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Sample records for 2d ion chamber

  1. A method to enhance 2D ion chamber array patient specific quality assurance for IMRT.

    PubMed

    Diaz Moreno, Rogelio Manuel; Venencia, Daniel; Garrigo, Edgardo; Pipman, Yakov

    2016-11-21

    Gamma index comparison has been established as a method for patient specific quality assurance in IMRT. Detector arrays can replace radiographic film systems to record 2D dose distributions and fulfill quality assurance requirements. These electronic devices present spatial resolution disadvantages with respect to films. This handicap can be partially overcome with a multiple acquisition sequence of adjacent 2D dose distributions. The detector spatial response influence can also be taken into account through the convolution of the calculated dose with the detector spatial response. A methodology that employs both approaches could allow for enhancements of the quality assurance procedure. 35 beams from different step and shoot IMRT plans were delivered on a phantom. 2D dose distributions were recorded with a PTW-729 ion chamber array for individual beams, following the multiple acquisition methodology. 2D dose distributions were also recorded on radiographic films. Measured dose distributions with films and with the PTW-729 array were processed with the software RITv5.2 for Gamma index comparison with calculated doses. Calculated dose was also convolved with the ion chamber 2D response and the Gamma index comparisons with the 2D dose distribution measured with the PTW-729 array was repeated. 3.7 ± 2.7% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index when using radiographic films compared with calculated dose, with a minimum of 0.67 and a maximum of 13.27. With the PTW-729 multiple acquisition methodology compared with calculated dose, 4.1 ± 1.3% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index, with a minimum of 1.44 and a maximum of 11.26. With the PTW- multiple acquisition methodology compared with convolved calculated dose, 2.7 ± 1.3% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index, with a minimum of 0.42 and a maximum of 5.75. The results obtained in this work suggest that the comparison of merged adjacent dose distributions with convolved calculated dose

  2. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Das, K J Maria; Raj, D Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams.

  3. Characterization and use of a 2D-array of ion chambers for brachytherapy dosimetric quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Yewondwossen, Mammo

    2012-10-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array MatriXX Evolution is one of the 2D ionization chamber arrays developed by IBA Dosimetry (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) for megavoltage real-time absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the performance of ion chamber array for submegavoltage range brachytherapy beam dose verification and quality assurance (QA) and (2) use the end-to-end dosimetric evaluation that mimics a patient treatment procedure and confirm the primary source strength calibration agrees in both the treatment planning system (TPS) and treatment delivery console computers. The dose linearity and energy dependence of the 2D ion chamber array was studied using kilovoltage X-ray beams (100, 180 and 300 kVp). The detector calibration factor was determined using 300 kVp X-ray beams so that we can use the same calibration factor for dosimetric verification of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The phantom used for this measurement consists of multiple catheters, the IBA MatriXX detector, and water-equivalent slab of RW3 to provide full scattering conditions. The treatment planning system (TPS) (Oncentra brachy version 3.3, Nucletron BV, Veenendaal, the Netherlands) dose distribution was calculated on the computed tomography (CT) scan of this phantom. The measured and TPS calculated distributions were compared in IBA Dosimetry OmniPro-I'mRT software. The quality of agreement was quantified by the gamma ({gamma}) index (with 3% delta dose and distance criterion of 2 mm) for 9 sets of plans. Using a dedicated phantom capable of receiving 5 brachytherapy intralumenal catheters a QA procedure was developed for end-to-end dosimetric evaluation for routine QA checks. The 2D ion chamber array dose dependence was found to be linear for 100-300 kVp and the detector response (k{sub user}) showed strong energy dependence for 100-300 kVp energy range. For the Ir-192 brachytherapy

  4. A 2D ion chamber array audit of wedged and asymmetric fields in an inhomogeneous lung phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, Jessica; Dunn, Leon Alves, Andrew; Kenny, John; Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan; Kron, Tomas; Cole, Andrew

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) has implemented a new method of a nonreference condition Level II type dosimetric audit of radiotherapy services to increase measurement accuracy and patient safety within Australia. The aim of this work is to describe the methodology, tolerances, and outcomes from the new audit. Methods: The ACDS Level II audit measures the dose delivered in 2D planes using an ionization chamber based array positioned at multiple depths. Measurements are made in rectilinear homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms composed of slabs of solid water and lung. Computer generated computed tomography data sets of the rectilinear phantoms are supplied to the facility prior to audit for planning of a range of cases including reference fields, asymmetric fields, and wedged fields. The audit assesses 3D planning with 6 MV photons with a static (zero degree) gantry. Scoring is performed using local dose differences between the planned and measured dose within 80% of the field width. The overall audit result is determined by the maximum dose difference over all scoring points, cases, and planes. Pass (Optimal Level) is defined as maximum dose difference ≤3.3%, Pass (Action Level) is ≤5.0%, and Fail (Out of Tolerance) is >5.0%. Results: At close of 2013, the ACDS had performed 24 Level II audits. 63% of the audits passed, 33% failed, and the remaining audit was not assessable. Of the 15 audits that passed, 3 were at Pass (Action Level). The high fail rate is largely due to a systemic issue with modeling asymmetric 60° wedges which caused a delivered overdose of 5%–8%. Conclusions: The ACDS has implemented a nonreference condition Level II type audit, based on ion chamber 2D array measurements in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. The powerful diagnostic ability of this audit has allowed the ACDS to rigorously test the treatment planning systems implemented in Australian radiotherapy facilities. Recommendations from audits have led to

  5. On-line quality assurance of rotational radiotherapy treatment delivery by means of a 2D ion chamber array and the Octavius phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ann van; Clermont, Christian; Devillers, Magali; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P.

    2007-10-15

    For routine pretreatment verification of innovative treatment techniques such as (intensity modulated) dynamic arc therapy and helical TomoTherapy, an on-line and reliable method would be highly desirable. The present solution proposed by TomoTherapy, Inc. (Madison, WI) relies on film dosimetry in combination with up to two simultaneous ion chamber point dose measurements. A new method is proposed using a 2D ion chamber array (Seven29, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. The octagonal shape allows easy positioning for measurements in multiple planes. The directional dependence of the response of the detector was primarily investigated on a dual energy (6 and 18 MV) Clinac 21EX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) as no fixed angle incidences can be calculated in the Hi-Art TPS of TomoTherapy. The array was irradiated from different gantry angles and with different arc deliveries, and the dose distributions at the level of the detector were calculated with the AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm) photon dose calculation algorithm implemented in Eclipse (Varian). For validation on the 6 MV TomoTherapy unit, rotational treatments were generated, and dose distributions were calculated with the Hi-Art TPS. Multiple cylindrical ion chamber measurements were used to cross-check the dose calculation and dose delivery in Octavius in the absence of the 2D array. To compensate for the directional dependence of the 2D array, additional prototypes of Octavius were manufactured with built-in cylindrically symmetric compensation cavities. When using the Octavius phantom with a 2 cm compensation cavity, measurements with an accuracy comparable to that of single ion chambers can be achieved. The complete Octavius solution for quality assurance of rotational treatments consists of: The 2D array, two octagonal phantoms (with and without compensation layer), an insert for nine cylindrical ion chambers, and a set of inserts of

  6. SU-E-T-758: To Determine the Source Dwell Positions of HDR Brachytherapy Using 2D 729 Ion Chamber Array

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Syam; Sitha

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Determination of source dwell positions of HDR brachytherapy using 2D 729 ion chamber array Methods: Nucletron microselectron HDR and PTW 2D array were used for the study. Different dwell positions were assigned in the HDR machine. Rigid interstitial needles and vaginal applicator were positioned on the 2D array. The 2D array was exposed for this programmed dwell positions. The positional accuracy of the source was analyzed after the irradiation of the 2D array. This was repeated for different dwell positions. Different test plans were transferred from the Oncentra planning system and irradiated with the same applicator position on the 2D array. The results were analyzed using the in house developed excel program. Results: Assigned dwell positions versus corresponding detector response were analyzed. The results show very good agreement with the film measurements. No significant variation found between the planned and measured dwell positions. Average dose response with 2D array between the planned and nearby dwell positions was found to be 0.0804 Gy for vaginal cylinder applicator and 0.1234 Gy for interstitial rigid needles. Standard deviation between the doses for all the measured dwell positions for interstitial rigid needle for 1 cm spaced positions were found to be 0.33 and 0.37 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. For intracavitory vaginal applicator this was found to be 0.21 for 1 cm spaced dwell positions and 0.06 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. Intracavitory test plans reproduced on the 2D array with the same applicator positions shows the ideal dose distribution with the TPS planned. Conclusion: 2D array is a good tool for determining the dwell position of HDR brachytherapy. With the in-house developed program in excel it is easy and accurate. The traditional way with film analysis can be replaced by this method, as the films will be more costly.

  7. SU-E-T-82: A Study On Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) Dosimetry Using 2D Seven29 Ion Chamber Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Syam; Aparna

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric properties of Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) using PTW Seven29 ion chamber array Methods: PTW Seven29 ion chamber array and Solid Water phantoms for different depths were used for the study. The study was carried out in Varian Clinac ix with photon energies, 6MV & 15MV. Primarily the solid water phantoms with the 2D array were scanned using a CT scanner (GE Optima 580) at different depths. These scanned images were used for EDW planning in an Eclipse treatment planning system (version 10). Planning was done for different wedge angles and for different depths for 6MV & 15MV. A dose of 100 CGy was delivered in each cases. For each delivery, calculated the Monitoring Unit (MU) required. Same set-up was created before delivering the plans in Varian Clinac-ix. For each clinically relevant depth and for different wedge angles, the same MU was delivered as calculated. Different wedged dose distributions where reconstructed from the measured 2D array data using the in-house developed excel program. Results: It is observed that the shoulder like region in the profile which reduces as depth increases. For the same depth and energy, the percentage difference between planned and measured dose is lesser than 3%. For smaller wedge angles, the percentage difference is found to be greater than 3% for the largest wedge angle. Standard deviation between measured doses at shoulder region for planned and measured profiles is 0.08 and 0.02 respectively. Standard deviations between planned and measured wedge factors for different depths (2.5cm, 5cm, 10cm, and 15cm) are (0.0021, 0.0007, 0.0050, 0.0001) for 6MV and (0.0024, 0.0191, 0.0013, 0.0005) for 15MV respectively. Conclusion: The 2D Seven29 ion chamber array is a good tool for the Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) dosimetry.

  8. SU-E-T-83: A Study On Evaluating the Directional Dependency of 2D Seven 29 Ion Chamber Array Clinically with Different IMRT Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Syam; Aswathi, C.P.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the directional dependency of 2D seven 29 ion chamber array clinically with different IMRT plans. Methods: 25 patients already treated with IMRT plans were selected for the study. Verification plans were created for each treatment plan in eclipse 10 treatment planning system using the AAA algorithm with the 2D array and the Octavius CT phantom. Verification plans were done 2 times for a single patient. First plan with real IMRT (plan-related approach) and second plan with zero degree gantry angle (field-related approach). Measurements were performed on a Varian Clinac-iX, linear accelerator equipped with a millennium 120 multileaf collimator. Fluence was measured for all the delivered plans and analyzed using the verisoft software. Comparison was done by selecting the fluence delivered in static gantry (zero degree gantry) versus IMRT with real gantry angles. Results: The gamma pass percentage is greater than 97 % for all IMRT delivered with zero gantry angle and between 95%–98% for real gantry angles. Dose difference between the TPS calculated and measured for IMRT delivered with zero gantry angle was found to be between (0.03 to 0.06Gy) and with real gantry angles between (0.02 to 0.05Gy). There is a significant difference between the gamma analysis between the zero degree and true angle with a significance of 0.002. Standard deviation of gamma pass percentage between the IMRT plans with zero gantry angle was 0.68 and for IMRT with true gantry angle was found to be 0.74. Conclusion: The gamma analysis for IMRT with zero degree gantry angles shows higher pass percentage than IMRT delivered with true gantry angles. Verification plans delivered with true gantry angles lower the verification accuracy when 2D array is used for measurement.

  9. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  10. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  11. Compact ion chamber based neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S.; Galambos, Paul C.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2015-10-27

    A directional neutron detector has an ion chamber formed in a dielectric material; a signal electrode and a ground electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the signal and ground electrodes; and a signal processor electrically coupled to the readout circuitry. The ion chamber has a pair of substantially planar electrode surfaces. The chamber pressure of the neutron absorbing material is selected such that the reaction particle ion trail length for neutrons absorbed by the neutron absorbing material is equal to or less than the distance between the electrode surfaces. The signal processor is adapted to determine a path angle for each absorbed neutron based on the rise time of the corresponding pulse in a time-varying detector signal.

  12. IUPAP Award: Ion transport in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Intercalation in 2D materials drastically influences both physical and chemical properties, which leads to a new degree of freedom for fundamental studies and expands the potential applications of 2D materials. In this talk, I will discuss our work in the past two years related to ion intercalation of 2D materials, including insertion of Li and Na ions in graphene and MoS2. We focused on both fundamental mechanism and potential application, e.g. we measured in-situ optical transmittance spectra and electrical transport properties of few-layer graphene (FLG) nanostructures upon electrochemical lithiation/delithiation. By observing a simultaneous increase of both optical transmittance and DC conductivity, strikingly different from other materials, we proposed its application as a next generation transparent electrode.

  13. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

    1983-11-10

    It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

  14. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  15. Measurement of surface alpha contamination using electret ion chambers.

    PubMed

    Dua, S K; Biswas, S K; Szerszen, P; Boudreaux, J; Ebadian, M A

    1999-06-01

    Electret ion chambers are inexpensive, light-weight, commercially available, passive charge-integrating devices for accurate measurement of different radiations. Performance of electret ion chambers for surface alpha contamination measurement was evaluated. Ion chambers of two types and electrets of three thicknesses were used for the study. Calibration of the electret ion chambers was performed using reference alpha standards of different energies and radioactivities. Effects of various parameters such as chamber dimensions, electret thickness, alpha particle energy, position of alpha source from the chamber centerline, source localized or uniformly distributed, level of alpha contamination, Mylar window covering the chamber, and ambient radon and gamma radiation on the response of the electret ion chambers were determined. Suitable combinations of chambers and electrets to measure surface alpha contamination were determined.

  16. Recombination characteristics of therapeutic ion beams on ion chamber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Matsuyama, Tetsuharu; Sato, Shinji; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    In heavy ion radiotherapy, ionization chambers are regarded as a standard for determining the absorbed dose given to patients. In ion dosimetry, it is necessary to correct the radiation quality, which depends on the initial recombination effect. This study reveals for the radiation quality dependence of the initial recombination in air in ion dosimetry. Ionization charge was measured for the beams of protons at 40-160 MeV, carbon at 21-400 MeV/n, and iron at 23.5-500 MeV/n using two identical parallel-plate ionization chambers placed in series along the beam axis. The downstream chamber was used as a monitor operated with a constant applied voltage, while the other chamber was used for recombination measurement by changing the voltage. The ratio of the ionization charge measured by the two ionization chambers showed a linear relationship with the inverse of the voltage in the high-voltage region. The initial recombination factor was estimated by extrapolating the obtained linear relationship to infinite voltage. The extent of the initial recombination was found to increase with decreasing incident energy or increasing atomic number of the beam. This behavior can be explained with an amorphous track structure model: the increase of ionization density in the core region of the track due to decreasing kinetic energy or increasing atomic number leads to denser initial ion production and results in a higher recombination probability. For therapeutic carbon ion beams, the extent of the initial recombination was not constant but changed by 0.6% even in the target region. This tendency was quantitatively well reproduced with the track-structure based on the initial recombination model; however, the transitional change in the track structure is considered to play an important role in further understanding of the characteristics of the initial recombination.

  17. Vacuum chamber for ion manipulation device

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D; Anderson, Gordon A; Baker, Erin M

    2014-12-09

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area. A predetermined number of pairs of surfaces are disposed in one or more chambers, forming a multiple-layer ion mobility cyclotron device.

  18. SU-E-P-35: Real-Time Patient Transit Dose Verification of Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy by a 2D Ionization Chamber Array

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the real-time dose verification method in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source-detector distance (SDD)was 140cm. 8mm RW3 solid water was added to the detector panel to achieve maximum readings.The patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to deliver on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real-time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions wereevaluated using gamma index criteria of 3mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the firsttime Result. Results: The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%; The gamma index pass rate for esophageal, liver and prostate cancer patient were about 92%,94%, and 92%, respectively; Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusion: The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.

  19. Ion acoustic wave collapse via two-ion wave decay: 2D Vlasov simulation and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    The decay of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) via two-ion wave decay may transfer energy from the electric field of the IAWs to the particles, resulting in a significant heating of resonant particles. This process has previously been shown in numerical simulations to decrease the plasma reflectivity due to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Two-ion wave decay is a fundamental property of ion acoustic waves that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to inertial confinement fusion experiments, and can lead to a sudden collapse of IAWs. The treatment of all species kinetically, and in particular the electrons, is required to describe the decay process correctly. We present fully kinetic 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of IAWs undergoing decay to a highly nonlinear turbulent state using the code LOKI. The scaling of the decay rate with characteristic plasma parameters and wave amplitude is shown. A new theory describing two-ion wave decay in 2D, that incorporates key kinetic properties of the electrons, is presented and used to explain quantitatively for the first time the observed decay of IAWs. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734. Funded by LDRD 15-ERD-038 and supported by LLNL Grand Challenge allocation.

  20. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    SciTech Connect

    Stelljes, T. S. Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Poppe, B.; Harmeyer, A.; Reuter, J.; Harder, D.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm{sup 2} measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor k{sub NR} for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1

  1. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  2. Response of large cavity ion chambers to space protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    The assumption that spherical-shell ion chamber rssponse is equal to the dose in the center of the cavity is found to be a poor approximation for ion chambers used for area monitoring in the space program. The dose response is calculated using the appropriate areal density distribution function. Effects of nuclear reaction are evaluated using proton buildup factors. Errors of up to 100% are found for some components of the space radiation environments.

  3. Absolute state-selected total cross sections for the ion-molecule reactions O + (4S,2D,2P)+H2(D2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Huang, Y.-L.; Flesch, G. D.; Ng, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    Absolute total cross sections for the state-selected reactions of O+(4S,2D,2P)+H2 (D2) have been measured in the center-of-mass collision energy (Ec.m.) range of 0.02-12 eV. The cross sections for OH+ (OD+) from O+(2D)+H2 (D2) are slightly higher than those from O+(4S)+H2 (D2), whereas the OH+ (OD+) cross sections from O+ (2P)+H2 (D2) are ≈40% lower than those from O+(4S)+H2 (D2) and O+ (2D)+H2 (D2). At Ec.m.<0.5 eV, the total cross sections for OH+ (OD+) from O+ (4S)+H2 (D2) and O+(2D)+H2 (D2) are in accord with those predicted by the Langevin-Gioumousis-Stevenson model. Significantly higher cross sections are observed for H+ (D+) and H2+ (D2+) from O+(2D)+H2 (D2) and O+(2P)+H2 (D2), as compared to those from O+(4S)+H2 (D2). The exothermic nature of the O+(2D,2P)+H2 (D2) charge transfer collisions accounts for the high cross sections observed for H2+ (D2+). While the H+ (D+) ions observed in the O+(4S)+H2 (D2) reaction are identified with the H+ (D+)+O+H channel, the H+ (D+) ions from the reactions involving O+(2D) and O+(2P) are associated mostly with the H+ (D+)+OH (OD) channel, the formation of which obeys the spin-conservation rule. The comparison of the sum (σT) of cross sections for OH+ (OD+), H2+ (D2+), and H+ (D+) from O+(4S)+H2 (D2) to those from O+(2D)+H2 (D2) and O+(2P)+H2 (D2) shows that the σTs for O+(4S)+H2 (D2), O+(2D)+H2 (D2), and O+(2P)+H2 (D2) at Ec.m.<0.5 eV are comparable. At Ec.m.>0.5 eV, the σTs for O+(2P)+H2 (D2) are greater than those for O+(2D)+H2 (D2), which in turn are greater than those for O+(4S)+H2 (D2). This observation is attributed to the increase in the number of accessible product channels for reactions involving the excited O+(2D) and O+(2P) reactant ions.

  4. Chamber transport of ''foot'' pulses for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan-Miller, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.

    2002-02-20

    Indirect-drive targets for heavy-ion fusion must initially be heated by ''foot'' pulses that precede the main heating pulses by tens of nanoseconds. These pulses typically have a lower energy and perveance than the main pulses, and the fusion-chamber environment is different from that seen by later pulses. The preliminary particle-in-cell simulations of foot pulses here examine the sensitivity of the beam focusing to ion-beam perveance, background-gas density, and pre-neutralization by a plasma near the chamber entry port.

  5. Realistic modeling of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.

    2003-05-01

    Transport of intense heavy-ion beams to an inertial-fusion target after final focus is simulated here using a realistic computer model. It is found that passing the beam through a rarefied plasma layer before it enters the fusion chamber can largely neutralize the beam space charge and lead to a usable focal spot for a range of ion species and input conditions.

  6. Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Niller, D A C; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

    2002-08-02

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  7. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  8. Charges and current induced by moving ions in multiwire chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erskine, G. A.

    1982-07-01

    A method for calculating the charges induced on the grid wires, and on cathode strips parallel to the grid wires, by a point charge in a multiwire chamber is described. The method is applied to the calculation, as a function of time, of the charge and current induced by a small group of positive ions moving in accordance with the drift equation v= μE where v is the velocity. An appendix lists a number of formulae relating to the electrostatic field of a multiwire chamber.

  9. Development of ultra-fast 2D ion Doppler tomography using image intensified CMOS fast camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; Kuwahata, Akihiro; Yamanaka, Haruki; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; TS-group Team

    2015-11-01

    The world fastest novel time-resolved 2D ion Doppler tomography diagnostics has been developed using fast camera with high-speed gated image intensifier (frame rate: 200kfps. phosphor decay time: ~ 1 μ s). Time evolution of line-integrated spectra are diffracted from a f=1m, F/8.3 and g=2400L/mm Czerny-Turner polychromator, whose output is intensified and recorded to a high-speed camera with spectral resolution of ~0.005nm/pixel. The system can accommodate up to 36 (9 ×4) spatial points recorded at 5 μs time resolution, tomographic reconstruction is applied for the line-integrated spectra, time-resolved (5 μs/frame) local 2D ion temperature measurement has been achieved without any assumption of shot repeatability. Ion heating during intermittent reconnection event which tends to happen during high guide field merging tokamak was measured around diffusion region in UTST. The measured 2D profile shows ion heating inside the acceleration channel of reconnection outflow jet, stagnation point and downstream region where reconnected field forms thick closed flux surface as in MAST. Achieved maximum ion temperature increases as a function of Brec2 and shows good fit with MAST experiment, demonstrating promising CS-less startup scenario for spherical tokamak. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H05750 and 15K20921.

  10. Measurement of alpha particle energy using windowless electret ion chambers.

    PubMed

    Dua, S K; Kotrappa, P; Srivastava, R; Ebadian, M A; Stieff, L R

    2002-10-01

    Electret ion chambers are inexpensive, lightweight, robust, commercially available, passive, charge-integrating devices for accurate measurement of different ionizing radiations. In an earlier work a chamber of dimensions larger than the range of alpha particles having aluminized Mylar windows of different thickness was used for measurement of alpha radiation. Correlation between electret mid-point voltage, alpha particle energy, and response was developed and it was shown that this chamber could be used for estimating the effective energy of an unknown alpha source. In the present study, the electret ion chamber is used in the windowless mode so that the alpha particles dissipate their entire energy inside the volume, and the alpha particle energy is determined from the first principles. This requires that alpha disintegration rate be accurately known or measured by an alternate method. The measured energies were within 1 to 4% of the true values for different sources (230Th, 237Np, 239Pu, 241Am, and 224Cm). This method finds application in quantitative determination of alpha energy absorbed in thin membrane and, hence, the absorbed dose.

  11. Stationary-Afterglow measurements of dissociative recombination of H2D+ and HD2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnal, Petr; Kalosi, Abel; Plasil, Radek; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosik, Juraj

    2016-09-01

    Binary recombination rate coefficients of H2D+ and HD2+ ions have been measured at a temperature of 80 K in an afterglow plasma experiment in which the fractional abundances of H3+, H2D+, HD2+, and D3+ ions were varied by adjusting the [D2]/([D2] + [H2]) ratio of the neutral gas. The fractional abundances of the four ion species during the afterglow and their rotational states were determined in situ by continuous-wave cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS), using overtone transitions from the ground vibrational states of the ions. The experimentally determined recombination rate coefficients will be compared to results of advanced theoretical calculations and to the known H3+ and D3+ recombination rate coefficients. We conclude that the recombination coefficients depend only weakly on the isotopic composition. Astrophysical implications of the measured recombination rate coefficients will be also discussed. Work supported by: Czech Science Foundation projects GACR 14-14649P, GACR 15-15077S, GACR P209/12/0233, and by Charles University in Prague Project Nr. GAUK 692214.

  12. Beam loss ion chamber system upgrade for experimental halls

    SciTech Connect

    D. Dotson; D. Seidman

    2005-08-01

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  13. Beam Loss Ion Chamber System Upgrade for Experimental Halls

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Dotson; D.J. Seidman

    2005-05-16

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  14. Commissioning of a large segmented ion chamber for the FMA

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Davids, C.N.; Blumenthal, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    A large-area sectored ion chamber was built by a Yale-Daresbury (U.K.) - ANL collaboration to allow extensions of studies of N = Z (T = 0) nuclei. The ion chamber is a conventional DE-DE-E detector which is 20-cm deep, but each anode is segmented into eight pads to allow high count-rate capability and ray-trace reconstruction. With suitable electronics, the detector can become eight close-packed ion chambers, considerably reducing the count rate in each. A position-wire plane allows further raytracing which should permit the rejection of anomalous trajectories and improve Z-separation. A brief test run was scheduled shortly after delivery. Performance appeared promising, but issues of gain matching and cross talk need further exploration. We will study these features {open_quotes}off line{close_quotes} and hope to perform a full experiment on selenium isotopes in the summer. This detector appears to have many uses and is potentially more useful than previous detectors of its type. Similar detectors are being built for the HHRF at Oak Ridge and for Texas A&M University.

  15. 2D fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring ion-exchange membrane based technologies - Reverse electrodialysis (RED).

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Sylwin; Galinha, Claudia F; Crespo, João G; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2016-01-01

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is one of the emerging, membrane-based technologies for harvesting salinity gradient energy. In RED process, fouling is an undesirable operation constraint since it leads to a decrease of the obtainable net power density due to increasing stack electric resistance and pressure drop. Therefore, early fouling detection is one of the main challenges for successful RED technology implementation. In the present study, two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence spectroscopy was used, for the first time, as a tool for fouling monitoring in RED. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) of ion-exchange membrane surfaces and of natural aqueous streams were acquired during one month of a RED stack operation. Fouling evolvement on the ion-exchange membrane surfaces was successfully followed by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy and quantified using principal components analysis (PCA). Additionally, the efficiency of cleaning strategy was assessed by measuring the membrane fluorescence emission intensity before and after cleaning. The anion-exchange membrane (AEM) surface in contact with river water showed to be significantly affected due to fouling by humic compounds, which were found to cross through the membrane from the lower salinity (river water) to higher salinity (sea water) stream. The results obtained show that the combined approach of using 2D fluorescence spectroscopy and PCA has a high potential for studying fouling development and membrane cleaning efficiency in ion exchange membrane processes.

  16. MEASUREMENT OF SURFACE ALPHA CONTAMINATION USING ELECTRET ION CHAMBERS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Electret ion chambers (EICs) are known to be inexpensive, reliable, passive, integrating devices used for measurement of ionizing radiation. Their application for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces was recently realized. This two-year project deals with the evaluation of electret ion chambers with different types of electrets and chambers for measurement of surface alpha contamination, their demonstration at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, a cost-benefit comparison with the existing methods, and the potential deployment at DOE sites. During the first year (FY98) of the project, evaluation of the EICS was completed. It was observed that EICS could be used for measurement of free release level of alpha contamination for transuranics (100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} fixed). DOE sites, where demonstration of EIC technology for surface alpha contamination measurements could be performed, were also identified. During FY99, demonstration and deployment of EICS at DOE sites are planned. A cost-benefit analysis of the EIC for surface alpha contamination measurement will also be performed.

  17. Radon exhalation rates from building materials using electret ion chamber radon monitors in accumulators.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, Payasada; Stieff, Frederick

    2009-08-01

    An electret ion chamber (EIC) radon monitor in a sealed accumulator measures the integrated average radon concentration at the end of the accumulation duration. Theoretical equations have been derived to relate such radon concentrations (Bq m(-3) ) to the radon emanation rate (Bq d(-1)) from building materials enclosed in the accumulator. As an illustration, a 4-L sealable glass jar has been used as an accumulator to calculate the radon emanation rate from different granite samples. The radon emanation rate was converted into radon flux (Bq mm(-2) d(-1)) by dividing the emanation rate by surface area of the sample. Fluxes measured on typical, commercially available granites ranged from 20-30 Bq m(-2) d(-1). These results are similar to the results reported in the literature. The lower limit of detection for a 2-d measurement works out to be 7 Bq m(-2) d(-1). Equations derived can also be used for other sealable accumulators and other integrating detectors, such as alpha track detectors.

  18. Quantum information experiments with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2016-05-01

    We summarize recent experimental work with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped 9 Be+ ions stored in a Penning trap. Penning traps utilize static magnetic and electric fields to confine ions, and enable the trapping and laser cooling of ion crystals larger than typically possible in RF ion traps. We work with single-plane ion crystals where the ions form a triangular lattice through minimization of their Coulomb potential energy. The crystals rotate, and we present numerical studies that determine optimal operating parameters for producing low temperature, stable 2-dimensional crystals with Doppler laser cooling and a rotating wall potential. Our qubit is the electron spin-flip transition in the ground state of 9 Be+ and is sensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. Through mitigation of part-per-billion, vibration-induced magnetic field fluctuations we demonstrate T2 coherence times longer than 50 ms. We engineer long-range Ising interactions with spin-dependent optical dipole forces, and summarize recent measurements that characterize the entanglement generated through single-axis twisting. Supported by: JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PHY-1521080, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  19. Origin of energetic ions observed in the terrestrial ion foreshock : 2D full-particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, Philippe; Lembege, bertrand

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks are well-known structures in astrophysical environments which dissipate bulk flow kinetic energy and accelerate large fraction of particle. Spacecrafts have firmly established the existence of the so-called terrestrial foreshock region magnetically connected to the shock and filled by two distinct populations in the quasi-perpendicular shock region (i.e. for 45r{ } ≤ quad θ Bn quad ≤ 90r{ }, where θ Bn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field) : (i) the field-aligned ion beams or `` FAB '' characterized by a gyrotropic distributionsout{,} and (ii) the gyro-phase bunched ions or `` GPB '' characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution. The present work is based on the use of two dimensional PIC simulation of a curved shock and associated foreshock region where full curvature effects, time of flight effects and both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described by a self consistent approach. Our previous analysis (Savoini et Lembège, 2015) has evidenced that these two types of backstreaming populations can originate from the shock front itself without invoking any local diffusion by ion beam instabilities. Present results are focussed on individual ion trajectories and evidence that "FAB" population is injected into the foreshock mainly along the shock front whereas the "GPB" population penetrates more deeply the shock front. Such differences explain why the "FAB" population loses their gyro-phase coherency and become gyrotropic which is not the case for the "GPB". The impact of these different injection features on the energy gain for each ion population will be presented in détails. Savoini, P. and B. Lembège (2015), `` Production of nongyrotropic and gyrotropic backstreaming ion distributions in the quasi-perpendicular ion foreshock région '', J. Geophys. Res., 120, pp 7154-7171, doi = 10.1002/2015JA021018.

  20. Paired Ion Chamber Constants for Fission Gamma-Neutron Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    energy E. For neutrons with energies distributed over a spectrum, the above theory must be extended to define a spectrum-averaged neutron W-value...733, 1979. 21. DLC-31/(DPL-1/FEWG1), 37- neutrOn , 21-gamma ray coupled, P3, multigroup library in ANISN Format. ORNL/TM-4840. Oak Ridge National...ragMD©/^ ^i[p@^¥ Paired ion chamber constants for fission gamma- neutron fields G. H.Zeman K. P. Ferlic DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY ARMED FORCES

  1. Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

    1989-03-01

    A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. SU-E-T-645: Qualification of a 2D Ionization Chamber Array for Beam Steering and Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, S; Balter, P; Rose, M; Simon, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Establish a procedure for beam steering and profile measurement using a 2D ionization chamber array and show equivalence to a water scanning system. Methods: Multiple photon beams (30×30cm{sup 2} field) and electron beams (25×25cm{sup 2} cone) were steered in the radial and transverse directions using Sun Nuclear’s IC PROFILER (ICP). Solid water was added during steering to ensure measurements were beyond the buildup region. With steering complete, servos were zeroed and enabled. Photon profiles were collected in a 30×30cm{sup 2} field at dmax and 2.9 cm depth for flattened and FFF beams respectively. Electron profiles were collected with a 25×25cm{sup 2} cone and effective depth (solid water + 0.9 cm intrinsic buildup) as follows: 0.9 cm (6e), 1.9 cm (9e), 2.9 cm (12e, 16e, 20e). Profiles of the same energy, field size and depth were measured in water with Sun Nuclear’s 3D SCANNER (3DS). Profiles were re-measured using the ICP after the in-water scans. Profiles measured using the ICP and 3DS were compared by (a) examining the differences in Varian’s “Point Difference Symmetry” metric, (b) visual inspection of the overlaid profile shapes and (c) calculation of point-by-point differences. Results: Comparing ICP measurements before and after water scanning showed very good agreement indicating good stability of the linac and measurement system. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using Varian’s symmetry metric showed agreement within 0.5% for all beams. The average magnitude of the agreement was within 0.2%. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using point-by-point difference showed agreement within 0.5% inside of 80% area of the field width. Conclusion: Profile agreement to within 0.5% was observed between ICP and 3DS after steering multiple energies with the ICP. This indicates that the ICP may be used for steering electron beams, and both flattened and FFF photon beams. Song Gao: Sun Nuclear

  3. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  4. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  5. Phantom dosimetric study of nondivergent aluminum tissue compensator using ion chamber, TLD, and gafchromic film.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Upreti, Ritu R; Patkar, Sachin; Patil, Kalpana; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2008-01-01

    Anatomic contour irregularity and tissue inhomogeneity in head-and-neck radiotherapy can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity due to the presence of hot and cold spots across the treatment volumes. Missing tissue compensators (TCs) can overcome this dose inhomogeneity. The current study examines the capacity of 2-dimensional (2D) custom aluminum TCs fabricated at our hospital to improve the dose homogeneity across the treatment volume. The dosimetry of the 2D custom TCs was carried out in a specially designed head-and-neck phantom for anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) fields with an ion chamber, thermoluminscence dosimeters (TLDs), and film. The results were compared for compensated and uncompensated plans generated from the Eclipse treatment planning system. On average, open-field plans contained peak doses of 117%, optimally wedged-plans contained peak doses of 113%, and custom-compensated plans contained peak doses of 105%. The dose variation between prescribed and measured dose at midplane of the phantom was observed as high as 17%, which was reduced to 3.2% for the customized TC during ionometric measurements. It was further confirmed with TLDs, in a sagittal plane, that the high-dose region of 13.3% was reduced to 2.3%. The measurements carried out with the ion chamber, TLDs, and film were found in good agreement with each other and with Eclipse. Thus, a custom-made 2D TC is capable of reducing hot spots to improve overall dose homogeneity across the treatment volume.

  6. The stability of freely-propagating ion acoustic waves in 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    The stability of a freely-propagating ion acoustic wave (IAW) is a basic science problem that is made difficult by the need to resolve electron kinetic effects over a timescale that greatly exceeds the IAW period during numerical simulation. Recent results examining IAW stability using a 1D+1V Vlasov-Poisson solver indicate that instability is a fundamental property of IAWs that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to ICF experiments. We present here new results addressing the fundamental question of IAW stability across a broad range of plasma conditions in a 2D+2V system using LOKI, ranging from a regime of relatively weak to a regime of relatively strong ion kinetic effects. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL (DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD Program at LLNL (12-ERD-061).

  7. SU-E-T-778: Use of the 2D MatriXX Detector for Measuring Scanned Ion Beam Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Anvar, M Varasteh; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Guarachi, L Fanola; Cirio, R; Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Vignati, A; Donetti, M; Ciocca, M; Panizza, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The quality assurance (QA) procedure has to check the most relevant beam parameters to ensure the delivery of the correct dose to patients. Film dosimetry, which is commonly used for scanned ion beam QA, does not provide immediate results. The purpose of this work is to answer whether, for scanned ion beam therapy, film dosimetry can be replaced with the 2D MatriXX detector as a real-time tool. Methods: MatriXX, equipped with 32×32 parallel plate ion-chambers, is a commercial device intended for pre-treatment verification of conventional radiation therapy.The MatriXX, placed at the isocenter, and GAFCHROMIC films, positioned on the MatriXX entrance, were exposed to 131.44 MeV proton and 221.45 MeV/u Carbon-ion beams.The OmniPro-I’mRT software, applied for the data taking of MatriXX, gives the possibility of acquiring consecutive snapshots. Using the NI LabVIEW, the data from snapshots were logged as text files for further analysis. Radiochromic films were scanned with EPSON scanner and analyzed using software programs developed in-house for comparative purposes. Results: The field dose uniformity, flatness, beam position and beam width were investigated. The field flatness for the region covering 6×6 cm{sup 2} square field was found to be better than 2%. The relative standard deviations, expected to be constant over 2×2, 4×4 and 6×6 pixels from MatriXX measurement gives a uniformity of 1.5% in good agreement with the film results.The beam center position is determined with a resolution better than 200 µm for Carbon and less than 100 µm for proton beam.The FWHM determination for a beam wider than 10 mm is satisfactory, whilst for smaller beams the determination is uncertain. Conclusion: Precise beam position and fast 2D dose distribution can be determined in real-time using MatriXX detector. The results show that MatriXX is quick and accurate enough to be used in charged-particle therapy QA.

  8. Plasma generation near an Ion thruster disharge chamber hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Anderson, John R.; Goebel, Dan M.; Wirz, Richard; Sengupta, Anita

    2003-01-01

    In gridded electrostatic thrusters, ions are produced by electron bombardment in the discharge chamber. In most of these thrusters, a single, centrally located hollow cathode supplies the ionizing electrons. An applied magnetic field in the discharge chamber restricts the electrons leaving the hollow cathode to a very narrow channel. In this channel, the high electron current density ionizes both propellant gas flowing from the hollow cathode, and other neutrals from the main propellant flow from the plenum. The processes that occur just past the hollow cathode exit are very important. In recent engine tests, several cases of discharge cathode orifice place and keeper erosion have been reported. In this paper we present results from a new 1-D, variable area model of the plasma processes in the magnetized channel just downstream of the hollow cathode keeper. The model predicts plasma densities, and temperatures consistent with those reported in the literature for the NSTAR engine, and preliminary results from the model show a potential maximum just downstream of the cathode.

  9. A High-Performance Lithium-Ion Capacitor Based on 2D Nanosheet Materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaohui; Chen, Jingwei; Cui, Mengqi; Cai, Guofa; Wang, Jiangxin; Cui, Peng; Gong, Xuefei; Lee, Pooi See

    2017-02-01

    Lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) are promising electrical energy storage systems for mid-to-large-scale applications due to the high energy and large power output without sacrificing long cycle stability. However, due to the different energy storage mechanisms between anode and cathode, the energy densities of LICs often degrade noticeably at high power density, because of the sluggish kinetics limitation at the battery-type anode side. Herein, a high-performance LIC by well-defined ZnMn2 O4 -graphene hybrid nanosheets anode and N-doped carbon nanosheets cathode is presented. The 2D nanomaterials offer high specific surface areas in favor of a fast ion transport and storage with shortened ion diffusion length, enabling fast charge and discharge. The fabricated LIC delivers a high specific energy of 202.8 Wh kg(-1) at specific power of 180 W kg(-1) , and the specific energy remains 98 Wh kg(-1) even when the specific power achieves as high as 21 kW kg(-1) .

  10. Polarity and ion recombination corrections in continuous and pulsed beams for ionization chambers with high Z chamber walls.

    PubMed

    Aldosary, Ghada; Safigholi, Habib; Song, William; Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the response of Farmer-type ionization chambers fitted with high atomic number (Z) walls is studied, and results of the effects of such walls on polarity and ion recombination correction factors in both continuous and pulsed beams are presented. Measurements were made in a continuous Co-60 beam and a pulsed 6MV linac beam using an Exradin-A12 ionization chamber fitted with the manufacturer's C-552 plastic wall, as well as geometrically identical walls made from aluminum, copper and molybdenum. The bias voltage was changed between 10values (range: +50 to +560V). Ion recombination was determined from Jaffé plots and by using the "two-voltage technique". The saturation charge measured with each chamber wall was extrapolated from Jaffé plots. Additionally, the effect of different wall materials on chamber response was studied using MCNP simulations. Results showed that the polarity correction factor is not significantly affected by changes in chamber wall material (within 0.1%). Furthermore, although the saturation charges greatly vary with each chamber wall material, and charge multiplication increases for higher atomic number wall materials, the standard methods of calculating ion recombination yielded results that differed by only 0.2%. Therefore, polarity and ion recombination correction factors are not greatly affected by the chamber wall material. The experimental saturation charges for all the different wall materials agreed well within the uncertainty with MCNP simulations. The breakdown of the linear relationship in Jaffé plots that was previously reported to exist for conventional chamber walls was also observed with the different wall materials.

