimental results are also presented in this paper. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. 2 D patterns of soil gas diffusivity , soil respiration, and methane oxidation in a soil profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    The apparent gas diffusion coefficient in soil (DS) is an important parameter describing soil aeration, which makes it a key parameter for root growth and gas production and consumption. Horizontal homogeneity in soil profiles is assumed in most studies for soil properties - including DS. This assumption, however, is not valid, even in apparently homogeneous soils, as we know from studies using destructive sampling methods. Using destructive methods may allow catching a glimpse, but a large uncertainty remains, since locations between the sampling positions cannot be analyzed, and measurements cannot be repeated. We developed a new method to determine in situ the apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient in order to examine 2 D pattern of DS and methane oxidation in a soil profile. Different tracer gases (SF6, CF4, C2H6) were injected continuously into the subsoil and measured at several locations in the soil profile. These data allow for modelling inversely the 2 D patterns of DS using Finite Element Modeling. The 2D DS patterns were then combined with naturally occurring CH4 and CO2 concentrations sampled at the same locations to derive the 2D pattern of soil respiration and methane oxidation in the soil profile. We show that methane oxidation and soil respiration zones shift within the soil profile while the gas fluxes at the surface remain rather stable during a the 3 week campaign.

  6. CYP2D6 phenotype-genotype relationships in African-Americans and Caucasians in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Leathart, J B; London, S J; Steward, A; Adams, J D; Idle, J R; Daly, A K

    1998-12-01

    CYP2D6 genotyping (CYP2D6*3, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6*5, CYP2D6*13, CYP2D6*16 alleles and gene duplications) was previously performed on 1053 Caucasian and African-American lung cancer cases and control individuals and no significant difference in allele frequencies between cases and control individuals detected. We have carried out additional genotyping (CYP2D6*6, CYP2D6*7, CYP2D6*8, CYP2D6*9, CYP2D6*10, CYP2D6*17 alleles) and debrisoquine phenotyping on subgroups from this study to assess phenotype-genotype relationships. African-Americans showed significant differences from Caucasians with respect to frequency of defective CYP2D6 alleles, particularly CYP2D6*4 and CYP2D6*5. The CYP2D6*17 allele occurred at a frequency of 0.26 among 87 African-Americans and appeared to explain higher average metabolic ratios among African-Americans compared with Caucasians. CYP2D6*6, CYP2D6*8, CYP2D6*9 and CYP2D6*10 were rare in both ethnic groups but explained approximately 40% of higher than expected metabolic ratios among extensive metabolizers. Among individuals phenotyped with debrisoquine, 32 out of 359 were in the poor metabolizer range with 24 of these (75%) also showing two defective CYP2D6 alleles. Additional single strand conformational polymorphism analysis screening of samples showing large phenotype-genotype discrepancies resulted in the detection of three novel polymorphisms. If subjects taking potentially interfering drugs were excluded, this additional screening enabled the positive identification of 88% of phenotypic poor metabolizers by genotyping. This sensitivity was comparable with that of phenotyping, which identified 90% of those with two defective alleles as poor metabolizers. PMID:9918137

  7. Differential CYP 2D6 Metabolism Alters Primaquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Brittney M. J.; Xie, Lisa H.; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T.; Bandara Herath, H. M. T.; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N. P.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity. PMID:25645856

  8. Canonical vs. micro-canonical sampling methods in a 2D Ising model

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, J.

    1990-12-01

    Canonical and micro-canonical Monte Carlo algorithms were implemented on a 2D Ising model. Expressions for the internal energy, U, inverse temperature, Z, and specific heat, C, are given. These quantities were calculated over a range of temperature, lattice sizes, and time steps. Both algorithms accurately simulate the Ising model. To obtain greater than three decimal accuracy from the micro-canonical method requires that the more complicated expression for Z be used. The overall difference between the algorithms is small. The physics of the problem under study should be the deciding factor in determining which algorithm to use. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. The validation of the robust input estimation approach to two-dimensional inverse heat conduction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan, P.C.; Ju, M.C.

    2000-03-01

    A novel adaptive and robust input estimation inverse methodology of estimating the time-varying unknown heat flux, named as the input, on the two active boundaries of a 2-D inverse heat conduction problem is presented. The algorithm includes using the Kalman filter to propose a regression model between the residual innovation and the two thermal unknown boundaries flux through given 2-D heat conduction state-space models and noisy measurement sequence. Based on this regression equation, a recursive least-square estimator (RLSE) weighted by the forgetting factor is proposed to on-line estimate these unknowns. The adaptive and robust weighting technique is essential since unknowns input are time-varied and have unpredictable changing status. In this article, the authors provide the bandwidth analysis together with bias and variance tests to construct an efficient and robust forgetting factor as the ratio between the standard deviation of measurement and observable bias innovation at each time step. Herein, the unknowns are robustly and adaptively estimated under the system involving measurement noise, process error, and unpredictable change status of time-varying unknowns. The capabilities of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated through the comparison with the conventional input estimation algorithm and validated by two benchmark performance tests in 2-D cases. Results show that the proposed algorithm not only exhibits superior robust capability but also enhances the estimation performance and highly facilitates practical implementation.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  11. 2D to 3D to 2D Dimensionality Crossovers in Thin BSCCO Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    With increasing temperature the superfluid fraction in very thin BSCCO films undergoes a series of dimensionality crossovers. At low temperatures the strong anisotropy causes the thermal excitations to be 2D pancake-antipancake pairs in uncoupled layers. At higher temperatures where the c-axis correlation length becomes larger than a layer there is a crossover to 3D vortex loops. These are initially elliptical, but as the 3D Tc is approached they become more circular as the anisotropy scales away, as modeled by Shenoy and Chattopadhyay [1]. Close to Tc when the correlation length becomes comparable to the film thickness there is a further crossover to a 2D Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, with a drop of the superfluid fraction to zero at T_KT which can be of the order of 1 K below T_c. Good agreement with this model is found for experiments on thin BSCCO 2212 films [2]. 1. S. R. Shenoy and B. Chattopadhyay, Phys. Rev. B 51, 9129 (1995). 2. K. Osborn et al., cond-mat/0204417.

