Science.gov

Sample records for 2d ir chemical

  1. Hydrogen bond migration between molecular sites observed with ultrafast 2D IR chemical exchange spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Daniel E; Kwak, Kyungwon; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Fayer, M D

    2010-02-25

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) chemical exchange spectroscopy. Phenylacetylene has two possible pi hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution at room temperature. The OD stretch frequency of deuterated phenol is sensitive to which acceptor site it is bound. The appearance of off-diagonal peaks between the two vibrational frequencies in the 2D IR spectrum reports on the exchange process between the two competitive hydrogen-bonding sites of phenol-phenylacetylene complexes in the neat phenylacetylene solvent. The chemical exchange process occurs in approximately 5 ps and is assigned to direct hydrogen bond migration along the phenylacetylene molecule. Other nonmigration mechanisms are ruled out by performing 2D IR experiments on phenol dissolved in the phenylacetylene/carbon tetrachloride mixed solvent. The observation of direct hydrogen bond migration can have implications for macromolecular systems.

  2. Solute-Solvent Complex Switching Dynamics of Chloroform between Acetone and Dimethylsulfoxide - 2D IR Chemical Exchange Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kyungwon; Rosenfeld, Daniel E.; Chung, Jean K.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds formed between C-H and various hydrogen bond acceptors play important roles in the structure of proteins and organic crystals, and the mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage reactions. Chloroform, a C-H hydrogen bond donor, can form weak hydrogen bonded complexes with acetone and with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). When chloroform is dissolved in a mixed solvent consisting of acetone and DMSO, both types of hydrogen bonded complexes exist. The two complexes, chloroform-acetone and chloroform-DMSO, are in equilibrium, and they rapidly interconvert by chloroform exchanging hydrogen bond acceptors. This fast hydrogen bond acceptor substitution reaction is probed using ultrafast two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo chemical exchange spectroscopy. Deuterated chloroform is used in the experiments, and the 2D IR spectrum of the C-D stretching mode is measured. The chemical exchange of the chloroform hydrogen bonding partners is tracked by observing the time-dependent growth of off-diagonal peaks in the 2D IR spectra. The measured substitution rate is 1/30 ps for an acetone molecule to replace a DMSO molecule in a chloroform-DMSO complex and 1/45ps for a DMSO molecule to replace an acetone molecule in a chloroform-acetone complex. Free chloroform exists in the mixed solvent, and it acts as a reactive intermediate in the substitution reaction, analogous to a SN1 type reaction. From the measured rates and the equilibrium concentrations of acetone and DMSO, the dissociation rates for the chloroform-DMSO and chloroform-acetone complexes are found to be 1/24 ps and 1/5.5 ps respectively. The difference between the measured rate for the complete substitution reaction and the rate for complex dissociation corresponds to the diffusion limited rate. The estimated diffusion limited rate agrees well with the result from a Smoluchowski treatment of diffusive reactions. PMID:18855462

  3. Chemical profiling and adulteration screening of Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Lei; Chen, Jian-bo; Zhang, Gui-Jun; Sun, Su-qin; Zheng, Jing

    2017-03-01

    As a kind of expensive perfume and valuable herb, Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum (ALR) is often adulterated for economic motivations. In this research, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is employed to establish a simple and quick method for the adulteration screening of ALR. First, the principal chemical constituents of ALR are characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy at room temperature and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy with thermal perturbation. Besides the common cellulose and lignin compounds, a certain amount of resin is the characteristic constituent of ALR. Synchronous and asynchronous 2D-IR spectra indicate that the resin (an unstable secondary metabolite) is more sensitive than cellulose and lignin (stable structural constituents) to the thermal perturbation. Using a certified ALR sample as the reference, the infrared spectral correlation threshold is determined by 30 authentic samples and 6 adulterated samples. The spectral correlation coefficient of an authentic ALR sample to the standard reference should be not less than 0.9886 (p = 0.01). Three commercial adulterated ALR samples are identified by the correlation threshold. Further interpretation of the infrared spectra of the adulterated samples indicates the common adulterating methods - counterfeiting with other kind of wood, adding ingredient such as sand to increase the weight, and adding the cheap resin such as rosin to increase the content of resin compounds. Results of this research prove that FT-IR spectroscopy can be used as a simple and accurate quality control method of ALR.

  4. Chemical profiling and adulteration screening of Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lei; Chen, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Gui-Jun; Sun, Su-Qin; Zheng, Jing

    2017-03-05

    As a kind of expensive perfume and valuable herb, Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum (ALR) is often adulterated for economic motivations. In this research, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is employed to establish a simple and quick method for the adulteration screening of ALR. First, the principal chemical constituents of ALR are characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy at room temperature and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy with thermal perturbation. Besides the common cellulose and lignin compounds, a certain amount of resin is the characteristic constituent of ALR. Synchronous and asynchronous 2D-IR spectra indicate that the resin (an unstable secondary metabolite) is more sensitive than cellulose and lignin (stable structural constituents) to the thermal perturbation. Using a certified ALR sample as the reference, the infrared spectral correlation threshold is determined by 30 authentic samples and 6 adulterated samples. The spectral correlation coefficient of an authentic ALR sample to the standard reference should be not less than 0.9886 (p=0.01). Three commercial adulterated ALR samples are identified by the correlation threshold. Further interpretation of the infrared spectra of the adulterated samples indicates the common adulterating methods - counterfeiting with other kind of wood, adding ingredient such as sand to increase the weight, and adding the cheap resin such as rosin to increase the content of resin compounds. Results of this research prove that FT-IR spectroscopy can be used as a simple and accurate quality control method of ALR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Isotope-Labeled Amyloids via Synthesis, Expression, and Chemical Ligation for Use in FTIR, 2D IR, and NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi O; Grechko, Maksim; Moran, Sean D; Zanni, Martin T

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides protocols for isotope-labeling the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) involved in type II diabetes and γD-crystallin involved in cataract formation. Because isotope labeling improves the structural resolution, these protocols are useful for experiments using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), and NMR spectroscopies. Our research group specializes in using 2D IR spectroscopy and isotope labeling. 2D IR spectroscopy provides structural information by measuring solvation from 2D diagonal lineshapes and vibrational couplings from cross peaks. Infrared spectroscopy can be used to study kinetics, membrane proteins, and aggregated proteins. Isotope labeling provides greater certainty in the spectral assignment, which enables new structural insights that are difficult to obtain with other methods. For amylin, we provide a protocol for (13)C/(18)O labeling backbone carbonyls at one or more desired amino acids in order to obtain residue-specific structural resolution. We also provide a protocol for expressing and purifying amylin from E. coli, which enables uniform (13)C or (13)C/(15)N labeling. Uniform labeling is useful for measuring the monomer infrared spectrum in an amyloid oligomer or fiber as well as amyloid protein bound to another polypeptide or protein, such as a chaperone or an inhibitor. In addition, our expression protocol results in 2-2.5 mg of amylin peptide per 1 L cell culture, which is a high enough yield to straightforwardly obtain the 2-10 mg needed for high resolution and solid-state NMR experiments. Finally, we provide a protocol to isotope-label either of the two domains of γD-crystallin using expressed protein ligation. Domain labeling makes it possible to resolve the structures of the two halves of the protein in FTIR and 2D IR spectra. With modifications, these strategies and protocols for isotope labeling can be applied to other amyloid polypeptides and proteins.