  11. D-IMRT verification with a 2D pixel ionization chamber: dosimetric and clinical results in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Stasi, M; Giordanengo, S; Cirio, R; Boriano, A; Bourhaleb, F; Cornelius, I; Donetti, M; Garelli, E; Gomola, I; Marchetto, F; Porzio, M; Sanz Freire, C J; Sardo, A; Peroni, C

    2005-10-07

    Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT) using the sliding-window technique is currently applied for selected treatments of head and neck cancer at Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment of Candiolo (Turin, Italy). In the present work, a PiXel-segmented ionization Chamber (PXC) has been used for the verification of 19 fields used for four different head and neck cancers. The device consists of a 32x32 matrix of 1024 parallel-plate ionization chambers arranged in a square of 24x24 cm2 area. Each chamber has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height; a distance of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent chambers. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm3. Each of the 1024 independent ionization chambers is read out with a custom microelectronics chip.The output factors in water obtained with the PXC at a depth of 10 cm were compared to other detectors and the maximum difference was 1.9% for field sizes down to 3x3 cm2. Beam profiles for different field dimensions were measured with the PXC and two other types of ionization chambers; the maximum distance to agreement (DTA) in the 20-80% penumbra region of a 3x3 cm2 field was 0.09 cm. The leaf speed of the multileaf collimator was varied between 0.07 and 2 cm s-1 and the detector response was constant to better than 0.6%. The behaviour of the PXC was measured while varying the dose rate between 0.21 and 1.21 Gy min-1; the mean difference was 0.50% and the maximum difference was 0.96%. Using fields obtained with an enhanced dynamic wedge and a staircase-like (step) IMRT field, the PXC has been tested for simple 1D modulated beams; comparison with film gave a maximum DTA of 0.12 cm. The PXC was then used to check four different IMRT plans for head and neck cancer treatment: cervical chordoma, parotid, ethmoid and skull base. In the comparison of the PXC versus film and PXC versus treatment planning system, the number of pixels with gamma parameter

  12. D-IMRT verification with a 2D pixel ionization chamber: dosimetric and clinical results in head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasi, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Cirio, R.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cornelius, I.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Gomola, I.; Marchetto, F.; Porzio, M.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Sardo, A.; Peroni, C.

    2005-10-01

    Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT) using the sliding-window technique is currently applied for selected treatments of head and neck cancer at Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment of Candiolo (Turin, Italy). In the present work, a PiXel-segmented ionization Chamber (PXC) has been used for the verification of 19 fields used for four different head and neck cancers. The device consists of a 32 × 32 matrix of 1024 parallel-plate ionization chambers arranged in a square of 24 × 24 cm2 area. Each chamber has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height; a distance of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent chambers. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm3. Each of the 1024 independent ionization chambers is read out with a custom microelectronics chip. The output factors in water obtained with the PXC at a depth of 10 cm were compared to other detectors and the maximum difference was 1.9% for field sizes down to 3 × 3 cm2. Beam profiles for different field dimensions were measured with the PXC and two other types of ionization chambers; the maximum distance to agreement (DTA) in the 20-80% penumbra region of a 3 × 3 cm2 field was 0.09 cm. The leaf speed of the multileaf collimator was varied between 0.07 and 2 cm s-1 and the detector response was constant to better than 0.6%. The behaviour of the PXC was measured while varying the dose rate between 0.21 and 1.21 Gy min-1; the mean difference was 0.50% and the maximum difference was 0.96%. Using fields obtained with an enhanced dynamic wedge and a staircase-like (step) IMRT field, the PXC has been tested for simple 1D modulated beams; comparison with film gave a maximum DTA of 0.12 cm. The PXC was then used to check four different IMRT plans for head and neck cancer treatment: cervical chordoma, parotid, ethmoid and skull base. In the comparison of the PXC versus film and PXC versus treatment planning system, the number of pixels with γ parameter <=1 was 97.7% and 97

  13. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  14. Extraction characteristics of a low-energy ion beam system with a remote plasma chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-15

    Low-energy argon beams were extracted from a dual-chamber ion source system. The first chamber is a quartz cylinder where dense inductively coupled plasmas were produced using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) power. The discharge was driven into an adjacent chamber which acts as a reservoir for ion beam extraction using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. Extraction of ions from the second chamber with energies in the 100 eV range was achieved while minimizing fluctuations induced by the rf signal. A custom-built retarding potential analyzer was used to analyze the effectiveness of ion beam transport using the remote plasma chamber. Well-defined beams were extracted between 60 and 100 V extraction potentials at 50–100 W rf powers. An increase in rf power resulted in an increase in average ion energy, increase in ion current density while the energy spread remains constant.

  15. Development of a novel reaction chamber for ion beam analysis of large samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuee, O. R.; Fathollahi, V.; Agha-Aligol, D.; Farmahini-Farahani, M.; Oliaiy, P.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2008-04-01

    A novel vacuum chamber for ion beam analysis of large-size industrial samples - whose analysis are not feasible in conventional ion beam analysis reaction chambers - has been designed, fabricated and successfully tested. Using the newly developed chamber, both PIXE and RBS analyses could be carried out at the same time and on the same point of the samples. Ion beam analysis using this novel chamber lacks the disadvantages of external beam analysis and benefits the advantages of in-vacuum analysis. This has been achieved by designing a tiny open port in the wall of the reaction chamber to be sealed with a small flat area of sample body where its analysis is of interest. As a case study, two samples of gas turbine blades, a corroded one at highly corrosive environment and a refurbished one after application of certain coatings are analysed using the novel chamber. Experimental results confirm the performance and capability of the reaction chamber.

  16. Ion cyclotron emission calculations using a 2D full wave numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, D. B.; Jaeger, E. F.; Colestock, P. L.

    1987-09-01

    Measurement of radiation in the HF band due to cyclotron emission by energetic ions produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic on large devices which are entering the reactor regime of operation. A number of complications make the modelling and interpretation of such measurements difficult using conventional geometrical optics methods. In particular the long wavelength and lack of high directivity of antennas in this frequency regime make observation of a single path across the plasma into a viewing dump impractical. Pickup antennas effectively see the whole plasma and wall reflection effects are important. We have modified our 2D full wave ICRH code2 to calculate wave fields due to a distribution of energetic ions in tokamak geometry. The radiation is modeled as due to an ensemble of localized source currents distributed in space. The spatial structure of the coherent wave field is then calculated including cyclotron harmonic damping as compared to the usual procedure of incoherently summing powers of individual radiators. This method has the advantage that phase information from localized radiating currents is globally retained so the directivity of the pickup antennas is correctly represented. Also standing waves and wall reflections are automatically included.

  17. Origin of the different energetic ion populations in the quasi-perpendicular Ion Foreshock: 2D Full-particle simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, P.; Lembege, B.; Stienlet, J.

    2012-04-01

    The foreshock region is located upstream of the terrestrial bow shock and is characterized by energetic backstreaming particles (electrons and ions) issued from the shock and by an important wave activity as observed by many space missions. In order to analyse the foreshock region, a curved shock is simulated with the help of a 2 - D full particle (PIC) code, where full curvature and time of flight effects, and where both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described by a self consistent approach. The analysis is presently restricted to the quasi-perpendicular angular range defined by 45°≤ θBn ≤ 90°, where θBn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field, and we focus only on the ion foreshock. In a good agreement with experimental data, present preliminary results evidence two distinct ion populations collimated along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF): (i) the Field-Aligned Beam population (hereafter named "FAB") and (ii) the gyro-phase bunch population (hereafter named "GPB") which differ from each other by their gyrotropic or non-gyrotropic behavior, respectively. Additionally, the "FAB" population is observed at the edge of the ion foreshock and near the curved shock front, while the "'GPB" population is observed deeper in the foreshock and further from the shock front. The analysis shows that no pitch angle scattering mechanism needs to be invoked to account for the generation of the "GPB", but rather additional criteria are necessary namely: the interaction time Δtint of backstreaming ions with the shock front and their downstream penetration depth. These criteria allow to evidence that (i) the "FAB" population corresponds to particles which move back and forth between the upstream edge of the front and the overshoot, and are characterized by a quite large Δtint (covering several local gyro-periods, 4 ≤ τci ≤ 12). In contrast, (ii) the "GPB" ions have suffered a very short interaction time (i.e. Δtint < 1

  18. Dosimetric Verification and Validation of Conformal and IMRT Treatments Fields with an Ionization Chamber 2D-Array

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelina, Figueroa M.; Gabriel, Resendiz G.; Miguel, Perez P.

    2008-08-11

    A three-dimensional treatment planning system requires comparisons of calculated and measured dose distributions. It is necessary to confirm by means of patient specific QA that the dose distributions are correctly calculated, and that the patient data is correctly transferred to and delivered by the treatment machine. We used an analysis software for bi-dimensional dosimetric verification of conformal treatment and IMRT fields using as objective criterion the gamma index. An ionization chamber bi-dimensional array was used for absolute dose measurement in the complete field area.

  19. Post-flight Analysis of the Argon Filled Ion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Goldhagen, P.; Jones, I. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is a complex mixture of primary galactic and solar cosmic rays and a multitude of secondary particles produced in collision with air nuclei. The first series of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurement flights on the NASA research aircraft ER-2 took place in June 1997. The ER-2 flight package consisted of fifteen instruments from six countries and were chosen to provide varying sensitivity to specific components. These AIR ER-2 flight measurements are to characterize the AIR environment during solar minimum to allow the continued development of environmental models of this complex mixture of ionizing radiation. This will enable scientists to study the ionizing radiation health hazard associated with the high-altitude operation of a commercial supersonic transport and to allow estimates of single event upsets for advanced avionics systems design. The argon filled ion chamber representing about 40 percent of the contributions to radiation risks are analyzed herein and model discrepancies for solar minimum environment are on the order of 5 percent and less. Other biologically significant components remain to be analyzed.

  20. Dose verification with different ion chambers for SRT/SBRT plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmus, I. F.; Tas, B.; Okumus, A.; Uzel, O. E.

    2017-02-01

    Verification of patient plan is very important in stereotactic treatments. VMAT plans were prepared with 6MV-FFF or 10MV-FFF energies for 25 intracranial and extracranial stereotactic patients. Absolute dose was measured for dose verification in each plans. Iba® CC01, Iba® CC04, Iba® CC13 ion chambers placed at a depth of 5cm in solid phantom (RW3). Also we scanned this phantom with ion chambers by Siemens® Biograph mCT. QA plans were prepared by transferring twenty five patient plans to phantom assemblies for three ion chambers. All plans were performed separately for three ion chambers at Elekta® Versa HD linear accelerator. Statistical analysis of results were made by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Difference between dose values were determined %1.84±3.4 (p: 0.001) with Iba CC13 ion chamber, %1.80±3.4 (p: 0.002) with Iba CC04 ion chamber and %0.29±4.6 (p: 0.667) with Iba CC01 ion chamber. In stereotactic treatments, dosimetric uncertainty increases in small areas. We determined more accurate results with small sized detectors. Difference between TPS calculations and all measurements were founded lower than %2.

  1. Characterization of a multi-axis ion chamber array

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kozelka, Jakub; Simon, William E.; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Chihray

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to characterize a multi-axis ion chamber array (IC PROFILER; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL USA) that has the potential to simplify the acquisition of LINAC beam data. Methods: The IC PROFILER (or panel) measurement response was characterized with respect to radiation beam properties, including dose, dose per pulse, pulse rate frequency (PRF), and energy. Panel properties were also studied, including detector-calibration stability, power-on time, backscatter dependence, and the panel's agreement with water tank measurements [profiles, fractional depth dose (FDD), and output factors]. Results: The panel's relative deviation was typically within ({+-}) 1% of an independent (or nominal) response for all properties that were tested. Notable results were (a) a detectable relative field shape change of {approx}1% with linear accelerator PRF changes; (b) a large range in backscatter thickness had a minimal effect on the measured dose distribution (typically less than 1%); (c) the error spread in profile comparison between the panel and scanning water tank (Blue Phantom, CC13; IBA Schwarzenbruck, DE) was approximately ({+-}) 0.75%. Conclusions: The ability of the panel to accurately reproduce water tank profiles, FDDs, and output factors is an indication of its abilities as a dosimetry system. The benefits of using the panel versus a scanning water tank are less setup time and less error susceptibility. The same measurements (including device setup and breakdown) for both systems took 180 min with the water tank versus 30 min with the panel. The time-savings increase as the measurement load is increased.

  2. High-intensity positive beams extracted from a compact double-chamber ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Huck, H.; Somacal, H.; Di Gregorio, D.E.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Igarzabal, M.; Di Paolo, H.; Reinoso, M.

    2005-06-15

    This work presents the design and development of a simple ion source, the associated ion extraction optics, and the beam transport of a low-energy and high-current proton accelerator. In its actual version, the ion source can deliver positive proton currents up to 100 mA. This rather high beam current is achieved by adding a small ionization chamber between the discharge chamber containing the filament and the extraction electrode of the ion source. Different parameters of the ion source and the injection beam line are evaluated by means of computer simulations to optimize the beam production and transmission.

  3. Calibration of the borated ion chamber at NIST reactor thermal column.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Hertel, N E; Lennox, A

    2007-01-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy and boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy, the absorbed dose of tissue due to the boron neutron capture reaction is difficult to measure directly. This dose can be computed from the measured thermal neutron fluence rate and the (10)B concentration at the site of interest. A borated tissue-equivalent (TE) ion chamber can be used to directly measure the boron dose in a phantom under irradiation by a neutron beam. Fermilab has two Exradin 0.5 cm(3) Spokas thimble TE ion chambers, one loaded with boron, available for such measurements. At the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility, these ion chambers are generally used with air as the filling gas. Since alpha particles and lithium ions from the (10)B(n,alpha)(7)Li reactions have very short ranges in air, the Bragg-Gray principle may not be satisfied for the borated TE ion chamber. A calibration method is described in this paper for the determination of boron capture dose using paired ion chambers. The two TE ion chambers were calibrated in the thermal column of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor. The borated TE ion chamber is loaded with 1,000 ppm of natural boron (184 ppm of (10)B). The NIST thermal column has a cadmium ratio of greater than 400 as determined by gold activation. The thermal neutron fluence rate during the calibration was determined using a NIST fission chamber to an accuracy of 5.1%. The chambers were calibrated at two different thermal neutron fluence rates: 5.11 x 10(6) and 4.46 x 10(7)n cm(-2) s(-1). The non-borated ion chamber reading was used to subtract collected charge not due to boron neutron capture reactions. An optically thick lithium slab was used to attenuate the thermal neutrons from the neutron beam port so the responses of the chambers could be corrected for fast neutrons and gamma rays in the beam. The calibration factor of the borated ion chamber was determined to be 1.83 x 10(9) +/- 5.5% (+/- 1sigma) n

  4. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  5. Reactions of State-Selected Atomic Oxygen Ions O(+)((4)S, (2)D, (2)P) with Methane.

    PubMed

    Cunha de Miranda, Barbara; Romanzin, Claire; Chefdeville, Simon; Vuitton, Véronique; Žabka, Jan; Polášek, Miroslav; Alcaraz, Christian

    2015-06-11

    An experimental study has been carried out on the reactions of state selected O(+)((4)S, (2)D, (2)P) ions with methane with the aims of characterizing the effects of both the parent ion internal energy and collision energy on the reaction dynamics and determining the fate of oxygen species in complex media, in particular the Titan ionosphere. Absolute cross sections and product velocity distributions have been determined for the reactions of (16)O(+) or (18)O(+) ions with CH4 or CD4 from thermal to 5 eV collision energies by using the guided ion beam (GIB) technique. Dissociative photoionization of O2 with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation delivered by the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL storage ring and the threshold photoion photoelectron coincidence (TPEPICO) technique are used for the preparation of purely state-selected O(+)((4)S, (2)D, (2)P) ions. A complete inversion of the product branching ratio between CH4(+) and CH3(+) ions in favor of the latter is observed for excitation of O(+) ions from the (4)S ground state to either the (2)D or the (2)P metastable state. CH4(+) and CH3(+) ions, which are by far the major products for the reaction of ground state and excited states, are strongly backward scattered in the center of mass frame relative to O(+) parent ions. For the reaction of O(+)((4)S), CH3(+) production also rises with increasing collision energy but with much less efficiency than with O(+) excitation. We found that a mechanism of dissociative charge transfer, mediated by an initial charge transfer step, can account very well for all the observations, indicating that CH3(+) production is associated with the formation of H and O atoms (CH3(+) + H + O) rather than with OH formation by an hydride transfer process (CH3(+) + OH). Therefore, as the CH4(+) production by charge transfer is also associated with O atoms, the fate of oxygen species in these reactions is essentially the O production, except for the reaction of O(+)((4)S), which also

  6. Structures and Luminescent Properties of Two 2D Coordination Polymers Containing Tb(III) or Dy(III) Ions.

    PubMed

    An, Xiaoping; Wang, Hongsheng; Li, Gongchun

    2014-03-01

    Two 2D rare earth terbium and dysprosium coordination polymers with 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylate and oxalate anions have been synthesized by hydrothermal method, the formula is {[RE(pda)(ox)0.5(H2O)4]·2H2O}n (RE = Tb (1) and Dy (2); H2pda = 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid; ox = oxalate anion). The two complexes are isomorphic and crystallized in monoclinic system, P21/c space group. Each pda anion connects two rare earth ions with 2- carboxyl group and the nitrogen atom but the 4- carboxyl group does not coordinate with rare earth ions. Each ox anion connects two rare earth ions by μ 2-bridge way. Both the complexes exhibit intense characteristic luminescence of Tb(III) or Dy(III) ion with excitation of UV-rays.

  7. Heavy ion beam studies and imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1981-03-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber is used to accurately measure intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. An imaging capability has now been developed for the system, allowing for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of radiological objects using heavy ion beams.

  8. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams.

  9. Verification of patient-specific dose distributions in proton therapy using a commercial two-dimensional ion chamber array

    SciTech Connect

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Ciangaru, George; Zhu, Ronald; Song Xiaofei; Gillin, Michael

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether a two-dimensional (2D) ion chamber array detector quickly and accurately measures patient-specific dose distributions in treatment with passively scattered and spot scanning proton beams. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array detector MatriXX was used to measure the dose distributions in plastic water phantom from passively scattered and spot scanning proton beam fields planned for patient treatment. Planar dose distributions were measured using MatriXX, and the distributions were compared to those calculated using a treatment-planning system. The dose distributions generated by the treatment-planning system and a film dosimetry system were similarly compared. Results: For passively scattered proton beams, the gamma index for the dose-distribution comparison for treatment fields for three patients with prostate cancer and for one patient with lung cancer was less than 1.0 for 99% and 100% of pixels for a 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement, respectively. For spot scanning beams, the mean ({+-} standard deviation) percentages of pixels with gamma indices meeting the passing criteria were 97.1%{+-}1.4% and 98.8%{+-}1.4% for MatriXX and film dosimetry, respectively, for 20 fields used to treat patients with prostate cancer. Conclusions: Unlike film dosimetry, MatriXX provides not only 2D dose-distribution information but also absolute dosimetry in fractions of minutes with acceptable accuracy. The results of this study indicate that MatriXX can be used to verify patient-field specific dose distributions in proton therapy.

  10. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2014-02-01

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λD. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  11. Theorization on ion-exchange equilibria: activity of species in 2-D phases.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Hiroki

    2004-11-01

    Ion-exchange reactions are naturally occurring at soil and sediment/water interphases, determining soil fertility and water quality. These ion-exchange reactions with inorganic and organic exchangers are applied to chemical analysis, recovery of useful ions from low-grade ores (potentially from sea water), water purification including the preparation of "ultrapure" water, production of foods and medicines, therapy, and other uses. It is important to theorize about or to model ion-exchange reactions for quantitative explanations of ion-exchange phenomena and for efficient operation of ion-exchange processes. This paper describes the modeling of ion-exchange equilibria for hydroxyl sites on metal oxides and carboxyl sites in resins with monovalent cations (alkali metal ions), a monovalent anion (nitrate ion), and divalent heavy metal ions. The procedure of modeling is as follows: the stoichiometry and material balance equations of the respective ion-exchange reactions were established based on findings here and by others. The equilibrium conditions were given by the Frumkin equation, where the mass-action relation is modified with lateral interactions between species at the interphase. The model equations were fitted to the measured data and model parameter values were determined by nonlinear regression analysis. The formation of bonds between ions and exchanger sites was evaluated by the equilibrium constant and the suppression of bond formation by electrostatic, geometric, and other lateral interactions was evaluated by the interaction constant. It was established that the properties of ions are determined by the valence, size, and hydration state of the ions. Monovalent ions (anions and cations) react with oxide surface hydroxyl and resin carboxyl sites as hydrated ions and form loose ion-site pairs by a weak electrostatic bond (nonspecific adsorption). However, the lateral interactions are large because of a large polarization of the ion-site pairs. When the

  12. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-06-28

    Neutronics analysis has been performed to assess the shielding requirements for the insulators and final focusing magnets in a modified HYLIFE-II target chamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion beam transport. Using 65 cm thick Flibe jet assemblies provides adequate shielding for the electrical insulator units. Additional shielding is needed in front of the final focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets. A shield with a thickness varying between 45 and 90 cm needs to be provided in front of the quadrupole unit. The final laser mirrors located along the channel axis are in the direct line-of-sight of source neutrons. Neutronics calculations were performed to determine the constraints on the placement of these mirrors to be lifetime components.

  13. NOTE: Hybrid plan verification for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX—a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, Barbara; Streck, Natalia; Klein, Elisabeth; Loeschel, Rainer; Haertl, Petra; Koelbl, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX (IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) has been developed for absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for perpendicular beam incidence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of I'mRT MatriXX for oblique beam incidence and hybrid plan verification of IMRT with original gantry angles. For the assessment of angular dependence, open fields with gantry angles in steps of 10° were calculated on a CT scan of I'mRT MatriXX. For hybrid plan verification, 17 clinical IMRT plans and one rotational plan were used. Calculations were performed with pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC) and Monte Carlo (MC) methods, which had been previously validated. Measurements were conducted on an Elekta SynergyS linear accelerator. To assess the potential and limitations of the system, gamma evaluation was performed with different dose tolerances and distances to agreement. Hybrid plan verification passed the gamma test with 4% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement in all cases, in 82-88% of the cases for tolerances of 3%/3 mm, and in 59-76% of the cases if 3%/2 mm were used. Separate evaluation of the low dose and high dose regions showed that I'mRT MatriXX can be used for hybrid plan verification of IMRT plans within 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement with a relaxed dose tolerance of 4% in the low dose region outside the multileaf collimator (MLC).

  14. Convert Ten Foot Environmental Test Chamber into an Ion Engine Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanVelzer, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The 10 Foot Space Simulator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been used for the last 40 years to test numerous spacecraft, including the Ranger series, several Mariner class, among many others and finally, the Spirit and Opportunity Mars Rovers. The request was made to convert this facility to an Ion Engine test facility, with a possible long term life test. The Ion engine was to propel the Prometheus spacecraft to Jupiter's moons. This paper discusses the challenges that were met, both from a procedural and physical standpoint. The converted facility must operate unattended, support a 30 Kw Ion Engine, operate economically, and be easily converted back to former operation as a spacecraft test facility.

  15. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  16. Computational Model Tracking Primary Electrons, Secondary Electrons, and Ions in the Discharge Chamber of an Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Computational modeling of the plasma located in the discharge chamber of an ion engine is an important activity so that the development and design of the next generation of ion engines may be enhanced. In this work a computational tool called XOOPIC is used to model the primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions inside the discharge chamber. The details of this computational tool are discussed in this paper. Preliminary results from XOOPIC are presented. The results presented include particle number density distributions for the primary electrons, the secondary electrons, and the ions. In addition the total number of a particular particle in the discharge chamber as a function of time, electric potential maps and magnetic field maps are presented. A primary electron number density plot from PRIMA is given in this paper so that the results of XOOPIC can be compared to it. PRIMA is a computer code that the present investigators have used in much of their previous work that provides results that compare well to experimental results. PRIMA only models the primary electrons in the discharge chamber. Modeling ions and secondary electrons, as well as the primary electrons, will greatly increase our ability to predict different characteristics of the plasma discharge used in an ion engine.

  17. Distributed drift chamber design for rare particle detection in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bellwied, R.; Bennett, M.J.; Bernardo, V.; Caines, H.; Christie, W.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Debbe, R.; Dinnwiddie, R.; Engelage, J.; Flores, I.; Fuzesy, R.; Greiner, L.; Hallman, T.; Hoffmann, G.; Huang, H.Z.; Jensen, P.; Judd, E.G.; Kainz, K.; Kaplan, M.; Kelly, S.; Lindstrom, P.J; Llope, W.J.; LoCurto, G.; Longacre, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Mitchell, J.T.; Mitchell, J.W.; Mogavero, E.; Mutchler, G.; Paganis, S.; Platner, E.; Potenza, R.; Rotondo, F.; Russ, D.; Sakrejda, I.; Saulys, A.; Schambach, J.; Sheen, J.; Smirnoff, N.; Stokeley, C.; Tang, J.; Trattner, A.L.; Trentalange, S.; Visser, G.; Whitfield, J.P.; Witharm, F.; Witharm, R.; Wright, M.

    2001-10-02

    This report describes a multi-plane drift chamber that was designed and constructed to function as a topological detector for the BNL AGSE896 rare particle experiment. The chamber was optimized for good spatial resolution, two track separation, and a high uniform efficiency while operating in a 1.6 Tesla magnetic field and subjected to long term exposure from a 11.6 GeV/nucleon beam of 10**6 Au ions per second.

  18. Monte Carlo calculations of electron beam quality conversion factors for several ion chamber types

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive investigation of electron beam reference dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulations of the response of 10 plane-parallel and 18 cylindrical ion chamber types. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of the optimal shift of the chambers’ effective point of measurement (EPOM) and beam quality conversion factors. Methods: The EGSnrc system is used for calculations of the absorbed dose to gas in ion chamber models and the absorbed dose to water as a function of depth in a water phantom on which cobalt-60 and several electron beam source models are incident. The optimal EPOM shifts of the ion chambers are determined by comparing calculations of R{sub 50} converted from I{sub 50} (calculated using ion chamber simulations in phantom) to R{sub 50} calculated using simulations of the absorbed dose to water vs depth in water. Beam quality conversion factors are determined as the calculated ratio of the absorbed dose to water to the absorbed dose to air in the ion chamber at the reference depth in a cobalt-60 beam to that in electron beams. Results: For most plane-parallel chambers, the optimal EPOM shift is inside of the active cavity but different from the shift determined with water-equivalent scaling of the front window of the chamber. These optimal shifts for plane-parallel chambers also reduce the scatter of beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, as a function of R{sub 50}. The optimal shift of cylindrical chambers is found to be less than the 0.5 r{sub cav} recommended by current dosimetry protocols. In most cases, the values of the optimal shift are close to 0.3 r{sub cav}. Values of k{sub ecal} are calculated and compared to those from the TG-51 protocol and differences are explained using accurate individual correction factors for a subset of ion chambers investigated. High-precision fits to beam quality conversion factors normalized to unity in a beam with R{sub 50} = 7.5 cm (k{sub Q}{sup ′}) are provided. These

  19. Engineered long-range interactions on a 2D array of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Joseph W.; Sawyer, Brian C.; Bollinger, John J.; Freericks, James K.

    2014-03-01

    Ising interactions are one paradigm used to model quantum magnetism in condensed matter systems. At NIST Boulder we confine and Doppler laser cool hundreds of 9Be+ ions in a Penning trap. The valence electron of each ion behaves as an ideal spin-1/2 particle and, in the limit of weak radial confinement relative to axial confinement, the ions naturally form a two-dimensional triangular lattice. A variable-range anti-ferromagnetic Ising interaction is engineered with a spin-dependent optical dipole force (ODF) through spin-dependent excitation of collective modes of ion motion. We have also exploited this spin-dependent force to perform spectroscopy and thermometry of the normal modes of the trapped ion crystal. The high spin-count and long-range spin-spin couplings achievable in the NIST Penning trap brings within reach simulation of computationally intractable problems in quantum magnetism. Examples include modeling quantum magnetic phase transitions and propagation of spin correlations resulting from a quantum quench. The Penning system may also be amenable to observation of spin-liquid behavior thought to arise in systems where the underlying lattice structure can frustrate long-range ordering. Supported by DARPA OLE and NIST.

  20. Dynamics of Ion-Gating 2D Crystals Using a Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-Min; Bourdon, Buchanan; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Robinson, Joshua; Seabaugh, Alan; Fullerton, Susan; CenterLow Energy Systems Technology (Least) Team

    2015-03-01

    Ion-gating can significantly increase the static carrier density of graphene due to the formation of an electric double layer (EDL); however, the dynamics of ion-gating have not been extensively reported. A comprehensive understanding of ion dynamics is important because it establishes the timescales required to achieve EDL equilibrium, and directly affects the operating speed of devices and circuits employing electrolytic gates. Here, ion dynamics are measured on epitaxial graphene Hall-bar devices that are electrolytically gated with polyethylene oxide and lithium perchlorate. The time constants for EDL formation and dissipation are measured as a function of temperature. The measured formation time is slower than the dissipation time, because ion diffusion resulting from a concentration gradient must be opposed during EDL formation. These results quantitatively agree with COMSOL multiphysics simulations. EDL dissipation follows a stretched exponential decay described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) equation. The temperature-dependent relaxation times extracted from the KWW fit follow the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) temperature dependence. At temperatures approaching the glass transition temperature of the electrolyte, the relaxation times exceed several hours, demonstrating the long timescales over which the EDL can persist in the absence of a gate bias.

  1. 2D spatial profile measurements of potential fluctuation with heavy ion beam probe on the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, A.; Ido, T.; Nishiura, M.; Kato, S.; Ogawa, K.; Takahashi, H.; Igami, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional spatial profiles of potential fluctuation were measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) in the Large Helical Device (LHD). For 2D spatial profile measurements, the probe beam energy has to be changed, which requires the adjustment of many deflectors in the beam transport line to optimize the beam trajectory, since the transport line of LHD-HIBP system is long. The automatic beam adjustment system was developed, which allows us to adjust the beam trajectory easily. By analyzing coherence between potential fluctuation and magnetic probe signal, the noise level of the mode power spectrum of the potential fluctuation can be reduced. By using this method, the 2D spatial profile of potential fluctuation profile was successfully obtained.

  2. Label free biochemical 2D and 3D imaging using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John S; Vickerman, John C; Winograd, Nicholas

    2011-10-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) provides a method for the detection of native and exogenous compounds in biological samples on a cellular scale. Through the development of novel ion beams the amount of molecular signal available from the sample surface has been increased. Through the introduction of polyatomic ion beams, particularly C(60), ToF-SIMS can now be used to monitor molecular signals as a function of depth as the sample is eroded thus proving the ability to generate 3D molecular images. Here we describe how this new capability has led to the development of novel instrumentation for 3D molecular imaging while also highlighting the importance of sample preparation and discuss the challenges that still need to be overcome to maximise the impact of the technique.

  3. Retention of Sputtered Molybdenum on Ion Engine Discharge Chamber Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Dever, Joyce A.; Power, John L.

    2001-01-01

    Grit-blasted anode surfaces are commonly used in ion engines to ensure adherence of sputtered coatings. Next generation ion engines will require higher power levels, longer operating times, and thus there will likely be thicker sputtered coatings on their anode surfaces than observed to date on 2.3 kW-class xenon ion engines. The thickness of coatings on the anode of a 10 kW, 40-centimeter diameter thruster, for example, may be 22 micrometers or more after extended operation. Grit-blasted wire mesh, titanium, and aluminum coupons were coated with molybdenum at accelerated rates to establish coating stability after the deposition process and after thermal cycling tests. These accelerated deposition rates are roughly three orders of magnitude more rapid than the rates at which the screen grid is sputtered in a 2.3 kW-class, 30-centimeter diameter ion engine. Using both RF and DC sputtering processes, the molybdenum coating thicknesses ranged from 8 to 130 micrometers, and deposition rates from 1.8 micrometers per hour to 5.1 micrometers per hour. In all cases, the molybdenum coatings were stable after the deposition process, and there was no evidence of spalling of the coatings after 20 cycles from about -60 to +320 C. The stable, 130 micrometer molybdenum coating on wire mesh is 26 times thicker than the thickest coating found on the anode of a 2.3 kW, xenon ion engine that was tested for 8200 hr. Additionally, this coating on wire mesh coupon is estimated to be a factor of greater than 4 thicker than one would expect to obtain on the anode of the next generation ion engine which may have xenon throughputs as high as 550 kg.

  4. Efficiency improvements for ion chamber calculations in high energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, J.; Zink, K.; Kawrakow, I.

    2008-04-15

    This article presents the implementation of several variance reduction techniques that dramatically improve the simulation efficiency of ion chamber dose and perturbation factor calculations. The cavity user code for the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system is extended by photon cross-section enhancement (XCSE), an intermediate phase-space storage (IPSS) technique, and a correlated sampling (CS) scheme. XCSE increases the density of photon interaction sites inside and in the vicinity of the chamber and results - in combination with a Russian Roulette game for electrons that cannot reach the cavity volume - in an increased efficiency of up to a factor of 350 for calculating dose in a Farmer type chamber placed at 10 cm depth in a water phantom. In combination with the IPSS and CS techniques, the efficiency for the calculation of the central electrode perturbation factor P{sub cel} can be increased by up to three orders of magnitude for a single chamber location and by nearly four orders of magnitude when considering the P{sub cel} variation with depth or with distance from the central axis in a large field photon beam. The intermediate storage of the phase-space properties of particles entering a volume that contains many possible chamber locations leads to efficiency improvements by a factor larger than 500 when computing a profile of chamber doses in the field of a linear accelerator photon beam. All techniques are combined in a new EGSnrc user code egs{sub c}hamber. Optimum settings for the variance reduction parameters are investigated and are reported for a Farmer type ion chamber. A few example calculations illustrating the capabilities of the egs{sub c}hamber code are presented.

  5. The 2-D Ion Chromatography Development and Application: Determination of Sulfate in Formation Water at Pre-Salt Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonietto, G. B.; Godoy, J. M.; Almeida, A. C.; Mendes, D.; Soluri, D.; Leite, R. S.; Chalom, M. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Formation water is the naturally-occurring water which is contained within the geological formation itself. The quantity and quality of the formation water can both be problematic. Over time, the water volume should decrease as the gas volumes increase. Formation water has been found to contain high levels of Cl, As, Fe, Ba, Mn, PAHs and may even contain naturally occurring radioactive materials. Chlorides in some cases have been found to be in excess of four-five times the level of concentrations found in the ocean. Within the management of well operation, there is sulfate between the analytes of greatest importance due to the potential for hydrogen sulphide formation and consequent corrosion of pipelines. As the concentration of sulfate in these waters can be less than n times that of chloride, a quantitative determination, using the technique of ion chromatography, constitutes an analytical challenge. This work aimed to develop and validate a method for the determination of sulphate ions in hyper-saline waters coming from the oil wells of the pre-salt, using 2D IC. In 2D IC the first column can be understood as a separating column, in which the species with retention times outside a preset range are discarded, while those belonging to this range are retained in a pre-concentrator column to further injecting a second column, the second dimension in which occurs the separation and quantification of the analytes of interest. As the chloride ions have a retention time lower than that of sulfate, a method was developed a for determining sulfate in very low range (mg L-1) by 2D IC, applicable to hypersaline waters, wherein the first dimension is used to the elimination of the matrix, ie, chloride ions, and the second dimension utilized in determining sulfate. For sulphate in a concentration range from 1.00 mg L-1 was obtained an accuracy of 1.0%. The accuracy of the method was tested by the standard addition method different samples of formation water in the pre

  6. Laser characterization of the unsteady 2-D ion flow field in a Hall thruster with breathing mode oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; MacDonald-Tenenbaum, Natalia; Hargus, William, Jr.; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Hall thrusters are a mature form of electric propulsion for spacecraft. One commonly observed low frequency (10-50 kHz) discharge current oscillation in these E × B devices is the breathing mode, linked to a propagating ionization front traversing the channel. The complex time histories of ion production and acceleration in the discharge channel and near-field plume lead to interesting dynamics and interactions in the central plasma jet and downstream plume regions. A time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic non-intrusively measures 2-D ion velocity and relative ion density throughout the plume of a commercial BHT-600 Hall thruster manufactured by Busek Co. Low velocity classes of ions observed in addition to the main accelerated population are linked to propellant ionization outside of the device. Effects of breathing mode dynamics are shown to persist far downstream where modulations in ion velocity and LIF intensity are correlated with discharge current oscillations. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. M. Birkan as program manager. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NSSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  7. Alternative solutions to caesium in negative-ion sources: a study of negative-ion surface production on diamond in H2/D2 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartry, Gilles; Kogut, Dmitry; Achkasov, Kostiantyn; Layet, Jean-Marc; Farley, Thomas; Gicquel, Alix; Achard, Jocelyn; Brinza, Ovidiu; Bieber, Thomas; Khemliche, Hocine; Roncin, Philippe; Simonin, Alain

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with a study of H‑/D‑ negative ion surface production on diamond in low pressure H2/D2 plasmas. A sample placed in the plasma is negatively biased with respect to plasma potential. Upon positive ion impacts on the sample, some negative ions are formed and detected according to their mass and energy by a mass spectrometer placed in front of the sample. The experimental methods developed to study negative ion surface production and obtain negative ion energy and angle distribution functions are first presented. Different diamond materials ranging from nanocrystalline to single crystal layers, either doped with boron or intrinsic, are then investigated and compared with graphite. The negative ion yields obtained are presented as a function of different experimental parameters such as the exposure time, the sample bias which determines the positive ion impact energy and the sample surface temperature. It is concluded from these experiments that the electronic properties of diamond materials, among them the negative electron affinity, seem to be favourable for negative-ion surface production. However, the negative ion yield decreases with the plasma induced defect density.

  8. Engineering 2D Ising Interactions in a Large (N>100) Ensemble of Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Keith, Adam; Wang, Joseph; Freericks, James; Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael; Bollinger, John

    2012-06-01

    Experimental progress in atomic, molecular, and optical physics has enabled exquisite control over ensembles of cold trapped ions. We have recently engineered long-range Ising interactions in a two-dimensional, 1-mK Coulomb crystal of hundreds of ^9Be^+ ions confined within a Penning trap. Interactions between the ^9Be^+ valence spins are mediated via spin-dependent optical dipole forces (ODFs) coupling to transverse motional modes of the planar crystal. A continuous range of inverse power-law spin-spin interactions from infinite (1/r^0) to dipolar (1/r^3) are accessible by varying the ODF drive frequency relative to the transverse modes. The ions naturally form a triangular lattice structure within the planar array, allowing for simulation of spin frustration using our generated antiferromagnetic couplings. We report progress toward simulating the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic transverse quantum Ising Hamiltonians in this large ensemble. We also report spectroscopy, thermometry, and sensitive displacement detection (˜100 pm) via entanglement of valence spin and drumhead oscillations.

  9. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  10. Comparison of dose measurements in CT using a novel semiconductor detector and a small ion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Paschoal, Cinthia M. M.; Ferreira, Fernanda Carla L.; Santos, Luiz A. P.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2015-07-01

    The advance of multislice computed tomography (CT) has become inadequate the currently dosimetric protocol used in CT. Instead of dosimetry based on the measurement of CTDI using a pencil ion chamber of 100 m of length, it was proposed the use of a small ion chamber (IC) and the calculating the dose equilibrium (Deq) at the location of the chamber. The objective of this work was to compare the performance of a short IC and a commercial photodiode to measure the accumulated dose at the center of the scan length L, DL(0), and to obtain the equilibrium dose Deq using the two detectors. The result for L=100 mm was compared with the result of a pencil chamber. The results indicate that the commercial photodiode is suitable to measure the accumulated dose at the center of the scan length L as compared with the ion chambers. This methodology allows measurements of the accumulated dose for any desired scan length, allowing measuring the equilibrium dose Deq if the phantom is long enough to allow it. (authors)

  11. 2D Electrides as Promising Anode Materials for Na-Ion Batteries from First-Principles Study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junping; Xu, Bo; Yang, Shengyuan A; Guan, Shan; Ouyang, Chuying; Yao, Yugui

    2015-11-04

    Searching for suitable anodes with good performance is a key challenge for rechargeable Na-ion batteries (NIBs). Using the first-principles method, we predict that 2D nitrogen electride materials can be served as anode materials for NIBs. Particularly, we show that Ca2N meets almost all the requirements of a good NIB anode. Each formula unit of a monolayer Ca2N sheet can absorb up to four Na atoms, corresponding to a theoretical specific capacity of 1138 mAh·g(-1). The metallic character for both pristine Ca2N and its Na intercalated state NaxCa2N ensures good electronic conduction. Na diffusion along the 2D monolayer plane can be very fast even at room temperature, with a Na migration energy barrier as small as 0.084 eV. These properties are key to the excellent rate performance of an anode material. The average open-circuit voltage is calculated to be 0.18 V vs Na/Na(+) for the chemical stoichiometry of Na2Ca2N and 0.09 V for Na4Ca2N. The relatively low average open-circuit voltage is beneficial to the overall voltage of the cell. In addition, the 2D monolayers have very small lattice change upon Na intercalation, which ensures a good cycling stability. All these results demonstrate that the Ca2N monolayer could be an excellent anode material for NIBs.

  12. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  13. Lithium-ion capacitors with 2D Nb2CTx (MXene) - carbon nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Ayeong; Glushenkov, Alexey M.; Anasori, Babak; Urbankowski, Patrick; Li, Jingwen; Byles, Bryan W.; Blake, Brian; Van Aken, Katherine L.; Kota, Sankalp; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Lee, Jae W.; Chen, Ying; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing interest to hybrid energy storage devices, such as lithium-ion capacitors, in which battery-type electrodes are combined with capacitor-type ones. It is anticipated that the energy density (either gravimetric or volumetric) of lithium-ion capacitors is improved if pseudocapacitive or fast insertion materials are used instead of conventional activated carbon (AC) in the capacitor-type electrode. MXenes, a new family of two-dimensional transition metal carbides, demonstrate metallic conductivity and fast charge-discharge behavior that make them suitable for this application. In this study, we move beyond single electrodes, half-cell studies and demonstrate three types of hybrid cells using Nb2CTx-carbon nanotube (CNT) films. It is shown that lithiated graphite/Nb2CTx-CNT, Nb2CTx-CNT/LiFePO4 and lithiated Nb2CTx-CNT/Nb2CTx-CNT cells are all able to operate within 3 V voltage windows and deliver capacities of 43, 24 and 36 mAh/g (per total weight of two electrodes), respectively. Moreover, the polarity of the electrodes can be reversed in the symmetric Nb2CTx-CNT cells from providing a positive potential between 0 and 3 V to a negative one from -3 to 0 V. It is shown that the volumetric energy density (50-70 Wh/L) of our first-generation devices with MXene electrodes exceeds that of a lithium titanate/AC capacitor.