  12. Mass loss in 2D rotating stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Lovekin, Caterine; Deupree, Bob

    2010-10-05

    Radiatively driven mass loss is an important factor in the evolution of massive stars . The mass loss rates depend on a number of stellar parameters, including the effective temperature and luminosity. Massive stars are also often rapidly rotating, which affects their structure and evolution. In sufficiently rapidly rotating stars, both the effective temperature and radius vary significantly as a function of latitude, and hence mass loss rates can vary appreciably between the poles and the equator. In this work, we discuss the addition of mass loss to a 2D stellar evolution code (ROTORC) and compare evolution sequences with and without mass loss. Preliminary results indicate that a full 2D calculation of mass loss using the local effective temperature and luminosity can significantly affect the distribution of mass loss in rotating main sequence stars. More mass is lost from the pole than predicted by 1D models, while less mass is lost at the equator. This change in the distribution of mass loss will affect the angular momentum loss, the surface temperature and luminosity, and even the interior structure of the star. After a single mass loss event, these effects are small, but can be expected to accumulate over the course of the main sequence evolution.

  13. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT`S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (``port approximation``). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  14. Sigma-delta cellular neural network for 2D modulation.

    PubMed

    Aomori, Hisashi; Otake, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2008-01-01

    Although sigma-delta modulation is widely used for analog-to-digital (A/D) converters, sigma-delta concepts are only for 1D signals. Signal processing in the digital domain is extremely useful for 2D signals such as used in image processing, medical imaging, ultrasound imaging, and so on. The intricate task that provides true 2D sigma-delta modulation is feasible in the spatial domain sigma-delta modulation using the discrete-time cellular neural network (DT-CNN) with a C-template. In the proposed architecture, the A-template is used for a digital-to-analog converter (DAC), the C-template works as an integrator, and the nonlinear output function is used for the bilevel output. In addition, due to the cellular neural network (CNN) characteristics, each pixel of an image corresponds to a cell of a CNN, and each cell is connected spatially by the A-template. Therefore, the proposed system can be thought of as a very large-scale and super-parallel sigma-delta modulator. Moreover, the spatio-temporal dynamics is designed to obtain an optimal reconstruction signal. The experimental results show the excellent reconstruction performance and capabilities of the CNN as a sigma-delta modulator. PMID:18215502

  15. Using dispersive medium to control excitons in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klots, Andrey; Bolotin, Kirill I.

    Excitons in 2D materials (2DMs) are known to be sensitive to the surrounding environment. This makes it possible to modify 2D excitons by depositing materials with controlled dielectric constant on top of 2DMs. This possibility becomes especially interesting if we consider materials with dielectric permittivity ɛ that depends both on wavevector k (this happens if the medium is spatially non-uniform) and frequency ω. Here, we develop platforms to control ɛ (k , ω) and explore resulting changes in light-matter interactions of 2DMs. To examine the effect of wavevector-dependent permittivity of the medium, we study absorption/photoluminescence of graphene and MoS2 in the vicinity of highly non-uniform medium - an array of metal nanoparticles, 3-5 nm in diameter. In this case absorption of light can lead to creation of excitons with non-zero momentum. These dark states are not accessible via regular absorption spectroscopy. We study the case of frequency-dependent permittivity by surrounding MoS2 by a highly-dispersive media (e.g. dielectric liquids, graphene and VO2) . We demonstrate non-trivial frequency-dependent renormalization of the quasiparticle bandgap and exciton binding energies.

  16. Marginal fluctuations as instantons on M2/D2-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghdi, M.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce some (anti-) M/D-branes through turning on the corresponding field strengths of the 11- and 10-dimensional supergravity theories over spaces, where we use and for the internal spaces. Indeed, when we add M2/D2-branes on the same directions with the near horizon branes of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena model, all symmetries and supersymmetries are preserved trivially. In this case, we obtain a localized object just in the horizon. This normalizable bulk massless scalar mode is a singlet of and , and it agrees with a marginal boundary operator of the conformal dimension of . However, after performing a special conformal transformation, we see that the solution is localized in the Euclideanized space and is attributable to the included anti-M2/D2-branes, which are also necessary to ensure that there is no back-reaction. The resultant theory now breaks all supersymmetries to , while the other symmetries are so preserved. The dual boundary operator is then set up from the skew-whiffing of the representations and for the supercharges and scalars, respectively, while the fermions remain fixed in of the original theory. Besides, we also address another alternate bulk to boundary matching procedure through turning on one of the gauge fields of the full gauge group along the same lines with a similar situation to the one faced in the AdS/CFT correspondence. The latter approach covers the difficulty already faced with in the bulk-boundary matching procedure for as well.

  17. Predicting non-square 2D dice probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pender, G. A. T.; Uhrin, M.

    2014-07-01

    The prediction of the final state probabilities of a general cuboid randomly thrown onto a surface is a problem that naturally arises in the minds of men and women familiar with regular cubic dice and the basic concepts of probability. Indeed, it was considered by Newton in 1664 (Newton 1967 The Mathematical Papers of Issac Newton vol I (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) pp 60-1). In this paper we make progress on the 2D problem (which can be realized in 3D by considering a long cuboid, or alternatively a rectangular cross-sectioned dreidel). For the two-dimensional case we suggest that the ratio of the probabilities of landing on each of the two sides is given by \\frac{\\sqrt{{{k}^{2}}+{{l}^{2}}}-k}{\\sqrt{{{k}^{2}}+{{l}^{2}}}-l}\\frac{arctan \\frac{l}{k}}{arctan \\frac{k}{l}} where k and l are the lengths of the two sides. We test this theory both experimentally and computationally, and find good agreement between our theory, experimental and computational results. Our theory is known, from its derivation, to be an approximation for particularly bouncy or ‘grippy’ surfaces where the die rolls through many revolutions before settling. On real surfaces we would expect (and we observe) that the true probability ratio for a 2D die is a somewhat closer to unity than predicted by our theory. This problem may also have wider relevance in the testing of physics engines.