  6. Relaxation-Assisted 2D IR Using Weak Vibrational Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, Dmitry V.; Naraharisetty, Sri Ram G.; Rubtsov, Igor V.

    Implementation of weak IR modes as structural reporters via dual-frequency 2D IR spectroscopy is demonstrated. Prominent cross peaks originated from interactions of C≡N with C=O and C≡N with C=C modes were measured in 3-cyanocoumarin using heterodyned three-pulse photon-echo technique. In 4-acetylbenzonitrile, where the distance between CN and CO groups is over two times larger than in 3-cyanocoumarin, the direct coupling was just below the level of detectivity. A new method of measuring 2D spectra is proposed that utilizes vibrational relaxation phenomena. Using the new method the cross peaks at (ωCN, ωCO) has easily been detected; over six times increase of the cross-peak amplitude has been observed when the waiting time between the second and third pulses, T, was varied. Calculations show that using this approach vibrational modes separated by over 7-10 Å can be used as structural probes enhancing substantially detectable distances via 2D IR, especially when weak IR modes are used. We have also demonstrated implementation of C-D stretching modes as structural reporters. Although C-D modes have very small transition dipoles, interaction with C≡N mode has been cleanly detected in acetonitrile-D3. As C-H groups are widespread in organic molecules, the deuterium can be placed in the vicinity of virtually any group. Implementation of new labels, reinforced by vibrational-relaxation-assisted 2D IR method, provides universal labeling strategies for structure determination via 2D IR.

  7. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  8. 2-d chemical sampling of a tropopause fold over the Mediterranean: Observations by the IR limb-imager GLORIA and calculations by chemistry-transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sören; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Höpfner, Michael; Ungermann, Jörn; Vogel, Bärbel; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Müller, Rolf; Diekmann, Christopher; Schröter, Jennifer; Ruhnke, Roland; Orphal, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    We will present results from measurements obtained by the GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere) instrument that has been operated on the Geophysica research aircraft during a field campaign within the European StratoClim project in the Mediterranean area with basis in Kalamata, Greece, in September 2016. The flight at an altitude of 18 km (400 K) reached the eastern Mediterranean south of Cyprus, where air influence by the Asian Monsoon was sampled. We will show retrievals of two-dimensional trace-gas distributions derived from GLORIA observations performed with high spectral resolution. Targeted gases are, amongst others, O3 and HNO3 as stratospheric tracers and PAN and C2H6 as pollution indicators. We will present an analysis of retrieval performance including diagnostics of spatial resolution and an estimated error budget. For a first scientific analysis, comparisons to atmospheric model simulations from two atmospheric chemistry-transport models, ICON-ART (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic model - Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) and CLaMS (Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere) will be discussed. Focus will be on comparisons of the distribution of the trace gases measured by GLORIA to the model tracers indicating the chemical composition as well as well as the air mass origin. Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603557

  9. Determination of chemical changes in Isatis indigotica seeds carried after Chinese first spaceship with FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangdong; Keong, Choong Yew; Mei, Xiling; Lan, Jin

    2014-04-24

    Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition. Space mutagenesis breeding has achieved and marked certain results over the years. This method was employed in our previous studies in order to obtain improved germplasm of Isatis indigotica. This study is to determine the chemical changes in I. indigotica seeds carried after Chinese first spaceship (Shenzhou I). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), second derivative and two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) correlation spectroscopy were used in analysis. Not much differences between the two spectra were found except the peaks in the range of 1500-1200 cm(-)(1) which was about 7 cm(-)(1) different and indicated the absorption could be initialed from different bonds. SP4 showed different derivative compared with C4 in the second derivative spectra of 1200-800 cm(-)(1). The stronger signal of 2DIR in SP4 indicated the protein content of the seed was changed after spaceflight. It is concluded that spaceflight provided an extreme condition that caused changes of chemical properties in I. indigotica.

  10. [Study on the processing of leech by FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Ning; Wu, Yan-Wen; Ouyang, Jie; Sun, Su-Qin; Chen, Shun-Cong

    2011-04-01

    The chemical differences of traditional Chinese medicine leech before and after processing were analyzed by FTIR and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The result showed that the leech was high in protein, with characteristic peaks of amide I, II bands. Comparing the IR spectra of samples, the primary difference was that the characteristic peak of fresh leech was at 1 543 cm(-1), while that of crude and processed leech was at 1 535 cm(-1). A 2D-IR spectrum with heating perturbation was used to track the processing dynamics of leech In the 2D-IR correlation spectra, fresh leech exhibited stronger automatic peaks of the amide I and II bands than that of processed leech, which indicates that the protein components of the fresh leech were more sensitive to heat perturbation than the processed one. Moreover, the result of FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectra validated that the 3-dimensional structure of protein was damaged and hydrogen bonds were broken after processing, which resulted in the inactivation of protein. The fatty acids and cholesterol components of leech were also oxidized in this process.

  11. Discrimination of five species of Fritillaria and its extracts by FT-IR and 2D-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Jin, Zhexiong; Zhou, Qun; Chen, Jianbo; Lei, Yu; Sun, Suqin

    2010-06-01

    Bulbus Fritillariae (in Chinese named Beimu), referred to the bulbs of several Fritillaria species ( Liliaceae), is a commonly used anti-tussive and expectorant herb in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 2000 years. The objective of this study is to discriminate five species of Beimu herbs and their total alkaloid extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared spectroscopy, and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) under thermal perturbation. The structural information of the samples indicated that, Beimu and their extract residues contain a large amount of starch, since some characteristic absorption peaks of the starch, such as 1158, 1080, 1015 and 987 cm -1 can be observed. Further more, the characteristic absorption peaks of the sulfate which arouse at 1120 ± 5 and 618 cm -1 in the IR spectra of Beimu aqueous extracts can be find. This validated that people used the sulfur fumigation method in the processing. The macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectra can not only provide the information of main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their different extracts, but also compare the components differences among the similar samples. In conclusion, the multi-steps IR macro-fingerprint method is rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research.