  14. Evaluation of the accuracy of 3DVH software estimates of dose to virtual ion chamber and film in composite IMRT QA

    SciTech Connect

    Olch, Arthur J.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: A novel patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA system, 3DVH software and mapcheck 2, purports to be able to use diode array-measured beam doses and the patient's DICOM RT plan, structure set, and dose files to predict the delivered 3D dose distribution in the patient for comparison to the treatment planning system (TPS) calculated doses. In this study, the composite dose to an ion chamber and film in phantom predicted by the 3DVH and mapcheck 2 system is compared to the actual measured chamber and film doses. If validated in this context, then 3DVH can be used to perform an equivalent dose analysis as that obtained with film dosimetry and ion chamber-based composite IMRT QA. This is important for those losing their ability to perform film dosimetry for true composite IMRT QA and provides a measure of confidence in the accuracy of 3DVH 3D dose calculations which may replace phantom-based IMRT QA. Methods: The dosimetric results from 15 consecutive patient-specific IMRT QA tests performed by composite field irradiation of ion chamber and EDR2 film in a solid water phantom were compared to the predicted doses for those virtual detectors based on the calculated 3D dose by the 3DVH software using mapcheck 2 measured doses of each beam within each plan. For each of the 15 cases, immediately after performing the ion chamber plus film measurements, the mapcheck 2 was used to measure the dose for each beam of the plan. The dose to the volume of the virtual ion chamber and the dose distribution in the plane of the virtual film calculated by the 3DVH software was extracted. The ratio of the measured to 3DVH or eclipse-predicted ion chamber doses was calculated. The same plane in the phantom measured using film and calculated with eclipse was exported from 3DVH and the 2D gamma metric was used to compare the relationship between the film doses and the eclipse or 3DVH predicted planar doses. Also, the 3D gamma value was calculated in the 3DVH

  15. Plasma Emission Characteristics From a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-11-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  16. Plasma Emission Characteristics from a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  17. Analysis of the terrestrial ion foreshock: 2D Full-Particle simulation of a curved supercritical shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembege, B.; Savoini, P.; Stienlet, J.

    2013-05-01

    Two distinct ion populations backstreaming into the solar wind have been clearly evidenced by various space missions within the quasi-perpendicular region of the ion foreshock located upstream of the Earth's Bow shock (i.e. for 45° ≤ Theta_Bn ≤ 90°, where Theta_Bn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field): (i) field-aligned ion beams (« FAB ») characterized by a gyrotropic distribution, and (ii) gyro-phase bunched ions («GPB »), characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution. The origin of these backstreaming ions has not been clearly identified and is presently analyzed with the help of 2D PIC simulation of a curved shock, where full curvature effects, time of flight effects and both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described within a self consistent approach. Present simulations evidence that these two populations can be effectively created directly by the shock front without invoking microinstabilities. The analysis of both individual and statistical ion trajectories evidences that: (i) two new parameters, namely the interaction time DT_inter and distance of penetration L_depth into the shock wave, play a key role and allow to discriminate these two populations. "GPB" population is characterized by a very short interaction time (DT_inter = 1 to 2 Tci) in comparison to the "FAB" population (DT_inter = 2 Tci to 10 Tci) which moves back and forth between the upstream edge of the shock front and the overshoot, where tci is the upstream ion gyroperiod. (ii) the importance of the injection angle (i.e. the angle between the normal of the shock front and the gyration velocity when ions reach the shock) to understand how the reflection process takes place. (iii) "FAB" population drifts along the curved shock front scanning a large Theta_Bn range from 90°. (iv) "GPB" population is embedded within the "FAB" population near the shock front which explains the difficulty to identify such a population in the experimental

  18. SU-E-T-35: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Cervical IMRT Dose Distribution Using 2D/3D Ionization Chamber Arrays System and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Liu, H; Liu, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to compare the verification results of three solutions (2D/3D ionization chamber arrays measurement and Monte Carlo simulation), the results will help make a clinical decision as how to do our cervical IMRT verification. Methods: Seven cervical cases were planned with Pinnacle 8.0m to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were recalculated in the Matrixx and Delta4 phantom with the accurate plans parameters. The plans were also recalculated by Monte Carlo using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans of every patient, Matrixx and Delta4 phantom. All plans of Matrixx and Delta4 phantom were delivered and measured. The dose distribution of iso slice, dose profiles, gamma maps of every beam were used to evaluate the agreement. Dose-volume histograms were also compared. Results: The dose distribution of iso slice and dose profiles from Pinnacle calculation were in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation, Matrixx and Delta4 measurement. A 95.2%/91.3% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Pinnacle distributions within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. A 96.4%/95.6% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation within 2mm/2% gamma criteria, almost 100% gamma pass ratio within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. The DVH plot have slightly differences between Pinnacle and Delta4 measurement as well as Pinnacle and Monte Carlo simulation, but have excellent agreement between Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusion: It was shown that Matrixx/Delta4 and Monte Carlo simulation can be used very efficiently to verify cervical IMRT delivery. In terms of Gamma value the pass ratio of Matrixx was little higher, however, Delta4 showed more problem fields. The primary advantage of Delta4 is the fact it can measure true 3D dosimetry while Monte Carlo can simulate in patients CT images but not in phantom.

  19. Computational Study of Primary Electrons in the Cusp Region of an Ion Engine's Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor); Deshpande, Shirin S.; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a computer code called PRIMA is used to study the motion of primary electrons in the magnetic cusp region of the discharge chamber of an ion engine. Even though the amount of wall area covered by the cusps is very small, the cusp regions are important because prior computational analyses have indicated that most primary electrons leave the discharge chamber through the cusps. The analysis presented here focuses on the cusp region only. The affects of the shape and size of the cusp region on primary electron travel are studied as well as the angle and location at which the electron enters the cusp region. These affects are quantified using the confinement length and the number density distributions of the primary electrons. In addition to these results comparisons of the results from PRIMA are made to experimental results for a cylindrical discharge chamber with two magnetic rings. These comparisons indicate the validity of the computer code called PRIMA.

  20. Origin and acceleration mechanisms of backstreaming ion populations in the Earth's quasi-perpendicular Ion Foreshock: Full-particle 2D simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, Philippe; Lembege, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    The ion foreshock located upstream of the Earth's bow shock is populated with ions reflected back by the shock front with an high energy gain. In-situ spacecraft measurements have clearly established the existence of two distinct populations in the foreshock upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock region (i.e. for 45° ≤ ΘBn ≤ 90° , where ΘBnis the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field): (i) field-aligned ion beams (or ' FAB ') characterized by a gyrotropic distribution, and (ii) gyro-phase bunched ions (or ' GPB ') characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution, which exhibits a non-vanishing perpendicular bulk velocity. The use of 2D PIC simulations of a curved shock, where full curvature effects, time of flight effects and both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described, has evidenced that the shock front itself can be the possible source of the different backstreaming ions. Our analysis evidences the importance of the interaction time (Δinter) with the shock front, in particular ' GPB ' and ' FAB ' populations are characterized by a short (Δinter= 1 to 2 τci) and much larger (Δinter= 1 to 10 τci) interaction time respectively, where τci is the ion upstream gyroperiod. This discrimination allows a deeper statistical analysis: (i) backstreaming ions are splitted into both ' FAB ' and ' GPB ' populations depending on their injection angle when hitting the shock front (i.e. defined between the local normal to the shock front and the gyration velocity vector at the time ions hit the front). (ii) As a consequence, ion trajectories strongly differ between the ' FAB ' and ' GPB ' populations at the shock front. In particular, ' FAB ' ions suffer multi-bounces along the curved front whereas ' GPB ' ions make only one bounce. Such differences can explain why the ' FAB ' population loses their gyro-phase coherency and become gyrotropic which is not the case for the ' GPB '. As also evidenced by these simulations, the

  1. Origin and acceleration mechanisms of gyrotropic/non gyrotropic ion populations in the Earth's quasi-perpendicular Ion Foreshock: Full-particle 2D simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, Philippe; Lembege, Bertrand

    The ion foreshock located upstream of the Earth's bow shock is populated with ions reflected back by the shock front with an high energy gain. In-situ spacecraft measurements have clearly established the existence of two distinct populations in the foreshock upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock region (i.e. for 45(o) ≤ Theta_{Bn} ≤ 90(o) , where Theta_{Bn} is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field): (i) field-aligned ion beams (or ‘FAB’) characterized by a gyrotropic distribution, and (ii) gyro-phase bunched ions (or ‘GPB’) characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution and with a non-vanishing perpendicular bulk velocity. The use of 2D PIC simulations of a curved shock, where full curvature effects and time of flight effects are fully described, has evidenced that the shock front itself can be the possible source of the different backstreaming ions. Our analysis evidences that both populations can be discriminated in terms of interaction time (Δinter) and distance of penetration within the shock front, in particular that "GPB" and ‘FAB’ populations are characterized by a short (Delta_{inter}= 1 to 2 tau_{ci}) and much larger (Delta_{inter}= 1 to 10 tau_{ci}) interaction time respectively, where tau_{ci} is the ion upstream gyroperiod. This discrimination allows a deeper statistical analysis which evidences that: (i) backstreaming ions are splitted into both "FAB" and "GPB populations" depending on their injection angle when hitting the shock front (i.e. defined between the local normal to the shock front and the gyration velocity vector at the time ions hit the front). (ii) As a consequence, ion trajectories strongly differ between the "FAB" and "GPB" populations at the shock front. In particular, "FAB" ions suffer multi-bounces along the curved front whereas "GPB" ions make only one bounce. Such differences can explain why the "FAB" population loses their gyro-phase coherency and become gyrotropic which is

  2. Leakage correction estimate for electret ion chamber dielectric material used for long-term environmental gamma monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jones, David F; Paulus, L R

    2008-05-01

    The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality INL Oversight Program (DEQ-INL) operates an environmental gamma radiation detection network consisting of a series of high-pressure ion chambers to provide real-time ambient radiation measurements and a series of passive environmental electret ion chambers to increase coverage area and measure cumulative dose over a calendar quarter. DEQ-INL has identified a consistent over-response of approximately 40% by the electret ion chambers with respect to co-located high-pressure ion chambers since 1998. DEQ-INL conducted a series of three investigations to quantify this over-response. The over-response is likely attributable to a number of factors, including inherent voltage loss by the electret material not due to ionization within the chamber. One aspect of the investigation verified the manufacturer's calibration factor used to convert decrease in voltage to exposure. Additional investigations were performed that identified an average electret voltage loss of 0.2 V d(-1). When this voltage correction was applied to historical environmental data, electret ion chamber response was within 10% of the co-located high-pressure ion chamber response.

  3. Dosimetric comparisons of carbon ion treatment plans for 1D and 2D ripple filters with variable thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Printz Ringbæk, Toke; Weber, Uli; Santiago, Alina; Simeonov, Yuri; Fritz, Peter; Krämer, Michael; Wittig, Andrea; Bassler, Niels; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    A ripple filter (RiFi)—also called mini-ridge filter—is a passive energy modulator used in particle beam treatments that broadens the Bragg peak (BP) as a function of its maximum thickness. The number of different energies requested from the accelerator can thus be reduced, which significantly reduces the treatment time. A new second generation RiFi with 2D groove shapes was developed using rapid prototyping, which optimizes the beam-modulating material and enables RiFi thicknesses of up to 6 mm. Carbon ion treatment plans were calculated using the standard 1D 3 mm thick RiFi and the new 4 and 6 mm 2D RiFis for spherical planning target volumes (PTVs) in water, eight stage I non-small cell lung cancer cases, four skull base chordoma cases and three prostate cancer cases. TRiP98 was used for treatment planning with facility-specific base data calculated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT12A. Dose-volume-histograms, spatial dose distributions and dosimetric indexes were used for plan evaluation. Plan homogeneity and conformity of thinner RiFis were slightly superior to thicker RiFis but satisfactory results were obtained for all RiFis investigated. For the 6 mm RiFi, fine structures in the dose distribution caused by the larger energy steps were observed at the PTV edges, in particular for superficial and/or very small PTVs but performances for all RiFis increased with penetration depth due to straggling and scattering effects. Plans with the new RiFi design yielded for the studied cases comparable dosimetric results to the standard RiFi while the 4 and 6 mm RiFis lowered the irradiation time by 25-30% and 45-49%, respectively.

  4. Methods and apparatus for cleaning objects in a chamber of an optical instrument by generating reactive ions using photon radiation

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Delgado, Gildardo R.; Hollenshead, Jeromy T.; Umstadter, Karl R.; Starodub, Elena; Zhuang, Guorong V.

    2015-10-13

    An optical instrument, including a chamber, an object exposed to an interior of the chamber, a source of low-pressure gas, the gas comprising at least one of low-pressure molecular hydrogen gas, low-pressure molecular oxygen and a low-pressure noble gas, the source of low pressure gas being fluidly coupled to the chamber, a low voltage source electrically coupled between the object and a remaining portion of the instrument that is exposed to the interior of the chamber so as to maintain the object at a low voltage relative to the remaining portion, and an EUV/VUV light source adapted to direct EUV/VUV light through the low pressure gas in the chamber onto the object. In such a system, when the EUV/VUV light source is activated ions of the low-pressure gas are formed and directed to the object. The ions may be ions of Hydrogen, Oxygen or a noble gas.

  5. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R. Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for

  6. Heavy-ion inertial fusion: influence of target gain on accelerator parameters for vacuum-propagation regimes in reaction chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.; Bangerter, R.O.; Barletta, W.A.; Fawley, W.M.; Judd, D.L.

    1982-03-04

    Target physics imposes requirements on the design of inertial fusion drivers. The influence of beam propagation in near vacuum fusion reaction chambers is evaluated for the relation between target gain and the phase-space requirements of heavy-ion accelerators. Initial results suggest that neutralization of the ion beam has a much greater positive effect than the deleterious one of beam stripping provided that the fusion chamber pressure is < 10/sup -3/ torr (of Li vapor or equivalent).

  7. A Current Mode Ion Chamber for the n+p->D+gamma Parity Violation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, William

    2001-04-01

    We have developed and tested a current-mode 3He-based ion chamber for the measurement of the neutron time-of-flight spectrum from a pulsed cold neutron source on a pulse-by-pulse basis. Such a device is required in the n+p->D+gamma experiment for general diagnostic purposes and for monitoring the ortho-para ratio in the liquid hydrogen target by neutron transmission. This detector was tested in the fall of 2000 at the LANSCE pulsed cold neutron source. The chamber operates with a mixture gas of 0.5 atm 3He and 3 atm H2 and possesses segmentation along the neutron beam. The design is similar to that of Penn et al [1] which was used for a neutron-4He parity violation experiment, but with modifications to the time response and the dynamic range in neutron energy required for operation at a pulsed neutron source. The relevant technical characteristics of the ion chamber (time response, sensitivity to Mev gammas, noise, efficiency, neutron energy dynamic range, linearity) will be described. [1] S. Penn et.al., submitted to NIM (2000)

  8. Solutions for discharge chamber sputtering and anode deposit spalling in small mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L.; Hiznay, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Proposed solutions to the problems of sputter erosion and sputtered material spalling in the discharge chamber of small mercury ion thrusters are presented. The accelerated life test evaluated three such proposed solutions: (1) the use of tantalum as a single low sputter yield material for the exposed surfaces of the discharge chamber components subject to sputtering, (2) the use of a severely roughened anode surface to improve the adhesion of the sputter-deposited coating, and (3) the use of a wire cloth anode surface in order to limit the size of any coating flakes which might spall from it. Because of the promising results obtained in the accelerated life test with anode surfaces roughened by grit-blasting, experiments were carried out to optimize the grit-blasting procedure. The experimental results and an optimal grit-blasting procedure are presented.

  9. Ion-chamber-based loss monitor system for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Brown, D.; Browman, A.; Macek, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    A new loss monitor system has been designed and installed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The detectors are ion chambers filled with N{sub 2} gas. The electronics modules have a threshold range of 1:100, and they can resolve changes in beam loss of about 2% of the threshold settings. They can generate a trip signal in 2 {mu}s if the beam loss is large enough; if the response time of the Fast Protect System is included the beam will be shut off in about 37 {mu}s.

  10. Sputtering phenomena of discharge chamber components in a 30-cm diameter Hg ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.; Rawlin, V. K.

    1976-01-01

    Sputtering and deposition rates were measured for discharge chamber components of a 30-cm diameter mercury ion thruster. It was found that sputtering rates of the screen grid and cathode baffle were strongly affected by geometry of the baffle holder. Sputtering rates of the baffle and screen grid were reduced to 80 and 125 A/hr, respectively, by combination of appropriate geometry and materials selections. Sputtering rates such as these are commensurate with thruster lifetimes of 15,000 hours or more. A semiempirical sputtering model showed good agreement with the measured values.

  11. Ag(nic)2 (nic = nicotinate): a spin-canted quasi-2D antiferromagnet composed of square-planar S = 1/2 Ag(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Manson, Jamie L; Woods, Toby J; Lapidus, Saul H; Stephens, Peter W; Southerland, Heather I; Zapf, Vivien S; Singleton, John; Goddard, Paul A; Lancaster, Tom; Steele, Andrew J; Blundell, Stephen J

    2012-02-20

    Square-planar S = 1/2 Ag(II) ions in polymeric Ag(nic)(2) are linked by bridging nic monoanions to yield 2D corrugated sheets. Long-range magnetic order occurs below T(N) = 11.8(2) K due to interlayer couplings that are estimated to be about 30 times weaker than the intralayer exchange interaction.

  12. An exposure chamber for studies on human perception of DC electric fields and ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.H.; Maruvada, P.S. )

    1994-10-01

    Direct current (DC) transmission lines are often used, for technical and economic reasons, as interconnections in modern high voltage power systems, which are essentially of the alternating current (AC) type. Significant differences exist, however, between the field effects produced in the vicinity of AC and DC transmission lines. DC electric fields induce charges, on the surface of a conducting body such as a human being and may therefore be ''perceived'' by humans due to hair stimulation and other sensations experienced by the skin. A human being exposed to the ionized field of a DC transmission line experiences not only surface charges but also the conducted ion currents. A systematic laboratory study has been undertaken by Hydro Quebec to investigate human perception, using well established psycho physical techniques, of DC electric fields and ions. The design, construction and operation of an exposure chamber for this purpose, in the high voltage laboratory of IREQ, are described in this paper.

  13. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.; Yoshida, Y.

    2016-02-15

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  14. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, A.; Biri, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  15. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Rácz, R; Muramatsu, M; Kato, Y; Kitagawa, A; Biri, S; Yoshida, Y

    2016-02-01

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  16. Electret ion chamber radon monitors measure dissolved 222Rn in water.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, P; Jester, W A

    1993-04-01

    This paper describes a simple and relatively inexpensive method of determining the concentration of dissolved 222Rn in water. The method involves a recently developed electret-passive environmental radon monitor, which uses an electret ion chamber. The procedure consists of sealing a known volume of a carefully collected water sample with one of these monitors in an exposure container and determining the average equilibrium 222Rn gas concentration in the air phase during the exposure time period. This average concentration can then be used to calculate the 222Rn concentration in the original water sample. Identical samples were analyzed both by this new method and by a standard liquid scintillation method, and the results were compared over a wide range of 222Rn concentrations. There was good agreement except that the electret ion chamber method gave results that were consistently lower by about 15%. This bias in the results was attributed to both 222Rn losses during sample handling and possibly to some errors in the assumptions made in the theoretical model. A correction factor is recommended to bring the results of this technique into agreement with the standard method. The procedures are simple and economical and can be easily employed by many primary 222Rn-measuring laboratories currently using these monitors for measuring indoor 222Rn.

  17. Simulation of ion chamber signals in the n+3 He -> p + t experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Christopher; n3He Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The parity violating proton directional asymmetry from the capture of polarized neutrons on 3He was measured with a pulsed neutron beam at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The target is an ion chamber with 3He at 0.476 atmosphere. Signal wires in the chamber have different sensitivities to the physics asymmetry, depdendent on their location and the configuration of the experiment. These geometry factors must be determined by simulation. In addition, simulation estimates the statistical precision of the experiment, optimizes configuration variables, and assists with systematic analysis. To achieve the most accurate simulation of the detector signals, a custom simulation was written in C++ using weighted variables and taking advantage of parallel execution. The phsyics inputs to the simulation came from measurements of the neutron phase space, ENDF cross sections, and PSTAR ionization data. A cell model was applied to combine this physics to produce an accurate simulation of the experimental data. This simulation can be used to calculate accurate and tunable geometry factors, and to produce desired quanities for use in optimization and analysis.

  18. Performance of single chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis with different types of ion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Rozendal, René A; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Molenkamp, Redmar J; Buisman, Cees J N

    2007-05-01

    In this paper hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis was studied for the first time in a single chamber configuration. Single chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis was tested in two configurations: (i) with a cation exchange membrane (CEM) and (ii) with an anion exchange membrane (AEM). Both configurations performed comparably and produced over 0.3 m3 H2/m3 reactor liquid volume/day at 1.0 V applied voltage (overall hydrogen efficiencies around 23%). Analysis of the water that permeated through the membrane revealed that a large part of potential losses in the system were associated with a pH gradient across the membrane (CEM DeltapH=6.4; AEM DeltapH=4.4). These pH gradient associated potential losses were lower in the AEM configuration (CEM 0.38 V; AEM 0.26 V) as a result of its alternative ion transport properties. This benefit of the AEM, however, was counteracted by the higher cathode overpotentials occurring in the AEM configuration (CEM 0.12 V at 2.39 A/m2; AEM 0.27 V at 2.15 A/m2) as a result of a less effective electroless plating method for the AEM membrane electrode assembly (MEA).

  19. Frequency measurement of the 2S(1/2)-2D(3/2) electric quadrupole transition in a single 171Yb+ ion.

    PubMed

    Webster, Stephen; Godun, Rachel; King, Steven; Huang, Guilong; Walton, Barney; Tsatourian, Veronika; Margolis, Helen; Lea, Stephen; Gill, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    We report on precision laser spectroscopy of the 2S(1/2)(F = 0)-2D(3/2) (F = 2, m(F) = 0) clock transition in a single ion of 171Yb+. The absolute value of the transition frequency, determined using an optical frequency comb referenced to a hydrogen maser, is 688358979309310 +/- 9 Hz. This corresponds to a fractional frequency uncertainty of 1.3 x 10(-14).

  20. SU-F-303-15: Ion Chamber Dose Response in Magnetic Fields as a Function of Incident Photon Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Malkov, V. N.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In considering the continued development of synergetic MRI-radiation therapy machines, we seek to quantify the variability of ion chamber response per unit dose in the presence of magnetic fields of varying strength as a function of incident photon beam quality and geometric configuration. Methods: To account for the effect of magnetic fields on the trajectory of charged particles a new algorithm was introduced into the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. In the egs-chamber user code the dose to the cavity of an NE2571 ion chamber is calculated in two configurations, in 0 to 2 T magnetic fields, with an incoming parallel 10×10 cm{sup 2} photon beam with energies ranging between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV. In the first, the photon beam is incident on the long-axis of the ion chamber (config-1), and in the second the beam is parallel to the long-axis and incident from the conical end of the chamber (config-2). For both, the magnetic field is perpendicular to the direction of the beam and the long axis of the chamber. Results: The ion chamber response per unit dose to water at the same point is determined as a function of magnetic field and is normalized to the 0T case for each of incoming photon energies. For both configurations, accurate modeling of the ion chamber yielded closer agreement with the experimental results obtained by Meijsing et. al (2009). Config-1 yields a gradual increase in response with increasing field strength to a maximum of 13.4% and 1.4% for 1 MeV and 8 MeV photon beams, respectively. Config-2 produced a decrease in response of up to 6% and 13% for 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV beams, respectively. Conclusion: These results provide further support for ion chamber calibration in MRI-radiotherapy coupled systems and demonstrates noticeable energy dependence for clinically relevant fields.

  1. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array.

    PubMed

    King, R B; Agnew, C E; O'Connell, B F; Prise, K M; Hounsell, A R; McGarry, C K

    2016-08-07

    The aim of this work was to track and verify the delivery of respiratory-gated irradiations, performed with three versions of TrueBeam linac, using a novel phantom arrangement that combined the OCTAVIUS(®) SRS 1000 array with a moving platform. The platform was programmed to generate sinusoidal motion of the array. This motion was tracked using the real-time position management (RPM) system and four amplitude gating options were employed to interrupt MV beam delivery when the platform was not located within set limits. Time-resolved spatial information extracted from analysis of x-ray fluences measured by the array was compared to the programmed motion of the platform and to the trace recorded by the RPM system during the delivery of the x-ray field. Temporal data recorded by the phantom and the RPM system were validated against trajectory log files, recorded by the linac during the irradiation, as well as oscilloscope waveforms recorded from the linac target signal. Gamma analysis was employed to compare time-integrated 2D x-ray dose fluences with theoretical fluences derived from the probability density function for each of the gating settings applied, where gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm and 0.5%/0.5 mm were used to evaluate the limitations of the RPM system. Excellent agreement was observed in the analysis of spatial information extracted from the SRS 1000 array measurements. Comparisons of the average platform position with the expected position indicated absolute deviations of  <0.5 mm for all four gating settings. Differences were observed when comparing time-resolved beam-on data stored in the RPM files and trajectory logs to the true target signal waveforms. Trajectory log files underestimated the cycle time between consecutive beam-on windows by 10.0  ±  0.8 ms. All measured fluences achieved 100% pass-rates using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm and 50% of the fluences achieved pass-rates  >90% when criteria of 0.5%/0.5

  2. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, R. B.; Agnew, C. E.; O'Connell, B. F.; Prise, K. M.; Hounsell, A. R.; McGarry, C. K.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to track and verify the delivery of respiratory-gated irradiations, performed with three versions of TrueBeam linac, using a novel phantom arrangement that combined the OCTAVIUS® SRS 1000 array with a moving platform. The platform was programmed to generate sinusoidal motion of the array. This motion was tracked using the real-time position management (RPM) system and four amplitude gating options were employed to interrupt MV beam delivery when the platform was not located within set limits. Time-resolved spatial information extracted from analysis of x-ray fluences measured by the array was compared to the programmed motion of the platform and to the trace recorded by the RPM system during the delivery of the x-ray field. Temporal data recorded by the phantom and the RPM system were validated against trajectory log files, recorded by the linac during the irradiation, as well as oscilloscope waveforms recorded from the linac target signal. Gamma analysis was employed to compare time-integrated 2D x-ray dose fluences with theoretical fluences derived from the probability density function for each of the gating settings applied, where gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm and 0.5%/0.5 mm were used to evaluate the limitations of the RPM system. Excellent agreement was observed in the analysis of spatial information extracted from the SRS 1000 array measurements. Comparisons of the average platform position with the expected position indicated absolute deviations of  <0.5 mm for all four gating settings. Differences were observed when comparing time-resolved beam-on data stored in the RPM files and trajectory logs to the true target signal waveforms. Trajectory log files underestimated the cycle time between consecutive beam-on windows by 10.0  ±  0.8 ms. All measured fluences achieved 100% pass-rates using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm and 50% of the fluences achieved pass-rates  >90% when criteria of 0.5%/0.5 mm were

  3. Influence of pressurized anode chamber on ion transports and power generation of UF membrane microbial fuel cells (UF-MFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Yang, Euntae; Lee, Mi-Young; Kim, In S.

    2015-04-01

    Ultrafiltration membrane integrated microbial fuel cell (UF-MFC) has developed to produce high-quality effluents by integrating the membrane filtration process into the MFC system. During UF-MFC operation, however, unexpected power reductions were observed under different pressures that were applied in the anode chamber (22.0% and 25.5% at 0.7 bar and 2.1 bar, respectively). It was hypothesized that those of power reductions might occur due to the limitation of ion transport across the UF membrane- which could be caused by the pressurized anode chamber to filter the anode solution through the UF membrane. A test with a NaCl concentrated cathode solution showed few dissolved ions being transported from the cathode to anode chamber while the pressure was being applied in the anode chamber. This result clearly indicates that the limitation of ion transport from the cathode to the pressurized anode chamber is a significant factor affecting the power density of UF-MFCs, even more so than water permeation through the UF membrane.

  4. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, Nigel Oswald

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of ~17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, ~200 g/cm3 and ~20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases ~350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  5. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-15

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  6. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Mändl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-01

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton® windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  7. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber.

    PubMed

    Manova, D; Bergmann, A; Mändl, S; Neumann, H; Rauschenbach, B

    2012-11-01

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton(®) windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  8. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher

    2013-04-19

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  9. An experimental and computational investigation of the standard temperature-pressure correction factor for ion chambers in kilovoltage x rays.

    PubMed

    La Russa, Daniel J; McEwen, Malcolm; Rogers, D W O

    2007-12-01

    For ion chambers with cavities open to the surrounding atmosphere, the response measured at a given temperature and pressure must be corrected using the standard temperature-pressure correction factor (P(TP)). A previous paper based solely on Monte Carlo simulations [D. J. La Russa and D. W. O. Rogers, Med. Phys. 33, 4590-4599 (2006)] pointed out the shortcomings of the P(TP) correction factor when used to correct the response of non-air-equivalent chambers for low-energy x-ray beams. This work presents the results of several experiments that corroborate these calculations for a number of ion chambers. Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental setup revealed additional insight into the various factors affecting the extent of the breakdown of P(TP), including the effect of impurities and the sensitivity to chamber dimensions. For an unfiltered 60 kV beam, the P(TP)-corrected response of an NE 2571 ion chamber measured at 0.7 atm was 2.5% below the response measured at reference conditions. In general, Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental setup using EGSnrc were within 0.5% of measured values. EGSnrc-calculated values of air kerma calibration coefficients (N(K)) at low x-ray energies are also provided as a means of estimating the level of impurities in the chambers investigated. Calculated values of N(K) normalized to the value measured for a 250 kV beam were obtained for three chambers and were within 1% of experiment with one exception, the Exradin A12 in a 50 kV beam.

  10. Formation of gyrotropic and non gyrotropic field-aligned beams in the Earth's quasi-perpendicular Ion Foreshock: Full-particle 2D simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, P.; Lembege, B.

    2013-12-01

    The ion foreshock located upstream of the Earth's bow shock is populated with ions reflected back by the shock front with an high energy gain. In-situ spacecraft measurements have clearly established the existence of two distinct populations in the foreshock upstream of quasi-perpendicular shock region (i.e. for 45° ≤ ΘBn≤ 90°, where ΘBn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field): (i) field-aligned (';FAB') ion beams characterized by a gyrotropic distribution, and (ii) gyro-phase bunched (';GPB') ions characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution, which exhibits a non-vanishing perpendicular bulk velocity. The purpose of the present work is to identify the possible sources of the different backstreaming ions and is based on the use of 2D PIC simulations of a curved shock, where full curvature effects, time of flight effects and both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described by a self consistent approach. Our analysis evidences that the two populations mentionned above may have different origins identified both in terms of interaction time and distance of penetration within the shock front. In particular, ours simulations evidence that "GPB" and ';FAB' populations are characterized by a short (Δinter= 1 to 2 tci) and much larger (Δinter= 1 to 10 tci) interaction time respectively, where τci is the ion upstream gyroperiod. In addition, a deeper statistical analysis of ion trajectories evidences that: (i) both populations can be discriminated in terms of injection angle into the shock front (i.e. defined between the local normal to the shock front and the gyration velocity vector at the time ions reach the front). Such a behavior explains how reflected ions can be splitted in the observed two populations "FAB" and "GPB". (ii) ion trajectories strongly differ between the "FAB" and "GPB" populations at the shock front. In particular, ';FAB' ions suffer multi-bounces whereas ';GPB '; ions make only one bounce. Such

  11. A New Cell-Centered Implicit Numerical Scheme for Ions in the 2-D Axisymmetric Code Hall2de

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez Ortega, Alejandro; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm in the Hall2De code to simulate the ion hydrodynamics in the acceleration channel and near plume regions of Hall-effect thrusters. This implementation constitutes an upgrade of the capabilities built in the Hall2De code. The equations of mass conservation and momentum for unmagnetized ions are solved using a conservative, finite-volume, cell-centered scheme on a magnetic-field-aligned grid. Major computational savings are achieved by making use of an implicit predictor/multi-corrector algorithm for time evolution. Inaccuracies in the prediction of the motion of low-energy ions in the near plume in hydrodynamics approaches are addressed by implementing a multi-fluid algorithm that tracks ions of different energies separately. A wide range of comparisons with measurements are performed to validate the new ion algorithms. Several numerical experiments with the location and value of the anomalous collision frequency are also presented. Differences in the plasma properties in the near-plume between the single fluid and multi-fluid approaches are discussed. We complete our validation by comparing predicted erosion rates at the channel walls of the thruster with measurements. Erosion rates predicted by the plasma properties obtained from simulations replicate accurately measured rates of erosion within the uncertainty range of the sputtering models employed.

  12. Micro-patterning of ionic reservoirs within a double bilayer lipid membrane to fabricate a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Sansinena, J. M.; Yee, C. K.; Sapuri, A.; Swanson, Basil I.; Redondo, A.; Parikh, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple approach for the design of ionic reservoir arrays within a double phospholipid bilayer to ultimately develop a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors. As a first step, a primary bilayer lipid membrane is deposited onto an array of electrodes patterned onto a substrate surface. Subsequently, an array of microvoids is created within the bilayer by a wet photolithographic patterning of phospholipid bilayers using a deep UV light source and a quartz/chrome photomask. To ensure registry, the photomask used to pattern bilayers is designed to match up the microvoids within the primary bilayer with the array of electrodes on the substrate surface. The deposition of a secondary bilayer lipid membrane onto the primary bilayer that spans across the patterned microvoids leads to the formation of the array of ionic reservoirs within the double phospholipid bilayer. This is accomplished using giant unilamellar vesicles and by exploiting membrane electrostatics. The use of ion-channels incorporated into the secondary bilayer that covers the individual ionic reservoirs allows the construction of a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors that are able to recognize different target-agents simultaneously.

  13. Estimation of absorbed dose in clinical radiotherapy linear accelerator beams: Effect of ion chamber calibration and long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, Johnson Pichy; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2013-10-01

    The measured dose in water at reference point in phantom is a primary parameter for planning the treatment monitor units (MU); both in conventional and intensity modulated/image guided treatments. Traceability of dose accuracy therefore still depends mainly on the calibration factor of the ion chamber/dosimeter provided by the accredited Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) network of laboratories. The data related to Nd,water calibrations, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) postal dose validation, inter-comparison of different dosimeter/electrometers, and validity of Nd,water calibrations obtained from different calibration laboratories were analyzed to find out the extent of accuracy achievable. Nd,w factors in Gray/Coulomb calibrated at IBA, GmBH, Germany showed a mean variation of about 0.2% increase per year in three Farmer chambers, in three subsequent calibrations. Another ion chamber calibrated in different accredited laboratory (PTW, Germany) showed consistent Nd,w for 9 years period. The Strontium-90 beta check source response indicated long-term stability of the ion chambers within 1% for three chambers. Results of IAEA postal TL "dose intercomparison" for three photon beams, 6 MV (two) and 15 MV (one), agreed well within our reported doses, with mean deviation of 0.03% (SD 0.87%) (n = 9). All the chamber/electrometer calibrated by a single SSDL realized absorbed doses in water within 0.13% standard deviations. However, about 1-2% differences in absorbed dose estimates observed when dosimeters calibrated from different calibration laboratories are compared in solid phantoms. Our data therefore imply that the dosimetry level maintained for clinical use of linear accelerator photon beams are within recommended levels of accuracy, and uncertainties are within reported values.

  14. An Egsnrc investigation of the P(TP) correction factor for ion chambers in kilovoltage X rays.

    PubMed

    La Russa, Daniel J; Rogers, D W O

    2006-12-01

    As part of the standard practice for obtaining consistent ion chamber measurements with cavities open to the surrounding atmosphere, the raw measured response is corrected to the response at a reference temperature and pressure using the standard temperature-pressure correction factor (P(TP)). In this study, the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to investigate the validity of the P(TP) correction factor for kilovoltage x rays incident on various geometrically distinct ion chambers. The calculated P(TP)-corrected chamber response deviated by over 2% relative to expected values for a 40 kV spectrum incident on a graphite thimble chamber at an air density typical of Mexico City. The relative deviation from the expected response was much worse for a large spherical graphite chamber, exceeding 16% at an air density of 0.6 kg/m3 (approximately 0.5 atm at 22 degrees C) for the same beam energy. The breakdown of the P(TP) correction factor was also observed for a 26 kV mammography spectrum incident on two mammography chambers. For 60Co beams, the P(TP) correction factor behaved as expected. For day-to-day variations in pressure, only a negligible of the P(TP) correction factor was observed with low x-ray energies. Factors contributing to the breakdown of the P(TP) correction factor at low x-ray energies and large pressure variations, such as the range of electrons, the material of the wall, the chamber dimensions and air-photon interactions, are discussed in depth.

  15. Development of a Novel Contamination Resistant Ion Chamber for Process Tritium Measurement and Use in the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Worth, L.B.C.; Pearce, R.J.H.; Bruce, J.; Banks, J.; Scales, S.

    2005-07-15

    The accuracy of process measurements of tritium with conventional ion chambers is often affected by surface tritium contamination. The measurement of tritium in the exhaust of the JET torus is particularly difficult due to surface contamination with highly tritiated hydrocarbons. JET's first unsuccessful attempt to overcome the contamination problem was to use an ion chamber, with a heating element as the chamber wall so that it could be periodically decontaminated by baking. The newly developed ion chamber works on the principle of minimising the surface area within the boundary of the anode and cathode.This paper details the design of the ion chamber, which utilises a grid of 50-micron tungsten wire to define the ion chamber wall and the collector electrode. The effective surface area which, by contamination, is able to effect the measurement of tritium within the process gas has been reduced by a factor of {approx}200 over a conventional ion chamber. It is concluded that the new process ion chamber enables sensitive accurate tritium measurements free from contamination issues. It will be a powerful new tool for future tritium experiments both to improve tritium tracking and to help in the understanding of tritium retention issues.

  16. Experimental validation of a versatile system of CT dosimetry using a conventional ion chamber: Beyond CTDI{sub 100}

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Ballard, Adam C.

    2007-08-15

    This article is an experimental demonstration and authentication of a new method of computed tomography dosimetry [R. L. Dixon, Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)], which utilizes a short, conventional ion chamber rather than a pencil chamber, and which is more versatile than the latter. The value of CTDI{sub 100} correctly predicts the accumulated dose only for a total scan length L equal to 100 mm and underestimates the limiting equilibrium dose approached for longer, clinically relevant body scan lengths [R. L. Dixon, Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003); K. D. Nakonechny, B. G. Fallone, and S. Rathee, Med. Phys. 32, 98-109 (2005); S. Mori, M. Endo, K. Nishizawa, T. Tsunoo, T. Aoyama, H. Fujiwara, and K. Murase, Med. Phys. 32, 1061-1069 (2005); R. L. Dixon, M. T. Munley, and E. Bayram, Med. Phys. 32, 3712-3728 (2005); R. L. Dixon, Med. Phys. 33, 3973-3976 (2006)]. Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)] originally proposed an alternative using a short ion chamber and a helical scan acquisition to collect the same integral for any scan length L (and not limited 100 mm). The primary purpose of this work is to demonstrate experimentally the implementation, robustness, and versatility of this small ion chamber method in measuring the accumulated dose in the body phantom for any desired scan length L (up to the available phantom length) including the limiting equilibrium dose (symbolically CTDI{sub {infinity}}), and validation of the method against the pencil chamber methodology. Additionally, a simple and robust method for independently verifying the active length of a pencil chamber is described. The results of measurements made in a 400 mm long, 32 cm diameter polymethylmethacrylate body phantom using a small Farmer-type ion chamber and two pencil chambers of lengths l=100 and 150 mm confirm that the two methodologies provide the same dose values at the corresponding scan lengths L=l. The measured equilibrium doses obtained for GE MDCT scanners at 120 kVp are CTDI

  17. Electret ion chamber-based passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, P; Steck, D

    2010-10-01

    Electret ion chambers (EICs), commercially available under brand name E-PERM(®), are widely used for measuring indoor and outdoor (222)Rn concentrations in air. These are designed to respond only to (222)Rn and not to (220)Rn by restricting diffusional entry area. Such radon EIC (R EIC) monitors are modified by increasing the entry area to allow (220)Rn, in addition to (222)Rn. Such modified units are called RT EIC. When a set of R and RT EICs are collocated, it is possible to discriminate and measure both radon and thoron concentrations, using appropriate calibration factors (CFs) and algorithms. The EICs come in different volumes, providing different sensitivities. The thoron CFs for 58-, 210- and 960-ml volume R and RT pairs are, respectively, 2.8-, 18.7- and 89-V drop per (kBq m(-3) d ), respectively. These provide much wider sensitivities and ranges compared to alpha track-based passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors.

  18. Development and characterization of a 2D scintillation detector for quality assurance in scanned carbon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborini, A.; Raffaele, L.; Mirandola, A.; Molinelli, S.; Viviani, C.; Spampinato, S.; Ciocca, M.

    2016-04-01

    At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO Foundation), a two-dimensional high resolution scintillating dosimetry system has been developed and tested for daily Quality Assurance measurements (QA) in carbon ion radiotherapy with active scanning technique, for both single pencil beams and scanned fields produced by a synchrotron accelerator. The detector consists of a thin plane organic scintillator (25×25 cm2, 2 mm thick) coupled with a high spatial resolution CCD camera (0.25 mm) in a light-tight box. A dedicated Labview software was developed for image acquisition triggered with the beam extraction, data post-processing and analysis. The scintillator system was preliminary characterized in terms of short-term reproducibility (found to be within±0.5%), linearity with the number of particles (linear fit χ2 = 0.996) and dependence on particle flux (measured to be < 1.5 %). The detector was then tested for single beam spot measurements (Full Width at Half Maximum and position) and for 6×6 cm2 reference scanned field (determination of homogeneity) for carbon ions with energy from 115 MeV/u up to 400 MeV/u. No major differences in the investigated beam parameters measured with scintillator system and the radiochromic EBT3 reference films were observed. The system allows therefore real-time monitoring of the carbon ion beam relevant parameters, with a significant daily time saving with respect to films currently used. The results of this study show the suitability of the scintillation detector for daily QA in a carbon ion facility with an active beam delivery system.