  18. The unitary conformal field theory behind 2D Asymptotic Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nink, Andreas; Reuter, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Being interested in the compatibility of Asymptotic Safety with Hilbert space positivity (unitarity), we consider a local truncation of the functional RG flow which describes quantum gravity in d > 2 dimensions and construct its limit of exactly two dimensions. We find that in this limit the flow displays a nontrivial fixed point whose effective average action is a non-local functional of the metric. Its pure gravity sector is shown to correspond to a unitary conformal field theory with positive central charge c = 25. Representing the fixed point CFT by a Liouville theory in the conformal gauge, we investigate its general properties and their implications for the Asymptotic Safety program. In particular, we discuss its field parametrization dependence and argue that there might exist more than one universality class of metric gravity theories in two dimensions. Furthermore, studying the gravitational dressing in 2D asymptotically safe gravity coupled to conformal matter we uncover a mechanism which leads to a complete quenching of the a priori expected Knizhnik-Polyakov-Zamolodchikov (KPZ) scaling. A possible connection of this prediction to Monte Carlo results obtained in the discrete approach to 2D quantum gravity based upon causal dynamical triangulations is mentioned. Similarities of the fixed point theory to, and differences from, non-critical string theory are also described. On the technical side, we provide a detailed analysis of an intriguing connection between the Einstein-Hilbert action in d > 2 dimensions and Polyakov's induced gravity action in two dimensions.

  19. Atmospheric Outflows from Hot Jupiters: 2D MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, A.; Matsakos, T.; Konigl, A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of stellar hydrogen Ly-α line absorption during transits of some hot Jupiter exoplanets suggest the presence of a dense, fast wind that is blowing from planetary atmosphere tep{2003Natur.422..143V,2007ApJ...671L..61B}. Modeling efforts include 1D hydrodynamic models tep{2009ApJ...693...23M,2004Icar..170..167Y,2007P&SS...55.1426G} and 2D isothermal magnetized wind models tep{2014arXiv1404.5817T}, among others. In this work, we model the 2D structure of the irradiated upper atmosphere of a hot Jupiter planet and its interaction with the planetary magnetic field. We calculate self consistently the heating by stellar UV radiation and the cooling of the atmosphere by Ly-α emission. We solve for the ionization structure assuming a 100% hydrogen atmosphere, accounting for the radiative ionization, recombination and advection of the gas. We show the effect of stellar tides and planetary magnetic field on the planet outflow and calculate the Ly-α transmission spectra of the resulting atmosphere.

  20. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field ( port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  1. Conformal Laplace superintegrable systems in 2D: polynomial invariant subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Ruiz, M. A.; Miller, Willard, Jr.

    2016-07-01

    2nd-order conformal superintegrable systems in n dimensions are Laplace equations on a manifold with an added scalar potential and 2n-1 independent 2nd order conformal symmetry operators. They encode all the information about Helmholtz (eigenvalue) superintegrable systems in an efficient manner: there is a 1-1 correspondence between Laplace superintegrable systems and Stäckel equivalence classes of Helmholtz superintegrable systems. In this paper we focus on superintegrable systems in two-dimensions, n = 2, where there are 44 Helmholtz systems, corresponding to 12 Laplace systems. For each Laplace equation we determine the possible two-variate polynomial subspaces that are invariant under the action of the Laplace operator, thus leading to families of polynomial eigenfunctions. We also study the behavior of the polynomial invariant subspaces under a Stäckel transform. The principal new results are the details of the polynomial variables and the conditions on parameters of the potential corresponding to polynomial solutions. The hidden gl 3-algebraic structure is exhibited for the exact and quasi-exact systems. For physically meaningful solutions, the orthogonality properties and normalizability of the polynomials are presented as well. Finally, for all Helmholtz superintegrable solvable systems we give a unified construction of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) quasi-exactly solvable potentials possessing polynomial solutions, and a construction of new 2D PT-symmetric potentials is established.

  2. Geophysical Inversion Through Hierarchical Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, A.; Huisman, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Geophysical investigation is a powerful tool that allows non-invasive and non-destructive mapping of subsurface states and properties. However, non-uniqueness associated with the inversion process prevents the quantitative use of these methods. One major direction researchers are going is constraining the inverse problem by hydrological observations and models. An alternative to the commonly used direct inversion methods are global optimization schemes (such as genetic algorithms and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods). However, the major limitation here is the desired high resolution of the tomographic image, which leads to a large number of parameters and an unreasonably high computational effort when using global optimization schemes. Two innovative schemes are presented here. First, a hierarchical approach is used to reduce the computational effort for the global optimization. Solution is achieved for coarse spatial resolution, and this solution is used as the starting point for finer scheme. We show that the computational effort is reduced in this way dramatically. Second, we use a direct ERT inversion as the starting point for global optimization. In this case preliminary results show that the outcome is not necessarily beneficial, probably because of spatial mismatch between the results of the direct inversion and the true resistivity field.

  3. Prevalence of CYP2D6*2, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6*10, and CYP3A5*3 in Thai breast cancer patients undergoing tamoxifen treatment

    PubMed Central

    Charoenchokthavee, Wanaporn; Panomvana, Duangchit; Sriuranpong, Virote; Areepium, Nutthada