  12. Rapid discrimination of extracts of Chinese propolis and poplar buds by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-Wen; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhao, Jing; Li, Yi; Zhou, Qun

    2008-07-01

    The extract of Chinese propolis (ECP) has recently been adulterated with that of poplar buds (EPB), because most of ECP is derived from the poplar plant, and ECP and EPB have almost identical chemical compositions. It is very difficult to differentiate them by using the chromatographic methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). Therefore, how to effectively discriminate these two mixtures is a problem to be solved urgently. In this paper, a rapid method for discriminating ECP and EPB was established by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra combined with the two-dimensional infrared correlation (2D IR) analysis. Forty-three ECP and five EPB samples collected from different areas of China were analyzed by the FT-IR spectroscopy. All the ECP and EPB samples tested show similar IR spectral profiles. The significant differences between ECP and EPB appear in the region of 3000-2800 cm -1 of the spectra. Based on such differences, the two species were successfully classified with the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) pattern recognition technique. Furthermore, these differences were well validated by a series of temperature-dependent dynamic FT-IR spectra and the corresponding 2D IR plots. The results indicate that the differences in these two natural products are caused by the amounts of long-chain alkyl compounds (including long-chain alkanes, long-chain alkyl esters and long chain alkyl alcohols) in them, rather than the flavonoid compounds, generally recognized as the bioactive substances of propolis. There are much more long-chain alkyl compounds in ECP than those in EPB, and the carbon atoms of the compounds in ECP remain in an order Z-shaped array, but those in EPB are disorder. It suggests that FT-IR and 2D IR spectroscopy can provide a valuable method for the rapid differentiation of similar natural products, ECP and EPB. The IR spectra could directly reflect the integrated chemical

  13. Site-specific difference 2D-IR spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Hamm, Peter

    2009-05-07

    We demonstrate the extension of the principle of difference Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to difference 2D-IR spectroscopy. To this end, we measure difference 2D-IR spectra of the protein bacteriorhodopsin in its early J- and K-intermediates. By comparing with the static 2D-IR spectrum of the protonated Schiff base of all-trans retinal, we demonstrate that the 2D-IR spectrum of the all-trans retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin can be measured with the background from the remainder of the protein completely suppressed. We discuss several models to interpret the detailed line shape of the difference 2D-IR spectrum.

  14. 2D IR cross peaks reveal hydrogen-deuterium exchange with single residue specificity.

    PubMed

    Dunkelberger, Emily B; Woys, Ann Marie; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-12-12

    A form of chemical exchange, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), has long been used as a method for studying the secondary and tertiary structure of peptides and proteins using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we resolve cross peaks between the amide II band and a (13)C(18)O isotope-labeled amide I band, which we show measures HDX with site-specific resolution. By rapidly scanning 2D IR spectra using mid-IR pulse shaping, we monitor the kinetics of HDX exchange on-the-fly. For the antimicrobial peptide ovispirin bound to membrane bilayers, we find that the amide II peak decays with a biexponential with rate constants of 0.54 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 min(-1), which is a measure of the overall HDX in the peptide. The cross peaks between Ile-10-labeled ovispirin and the amide II mode, which specifically monitor HDX kinetics at Ile-10, decay with a single rate constant of 0.36 ± 0.1 min(-1). Comparing this exchange rate to theoretically determined exchange rates of Ile-10 for ovispirin in a solution random coil configuration, the exchange rate at Ile-10 is at least 100 times slower, consistent with the known α-helix structure of ovispirin in bilayers. Because backbone isotope labels produce only a very small shift of the amide II band, site-specific HDX cannot be measured with FTIR spectroscopy, which is why 2D IR spectroscopy is needed for these measurements.

  15. 2D IR Cross Peaks Reveal Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange with Single Residue Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Woys, Ann Marie; Zanni, Martin T.

    2013-01-01

    A form of chemical exchange, hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX), has long been used as a method for studying the secondary and tertiary structure of peptides and proteins using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using 2D IR (two dimensional infrared) spectroscopy, we resolve cross peaks between the amide II band and a 13C18O isotope labeled amide I band, which we show measures HDX with site-specific resolution. By rapidly scanning 2D IR spectra using mid-IR pulse shaping, we monitor the kinetics of HDX exchange on-the-fly. For the antimicrobial peptide, ovispirin, bound to membrane bilayers, we find that the amide II peak decays with a biexponential with rate constants of 0.54 ± 0.02 and 0.12 ± 0.01 min−1, which is a measure of the overall HDX in the peptide. The cross peaks between Ile-10 labeled ovispirin and the amide II mode, which specifically monitor HDX kinetics at Ile-10, decay with a single rate constant of 0.36 ± 0.1 min−1. Comparing this exchange rate to theoretically determined exchange rates of Ile-10 for ovispirin in a solution random coil configuration, the exchange rate at Ile-10 is at least 100 times slower, consistent with the known α-helix structure of ovispirin in bilayers. Because backbone isotope labels produce only a very small shift of the amide II band, site-specific HDX cannot be measured with FTIR spectroscopy, which is why 2D IR spectroscopy is needed for these measurements. PMID:23659731

  16. Cosolvent Effects on Solute-Solvent Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics: Ultrafast 2D IR Investigations.

    PubMed

    Kashid, Somnath M; Jin, Geun Young; Bagchi, Sayan; Kim, Yung Sam

    2015-12-10

    Cosolvents strongly influence the solute-solvent interactions of biomolecules in aqueous environments and have profound effects on the stability and activity of several proteins and enzymes. Experimental studies have previously reported on the hydrogen-bond dynamics of water molecules in the presence of a cosolvent, but understanding the effects from a solute's perspective could provide greater insight into protein stability. Because carbonyl groups are abundant in biomolecules, the current study used 2D IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the hydrogen-bond dynamics of the solute's carbonyl group in aqueous solution, with and without the presence of DMSO as a cosolvent. 2D IR spectroscopy was used to quantitatively estimate the time scales of the hydrogen-bond dynamics of the carbonyl group in neat water and 1:1 DMSO/water solution. The 2D IR results show spectral signatures of a chemical exchange process: The presence of the cosolvent was found to lower the hydrogen-bond exchange rate by a factor of 5. The measured exchange rates were 7.50 × 10(11) and 1.48 × 10(11) s(-1) in neat water and 1:1 DMSO/water, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations predict a significantly shorter carbonyl hydrogen-bond lifetime in neat water than in 1:1 DMSO/water and provide molecular insights into the exchange mechanism. The binding of the cosolvent to the solute was found to be accompanied by the release of hydrogen-bonded water molecules to the bulk. The widely different hydrogen-bond lifetimes and exchange rates with and without DMSO indicate a significant change in the ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics in the presence of a cosolvent, which, in turn, might play an important role in the stability and activity of biomolecules.

  17. Determining Transition State Geometries in Liquids Using 2D-IR

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Charles; Cahoon, James F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

    2007-12-11

    Many properties of chemical reactions are determined by the transition state connecting reactant and product, yet it is difficult to directly obtain any information about these short-lived structures in liquids. We show that two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy can provide direct information about transition states by tracking the transformation of vibrational modes as a molecule crossed a transition state. We successfully monitored a simple chemical reaction, the fluxional rearrangement of Fe(CO)5, in which the exchange of axial and equatorial CO ligands causes an exchange of vibrational energy between the normal modes of the molecule. This energy transfer provides direct evidence regarding the time scale, transition state, and mechanism of the reaction.