  19. 2D ion velocity distribution function measurements by laser-induced fluorescence above a radio-frequency biased silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Nathaniel; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Zhang, Yiting; Kushner, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Ion dynamics have been measured in the sheath above a 30 cm diameter, 2.2 MHz-biased silicon wafer in a plasma processing etch tool using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The velocity distribution function of argon ions was measured at thousands of positions above and radially along the edge of the wafer by sending a planar laser sheet from a pulsed, tunable dye laser into the tool. The RF sheath is clearly resolved. The laser sheet entered the machine both parallel and perpendicular to the wafer in order to measure the distribution function for both parallel and perpendicular velocities/energies (0.4 eV < Emax<600 eV). The resulting fluorescence was recorded using a fast CCD camera, which provided spatial (0.4 mm) and temporal (30 ns) resolution. Data was taken at eight different phases of the 2.2 MHz cycle. The distribution functions were found to be spatially non-uniform near the edge of the wafer and the distribution of energies extremely phase-dependent. Several cm above the wafer the distribution is Maxwellian and independent of phase. Results are compared with simulations; for example, the experimental time-averaged ion energy distribution function compares favorably with a computer model carefully constructed to emulate the device.

  20. 2D ion velocity distribution function measurements by laser-induced fluorescence above a radio-frequency biased silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Nathaniel; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Zhang, Yiting; Kushner, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Ion dynamics have been measured in the sheath above a 30 cm diameter, 2.2 MHz-biased silicon wafer in a plasma processing etch tool using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The velocity distribution function of argon ions was measured at thousands of positions above and radially along the edge of the wafer by sending a planar laser sheet from a pulsed, tunable dye laser into the tool. The RF sheath is clearly resolved. The laser sheet entered the machine both parallel and perpendicular to the wafer in order to measure the distribution function for both parallel and perpendicular velocities/energies (0.4 eV < Emax< 600 eV). The resulting fluorescence was recorded using a fast CCD camera, which provided spatial (0.4 mm) and temporal (30 ns) resolution. Data was taken at eight different phases of the 2.2 MHz cycle. The distribution functions were found to be spatially non-uniform near the edge of the wafer and the distribution of energies extremely phase-dependent. Several cm above the wafer the distribution is Maxwellian and independent of phase. Results are compared with simulations; for example, the experimental time-averaged ion energy distribution function compares favorably with a computer model carefully constructed to emulate the device.

  1. Full-particle 2-D Simulations of the Ion Foreshock associated to a Supercritical Quasi-perpendicular Curved Collisionless Shock : Origin of Backstreaming Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, P.; Lembege, B.

    2014-12-01

    The ion foreshock located upstream of the Earth's bow shock is populated with ions reflected back by the shock front. In-situ spacecraft measurements have clearly established the existence of two distinct populations in the upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock region (i.e. for 45o ≤ ΘBn≤ 90o, where ΘBn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field): (i) field-aligned ion beams (or 'FAB') characterized by a gyrotropic distribution, and (ii) gyro-phase bunched ions (or 'GPB') characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution, which exhibits a non-vanishing perpendicular bulk velocity. The use of 2D PIC simulations where full curvature effects, time of flight effects and both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described, has evidenced that the shock front itself can be the possible source of these two characteristic populations. A recent analysis has evidenced that both populations can be discriminated in terms of interaction time (Δtinter) with the shock front. 'GPB' and 'FAB' populations are characterized by a short (Δtinter ~ 1 τci) and much larger (Δtinter ≥ 2 τci) interaction time respectively, where τci is the ion upstream gyroperiod. In addition, present statistical results evidence that: (i) backstreaming ions are splitted into 'FAB' and 'GPB' populations depending on their injection angle when hitting the shock front (defined between the local normal to the shock front and the gyration velocity vector). (ii) As a consequence, ion trajectories strongly differ between the 'FAB' and 'GPB' populations at the shock front. In particular, 'FAB' ions suffer multi-bounces along the curved front whereas 'GPB' ions make only one bounce. Such differences may explain why the 'FAB' population loses their gyro-phase coherency and become gyrotropic which is not the case for the 'GPB'. Then, the differences observed between 'FAB' and 'GPB' populations do not involve some distinct reflection processes as often claimed in the

  2. Configuration of the electron transport algorithm of PENELOPE to simulate ion chambers.

    PubMed

    Sempau, J; Andreo, P

    2006-07-21

    The stability of the electron transport algorithm implemented in the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with respect to variations of its step length is analysed in the context of the simulation of ion chambers used in photon and electron dosimetry. More precisely, the degree of violation of the Fano theorem is quantified (to the 0.1% level) as a function of the simulation parameters that determine the step size. To meet the premises of the theorem, we define an infinite graphite phantom with a cavity delimited by two parallel planes (i.e., a slab) and filled with a 'gas' that has the same composition as graphite but a mass density a thousand-fold smaller. The cavity walls and the gas have identical cross sections, including the density effect associated with inelastic collisions. Electrons with initial kinetic energies equal to 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 or 20 MeV are generated in the wall and in the gas with a uniform intensity per unit mass. Two configurations, motivated by the design of pancake- and thimble-type chambers, are considered, namely, with the initial direction of emission perpendicular or parallel to the gas-wall interface. This version of the Fano test avoids the need of photon regeneration and the calculation of photon energy absorption coefficients, two ingredients that are common to some alternative definitions of equivalent tests. In order to reduce the number of variables in the analysis, a global new simulation parameter, called the speedup parameter (a), is introduced. It is shown that setting a = 0.2, corresponding to values of the usual PENELOPE parameters of C1 = C2 = 0.02 and values of WCC and WCR that depend on the initial and absorption energies, is appropriate for maximum tolerances of the order of 0.2% with respect to an analogue, i.e., interaction-by-interaction, simulation of the same problem. The precise values of WCC and WCR do not seem to be critical to achieve this level of accuracy. The step-size dependence of the absorbed dose is explained in

  3. 2D wax-printed paper substrates with extended solvent supply capabilities allow enhanced ion signal in paper spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Damon, Deidre E; Maher, Yosef S; Yin, Mengzhen; Jjunju, Fred P M; Young, Iain S; Taylor, Stephen; Maher, Simon; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-06-21

    Paper-based microfluidic channels were created from solid wax printing, and the resultant 2D wax-printed paper substrates were used for paper spray (PS) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of small organic compounds. Controlling fluid flow at the tip of the wax-printed paper triangles enabled the use of lower spray voltages (0.5-1 kV) and extended signal lifetime (10 minutes) in PS-MS. High sensitivity (sub ng mL(-1) levels) and quantitation precision (<10% RSD) have been achieved in the analysis of illicit drugs in 4 μL of raw urine (fresh and dry), as well as corrosion inhibitors and pesticides in water samples. The reported study encourages the future development of disposable 3D microfluidic paper-based analytical devices, which function with simple operation but capable of on-chip analyte detection by MS; such a device can replace the traditional complex laboratory procedures for MS analysis to enable on-site in situ sampling with portable mass spectrometers.

  4. Fast ion induced shearing of 2D Alfvén eigenmodes measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Tobias, B J; Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Heidbrink, W W; Luhmann, N C; Nazikian, R; Park, H K; Spong, D A; Van Zeeland, M A

    2011-02-18

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  5. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfvén Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B. J.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H. K.; Spong, D. A.; van Zeeland, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  6. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  7. Characterization of Downstream Ion Energy Distributions From a High Current Hollow Cathode in a Ring Cusp Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 10 Angstroms) has been documented in the literature. As part of an ongoing effort to uncover the underlying physics of the formation of these ions, ion efflux from a high current hollow cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber was investigated. Using a spherical sector electrostatic energy analyzer located downstream of the discharge cathode, the ion energy distribution over a 0 to 60 eV energy range was measured. The sensitivity of the ion energy distribution function to zenith angle was also assessed at 3 different positions: 0, 15, and 25 degrees. The measurements suggest that the majority of the ion current at the measuring point falls into the analyzer with an energy approximately equal to the discharge voltage. The ion distribution, however, was found to be quite broad. The high energy tail of the distribution function tended to grow with increasing discharge current. Sensitivity of the profiles to flow rate at fixed discharge current was also investigated. A simple model is presented that provides a potential mechanism for the production of ions with energies above the discharge voltage.

  8. Physical and chemical analysis of lithium-ion battery cell-to-cell failure events inside custom fire chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinner, Neil S.; Field, Christopher R.; Hammond, Mark H.; Williams, Bradley A.; Myers, Kristina M.; Lubrano, Adam L.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Tuttle, Steven G.

    2015-04-01

    A 5-cubic meter decompression chamber was re-purposed as a fire test chamber to conduct failure and abuse experiments on lithium-ion batteries. Various modifications were performed to enable remote control and monitoring of chamber functions, along with collection of data from instrumentation during tests including high speed and infrared cameras, a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, real-time gas analyzers, and compact reconfigurable input and output devices. Single- and multi-cell packages of LiCoO2 chemistry 18650 lithium-ion batteries were constructed and data was obtained and analyzed for abuse and failure tests. Surrogate 18650 cells were designed and fabricated for multi-cell packages that mimicked the thermal behavior of real cells without using any active components, enabling internal temperature monitoring of cells adjacent to the active cell undergoing failure. Heat propagation and video recordings before, during, and after energetic failure events revealed a high degree of heterogeneity; some batteries exhibited short burst of sparks while others experienced a longer, sustained flame during failure. Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, dimethyl carbonate, and ethylene carbonate were detected via gas analysis, and the presence of these species was consistent throughout all failure events. These results highlight the inherent danger in large format lithium-ion battery packs with regards to cell-to-cell failure, and illustrate the need for effective safety features.

  9. 2D Space-Confined Synthesis of Few-Layer MoS2 Anchored on Carbon Nanosheet for Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingwen; Qin, Jian; Zhang, Xiang; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; Li, Jiajun; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Chunnian

    2015-04-28

    A facile and scalable 2D spatial confinement strategy is developed for in situ synthesizing highly crystalline MoS2 nanosheets with few layers (≤5 layers) anchored on 3D porous carbon nanosheet networks (3D FL-MoS2@PCNNs) as lithium-ion battery anode. During the synthesis, 3D self-assembly of cubic NaCl particles is adopted to not only serve as a template to direct the growth of 3D porous carbon nanosheet networks, but also create a 2D-confined space to achieve the construction of few-layer MoS2 nanosheets robustly lain on the surface of carbon nanosheet walls. In the resulting 3D architecture, the intimate contact between the surfaces of MoS2 and carbon nanosheets can effectively avoid the aggregation and restacking of MoS2 as well as remarkably enhance the structural integrity of the electrode, while the conductive matrix of 3D porous carbon nanosheet networks can ensure fast transport of both electrons and ions in the whole electrode. As a result, this unique 3D architecture manifests an outstanding long-life cycling capability at high rates, namely, a specific capacity as large as 709 mAh g(-1) is delivered at 2 A g(-1) and maintains ∼95.2% even after 520 deep charge/discharge cycles. Apart from promising lithium-ion battery anode, this 3D FL-MoS2@PCNN composite also has immense potential for applications in other areas such as supercapacitor, catalysis, and sensors.

  10. Monte Carlo-based correction factors for ion chamber dosimetry in heterogeneous phantoms for megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Araki, Fujio

    2012-11-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perturbation correction factors and inhomogeneity correction factors (ICFs) for a thin-walled cylindrical ion chamber in a heterogeneous phantom including solid water, lung and bone plastic materials. The perturbation factors due to the replacement of the air cavity, non-water equivalence of the wall and the stem, non-air equivalence of the central electrode and the overall perturbation factor, P(Q), for a cylindrical chamber, in the heterogeneous phantom were calculated with the EGSnrc/Cavity Monte Carlo code for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The PTW31010 (0.125 cm(3)) chamber was modeled with Monte Carlo simulations, and was used for measurements and calculations of percentage depth ionization (PDI) or percentage depth dose (PDD). ICFs were calculated from the ratio of the product of the stopping power ratios (SPRs) and P(Q) of lung or bone to solid water. Finally, the measured PDIs were converted to PDDs by using ICFs and were compared with those calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The perturbation effect for the ion chamber in lung material is insignificant at 5 × 5 and 10 × 10 cm(2) fields, but the effect needs to be considered under conditions of lateral electron disequilibrium with a 3 × 3 cm(2) field. ICFs in lung varied up to 2% and 4% depending on the field size for 6 and 15 MV, respectively. For bone material, the perturbation effects due to the chamber wall and the stem were more significant at up to 3.5% and 1.6% for 6 MV, respectively. ICFs for bone material were approximately 0.945 and 0.940 for 6 and 15 MV, respectively. The converted PDDs by using ICFs were in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculated PDDs. The chamber perturbation correction and SPRs should strictly be considered for ion chamber dosimetry in heterogeneous media. This is more important for small field dosimetry in lung and bone materials.

  11. Characterization of a cold cathode Penning ion source for the implantation of noble gases beneath 2D monolayers on metals: Ions and neutrals

    SciTech Connect

    Cun, Huanyao E-mail: greber@physik.uzh.ch; Spescha, Annina; Schuler, Adrian; Hengsberger, Matthias; Osterwalder, Jürg; Greber, Thomas E-mail: greber@physik.uzh.ch

    2016-03-15

    Argon ion kinetic energy spectra at different discharge voltages (between 480 and 600 V) of a commercial cold cathode ion source IQP10/63 are reported. The high kinetic energy cut-off depends on the discharge voltage and the corresponding plasma potential due to excess positive charges which is found to be about 136 V. Exposure of single layer hexagonal boron nitride on rhodium to the beam of the ion source leads to the formation of nanotents, i.e., stable atomic protrusions. A positive bias voltage is applied to the target sample to block the positive ions produced by the ion source. However, application of a positive bias potential (800 eV), which is higher than the kinetic energy cut-off, still allows the formation of nanotents and its observation with scanning tunneling microscopy. This indicates that the ion source also produces neutral atoms with kinetic energies higher than the penetration threshold across a single layer of hexagonal boron nitride.

  12. Vlasov simulation of 2D Modulational Instability of Ion Acoustic Waves and Prospects for Modeling such instabilities in Laser Propagation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Richard; Chapman, T.; Banks, J. W.; Brunner, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of Ion Acoustic waves (IAWs) driven by an external traveling-wave potential, ϕ0 (x , t) , with frequency, ω, and wavenumber, k, obeying the kinetic dispersion relation. Both electrons and ions are treated kinetically. Simulations with ϕ0 (x , t) , localized transverse to the propagation direction, model IAWs driven in a laser speckle. The waves bow with a positive or negative curvature of the wave fronts that depends on the sign of the nonlinear frequency shift ΔωNL , which is in turn determined by the magnitude of ZTe /Ti where Z is the charge state and Te , i is the electron, ion temperature. These kinetic effects result can cause modulational and self-focusing instabilities that transfer wave energy to kinetic energy. Linear dispersion properties of IAWs are used in laser propagation codes that predict the amount of light reflected by stimulated Brillouin scattering. At high enough amplitudes, the linear dispersion is invalid and these kinetic effects should be incorporated. Including the spatial and time scales of these instabilities is computationally prohibitive. We report progress including kinetic models in laser propagation codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 15.

  13. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part II. State estimation via impedance-based temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Impedance-based temperature detection (ITD) is a promising approach for rapid estimation of internal cell temperature based on the correlation between temperature and electrochemical impedance. Previously, ITD was used as part of an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) state-estimator in conjunction with a thermal model to enable estimation of the 1-D temperature distribution of a cylindrical lithium-ion battery. Here, we extend this method to enable estimation of the 2-D temperature field of a battery with temperature gradients in both the radial and axial directions. An EKF using a parameterised 2-D spectral-Galerkin model with ITD measurement input (the imaginary part of the impedance at 215 Hz) is shown to accurately predict the core temperature and multiple surface temperatures of a 32,113 LiFePO4 cell, using current excitation profiles based on an Artemis HEV drive cycle. The method is validated experimentally on a cell fitted with a heat sink and asymmetrically cooled via forced air convection. A novel approach to impedance-temperature calibration is also presented, which uses data from a single drive cycle, rather than measurements at multiple uniform cell temperatures as in previous studies. This greatly reduces the time required for calibration, since it overcomes the need for repeated cell thermal equalization.

  14. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part I. Low-order thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating the temperature distribution within Li-ion batteries during operation is critical for safety and control purposes. Although existing control-oriented thermal models - such as thermal equivalent circuits (TEC) - are computationally efficient, they only predict average temperatures, and are unable to predict the spatially resolved temperature distribution throughout the cell. We present a low-order 2D thermal model of a cylindrical battery based on a Chebyshev spectral-Galerkin (SG) method, capable of predicting the full temperature distribution with a similar efficiency to a TEC. The model accounts for transient heat generation, anisotropic heat conduction, and non-homogeneous convection boundary conditions. The accuracy of the model is validated through comparison with finite element simulations, which show that the 2-D temperature field (r, z) of a large format (64 mm diameter) cell can be accurately modelled with as few as 4 states. Furthermore, the performance of the model for a range of Biot numbers is investigated via frequency analysis. For larger cells or highly transient thermal dynamics, the model order can be increased for improved accuracy. The incorporation of this model in a state estimation scheme with experimental validation against thermocouple measurements is presented in the companion contribution (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775316308163).

  15. Influence of electron-neutral elastic collisions on the instability of an ion-contaminated cylindrical electron cloud: 2D3V PIC-with-MCC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is a simulation based investigation of the effect of elastic collisions and effectively elastic-like excitation collisions between electrons and background neutrals on the dynamics of a cylindrically trapped electron cloud that also has an ion contaminant mixed in it. A cross section of the trapped non neutral cloud composed of electrons mixed uniformly with a fractional population of ions is loaded on a 2D PIC grid with the plasma in a state of unstable equilibrium due to differential rotation between the electron and the ion component. The electrons are also loaded with an axial velocity component, vz, that mimics their bouncing motion between the electrostatic end plugs of a Penning-Malmberg trap. This vz loading facilitates 3D elastic and excitation collisions of the electrons with background neutrals under a MCC scheme. In the present set of numerical experiments, the electrons do not ionize the neutrals. This helps in separating out only the effect of non-ionizing collisions of electrons on the dynamics of the cloud. Simulations reveal that these non-ionizing collisions indirectly influence the ensuing collisionless ion resonance instability of the contaminated electron cloud by a feedback process. The collisional relaxation reduces the average density of the electron cloud and thereby increases the fractional density of the ions mixed in it. The dynamically changing electron density and fractional density of ions feed back on the ongoing ion-resonance (two-stream) instability between the two components of the nonneutral cloud and produce deviations in the paths of progression of the instability that are uncorrelated at different background gas pressures. Effects of the collisions on the instability are evident from alteration in the growth rate and energetics of the instability caused by the presence of background neutrals as compared to a vacuum background. Further in order to understand if the non-ionizing collisions can independently be a cause

  16. Guided ion beam and theoretical study of the reactions of Hf{sup +} with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Christopher S.; Armentrout, P. B.

    2010-09-28

    The kinetic energy dependences of reactions of the third-row transition metal cation Hf{sup +} with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD were determined using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. A flow tube ion source produces Hf{sup +} in its {sup 2}D (6s{sup 2}5d{sup 1}) electronic ground state level. Corresponding state-specific reaction cross sections are obtained. The kinetic energy dependences of the cross sections for the endothermic formation of HfH{sup +} and HfD{sup +} are analyzed to give a 0 K bond dissociation energy of D{sub 0}(Hf{sup +}-H)=2.11{+-}0.08 eV. Quantum chemical calculations at several levels of theory performed here generally overestimate the experimental bond energy but results obtained using the Becke-half-and-half-LYP functional show good agreement. Theory also provides the electronic structures of these species and the reactive potential energy surfaces. Results from the reactions with HD provide insight into the reaction mechanisms and indicates that Hf{sup +} reacts via a statistical mechanism. We also compare this third-row transition metal system with the first-row and second-row congeners, Ti{sup +} and Zr{sup +}, and find that Hf{sup +} has a weaker M{sup +}-H bond. As most third-row transition metal hydride cation bonds exceed their lighter congeners, this trend is unusual but can be understood using promotion energy arguments.

  17. Technical Note: Influence of Compton currents on profile measurements in small-volume ion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, Sean; Sperling, Nicholas; Parsai, E. Ishmael; Holmes, Shannon

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This work is to evaluate the effects of Compton current generation in three small-volume ionization chambers on measured beam characteristics for electron fields. Methods: Beam scans were performed using Exradin A16, A26, and PTW 31014 microchambers. Scans with varying chamber components shielded were performed. Static point measurements, output factors, and cable only irradiations were performed to determine the contribution of Compton currents to various components of the chamber. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate why one microchamber showed a significant reduction in Compton current generation. Results: Beam profiles demonstrated significant distortion for two of the three chambers when scanned parallel to the chamber axis, produced by electron deposition within the wire. Measurements of ionization produced within the cable identified Compton current generation as the cause of these distortions. The size of the central collecting wire was found to have the greatest influence on the magnitude of Compton current generation. Conclusions: Microchambers can demonstrate significant (>5%) deviations from properties as measured with larger volume chambers (0.125 cm{sup 3} and above). These deviations can be substantially reduced by averaging measurements conducted at opposite polarities.

  18. Differential cross sections, measured with guided ion beams: applications to N + + N 2 and C 2H 2+ + C 2D 4 collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, S.; Gerlich, D.

    1996-09-01

    In gas phase ion chemistry, the guided-ion-beam (GIB) technique is well established for measuring reliable absolute integral cross sections over a wide range of collision energies. It is less known that the method is also well suited for recoil velocity distributions of product ions (the axial component is determined by using the time-off-flight method (GIB-TOF), the transverse component by guiding field variation (GIB-VAR)). This additional information can be used as a diagnostic tool and helps to unravel the energetics of competing reaction pathways. In general, it allows determination of absolute doubly differential cross sections with very high sensitivity and in an energy and scattering angular range inaccessible to standard ion-beam methods. The experimental part of this paper describes the technique in detail, its difficulties and advantages and the required experimental test procedures. Numerical simulations aid the understanding of the kinematics and the shortfalls of the technique, mainly caused by the random motion of the gas in the scattering cell. The results section briefly summarizes already published product velocity distributions obtained for simple systems. New measurements will be presented for two collision systems, N + + N 2 and C 2H 2+C 2D 4. For the first one, product velocity distributions provide information on the role of excited states of both reactants and products. In combination with new ab initio calculations of the N 3+ potential surface [F.R. Bennett et al., Chem. Phys., this issue] the role of barriers and nonadiabatic interactions is elucidated. In the case of the more complicated hydrocarbon system, the method allows us to distinguish between products of same mass but different isotopic compositions. In addition, different reaction pathways are identified and hints to barrier heights are extracted from the product velocity distributions.

  19. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  20. A TPC (Time Projection Chamber) detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Bieser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Klienfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wieman, H.; Wright, M.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx} 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Guided ion beam and theoretical study of the reactions of Au{sup +} with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD

    SciTech Connect

    Li Fengxia; Hinton, Christopher S.; Citir, Murat; Liu, Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2011-01-14

    Reactions of the late third-row transition metal cation Au{sup +} with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD are examined using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry. A flow tube ion source produces Au{sup +} in its {sup 1}S (5d{sup 10}) electronic ground state level. Corresponding state-specific reaction cross sections for forming AuH{sup +} and AuD{sup +} as a function of kinetic energy are obtained and analyzed to give a 0 K bond dissociation energy of D{sub 0}(Au{sup +}-H) = 2.13 {+-} 0.11 eV. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/HW+/6-311+G(3p) and B3LYP/Def2TZVPP levels performed here show good agreement with the experimental bond energy. Theory also provides the electronic structures of these species and the reactive potential energy surfaces. We also compare this third-row transition metal system with previous results for analogous reactions of the first-row and second-row congeners, Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +}. We find that Au{sup +} has a stronger M{sup +}-H bond, which can be explained by the lanthanide contraction and relativistic effects that alter the relative size of the valence s and d orbitals. Results from reactions with HD provide insight into the reaction mechanism and indicate that ground state Au{sup +} reacts largely via a direct mechanism, in concordance with the behavior of the lighter group 11 metal ions, but includes more statistical behavior than these metals as well.

  2. Modeling of life limiting phenomena in the discharge chamber of an electron bombardment ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handoo, Arvind K.; Ray, Pradosh K.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental facility to study the low energy sputtering of metal surfaces with ions produced by an ion gun is described. The energy of the ions ranged from 10 to 500 eV. Cesium ions with energies from 100 to 500 eV were used initially to characterize the operation of the ion gun. Next, argon and xenon ions were used to measure the sputtering yields of cobalt (Co), Cadmium (Cd), and Chromium (Cr) at an operating temperature of 2x10(exp -5) Torr. The ion current ranged from 0.0135 micro-A at 500 eV. The targets were electroplated on a copper substrate. The surface density of the electroplated material was approx. 50 micro-g/sq cm. The sputtered atoms were collected on an aluminum foil surrounding the target. Radioactive tracers were used to measure the sputtering yields. The sputtering yields of Cr were found to be much higher than those of Co and Cd. The yields of Co and Cd were comparable, with Co providing the higher yields. Co and Cd targets were observed to sputter at energies as low as 10 eV for both argon and xenon ions. The Cr yields could not be measured below 20 eV for argon ions and 15 eV for xenon ions. On a linear scale the yield energy curves near the threshold energies exhibit a concave nature.

  3. Signal generator exciting an electromagnetic field for ion beam transport to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubol'tsev, Yu. V.; Kogan, V. T.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Chichagov, Yu. V.; Antonov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    A high-voltage high-frequency signal generator is described that excites an electric field for ion beam transport from an ion source to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer. Excitation signals to the number of two are high-frequency sine-wave out-of-phase signals with the same amplitudes. The amplitude and phase of the signals vary from 20 to 100 V and from 10 kHz to 1 MHz, respectively. The generator also produces a controlled bias voltage in the interval 50-200 V. The frequency and amplitude of the signals, as well as the bias voltage, are computer-controlled via the USB interface.

  4. SU-E-T-172: Evaluation of the Exradin A26 Ion Chamber in Megavoltage Photon Beams as a Reference Class Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Exradin A26 is a new design of micro-ionization ion chamber that externally resembles the Exradin A16 model but has significant internal changes to address measurement issues reported in the literature for the A16. This project involved the characterization of two versions of the A26 chamber in high energy x-rays with particular reference to the performance specification laid out in the imminent Addendum to TG-51. Methods: The Exradin A26 was investigated in a range of megavoltage photon beams (6–25 MV). Investigations looked at chamber settling, ion recombination and polarity. Since it has been previously shown that non-ideal performance is most easily identified through ion recombination measurements, the focus was on the determination of Pion. Results: i) Chamber settling - the chamber response stabilizes very quickly (within 3 minutes), even after a large change in the polarizing voltage.ii) The polarity correction was found to be small (within 0.2% of unity)iii) The chamber showed linear behavior for a Jaffe plot (1/reading vs 1/polarizing voltage) for applied voltages ≤ 200 V.iv) The recombination correction showed a linear variation with the doseper- pulse, was not significantly dependent on the polarity of the collecting voltage and was consistent with the chamber dimensions (i.e. agreed with Boag theory). Conclusion: An initial investigation of the Exradin A26 micro chamber suggests that although its performance exceeds the AAPM specification for a reference-class ion chamber for use in megavoltage photon beams it is a significant improvement over the previous A16 design. Further work is required to evaluate long-term stability and determine kQ factors.

  5. Guided ion beam and theoretical study of the reactions of Os{sup +} with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Christopher S.; Citir, Murat; Armentrout, P. B.

    2011-12-21

    Reactions of the third-row transition metal cation Os{sup +} with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD to form OsH{sup +} (OsD{sup +}) were studied using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. A flow tube ion source produces Os{sup +} in its {sup 6}D (6s{sup 1}5d{sup 6}) electronic ground state level. Corresponding state-specific reaction cross sections are obtained. The kinetic energy dependences of the cross sections for the endothermic formation of OsH{sup +} and OsD{sup +} are analyzed to give a 0 K bond dissociation energy of D{sub 0}(Os{sup +}-H) = 2.45 {+-} 0.10 eV. Quantum chemical calculations are performed here at several levels of theory, with B3LYP approaches generally overestimating the experimental bond energy whereas results obtained using BHLYP and CCSD(T), coupled-cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, levels show good agreement. Theory also provides the electronic structures of these species and the potential energy surfaces for reaction. Results from the reactions with HD provide insight into the reaction mechanism and indicate that Os{sup +} reacts via a direct reaction. We also compare this third-row transition metal system with the first-row and second-row congeners, Fe{sup +} and Ru{sup +}, and find that Os{sup +} reacts more efficiently with dihydrogen, forming a stronger M{sup +}-H bond. These differences can be attributed to the lanthanide contraction and relativistic effects.

  6. Theoretical study of dissociative recombination of C{sub 2v} triatomic ions: Application to H{sub 2}D{sup +} and D{sub 2}H{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Greene, Chris H.

    2005-08-15

    We develop a theoretical treatment of the dissociative recombination of triatomic molecular ions of the C{sub 2v} molecular symmetry group. Using the method, we study the dissociative recombination of the H{sub 2}D{sup +} and D{sub 2}H{sup +} ions. The theoretical rates obtained for the H{sub 2}D{sup +} and D{sub 2}H{sup +} dissociative recombination are in general agreement with storage-ring experiments although there are some potentially informative discrepancies.

  7. Pseudocapacitive Na-Ion Storage Boosts High Rate and Areal Capacity of Self-Branched 2D Layered Metal Chalcogenide Nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dongliang; Liang, Pei; Chen, Zhen; Bai, Linyi; Shen, He; Liu, Xiaoxu; Xia, Xinhui; Zhao, Yanli; Savilov, Serguei V; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2016-11-22

    The abundant reserve and low cost of sodium have provoked tremendous evolution of Na-ion batteries (SIBs) in the past few years, but their performances are still limited by either the specific capacity or rate capability. Attempts to pursue high rate ability with maintained high capacity in a single electrode remains even more challenging. Here, an elaborate self-branched 2D SnS2 (B-SnS2) nanoarray electrode is designed by a facile hot bath method for Na storage. This interesting electrode exhibits areal reversible capacity of ca. 3.7 mAh cm(-2) (900 mAh g(-1)) and rate capability of 1.6 mAh cm(-2) (400 mAh g(-1)) at 40 mA cm(-2) (10 A g(-1)). Improved extrinsic pseudocapacitive contribution is demonstrated as the origin of fast kinetics of an alloying-based SnS2 electrode. Sodiation dynamics analysis based on first-principles calculations, ex-situ HRTEM, in situ impedance, and in situ Raman technologies verify the S-edge effect on the fast Na(+) migration and reversible and sensitive structure evolution during high-rate charge/discharge. The excellent alloying-based pseudocapacitance and unsaturated edge effect enabled by self-branched surface nanoengineering could be a promising strategy for promoting development of SIBs with both high capacity and high rate response.

  8. TH-C-19A-08: PDD Discrepancies at Opposite Biases From Very Small Volume Ion Chambers When Using Water Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, V; Zhao, H; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B; Wang, B; James, J; McCullough, K; Lynch, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: As more so-called micro ion chambers become commercially available, medical physicists may be inclined to use them during the linear accelerator commissioning process, in an attempt to better characterize the beam in steep dose gradient areas. The purpose of this work is to inform the medical physics community of a non-trivial, anomalous behavior observed when very small chambers are used in certain beam scanning configurations. Methods: A total of six ion chambers (0.007cc to 0.6cc) were used to scan PDDs from a 10×10cm2 field at both +300V and −300V biases. PDDs were scanned using three different water tank scanning systems to determine whether different scanners exhibit the same abnormality. Finally, PDDs were sampled using an external electrometer to bypass the internal electrometer of the scanner to determine the potential contributions of the scanner electronics to the abnormality observed. Results: We observed a reproducible, significant difference (over-response with depth) in PDDs acquired when using very small ion chambers with certain bias and watertank combinations, on the order of 3–5% at a depth of 25 cm in water. This difference was not observed when the PDDs were sampled using the ion chambers in conjunction with an external electrometer. This suggests a contribution of interference produced by the controller box and scanning system, which becomes significant for the very small signals collected by very small ion chambers, especially at depth, as the signal level is reduced even further. Conclusion: Based on the results observed here, if currently available very small ion chambers are used with specific bias and scanning water-tank combinations, erroneous PDD data may be collected. If this data is used as input to the Treatment Planning System, systematic errors on the order of 3%–5% may be introduced into the treatment planning process.

  9. Direct determination of k Q for Farmer-type ionization chambers in a clinical scanned carbon ion beam using water calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Osinga-Blättermann, J-M; Brons, S; Greilich, S; Jäkel, O; Krauss, A

    2017-03-21

    Until now, the dosimetry of carbon ions with ionization chambers has not reached the same level of accuracy as that of high-energy photons. This is mainly caused by the approximately threefold larger uncertainty of the k Q factor of ionization chambers, which, due to the lack of experimental data, is still derived by calculations. Measurements of absorbed dose to water, D w, by means of water calorimetry have now been performed in the entrance channel of a scanned 6 cm  ×  6 cm radiation field of 429 MeV/u carbon ions, allowing the direct calibration of ionization chambers and thus the experimental determination of k Q. Within this work, values for k Q have been determined for the Farmer-type ionization chambers FC65-G and TM30013. A detailed investigation of the radiation field enabled the accurate determination of correction factors needed for both calorimetric and ionometric measurements. Finally, a relative standard measurement uncertainty of 0.8% (k  =  1) could be achieved for the experimental k Q values. For both chambers, the experimental k Q factors were found to be about 1% larger than those tabulated in the German DIN 6801-1 protocol, whereas compared to the theoretical values stated in the TRS-398 protocol, the experimental k Q value agrees within 0.4% for the TM30013 chamber but is about 1% lower in the case of the FC65-G chamber.

  10. Direct determination of k Q for Farmer-type ionization chambers in a clinical scanned carbon ion beam using water calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinga-Blättermann, J.-M.; Brons, S.; Greilich, S.; Jäkel, O.; Krauss, A.

    2017-03-01

    Until now, the dosimetry of carbon ions with ionization chambers has not reached the same level of accuracy as that of high-energy photons. This is mainly caused by the approximately threefold larger uncertainty of the k Q factor of ionization chambers, which, due to the lack of experimental data, is still derived by calculations. Measurements of absorbed dose to water, D w, by means of water calorimetry have now been performed in the entrance channel of a scanned 6 cm  ×  6 cm radiation field of 429 MeV/u carbon ions, allowing the direct calibration of ionization chambers and thus the experimental determination of k Q. Within this work, values for k Q have been determined for the Farmer-type ionization chambers FC65-G and TM30013. A detailed investigation of the radiation field enabled the accurate determination of correction factors needed for both calorimetric and ionometric measurements. Finally, a relative standard measurement uncertainty of 0.8% (k  =  1) could be achieved for the experimental k Q values. For both chambers, the experimental k Q factors were found to be about 1% larger than those tabulated in the German DIN 6801-1 protocol, whereas compared to the theoretical values stated in the TRS-398 protocol, the experimental k Q value agrees within 0.4% for the TM30013 chamber but is about 1% lower in the case of the FC65-G chamber.

  11. Sputter erosion and deposition in the discharge chamber of a small mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    A 5-cm diameter mercury ion thruster similar to one tested for 9715 hours was operated approximately 400 hrs each at discharge voltages of 36.6, 39.6, and 42.6 V, with corresponding discharge propellant utilizations of 58, 68, and 70 percent. The observed sputter erosion rates of the internal thruster parts and the anode weight gain rate all rose rapidly with discharge voltage and were roughly in the ratio of 1:3:5 for the three voltages. The combined weight loss of the internal thruster parts nearly balanced the anode weight gain. Hg+2 ions apparently caused most of the observed erosion.

  12. Sputter erosion and deposition in the discharge chamber of a small mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    A 5 cm diameter mercury ion thruster similar to one tested for 9715 hours was operated approximately 400 hrs each at discharge voltages of 36.6, 39.6, and 42.6 V, with corresponding discharge propellant utilizations of 58, 68, and 70 percent. The observed sputter erosion rates of the internal thruster parts and the anode weight gain rate all rose rapidly with discharge voltage and were roughly in the ratio of 1:3:5 for the three voltages. The combined weight loss of the internal thruster parts nearly balanced the anode weight gain. Hg(+2) ion apparently caused most of the observed erosion.

  13. SU-E-T-392: Evaluation of Ion Chamber/film and Log File Based QA to Detect Delivery Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C; Mason, B; Kirsner, S; Ohrt, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ion chamber and film (ICAF) is a method used to verify patient dose prior to treatment. More recently, log file based QA has been shown as an alternative for measurement based QA. In this study, we delivered VMAT plans with and without errors to determine if ICAF and/or log file based QA was able to detect the errors. Methods: Using two VMAT patients, the original treatment plan plus 7 additional plans with delivery errors introduced were generated and delivered. The erroneous plans had gantry, collimator, MLC, gantry and collimator, collimator and MLC, MLC and gantry, and gantry, collimator, and MLC errors. The gantry and collimator errors were off by 4{sup 0} for one of the two arcs. The MLC error introduced was one in which the opening aperture didn’t move throughout the delivery of the field. For each delivery, an ICAF measurement was made as well as a dose comparison based upon log files. Passing criteria to evaluate the plans were ion chamber less and 5% and film 90% of pixels pass the 3mm/3% gamma analysis(GA). For log file analysis 90% of voxels pass the 3mm/3% 3D GA and beam parameters match what was in the plan. Results: Two original plans were delivered and passed both ICAF and log file base QA. Both ICAF and log file QA met the dosimetry criteria on 4 of the 12 erroneous cases analyzed (2 cases were not analyzed). For the log file analysis, all 12 erroneous plans alerted a mismatch in delivery versus what was planned. The 8 plans that didn’t meet criteria all had MLC errors. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that log file based pre-treatment QA was able to detect small errors that may not be detected using an ICAF and both methods of were able to detect larger delivery errors.

  14. SU-E-T-198: Comparison Between a PTW MicroDiamond Dosimeter and a Markus Chamber in a 62 MeV/n Carbon Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Rossomme, S; Hopfgartner, J; Delor, A; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of a PTW Freiburg microDiamond dosimeter, we compared its response to the response of a plane-parallel Markus chamber in a 62 MeV/n mono-energetic carbon ion beam. Methods: The response of both detectors has been studied as a function of depth in graphite by adding or removing graphite plates in front of the detectors. To account for fluctuations of the beam, we used two setups with different monitor chambers. The depth of the effective point of measurement of both detectors has been converted into a graphite equivalent depth using ICRU Report 73 data. As recommended by IAEA TRS-398, the response of the Markus chamber has been corrected for temperature, pressure, polarity effects and ion recombination. The latter required an additional experiment; to quantify the effect of volume recombination and initial recombination, measurements have been performed at different voltages and different dose rates. Results: As expected, the dominant process leading to ion recombination for carbon ion beam is the initial recombination. At the entrance, the ion recombination correction equals 1.1% and the value is approximately constant in the plateau region. Due to the increase of the LET in the Bragg peak region, we observe a strong increase of the ion recombination correction, up to 6.1% at the distal edge. Comparison between the microDiamond response and the Markus chamber response shows good agreement in the plateau region. However, we observe a 13.6% under response of the microDiamond in the Bragg peak. Conclusion: Increasing between 1% and 6%, the depth dependent ion recombination correction has to be applied to the Markus response. The comparison between the microDiamond and the Markus chamber indicates that there is an under-response of the microDiamond in the vicinity of the Bragg peak due to the increased LET.

  15. Anisotropic dipole polarizability of transition metal atoms: Sc(2D), Ti(3F,3P), V(4F,4P,6D), Ni(3F) and ions: Sc2+(2D), Ti2+(3F,3P).

    PubMed

    Kłos, J

    2005-07-08

    Dipole polarizability tensor components and quadrupole moments of transition-metal atoms Sc, Ti, V, Ni, and Cu and ions Sc2+ and Ti2+ are computed using finite field complete active space self-consistent field and multireference configuration interaction ab initio methods. Perpendicular components of the dipole polarizability tensor are calculated from equations involving only parallel components of the polarizability tensor and its average value. Mean polarizability and polarizability anisotropy decrease in the Sc-Ni series. Relativistic effects are accounted for with the Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian. The consequences of the anisotropic properties of these atoms to their interactions with spherically symmetric rare gases are also discussed.

  16. An ion thruster internal discharge chamber electrostatic probe diagnostic technique using a high-speed probe positioning system.

    PubMed

    Herman, Daniel A; Gallimore, Alec D

    2008-01-01

    Extensive resources have been allocated to diagnose and minimize lifetime-limiting factors in gridded ion thrusters. While most of this effort has focused on grid erosion, results from wear tests indicate that discharge cathode erosion may also play an important role in limiting the lifetime of ring-cusp ion thrusters proposed for future large flagship missions. The detailed characterization of the near-cathode discharge plasma is essential for mitigating discharge cathode erosion. However, severe difficulty is encountered when attempting to measure internal discharge plasma parameters during thruster operation with conventional probing techniques. These difficulties stem from the high-voltage, high-density discharge cathode plume, which is a hostile environment for probes. A method for interrogating the discharge chamber plasma of a working ion thruster over a two-dimensional grid is demonstrated. The high-speed axial reciprocating probe positioning system is used to minimize thruster perturbation during probe insertion and to reduce heating of the probe. Electrostatic probe measurements from a symmetric double Langmuir probe are presented over a two-dimensional spatial array in the near-discharge cathode assembly region of a 30-cm-diameter ring-cusp ion thruster. Electron temperatures, 2-5 eV, and number density contours, with a maximum of 8 x 10(12) cm(-3) on centerline, are measured. These data provide detailed electron temperature and number density contours which, when combined with plasma potential measurements, may shed light on discharge cathode erosion processes and the effect of thruster operating conditions on erosion rates.