    2016-01-01

    Background Tamoxifen (TAM) is used in breast cancer treatment, but interindividual variabilities in TAM-metabolizing enzymes exist and have been linked to single nucleotide polymorphisms in the respective encoding genes. The different alleles and genotypes of these genes have been presented for Caucasians and Asians. This study aimed to explore the prevalence of the incomplete functional alleles and genotypes of the CYP2D6 and CYP3A5 genes in Thai breast cancer patients undergoing TAM treatment. Patients and methods In total, 134 Thai breast cancer patients were randomly invited to join the Thai Tamoxifen Project. Their blood samples were collected and extracted for individual DNA. The alleles and genotypes were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction with TaqMan® Drug Metabolism Genotyping Assays. Results The patients were aged from 27.0 years to 82.0 years with a body mass index range from 15.4 to 40.0, with the majority (103/134) in the early stage (stages 0–II) of breast cancer. The median duration of TAM administration was 17.2 months (interquartile range 16.1 months). Most (53%) of the patients were premenopausal with an estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status of ER+/PR+ (71.7%), ER+/PR− (26.9%), ER−/PR+ (0.7%), and ER−/PR− (0.7%). The allele frequencies of CYP2D6*1, CYP2D6*2, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6*10, CYP3A5*1, and CYP3A5*3 were 72.9%, 3.2%, 1.1%, 22.8%, 37.3%, and 62.7%, respectively, while the genotype frequencies of CYP2D6*1/*1, CYP2D6*1/*2, CYP2D6*2/*2, CYP2D6*4/*4, CYP2D6*1/*10, CYP2D6*2/*10, CYP2D6*4/*10, CYP2D6*10/*10, CYP3A5*1/*1, CYP3A5*1/*3, and CYP3A5*3/*3 were 9.7%, 2.2%, 3.7%, 1.5%, 15.7%, 9.7%, 3.7%, 53.7%, 13.4%, 47.8%, and 38.8%, respectively. Conclusion The majority (97.8%) of Thai breast cancer patients undergoing TAM treatment carry at least one incomplete functional allele, including 20.9% of the patients who carry only incomplete functional alleles for both the CYP2D6 and CYP3A5 genes. This research

  4. Anisotropic magnetotelluric inversion using a mutual information constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, E.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, several authors pointed that the electrical conductivity of many subsurface structures cannot be described properly by a scalar field. With the development of field devices and techniques, data quality improved to the point that the anisotropy in conductivity of rocks (microscopic anisotropy) and tectonic structures (macroscopic anisotropy) cannot be neglected. Therefore a correct use of high quality data has to include electrical anisotropy and a correct interpretation of anisotropic data characterizes directly a non-negligible part of the subsurface. In this work we test an inversion routine that takes advantage of the classic Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm to invert magnetotelluric (MT) data generated from a bi-dimensional (2D) anisotropic domain. The LM method is routinely used in inverse problems due its performance and robustness. In non-linear inverse problems -such the MT problem- the LM method provides a spectacular compromise betwee quick and secure convergence at the price of the explicit computation and storage of the sensitivity matrix. Regularization in inverse MT problems has been used extensively, due to the necessity to constrain model space and to reduce the ill-posedness of the anisotropic MT problem, which makes MT inversions extremely challenging. In order to reduce non-uniqueness of the MT problem and to reach a model compatible with other different tomographic results from the same target region, we used a mutual information (MI) based constraint. MI is a basic quantity in information theory that can be used to define a metric between images, and it is routinely used in fields as computer vision, image registration and medical tomography, to cite some applications. We -thus- inverted for the model that best fits the anisotropic data and that is the closest -in a MI sense- to a tomographic model of the target area. The advantage of this technique is that the tomographic model of the studied region may be produced by any

  5. Experimental validation of 2D profile photoresist shrinkage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Self, Andy; Ferry, Lorena; Danilevsky, Alex

    2011-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle in allowing the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. For the 32 nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques will be used, including immersion ArF (iArF) lithography and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability to print smaller feature widths and pitches. These smaller feature sizes will also require the use of thinner layers of photoresists, such as under 100 nm. In previous papers, we focused on ArF and iArF photoresist shrinkage. We evaluated the magnitude of shrinkage for both R&D and mature resists as a function of chemical formulation, lithographic sensitivity, scanning electron microscope (SEM) beam condition, and feature size. Shrinkage results were determined by the well accepted methodology described in SEMATECH's CD-SEM Unified Specification. In other associated works, we first developed a 1-D model for resist shrinkage for the bottom linewidth and then a 2-D profile model that accounted for shrinkage of all aspects of a trapezoidal profile along a given linescan. A fundamental understanding of the phenomenology of the shrinkage trends was achieved, including how the shrinkage behaves differently for different sized and shaped features. In the 1-D case, calibration of the parameters to describe the photoresist material and the electron beam was all that was required to fit the models to real shrinkage data, as long as the photoresist was thick enough that the beam could not penetrate the entire layer of resist. The later 2-D model included improvements for solving the CD shrinkage in thin photoresists, which is now of great interest for upcoming realistic lithographic processing to explore the change in resist profile with electron dose and to predict the influence of initial resist profile on shrinkage characteristics. The 2-D model also included shrinkage due to both the primary

  6. First 2D-ACAR Measurements on Cu with the new Spectrometer at TUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. A.; Böni, P.; Ceeh, H.; Leitner, M.; Hugenschmidt, Ch

    2013-06-01

    The two-dimensional measurement of the angular correlation of the positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) is a powerful tool to investigate the electronic structure of materials. Here we report on the first results obtained with the new 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the Technische Universitat München (TUM). To get experience in processing and interpreting 2D-ACAR data, first measurements were made on copper. The obtained data are treated with standard procedures and compared to theoretical calculations. It is shown that the measurements are in good agreement with the calculations and that the Fermi surface can be entirely reconstructed using three projections only.

  7. The Effect of CYP2D6 Drug-Drug Interactions on Hydrocodone Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Andrew A.; Heard, Kennon J.; Campbell, Jenny; Hamamura, D.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The hepatic cytochrome 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a saturable enzyme responsible for metabolism of approximately 25% of known pharmaceuticals. CYP interactions can alter the efficacy of prescribed medications. Hydrocodone is largely dependent on CYP2D6 metabolism for analgesia, ondansetron is inactivated by CYP2D6, and oxycodone analgesia is largely independent of CYP2D6. The objective was to determine if CYP2D6 medication co-ingestion decreases the effectiveness of hydrocodone. Methods This was a prospective observational study conducted in an academic U.S. emergency department (ED). Subjects were included if they had self-reported pain or nausea; and were excluded if they were unable to speak English, were less than 18 years of age, had liver or renal failure, or carried diagnoses of chronic pain or cyclic vomiting. Detailed drug ingestion histories for the preceding 48 hours prior to the ED visit were obtained. The patient's pain and nausea were quantified using a 100-millimeter visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline prior to drug administration and following doses of hydrocodone, oxycodone, or ondansetron. We used a mixed model with random subject effect to determine the interaction between CYP2D6 drug ingestion and study drug effectiveness. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated to compare clinically significant VAS changes between CYP2D6 users and non-users. Results Two hundred fifty (49.8%) of the 502 subjects enrolled had taken at least one CYP2D6 substrate, inhibitor, or inducing pharmaceutical, supplement, or illicit drug in the 48 hours prior to ED presentation. CYP2D6-drug users were one third as likely to respond to hydrocodone (OR 0.33, 95% CI = 0.1 to 0.8), and more than three times as likely as non-users to respond to ondansetron (OR 3.4, 95% CI = 1.3 to 9.1). There was no significant difference in oxycodone effectiveness between CYP2D6 users and non-users (OR 0.53, 95% CI = 0.3 to 1.1). Conclusions CYP2D6 drug-drug interactions appear to change

  8. Source localization in electromyography using the inverse potential problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Doel, Kees; Ascher, Uri M.; Pai, Dinesh K.