  18. Advances in 2D IR Spectroscopy and Applications to Sensitized Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudenhoven, Tracey A.

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy has been used to study molecular interactions and dynamics within complex systems for years. However, limitations in experimental design and sample concentration have limited its scientific breadth. In this thesis work, new technical advancements have been added to a 2D IR optical table to both increase the throughput of mid-IR to the sample cell as well as simplify the alignment when changing laser pulse wavelengths. By incorporating more reflective optics into a standard 2D IR pulse shaper, initial alignment and realignment due to a change in wavelengths are greatly simplified. Additionally, studies on dye-sensitized thin films have revealed the presence of dye aggregate domains at the interface. Vibrational coupling and energy transfer between aggregate domains could influence both the electron transfer mechanism and kinetics between the dye and semiconductor interface. With these new technological advances and thin film characterizations, preliminary work studying a monolayer of dyes on a glass window are presented. Using 2D IR to study monolayers gives interface specificity without the need of more complicated experimental designs like 2D sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. These technological advances will surely prove to expand the range of systems and problems that 2D IR spectroscopy can characterize and solve.

  19. Water induced relaxation of a degenerate vibration of guanidinium using 2D IR echo spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyev, Dmitriy Yu.; Kuo, Chun-Hung; Kuroda, Daniel G.; Scott, J. Nathan; Vanderkooi, Jane M.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2010-01-01

    The nearly degenerate asymmetric stretch vibrations near 1600 cm−1 of the guanidinium cation in D-glycerol/D2O mixtures having different viscosity were studied by 2D IR photon echo spectroscopy. The polarization dependent photon echo signal shows two separate frequency distributions in the 2D spectrum in D2O, even though only one band is evident from inspection of the linear FTIR spectrum. The split components are more clearly seen at higher viscosity. The interactions with solvent induce energy transfer between the degenerate component modes on the time scale of 0.5 ps. The energy transfer between modes is directly observed in 2D IR and distinguished by the waiting time dependence of the cross peaks from the transfers between threefold symmetric configurations of the distorted ion and solvent. The 2D IR analysis carried out for various polarization conditions required specification of frequency-frequency auto- and cross- correlation functions for the degenerate components. PMID:20143800

  20. 2D IR spectroscopy at 100 kHz utilizing a Mid-IR OPCPA laser source.

    PubMed

    Luther, Bradley M; Tracy, Kathryn M; Gerrity, Michael; Brown, Susannah; Krummel, Amber T

    2016-02-22

    We present a 100 kHz 2D IR spectrometer. The system utilizes a ytterbium all normal dispersion fiber oscillator as a common source for the pump and seed beams of a MgO:PPLN OPCPA. The 1030 nm OPCPA pump is generated by amplification of the oscillator in cryocooled Yb:YAG amplifiers, while the 1.68 μm seed is generated in a OPO pumped by the oscillator. The OPCPA outputs are used in a ZGP DFG stage to generate 4.65 μm pulses. A mid-IR pulse shaper delivers pulse pairs to a 2D IR spectrometer allowing for data collection at 100 kHz.

  1. Structural dynamics inside a functionalized metal–organic framework probed by ultrafast 2D IR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Nishida, Jun; Tamimi, Amr; Fei, Honghan; ...

    2014-12-15

    One key property of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are their structural elasticity. IHere we show that 2D IR spectroscopy with pulse-shaping techniques can probe the ultrafast structural fluctuations of MOFs. 2D IR data, obtained from a vibrational probe attached to the linkers of UiO-66 MOF in low concentration, revealed that the structural fluctuations have time constants of 7 and 670 ps with no solvent. Filling the MOF pores with dimethylformamide (DMF) slows the structural fluctuations by reducing the ability of the MOF to undergo deformations, and the dynamics of the DMF molecules are also greatly restricted. Finally, methodology advances were requiredmore » to remove the severe light scattering caused by the macroscopic-sized MOF particles, eliminate interfering oscillatory components from the 2D IR data, and address Förster vibrational excitation transfer.« less

  2. Interrogating Fiber Formation Kinetics with Automated 2D-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasfeld, David B.; Ling, Yun L.; Shim, Sang-Hee; Zanni, Martin T.

    A new method for collecting 2D-IR spectra that utilizes both a pump-probe beam geometry and a mid-IR pulse shaper is used to gain a fuller understanding of fiber formation in the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP). We extract structural kinetics in order to better understand aggregation in hIAPP, the protein component of the amyloid fibers found to inhibit insulin production in type II diabetes patients.

  3. Study on antibacterial alginate-stabilized copper nanoparticles by FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Visurraga, Judith; Daza, Carla; Pozo, Claudio; Becerra, Abraham; von Plessing, Carlos; García, Apolinaria

    2012-01-01

    count, and well-diffusion methods. On the basis of the semiquantitative analysis, there was a direct correlation between the reducing agent ratio and the percentage of zerovalent Cu. This was confirmed with the statistical analysis of population of Cu NPs from TEM micrographs. At lower reducing agent ratios, two phases coexist (Cu₂O and zerovalent Cu) due to incomplete reduction of copper ions by the reducing agent; however, at higher reducing agent ratios, the Cu NPs consist mainly of zerovalent Cu. Crystallite size and relative particle size of stabilized Cu NPs showed considerable differences in results and tendencies in respect to TEM analysis. However, the relative particle size values obtained from FT of XRD data agreed well with the histograms from the TEM observations. From FT results, the relative particle size and reducing agent ratio of stabilized Cu NPs showed an inverse correlation. The incomplete reduction of copper ions at lower reducing agent ratios was also confirmed by DSC studies. FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectra analysis suggested the first event involved in the stabilization of Cu NPs is their electrostatic interaction with -C=O of carboxylate groups of NaAlg, followed by the interaction with the available O-C-O⁻, and finally with the -OH groups. Bacterial susceptibility to stabilized nanoparticles was found to vary depending on the bacterial strains. The lowest MIC and MBC of stabilized Cu NPs ranged between 2 mg/L and 8 mg/L for all studied strains. Disk-diffusion studies with both E. coli strains revealed greater effectiveness of the stabilized Cu NPs compared to the positive controls (cloxacillin, amoxicillin, and nitrofurantoin). S. aureus showed the highest sensitivity to stabilized Cu NPs compared to the other studied strains. Cu NPs were successfully synthesized via chemical reduction assisted with microwave heating. Average particle size, polydispersity, and phase composition of Cu NPs depended mainly on the reducing agent ratio