  17. Design and Installation of a Field Ionization Test Chamber for Ion Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Romano Second Reader: Oscar Biblarz THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704–0188 Public...Paul W. Camp Approved by: Sebastian Osswald Thesis Advisor Marcello Romano Thesis Co-Advisor Oscar Biblarz Second Reader Knox T...in its success. I would also like to thank Professor Oscar Biblarz, for his wealth of knowledge on ion propulsion he imparted to me. A special

  18. Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

    2012-07-08

    A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

  19. Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Callahan-Miller, D.; Perkins, J.; Caporaso, G.; Tabak, M.; Moir, R.; Meier, W.; Bangerter, Roger; Lee, Ed

    1998-04-01

    Ion fast ignition, like laser fast ignition, can potentially reduce driver energy for high target gain by an order of magnitude, while reducing fuel capsule implosion velocity, convergence ratio, and required precisions in target fabrication and illumination symmetry, all of which should further improve and simplify IFE power plants. From fast-ignition target requirements, we determine requirements for ion beam acceleration, pulse-compression, and final focus for advanced accelerators that must be developed for much shorter pulses and higher voltage gradients than today's accelerators, to deliver the petawatt peak powers and small focal spots ({approx}100 {micro}m) required. Although such peak powers and small focal spots are available today with lasers, development of such advanced accelerators is motivated by the greater likely efficiency of deep ion penetration and deposition into pre-compressed 1000x liquid density DT cores. Ion ignitor beam parameters for acceleration, pulse compression, and final focus are estimated for two examples based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator; (1) a small target with {rho}r {approx} 2 g/cm{sup 2} for a small demo/pilot plant producing {approx}40 MJ of fusion yield per target, and (2) a large target with {rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2} producing {approx}1 GJ yield for multi-unit electricity/hydrogen plants, allowing internal T-breeding with low T/D ratios, >75 % of the total fusion yield captured for plasma direct conversion, and simple liquid-protected chambers with gravity clearing. Key enabling development needs for ion fast ignition are found to be (1) ''Close-coupled'' target designs for single-ended illumination of both compressor and ignitor beams; (2) Development of high gradient (>25 MV/m) linacs with high charge-state (q {approx} 26) ion sources for short ({approx}5 ns) accelerator output pulses; (3) Small mm-scale laser-driven plasma lens of {approx}10 MG fields to provide steep focusing angles close-in to the target

  20. Discharge Chamber Plasma Structure of a 30-cm NSTAR-Type Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-01

    Single Langmuir probe measurements are presented over a two-dimensional array of locations in the near Discharge Cathode Assembly (DCA) region of a 30-cm diameter ring cusp ion thruster over a range of thruster operating conditions encompassing the high-power half of the NASA throttling table. The Langmuir probe data were analyzed with two separate methods. All data were analyzed initially assuming an electron population consisting of Maxwellian electrons only. The on-axis data were then analyzed assuming both Maxwellian and primary electrons. Discharge plasma data taken with beam extraction exhibit a broadening of the higher electron temperature plume boundary compared to similar discharge conditions without beam extraction. The opposite effect is evident with the electron/ion number density as the data without began, extraction appears to be more collimated than the corresponding data with beam extraction. Primary electron energy and number densities are presented for one operating condition giving an order of magnitude of their value and the error associated with this calculation.

  1. Insulated Conducting Cantilevered Nanotips and Two-Chamber Recording System for High Resolution Ion Sensing AFM

    PubMed Central

    Meckes, Brian; Arce, Fernando Teran; Connelly, Laura S.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes contain ion channels, which are nanoscale pores allowing controlled ionic transport and mediating key biological functions underlying normal/abnormal living. Synthetic membranes with defined pores are being developed to control various processes, including filtration of pollutants, charge transport for energy storage, and separation of fluids and molecules. Although ionic transport (currents) can be measured with single channel resolution, imaging their structure and ionic currents simultaneously is difficult. Atomic force microscopy enables high resolution imaging of nanoscale structures and can be modified to measure ionic currents simultaneously. Moreover, the ionic currents can also be used to image structures. A simple method for fabricating conducting AFM cantilevers to image pore structures at high resolution is reported. Tungsten microwires with nanoscale tips are insulated except at the apex. This allows simultaneous imaging via cantilever deflections in normal AFM force feedback mode as well as measuring localized ionic currents. These novel probes measure ionic currents as small as picoampere while providing nanoscale spatial resolution surface topography and is suitable for measuring ionic currents and conductance of biological ion channels. PMID:24663394

  2. Heavy ion beam degradation from stripping in near vacuum reactor chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1981-07-21

    With the use of a particle simulation code we have investigated the ballistic transport of heavy ion beams through a gas-filled reactor for inertial confinement fusion. The background gas pressure has been taken to be 10/sup -4/ torr - 10/sup -3/ torr of Lithium vapor as is appropriate to the HYLIFE reactor concept. During transport to the pellet, Coulomb collisions of beam particles with the background gas will convert a fraction of the beam to charges states higher than the initial value. Collisons will also produce an associated swarm of knock-on electrons. As the beam approaches the pellet, anharmonic components of the space charges forces will lead to a distortion of the phase space of the beam and a consequent degradation of the focal properties of the beam. This degradation can be described in terms of an increase in the rms emittance of the beam. The degree of emittance growth depends sensitivity upon the initial spatial distribution of particles in the beam. For this study we have modified a single-disk particle simulation code, DESTIN (2), to follow two species of particles, the number of which varies in a prescribed fashion dependent upon reactor temperature as the beam converges toward the pellet.

  3. SU-E-T-382: Influence of Compton Currents On Profile Measurements in Small- Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, S; Parsai, E; Holmes, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Ionization chambers in electron radiation fields are known to exhibit polarity effects due to Compton currents. Previously we have presented a unique manifestation of this effect observed with a microionization chamber. We have expanded that investigation to include three micro-ionization chambers commonly used in radiation therapy. The purpose of this project is to determine what factors influence this polarity effect for micro-chambers and how it might be mitigated. Methods: Three chambers were utilized: a PTW 31016, an Exradin A-16, and an Exradin A- 26. Beam profile scans were obtained on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator in combination with a Wellhofer water phantom for 6, 9, and 12 MeV electrons. Profiles were obtained parallel and perpendicular to the chamber's long axis, with both positive and negative collecting bias. Profiles were obtained with various chamber components shielded by 5 mm of Pb at 6 MeV to determine their relative contributions to this polarity effect. Results: The polarity effect was observed for all three chambers, and the ratio of the polarity effect for the Exradin chambers is proportional to the ratio of chamber volumes. Shielding the stem of both Exradin chambers diminished, but did not remove the polarity effect. However, they demonstrated no out-of-field effect when the cable was shielded with Pb. The PTW chamber demonstrated a significantly reduced polarity effect without any shielding despite its comparable volume with the A-26. Conclusions: The sensitive volume of these micro-chambers is relatively insensitive to collecting polarity. However, charge deposition within the cable can dramatically alter measured ionization profiles. This is demonstrated by the removal of the out-of-field ionization when the cable is shielded for the Exradin chambers. We strongly recommend analyzing any polarity dependence for small-volume chambers used in characterization of electron fields.

  4. Ion-Exchange-Induced 2D-3D Conversion of HMA1-x FAx PbI3 Cl Perovskite into a High-Quality MA1-x FAx PbI3 Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge; Zhang, Taiyang; Guo, Nanjie; Xu, Feng; Qian, Xufang; Zhao, Yixin

    2016-10-17

    High-quality phase-pure MA1-x FAx PbI3 planar films (MA=methylammonium, FA=formamidinium) with extended absorption and enhanced thermal stability are difficult to deposit by regular simple solution chemistry approaches owing to crystallization competition between the easy-to-crystallize but unwanted δ-FAPbI3 /MAPbI3 and FAx MA1-x PbI3 requiring rigid crystallization conditions. Here A 2D-3D conversion to transform compact 2D mixed composition HMA1-x FAx PbI3 Cl perovskite precursor films into 3D MA1-x FAx PbI3 (x=0.1-0.9) perovskites is presented. The designed Cl/I and H/FA(MA) ion exchange reaction induced fast transformation of compact 2D perovskite film, helping to form the phase-pure and high quality MA1-x FAx PbI3 without δ-FAPbI3 and MAPbI3 impurity. In all, we successfully developed a facile one-step method to fabricate high quality phase-pure MA1-x FAx PbI3 (x=0.1-0.9) perovskite films by 2D-3D conversion of HMA1-x FAx PbI3 Cl perovskite. This 2D-3D conversion is a promising strategy for lead halide perovskite fabrication.

  5. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  6. Flow chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  7. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  8. A study of airborne radon levels in Paarl houses (South Africa) and associated source terms, using electret ion chambers and gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, R; Newman, R T; Speelman, W J

    2008-11-01

    Indoor radon ((222)Rn) concentrations were measured in Paarl homes by means of electret ion chambers. The concentrations varied between 28 and 465 Bq m(-3). The average values (Bq m(-3)) found in houses on the west and east side of the Berg River, which bisects Paarl, were 132 (+/-11) and 37 (+/-3), respectively. Radiometric analyses of soils show that the mean (226)Ra activity concentration is three times higher on the west than on the east side of the Berg River.

  9. TH-E-BRE-03: A Novel Method to Account for Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect in a Commercial Treatment Planning System Through Convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B; Li, J; Liu, C; Yan, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Fourier-based deconvolution approaches used to eliminate ion chamber volume averaging effect (VAE) suffer from measurement noise. This work aims to investigate a novel method to account for ion chamber VAE through convolution in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: Beam profiles of various field sizes and depths of an Elekta Synergy were collected with a finite size ion chamber (CC13) to derive a clinically acceptable beam model for a commercial TPS (Pinnacle{sup 3}), following the vendor-recommended modeling process. The TPS-calculated profiles were then externally convolved with a Gaussian function representing the chamber (σ = chamber radius). The agreement between the convolved profiles and measured profiles was evaluated with a one dimensional Gamma analysis (1%/1mm) as an objective function for optimization. TPS beam model parameters for focal and extra-focal sources were optimized and loaded back into the TPS for new calculation. This process was repeated until the objective function converged using a Simplex optimization method. Planar dose of 30 IMRT beams were calculated with both the clinical and the re-optimized beam models and compared with MapCHEC™ measurements to evaluate the new beam model. Results: After re-optimization, the two orthogonal source sizes for the focal source reduced from 0.20/0.16 cm to 0.01/0.01 cm, which were the minimal allowed values in Pinnacle. No significant change in the parameters for the extra-focal source was observed. With the re-optimized beam model, average Gamma passing rate for the 30 IMRT beams increased from 92.1% to 99.5% with a 3%/3mm criterion and from 82.6% to 97.2% with a 2%/2mm criterion. Conclusion: We proposed a novel method to account for ion chamber VAE in a commercial TPS through convolution. The reoptimized beam model, with VAE accounted for through a reliable and easy-to-implement convolution and optimization approach, outperforms the original beam model in standard IMRT QA

  10. Origin of the Ion Foreshock in a Quasi-perpendicular Curved Collisionless Shock: Particles Trajectory Analysis in 2D PIC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, P.; Lembege, B.

    2015-12-01

    The ion foreshock located upstream of the Earth's shock wave is populated with ions having interacted with the shock, and then, reflected back with an high energy gain. Spacecrafts have clearly established the existence of two distinct populations in the quasi-perpendicular shock region (i.e. for 45° ≤ ΘBn ≤ 90°, where ΘBn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field) : (i) field-aligned ion beams or « FAB » characterized by a gyrotropic distribution, and (ii) gyro-phase bunched ions or « GPB » characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution. One of the important unresolved problem is the exact origin of the particles contributing to these two populations. To our knowledge, it was the first time that full-particle simulations have been performed including self-consistently the shock front curvature and nonstationarity, and the time-of-flight effects. Our analysis evidences that these two backstreaming populations may be reflected by the front itself and can be differentiated both in terms of interaction time and trajectory within the shock front. In particular, simulations evidence that "GPB" population is characterized by a short interaction time (ΔTinter = 1 to 2 τci) while the "FAB" population corresponds to a much larger time range (from 1 τci to 10 τci), where tci is the upstream ion gyroperiod. Present individual ion trajectories evidence that "FAB" population shows a strong perpendicular drift at the shock front (i.e. strong dependence of the pitch angle to the perpendicular velocity) whereas the "GPB" population shows no perpendicular drift (i.e. its pitch angle is mainly driven by the parallel velocity). Such differences explain why the "FAB" population loses their gyro-phase coherency and become gyrotropic which is not the case for the "GPB". This important result was not expected and greatly simplifies the question of their origin.

  11. Robotic radiosurgery system patient-specific QA for extracranial treatments using the planar ion chamber array and the cylindrical diode array.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Han; Veltchev, Iavor; Koren, Sion; Ma, Charlie; Li, Jinsgeng

    2015-07-08

    Robotic radiosurgery system has been increasingly employed for extracranial treatments. This work is aimed to study the feasibility of a cylindrical diode array and a planar ion chamber array for patient-specific QA with this robotic radiosurgery system and compare their performance. Fiducial markers were implanted in both systems to enable image-based setup. An in-house program was developed to postprocess the movie file of the measurements and apply the beam-by-beam angular corrections for both systems. The impact of noncoplanar delivery was then assessed by evaluating the angles created by the incident beams with respect to the two detector arrangements and cross-comparing the planned dose distribution to the measured ones with/without the angular corrections. The sensitivity of detecting the translational (1-3 mm) and the rotational (1°-3°) delivery errors were also evaluated for both systems. Six extracranial patient plans (PTV 7-137 cm³) were measured with these two systems and compared with the calculated doses. The plan dose distributions were calculated with ray-tracing and the Monte Carlo (MC) method, respectively. With 0.8 by 0.8 mm² diodes, the output factors measured with the cylindrical diode array agree better with the commissioning data. The maximum angular correction for a given beam is 8.2% for the planar ion chamber array and 2.4% for the cylindrical diode array. The two systems demonstrate a comparable sensitivity of detecting the translational targeting errors, while the cylindrical diode array is more sensitive to the rotational targeting error. The MC method is necessary for dose calculations in the cylindrical diode array phantom because the ray-tracing algorithm fails to handle the high-Z diodes and the acrylic phantom. For all the patient plans, the cylindrical diode array/ planar ion chamber array demonstrate 100% / > 92% (3%/3 mm) and > 96% / ~ 80% (2%/2 mm) passing rates. The feasibility of using both systems for robotic

  12. Robotic radiosurgery system patient-specific QA for extracranial treatments using the planar ion chamber array and the cylindrical diode array.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Han; Veltchev, Iavor; Koren, Sion; Ma, Charlie; Li, Jinsgeng

    2015-07-01

    Robotic radiosurgery system has been increasingly employed for extracranial treatments. This work is aimed to study the feasibility of a cylindrical diode array and a planar ion chamber array for patient-specific QA with this robotic radiosurgery system and compare their performance. Fiducial markers were implanted in both systems to enable image-based setup. An in-house program was developed to postprocess the movie file of the measurements and apply the beam-by-beam angular corrections for both systems. The impact of noncoplanar delivery was then assessed by evaluating the angles created by the incident beams with respect to the two detector arrangements and cross-comparing the planned dose distribution to the measured ones with/without the angular corrections. The sensitivity of detecting the translational (1-3 mm) and the rotational (1°-3°) delivery errors were also evaluated for both systems. Six extracranial patient plans (PTV 7-137 cm(3)) were measured with these two systems and compared with the calculated doses. The plan dose distributions were calculated with ray-tracing and the Monte Carlo (MC) method, respectively. With 0.8 by 0.8 mm(2) diodes, the output factors measured with the cylindrical diode array agree better with the commissioning data. The maximum angular correction for a given beam is 8.2% for the planar ion chamber array and 2.4% for the cylindrical diode array. The two systems demonstrate a comparable sensitivity of detecting the translational targeting errors, while the cylindrical diode array is more sensitive to the rotational targeting error. The MC method is necessary for dose calculations in the cylindrical diode array phantom because the ray-tracing algorithm fails to handle the high-Z diodes and the acrylic phantom. For all the patient plans, the cylindrical diode array/ planar ion chamber array demonstrate 100%/>;92%(3%/3 mm) passing rates. The feasibility of using both systems for robotic radiosurgery system patient-specific QA

  13. Plasma Beta Dependence of the Ion-scale Spectral Break of Solar Wind Turbulence: High-resolution 2D Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franci, Luca; Landi, Simone; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-12-01

    We investigate properties of the ion-scale spectral break of solar wind turbulence by means of two-dimensional high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box and add a spectrum of in-plane, large-scale, magnetic and kinetic fluctuations. We perform a set of simulations with different values of the plasma β, distributed over three orders of magnitude, from 0.01 to 10. In all cases, once turbulence is fully developed, we observe a power-law spectrum of the fluctuating magnetic field on large scales (in the inertial range) with a spectral index close to -5/3, while in the sub-ion range we observe another power-law spectrum with a spectral index systematically varying with β (from around -3.6 for small values to around -2.9 for large ones). The two ranges are separated by a spectral break around ion scales. The length scale at which this transition occurs is found to be proportional to the ion inertial length, d i , for β ≪ 1 and to the ion gyroradius, {ρ }i={d}i\\sqrt{β }, for β ≫ 1, i.e., to the larger between the two scales in both the extreme regimes. For intermediate cases, i.e., β ˜ 1, a combination of the two scales is involved. We infer an empiric relation for the dependency of the spectral break on β that provides a good fit over the whole range of values. We compare our results with in situ observations in the solar wind and suggest possible explanations for such a behavior.

  14. SU-E-T-242: Monte Carlo Simulations Used to Test the Perturbation of a Reference Ion Chamber Prototype Used for Small Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez Quino, L; Calvo, O; Huerta, C; DeWeese, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the perturbation due to the use of a novel Reference Ion Chamber designed to measure small field dosimetry (KermaX Plus C by IBA). Methods: Using the Phase-space files for TrueBeam photon beams available by Varian in IAEA-compliant format for 6 and 15 MV. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc to investigate the perturbation introduced by a reference chamber into the PDDs and profiles measured in water tank. Field sizes ranging from 1×1, 2×2,3×3, 5×5 cm2 were simulated for both energies with and without a 0.5 mm foil of Aluminum which is equivalent to the attenuation equivalent of the reference chamber specifications in a water phantom of 30×30×30 cm3 and a pixel resolution of 2 mm. The PDDs, profiles, and gamma analysis of the simulations were performed as well as a energy spectrum analysis of the phase-space files generated during the simulation. Results: Examination of the energy spectrum analysis performed shown a very small increment of the energy spectrum at the build-up region but no difference is appreciated after dmax. The PDD, profiles and gamma analysis had shown a very good agreement among the simulations with and without the Al foil, with a gamma analysis with a criterion of 2% and 2mm resulting in 99.9% of the points passing this criterion. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential benefits of using the KermaX Plus C as reference chamber in the measurement of PDD and Profiles for small fields since the perturbation due to in the presence of the chamber the perturbation is minimal and the chamber can be considered transparent to the photon beam.

  15. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  16. A high-throughput 2D-analytical technique to obtain single protein parameters from complex cell lysates for in silico process development of ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Frieder; Elsäßer, Dennis; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2013-11-29

    The accelerating growth of the market for biopharmaceutical proteins, the market entry of biosimilars and the growing interest in new, more complex molecules constantly pose new challenges for bioseparation process development. In the presented work we demonstrate the application of a multidimensional, analytical separation approach to obtain the relevant physicochemical parameters of single proteins in a complex mixture for in silico chromatographic process development. A complete cell lysate containing a low titre target protein was first fractionated by multiple linear salt gradient anion exchange chromatography (AEC) with varying gradient length. The collected fractions were subsequently analysed by high-throughput capillary gel electrophoresis (HT-CGE) after being desalted and concentrated. From the obtained data of the 2D-separation the retention-volumes and the concentration of the single proteins were determined. The retention-volumes of the single proteins were used to calculate the related steric-mass action model parameters. In a final evaluation experiment the received parameters were successfully applied to predict the retention behaviour of the single proteins in salt gradient AEC.

  17. Output current variation and polarity effect by electric field and ion-pair non-uniformity inside thimble-type ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaecheon; Kim, Yong Kyun; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2007-09-01

    A new analytic approach considering both electric field and ion-pair non-uniformity has been proposed to accurately analyze the design characteristics of an ionization chamber and to interpret measurements. It is commonly assumed that ion-pairs are generated uniformly in the air volume, but such an assumption ignores various source and geometry conditions. The new approach was applied to angular dependence analysis and to polarity effect assessment in an ionization chamber. For the angular dependence analysis, whole, uniform, and non-uniform output currents were calculated as a function of the irradiation angle for an 241Am gamma-ray source. The non-uniform output current proposed in this paper was found to be closer to the measured one. This is because the non-uniform output current takes into account the ion-pair distribution in the air volume as well as the active volume determined by the electric field. For the polarity effect assessment, the amount of field distortion due to potential difference and actual current difference was calculated. Previous methods cannot appropriately estimate the variation of polarity effect because they ignore the influence of the ion-pair distribution. The polarity effect assessment using the non-uniform output current can be more useful for obtaining the practical current difference, because this assessment considers both the variation of active volume and the ion-pair non-uniformity according to source conditions such as the irradiation angle and the distance. It is important to precisely calculate not only the active volume, but also the variation in the ion-pair distribution.

  18. SU-E-T-137: Attenuation of Carbon Fiber IGRT Couch Top for SBRT By Using a MapCheck 2 and Ion Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, K; Li, B; Lerma, F; Sarfaraz, M; Jacobs, M; Laser, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is common to use posterior oblique beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for regular and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Beam attenuation by the treatment couch is not negligible when the couch is in the beam portal. In this study, we have correlated relative dose versus beam angle through a MapCheck 2TM diode array and an ionization chamber measurement. Methods: A Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator equipped with the image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) carbon fiber couch was used for delivery of radiation with different photon energies of 6MV, 15MV and 6MV FFF. A MapCHECK 2TM diode array with a MapPhan was employed for the measurement at three field sizes (3 by 3, 5 by 5, and 10 by 10 cm). The independent measurement was performed with an ionization chamber placed at the center of an acrylic cylindrical phantom at the isocenter. The measured data with the MapCHECK 2TM diode array were averaged over the central 2×2 cm diodes for each measurement. The couch attenuation was deduced from the angular dependence with and without the couch involvement. Results: For the MapCHECK 2TM with MapPhan used only the obvious attenuation was observed at the beam angle between 5 and 10 degree from the angular dependence using a 6MV photon beam. The similar Result was obtained for the MapCHECK 2TM /MapPhan with the couch involvement. The couch attenuation was then deduced from the difference of these two sets of data measurements. Maximum couch attenuation was found up to 4.2% which was verified with the ion chamber measurement. Conclusion: A maximum attenuation of 4.2% was found for the carbon fiber couch top using the MapCHECK 2TM/MapPhan, which is consistent with the ion chamber measurement.

  19. 2D potential measurements by applying automatic beam adjustment system to heavy ion beam probe diagnostic on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, A. Ido, T.; Kato, S.; Hamada, Y.; Kurachi, M.; Makino, R.; Nishiura, M.; Nishizawa, A.

    2014-11-15

    Two-dimensional potential profiles in the Large Helical Device (LHD) were measured with heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). To measure the two-dimensional profile, the probe beam energy has to be changed. However, this task is not easy, because the beam transport line of LHD-HIBP system is very long (∼20 m), and the required beam adjustment consumes much time. To reduce the probe beam energy adjustment time, an automatic beam adjustment system has been developed. Using this system, required time to change the probe beam energy is dramatically reduced, such that two-dimensional potential profiles were able to be successfully measured with HIBP by changing the probe beam energy shot to shot.

  20. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  1. Detection of Amines and Ammonia with an Ambient Pressure Mass Spectrometer using a Corona Discharge Ion Source, in an Urban Atmosphere and in a Teflon Film Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M.; Hanson, D. R.; Grieves, C.; Ortega, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    Amines and ammonia are an important group of molecules that can greatly affect atmospheric particle formation that can go on to impact cloud formation and their scattering of thermal and solar radiation, and as a result human health and ecosystems. In this study, an Ambient Pressure Mass Spectrometer (AmPMS) that is selective and sensitive to molecules with a high proton affinity, such as amines, was coupled with a newly built corona discharge ion source. AmPMS was used to monitor many different nitrogenous compound that are found in an urban atmosphere (July 2015, Minneapolis), down to the single digit pmol/mol level. Simultaneous to this, a proton transfer mass spectrometer also sampled the atmosphere through an inlet within 20 m of the AmPMS inlet. In another set of studies, a similar AmPMS was attached to a large Teflon film chamber at the Atmospheric Chemistry Division at NCAR (August 2015, Boulder). Exploratory studies are planned on the sticking of amines to the chamber walls as well as oxidizing the amine and monitoring products. Depending on the success of these studies, results will be presented on the reversability of amine partitioning and mass balance for these species in the chamber.

  2. Determination of PM10 and its ion composition emitted from biomass burning in the chamber for estimation of open burning emissions.

    PubMed

    Sillapapiromsuk, Sopittaporn; Chantara, Somporn; Tengjaroenkul, Urai; Prasitwattanaseree, Sukon; Prapamontol, Tippawan

    2013-11-01

    Biomass samples including agricultural waste (rice straw and maize residue) and forest leaf litter were collected from Chiang Mai Province, Thailand for the burning experiment in the self-designed stainless steel chamber to simulate the emissions of PM10. The burning of leaf litter emitted the highest PM10 (1.52±0.65 g kg(-1)). The PM10-bound ions emitted from the burning of rice straw and maize residue showed the same trend, which was K(+)>Cl(-)>SO4(2-)>NH4(+)>NO3(-). However, the emissions from maize residue burning were ~1.5-2.0 times higher than those from the rice straw burning. The ion content emitted from leaf litter burning was almost the same for all ion species. Noticeably, K(+) and Cl(-) concentrations were ~2-4 times lower than those emitted from agricultural waste burning. It can be deduced that K(+) and Cl(-) were highly emitted from agricultural waste burning due to the use of fertilizer and herbicides in the field, respectively. Based on emission values obtained from the chamber, the pollutant emission rate from open burning was calculated. Burned areas in Chiang Mai Province were 3510 and 866 km(2) in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Forest burning was 71-88%, while agricultural land burning accounted for 12-29% (rice field: crop field=1:3) of total burned area. Therefore, emissions of PM10 from open burning in Chiang Mai were 3051 ton (2010) and 705 ton (2011). Major ions emitted from agricultural waste burning were found to be K(+) and Cl(-), while those from forest burning were SO4(2-) and K(+).

  3. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  4. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  5. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  6. A smog chamber study coupling a photoionization aerosol electron/ion spectrometer to VUV synchrotron radiation: organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosol analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza-Romero, María Teresa; Gaie-Levrel, Francois; Mahjoub, Ahmed; López-Arza, Vicente; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    A reaction chamber was coupled to a photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on an electron/ion coincidence scheme and applied for on-line analysis of organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosols using synchrotron tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons as the ionization source. In this proof of principle study, both aerosol and gas phase were detected simultaneously but could be differentiated. Present results and perspectives for improvement for this set-up are shown in the study of ozonolysis ([O3] = 0.13-3 ppm) of α-pinene (2-3 ppm), and the uptake of glyoxal upon ammonium sulphate. In this work the ozone concentration was monitored in real time, together with the particle size distributions and chemical composition, the latter taking advantage of the coincidence spectrometer and the tuneability of the synchrotron radiation as a soft VUV ionization source.

  7. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  8. Performance of Current-Mode Ion Chambers as Beam Monitors in a Pulsed Cold Neutron Beam for the NPDGamma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, R. Chad

    2006-10-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has built and commissioned an apparatus to measure the parity-violating gamma asymmetry A in the low energy np capture process n+p->d+ γ. The asymmetry in question is a 10-8 correlation between the spin of the incident (polarized) neutron and the outgoing 2.2 MeV gamma ray. A set of purpose-built, 3He-filled ionization chambers read out in current mode is used to monitor the incident neutron flux, the beam polarization, and the transmission of the liquid para-hydrogen target during the NPDGamma measurements. As will be described in the talk, these beam monitors are simple, reliable, low-noise detectors that have performed excellently for NPDGamma. We have verified that the beam monitor signals can be interpreted to reproduce the known time-of-flight dependence of beam flux from the LANSCE pulsed cold neutron source, and that the neutron beam polarization can be measured at the 2% level from direct measurements of the transmission of the beam through the beam polarizer.

  9. Influence of chamber dimensions on the performance of a conduction micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Junyuan; Wan, Zhenping; Wen, Wanyu; Li, Yaochao; Tang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    An electrohydrodynamic (EHD) conduction micropump with symmetric planar electrodes is developed to investigate the effect of micropump chamber dimensions on static pressure and flow rate. The interdigitated electrodes are created on an FR-4 CCL (copper clad laminate) using photolithography. The micropump consists of an electrode plate, chamber plate, top and bottom end cover. A 2D numerical simulation study is conducted to provide details about the ion distribution and fluid flow behaviors within a local domain of micropumps with different chamber height. Experimental results show that, by increasing chamber height, the static pressure and flow rate rise with a big slope under a chamber height of 0.2 mm, and henceforth decrease dramatically. The variation trends of static pressure and flow rate with an increase in chamber height are determined by the combination of ion concentration distribution and fluidic circulation formed between the two electrodes. Additionally, the effect of the chamber width and length is experimentally analyzed for optimum pressure and output flow rate.

  10. IFE Chamber Technology - Status and Future Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.R.; Raffray, A.R.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Latowski, J.F.; Najmabadi, F.; Olson, C.L.; Peterson, P.F.; Ying, A.; Yoda, M.

    2003-07-15

    Significant progress has been made on addressing critical issues for inertial fusion energy (IFE) chambers for heavy-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including drywall (currently favored for laser IFE), wetted-wall (applicable to both laser and ion drivers), and thick-liquid-wall (favored by heavy ion and z-pinch drivers). Recent progress and remaining challenges in developing IFE chambers are reviewed.

  11. IFE Chamber Technology - Status and Future Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Raffrary, A R; Abdel-Khalik, S; Kulcinski, G; Latkowski, J F; Najmabadi, F; Olson, C L; Peterson, P F; Ying, A; Yoda, M

    2002-11-15

    Significant progress has been made on addressing critical issues for inertial fusion energy (IFE) chambers for heavy-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry-wall (currently favored for laser IFE), wetted-wall (applicable to both laser and ion drivers), and thick-liquid-wall favored by heavy ion and z-pinch drivers. Recent progress and remaining challenges in developing IFE chambers are reviewed.

  12. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  13. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  14. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  15. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  16. SU-E-T-448: On the Perturbation Factor P-cav of the Markus Parallel Plate Ion Chambers in Clinical Electron Beams, Monte Carlo Based Reintegration of An Historical Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Zink, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: All present dosimetry protocols recommend well-guarded parallel-plate ion chambers for electron dosimetry. For the guard-less Markus chamber an energy dependent fluence perturbation correction pcav is given. This perturbation correction was experimentally determined by van der Plaetsen by comparison of the read-out of a Markus and a NACP chamber, which was assumed to be “perturbation-free”. Aim of the present study is a Monte Carlo based reiteration of this experiment. Methods: Detailed models of four parallel-plate chambers (Roos, Markus, NACP and Advanced Markus) were designed using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc and placed in a water phantom. For all chambers the dose to the active volume filled with low density water was calculated for 13 clinical electron spectra (E{sub 0}=6-21 MeV) at the depth of maximum and at the reference depth under reference conditions. In all cases the chamber's reference point was positioned at the depth of measurement. Moreover, the dose to water DW was calculated in a small water voxel positioned at the same depth. Results: The calculated dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus}, which according to van der Plaetsen reflects the fluence perturbation correction of the Markus chamber, deviates less from unity than the values given by van der Plaetsen's but exhibits a similar energy dependence. The same holds for the dose ratios of the other well guarded chambers. But, in comparison to water, the Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation correction which is nearly energy independent at both investigated depths. Conclusion: The simulations principally confirm the energy dependence of the dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus} as published by van der Plaetsen. But, as shown by our simulations of the ratio D{sub W}/D{sub Markus}, the conclusion drawn in all dosimetry protocols is questionable: in contrast to all well-guarded chambers the guard-less Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation correction and

  17. SU-E-T-65: Characterization of a 2D Array for QA and Pretreatment Plan Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Anvari, A; Aghamiri, S; Mahdavi, S; Alaei, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The OCTAVIUS detector729 is a 2D array of 729 air vented cubic plane parallel ion chambers used for pretreatment verification and QA. In this study we investigated dosimetric characteristics of this system for clinical photon beam dosimetry. Methods: Detector performance evaluation included determination of the location of the effective point of measurement (EPM), sensitivity, linearity, and reproducibility of detector response, as well as output factor, dose rate, and source to surface distance (SSD) dependence. Finally, assessment of wedge modulated fields was carried out. All the evaluations were performed five times for low and high photon energies. For reference measurements, a 0.6 cc ionization chamber was used. Data analysis and comparison of the OCTAVIUS detector with reference ion chamber data was performed using the VeriSoft patient plan verification software. Results: The reproducibility and stability of the measurements are excellent, the detector showed same signal with a maximum deviation of less than 0.5% in short and long term. Results of sensitivity test showed same signal with a maximum deviation of approximately 0.1%. As the detector 729 response is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurement at regions of high dose gradient effectively. The detector agrees with the ionization chamber measurement to within 1% for SSD range of 75 to 125 cm. Also, its measured wedge modulated profiles matched very well with ion chamber dose profiles acquired in a water tank. Conclusions: As the response of the detector 729 is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurements in the areas of dose gradients effectively. Based on the measurements and comparisons performed, this system is a reliable and accurate dosimeter for QA and pretreatment plan verification in radiotherapy.

  18. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  19. Collisions of slow polyatomic ions with surfaces: dissociation and chemical reactions of C2H2+*, C2H3+, C2H4+*, C2H5+, and their deuterated variants C2D2+* and C2D4+* on room-temperature and heated carbon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jasík, Juraj; Zabka, Jan; Feketeova, Linda; Ipolyi, Imre; Märk, Tilmann D; Herman, Zdenek

    2005-11-17

    Interaction of C2Hn+ (n = 2-5) hydrocarbon ions and some of their isotopic variants with room-temperature and heated (600 degrees C) highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces was investigated over the range of incident energies 11-46 eV and an incident angle of 60 degrees with respect to the surface normal. The work is an extension of our earlier research on surface interactions of CHn+ (n = 3-5) ions. Mass spectra, translational energy distributions, and angular distributions of product ions were measured. Collisions with the HOPG surface heated to 600 degrees C showed only partial or substantial dissociation of the projectile ions; translational energy distributions of the product ions peaked at about 50% of the incident energy. Interactions with the HOPG surface at room temperature showed both surface-induced dissociation of the projectiles and, in the case of radical cation projectiles C2H2+* and C2H4+*, chemical reactions with the hydrocarbons on the surface. These reactions were (i) H-atom transfer to the projectile, formation of protonated projectiles, and their subsequent fragmentation and (ii) formation of a carbon chain build-up product in reactions of the projectile ion with a terminal CH3-group of the surface hydrocarbons and subsequent fragmentation of the product ion to C3H3+. The product ions were formed in inelastic collisions in which the translational energy of the surface-excited projectile peaked at about 32% of the incident energy. Angular distributions of reaction products showed peaking at subspecular angles close to 68 degrees (heated surfaces) and 72 degrees (room-temperature surfaces). The absolute survival probability at the incident angle of 60 degrees was about 0.1% for C2H2+*, close to 1% for C2H4+* and C2H5+, and about 3-6% for C2H3+.

  20. SU-C-304-01: Investigation of Various Detector Response Functions and Their Geometry Dependence in a Novel Method to Address Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B; Lebron, S; Li, J; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, C; Yan, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel convolution-based approach has been proposed to address ion chamber (IC) volume averaging effect (VAE) for the commissioning of commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). We investigate the use of various convolution kernels and its impact on the accuracy of beam models. Methods: Our approach simulates the VAE by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with a detector response function (DRF) while optimizing the beam model. At convergence, the convolved profiles match the measured profiles, indicating the calculated profiles match the “true” beam profiles. To validate the approach, beam profiles of an Elekta LINAC were repeatedly collected with ICs of various volumes (CC04, CC13 and SNC 125) to obtain clinically acceptable beam models. The TPS-calculated profiles were convolved externally with the DRF of respective IC. The beam model parameters were reoptimized using Nelder-Mead method by forcing the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. We evaluated three types of DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic) and the impact of kernel dependence on field geometry (depth and field size). The profiles calculated with beam models were compared with SNC EDGE diode-measured profiles. Results: The method was successfully implemented with Pinnacle Scripting and Matlab. The reoptimization converged in ∼10 minutes. For all tested ICs and DRFs, penumbra widths of the TPS-calculated profiles and diode-measured profiles were within 1.0 mm. Gaussian function had the best performance with mean penumbra width difference within 0.5 mm. The use of geometry dependent DRFs showed marginal improvement, reducing the penumbra width differences to less than 0.3 mm. Significant increase in IMRT QA passing rates was achieved with the optimized beam model. Conclusion: The proposed approach significantly improved the accuracy of the TPS beam model. Gaussian functions as the convolution kernel performed consistently better than Lorentzian and

  1. Isotopic zonations in silicic magma chambers: conventional and ion-microprobe data from the late-Oligocene Questa caldera, northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The >400km3 peralkaline high-SiO/sub 2/ rhyolite ash-flow tuff erupted form the Questa caldera is strongly zoned in trace elements and in initial 87Sr/86Sr, from 0.7082 at the top to 0.7123 at the base. This is accompanied by increasing abundance of zircons with inherited cores, as identified using the ANU SHRIMP ion-microprobe. Cores that are concordant at 1700, 100 and 1430 Ma occur within late-Oligocene zircons in the ash-flow tuff. Such inherited cores is best explained by a greater degree of assimilation of Precambrian roof rocks toward the top of the magma chamber prior to eruption. In contrast, element of Nd and delta 180 values are constant at -6 and +7, respectively. Mass-balance calculations using observed compositions of the Precambrian wall-rocks and the low Sr peralkaline magmas indicate that the amount of assimilation required is less than 15 percent. Peralkaline and metaluminous intrusions cogenetic with the ash flow tuff also have relatively constant element of Nd and delta 180 values of -6 and +7, but have initial 87Sr/86Sr between from 0.7077 to 0.7050. None of the intrusive bodies contain inherited zircons, in contrast with many other Tertiary granitic rocks in the western US. Comparison of isotopic zonations in magmas that are largely liquid with those in their solidified equivalents is important for distinguishing assimilation vs source effects, since the assimilation potential of volatile-rich, crystal-poor magmas is much different from that of the crystal-rich magmas that become plutons.

  2. Commissioning a small-field biological irradiator using point, 2D, and 3D dosimetry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Joseph; Oldham, Mark; Thomas, Andrew; Li Yifan; Adamovics, John; Kirsch, David G.; Das, Shiva

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To commission a small-field biological irradiator, the XRad225Cx from Precision x-Ray, Inc., for research use. The system produces a 225 kVp x-ray beam and is equipped with collimating cones that produce both square and circular radiation fields ranging in size from 1 to 40 mm. This work incorporates point, 2D, and 3D measurements to determine output factors (OF), percent-depth-dose (PDD) and dose profiles at multiple depths. Methods: Three independent dosimetry systems were used: ion-chambers (a farmer chamber and a micro-ionisation chamber), 2D EBT2 radiochromic film, and a novel 3D dosimetry system (DLOS/PRESAGE registered ). Reference point dose rates and output factors were determined from in-air ionization chamber measurements for fields down to {approx}13 mm using the formalism of TG61. PDD, profiles, and output factors at three separate depths (0, 0.5, and 2 cm), were determined for all field sizes from EBT2 film measurements in solid water. Several film PDD curves required a scaling correction, reflecting the challenge of accurate film alignment in very small fields. PDDs, profiles, and output factors were also determined with the 3D DLOS/PRESAGE registered system which generated isotropic 0.2 mm data, in scan times of 20 min. Results: Surface output factors determined by ion-chamber were observed to gradually drop by {approx}9% when the field size was reduced from 40 to 13 mm. More dramatic drops were observed for the smallest fields as determined by EBT{approx}18% and {approx}42% for the 2.5 mm and 1 mm fields, respectively. PRESAGE registered and film output factors agreed well for fields <20 mm (where 3D data were available) with mean deviation of 2.2% (range 1%-4%). PDD values at 2 cm depth varied from {approx}72% for the 40 mm field, down to {approx}55% for the 1 mm field. EBT and PRESAGE registered PDDs agreed within {approx}3% in the typical therapy region (1-4 cm). At deeper depths the EBT curves were slightly steeper (2.5% at 5 cm

  3. SU-E-T-350: Effective Point of Measurement and Total Perturbation Correction P for Parallel-Plate Ion Chambers in High-Energy Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Langner, N; Czarnecki, D; Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This paper aims to determine the effective point of measurement and the total perturbation correction p of parallel-plate chambers for clinical photon dosimetry. Methods: The effective point of measurement (EPOM) was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system with the EGSnrc user code egs- chamber. Depth dose curves of the ionization chambers were calculated in a water phantom for several high energy photon spectra (4, 6, 10, 15, 18 MV-X). Different normalization criterions (normalization to the maximum of the depth dose curve and normalization to the value in 10 cm depth) have been applied. The EPOM was determined by shifting the normalized depth dose curve of a small water voxel against the depth ionization curve until the disagreement (calculated by the root mean square deviation) reaches a minimum. In addition, the total perturbation correction p was calculated by the ratio of the dose to water and the product of the dose determined in the chamber and the water to air stopping power ratio. Results: The EPOM varied slightly depending on the chosen normalization criterion. For all chambers the necessary shift of the EPOM decreased linearly with increasing beam quality specifier TPR{sub 20/10}. For the Roos and NACP chamber, the results were positive suggesting that the chambers need to be shifted towards the focus. For the Markus chamber, the required shift was negative and for the Advanced Markus chamber partly negative and partly positive. The total perturbation correction p was almost independent of the depth. Only for regions below 1 cm the perturbation correction deviated significantly from unity. Conclusion: In the present study, the effective point of measurement and the total perturbation correction p was determined for four parallel-plate ionization chambers and five clinical relevant photon spectra. Applying the calculated EPOM, the residual perturbation correction p was mostly depth independent.