    2011-02-01

    We describe an efficient method for reconstructing the activity in human muscles from an array of voltage sensors on the skin surface. MRI is used to obtain morphometric data which are segmented into muscle tissue, fat, bone and skin, from which a finite element model for volume conduction is constructed. The inverse problem of finding the current sources in the muscles is solved using a careful regularization technique which adds a priori information, yielding physically reasonable solutions from among those that satisfy the basic potential problem. Several regularization functionals are considered and numerical experiments on a 2D test model are performed to determine which performs best. The resulting scheme leads to numerical difficulties when applied to large-scale 3D problems. We clarify the nature of these difficulties and provide a method to overcome them, which is shown to perform well in the large-scale problem setting.

  9. Forward model nonlinearity versus inverse model nonlinearity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of concern is the impact of forward model nonlinearity on the nonlinearity of the inverse model. The question posed is, "Does increased nonlinearity in the head solution (forward model) always result in increased nonlinearity in the inverse solution (estimation of hydraulic conductivity)?" It is shown that the two nonlinearities are separate, and it is not universally true that increased forward model nonlinearity increases inverse model nonlinearity. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  10. Superresolution imaging from nonlinear inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, R. Shane; Fiddy, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Inverse scattering algorithms typically rely on weak scattering approximations and the inversion of far field data on an Ewald sphere. This, in turn, fixes the resolution of the computed image. However, it has long been observed that when multiple scattering occurs in a strongly interacting object, and a nonlinear inversion method is employed to image it, the resulting image can reveal subwavelength resolution. We have observed this phenomenon using a cepstral filtering approach and characterize it more fully here.

  11. Effects of repeated treatment with the dopamine D2/D3 receptor partial agonist aripiprazole on striatal D2/D3 receptor availability in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Czoty, Paul W.; Gage, H. Donald; Garg, Pradeep K.; Garg, Sudha; Nader, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Chronic treatment with dopamine (DA) receptor agonists and antagonists can differentially affect measures of DA D2/D3 receptor number and function, but the effects of chronic treatment with a partial D2/D3 receptor agonist are not clear. Objective We used a within-subjects design in male cynomolgus monkeys to determine the effects of repeated (17-day) treatment with the D2/D3 receptor partial agonist aripiprazole (ARI; 0.03 mg/kg and 0.1 mg/kg i.m.) on food-reinforced behavior (n=5) and on D2/D3 receptor availability as measured with positron emission tomography (PET; n=9). Methods Five monkeys responded under a fixed-ratio 50 schedule of food reinforcement and D2/D3 receptor availability was measured before and four days after ARI treatment using PET and the D2/D3 receptor-selective radioligand [18F]fluoroclebopride (FCP). Four additional monkeys were studied using [11C]raclopride and treated sequentially with each dose of ARI for 17 days. Results ARI decreased food-maintained responding with minimal evidence of tolerance. Repeated ARI administration increased FCP and raclopride distribution volume ratios (DVRs) in the caudate nucleus and putamen in most monkeys, but decreases were observed in monkeys with the highest baseline DVRs. Conclusions The results indicate that repeated treatment with a low efficacy DA receptor partial agonist produces effects on brain D2/D3 receptor availability that are qualitatively different from those of both high-efficacy receptor agonists and antagonists, and suggest that the observed individual differences in response to ARI treatment may reflect its partial agonist activity. PMID:24077804

  12. 2D numerical modelling of meandering channel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    XIAO, Y.; ZHOU, G.; YANG, F. S.

    2016-03-01

    A 2D depth-averaged model for hydrodynamic sediment transport and river morphological adjustment was established. The sediment transport submodel takes into account the influence of non-uniform sediment with bed surface armoring and considers the impact of secondary flow in the direction of bed-load transport and transverse slope of the river bed. The bank erosion submodel incorporates a simple simulation method for updating bank geometry during either degradational or aggradational bed evolution. Comparison of the results obtained by the extended model with experimental and field data, and numerical predictions validate that the proposed model can simulate grain sorting in river bends and duplicate the characteristics of meandering river and its development. The results illustrate that by using its control factors, the improved numerical model can be applied to simulate channel evolution under different scenarios and improve understanding of patterning processes.

  13. Efficient Inversion of Mult-frequency and Multi-Source Electromagnetic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gary D. Egbert

    2007-03-22

    The project covered by this report focused on development of efficient but robust non-linear inversion algorithms for electromagnetic induction data, in particular for data collected with multiple receivers, and multiple transmitters, a situation extremely common in eophysical EM subsurface imaging methods. A key observation is that for such multi-transmitter problems each step in commonly used linearized iterative limited memory search schemes such as conjugate gradients (CG) requires solution of forward and adjoint EM problems for each of the N frequencies or sources, essentially generating data sensitivities for an N dimensional data-subspace. These multiple sensitivities allow a good approximation to the full Jacobian of the data mapping to be built up in many fewer search steps than would be required by application of textbook optimization methods, which take no account of the multiplicity of forward problems that must be solved for each search step. We have applied this idea to a develop a hybrid inversion scheme that combines features of the iterative limited memory type methods with a Newton-type approach using a partial calculation of the Jacobian. Initial tests on 2D problems show that the new approach produces results essentially identical to a Newton type Occam minimum structure inversion, while running more rapidly than an iterative (fixed regularization parameter) CG style inversion. Memory requirements, while greater than for something like CG, are modest enough that even in 3D the scheme should allow 3D inverse problems to be solved on a common desktop PC, at least for modest (~ 100 sites, 15-20 frequencies) data sets. A secondary focus of the research has been development of a modular system for EM inversion, using an object oriented approach. This system has proven useful for more rapid prototyping of inversion algorithms, in particular allowing initial development and testing to be conducted with two-dimensional example problems, before

  14. Factors controlling the tectonic inversion of the Pyrenean mountain belt : from observations to modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammes, S.; Huismans, R. S.