  4. Study on antibacterial alginate-stabilized copper nanoparticles by FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Visurraga, Judith; Daza, Carla; Pozo, Claudio; Becerra, Abraham; von Plessing, Carlos; García, Apolinaria

    2012-01-01

    , agar dilution plate count, and well-diffusion methods. Results On the basis of the semiquantitative analysis, there was a direct correlation between the reducing agent ratio and the percentage of zerovalent Cu. This was confirmed with the statistical analysis of population of Cu NPs from TEM micrographs. At lower reducing agent ratios, two phases coexist (Cu2O and zerovalent Cu) due to incomplete reduction of copper ions by the reducing agent; however, at higher reducing agent ratios, the Cu NPs consist mainly of zerovalent Cu. Crystallite size and relative particle size of stabilized Cu NPs showed considerable differences in results and tendencies in respect to TEM analysis. However, the relative particle size values obtained from FT of XRD data agreed well with the histograms from the TEM observations. From FT results, the relative particle size and reducing agent ratio of stabilized Cu NPs showed an inverse correlation. The incomplete reduction of copper ions at lower reducing agent ratios was also confirmed by DSC studies. FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectra analysis suggested the first event involved in the stabilization of Cu NPs is their electrostatic interaction with –C=O of carboxylate groups of NaAlg, followed by the interaction with the available O–C–O−, and finally with the –OH groups. Bacterial susceptibility to stabilized nanoparticles was found to vary depending on the bacterial strains. The lowest MIC and MBC of stabilized Cu NPs ranged between 2 mg/L and 8 mg/L for all studied strains. Disk-diffusion studies with both E. coli strains revealed greater effectiveness of the stabilized Cu NPs compared to the positive controls (cloxacillin, amoxicillin, and nitrofurantoin). S. aureus showed the highest sensitivity to stabilized Cu NPs compared to the other studied strains. Conclusion Cu NPs were successfully synthesized via chemical reduction assisted with microwave heating. Average particle size, polydispersity, and phase composition of Cu NPs

  5. Characterization of Extended Time Scale 2d IR Probes of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Sashary; Le Sueur, Amanda L.; Scott, Keith J.; Thielges, Megan

    2017-06-01

    The role of dynamics in the function of proteins is well appreciated, but not precisely understood due to the difficulty in their measurement. Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy is a powerful approach for the study of protein dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. This approach has led to the development of spectrally resolved IR probes that can be applied towards the measurement of dynamics at specific sites in a protein. However, the experimental time scale is limited by the vibrational lifetime of the probe, as such their remains a need for extended time scale probes. Towards the development of better 2D IR probes for the study of protein dynamics the spectroscopic characterization of p-cyano-seleno-phenylalanine (CNSePhe), isotopically labeled p-(^{13}C^{15}N-cyano)phenylalanine (^{13}C^{15}NPhe) and the site-specific incorporation of ^{13}C^{15}NPhe in the protein plastocyanin is discussed. The incorporation of the heavy Se atom and the isotopic labeling are shown to increase the vibrational lifetime of the probe which results in collection of 2D IR spectra for analysis of dynamics on longer timescales.

  6. Water of Hydration Dynamics in Minerals Gypsum and Bassanite: Ultrafast 2D IR Spectroscopy of Rocks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chang; Nishida, Jun; Yuan, Rongfeng; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-08-03

    Water of hydration plays an important role in minerals, determining their crystal structures and physical properties. Here ultrafast nonlinear infrared (IR) techniques, two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) spectroscopies, were used to measure the dynamics and disorder of water of hydration in two minerals, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O). 2D IR spectra revealed that water arrangement in freshly precipitated gypsum contained a small amount of inhomogeneity. Following annealing at 348 K, water molecules became highly ordered; the 2D IR spectrum became homogeneously broadened (motional narrowed). PSPP measurements observed only inertial orientational relaxation. In contrast, water in bassanite's tubular channels is dynamically disordered. 2D IR spectra showed a significant amount of inhomogeneous broadening caused by a range of water configurations. At 298 K, water dynamics cause spectral diffusion that sampled a portion of the inhomogeneous line width on the time scale of ∼30 ps, while the rest of inhomogeneity is static on the time scale of the measurements. At higher temperature, the dynamics become faster. Spectral diffusion accelerates, and a portion of the lower temperature spectral diffusion became motionally narrowed. At sufficiently high temperature, all of the dynamics that produced spectral diffusion at lower temperatures became motionally narrowed, and only homogeneous broadening and static inhomogeneity were observed. Water angular motions in bassanite exhibit temperature-dependent diffusive orientational relaxation in a restricted cone of angles. The experiments were made possible by eliminating the vast amount of scattered light produced by the granulated powder samples using phase cycling methods.

  7. Time-dependent fifth-order bands in nominally third-order 2D IR vibrational echo spectra.

    PubMed

    Thielges, Megan C; Fayer, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    Progress in the field of 2D IR vibrational spectroscopy has been bolstered by the production of intense mid-IR laser pulses. As higher-energy pulses are employed, a concomitant increase occurs in the likelihood of fifth-order contributions to the 2D IR spectra. We report the appearance of fifth-order signals in 2D IR spectra of CO bound to the active site of the enzyme cytochrome P450(cam) with the substrate norcamphor. Two bands with novel time dependences, one on the diagonal and one off-diagonal, are not accounted for by normal third-order interactions. These bands are associated with a ν = 1-2 vibrational transition frequency. Both bands decay to 0 and then grow back in with opposite sign. The diagonal band is positive at short time, decays to 0, reappears with negative sign, before eventually decaying to 0. The off-diagonal band is negative at short time, decays to 0, reappears positive, and then decays to 0. The appearance and time dependence of these bands are characterized. Understanding these fifth-order bands is useful because they may be misidentified with time-dependent bands that arise from other processes, such as chemical exchange, vibrational coupling, or energy transfer. The presence and unusual time dependences of the fifth-order bands are reproduced with model calculations that account for the fact that vibrational relaxation from the ν = 2 to 1 level is approximately a factor of 2 faster than that from the ν = 1 to 0 level. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  9. Folding of a heterogeneous β-hairpin peptide from temperature-jump 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kevin C.; Peng, Chunte Sam; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We provide a time- and structure-resolved characterization of the folding of the heterogeneous β-hairpin peptide Tryptophan Zipper 2 (Trpzip2) using 2D IR spectroscopy. The amide I′ vibrations of three Trpzip2 isotopologues are used as a local probe of the midstrand contacts, β-turn, and overall β-sheet content. Our experiments distinguish between a folded state with a type I′ β-turn and a misfolded state with a bulged turn, providing evidence for distinct conformations of the peptide backbone. Transient 2D IR spectroscopy at 45 °C following a laser temperature jump tracks the nanosecond and microsecond kinetics of unfolding and the exchange between conformers. Hydrogen bonds to the peptide backbone are loosened rapidly compared with the 5-ns temperature jump. Subsequently, all relaxation kinetics are characterized by an observed 1.2 ± 0.2-μs exponential. Our time-dependent 2D IR spectra are explained in terms of folding of either native or nonnative contacts from a common compact disordered state. Conversion from the disordered state to the folded state is consistent with a zip-out folding mechanism. PMID:23382249