  4. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  5. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  6. 2-D Clinostat for Simulated Microgravity Experiments with Arabidopsis Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Xugang; Krause, Lars; Görög, Mark; Schüler, Oliver; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Kircher, Stefan; Lasok, Hanna; Haser, Thomas; Rapp, Katja; Schmidt, Jürgen; Yu, Xin; Pasternak, Taras; Aubry-Hivet, Dorothée; Tietz, Olaf; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Palme, Klaus; Ditengou, Franck Anicet

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based simulators of microgravity such as fast rotating 2-D clinostats are valuable tools to study gravity related processes. We describe here a versatile g-value-adjustable 2-D clinostat that is suitable for plant analysis. To avoid seedling adaptation to 1 g after clinorotation, we designed chambers that allow rapid fixation. A detailed protocol for fixation, RNA isolation and the analysis of selected genes is described. Using this clinostat we show that mRNA levels of LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), MIZU-KUSSEI 1 (MIZ1) and microRNA MIR163 are down-regulated in 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana roots after 3 min and 6 min of clinorotation using a maximal reduced g-force of 0.02 g, hence demonstrating that this 2-D clinostat enables the characterization of early transcriptomic events during root response to microgravity. We further show that this 2-D clinostat is able to compensate the action of gravitational force as both gravitropic-dependent statolith sedimentation and subsequent auxin redistribution (monitoring D R5 r e v :: G F P reporter) are abolished when plants are clinorotated. Our results demonstrate that 2-D clinostats equipped with interchangeable growth chambers and tunable rotation velocity are suitable for studying how plants perceive and respond to simulated microgravity.

  7. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  8. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  9. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Renner, Tim R.; Nyman, Mark A.; Stradtner, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  10. Chamber Clearing First Principles Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G

    2009-06-09

    LIFE fusion is designed to generate 37.5 MJ of energy per shot, at 13.3 Hz, for a total average fusion power of 500 MW. The energy from each shot is partitioned among neutrons ({approx}78%), x-rays ({approx}12%), and ions ({approx}10%). First wall heating is dominated by x-rays and debris because the neutron mean free path is much longer than the wall thickness. Ion implantation in the first wall also causes damage such as blistering if not prevented. To moderate the peak-pulse heating, the LIFE fusion chamber is filled with a gas (such as xenon) to reduce the peak-pulse heat load. The debris ions and majority of the x-rays stop in the gas, which re-radiates this energy over a longer timescale (allowing time for heat conduction to cool the first wall sufficiently to avoid damage). After a shot, because of the x-ray and ion deposition, the chamber fill gas is hot and turbulent and contains debris ions. The debris needs to be removed. The ions increase the gas density, may cluster or form aerosols, and can interfere with the propagation of the laser beams to the target for the next shot. Moreover, the tritium and high-Z hohlraum debris needs to be recovered for reuse. Additionally, the cryogenic target needs to survive transport through the gas mixture to the chamber center. Hence, it will be necessary to clear the chamber of the hot contaminated gas mixture and refill it with a cool, clean gas between shots. The refilling process may create density gradients that could interfere with beam propagation, so the fluid dynamics must be studied carefully. This paper describes an analytic modeling effort to study the clearing and refilling process for the LIFE fusion chamber. The models used here are derived from first principles and balances of mass and energy, with the intent of providing a first estimate of clearing rates, clearing times, fractional removal of ions, equilibrated chamber temperatures, and equilibrated ion concentrations for the chamber. These can be used

  11. SU-E-T-01: 2-D Characterization of DLG Among All MLC Leaf Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaraswamy, L; Xu, Z; Podgorsak, M; Schmitt, J; Bailey, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of dosimetric leaf-gap (DLG) along the travel path of each MLC leaf pair. This study evaluates whether the spatial variations in DLG could cause dose differences between TPS-calculated and measured dose. Methods: The 6MV DLG values were measured for all leaf pairs in the direction of leaf motion using a 2-D diode array and 0.6cc ion chamber. These measurements were performed on two Varian Linacs, employing the Millennium 120-leaf MLC and a 2-D-DLG variation map was created via in-house software. Several test plans were created with sweeping MLC fields using constant gaps from 2mm to 10mm and corrected for 2-D variation utilizing in-house software. Measurements were performed utilizing the MapCHECK at 5.0cm depth for plans with and without the 2-D DLG correction and compared to the TPS calculated dose via gamma analysis (3%/3mm). Results: The measured DLGs for the middle 40 MLC leaf pairs (0.5cm width) were very similar along the central superior-inferior axis, with maximum variation of 0.2mm. The outer 20 MLC leaf pairs (1.0cm width) have DLG values from 0.32mm (mean) to 0.65mm (maximum) lower than the central leaf-pair, depending on off-axis distance. Gamma pass rates for the 2mm, 4mm, and 6mm sweep plans increased by 23.2%, 28.7%, and 26.0% respectively using the 2-D-DLG correction. The most improved dose points occur in areas modulated by the 1.0cm leaf-pairs. The gamma pass rate for the 10mm sweep plan increased by only 7.7%, indicating that the 2D variation becomes less significant for dynamic plans with larger MLC gaps. Conclusion: Fluences residing significantly off-axis with narrow sweeping gaps may exhibit significant variations from planned dose due to large differences between the true DLG exhibited by the 1.0cm leaf-pairs versus the constant DLG value utilized by the TPS for dose calculation.

  12. Beam charge and current neutralization of high-charge-state heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Callahan, D.A.

    1997-10-29

    High-charge-state heavy-ions may reduce the accelerator voltage and cost of heavy-ion inertial fusion drivers, if ways can be found to neutralize the space charge of the highly charged beam ions as they are focused to a target in a fusion chamber. Using 2-D Particle-In- Cell simulations, we have evaluated the effectiveness of two different methods of beam neutralization: (1) by redistribution of beam charge in a larger diameter, preformed plasma in the chamber, and (2), by introducing a cold-electron-emitting source within the beam channel at the beam entrance into the chamber. We find the latter method to be much more effective for high-charge-state ions.

  13. Effect of nebulizer/spray chamber interfaces on simultaneous, axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the direct determination of As and Se species separated by ion exchange high-performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettar, Raquel T.; Smichowski, Patricia; Garavaglia, Ricardo N.; Farías, Silvia; Batistoni, Daniel A.

    2005-06-01

    Different nebulizer/expansion chamber combinations were evaluated to assess their performance for sample introduction in the direct coupling with an axial view inductively coupled plasma multielement spectrometer for on-line determination of As and Se species previously separated by ion exchange-high performance liquid chromatography. The column effluents were injected into the plasma without prior derivatization. The instrument operation software was adapted for data acquisition and processing to allow multi-wavelength recording of the transient chromatographic peaks. After optimization of the chromatographic operating conditions, separation of mixtures of inorganic As and Se species, and of inorganic and two organic As species (monomethylarsonic and dimethylarsinic acids), was achieved with excellent resolution. Species discrimination from mixtures of As and Se oxyanions was further improved by the simultaneous element detection at specific analytical wavelengths. Three nebulizers and three spray chambers, employed in seven combinations, were tested as interfaces. Concentric nebulizers associated to a glass cyclonic chamber appear most suitable regarding sensitivity and signal to noise ratio. Measured element detection limits (3 σ) were around 10 ng ml - 1 for all the species considered, making the method a viable alternative to similar procedures that employ volatile hydride generation previous to sample injection into the plasma. Analytical recoveries both for inorganic and organic species ranged between 92 and 107%. The method was demonstrated to be apt for the analysis of surface waters potentially subjected to natural contamination with arsenic.

  14. Bottom-Up Preparation of Ultrathin 2D Aluminum Oxide Nanosheets by Duplicating Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhifeng; Zhou, Anan; Wu, Jifeng; Chen, Yunqiang; Lan, Xiaoli; Bai, Hua; Li, Lei

    2016-02-24

    2D ultrathin aluminum oxide (2D-Al2O3) nanosheets are prepared by duplicating graphene oxide. An amorphous precursor of the hydroxide of aluminum is first deposited onto graphene oxide sheets, which are then converted into 2D-Al2 O3 nanosheets by calcination, while the graphene oxide is removed. The 2D-Al2O3 nanosheets have a large specific surface area and a superior adsorption capacity to fluoride ions.

  15. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  16. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  17. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  18. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  19. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  20. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  1. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  2. Detection of IMRT delivery errors using a quantitative 2D dosimetric verification system

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, Nathan L.; Bloch, Charles; White, R. Allen; Salehpour, Mohammad; Rosen, Isaac I.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of detecting intensity modulated radiotherapy delivery errors automatically using a scalar evaluation of two-dimensional (2D) transverse dose measurement of the complete treatment delivery. Techniques using the gamma index and the normalized agreement test (NAT) index were used to parametrize the agreement between measured and computed dose distributions to seven different scalar metrics. Simulated verifications with delivery errors calculated using a commercially available treatment planning system for 9 prostate and 7 paranasal sinus cases were compared to 433 clinical verifications. The NAT index with 5% and 3 mm criteria that included cold areas outside the planning target volume detected the largest percent of delivery errors. Assuming a false positive rate of 5%, it was able to detect 88% of beam energy changes, 94% of a different patient's plan being delivered, 25% of plans with one beam's collimator rotated by 90 deg., 81% of rotating one beam's gantry angle by 10 deg., and 100% of omitting the delivery of one beam. However, no instances of changing one beam's monitor unit setting by 10% or shifting the isocenter by 5 mm were detected. Although the phantom shift could not be detected by the small change it made in the dose distribution, our autopositioning algorithm clearly identified the spatial anomaly. Using tighter 3%/2 mm criteria or combining dose and distance disagreements in an either/or fashion resulted in poorer delivery error detection. The mean value of the 2D gamma index distribution was less sensitive to delivery errors than the other scalar metrics studied. Although we found that scalar metrics do not have sufficient delivery error detection rates to be used as the sole clinical analysis technique, manually examining 2D dose comparison images would result in a near 100% detection rate while performing an ion chamber measurement alone would only detect 54% of these errors.

  3. Portable Hyperbaric Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, James P. (Inventor); DeLaFuente, Horacio (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A portable, collapsible hyperbaric chamber was developed. A toroidal inflatable skeleton provides initial structural support for the chamber, allowing the attendant and/or patient to enter the chamber. Oval hatches mate against bulkhead rings, and the hyperbaric chamber is pressurized. The hatches seal against an o-ring, and the internal pressure of the chamber provides the required pressure against the hatch to maintain an airtight seal. In the preferred embodiment, the hyperbaric chamber has an airlock to allow the attendant to enter and exit the patient chamber during treatment. Visual communication is provided through portholes in the patient and/or airlock chamber. Life monitoring and support systems are in communication with the interior of the hyperbaric chamber and/or airlock chamber through conduits and/or sealed feed-through connectors into the hyperbaric chamber.

  4. Crystal structure of the [Mg2+-(chromomycin A3)2]-d(TTGGCCAA)2 complex reveals GGCC binding specificity of the drug dimer chelated by a metal ion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ming-Hon; Robinson, Howard; Gao, Yi-Gui; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2004-01-01

    The anticancer antibiotic chromomycin A3 (Chro) is a DNA minor groove binding drug belonging to the aureolic family. Chro likely exerts its activity by interfering with replication and transcription. Chro forms a dimer, mediated by a divalent metal ion, which binds to G/C-rich DNA. Herein we report the first crystal structure of Chro bound to d(TTG GCCAA)2 DNA duplex solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) based on the chelated Co3+ ion. The structure of the Mg2+ complex was subsequently refined at 2.15 A resolution, which revealed two complexes of metal-coordinated dimers of Chro bound to the octamer DNA duplex in the asymmetric unit. The metal ion is octahedrally coordinated to the O1 and O9 oxygen atoms of the chromophore (CPH), and two water molecules act as the fifth and sixth ligands. The two coordinated water molecules are hydrogen bonded to O2 atoms of C5 and C13 bases. The Chro dimer binds at and significantly widens the minor groove of the GGCC sequence. The long axis of each chromophore lies along and stacks over the sugar-phosphate backbone with the two attached saccharide moieties (rings A/B and C/D/E) wrapping across the minor groove. DNA is kinked by 30 degrees and 36 degrees in the two complexes, respectively. Six G-specific hydrogen bonds between Chro and DNA provide the GGCC sequence specificity. Interestingly, DNA in concert with Chro appears to act as an effective template to catalyze the deamination of Co(NH3)6(3+), as shown by circular dichroism and crystal structure data. Our results present useful structural information for designing new anticancer drug derivatives in the future.

  5. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  6. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  7. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  8. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  9. 2D-3D transition of gold cluster anions resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Mikael P.; Lechtken, Anne; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M.; Furche, Filipp

    2008-05-01

    Small gold cluster anions Aun- are known for their unusual two-dimensional (2D) structures, giving rise to properties very different from those of bulk gold. Previous experiments and calculations disagree about the number of gold atoms nc where the transition to 3D structures occurs. We combine trapped ion electron diffraction and state of the art electronic structure calculations to resolve this puzzle and establish nc=12 . It is shown that theoretical studies using traditional generalized gradient functionals are heavily biased towards 2D structures. For a correct prediction of the 2D-3D crossover point it is crucial to use density functionals yielding accurate jellium surface energies, such as the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functional or the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional modified for solids (PBEsol). Further, spin-orbit effects have to be included, and large, flexible basis sets employed. This combined theoretical-experimental approach is promising for larger gold and other metal clusters.

  10. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  11. Two novel Krebs-type polyoxoanions [Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-XW 9O 33) 2] 12- (X = Sb III, Bi III) resulting in 2D layer structures linked by copper(I) ions and copper(II) complex groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Shuxia; Feng, Dan; Zhang, Chundan; Sun, Ping; Ma, Fengji

    2009-11-01

    Two sandwich-type organic-inorganic hybrid polyoxotungstates [enH 2] 5[Cu II(en) 2][Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-SbW 9O 33) 2]·16H 2O ( 1) and [enH 2] 5[Cu II(en) 2][Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-BiW 9O 33) 2]·22H 2O ( 2) (en = ethylenediamine) have been synthesized hydrothermally and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal stability analyses, X-ray powder diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The polyoxoanions in 1 and 2 are composed of two trivacant (B-β-XW 9O 33) 9- (X = Sb III ( 1), Bi III ( 2)) subunits joined together by two Cu(I) ions and two W(VI) ions resulting in two novel Krebs-type sandwich structures. These polyoxoanions are further connected by Cu(I) ions and [Cu II(en) 2] 2+ coordination cations, and afford the first copper(I)-linked 2D layer structure constructed from Krebs-type polyoxotungstates. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior and electrocatalysis of 1 and 2 modified carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) have been studied. The results indicate that they have good electrocatalytic activities toward the reduction of nitrite.

  12. CONTINUOUS ROTATION SCATTERING CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Verba, J.W.; Hawrylak, R.A.

    1963-08-01

    An evacuated scattering chamber for use in observing nuclear reaction products produced therein over a wide range of scattering angles from an incoming horizontal beam that bombards a target in the chamber is described. A helically moving member that couples the chamber to a detector permits a rapid and broad change of observation angles without breaching the vacuum in the chamber. Also, small inlet and outlet openings are provided whose size remains substantially constant. (auth)

  13. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  14. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  15. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  16. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  17. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  18. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Leland, W.T.

    1960-01-01

    The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

  19. Determination of the 1s2{\\ell }2{{\\ell }}^{\\prime } state production ratios {{}^{4}P}^{o}/{}^{2}P, {}^{2}D/{}^{2}P and {{}^{2}P}_{+}/{{}^{2}P}_{-} from fast (1{s}^{2},1s2s\\,{}^{3}S) mixed-state He-like ion beams in collisions with H2 targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benis, E. P.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2016-12-01

    New results are presented on the ratio {R}m={σ }{T2p}( {}4P)/{σ }{T2p}({}2P) concerning the production cross sections of Li-like 1s2s2p quartet and doublet P states formed in energetic ion-atom collisions by single 2p electron transfer to the metastable 1s2s {}3S component of the He-like ion beam. Spin statistics predict a value of R m = 2 independent of the collision system in disagreement with most reported measurements of {R}m≃ 1{--}9. A new experimental approach is presented for the evaluation of R m having some practical advantages over earlier approaches. It also allows for the determination of the separate contributions of ground- and metastable-state beam components to the measured spectra. Applying our technique to zero-degree Auger projectile spectra from 4.5 MeV {{{B}}}3+ (Benis et al 2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 064701) and 25.3 MeV {{{F}}}7+ (Zamkov et al 2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 062706) mixed state (1{s}2 {}1S,1s2s {}3S) He-like ion collisions with H2 targets, we report new values of {R}m=3.5+/- 0.4 for boron and {R}m=1.8+/- 0.3 for fluorine. In addition, the ratios of {}2D/{}2P and {{}2P}+/{{}2P}- populations from either the metastable and/or ground state beam component, also relevant to this analysis, are evaluated and compared to previously reported results for carbon collisions on helium (Strohschein et al 2008 Phys. Rev. A 77 022706) including a critical comparison to theory.

  20. Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-08-21

    Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

  1. 2D-2D tunneling field-effect transistors using WSe2/SnSe2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tania; Tosun, Mahmut; Hettick, Mark; Ahn, Geun Ho; Hu, Chenming; Javey, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials present a versatile platform for developing steep transistors due to their uniform thickness and sharp band edges. We demonstrate 2D-2D tunneling in a WSe2/SnSe2 van der Waals vertical heterojunction device, where WSe2 is used as the gate controlled p-layer and SnSe2 is the degenerately n-type layer. The van der Waals gap facilitates the regulation of band alignment at the heterojunction, without the necessity of a tunneling barrier. ZrO2 is used as the gate dielectric, allowing the scaling of gate oxide to improve device subthreshold swing. Efficient gate control and clean interfaces yield a subthreshold swing of ˜100 mV/dec for >2 decades of drain current at room temperature, hitherto unobserved in 2D-2D tunneling devices. The subthreshold swing is independent of temperature, which is a clear signature of band-to-band tunneling at the heterojunction. A maximum switching ratio ION/IOFF of 107 is obtained. Negative differential resistance in the forward bias characteristics is observed at 77 K. This work bodes well for the possibilities of two-dimensional materials for the realization of energy-efficient future-generation electronics.

  2. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  3. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  4. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  5. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  6. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  7. Novel LC-ESI/MS/MS(n) method for the characterization and quantification of 2'-deoxyguanosine adducts of the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine by 2-D linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Angela K; Schut, Herman A J; Turesky, Robert J

    2007-02-01

    An accurate and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/multi-stage mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS/MS(n)) technique has been developed for the characterization and quantification of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) adducts of the dietary mutagen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). PhIP is an animal and potential human carcinogen that occurs in grilled meats. Following enzymatic digestion and adduct enrichment by solid-phase extraction (SPE), PhIP-DNA adducts were analyzed by MS/MS and MS(n) scan modes on a 2-D linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (QIT/MS). The major DNA adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP), was detected in calf thymus (CT) DNA modified in vitro with a bioactivated form of PhIP and in the colon and liver of rats given PhIP as part of the diet. The lower limit of detection (LOD) was 1 adduct per 10(8) DNA bases, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 3 adducts per 10(8) DNA bases in both MS/MS and MS(3) scan modes, using 27 microg of DNA for analysis. Measurements were based on isotope dilution with the internal standard, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-(trideutero)methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-[2H3C]-PhIP). The selected reaction monitoring (SRM) scan mode in MS/MS was employed to monitor the loss of deoxyribose (dR) from the protonated molecules of the adducts ([M + H - 116]+). The consecutive reaction monitoring (CRM) scan modes in MS(3) and MS(4) were used to measure and further characterize product ions of the aglycone ion (BH2+) (Guanyl-PhIP). The MS(3) scan mode was effective in eliminating isobaric interferences observed in the MS/MS scan mode and resulted in an improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Moreover, the product ion spectra obtained by the MS(n) scan modes provided rich structural information about the adduct and were used to corroborate the identity of dG-C8-PhIP. In addition, an isomeric dG-PhIP adduct was detected in vivo

  8. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  9. Ion electric propulsion unit

    DOEpatents

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  10. Quantitation of protein in samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The concentration of protein in a sample prepared for two dimensional (2-D) electrophoretic analysis is usually determined by protein assay. Reasons for this include the following. (1) Protein quantitation ensures that the amount of protein to be separated is appropriate for the gel size and visualization method. (2) Protein quantitation facilitates comparison among similar samples, as image-based analysis is simplified when equivalent quantities of proteins have been loaded on the gels to be compared. (3) Quantitation is necessary in cases where the protein sample is labeled with dye before separation (1,2). The labeling chemistry is affected by the dye to protein ratio so it is essential to know the protein concentration before setting up the labeling reaction.A primary consideration with quantitating protein in samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis is interference by nonprotein substances that may be present in the sample. These samples generally contain chaotropic solubilizing agents, detergents, reductants, buffers or carrier ampholytes, all of which potentially interfere with protein quantitation. The most commonly used protein assays in proteomics research are colorimetric assays in which the presence of protein causes a color change that can be measured spectrophotometrically (3). All protein assays utilize standards, a dilution series of a known concentration of a known protein, to create a standard curve. Two methods will be considered that circumvent some of the problems associated with interfering substances and are well suited for samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis. The first method (4.1.1) relies on a color change that occurs upon binding of a dye to protein and the second (4.1.2) relies on binding and reduction of cupric ion (Cu2+) ion to cuprous ion (Cu+) by proteins.

  11. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  12. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  14. A soundproof pressure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Inoue, S

    1994-01-01

    For neurotological research we designed a soundproof pressure chamber in which pressure can be adjusted +/- 1000 mmH2O at the rate of less than 100 mmH2O per second. Noise in the chamber can be maintained under 30-35 dB while pressure is kept at a given level.

  15. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  16. Radiation damage to tetramethylsilane and tetramethylgermanium ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, Y.; Higuchi, M.; Oyama, K. . Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1994-08-01

    Two detector media suitable for a warm liquid, ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane (TMS) and tetramethylgermanium (TMG) were exposed to [gamma] radiation form a [sup 60]Co source up to dose 579 Gray and 902 Gray, respectively. The electron lifetimes and the free ion yields were measured as a function of accumulated radiation dose. A similar behavior of the electron lifetimes and the free ion yields with increasing radiation does was observed between the TMS and TMG ionization chambers.

  17. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  18. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  19. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  20. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  1. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  2. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  4. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  5. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  6. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Pardo, J.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Zapata, M.

    2006-05-01

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a ˜20C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27×10-2 K-1 for an operation electric field of 1.67×106 V m-1 has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  7. Numerical Study of Single-Chamber Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yong

    Single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SCFC) are ones in which the fuel and oxidizer are premixed, and selective electrode catalysts are used to generate the oxygen partial pressure gradient that in a conventional dual-chamber design is produced by physical separation of the fuel and oxidizer streams. The SCFC concept is a novel simplification of a conventional solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), and SCFCs have been shown capable of generating power densities high enough to make them potentially useful in many applications where the simplicity of a single gas chamber and absence of seals offsets the expected lower efficiency of SCFCs compared to dual-chamber SOFCs. SCFC performance is found to depend sensitively on cell microstructure, geometry, and flow conditions, and optimization of SCFC stacks requires considering complex, coupled chemical and transport processes. However, research activity in this area is far from sufficient and insights about SCFC systems are very limited. The understanding of many fundamental physical and chemical processes required for improving SCFC designs is often beyond the capability of modern experimental techniques, and efficient experimental studies are often held back by the lack of guidance from theoretical models due to the fact that modeling study about SCFC is very rare to date, and existing models about conventional SOFCs are not suitable for simulating SCFCs because of the inherent differences of single-chamber SOFCs from conventional ones. In order to systematically investigate these problems and optimize the electrical performance of SCFC systems, a 2D numerical model of a single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell (SCFC) operating on hydrocarbon fuels is developed and presented in this work. The model accounts for the coupled effects of gas channel fluid flow, heat transfer, porous media transport, catalytic reforming/shifting chemistry, electrochemistry, and mixed ionic-electronic conductivity. It solves for the velocity, temperature

  8. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; Galvin, James

    1987-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  9. The Mars Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mars chamber is a box about the size of a refrigerator that re-creates the temperatures, pressures, and atmosphere of the Martian surface, essentially creating a Mars environment on Earth! Scie...

  10. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  11. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  12. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  13. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  14. Performance of a 2D-CD nonaxisymmetric exhaust nozzle on a turbojet engine at altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straight, D. M.; Cullom, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Baseline thrust and cooling data obtained with a 2D-CD versatile research exhaust nozzle mounted on a turbojet engine in an altitude chamber are presented. The tests covered a range of nozzle pressure ratios, nozzle pressure ratios, nozzle throat areas, and internal expansion area ratios. The thrust data obtained show good agreement with theory and scale model results after correcting the data for leakage and bypass cooling flows. Additional work is needed to improve predictability of cooling performance.

  15. SU-E-T-77: Comparison of 2D and 3D Gamma Analysis in Patient-Specific QA for Prostate VMAT Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, F; Perez, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient-specific QA procedures for IMRT and VMAT are traditionally performed by comparing TPS calculations with measured single point values and plane dose distributions by means of gamma analysis. New QA devices permit us to calculate 3D dose distributions on patient anatomy as redundant secondary check and reconstruct it from measurements taken with 2D and 3D detector arrays. 3D dose calculations allow us to perform DVH-based comparisons with clinical relevance, as well as 3D gamma analysis. One of these systems (Compass, IBA Dosimetry) combines traditional 2D with new anatomical-based 3D gamma analysis. This work shows the ability of this system by comparing 2D and 3D gamma analysis in pre-treatment QA for several VMAT prostate plans. Methods: Compass is capable of calculating dose as secondary check from DICOM TPS data and reconstructing it from measurements taken by a 2D ion chamber array (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry). Both 2D and 3D gamma tests are available to compare calculated and reconstructed dose in Compass with TPS RT Dose. Results: 15 VMAT prostate plans have been measured with Compass. Dose is reconstructed with Compass for these plans. 2D gamma comparisons can be done for any plane from dose matrix. Mean gamma passing rates for isocenter planes (axial, coronal, sagittal) are (99.7±0.2)%, (99.9±0.1)%, (99.9±0.1)% for reconstructed dose planes. 3D mean gamma passing rates are (98.5±1.7)% for PTVs, (99.1±1.5)% for rectum, (100.0±0.0)% for bladder, (99.6±0.7)% for femoral heads and (98.1±4.1)% for penile bulb. Conclusion: Compass is a powerful tool to perform a complete pre-treatment QA analysis, from 2D techniques to 3D DVH-based techniques with clinical relevance. All reported values for VMAT prostate plans are in good agreement with TPS values. This system permits us to ensure the accuracy in the delivery of VMAT treatments completing a full patient-specific QA program.

  16. Discharge Chamber Primary Electron Modeling Activities in Three-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steuber, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Designing discharge chambers for ion thrusters involves many geometric configuration decisions. Various decisions will impact discharge chamber performance with respect to propellant utilization efficiency, ion production costs, and grid lifetime. These hardware design decisions can benefit from the assistance of computational modeling. Computational modeling for discharge chambers has been limited to two-dimensional codes that leveraged symmetry for interpretation into three-dimensional analysis. This paper presents model development activities towards a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation to aid discharge chamber design decisions. Specifically, of the many geometric configuration decisions toward attainment of a worthy discharge chamber, this paper focuses on addressing magnetic circuit considerations with a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation as a tool. With this tool, candidate discharge chamber magnetic circuit designs can be analyzed computationally to gain insight into factors that may influence discharge chamber performance such as: primary electron loss width in magnetic cusps, cathode tip position with respect to the low magnetic field volume, definition of a low magnetic field region, and maintenance of a low magnetic field region across the grid span. Corroborating experimental data will be obtained from mockup hardware tests. Initially, simulated candidate magnetic circuit designs will resemble previous successful thruster designs. To provide opportunity to improve beyond previous performance benchmarks, off-design modifications will be simulated and experimentally tested.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Slinger Combustor Using 2-D Axisymmetric Computational Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Semin; Park, Soo Hyung; Lee, Donghun

    2010-06-01

    Small-size turbojet engines have difficulties in maintaining the chemical reaction due to the limitation of chamber size. The combustion chamber is generally designed to improve the reaction efficiency by the generation of vortices in the chamber and to enhance air-fuel mixing characteristics. In the initial stage of designing the combustor, analysis of the 3-D full configuration is not practical due to the huge time consuming computation and grid generation followed by modifications of the geometry. In the present paper, an axisymmetric model maintaining geometric similarity and flow characteristic of 3-D configuration is developed. Based on numerical results from the full 3-D configuration, model reduction is achieved toward 2-D axisymmetric configuration. In the modeling process, the area and location of each hole in 3-D full configuration are considered reasonably and replaced to the 2-D axisymmetric model. By using the 2-D axisymmetric model, the factor that can affect the performance is investigated with the assumption that the flow is non-reacting and turbulent. Numerical results from the present model show a good agreement with numerical results from 3-D full configuration model such as existence of vortex pair in forward region and total pressure loss. By simplifying the complex 3-D model, computing time can be remarkably reduced and it makes easy to find effects of geometry modification.

  18. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  19. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  20. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  1. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  2. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  3. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  4. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  5. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  6. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  7. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  8. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  9. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  10. Irreversibility-inversions in 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We consider a recent theoretical prediction that for inertial particles in 2D turbulence, the nature of the irreversibility of their pair dispersion inverts when the particle inertia exceeds a certain value. In particular, when the particle Stokes number, St , is below a certain value, the forward-in-time (FIT) dispersion should be faster than the backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion, but for St above this value, this should invert so that BIT becomes faster than FIT dispersion. This non-trivial behavior arises because of the competition between two physically distinct irreversibility mechanisms that operate in different regimes of St . In 3D turbulence, both mechanisms act to produce faster BIT than FIT dispersion, but in 2D, the two mechanisms have opposite effects because of the inverse energy cascade in the turbulent velocity field. We supplement the qualitative argument given by Bragg et al. by deriving quantitative predictions of this effect in the short-time dispersion limit. These predictions are then confirmed by results of inertial particle dispersion in a direct numerical simulation of 2D turbulence.

  11. Target Chamber Manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantillo, Anthony; Watson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    A system has been developed to allow remote actuation of sensors in a high vacuum target chamber used with a particle accelerator. Typically, sensors of various types are placed into the target chamber at specific radial and angular positions relative to the beam line and target. The chamber is then evacuated and the experiments are performed for those sensor positions. Then, the chamber is opened, the sensors are repositioned to new angles or radii, and the process is repeated, with a separate pump-down cycle for each set of sensor positions. The new sensor positioning system allows scientists to pre-set the radii of up to a dozen sensors, and then remotely actuate their angular positions without breaking the vacuum of the target chamber. This reduces the time required to reposition sensors from 6 hours to 1 minute. The sensors are placed into one of two tracks that are separately actuated using vacuum-grade stepping motors. The positions of the sensors are verified using absolute optical rotary encoders, and the positions are accurate to 0.5 degrees. The positions of the sensors are electronically recorded and time-stamped after every change. User control is through a GUI using LabVIEW.

  12. Thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reusable life of the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) is influenced by the cyclic life of the regeneratively liquid cooled main combustion chamber (MCC). During an operational duty cycle the MCC liner is subjected to a large transient thermal gradient that imparts a high thermal cyclic strain to the liner hot gas wall. Life predictions of such chambers have usually been based on low cycle fatigue (LCF) evaluations. Hot-fire testing, however, has shown significant mid-channel wall deformation and thinning during accrued cyclic testing. This phenomenon is termed cyclic creep and appears to be significantly accelerated at elevated temperatures. An analytical method that models the cyclic creep phenomenon and its application to thrust chamber life prediction is presented. The chamber finite element geometry is updated periodically to account for accrued wall thinning and distortion. Failure is based on the tensile instability failure criterion. Cyclic life results for several chamber life enhancing coolant channel designs are compared to the typically used LCF analysis that neglects cyclic creep. The results show that the usable cyclic creep life is approximately 30 to 50% of the commonly used LCF life.

  13. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  14. Selective ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  15. Selective ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  16. Segmented ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for large-area, high-power ion engines comprise dividing a single engine into a combination of smaller discharge chambers (or segments) configured to operate as a single large-area engine. This segmented ion thruster (SIT) approach enables the development of 100-kW class argon ion engines for operation at a specific impulse of 10,000 s. A combination of six 30-cm diameter ion chambers operating as a single engine can process over 100 kW. Such a segmented ion engine can be operated from a single power processor unit.

  17. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  18. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  19. Antipollution combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Caruel, J.E.; Gastebois, P.M.

    1981-01-27

    The invention concerns a combustion chamber for turbojet engines. The combustion chamber is of the annular type and consists of two coaxial flame tubes opening into a common dilution and mixing zone. The inner tube is designed for low operating ratings of the engine, the outer tube for high ratings. Air is injected as far upstream as possible into the dilution zone, to enhance the homogenization of the gaseous flow issuing from the two tubes prior to their passage into the turbine and to assure the optimum radial distribution of temperatures. The combustion chamber according to the invention finds application in a particularly advantageous manner in turbojet engines used in aircraft propulsion because of the reduced emission of pollutants it affords.

  20. 2D modeling of electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2014-02-12

    The consequences of sheath (rectified) electric fields, resulting from the different mobility of electrons and ions as a response to radio frequency (RF) fields, are a concern for RF antenna design as it can cause damage to antenna parts, limiters and other in-vessel components. As a first step to a more complete description, the usual cold plasma dielectric description has been adopted, and the density profile was assumed to be known as input. Ultimately, the relevant equations describing the wave-particle interaction both on the fast and slow timescale will need to be tackled but prior to doing so was felt as a necessity to get a feeling of the wave dynamics involved. Maxwell's equations are solved for a cold plasma in a 2D antenna box with strongly varying density profiles crossing also lower hybrid and ion-ion hybrid resonance layers. Numerical modelling quickly becomes demanding on computer power, since a fine grid spacing is required to capture the small wavelengths effects of strongly evanescent modes.

  1. Stationary afterglow measurements of the temperature dependence of the electron–ion recombination rate coefficients of {{\\rm{H}}}_{2}{{\\rm{D}}}^{+} and {{HD}}_{2}^{+} in He/Ar/H2/D2 gas mixtures at T = 80–145 K 

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plašil, Radek; Dohnal, Petr; Kálosi, Ábel; Roučka, Štěpán; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosík, Juraj

    2017-03-01

    We report measurements of the binary and ternary recombination rate coefficients of deuterated isotopologues of {{{H}}}3+. A cavity ring-down absorption spectrometer was used to monitor the fractional abundances of {{{H}}}3+, {{{H}}}2{{{D}}}+, {{HD}}2+ and {{{D}}}3+ during the decay of a plasma in He/Ar/{{{H}}}2/{{{D}}}2 mixtures. A dependence of the measured effective recombination rate coefficients on the helium buffer gas density was observed and hence both the binary and the ternary recombination rate coefficients for {{{H}}}2{{{D}}}+ and {{HD}}2+ were obtained in the temperature range 80–145 K.

  2. Chamber, Target and Final Focus Integrated Design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    2000-03-03

    Liquid wall protection, which challenges chamber clearing, has such advantages it's Heavy Ion Fusion's (HIF) main line chamber design. Thin liquid protection from x rays is necessary to avoid erosion of structural surfaces and thick liquid makes structures behind 0.5 m of Flibe (7 mean free paths for 14 MeV neutrons), last the life of the plant. Liquid wall protection holds the promise of greatly increased economic competitiveness. Driver designers require {approx}200 beams to illuminate recent target designs from two sides. The illumination must be compatible with liquid wall protection. The ''best'' values for driver energy, gain, yield and pulse rate comes out of well-known trade-off studies. The chamber design is based on several key assumptions, which are to be proven before HIF can be shown to be feasible. The chamber R&D needed to reduce the unknowns and risks depend on resolving a few technical issues such as jet surface smoothness and rapid chamber clearing.

  3. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  4. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  5. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  6. Human erythrocytes analyzed by generalized 2D Raman correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Kozicki, Mateusz; Czepiel, Jacek; Łabanowska, Maria; Nowak, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Grzegorz; Kurdziel, Magdalena; Birczyńska, Malwina; Biesiada, Grażyna; Mach, Tomasz; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    The most numerous elements of the blood cells, erythrocytes, consist mainly of two components: homogeneous interior filled with hemoglobin and closure which is the cell membrane. To gain insight into their specific properties we studied the process of disintegration, considering these two constituents, and comparing the natural aging process of human healthy blood cells. MicroRaman spectra of hemoglobin within the single RBC were recorded using 514.5, and 785 nm laser lines. The generalized 2D correlation method was applied to analyze the collected spectra. The time passed from blood donation was regarded as an external perturbation. The time was no more than 40 days according to the current storage limit of blood banks, although, the average RBC life span is 120 days. An analysis of the prominent synchronous and asynchronous cross peaks allow us to get insight into the mechanism of hemoglobin decomposition. Appearing asynchronous cross-peaks point towards globin and heme separation from each other, while synchronous shows already broken globin into individual amino acids. Raman scattering analysis of hemoglobin "wrapping", i.e. healthy erythrocyte ghosts, allows for the following peculiarity of their behavior. The increasing power of the excitation laser induced alterations in the assemblage of membrane lipids. 2D correlation maps, obtained with increasing laser power recognized as an external perturbation, allows for the consideration of alterations in the erythrocyte membrane structure and composition, which occurs first in the proteins. Cross-peaks were observed indicating an asynchronous correlation between the senescent-cell antigen (SCA) and heme or proteins vibrations. The EPR spectra of the whole blood was analyzed regarding time as an external stimulus. The 2D correlation spectra points towards participation of the selected metal ion centers in the disintegration process.

  7. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  8. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  9. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  10. Metabolic simulation chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    Metabolic simulation combustion chamber was developed as subsystem for breathing metabolic simulator. Entire system is used for evaluation of life support and resuscitation equipment. Metabolism subsystem simulates a human by consuming oxygen and producing carbon dioxide. Basic function is to simulate human metabolic range from rest to hard work.

  11. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  12. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  13. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  14. Development of an Implicit, Charge and Energy Conserving 2D Electromagnetic PIC Code on Advanced Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Joshua; Taitano, William; Knoll, Dana; Liebs, Chris; Murthy, Karthik; Feltman, Nicolas; Wang, Yijie; McCarthy, Colleen; Cieren, Emanuel

    2012-10-01

    In order to solve problems such as the ion coalescence and slow MHD shocks fully kinetically we developed a fully implicit 2D energy and charge conserving electromagnetic PIC code, PlasmaApp2D. PlasmaApp2D differs from previous implicit PIC implementations in that it will utilize advanced architectures such as GPUs and shared memory CPU systems, with problems too large to fit into cache. PlasmaApp2D will be a hybrid CPU-GPU code developed primarily to run on the DARWIN cluster at LANL utilizing four 12-core AMD Opteron CPUs and two NVIDIA Tesla GPUs per node. MPI will be used for cross-node communication, OpenMP will be used for on-node parallelism, and CUDA will be used for the GPUs. Development progress and initial results will be presented.

  15. Combustor with fuel preparation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelina, Joseph (Inventor); Myers, Geoffrey D. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Ram (Inventor); Reynolds, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An annular combustor having fuel preparation chambers mounted in the dome of the combustor. The fuel preparation chamber comprises an annular wall extending axially from an inlet to an exit that defines a mixing chamber. Mounted to the inlet are an air swirler and a fuel atomizer. The air swirler provides swirled air to the mixing chamber while the atomizer provides a fuel spray. On the downstream side of the exit, the fuel preparation chamber has an inwardly extending conical wall that compresses the swirling mixture of fuel and air exiting the mixing chamber.

  16. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  17. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  18. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  19. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  20. Bioinspired 2D-Carbon Flakes and Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Composite for Arsenite Removal.

    PubMed

    Venkateswarlu, Sada; Lee, Daeho; Yoon, Minyoung

    2016-09-14

    Development of carbon-based materials has received tremendous attention owing to their multifunctional properties. Biomaterials often serve as an inspiration for the preparation of new carbon materials. Herein, we present a facile synthesis of a new bioinspired graphene oxide-like 2D-carbon flake (CF) using a natural resource, waste onion sheathing (Allium cepa). The 2D-CF was further decorated with crystalline Fe3O4 nanoparticles for applications. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (7 nm) were well-dispersed on the surface of the 2D-CF, which was characterized by X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy. Batch As(III) adsorption experiments showed that aqueous arsenic ions strongly adsorbed to the Fe3O4@2D-CF composite. The adsorption capacity of the Fe3O4@2D-CF composite for As(III) was 57.47 mg g(-1). The synergetic effect of both graphene oxide-like 2D-CF and Fe3O4 nanoparticles aided in excellent As(III) adsorption. An As(III) ion adsorption kinetics study showed that adsorption was very fast at the initial stage, and equilibrium was reached within 60 min following a pseudo-second-order rate model. Owing to the excellent superparamagnetic properties (52.6 emu g(-1)), the Fe3O4@2D-CF composite exhibited superb reusability with the shortest recovery time (28 s) among reported materials. This study indicated that Fe3O4@2D-CF composites can be used for practical applications as a global economic material for future generations.