    2012-04-01

    Local inherited weaknesses and regional inherited crust and mantle lithosphere structure are expected to control the structural style of tectonic inversion of rift zones and passive margins. However it is still unclear to which extent structural inheritance plays a role during inversion tectonics and contributes to the structural style of inversion. Here we focus in the context of the Topo-Europe project PYRTEC on the Pyrenean-Cantabrian mountain belt, which is very well studied. The moderate inversion, the good preservation of both pre and syn-orogenic strata and the excellent geological and geophysical data set make this chain one of the best candidates to investigate these questions. The influence of inherited crustal heterogeneities, denudation, subcrustal loads and crustal mechanical properties on the deformation style of the Pyrenean chain has been already investigated by Beaumont et al. [2000] with a comparison between observations and geodynamical models. The main conclusion of their study is that the asymmetry of the Pyrenean double wedge and its morphological evolution is a consequence of the asymmetric distribution of inherited crustal heterogeneity suggesting that the tectonic style of the Pyrenees is strongly controlled by the inversion of previous extensional features. Here we use lithosphere scale 2D numerical thermo-mechanical models to investigate the effect of rift inheritance on mountain building style with a procedure coined accordion tectonics. The formation of rift basin margin is explicitly modeled and the results are then used as initial condition for the lithospheric scale inversion. The purpose of our work is to explore to which extent local inherited weaknesses and regional inherited crust and mantle lithosphere structure play a role during inversion tectonics and contribute to the structural style of Pyrenean chain.

  15. High Frequency of CYP2D6 Ultrarapid Metabolizer Genotype in the Finnish Population.

    PubMed

    Pietarinen, Paavo; Tornio, Aleksi; Niemi, Mikko

    2016-09-01

    CYP2D6 participates in the biotransformation of many commonly used drugs. Large genetic variability in CYP2D6 results in a wide interindividual variability in the response to CYP2D6 substrate drugs. Previous studies have assessed the phenotype and genotype distributions of CYP2D6 in relatively small Finnish population samples. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequencies of CYP2D6 genotypes in a larger Finnish population cohort of 857 healthy volunteers. The volunteers were genotyped for 10 CYP2D6 genetic variants (*2, *3, *4, *5, *6, *9, *10, *17, *39, *41) and copy number variation performed with TaqMan genotyping assays and copy number assay targeting exon 9. CYP2D6 phenotypes were inferred from the genotype data with the classical and activity score methods. According to the classical method, a large majority of the study cases were extensive metabolizers (EM; 87.3%; 95% confidence interval 84.9-89.3) and the second largest group was ultrarapid metabolizers (UM; 7.2%; 5.7-9.2%). Intermediate (IM) and poor metabolizers (PM) were in clear minority (3.0%; 2.1-4.4% and 2.3%; 1.5-3.6%, respectively). The activity score method yielded similar phenotype predictions. These results show that the frequency of UM genotype is higher and that of PM and IM genotype is lower in the Finnish population than in other North European populations. Accordingly, CYP2D6 genetic profile of the Finnish population differs from its geographically close neighbours, which has implications for the effective and safe use of drugs metabolized by CYP2D6. PMID:27038154

  16. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  17. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Corey L.; Yarberry, Victor; Jorgensen, Craig

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats, are also provided in the library.

  18. 2D Electrical Resistivity Tomography surveys optimisation of the solutes transports in porous media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekmine, G.; Pessel, M.; Auradou, H.

    2009-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography applied in borehole or cross-borehole is a method often used to follow the invasion process of pollutant [Daily, 1991]. The aim of this work is to test experimentally the electrode arrays and inversion process used to obtain a spatial representation of tracer propagation in porous media. Experiments were conducted in a plexiglas container with glass beads of 166 microns in diameter. The height of the container is 275 mm, its width 85 mm and its thickness 10 mm. 21 electrodes, equally spaced, are placed along each of the lateral sides of the porous medium : these electrodes are used to perform the electrical measurements. The porous medium is lightened from behind and a video camera records the propagation of the fluids. The fluid containing the tracer (i.e the pollutant) is a water solution containing a small amount of dye together with NaCl (0.5g/l up to 2.0g/l). The medium is first saturated by a water solution containing a slight concentration of NaCl so that its density is smaller than the injected fluid. An upward flow is first established, then the denser fluid is injected at the bottom and over the full width of the medium. In this way, the flow is stabilized by gravity avoiding the development of unstable fingers. Still, the fluids are miscible and a mixing front develops during the flow: in the present study, both the determination by optical and electrical imaging of the mean position of the front and its width are of interest. The comparison of the two techniques allows to study the ability of the inversion process to quantify the solute transport. The electrical measurements are acquired by a standard multi electrode system (IRIS Instruments) and the data are inverted with the Res2Dinv software which models the 2D distribution of conductivity contrasts. The obtained bulk conductivity can be related through Archie's law to fluid conductivity by the porosity and the cementation factor which have been experimentally