  10. Dye aggregation identified by vibrational coupling using 2D IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oudenhoven, Tracey A.; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Zanni, Martin T.; Joo, Yongho; Gopalan, Padma

    2015-06-07

    We report that a model dye, Re(CO){sub 3}(bypy)CO{sub 2}H, aggregates into clusters on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles regardless of our preparation conditions. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we have identified characteristic frequencies of monomers, dimers, and trimers. A comparison of 2D IR spectra in solution versus those deposited on TiO{sub 2} shows that the propensity to dimerize in solution leads to higher dimer formation on TiO{sub 2}, but that dimers are formed even if there are only monomers in solution. Aggregates cannot be washed off with standard protocols and are present even at submonolayer coverages. We observe cross peaks between aggregates of different sizes, primarily dimers and trimers, indicating that clusters consist of microdomains in close proximity. 2D IR spectroscopy is used to draw these conclusions from measurements of vibrational couplings, but if molecules are close enough to be vibrationally coupled, then they are also likely to be electronically coupled, which could alter charge transfer.

  11. Probing Spatio-Temporal Correlation in Complex Aqueous Systems through 2D-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Biman; Biswas, Rajib; Samanta, Tuhin; Ghosh, Rikhia; Roy, Susmita

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneity is ubiquitous in aqueous solutions, e.g., in protein and DNA solutions, micelles and reverse micelles, density fluctuations during phase transitions (e,g., water to ice). Origin of heterogeneity can be diverse, sometimes stimulated by external biomolecular subsystems (proteins, DNA, lipids), nanoscopic materials etc, but may also be intrinsic to the thermodynamic nature of the aqueous solution itself. The altered dynamics of water in presence of such diverse surfaces have attracted considerable attention in recent years. However, efficiently capturing the length and timescale of heterogeneous dynamics of water is indeed a challenging task. Recent development of two dimensional infra-red (2D-IR) allows us to estimate length and time scales of such dynamics fairly accurately. In this work, we present a series of interesting studies employing two dimensional infra-red spectroscopy (2D-IR) to investigate (i) dynamics of water inside reverse micelles of varying sizes, (ii) supercritical water near the Widom line that is known to exhibit pronounced density fluctuation and calculate. The respective studies reveal a number of interesting facts. Spatio-temporal correlation of water dynamics with varying size of reverse micelles is well captured through the spectral diffusion of corresponding 2D-IR spectra. In case of supercritical water also, we observe strong signature of dynamic heterogeneity from the elongated nature of the spectra.

  12. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    DOE PAGES

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a highmore » crystallinity and very low defect concentration.« less

  13. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a high crystallinity and very low defect concentration.

  14. Time-Dependent 5th Order Bands in Nominally 3rd Order 2D IR Vibrational Echo Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Thielges, Megan C.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the field of 2D IR vibrational spectroscopy has been bolstered by the production of intense mid-IR laser pulses. As higher energy pulses are employed, a concomitant increase occurs in the likelihood of 5th order contributions to the 2D IR spectra. We report the appearance of 5th order signals in 2D IR spectra of CO bound to the active site of the enzyme cytochrome P450cam with the substrate norcamphor. Two bands with novel time dependences, one on the diagonal and one off-diagonal, are not accounted for by normal 3rd order interactions. These bands are associated with v = 1 to v = 2 vibrational transition frequency. Both bands decay to zero and then grow back in with opposite sign. The diagonal band is positive at short time, decays to zero, reappears with negative sign, before eventually decaying to zero. The off-diagonal band is negative at short time, decays to zero and reappears positive, and then decays to zero. The appearance and time dependence of these bands are characterized. Understanding these 5th order bands is useful because they may be misidentified with time dependent bands that arise from other processes, such as chemical exchange, vibrational coupling, or energy transfer. The presence and unusual time dependences of the 5th order bands are reproduced with model calculations that account for the fact that vibrational relaxation from the v = 2 to 1 level is approximately a factor of two faster than from the v = 1 to 0 level. PMID:21648438

  15. Non-native side chain IR probe in peptides: ab initio computation and 1D and 2D IR spectral simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Michael L; Zheng, David C; Wang, Jianping

    2010-02-18

    Infrared frequency region of 2000-2600 cm(-1) (i.e., ca. 4-5 microm in wavelength) is a well-known open spectral window for peptides and proteins. In this work, six unnatural amino acids (unAAs) were designed to have characteristic absorption bands located in this region. Key chemical groups that served as side chains in these unAAs are C[triple bond]C, Phe-C[triple bond]C, N=C=O, N=C=S, P-H, and Si-H, respectively. Cysteine (a natural AA having S-H in side chain) was also studied for comparison. The anharmonic vibrational properties, including frequencies, anharmonicities, and intermode couplings, were examined using the density functional theory. Broadband linear infrared (IR) and two-dimensional (2D) IR spectra were simulated for each molecule. It is found that all of the side chain modes have significant overtone diagonal anharmonicities. All have moderate transition dipole strengths except the C[triple bond]C and S-H stretching modes, in comparison with the C=O stretching mode. In each case, a collection of 2D IR cross peaks were predicted to appear due to the presence of the side chain groups, whose strengths are closely related to the intramolecular anharmonic interactions, and to the transition dipole strengths of the coupled vibrators. Further, potential energy distribution analysis and high-order anharmonic constant computation showed that these IR probes possess a varying degree of mode localization. The results suggest that these IR probes are potentially useful in complementing the well-studied amide-I mode, to investigate structures and dynamics of peptides and proteins.

  16. Preliminary results of determination of chemical changes on Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (W.Curt.:Fr.)P. Karst. (higher Basidiomycetes) carried by Shenzhou I spaceship with FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Choong, Yew Keong; Chen, Xiangdong; Jamal, Jamia Azdina; Wang, Qiuying; Lan, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition. Space mutagenesis breeding has achieved marked results over the years. The objective of this study is to determine the chemical changes in medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum cultivated after spaceflight in 1999. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) correlation spectroscopy were used in analysis. The sample Sx and its control Cx showed the least dissimilarities in one-dimensional FTIR spectra, but absorbance of Sx is twice as high as Cx. Sx presented a clear peak at 1648 cm in 2nd derivative spectra, which could not be detected in the Cx. The 2DIR spectra showed the intensity of Sx in the range 1800-1400 cm-1 for protein is higher than the control. The sample Sx produced some carbohydrate peaks in the area of 889 cm-1 compared with the Cx. The spaceflight set up an extreme condition and caused changes of chemical properties in G. lucidum strain.