  1. Transition to turbulence: 2D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Matthew; Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2016-11-01

    The transition to turbulence in simple shear flows has been studied for well over a century, yet in the last few years has seen major leaps forward. In pipe flow, this transition shows the hallmarks of (1 + 1) D directed percolation, a universality class of continuous phase transitions. In spanwisely confined Taylor-Couette flow the same class is found, suggesting the phenomenon is generic to shear flows. However in plane Couette flow the largest simulations and experiments to-date find evidence for a discrete transition. Here we study a planar shear flow, called Waleffe flow, devoid of walls yet showing the fundamentals of planar transition to turbulence. Working with a quasi-2D yet Navier-Stokes derived model of this flow we are able to attack the (2 + 1) D transition problem. Going beyond the system sizes previously possible we find all of the required scalings of directed percolation and thus establish planar shears flow in this class.

  2. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  3. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse.

  4. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  5. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  6. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  7. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  8. One cubic metre NIST traceable radon test chamber.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, P; Stieff, F

    2008-01-01

    With the availability of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Radon Emanation Standard with a content of approximately 5000 Bq of 226Ra, it is possible to build a flow through a practical radon test chamber. A standard glove box with four gloves and a transfer port is used. Air is pumped through a flow integrator, water jar for humidification and NIST source holder, and into the glove box through a manifold. A derived theoretical expression provides the calculated radon concentration inside the chamber. The calculation includes a derived decay correction due to the large volume and low flow rate of the system. Several calibrated continuous radon monitors and passive integrating electret ion chambers tested in the chamber agreed fairly well with the calculated radon concentrations. The chamber is suitable for handling the calibration of several detectors at the same time.

  9. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  10. Crystals in magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M.

    2011-12-01

    Differentiation processes in igneous systems are one way in which the diversity of igneous rocks is produced. Traditionally, magmatic diversity is considered as variations in the overall chemical composition, such as basalt and rhyolite, but I want to extend this definition to include textural diversity. Such textural variations can be manifested as differences in the amount of crystalline (and immiscible liquid) phases and in the origin and identity of such phases. One important differentiation process is crystal-liquid separation by floatation or decantation, which clearly necessitates crystals in the magma. Hence, it is important to determine if magmas in chambers (sensu lato) have crystals. The following discussion is framed in generalities - many exceptions occur. Diabase (dolerite) dykes are a common, widespread result of regional mafic magmatism. The rims of most diabase dykes have few or no phenocrysts and crystals in the cores are commonly thought to have crystallized in place. Hence, this major mafic magmatic source did not have crystals, although compositional diversity of these dykes is commonly explained by crystal-liquid separation. This can be resolved if crystallisation was on the walls on the magma chamber. Similarly, most flood basalts are low in crystals and separation of those that are present cannot always explain the observed compositional diversity. Crystal-rich flows do occur, for example the 'Giant Plagioclase Basalts' of the Deccan series, but the crystals are thought to form or accumulate in a crystal-rich zone beneath the roof of the chamber - the rest of the chamber probably has few crystals. Some magmas from Hawaii contain significant amounts of olivine crystals, but most of these are deformed and cannot have crystallised in the chamber. In this case the crystals are thought to grow as the magma passes through a decollement zone. They may have grown on the walls or been trapped by filters. Basaltic andesite ignimbrites generally have

  11. Combustion chamber noise suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.M.

    1986-08-19

    A combustion chamber is described for a hot fog generating machine comprising a hollow cylindrical combustion chamber shell having a closure plate at one end and outlet means at the opposite end for directing hot combustion gasses to a fogging nozzle, air inlet means disposed adjacent the outlet means, fuel inlet means and ignition means mounted in the closure plate and liner means disposed concentrically within the cylindrical combustion chamber for controlling the flow of air and combustion gasses within the shell. The liner means includes a liner base having a frustroconical configuration with the smaller diameter end thereof disposed in communication with the outlet means and with the larger diameter end thereof disposed in spaced relation to the shell, circumferentially spaced, longitudinally extending fins extending outwardly from the liner base intermediate the liner base and the shell, a cylindrical liner midsection having circumferentially spaced fins extending outwardly therefrom between the midsection and the shell with the fins supporting the midsection on the larger diameter end of the liner base.

  12. Segmented ionization chambers for beam monitoring in hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Saverio; Cirio, Roberto; Donetti, Marco; Marchetto, Flavio; Pittà, Giuseppe; Lavagno, Marco; La Rosa, Vanessa

    2015-05-01

    Segmented ionization chambers represent a good solution to monitor the position, the intensity and the shape of ion beams in hadrontherapy. Pixel and strip chambers have been developed for both passive scattering and active scanning dose delivery systems. In particular, strip chambers are optimal for pencil beam scanning, allowing for spatial and time resolutions below 0.1 mm and 1 ms, respectively. The MATRIX pixel and the Strip Accurate Monitor for Beam Applications (SAMBA) detectors are described in this paper together with the results of several beam tests and industrial developments based on these prototypes.

  13. Microstrip gas chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and micro gap chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W.G.; Harris, J.W.; Wieman, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors report developments of the Microstrip Gas Chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and the Micro Gap Chamber. By coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics), they built MSGCs of high gain stability and low leakage current. They were tested in Ar-CH{sub 4} (10%) and He-C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of 17-20% were measured for 6keV x-rays. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material. Micro Gap Chamber was successfully tested in He-C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (50%) and Ar-C{sub 2}H{sub 6}(50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of about 20% were obtained. Both detectors are expected to have high rate capability.

  14. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  15. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  16. Ternary recombination of H3+, H2D+, HD2+, and D3+ with electrons in He/Ar/H2/D2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalosi, Abel; Dohnal, Petr; Plasil, Radek; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosik, Juraj

    2016-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the ternary recombination rate coefficients of H2D+ and HD2+ ions has been studied in the temperature range of 80-150 K at pressures from 500 to 1700 Pa in a stationary afterglow apparatus equipped with a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Neutral gas mixtures consisting of He/Ar/H2/D2 (with typical number densities 1017 /1014 /1014 /1014 cm-3) were employed to produce the desired ionic species and their fractional abundances were monitored as a function of helium pressure and the [D2]/[H2] ratio of the neutral gas. In addition, the translational and the rotational temperature and the ortho to para ratio were monitored for both H2D+ and HD2+ ions. A fairly strong pressure dependence of the effective recombination rate coefficient was observed for both ion species, leading to ternary recombination rate coefficients close to those previously found for (helium assisted) ternary recombination of H3+ and D3+. Work supported by: Czech Science Foundation projects GACR 14-14649P, GACR 15-15077S, GACR P209/12/0233, and by Charles University in Prague Project Nr. GAUK 692214.

  17. Air ion exposure system for plants.

    PubMed

    Morrow, R C; Tibbitts, T W

    1987-02-01

    A system was developed for subjecting plants to elevated air ion levels. This system consisted of a rectangular Plexiglas chamber lined with a Faraday cage. Air ions were generated by corona discharge from frayed stainless steel fibers placed at one end of the chamber. This source was capable of producing varying levels of either positive or negative air ions. During plant exposures, environmental conditions were controlled by operating the unit in a growth chamber.

  18. Air ion exposure system for plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    A system was developed for subjecting plants to elevated air ion levels. This system consisted of a rectangular Plexiglas chamber lined with a Faraday cage. Air ions were generated by corona discharge from frayed stainless steel fibers placed at one end of the chamber. This source was capable of producing varying levels of either positive or negative air ions. During plant exposures, environmental conditions were controlled by operating the unit in a growth chamber.

  19. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  20. Construction of cuprous oxide electrodes composed of 2D single-crystalline dendritic nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Seong; Kim, Suk Jun; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2010-10-04

    An unusual anisotropic growth of Cu(2)O is stabilized via the electrochemical synthesis of Cu(2)O in the presence of Ag(+) ions, which results in the formation of Cu(2)O electrodes composed of 2D sheetlike crystals containing complex dendritic patterns. It is quite unusual for Cu(2)O to form a 2D morphology since it has a 3D isotropic cubic crystal structure where the a, b, and c axes are equivalent. Each Cu(2)O sheet is single-crystalline in nature and is grown parallel to the {110} plane, which is rarely observed in Cu(2)O crystal shapes. A various set of experiments are performed to understand the role of Ag(+) ions on the 2D growth of Cu(2)O. The results show that Ag(+) ions are deposited as silver islands on already growing Cu(2)O crystals and serve as nucleation sites for the new growth of Cu(2)O crystals. As a result, the growth direction of the newly forming Cu(2)O crystals is governed by the diffusion layer structure created by the pre-existing Cu(2)O crystals, which results in the formation of 2D dendritic patterns. The thin 2D crystal morphology can significantly increase the surface-to-volume ratio of Cu(2)O crystals, which is beneficial for enhancing various electrochemical and photoelectrochemical properties of the electrodes. The photoelectrochemical properties of the Cu(2)O electrodes composed of 2D dendritic crystals are investigated and compared to those of 3D dendritic crystals. This study provides a unique and effective route to maximize the {110} area per unit volume of Cu(2)O, which will be beneficial for any catalytic/sensing abilities that can be anisotropically enhanced by the {110} planes of Cu(2)O.

  1. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  2. SEM signal emulation for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Evgenii; Muelders, Thomas; Klostermann, Ulrich; Gao, Weimin; Braylovska, Mariya

    2016-03-01

    The application of accurate and predictive physical resist simulation is seen as one important use model for fast and efficient exploration of new patterning technology options, especially if fully qualified OPC models are not yet available at an early pre-production stage. The methodology of using a top-down CD-SEM metrology to extract the 3D resist profile information, such as the critical dimension (CD) at various resist heights, has to be associated with a series of presumptions which may introduce such small, but systematic CD errors. Ideally, the metrology effects should be carefully minimized during measurement process, or if possible be taken into account through proper metrology modeling. In this paper we discuss the application of a fast SEM signal emulation describing the SEM image formation. The algorithm is applied to simulated resist 3D profiles and produces emulated SEM image results for 1D and 2D patterns. It allows estimating resist simulation quality by comparing CDs which were extracted from the emulated and from the measured SEM images. Moreover, SEM emulation is applied for resist model calibration to capture subtle error signatures through dose and defocus. Finally, it should be noted that our SEM emulation methodology is based on the approximation of physical phenomena which are taking place in real SEM image formation. This approximation allows achieving better speed performance compared to a fully physical model.

  3. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  4. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  5. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  6. The APS ceramic chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  7. Influence of atomic physics on EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations of JET divertor detachment with carbon and beryllium/tungsten plasma-facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Pitts, R. A.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Gunn, J. P.; Bucalossi, J.; Arnoux, G.; Belo, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Corrigan, G.; Devaux, S.; Flanagan, J.; Groth, M.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Marchetto, C.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Meyer, O.; Stamp, M.; Strachan, J. D.; Wiesen, S.; Wischmeier, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-09-01

    The EDGE2D-EIRENE code is applied for simulation of divertor detachment during matched density ramp experiments in high triangularity, L-mode plasmas in both JET-Carbon (JET-C) and JET-ITER-Like Wall (JET-ILW). The code runs without drifts and includes either C or Be as impurity, but not W, assuming that the W targets have been coated with Be via main chamber migration. The simulations reproduce reasonably well the observed particle flux detachment as density is raised in both JET-C and JET-ILW experiments and can better match the experimental in-out divertor target power asymmetry if the heat flux entering the outer divertor is artificially set at around 2-3 times that entering the inner divertor. A careful comparison between different sets of atomic physics processes used in EIRENE shows that the detachment modelled by EDGE2D-EIRENE relies only on an increase of the particle sinks and not on a decrease of the ionization source. For the rollover and the beginning of the partially detached phase, the particle losses by perpendicular transport and the molecular activated recombination processes are mainly involved. For a deeper detachment with significant target ion flux reduction, volume recombination appears to be the main contributor. The elastic molecule-ion collisions are also important to provide good neutral confinement in the divertor and thus stabilize the simulations at low electron temperature (Te), when the sink terms are strong. Comparison between EDGE2D-EIRENE and SOLPS4.3 simulations of the density ramp in C shows similar detachment trends, but the importance of the elastic ion-molecule collisions is reduced in SOLPS4.3. Both codes suggest that any process capable of increasing the neutral confinement in the divertor should help to improve the modelling of the detachment. A further outcome of this work has been to demonstrate that key JET divertor diagnostic signals—Langmuir probe Te and bolometric tomographic reconstructions—are running beyond

  8. Inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inert gas performance with three types of 12 cm diameter magnetoelectrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters was tested. The types tested included: (1) a hemispherical shaped discharge chamber with platinum cobalt magnets; (2) three different lengths of the hemispherical chambers with samarium cobalt magnets; and (3) three lengths of the conical shaped chambers with aluminum nickel cobalt magnets. The best argon performance was produced by a 8.0 cm long conical chamber with alnico magnets. The best xenon high mass utilization performance was obtained with the same 8.0 cm long conical thruster. The hemispherical thruster obtained 75 to 87% mass utilization at 185 to 205 eV/ion of singly charged ion equivalent beam.

  9. 2D discrete Fourier transform on sliding windows.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-03-01

    Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is the most widely used method for determining the frequency spectra of digital signals. In this paper, a 2D sliding DFT (2D SDFT) algorithm is proposed for fast implementation of the DFT on 2D sliding windows. The proposed 2D SDFT algorithm directly computes the DFT bins of the current window using the precalculated bins of the previous window. Since the proposed algorithm is designed to accelerate the sliding transform process of a 2D input signal, it can be directly applied to computer vision and image processing applications. The theoretical analysis shows that the computational requirement of the proposed 2D SDFT algorithm is the lowest among existing 2D DFT algorithms. Moreover, the output of the 2D SDFT is mathematically equivalent to that of the traditional DFT at all pixel positions.

  10. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  11. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculation assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  12. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  13. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  14. NIKE2D96. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.; Engelmann, B.; Halquist, J.O.

    1992-01-24

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  15. Production of N[sup +] ions from a multicusp ion beam apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kango Leung; Kunkel, W.B.; Walther, S.R.

    1993-03-30

    A method of generating a high purity (at least 98%) N[sup +] ion beam using a multicusp ion source having a chamber formed by a cylindrical chamber wall surrounded by a plurality of magnets, a filament centrally disposed in said chamber, a plasma electrode having an extraction orifice at one end of the chamber, a magnetic filter having two parallel magnets spaced from said plasma electrode and dividing the chamber into arc discharge and extraction regions. The method includes ionizing nitrogen gas in the arc discharge region of the chamber, maintaining the chamber wall at a positive voltage relative to the filament and at a magnitude for an optimum percentage of N[sup +] ions in the extracted ion beams, disposing a hot liner within the chamber and near the chamber wall to limit recombination of N[sup +] ions into the N[sub 2][sup +] ions, spacing the magnets of the magnetic filter from each other for optimum percentage of N[sup 3] ions in the extracted ion beams, and maintaining a relatively low pressure downstream of the extraction orifice and of a magnitude (preferably within the range of 3-8[times]10[sup [minus]4] torr) for an optimum percentage of N[sup +] ions in the extracted ion beam.

  16. Production of N.sup.+ ions from a multicusp ion beam apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kunkel, Wulf B.; Walther, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    A method of generating a high purity (at least 98%) N.sup.+ ion beam using a multicusp ion source (10) having a chamber (11) formed by a cylindrical chamber wall (12) surrounded by a plurality of magnets (13), a filament (57) centrally disposed in said chamber, a plasma electrode (36) having an extraction orifice (41) at one end of the chamber, a magnetic filter having two parallel magnets (21, 22) spaced from said plasma electrode (36) and dividing the chamber (11) into arc discharge and extraction regions. The method includes ionizing nitrogen gas in the arc discharge region of the chamber (11), maintaining the chamber wall (12) at a positive voltage relative to the filament (57) and at a magnitude for an optimum percentage of N.sup.+ ions in the extracted ion beams, disposing a hot liner (45) within the chamber and near the chamber wall (12) to limit recombination of N.sup.+ ions into the N.sub.2.sup.+ ions, spacing the magnets (21, 22) of the magnetic filter from each other for optimum percentage of N.sup.3 ions in the extracted ion beams, and maintaining a relatively low pressure downstream of the extraction orifice and of a magnitude (preferably within the range of 3-8.times.10.sup.-4 torr) for an optimum percentage of N.sup.+ ions in the extracted ion beam.

  17. Ion beam emittance from an ECRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, P. Lang, R.; Mäder, J.; Maimone, F.; Schlei, B. R.; Tinschert, K.; Biri, S.; Rácz, R.

    2016-02-15

    Simulation of ion beam extraction from an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) is a fully 3 dimensional problem, even if the extraction geometry has cylindrical symmetry. Because of the strong magnetic flux density, not only the electrons are magnetized but also the Larmor radius of ions is much smaller than the geometrical dimension of the plasma chamber (Ø 64 × 179 mm). If we assume that the influence of collisions is small on the path of particles, we can do particle tracking through the plasma if the initial coordinates of particles are known. We generated starting coordinates of plasma ions by simulation of the plasma electrons, accelerated stochastically by the 14.5 GHz radio frequency power fed to the plasma. With that we were able to investigate the influence of different electron energies on the extracted beam. Using these assumptions, we can reproduce the experimental results obtained 10 years ago, where we monitored the beam profile with the help of viewing targets. Additionally, methods have been developed to investigate arbitrary 2D cuts of the 6D phase space. To this date, we are able to discuss full 4D information. Currently, we extend our analysis tool towards 5D and 6D, respectively.

  18. Transport simulations of the C-2 and C-2U Field Reversed Configurations with the Q2D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, Marco; Dettrick, Sean; Barnes, Daniel; Tajima, Toshiki; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    The Q2D code is a 2D MHD code, which includes a neutral fluid and separate ion and electron temperatures, coupled with a 3D Monte Carlo code, which is used to calculate source terms due to neutral beams. Q2D has been benchmarked against the 1D transport code Q1D and is used to simulate the evolution of the C-2 and C-2U field reversed configuration experiments [1]. Q2D simulations start from an initial equilibrium and transport coefficients are chosen to match C-2 experimental data. C-2U is an upgrade of C-2, with more beam power and angled beam injection, which demonstrates plasma sustainment for 5 + ms. The simulations use the same transport coefficients for C-2 and C-2U, showing the formation of a steady state in C-2U, sustained by fast ion pressure and current drive.

  19. A guide to Ussing chamber studies of mouse intestine

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Lane L.

    2009-01-01

    The Ussing chamber provides a physiological system to measure the transport of ions, nutrients, and drugs across various epithelial tissues. One of the most studied epithelia is the intestine, which has provided several landmark discoveries regarding the mechanisms of ion transport processes. Adaptation of this method to mouse intestine adds the dimension of investigating genetic loss or gain of function as a means to identify proteins or processes affecting transepithelial transport. In this review, the principles underlying the use of Ussing chambers are outlined including limitations and advantages of the technique. With an emphasis on mouse intestinal preparations, the review covers chamber design, commercial equipment sources, tissue preparation, step-by-step instruction for operation, troubleshooting, and examples of interpretation difficulties. Specialized uses of the Ussing chamber such as the pH stat technique to measure transepithelial bicarbonate secretion and isotopic flux methods to measure net secretion or absorption of substrates are discussed in detail, and examples are given for the adaptation of Ussing chamber principles to other measurement systems. The purpose of the review is to provide a practical guide for investigators who are new to the Ussing chamber method. PMID:19342508

  20. Development of a microwave ion source for ion implantations

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N. Murata, H.; Kitami, H.; Mitsubori, H.; Sakuraba, J.; Soga, T.; Aoki, Y.; Katoh, T.

    2016-02-15

    A microwave ion source is expected to have a long lifetime, as it has fewer consumables. Thus, we are in the process of developing a microwave ion source for ion implantation applications. In this paper, we report on a newly developed plasma chamber and the extracted P{sup +} beam currents. The volume of the plasma chamber is optimized by varying the length of a boron nitride block installed within the chamber. The extracted P{sup +} beam current is more than 30 mA, at a 25 kV acceleration voltage, using PH{sub 3} gas.

  1. Development of a microwave ion source for ion implantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Murata, H.; Kitami, H.; Mitsubori, H.; Sakuraba, J.; Soga, T.; Aoki, Y.; Katoh, T.

    2016-02-01

    A microwave ion source is expected to have a long lifetime, as it has fewer consumables. Thus, we are in the process of developing a microwave ion source for ion implantation applications. In this paper, we report on a newly developed plasma chamber and the extracted P+ beam currents. The volume of the plasma chamber is optimized by varying the length of a boron nitride block installed within the chamber. The extracted P+ beam current is more than 30 mA, at a 25 kV acceleration voltage, using PH3 gas.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of the 3d 2D → nf 2F transitions in lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzada, S.; Shah, M.; Haq, S. U.; Nawaz, M.; Ahmed, M.; Nadeem, Ali

    2016-05-01

    We report term energies and effective quantum numbers of the odd parity 3d 2D → nf 2F series of lithium using multi-step and multi-photon laser excitation schemes. The experiments were performed using three dye lasers simultaneously pumped by the second harmonic (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in conjunction with an atomic beam apparatus and thermionic diode ion detector. The first ionization potential of lithium has been determined as 43,487.13 ± 0.02 cm- 1 from the much extended 3d 2D → nf 2F (17 ≤ n ≤ 70) series. In addition, the oscillator strengths of the 3d 2D → nf 2F (15 ≤ n ≤ 48) transitions have been determined, showing a decreasing trend with the increase in principal quantum number n.

  3. Online measurement for geometrical parameters based on 2D laser sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongtao; Shao, Shuangyun; Feng, Qibo

    2015-02-01

    Based on 2-D laser sensor, an optimized system for dynamically measuring geomet rical parameters of train wheels is proposed in this paper. The calibrat ion of the system is simplified by combining a 1-D laser sensor and a 2-D laser sensor. Accuracy of the 2-D laser sensor reaches 0.2mm and it ensures that most information of the wheel tread surface is acquired. The geometrical parameters including wheel diameter, flange thickness, flange height, tread wear and rim width can be calculated once the information is processed. In order to improve the measurement accuracy of wheel diameter, a new method for spatial circle fitting is proposed. According to the results acquired in the field, the measurement system can satisfy the requirements of dynamically measuring the geometrical parameters of train wheels.

  4. Laboratory studies on N(2D) reactions of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, N.; Casavecchia, P.

    Molecular nitrogen is a very stable molecule, practically inert from a chemical point of view. For a nitrogen chemistry to occur in the planetary atmospheres which contain N2 , it is necessary to transform it into an active form, such as atoms or ions. As far as the production of atomic nitrogen in the upper atmospheres of planets (like Mars) or moons (like Titan) is concerned, several processes - as N2 dissociation induced by electron impact, EUV photolysis (λ <80 nm) and dissociative photoionization, or galactic cosmic ray absorption and N+ dissociative recombination all 2 lead to atomic nitrogen, notably in the ground, 4 S3/2 , and first electronically excited, 2 D3/2,5/2 , states with comparable yields. The radiative lifetimes of the metastable states 2 D3/2 and 2 D5/2 are quite long (12.3 and 48 hours, respectively), because the transition from a doublet to a quartet state is strongly forbidden. In addition, the physical quenching of N(2 D) is often a slow process and in some important cases the main fate of N(2 D) is chemical reaction with other constituents of the planetary atmospheres. The production of N atoms in the 2 D state is an important fact, because N(4 S) atoms exhibit very low reactivity with closed-shell molecules and the probability of collision with an open-shell radical is small. Unfortunately laboratory experiments on the gas-phase reactions of N(2 D) have been lacking until recently, because of serious experimental difficulties in studying these reactive systems. Accurate kinetic data on the reactions of N(2 D) with the some molecules of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres have finally become available in the late 90's, but a better knowledge of the reactive behavior requires a dynamical investigation of N(2 D) reactions. The capability of generating intense continuous beams of N(2 D) achieved in our laboratory some years ago has opened up the possibility of studying the reactive scattering of this species under single

  5. Synthesis and characterization of 2D molybdenum carbide (MXene)

    DOE PAGES

    Halim, Joseph; Kota, Sankalp; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; ...

    2016-02-17

    Large scale synthesis and delamination of 2D Mo2CT x (where T is a surface termination group) has been achieved by selectively etching gallium from the recently discovered nanolaminated, ternary transition metal carbide Mo2Ga2C. Different synthesis and delamination routes result in different flake morphologies. The resistivity of free-standing Mo2CT x films increases by an order of magnitude as the temperature is reduced from 300 to 10 K, suggesting semiconductor-like behavior of this MXene, in contrast to Ti3C2T x which exhibits metallic behavior. At 10 K, the magnetoresistance is positive. Additionally, changes in electronic transport are observed upon annealing of the films.more » When 2 μm thick films are tested as electrodes in supercapacitors, capacitances as high as 700 F cm–3 in a 1 m sulfuric acid electrolyte and high capacity retention for at least 10,000 cycles at 10 A g–1 are obtained. Free-standing Mo2CT x films, with ≈8 wt% carbon nanotubes, perform well when tested as an electrode material for Li-ions, especially at high rates. In conclusion, at 20 and 131 C cycling rates, stable reversible capacities of 250 and 76 mAh g–1, respectively, are achieved for over 1000 cycles.« less

  6. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  7. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  8. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  9. Localized charged magnetoexcitons in 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosma, Diana; Todd, Alexander; Dzyubenko, Alexander; Sivachenko, Andrey

    2007-03-01

    We performed a detailed theoretical study of localization of spin-singlet Xs^- and spin-triplet Xt^- negatively charged excitons on isolated charged donors D^+ located at various distances L from the heteroboundary of a Quantum Well (QW). Our results show that the parent bright singlet state Xs^- remains always bound. In contrast, the dark Xtd^- and bright Xtb^- triplet states survive only for sufficiently large distances L to the donor ion D^+. In the presence of the D^+ the dark triplet acquires finite oscillator strengths. We also found several new bound X^- states, some of which have surprisingly large oscillator strengths. We showed that shake-up processes are strictly prohibited in magneto-photoluminescence of free charged excitons and only become allowed in the presence of a D^+ or other symmetry-breaking mechanisms. Our results show that the main magneto-PL peaks of free and donor bound charged excitons may exhibit very similar features while the shake-up processes in PL are symmetry-breaking signatures.

  10. Herds of methane chambers grazing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinham, Alistair; Dunbabin, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    , localised bubbling zones on the water storage were found to produce over 50,000 mg m-2 d-1 and the areal extent ranged from 1.8 to 7% of the total reservoir area. The drivers behind these changes as well as lessons learnt from the system implementation are presented. This system exploits relatively cheap materials, sensing and computing and can be applied to a wide variety of aquatic and terrestrial systems.

  11. HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF PLENUM WITH ATTACHED DRAFT REGULATOR. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  12. Direct Self-Assembly of a 2D and 3D Star of David.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Kun; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Bolarinwa, Olapeju; Wang, Jing; Li, Yiming; Yin, Guang-Qiang; Rivera, Edwin; Yang, Hai-Bo; Liu, Changlin; Xu, Bingqian; Li, Xiaopeng

    2017-04-06

    Two- and three-dimensional metallosupramolecules shaped like a Star of David were synthesized by the self-assembly of a tetratopic pyridyl ligand with a 180° diplatinum(II) motif and Pd(II) ions, respectively. In contrast to other strategies, such as template-directed synthesis and stepwise self-assembly, this design enables the formation of 2D and 3D structures in one step and high yield. The structures were characterized by both one-dimensional ((1) H, (13) C, (31) P) and two-dimensional (COSY, NOESY, DOSY) NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS, ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), AFM, and TEM. The stabilities of the 2D and 3D structures were measured and compared by gradient tandem mass spectrometry (gMS(2) ). The high stability of the 3D Star of David was correlated to its high density of coordination sites (DOCS).

  13. Experimental Analysis of a 2-D Lightcraft in Static and Hypersonic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Israel I.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Minucci, Marco A. S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; Rego, Israel S.; Toro, Paulo G. P.; Channes, José B.

    2010-05-01

    Aiming at the hypersonic phase of the Earth-to-Orbit trajectory for a laser propelled vehicle, a 2-D Lightcraft model was designed to be tested at the T3 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at the Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory for Aerodynamics and Hypersonics. A high energy laser pulse was supplied by a Lumonics TEA 620 laser system operating in unstable resonator cavity mode. The experiments were performed at quiescent (no flow) conditions and at a nominal Mach number of 9.2. A Schlieren visualization apparatus was used in order to access both the cold hypersonic flowfield structure (without laser deposition) and the time dependent flowfield structure, taking place after the laser induced breakdown inside the absorption chamber. The model was fitted with piezoelectric pressure transducers and surface junction thermocouples in an attempt to measure pressure and heat transfer time dependent distributions at the internal surfaces of the model's absorption chamber. The 2-D model followed a modular design for flexibility on the analysis of geometrical features contribution on the expansion of the laser induced blast wave. Finally, future evolution of the experiments being currently pursued is addressed.

  14. Precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Guan, H.; Qian, Y.; Gao, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca. The measurement was performed using a high-efficiency quantum-state detection technique to monitor quantum jumps and a high-precision and highly synchronous measurement sequence for laser control. A feature in our measurement is the pumping rate of the 729-nm laser that was corrected in a real-time way. The 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime was obtained through the measurement of the spontaneous decay rate after incoherent shelving of the ion to the 3 d 3/2 2D state with a wait time. Systematic errors, such as collisions with background gases, heating effects, impurity components, the shelving and pumping rates, and state detection, were carefully analyzed and estimated. We determined an improved value of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime to be τ3 /2=1.195 (8 ) s. Furthermore, the 3 d 3/2 2D →4 s 1/2 2S quadrupole transition matrix element was measured to be Sk i=7.936 (26 ) e a02 , and the ratio between the lifetimes of 3 d 2D3 /2 and 3 d 2D5 /2 was determined to be 1.018(11). Our method can be universally applied to lifetime measurements of other single ions and atoms with a similar structure.

  15. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  16. Modeling Tear Film Dynamics on a 2-D Eye-shaped Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longfei; Braun, Richard; Maki, Kara; Henshaw, William

    2012-11-01

    We study tear film dynamics on a 2-D eye-shaped domain using a lubrication model. Time dependent flux boundary conditions that model the lacrimal gland tear supply and punctal drainage are imposed. We solved the model equations with Overture computational framework. Results reveals our model captures the hydraulic connectivity and other key physics of human tear film observed in vivo. Comparisons are made with existing models and experiments. Should time permit, osmolarity dynamics (salt ion concentration) will be included.

  17. Phase states of a 2D easy-plane ferromagnet with strong inclined anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, Yu. A. Klevets, F. N.; Gorelikov, G. A.; Meleshko, A. G.

    2012-12-15

    We investigate the spin states of a 2D film exhibiting easy-axis anisotropy and a strong single-ion inclined anisotropy whose axis forms a certain angle with the normal to the film surface. Such a system may have an angular ferromagnetic phase, a spatially inhomogeneous state, and a quadrupole phase, whose realization depends substantially on the inclined anisotropy and the orientation of the wavevector in the film plane.

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  19. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  20. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  1. Ion thruster performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A model of ion thruster performance is developed for high flux density, cusped magnetic field thruster designs. This model is formulated in terms of the average energy required to produce an ion in the discharge chamber plasma and the fraction of these ions that are extracted to form the beam. The direct loss of high energy (primary) electrons from the plasma to the anode is shown to have a major effect on thruster performance. The model provides simple algebraic equations enabling one to calculate the beam ion energy cost, the average discharge chamber plasma ion energy cost, the primary electron density, the primary-to-Maxwellian electron density ratio and the Maxwellian electron temperature. Experiments indicate that the model correctly predicts the variation in plasma ion energy cost for changes in propellant gas (Ar, Kr and Xe), grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam extraction area, discharge voltage, and discharge chamber wall temperature. The model and experiments indicate that thruster performance may be described in terms of only four thruster configuration dependent parameters and two operating parameters. The model also suggests that improved performance should be exhibited by thruster designs which extract a large fraction of the ions produced in the discharge chamber, which have good primary electron and neutral atom containment and which operate at high propellant flow rates.

  2. ION ACCELERATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.; Martin, J.A.

    1960-02-23

    Well focused, intense ion beams are obtained by providing a multi- apertured source grid in front of an ion source chamber and an accelerating multi- apertured grid closely spaced from and in alignment with the source grid. The longest dimensions of the elongated apertures in the grids are normal to the direction of the magnetic field used with the device. Large ion currents may be withdrawn from the source, since they do not pass through any small focal region between the grids.

  3. LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

    1964-07-08

    The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

  4. Characterization of a Reverberation Chamber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    electromagnetic susceptibility and immunity of a device under test because of its repeatability and measurement speed. A reverberation chamber is...devices or unmanned aircraft systems has led to a baseline characterization of the reverberation chamber at the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL). A...

  5. Small rocket flowfield diagnostic chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, Sybil; Reed, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Instrumented and optically-accessible rocket chambers are being developed to be used for diagnostics of small rocket (less than 440 N thrust level) flowfields. These chambers are being tested to gather local fluid dynamic and thermodynamic flowfield data over a range of test conditions. This flowfield database is being used to better understand mixing and heat transfer phenomena in small rockets, influence the numerical modeling of small rocket flowfields, and characterize small rocket components. The diagnostic chamber designs include: a chamber design for gathering wall temperature profiles to be used as boundary conditions in a finite element heat flux model; a chamber design for gathering inner wall temperature and static pressure profiles; and optically-accessible chamber designs, to be used with a suite of laser-based diagnostics for gathering local species concentration, temperature, density, and velocity profiles. These chambers were run with gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen (GH2/GO2) propellants, while subsequent versions will be run on liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/HC) propellants. The purpose, design, and initial test results of these small rocket flowfield diagnostic chambers are summarized.

  6. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  7. DUAL HEATED ION SOURCE STRUCTURE HAVING ARC SHIFTING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.

    1959-04-14

    An ion source is presented for calutrons, particularly an electrode arrangement for the ion generator of a calutron ion source. The ion source arc chamber is heated and an exit opening with thermally conductive plates defines the margins of the opening. These plates are electrically insulated from the body of the ion source and are connected to a suitable source of voltage to serve as electrodes for shaping the ion beam egressing from the arc chamber.

  8. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  9. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  10. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  11. Using 2D and 3D Modeling to Infer the Depth of the Okavango Dyke Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, M. K.; Mortimer, D.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    The 179 Ma N110°-striking Okavango Dyke swarm (ODS) extends from southern Zimbabwe for approximately 1500 km northwest into Namibia. The emplacement of dyke swarms is typically associated with the initiation of continental breakup and has been suggested that ODS was emplaced during the breakup of Gondwana along an existing zone of weakness. However, the understanding of how these giant dyke swarms are emplaced over large distances for hundreds of kilometers is limited- do these giant dike swarms propagate from a single source for hundreds of kilometers or do they propagate from sub-crustal magma chambers along a zone of weakness? To address these questions we investigated the ODS in northern Botswana. The dyke swarm is exposed at the surface in the east close to its origin but is buried in the northwest within the Okavango Rift Zone. Using airborne magnetic and ground gravity survey data along with rock property data from the exposed sections, 2D and 3D models were created in order to determine the depth of the dyke swarm. Initially several 2D models were used to test hypothesis of varying depths and rock parameters. The 2D models were then used to ‘seed’ the 3D models with similar density, susceptibility, and depth parameters. The dykes appear to have relatively shallow and finite depths, in the range of 2 to 5 km deep. These results are consistent with a lateral emplacement stemming from the failed triple junction and thus ruling out an infinite depth extent which would have been the case if the dykes were propagated vertically from sub-crustal magma chambers.

  12. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1958-08-19

    A novel ion source is described for use in a calutron which has the prime adwantage of reducing the nunnber of unwanted ions in the ion generating mechamism.An important feature of the invention resides In an arc chamber having a lining of the polyisotopic material to be treated In the calutron and bombardment of the linirg with positive ions of a light gas to induce sputtering and ionization of the lining. With the reduction of unwanted ions in the source beam provided by the described source, the calutron operation may be more accurately controlled.

  13. PULSED ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.E.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1958-06-17

    An ion source is described for producing very short high density pulses of ions without bcam scattering. The ions are created by an oscillating electron discharge within a magnetic field. After the ions are drawn from the ionization chamber by an accelerating electrode the ion beam is under the influence of the magnetic field for separation of the ions according to mass and, at the same time, passes between two neutralizing plntes maintained nt equal negative potentials. As the plates are formed of a material having a high ratio of secondary electrons to impinging ions, the ion bombardment of the plntes emits electrons which neutralize the frirge space-charge of the beam and tend to prevent widening of the beam cross section due to the mutual repulsion of the ions.

  14. Roos and NACP-02 ion chamber perturbations and water-air stopping-power ratios for clinical electron beams for energies from 4 to 22 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M.; Shipley, D. R.; Manning, J. W.

    2015-02-01

    Empirical fits are developed for depth-compensated wall- and cavity-replacement perturbations in the PTW Roos 34001 and IBA / Scanditronix NACP-02 parallel-plate ionisation chambers, for electron beam qualities from 4 to 22 MeV for depths up to approximately 1.1 × R50,D. These are based on calculations using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code EGSnrc and its user codes with a full simulation of the linac treatment head modelled using BEAMnrc. These fits are used with calculated restricted stopping-power ratios between air and water to match measured depth-dose distributions in water from an Elekta Synergy clinical linear accelerator at the UK National Physical Laboratory. Results compare well with those from recent publications and from the IPEM 2003 electron beam radiotherapy Code of Practice.

  15. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-07

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs.

  16. The high momentum spectrometer drift chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, D.; Baker, O. K.; Beaufait, J.; Bennett, C.; Bryant, E.; Carlini, R.; Kross, B.; McCauley, A.; Naing, W.; Shin, T.; Vulcan, W.

    1992-12-01

    The High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C will use planar drift chambers for charged particle track reconstruction. The chambers are constructed using well understood technology and a conventional gas mixture. Two (plus one spare) drift chambers will be constructed for this spectrometers. Each chamber will contain 6 planes of readout channels. This paper describes the chamber design and gas handling system used.

  17. A two dimensional finite difference time domain analysis of the quiet zone fields of an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Deirdre A.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Kunz, Karl S.; Steich, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Prediction of anechoic chamber performance is a difficult problem. Electromagnetic anechoic chambers exist for a wide range of frequencies but are typically very large when measured in wavelengths. Three dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of anechoic chambers is possible with current computers but at frequencies lower than most chamber design frequencies. However, two dimensional FDTD (2D-FTD) modeling enables much greater detail at higher frequencies and offers significant insight into compact anechoic chamber design and performance. A major subsystem of an anechoic chamber for which computational electromagnetic analyses exist is the reflector. First, an analysis of the quiet zone fields of a low frequency anechoic chamber produced by a uniform source and a reflector in two dimensions using the FDTD method is presented. The 2D-FDTD results are compared with results from a three dimensional corrected physical optics calculation and show good agreement. Next, a directional source is substituted for the uniform radiator. Finally, a two dimensional anechoic chamber geometry, including absorbing materials, is considered, and the 2D-FDTD results for these geometries appear reasonable.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of 2D molybdenum carbide (MXene)

    SciTech Connect

    Halim, Joseph; Kota, Sankalp; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Naguib, Michael; Zhao, Meng -Qiang; Moon, Eun Ju; Pitock, Jeremy; Nanda, Jagjit; May, Steven J.; Gogotsi, Yury; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-02-17

    Large scale synthesis and delamination of 2D Mo2CT x (where T is a surface termination group) has been achieved by selectively etching gallium from the recently discovered nanolaminated, ternary transition metal carbide Mo2Ga2C. Different synthesis and delamination routes result in different flake morphologies. The resistivity of free-standing Mo2CT x films increases by an order of magnitude as the temperature is reduced from 300 to 10 K, suggesting semiconductor-like behavior of this MXene, in contrast to Ti3C2T x which exhibits metallic behavior. At 10 K, the magnetoresistance is positive. Additionally, changes in electronic transport are observed upon annealing of the films. When 2 μm thick films are tested as electrodes in supercapacitors, capacitances as high as 700 F cm–3 in a 1 m sulfuric acid electrolyte and high capacity retention for at least 10,000 cycles at 10 A g–1 are obtained. Free-standing Mo2CT x films, with ≈8 wt% carbon nanotubes, perform well when tested as an electrode material for Li-ions, especially at high rates. In conclusion, at 20 and 131 C cycling rates, stable reversible capacities of 250 and 76 mAh g–1, respectively, are achieved for over 1000 cycles.

  19. Circular photogalvanic effect caused by the transitions between edge and 2D states in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, L. I.; Entin, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron absorption and the edge photocurrent of a 2D topological insulator are studied for transitions between edge states to 2D states. The circular polarized light is found to produce the edge photocurrent, the direction of which is determined by light polarization and edge orientation. It is shown that the edge-state current is found to exceed the 2D current owing to the topological protection of the edge states.

  20. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Z.Q.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1993-10-26

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source having an electron gun for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber of the ion source is described. The ion source has a injection enclosure and a plasma chamber tank. The plasma chamber is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets. The electron gun injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber such that ionization within the plasma chamber occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun. The electron gun has a cathode for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply. A concentric inner conductor and outer conductor carry heating current to a carbon chuck and carbon pusher which hold the cathode in place and also heat the cathode. In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, the electron gun replaces the conventional first stage used in prior electron cyclotron resonance ion generators. 5 figures.

  1. A high rate proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.; Fraszer, W.; Openshaw, R.; Sheffer, G.; Salomon, M.; Dew, S.; Marans, J.; Wilson, P.

    1987-02-01

    Gas mixtures with high specific ionization allow the use of small interelectrode distances while still maintaining full efficiency. With the short electron drift distances the timing resolution is also improved. The authors have built and operated two 25 cm/sup 2/ chambers with small interelectrode distances. Also single wire detector cells have been built to test gas mixture lifetimes. Various admixtures of CF/sub 4/, DME, Isobutane, Ethane and Argon have been tested. Possible applications of such chambers are as beam profile monitors, position tagging of rare events and front end chambers in spectrometers.