  19. Concordance between CYP2D6 genotypes obtained from tumor-derived and germline DNA.

    PubMed

    Rae, James M; Regan, Meredith M; Thibert, Jacklyn N; Gersch, Christina; Thomas, Dafydd; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Viale, Giuseppe; Pusztai, Lajos; Hayes, Daniel F; Skaar, Todd; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors (FFPETs) are a valuable source of DNA for genotype association studies and are often the only germline DNA resource from cancer clinical trials. The anti-estrogen tamoxifen is metabolized into endoxifen by CYP2D6, leading to the hypothesis that patients with certain CYP2D6 genotypes may not receive benefit because of their inability to activate the drug. Studies testing this hypothesis using FFPETs have provided conflicting results. It has been postulated that CYP2D6 genotype determined using FFPET may not be accurate because of somatic tumor alterations. In this study, we determined the concordance between CYP2D6 genotypes generated using 3 tissue sources (FFPETs; formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded unaffected lymph nodes [FFPELNs]; and whole blood cells [WBCs]) from 122 breast cancer patients. Compared with WBCs, FFPET and FFPELN genotypes were highly concordant (>94%), as were the predicted CYP2D6 metabolic phenotypes (>97%). We conclude that CYP2D6 genotypes obtained from FFPETs accurately represent the patient's CYP2D6 metabolic phenotype. PMID:23958736

  20. Impact of CYP2D*6 in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer patients with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Markopoulos, Christos; Kykalos, Stylianos; Mantas, Dimitrios

    2014-08-10

    Biotransformation of tamoxifen to the potent antiestrogen endoxifen is performed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, in particular the CYP2D6 isoform. CYP2D6*4 is one of the most frequent alleles associated with loss of enzymatic activity. The incidence of CYP2D6*4 among Caucasians is estimated up to 27%, while it is present in up to 90% of all poor metabolizers within the Caucasian population. The hypothesis under question is whether the presence of one or two non-functioning (null) alleles predicts an inferior outcome in postmenopausal women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen. The numerous existing studies investigating the association of CYP2D6 with treatment failure in breast cancer are inconsistent and give rather conflicting results. Currently, routine CYP2D6 testing among women with breast cancer is not recommended and the significance of CYP2D6 phenotype in decision making regarding the administration of tamoxifen is unclear. The present study summarizes current literature regarding clinical studies on CYP2D6*4, particularly in terms of response to tamoxifen therapy and breast cancer outcome. PMID:25114852

  1. Impact of CYP2D*6 in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer patients with tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Markopoulos, Christos; Kykalos, Stylianos; Mantas, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Biotransformation of tamoxifen to the potent antiestrogen endoxifen is performed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, in particular the CYP2D6 isoform. CYP2D6*4 is one of the most frequent alleles associated with loss of enzymatic activity. The incidence of CYP2D6*4 among Caucasians is estimated up to 27%, while it is present in up to 90% of all poor metabolizers within the Caucasian population. The hypothesis under question is whether the presence of one or two non-functioning (null) alleles predicts an inferior outcome in postmenopausal women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen. The numerous existing studies investigating the association of CYP2D6 with treatment failure in breast cancer are inconsistent and give rather conflicting results. Currently, routine CYP2D6 testing among women with breast cancer is not recommended and the significance of CYP2D6 phenotype in decision making regarding the administration of tamoxifen is unclear. The present study summarizes current literature regarding clinical studies on CYP2D6*4, particularly in terms of response to tamoxifen therapy and breast cancer outcome. PMID:25114852

  2. A survey and task-based quality assessment of static 2D colormaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Jürgen; Steiger, Martin; Mittelstädt, Sebastian; Thum, Simon; Keim, Daniel; Kohlhammer, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Color is one of the most important visual variables since it can be combined with any other visual mapping to encode information without using additional space on the display. Encoding one or two dimensions with color is widely explored and discussed in the field. Also mapping multi-dimensional data to color is applied in a vast number of applications, either to indicate similar, or to discriminate between different elements or (multi-dimensional) structures on the screen. A variety of 2D colormaps exists in literature, covering a large variance with respect to different perceptual aspects. Many of the colormaps have a different perspective on the underlying data structure as a consequence of the various analysis tasks that exist for multivariate data. Thus, a large design space for 2D colormaps exists which makes the development and use of 2D colormaps cumbersome. According to our literature research, 2D colormaps have not been subject of in-depth quality assessment. Therefore, we present a survey of static 2D colormaps as applied for information visualization and related fields. In addition, we map seven devised quality assessment measures for 2D colormaps to seven relevant tasks for multivariate data analysis. Finally, we present the quality assessment results of the 2D colormaps with respect to the seven analysis tasks, and contribute guidelines about which colormaps to select or create for each analysis task.

  3. Measurements of Schottky barrier heights formed from metals and 2D transition metal dichalcogedides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changsik; Moon, Inyong; Nam, Seunggeol; Cho, Yeonchoo; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Park, Seongjun; Yoo, Won Jong

    Schottky barrier height (SBH) is an important parameter that needs to be considered for designing electronic devices. However, for two dimensional (2D) materials based devices, SBH control is limited by 2D structure induced quantum confinement and 2D surface induced Fermi level pinning. In this work, we explore differences in measuring SBH between 2D and 3D materials. Recently, low temperature I-V measurement has been reported to extract SBH based on thermionic emission equation for Schottky diode. However, 2D devices are not real Schottky diode in that both source and drain metal electrodes make Schottky contact. According to our experimental results, SBH extracted from linear slope of ln (I/T3/2) against 1/T show widely diverse values, dependent on applied voltage bias and tested temperature which affect carrier transport including tunneling or thermionic emission across the metal-2D material interface. In this work, we wish to demonstrate the method to determine SBH and Fermi level pinning which are attributed to 2D transition metal dichalcogedides, differently from conventional 3D materials. .