  17. Ultrafast vibrational population transfer dynamics in 2-acetylcyclopentanone studied by 2D IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungnam; Ji, Minbiao

    2011-03-14

    2-Acetylcyclopentanone (2-ACP), which is a β-dicarbonyl compound, undergoes keto-enol isomerization, and its enol tautomers are stabilized by a cyclic intramolecular hydrogen bond. 2-ACP (keto form) has symmetric and asymmetric vibrational modes of the two carbonyl groups at 1748 and 1715 cm(-1) , respectively, which are well separated from the carbonyl modes of its enol tautomers in the FTIR spectrum. We have investigated 2-ACP dissolved in carbon tetrachloride by 2D IR spectroscopy and IR pump-probe spectroscopy. Vibrational population transfer dynamics between the two carbonyl modes were observed by 2D IR spectroscopy. To extract the population exchange dynamics (i.e., the down- and uphill population transfer rate constants), we used the normalized volumes of the cross-peaks with respect to the diagonal peaks at the same emission frequency and the survival and conditional probability functions. As expected, the downhill population transfer time constant (3.2 ps) was measured to be smaller than the uphill population transfer time constant (3.8 ps). In addition, the vibrational population relaxation dynamics of the two carbonyl modes were observed to be the same within the experimental error and were found to be much slower than vibrational population transfer between two carbonyl modes. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Hydrogen bonding and Raman, IR, and 2D-IR spectroscopy of dilute HOD in liquid D2O.

    PubMed

    Auer, B; Kumar, R; Schmidt, J R; Skinner, J L

    2007-09-04

    We present improvements on our previous approaches for calculating vibrational spectroscopy observables for the OH stretch region of dilute HOD in liquid D2O. These revised approaches are implemented to calculate IR and isotropic Raman spectra, using the SPC/E simulation model, and the results are in good agreement with experiment. We also calculate observables associated with three-pulse IR echoes: the peak shift and 2D-IR spectrum. The agreement with experiment for the former is improved over our previous calculations, but discrepancies between theory and experiment still exist. Using our proposed definition for hydrogen bonding in liquid water, we decompose the distribution of frequencies in the OH stretch region in terms of subensembles of HOD molecules with different local hydrogen-bonding environments. Such a decomposition allows us to make the connection with experiments and calculations on water clusters and more generally to understand the extent of the relationship between transition frequency and local structure in the liquid.

  19. Hydrogen bonding and Raman, IR, and 2D-IR spectroscopy of dilute HOD in liquid D2O

    PubMed Central

    Auer, B.; Kumar, R.; Schmidt, J. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We present improvements on our previous approaches for calculating vibrational spectroscopy observables for the OH stretch region of dilute HOD in liquid D2O. These revised approaches are implemented to calculate IR and isotropic Raman spectra, using the SPC/E simulation model, and the results are in good agreement with experiment. We also calculate observables associated with three-pulse IR echoes: the peak shift and 2D-IR spectrum. The agreement with experiment for the former is improved over our previous calculations, but discrepancies between theory and experiment still exist. Using our proposed definition for hydrogen bonding in liquid water, we decompose the distribution of frequencies in the OH stretch region in terms of subensembles of HOD molecules with different local hydrogen-bonding environments. Such a decomposition allows us to make the connection with experiments and calculations on water clusters and more generally to understand the extent of the relationship between transition frequency and local structure in the liquid. PMID:17576923

  20. 2D IR spectra of cyanide in water investigated by molecular dynamics simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung Won; Carr, Joshua K.; Göllner, Michael; Hamm, Peter; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the 2D infrared (IR) spectroscopy of CN− solvated in D2O is investigated. Depending on the force field parametrizations, most of which are based on multipolar interactions for the CN− molecule, the frequency-frequency correlation function and observables computed from it differ. Most notably, models based on multipoles for CN− and TIP3P for water yield quantitatively correct results when compared with experiments. Furthermore, the recent finding that T 1 times are sensitive to the van der Waals ranges on the CN− is confirmed in the present study. For the linear IR spectrum, the best model reproduces the full widths at half maximum almost quantitatively (13.0 cm−1 vs. 14.9 cm−1) if the rotational contribution to the linewidth is included. Without the rotational contribution, the lines are too narrow by about a factor of two, which agrees with Raman and IR experiments. The computed and experimental tilt angles (or nodal slopes) α as a function of the 2D IR waiting time compare favorably with the measured ones and the frequency fluctuation correlation function is invariably found to contain three time scales: a sub-ps, 1 ps, and one on the 10-ps time scale. These time scales are discussed in terms of the structural dynamics of the surrounding solvent and it is found that the longest time scale (≈10 ps) most likely corresponds to solvent exchange between the first and second solvation shell, in agreement with interpretations from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements.

  1. NOESY-Like 2D-IR Spectroscopy Reveals Non-Gaussian Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Laura M; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2016-10-06

    We have identified an unexpected signature of non-Gaussian dynamics in a conventional 2D IR measurement on a system with rapid intermolecular vibrational energy transfer. In a ternary mixture of the CO2 reduction photocatalyst, ReCl(bpy)(CO)3, NaSCN, and THF solvent, preferential association between the metal carbonyl catalyst and the NaSCN ion pairs facilitates intermolecular energy transfer on a few picoseconds time scale. Monitoring the cross peak between the highest frequency metal carbonyl band and the CN bands of NaSCN contact ion pairs, we find a striking time evolution of the cross-peak position on the detection axis. This frequency shift, which is due to spectral diffusion following intermolecular energy transfer, occurs with a time scale that is distinct from either the donor or acceptor spectral diffusion measured simultaneously. We argue that the energy transfer, a second-order Förster process, effectively increases the dimensionality of the 2D-IR spectroscopy and thus enables sensitivity to non-Gaussian dynamics.

  2. Simplified and economical 2D IR spectrometer design using a dual acousto-optic modulator

    PubMed Central

    Skoff, David R.; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Middleton, Chris T.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy has proven to be a very useful extension of infrared spectroscopy, yet the technique remains restricted to a small group of specialized researchers because of its experimental complexity and high equipment cost. We report on a spectrometer that is compact, mechanically robust, and is much less expensive than previous designs because it uses a single pixel MCT detector rather than an array detector. Moreover, each axis of the spectrum can be collected in either the time or frequency domain via computer programming. We discuss pulse sequences for scanning the probe axis, which were not previously possible. We present spectra on metal carbonyl compounds at 5 µm and a model peptide at 6 µm. Data collection with a single pixel MCT takes longer than using an array detector, but publishable quality data are still achieved with only a few minutes of averaging. PMID:24659850

  3. Tidal surge in the M2 proton channel, sensed by 2D IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Qiu, Jade; DeGrado, William F; Hochstrasser, Robin M