  2. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  3. Energy Efficiency of D2D Multi-User Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zufan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-28

    The Device-to-Device (D2D) communication system is an important part of heterogeneous networks. It has great potential to improve spectrum efficiency, throughput and energy efficiency cooperation of multiple D2D users with the advantage of direct communication. When cooperating, D2D users expend extraordinary energy to relay data to other D2D users. Hence, the remaining energy of D2D users determines the life of the system. This paper proposes a cooperation scheme for multiple D2D users who reuse the orthogonal spectrum and are interested in the same data by aiming to solve the energy problem of D2D users. Considering both energy availability and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of each D2D user, the Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is introduced in the cooperation scheme to solve relay selection problems. Thus, the cooperation issue is transformed into a maximum weighted matching (MWM) problem. In order to enhance energy efficiency without the deterioration of Quality of Service (QoS), the link outage probability is derived according to the Shannon Equation by considering the data rate and delay. The simulation studies the relationships among the number of cooperative users, the length of shared data, the number of data packets and energy efficiency.

  4. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  5. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  6. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  7. Nanoscale elastic changes in 2D Ti3C2Tx (MXene) pseudocapacitive electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Come, Jeremy; Xie, Yu; Naguib, Michael; ...

    2016-02-01

    Designing sustainable electrodes for next generation energy storage devices relies on the understanding of their fundamental properties at the nanoscale, including the comprehension of ions insertion into the electrode and their interactions with the active material. One consequence of ion storage is the change in the electrode volume resulting in mechanical strain and stress that can strongly affect the cycle life. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes of dimensions and mechanical properties occurring during electrochemical reactions. While the characterization of mechanical properties via macroscopic measurements is well documented, in-situ characterization of their evolution has never been achieved atmore » the nanoscale. Two dimensional (2D) carbides, known as MXenes, are promising materials for supercapacitors and various kinds of batteries, and understating the coupling between their mechanical and electrochemical properties is therefore necessary. Here we report on in-situ imaging, combined with density functional theory of the elastic changes, of a 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) electrode in direction normal to the basal plane during cation intercalation. The results show a strong correlation between the Li+ ions content and the elastic modulus, whereas little effects of K+ ions are observed. Moreover, this strategy enables identifying the preferential intercalation pathways within a single particle.« less

  8. Study of the PTW microLion chamber temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; González-Castaño, D.; Díaz-Botana, P.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2014-06-01

    The use of liquid ionization chambers in radiotherapy has grown during the past few years. While for air ionization chambers the kTP correction for air mass density due to pressure and temperature variations is well known, less work has been done on the case of liquid ionization chambers, where there is still the need to take into account the influence of temperature in the free ion yield. We have measured the PTW microLion isooctane-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence in a ˜ ±10 °C interval around the standard 20 °C room temperature for three operation voltages, including the manufacturer recommended voltage, and two beam qualities, 60Co and 50 kV x-rays. Within the measured temperature range, the microLion signal exhibits a positive linear dependence, which is around 0.24% K-1 at 800 V with 60Co irradiation. This effect is of the same order of magnitude as the T dependence found in air ionization chambers, but its nature is completely different and its sign opposite to that of an air chamber. Onsager theory has been used to model the results and is consistent with this linear behaviour. However, some inconsistencies in the modelling of the 50 kV x-ray results have been found that are attributed to the failure of Onsager's isolated pair assumption for such radiation quality.

  9. KMT2D regulates specific programs in heart development via histone H3 lysine 4 di-methylation

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Siang-Yun; Uebersohn, Alec; Spencer, C. Ian; Huang, Yu; Lee, Ji-Eun; Ge, Kai; Bruneau, Benoit G.

    2016-01-01

    KMT2D, which encodes a histone H3K4 methyltransferase, has been implicated in human congenital heart disease in the context of Kabuki syndrome. However, its role in heart development is not understood. Here, we demonstrate a requirement for KMT2D in cardiac precursors and cardiomyocytes during cardiogenesis in mice. Gene expression analysis revealed downregulation of ion transport and cell cycle genes, leading to altered calcium handling and cell cycle defects. We further determined that myocardial Kmt2d deletion led to decreased H3K4me1 and H3K4me2 at enhancers and promoters. Finally, we identified KMT2D-bound regions in cardiomyocytes, of which a subset was associated with decreased gene expression and decreased H3K4me2 in mutant hearts. This subset included genes related to ion transport, hypoxia-reoxygenation and cell cycle regulation, suggesting that KMT2D is important for these processes. Our findings indicate that KMT2D is essential for regulating cardiac gene expression during heart development primarily via H3K4 di-methylation. PMID:26932671

  10. Slow magnetic relaxation in a hydrogen-bonded 2D array of mononuclear dysprosium(III) oxamates.

    PubMed

    Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Vallejo, Julia; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2013-05-06

    The reaction of N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)oxamic acid with dysprosium(III) ions in a controlled basic media afforded the first example of a mononuclear lanthanide oxamate complex exhibiting a field-induced slow magnetic relaxation behavior typical of single-ion magnets (SIMs). The hydrogen-bond-mediated self-assembly of this new bifunctional dysprosium(III) SIM in the solid state provides a unique example of 2D hydrogen-bonded polymer with a herringbone net topology.

  11. Regulation of ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.; Gasser, Stephan; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Deng, Weiwen; Jung, Heiyoun

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed by all NK cells and subsets of T cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of transformed and infected cells and participates in the genesis of several inflammatory diseases. The ligands for NKG2D are self-proteins that are induced by pathways that are active in certain pathophysiological states. NKG2D ligands are regulated transcriptionally, at the level of mRNA and protein stability, and by cleavage from the cell surface. In some cases, ligand induction can be attributed to pathways that are activated specifically in cancer cells or infected cells. We review the numerous pathways that have been implicated in the regulation of NKG2D ligands, discuss the pathologic states in which those pathways are likely to act, and attempt to synthesize the findings into general schemes of NKG2D ligand regulation in NK cell responses to cancer and infection. PMID:23298206

  12. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  13. New generation transistor technologies enabled by 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of graphene opened the door to 2D crystal materials. The lack of a bandgap in 2D graphene makes it unsuitable for electronic switching transistors in the conventional field-effect sense, though possible techniques exploiting the unique bandstructure and nanostructures are being explored. The transition metal dichalcogenides have 2D crystal semiconductors, which are well-suited for electronic switching. We experimentally demonstrate field effect transistors with current saturation and carrier inversion made from layered 2D crystal semiconductors such as MoS2, WS2, and the related family. We also evaluate the feasibility of such semiconducting 2D crystals for tunneling field effect transistors for low-power digital logic. The article summarizes the current state of new generation transistor technologies either proposed, or demonstrated, with a commentary on the challenges and prospects moving forward.

  14. Advanced ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    A simple model describing the discharge chamber performance of high strength, cusped magnetic field ion thrusters is developed. The model is formulated in terms of the energy cost of producing ions in the discharge chamber and the fraction of ions produced in the discharge chamber that are extracted to form the ion beam. The accuracy of the model is verified experimentally in a series of tests wherein the discharge voltage, propellant, grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam diameter and discharge chamber wall temperature are varied. The model is exercised to demonstrate what variations in performance might be expected by varying discharge chamber parameters. The results of a study of xenon and argon orificed hollow cathodes are reported. These results suggest that a hollow cathode model developed from research conducted on mercury cathodes can also be applied to xenon and argon. Primary electron mean free paths observed in argon and xenon cathodes that are larger than those found in mercury cathodes are identified as a cause of performance differences between mercury and inert gas cathodes. Data required as inputs to the inert gas cathode model are presented so it can be used as an aid in cathode design.

  15. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xian; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-07-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼ 50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter.

  16. Characterization of hollow cathode, ring cusp discharge chambers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study into the effects of changes in such physical design parameters as hollow cathode position, anode position and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance, is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction and ion beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate specific means by which changes in these design parameters induce changes in performance, i.e., through changes in the loss rates of primary electrons to the anode, of ions to discharge chamber walls or of ions to cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid, (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density on the discharge chamber centerline, and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface and so there are no steep magnetic flux density gradients near the walls through which ions can be lost by Bohm diffusion. The uniformity of the plasma density at the grids can also be improved by moving the point of primary electron injection into the discharge chamber off of the chamber centerline. Other results show the discharge chamber losses decrease when a filament cathode is substituted for a hollow cathode to the extent of the hollow cathode operating power. When plasma ion energy cost is determined in such a way that the cost of operating the hollow cathode is subtracted out, the performance using either electron source is similar.

  17. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge.

  18. IRIS Leaves Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the transportation of the IRIS observatory from the thermal vacuum chamber back to the clean tent for final testing and preparations for delivery to the launch site at Vandenberg A...

  19. Vaporization chambers and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.; Shunn, Lee P.

    2017-02-21

    A vaporization chamber may include at least one conduit and a shell. The at least one conduit may have an inlet at a first end, an outlet at a second end and a flow path therebetween. The shell may surround a portion of each conduit and define a chamber surrounding the portion of each conduit. Additionally, a plurality of discrete apertures may be positioned at longitudinal intervals in a wall of each conduit, each discrete aperture of the plurality of discrete apertures sized and configured to direct a jet of fluid into each conduit from the chamber. A liquid may be vaporized by directing a first fluid comprising a liquid into the inlet at the first end of each conduit, directing jets of a second fluid into each conduit from the chamber through discrete apertures in a wall of each conduit and transferring heat from the second fluid to the first fluid.

  20. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Zeballos, E. Cerron; Crotty, I.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Valverde, J. Lamas; Neupane, S.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zichichi, A.

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  1. Cyclically controlled welding purge chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An arrangement for butt-welding cylindrical sections of large, thin-wall tanks includes a rotatable mandrel with side-by-side sets of radial position adjusters. Each set of adjusters bears on one of the tank sections adjacent the seam, to prevent the sections from sagging out-of-round. The mandrel rotates relative to the welder, so that a continuous seam is formed. A purge chamber is fixed in position behind the seam at the weld head, and is flushed with inert gas. The purge chamber includes a two-sided structure which is contiguous with the cylindrical sections and a circumferential vane to form an open-ended tube-like structure, through which the radial position adjusters pass as the mandrel and cylindrical workpiece sections rotate. The tube-like structure is formed into a chamber by a plurality of movable gates which are controlled to maintain a seal while allowing adjusters to progress through the purge chamber.

  2. Advanced light ion source extraction system for a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source geometry at Saclay.

    PubMed

    Delferrière, O; Gobin, R; Harrault, F; Nyckees, S; Sauce, Y; Tuske, O

    2012-02-01

    One of the main goal of intense light ion injector projects such as IPHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2, is to produce high current beams while keeping transverse emittance as low as possible. To prevent emittance growth induced in a dual solenoid low energy transfer line, its length has to be minimized. This can be performed with the advanced light ion source extraction system concept that we are developing: a new ECR 2.45 GHz type ion source based on the use of an additional low energy beam transport (LEBT) short length solenoid close to the extraction aperture to create the resonance in the plasma chamber. The geometry of the source has been considerably modified to allow easy maintenance of each component and to save space in front of the extraction. The source aims to be very flexible and to be able to extract high current ion beams at energy up to 100 kV. A specific experimental setup for this source is under installation on the BETSI test bench, to compare its performances with sources developed up to now in the laboratory, such as SILHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2 ECR sources. This original extraction source concept is presented, as well as electromagnetic simulations with OPERA-2D code. Ion beam extraction in space charge compensation regime with AXCEL, and beam dynamics simulation with SOLMAXP codes show the beam quality improvement at the end of the LEBT.

  3. Advanced light ion source extraction system for a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source geometry at Saclaya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Nyckees, S.; Sauce, Y.; Tuske, O.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main goal of intense light ion injector projects such as IPHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2, is to produce high current beams while keeping transverse emittance as low as possible. To prevent emittance growth induced in a dual solenoid low energy transfer line, its length has to be minimized. This can be performed with the advanced light ion source extraction system concept that we are developing: a new ECR 2.45 GHz type ion source based on the use of an additional low energy beam transport (LEBT) short length solenoid close to the extraction aperture to create the resonance in the plasma chamber. The geometry of the source has been considerably modified to allow easy maintenance of each component and to save space in front of the extraction. The source aims to be very flexible and to be able to extract high current ion beams at energy up to 100 kV. A specific experimental setup for this source is under installation on the BETSI test bench, to compare its performances with sources developed up to now in the laboratory, such as SILHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2 ECR sources. This original extraction source concept is presented, as well as electromagnetic simulations with OPERA-2D code. Ion beam extraction in space charge compensation regime with AXCEL, and beam dynamics simulation with SOLMAXP codes show the beam quality improvement at the end of the LEBT.

  4. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  5. CALUTRON ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1959-02-17

    An improvement is described in ion source mechanisms whereby the source structure is better adapted to withstanid the ravages of heat, erosion, and deterioration concomitant with operation of an ion source of the calutron type. A pair of molybdenum plates define the exit opening of the arc chamber and are in thermal contact with the walls of the chamber. These plates are maintained at a reduced temperature by a pair of copper blocks in thermal conducting contact therewith to form subsequent diverging margins for the exit opening.

  6. Advanced penning ion source

    DOEpatents

    Schenkel, Thomas; Ji, Qing; Persaud, Arun; Sy, Amy V.

    2016-11-01

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus for ion generation. In one aspect, an apparatus includes an anode, a first cathode, a second cathode, and a plurality of cusp magnets. The anode has a first open end and a second open end. The first cathode is associated with the first open end of the anode. The second cathode is associated with the second open end of the anode. The anode, the first cathode, and the second cathode define a chamber. The second cathode has an open region configured for the passage of ions from the chamber. Each cusp magnet of the plurality of cusp magnets is disposed along a length of the anode.

  7. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to improvements in calutron devices and particularly describes a novel ion source. The unique feature of this source lies in the shaping of the ionizing electron stream to conform to the arc plasma boundary at the exit slit of the ionization chamber, thereby increasing the ion density produced at the plasma boundary. The particular structure consists of an electron source disposed at onc end of an elongated ionization chambcr and a coilimating electrode positioned to trim the electron stream to a crescent shape before entering the ionization chamber.

  8. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-04

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  9. Development of a pixel ionization chamber for beam monitor in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Garella, M. A.; Attili, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Marchetto, F.; Mazza, G.; Meyroneinc, S.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a detector to be used as monitor for proton therapy beam lines. The detector is a 2-D parallel plate ionization chamber, with the anode segmented in 1024 square pixels arranged in a 32×32 matrix. The detector characterization is presented.

  10. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  11. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  12. Joint 2D and 3D phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to 2D echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yuyao; Gibbs, Eric; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) measures tissue magnetic susceptibility and typically relies on time-consuming three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI. Recent studies have shown that two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI), which is commonly used in functional MRI (fMRI) and other dynamic imaging techniques, can also be used to produce data suitable for QSM with much shorter scan times. However, the production of high-quality QSM maps is difficult because data obtained by 2D multi-slice scans often have phase inconsistencies across adjacent slices and strong susceptibility field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. To address these challenges in 2D EPI-based QSM studies, we present a new data processing procedure that integrates 2D and 3D phase processing. First, 2D Laplacian-based phase unwrapping and 2D background phase removal are performed to reduce phase inconsistencies between slices and remove in-plane harmonic components of the background phase. This is followed by 3D background phase removal for the through-plane harmonic components. The proposed phase processing was evaluated with 2D EPI data obtained from healthy volunteers, and compared against conventional 3D phase processing using the same 2D EPI datasets. Our QSM results were also compared with QSM values from time-consuming 3D GRE data, which were taken as ground truth. The experimental results show that this new 2D EPI-based QSM technique can produce quantitative susceptibility measures that are comparable with those of 3D GRE-based QSM across different brain regions (e.g. subcortical iron-rich gray matter, cortical gray and white matter). This new 2D EPI QSM reconstruction method is implemented within STI Suite, which is a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  14. NKG2D Receptor and Its Ligands in Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-06-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T cells, and subsets of CD4(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells (iNKT), and γδ T cells. In humans, NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit, and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least eight genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and posttranslation. In general, healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyperproliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves as a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone "stress." Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system, and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

  15. 2-D Versus 3-D Magnetotelluric Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, the number of publications dealing with the mathematical and physical 3-D aspects of the magnetotelluric method has increased drastically. However, field experiments on a grid are often impractical and surveys are frequently restricted to single or widely separated profiles. So, in many cases we find ourselves with the following question: is the applicability of the 2-D hypothesis valid to extract geoelectric and geological information from real 3-D environments? The aim of this paper is to explore a few instructive but general situations to understand the basics of a 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data and to determine which data subset (TE-mode or TM-mode) is best for obtaining the electrical conductivity distribution of the subsurface using 2-D techniques. A review of the mathematical and physical fundamentals of the electromagnetic fields generated by a simple 3-D structure allows us to prioritise the choice of modes in a 2-D interpretation of responses influenced by 3-D structures. This analysis is corroborated by numerical results from synthetic models and by real data acquired by other authors. One important result of this analysis is that the mode most unaffected by 3-D effects depends on the position of the 3-D structure with respect to the regional 2-D strike direction. When the 3-D body is normal to the regional strike, the TE-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, while the TM-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects. In this case, a 2-D interpretation of the TM-mode is prone to error. When the 3-D body is parallel to the regional 2-D strike the TE-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects and the TM-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, making it more suitable for 2-D interpretation. In general, a wise 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data can be a guide to a reasonable geological interpretation.

  16. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  17. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  18. Gas dynamics and radiative heat transfer in IFE chambers with emphasis on the HYLIFE-II design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantzen, Caron Ann

    Gas dynamics in a heavy-ion inertial-fusion energy power plant have been modeled using the two-dimensional code, TSUNAMI. After fusion, approximately 2/3 of the yield energy will be given off as 14 Mev neutrons and the remaining third partitioned between target x-rays and debris energy. The chamber dynamic events which follow the fusion event occur over three distinct time periods, permitting separation of the underlying phenomena. Simulations of the HYLIFE-II reactor design were then run and results compared using both ideal-gas and partialionization equations of state. Results from a cylindrically symmetric simulation indicate that an initial, low density, burst of high-energy particles enters the final focus section of the heavy ion driver within 120mus of the blast and a second, larger, density rise occurs approximately 100mus later. Uncertainty in IFE target design motivated a parametric study of the x-ray to debris kinetic energy. Increasing this ratio lead to more jet ablation by target x-rays and, therefore, higher chamber densities. Chamber averaged temperature remained high, around 2.1 eV. Therefore, a subsequent study considered secondary radiation emitted by this hot vapor. The photon transport equation was applied in a finite difference model to both the target and ablation regions. Result indicated that radiation from the expanding target debris supplies 15MJ of energy to the liquid jets within the first 12mus of target ignition and becomes negligible beyond that time. In an inertial fusion energy (IFE) target chamber using thick-liquid protection, placing liquid surfaces close to the fusion target helps reduce pumping cost and final-focus stand-off distance. An additional issue then becomes the impulse load delivered to protective jets by target debris and x-ray ablated material since this pressure load provides the most important boundary condition for the subsequent liquid hydraulic response, pocket disruption, droplet generation, and pocket

  19. Denitrification associated with stream periphyton: Chamber estimates from undisrupted communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duff, J.H.; Triska, F.J.; Oremland, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Undisrupted periphyton communities from a N-rich (NO3- = 63 ??mol L-1) and pristine (NO3- = 2.9 ??mol L-1) stream were assayed for denitrifying activity (acetylene-blockage technique) in 40-L chambers incubated at in situ temperature and nutrient concentrations. Nitrous oxide formation associated with periphyton from the N-rich stream was immediate and linear (52.1 ??mol N2O m-2 h-1) in the dark, anaerobic chamber (50 kPa C2H2). In the corresponding light, aerobic chamber (50 kPa C2H2), N2O production was inhibited by 82% (9.3 ??mol N2O m-2 h-1). Nitrous oxide formation was not associated with periphyton from the pristine stream incubated in situ, either with or without NO3- amendment. Denitrification estimates made with undisrupted periphyton communities at in situ temperature and nutrient concentrations (40-L chambers) were less variable than estimates made with periphyton 'scrapings' in small flasks (room temperature). The calculated diel periphyton-associated denitrification rate based on a 14-h light-10-h dark day was 651 ??mol N2O m-2 d-1. The data suggest denitrification within periphyton mats may contribute toward removal of NO3- from N-rich fluvial environments.

  20. Submillimeter laboratory identification of CH{sup +} and CH{sub 2}D{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, T.

    2015-01-22

    Laboratory identification of two basic and important interstellar molecular ions is presented. The J = 1 - 0 rotational transition of {sup 12}CH{sup +} together with those of {sup 13}CH{sup +} and {sup 12}CD{sup +} was observed in the laboratory. The newly obtained frequencies were found to be different from those reported previously. Various experimental evidences firmly support the new measurements. In addition, the Zeeman effect and the spin-rotation hyperfine interaction enforce the laboratory identification with no ambiguity. Rotational lines of CH{sub 2}D{sup +} were observed in the submillimeter-wave region. This laboratory observation is consistent with a recent tentative identification of CH{sub 2}D{sup +} toward Ori IRc2.

  1. Formation and properties of a terpyridine-based 2D MOF on the surface of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koitz, Ralph; Hutter, Jürg; Iannuzzi, Marcella

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional networks inspired by graphene are of prime importance in nanoscience. We present a computational study of an infinite molecular sheet confined on a water surface to assess its properties and formation mechanism. Terpyridine-based ligand molecules are interlinked by Zn ions to form an extended 2D metal-organic framework. We show that the network is stable on the water surface, and that the substrate affects the dynamic properties of the sheet, exhibiting a confining effect and flattening the sheet by 30%. We use metadynamics to characterize the process of network formation and breaking and determine an intra-network binding energy of 143 kJ mol-1. Based on this mechanistic insight we propose that the 2D network strength can be tuned by varying the rigidity of the ligand through its chemical structure.

  2. Effects of coating rectangular microscopic electrophoresis chamber with methylcellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    One of the biggest problems in obtaining high accuracy in microscopic electrophoresis is the parabolic flow of liquid in the chamber due to electroosmotic backflow during application of the electric field. In chambers with glass walls the source of polarization leading to electroosmosis is the negative charge of the silicare and other ions that form the wall structure. It was found by Hjerten, who used a rotating 3.0 mm capillary tube for free zone electrophoresis, that precisely neutralizing this charge was extremely difficult, but if a neutral polymer matrix (formaldehyde fixed methylcellulose) was formed over the glass (quartz) wall the double layer was displaced and the viscosity at the shear plane increased so that electroosmotic flow could be eliminated. Experiments were designed to determine the reliability with which methylcellulose coating of the Zeiss Cytopherometer chamber reduced electroosmotic backflow and the effect of coating on the accuracy of cell electrophoretic mobility (EPN) determinations. Fixed rat erythrocytes (RBC) were used as test particles.

  3. The PEP-II Lower Pressure HER Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    DeBarger, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wright, D.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    This new vacuum chamber has been installed from 12 to 21 meters upstream of the BaBar detector in the PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER) to reduce lost particle backgrounds. The backgrounds from HER now dominate the backgrounds in the BaBar detector and the present vacuum pressure is 1 x 10{sup -9} Torr. The new chamber will increase the pumping significantly by adding 18 x 2000 l/s titanium sublimation pumps to the existing 5 x 440 l/s ion pumps, and is expected to reduce the pressure by about a factor of five. Features of the chamber include improved water cooling, improved vacuum conductance through copper RF screens featuring over 15,000 small square holes and the ability to sublimate titanium while the beam is still on.

  4. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  5. IRIS : A reaction spectroscopy facility with solid H2 /D2 target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Matthias; Kanungo, Ritu; Alcorta, Martin; Andreoiu, Corina; Bidaman, Harris; Burbadge, Christina; Burke, Devin; Chen, Alan; Davids, Barry; Diaz Varela, Alejandra; Garrett, Paul; Hackman, Greg; Ishimoto, Shigeru; Kaur, Satbir; Keefe, Matthew; Kruecken, Reiner; Mansour, Iymad; Randhawa, Jaspreet; Sanetullaev, Alisher; Shotter, Alan; Smith, Jenna; Tanaka, Junki; Tanihata, Isao; Turko, Joseph; Workman, Orry

    2016-09-01

    The charged particle reaction spectroscopy station IRIS at TRIUMF is designed to allow studies of inelastic scattering and transfer reactions for low intensity beams. To do so, a novel solid H2 /D2 target is used in combination with a low pressure ionization chamber for the identification of incoming beam particles. The light ejectiles are measured using a ΔE - E telescope consisting of an annular silicon detector followed by CsI(Tl) array. Another ΔE - E telescope, consisting of two segmented silicon detectors, is used to identify the heavy outgoing particles. An overview of the faciltity will be given and examples from recent experiments that illustrate that facility's capability for reaction studies of exotic nuclei will be shown. Support from Canada Foundation for Innovation, Nova Scotia Research and Innovation Trust and NSERC.

  6. ION SOURCE (R.F. INDUCTION TYPE)

    DOEpatents

    Mills, C.B.

    1963-04-01

    A method is given for producing energetic ions by ionizing a gas with an oscillating electric field which is parallel to a confining magnetic field, then reorienting the fields perpendicular to each other to accelerate the ions to higher energies. An ion source is described wherein a secondary coil threads the bottom of a rectangular ionization chamber and induces an oscillating field parallel to a fixed intense magnetic field through the chamber. (AEC)

  7. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  8. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  9. Recent developments in 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Late, Dattatray J.; Morgan, Hywel; Rout, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional layered inorganic nanomaterials (2D-LINs) have recently attracted huge interest because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties and potential technological applications. The properties of these layered materials can be tuned via both physical and chemical processes. Some 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials like MoS2, WS2 and SnS2 have been recently developed and employed in various applications, including new sensors because of their layer-dependent electrical properties. This article presents a comprehensive overview of recent developments in the application of 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials as sensors. Some of the salient features of 2D materials for different sensing applications are discussed, including gas sensing, electrochemical sensing, SERS and biosensing, SERS sensing and photodetection. The working principles of the sensors are also discussed together with examples.

  10. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-07

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  11. Exact Solution of Ising Model in 2d Shortcut Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, O.

    We give the exact solution to the Ising model in the shortcut network in the 2D limit. The solution is found by mapping the model to the square lattice model with Brascamp and Kunz boundary conditions.

  12. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  13. Reconstruction-based 3D/2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Tomazevic, Dejan; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel 3D/2D registration method, where first, a 3D image is reconstructed from a few 2D X-ray images and next, the preoperative 3D image is brought into the best possible spatial correspondence with the reconstructed image by optimizing a similarity measure. Because the quality of the reconstructed image is generally low, we introduce a novel asymmetric mutual information similarity measure, which is able to cope with low image quality as well as with different imaging modalities. The novel 3D/2D registration method has been evaluated using standardized evaluation methodology and publicly available 3D CT, 3DRX, and MR and 2D X-ray images of two spine phantoms, for which gold standard registrations were known. In terms of robustness, reliability and capture range the proposed method outperformed the gradient-based method and the method based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs).

  14. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-09

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  15. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevector aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of inertial ranged magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between perpendicular and parallel reduced power spectra which is expected for the 2D component but not for the slab component. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant (approximately 85 percent by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  16. Studying Zeolite Catalysts with a 2D Model System

    SciTech Connect

    Boscoboinik, Anibal

    2016-12-07

    Anibal Boscoboinik, a materials scientist at Brookhaven’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials, discusses the surface-science tools and 2D model system he uses to study catalysis in nanoporous zeolites, which catalyze reactions in many industrial processes.

  17. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  18. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  19. Anisotropic 2D Materials for Tunable Hyperbolic Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Nemilentsau, Andrei; Low, Tony; Hanson, George

    2016-02-12

    Motivated by the recent emergence of a new class of anisotropic 2D materials, we examine their electromagnetic modes and demonstrate that a broad class of the materials can host highly directional hyperbolic plasmons. Their propagation direction can be manipulated on the spot by gate doping, enabling hyperbolic beam reflection, refraction, and bending. The realization of these natural 2D hyperbolic media opens up a new avenue in dynamic control of hyperbolic plasmons not possible in the 3D version.

  20. RNA folding pathways and kinetics using 2D energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Senter, Evan; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    RNA folding pathways play an important role in various biological processes, such as (i) the hok/sok (host-killing/suppression of killing) system in E. coli to check for sufficient plasmid copy number, (ii) the conformational switch in spliced leader (SL) RNA from Leptomonas collosoma, which controls trans splicing of a portion of the '5 exon, and (iii) riboswitches--portions of the 5' untranslated region of messenger RNA that regulate genes by allostery. Since RNA folding pathways are determined by the energy landscape, we describe a novel algorithm, FFTbor2D, which computes the 2D projection of the energy landscape for a given RNA sequence. Given two metastable secondary structures A, B for a given RNA sequence, FFTbor2D computes the Boltzmann probability p(x, y) = Z(x,y)/Z that a secondary structure has base pair distance x from A and distance y from B. Using polynomial interpolationwith the fast Fourier transform,we compute p(x, y) in O(n(5)) time and O(n(2)) space, which is an improvement over an earlier method, which runs in O(n(7)) time and O(n(4)) space. FFTbor2D has potential applications in synthetic biology, where one might wish to design bistable switches having target metastable structures A, B with favorable pathway kinetics. By inverting the transition probability matrix determined from FFTbor2D output, we show that L. collosoma spliced leader RNA has larger mean first passage time from A to B on the 2D energy landscape, than 97.145% of 20,000 sequences, each having metastable structures A, B. Source code and binaries are freely available for download at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/FFTbor2D. The program FFTbor2D is implemented in C++, with optional OpenMP parallelization primitives.

  1. Supported and Free-Standing 2D Semimetals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    of this effort on focusing on rare- earth arsenides (RE-A), although not a van der Waals 2D solid, nonetheless, exhibits substantial 2D quantum size...this effort on focusing on rare- earth arsenides (RE- A), although not a van der Waals 20 solid, nonetheless, exhibits substantial 20 quantum size...Brongersma and S.R. Bank, "Rare- earth monopnictide alloys for tunable, epitaxial metals" in preparation. iii. S. Rahimi, E. M. Krivoy, J. Lee, M. E

  2. Application of 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Tan, Mingshu; Ding, Kequan

    2005-10-01

    Recently, we proposed a 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence [Bo Liao, A 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence, Chem. Phys. Lett. 401 (2005) 196-199]. Based on this representation, we consider properties of mutations and compute the similarities among 11 mitochondrial sequences belonging to different species. The elements of the similarity matrix are used to construct phylogenic tree. Unlike most existing phylogeny construction methods, the proposed method does not require multiple alignment.

  3. phase_space_cosmo_fisher: Fisher matrix 2D contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alejo

    2016-11-01

    phase_space_cosmo_fisher produces Fisher matrix 2D contours from which the constraints on cosmological parameters can be derived. Given a specified redshift array and cosmological case, 2D marginalized contours of cosmological parameters are generated; the code can also plot the derivatives used in the Fisher matrix. In addition, this package can generate 3D plots of qH^2 and other cosmological quantities as a function of redshift and cosmology.

  4. A simultaneous 2D/3D autostereo workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Dennis; McGinnis, Bradley; Talandis, Jonas; Leigh, Jason; Peterka, Tom; Knoll, Aaron; Sumer, Aslihan; Papka, Michael; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel immersive workstation environment that scientists can use for 3D data exploration and as their everyday 2D computer monitor. Our implementation is based on an autostereoscopic dynamic parallax barrier 2D/3D display, interactive input devices, and a software infrastructure that allows client/server software modules to couple the workstation to scientists' visualization applications. This paper describes the hardware construction and calibration, software components, and a demonstration of our system in nanoscale materials science exploration.

  5. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  6. Pulsed discharge ionization source for miniature ion mobility spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Ramsey, J. Michael; Whitten, William B.

    2004-11-23

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for flowing a sample gas and a reactant gas (38, 43) past a corona discharge electrode (26) situated at a first location in an ion drift chamber (24), applying a pulsed voltage waveform comprising a varying pulse component and a dc bias component to the corona discharge electrode (26) to cause a corona which in turn produces ions from the sample gas and the reactant gas, applying a dc bias to the ion drift chamber (24) to cause the ions to drift to a second location (25) in the ion drift chamber (24), detecting the ions at the second location (25) in the drift chamber (24), and timing the period for the ions to drift from the corona discharge electrode to the selected location in the drift chamber.

  7. 63. Interior view, kitchen chamber, north elevation. The kitchen chamber ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Interior view, kitchen chamber, north elevation. The kitchen chamber was completed in the first stages of phase III construction. The paneled wall to the fireplace's right displays a phase III molding profile. The mark between the cabinet doors and on the large lower panel indicates the former position of a partition wall. The chimney-breast paneling bears a phase I profile and might have been moved to the room when the fireplace mass in the hall was reduced. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  9. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  10. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  11. Plant growth chamber M design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Crop production is just one of the many processes involved in establishing long term survival of man in space. The benefits of integrating higher plants into the overall plan was recognized early by NASA through the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. The first step is to design, construct, and operate a sealed (gas, liquid, and solid) plant growth chamber. A 3.6 m diameter by 6.7 m high closed cylinder (previously used as a hypobaric vessel during the Mercury program) is being modified for this purpose. The chamber is mounted on legs with the central axis vertical. Entrance to the chamber is through an airlock. This chamber will be devoted entirely to higher plant experimentation. Any waste treatment, food processing or product storage studies will be carried on outside of this chamber. Its primary purpose is to provide input and output data on solids, liquids, and gases for single crop species and multiple species production using different nutrient delivery systems.

  12. Regulation of NKG2D ligand gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Robert A; Traherne, James A; Ashiru, Omodele; Wills, Mark R; Trowsdale, John

    2006-03-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D has seven known host ligands encoded by the MHC class I chain-related MIC and ULBP/RAET genes. Why there is such diversity of NKG2D ligands is not known but one hypothesis is that they are differentially expressed in different tissues in response to different stresses. To explore this, we compared expression patterns and promoters of NKG2D ligand genes. ULBP/RAET genes were transcribed independent of each other in a panel of cell lines. ULBP/RAET gene expression was upregulated on infection with human cytomegalovirus; however, a clinical strain, Toledo, induced expression more slowly than did a laboratory strain, AD169. ULBP4/RAET1E was not induced by infection with either strain. To investigate the mechanisms behind the similarities and differences in NKG2D ligand gene expression a comparative sequence analysis of NKG2D ligand gene putative promoter regions was conducted. Sequence alignments demonstrated that there was significant sequence diversity; however, one region of high similarity between most of the genes is evident. This region contains a number of potential transcription factor binding sites, including those involved in shock responses and sites for retinoic acid-induced factors. Promoters of some NKG2D ligand genes are polymorphic and several sequence alterations in these alleles abolished putative transcription factor binding.

  13. CYP2D6 variability in populations from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Nancy; Flores-Angulo, Carlos; Villegas, Cecilia; Mora, Yuselin

    2016-12-01

    CYP2D6 is an important cytochrome P450 enzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of about 25% of currently prescribed drugs. The presence of polymorphisms in the CYP2D6 gene may modulate enzyme level and activity, thereby affecting individual responses to pharmacological treatments. The most prevalent diseases in the admixed population from Venezuela are cardiovascular and cancer, whereas viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases, particularly malaria, are prevalent in Amerindian populations; in the treatment of these diseases, several drugs that are metabolized by CYP2D6 are used. In this work, we reviewed the data on CYP2D6 variability and predicted metabolizer phenotypes, in healthy volunteers of two admixed and five Amerindian populations from Venezuela. The Venezuelan population is very heterogeneous as a result of the genetic admixture of three major ethnical components: Europeans, Africans and Amerindians. There are noticeable inter-regional and inter-population differences in the process of mixing of this population. Hitherto, there are few published studies in Venezuela on CYP2D6; therefore, it is necessary to increase research in this regard, in particular to develop studies with a larger sample size. There is a considerable amount of work remaining before CYP2D6 is integrated into clinical practice in Venezuela.

  14. 2D microscopic model of graphene fracture properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2015-05-01

    An analytical two-dimensional (2D) microscopic fracture model based on Morse-type interaction is derived containing no adjustable parameter. From the 2D Young’s moduli and 2D intrinsic strengths of graphene measured by nanoindentation based on biaxial tension and calculated by density functional theory for uniaxial tension the widely unknown breaking force, line or edge energy, surface energy, fracture toughness, and strain energy release rate were determined. The simulated line energy agrees well with ab initio calculations and the fracture toughness of perfect graphene sheets is in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and the fracture toughness evaluated for defective graphene using the Griffith relation. Similarly, the estimated critical strain energy release rate agrees well with result of various theoretical approaches based on the J-integral and surface energy. The 2D microscopic model, connecting 2D and three-dimensional mechanical properties in a consistent way, provides a versatile relationship to easily access all relevant fracture properties of pristine 2D solids.

  15. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  16. Graphene-assisted room-temperature synthesis of 2D nanostructured hybrid electrode materials: dramatic acceleration of the formation rate of 2D metal oxide nanoplates induced by reduced graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Sung, Da-Young; Gunjakar, Jayavant L; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Lee, Yu Ri; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2013-05-27

    A new prompt room temperature synthetic route to 2D nanostructured metal oxide-graphene-hybrid electrode materials can be developed by the application of colloidal reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets as an efficient reaction accelerator for the synthesis of δ-MnO2 2D nanoplates. Whereas the synthesis of the 2D nanostructured δ-MnO2 at room temperature requires treating divalent manganese compounds with persulfate ions for at least 24 h, the addition of RGO nanosheet causes a dramatic shortening of synthesis time to 1 h, underscoring its effectiveness for the promotion of the formation of 2D nanostructured metal oxide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of the accelerated synthesis of 2D nanostructured hybrid material induced by the RGO nanosheets. The observed acceleration of nanoplate formation upon the addition of RGO nanosheets is attributable to the enhancement of the oxidizing power of persulfate ions, the increase of the solubility of precursor MnCO3, and the promoted crystal growth of δ-MnO2 2D nanoplates. The resulting hybridization between RGO nanosheets and δ-MnO2 nanoplates is quite powerful not only in increasing the surface area of manganese oxide nanoplate but also in enhancing its electrochemical activity. Of prime importance is that the present δ-MnO2 -RGO nanocomposites show much superior electrode performance over most of 2D nanostructured manganate systems including a similar porous assembly of RGO and layered MnO2 nanosheets. This result underscores that the present RGO-assisted solution-based synthesis can provide a prompt and scalable method to produce nanostructured hybrid electrode materials.

  17. High current ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.; Galvin, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  18. 2D Hexagonal Boron Nitride (2D-hBN) Explored for the Electrochemical Sensing of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aamar F; Brownson, Dale A C; Randviir, Edward P; Smith, Graham C; Banks, Craig E

    2016-10-04

    Crystalline 2D hexagonal boron nitride (2D-hBN) nanosheets are explored as a potential electrocatalyst toward the electroanalytical sensing of dopamine (DA). The 2D-hBN nanosheets are electrically wired via a drop-casting modification process onto a range of commercially available carbon supporting electrodes, including glassy carbon (GC), boron-doped diamond (BDD), and screen-printed graphitic electrodes (SPEs). 2D-hBN has not previously been explored toward the electrochemical detection/electrochemical sensing of DA. We critically evaluate the potential electrocatalytic performance of 2D-hBN modified electrodes, the effect of supporting carbon electrode platforms, and the effect of "mass coverage" (which is commonly neglected in the 2D material literature) toward the detection of DA. The response of 2D-hBN modified electrodes is found to be largely dependent upon the interaction between 2D-hBN and the underlying supporting electrode material. For example, in the case of SPEs, modification with 2D-hBN (324 ng) improves the electrochemical response, decreasing the electrochemical oxidation potential of DA by ∼90 mV compared to an unmodified SPE. Conversely, modification of a GC electrode with 2D-hBN (324 ng) resulted in an increased oxidation potential of DA by ∼80 mV when compared to the unmodified electrode. We explore the underlying mechanisms of the aforementioned examples and infer that electrode surface interactions and roughness factors are critical considerations. 2D-hBN is utilized toward the sensing of DA in the presence of the common interferents ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). 2D-hBN is found to be an effective electrocatalyst in the simultaneous detection of DA and UA at both pH 5.0 and 7.4. The peak separations/resolution between DA and UA increases by ∼70 and 50 mV (at pH 5.0 and 7.4, respectively, when utilizing 108 ng of 2D-hBN) compared to unmodified SPEs, with a particularly favorable response evident in pH 5.0, giving rise to a

  19. Characterization and testing of a new environmental chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskinen, A.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Kuuspalo, K.; Sippula, O.; Jalava, P.; Hirvonen, M.-R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Virtanen, A.; Komppula, M.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.

    2015-06-01

    A 29 m3 Teflon chamber, designed for studies on the aging of combustion aerosols, at the University of Eastern Finland is described and characterized. The chamber is part of a research facility, called Ilmari, where small-scale combustion devices, a dynamometer for vehicle exhaust studies, dilution systems, the chamber, and cell and animal exposure devices are located side by side under the same roof. The small surface-to-volume ratio of the chamber enables reasonably long experiment times, with particle wall loss rate constants of 0.088, 0.080, 0.045, and 0.040 h-1 for polydisperse, 50, 100, and 200 nm monodisperse aerosols, respectively. The NO2 photolysis rate can be adjusted from 0 to 0.62 min-1. The irradiance spectrum is centered at either 350 or 365 nm, and the maximum irradiance, produced by up to 160 blacklight lamps, is 29.7 W m-2, which corresponds to the ultraviolet (UV) irradiance in Central Finland at noon on a sunny day in the midsummer. The temperature inside the chamber is uniform and can be kept at 25±1 °C. The chamber is kept in an overpressure with a moving top frame, which reduces sample dilution and entrance of contamination during an experiment. The functionality of the chamber was tested with oxidation experiments of toluene, resulting in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields of 12-42%, depending on the initial conditions, such as NOx concentration and UV irradiation. The highest gaseous oxidation product yields of 12.4-19.5% and 5.8-19.5% were detected with ions corresponding to methyl glyoxal (m/z 73.029) and 4-oxo-2-pentenal (m/z 99.044), respectively. Overall, reasonable yields of SOA and gaseous reaction products, comparable to those obtained in other laboratories, were obtained.

  20. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications, including the treatment of medical conditions. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system that will provide controlled pressurization of the system, and provide adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the