  4. Finger length ratios (2D:4D) in anthropoids implicate reduced prenatal androgens in social bonding.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Emma; Shultz, Susanne

    2010-03-01

    The second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) has been proposed as a biomarker reflecting prenatal androgen effects (PAE), such that individuals with lower ratios have experienced higher PAE than those with higher ratios. 2D:4D has been correlated with a number of sex-linked traits in humans such as aggression, promiscuity, and competitiveness. In addition, polygynous societies reportedly have lower 2D:4D (higher PAE) than more monogamous populations. This evidence suggests that PAE may be implicated in the development of sexually selected behaviors in humans. To place 2D:4D research into a broader context, we test the relationship between digit ratios and behavior across nonhuman anthropoids; polygynous species, with higher levels of intrasexual competition, should have more pronounced markers of PAE (lower 2D:4D) than pair-bonded species. Our results accord with those found in humans: 2D:4D is lower in polygynous species and higher (lower PAE) in pair-bonded species. Old World monkeys have low, and relatively invariant 2D:4D (high PAE), which is coupled with high levels of intrasexual competition. This contrasts with higher and more variable ratios in both great apes and New World monkeys. In addition, both male and female ratios decrease with increasing levels of intrasexual competition. Human ratios are intermediate between pair-bonded and more promiscuous hominoids. We propose that PAE may be involved in promoting species characteristic social behavior in anthropoids. PMID:19862809

  5. Device and methods for "gold standard" registration of clinical 3D and 2D cerebral angiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, Hennadii; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Å piclin, Žiga

    2015-03-01

    Translation of any novel and existing 3D-2D image registration methods into clinical image-guidance systems is limited due to lack of their objective validation on clinical image datasets. The main reason is that, besides the calibration of the 2D imaging system, a reference or "gold standard" registration is very difficult to obtain on clinical image datasets. In the context of cerebral endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs), we present a calibration device in the form of a headband with integrated fiducial markers and, secondly, propose an automated pipeline comprising 3D and 2D image processing, analysis and annotation steps, the result of which is a retrospective calibration of the 2D imaging system and an optimal, i.e., "gold standard" registration of 3D and 2D images. The device and methods were used to create the "gold standard" on 15 datasets of 3D and 2D cerebral angiograms, whereas each dataset was acquired on a patient undergoing EIGI for either aneurysm coiling or embolization of arteriovenous malformation. The use of the device integrated seamlessly in the clinical workflow of EIGI. While the automated pipeline eliminated all manual input or interactive image processing, analysis or annotation. In this way, the time to obtain the "gold standard" was reduced from 30 to less than one minute and the "gold standard" of 3D-2D registration on all 15 datasets of cerebral angiograms was obtained with a sub-0.1 mm accuracy.

  6. Joint inversion of geophysical data using petrophysical clustering and facies deformation wth the level set technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2015-12-01

    Geological expertise and petrophysical relationships can be brought together to provide prior information while inverting multiple geophysical datasets. The merging of such information can result in more realistic solution in the distribution of the model parameters, reducing ipse facto the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. We consider two level of heterogeneities: facies, described by facies boundaries and heteroegenities inside each facies determined by a correlogram. In this presentation, we pose the geophysical inverse problem in terms of Gaussian random fields with mean functions controlled by petrophysical relationships and covariance functions controlled by a prior geological cross-section, including the definition of spatial boundaries for the geological facies. The petrophysical relationship problem is formulated as a regression problem upon each facies. The inversion of the geophysical data is performed in a Bayesian framework. We demonstrate the usefulness of this strategy using a first synthetic case for which we perform a joint inversion of gravity and galvanometric resistivity data with the stations located at the ground surface. The joint inversion is used to recover the density and resistivity distributions of the subsurface. In a second step, we consider the possibility that the facies boundaries are deformable and their shapes are inverted as well. We use the level set approach to perform such deformation preserving prior topological properties of the facies throughout the inversion. With the help of prior facies petrophysical relationships and topological characteristic of each facies, we make posterior inference about multiple geophysical tomograms based on their corresponding geophysical data misfits. The method is applied to a second synthetic case showing that we can recover the heterogeneities inside the facies, the mean values for the petrophysical properties, and, to some extent, the facies boundaries using the 2D joint inversion of

  7. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür; Kürklüoglu, Mustafa; Lovejoy, John; Yaniv, Ziv

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the

  8. Inverse magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arco, L; López-López, M T; Zubarev, A Y; Gdula, K; Durán, J D G

    2014-09-01

    We report a new kind of field-responsive fluid consisting of suspensions of diamagnetic (DM) and ferromagnetic (FM) microparticles in ferrofluids. We designate them as inverse magnetorheological (IMR) fluids for analogy with inverse ferrofluids (IFFs). Observations on the particle self-assembly in IMR fluids upon magnetic field application showed that DM and FM microparticles were assembled into alternating chains oriented along the field direction. We explain such assembly on the basis of the dipolar interaction energy between particles. We also present results on the rheological properties of IMR fluids and, for comparison, those of IFFs and bidispersed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. Interestingly, we found that upon magnetic field application, the rheological properties of IMR fluids were enhanced with respect to bidispersed MR fluids with the same FM particle concentration, by an amount greater than the sum of the isolated contribution of DM particles. Furthermore, the field-induced yield stress was moderately increased when up to 30% of the total FM particle content was replaced with DM particles. Beyond this point, the dependence of the yield stress on the DM content was non-monotonic, as expected for FM concentrations decreasing to zero. We explain these synergistic results by two separate phenomena: the formation of exclusion areas for FM particles due to the perturbation of the magnetic field by DM particles and the dipole-dipole interaction between DM and FM particles, which enhances the field-induced structures. Based on the second phenomenon, we present a theoretical model for the yield stress that semi-quantitatively predicts the experimental results. PMID:25022363

  9. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  10. AnisWave2D: User's Guide to the 2d Anisotropic Finite-DifferenceCode

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Aoife

    2005-01-06

    This document describes a parallel finite-difference code for modeling wave propagation in 2D, fully anisotropic materials. The code utilizes a mesh refinement scheme to improve computational efficiency. Mesh refinement allows the grid spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, so that fine grid spacing can be used in low velocity zones where the seismic wavelength is short, and coarse grid spacing can be used in zones with higher material velocities. Over-sampling of the seismic wavefield in high velocity zones is therefore avoided. The code has been implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and allows large-scale models and models with large velocity contrasts to be simulated with ease.

  11. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  12. Homogenization models for 2-D grid structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Cioranescu, D.; Rebnord, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    In the past several years, we have pursued efforts related to the development of accurate models for the dynamics of flexible structures made of composite materials. Rather than viewing periodicity and sparseness as obstacles to be overcome, we exploit them to our advantage. We consider a variational problem on a domain that has large, periodically distributed holes. Using homogenization techniques we show that the solution to this problem is in some topology 'close' to the solution of a similar problem that holds on a much si