    2011-04-12

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus transmits protons across membranes via a narrow aqueous pore lined by water and a proton sensor, His37. Near the center of the membrane, a water cluster is stabilized by the carbonyl of Gly34 and His37, the properties of which are modulated by protonation of His37. At low pH (5-6), where M2 conducts protons, this region undergoes exchange processes on the microsecond to second timescale. Here, we use 2D IR to examine the instantaneous conformational distribution and hydration of G34, and the evolution of the ensemble on the femtosecond to picosecond timescale. The channel water is strongly pH dependent as gauged by 2D IR which allows recording of the vibrational frequency autocorrelation function of a (13)C = (18)O Gly34 probe. At pH 8, where entry and exit of protons within the channel are very slow, the carbonyl groups appear to adopt a single conformation/environment. The high-pH conformer does not exhibit spectral dynamics near the Gly34, and water in the channel must form a relatively rigid ice-like structure. By contrast, two vibrational forms of G34 are seen at pH 6.2, neither of which is identical to the high-pH form. In at least one of these low-pH forms, the probe is immersed in a very mobile, bulk-like aqueous environment having a correlation time ca. 1.3 ps at pH 6.2. Thus, protonation of His37 at low pH causes liquid-like water molecules to flow into the neighborhood of the Gly34.

  4. The dynamics of peptide-water interactions in dialanine: An ultrafast amide I 2D IR and computational spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chi-Jui; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2017-08-01

    We present a joint experimental and computational study of the dynamic interactions of dialanine (Ala-Ala) with water, comparing the results of ultrafast 2D IR and infrared transient absorption spectroscopy of its amide I vibration with spectra modeled from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The experimental data are analyzed to describe vibrational frequency fluctuations, vibrational energy relaxation, and chemical exchange processes. The origin of these processes in the same underlying fluctuating forces allows a common description in terms of the fluctuations and conformational dynamics of the peptide and associated solvent. By comparing computational spectroscopy from MD simulations with multiple force fields and water models, we describe how the dynamics of water hydrogen bond fluctuations and switching processes act as a source of friction that governs the dephasing and vibrational relaxation, and provide a description of coupled water and peptide motions that give rise to spectroscopic exchange processes.

  5. Residue-Specific Structural Kinetics of Proteins through the Union of Isotope Labeling, Mid-IR Pulse Shaping, and Coherent 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a methodology for studying protein kinetics using a rapid-scan technology for collecting 2D IR spectra. In conjunction with isotope labeling, 2D IR spectroscopy is able to probe the secondary structure and environment of individual residues in polypeptides and proteins. It is particularly useful for membrane and aggregate proteins. Our rapid-scan technology relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that computer generates the pulse shapes, much like in an NMR spectrometer. With this device, data collection is faster, easier, and more accurate. We describe our 2D IR spectrometer, as well as protocols for 13C=18O isotope labeling, and then illustrate the technique with an application to the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide form type 2 diabetes. PMID:20472067

  6. Ultrafast 2D IR anisotropy of water reveals reorientation during hydrogen-bond switching.

    PubMed

    Ramasesha, Krupa; Roberts, Sean T; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2011-08-07

    Rearrangements of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water are believed to involve rapid and concerted hydrogen bond switching events, during which a hydrogen bond donor molecule undergoes large angle molecular reorientation as it exchanges hydrogen bonding partners. To test this picture of hydrogen bond dynamics, we have performed ultrafast 2D IR spectral anisotropy measurements on the OH stretching vibration of HOD in D(2)O to directly track the reorientation of water molecules as they change hydrogen bonding environments. Interpretation of the experimental data is assisted by modeling drawn from molecular dynamics simulations, and we quantify the degree of molecular rotation on changing local hydrogen bonding environment using restricted rotation models. From the inertial 2D anisotropy decay, we find that water molecules initiating from a strained configuration and relaxing to a stable configuration are characterized by a distribution of angles, with an average reorientation half-angle of 10°, implying an average reorientation for a full switch of ≥20°. These results provide evidence that water hydrogen bond network connectivity switches through concerted motions involving large angle molecular reorientation.

  7. 2D-3D MIGRATION AND CONFORMATIONAL MULTIPLICATION OF CHEMICALS IN LARGE CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical interactions are three-dimensional (3D) in nature and require modeling chemicals as 3D entities. In turn, using 3D models of chemicals leads to the realization that a single 2D structure can have hundreds of different conformations, and the electronic properties of these...

  8. 2D-3D MIGRATION AND CONFORMATIONAL MULTIPLICATION OF CHEMICALS IN LARGE CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical interactions are three-dimensional (3D) in nature and require modeling chemicals as 3D entities. In turn, using 3D models of chemicals leads to the realization that a single 2D structure can have hundreds of different conformations, and the electronic properties of these...

  9. Anharmonic vibrational modes of nucleic acid bases revealed by 2D IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chunte Sam; Jones, Kevin C; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2011-10-05

    Polarization-dependent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of the purine and pyrimadine base vibrations of five nucleotide monophosphates (NMPs) were acquired in D(2)O at neutral pH in the frequency range 1500-1700 cm(-1). The distinctive cross-peaks between the ring deformations and carbonyl stretches of NMPs indicate that these vibrational modes are highly coupled, in contrast with the traditional peak assignment, which is based on a simple local mode picture such as C═O, C═N, and C═C double bond stretches. A model of multiple anharmonically coupled oscillators was employed to characterize the transition energies, vibrational anharmonicities and couplings, and transition dipole strengths and orientations. No simple or intuitive structural correlations are found to readily assign the spectral features, except in the case of guanine and cytosine, which contain a single local CO stretching mode. To help interpret the nature of these vibrational modes, we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations and found that multiple ring vibrations are coupled and delocalized over the purine and pyrimidine rings. Generally, there is close correspondence between the experimental and computational results, provided that the DFT calculations include explicit waters solvating hydrogen-bonding sites. These results provide direct experimental evidence of the delocalized nature of the nucleotide base vibrations via a nonperturbative fashion and will serve as building blocks for constructing a structure-based model of DNA and RNA vibrational spectroscopy.

  10. Phase-Resolved Heterodyne-Detected Transient Grating Enhances the Capabilities of 2D IR Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Geun Young; Kim, Yung Sam

    2017-02-09

    2D IR echo spectroscopy, with high sensitivity and femtosecond time resolution, enables us to understand structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecular systems. Application of this experimental technique on weakly absorbing samples, however, had been limited by the precise and unambiguous phase determination of the echo signals. In this study, we propose a new experimental scheme that significantly increases the phase stability of the involved IR pulses. We have demonstrated that the incorporation of phase-resolved heterodyne-detected transient grating (PR-HDTG) spectroscopy greatly enhances the capabilities of 2D IR spectroscopy. The new experimental scheme has been used to obtain 2D IR spectra on weakly absorbing azide ions (N3(-)) in H2O (absorbance ∼0.025), free of phase ambiguity even at large waiting times. We report the estimated spectral diffusion time scale (1.056 ps) of azide ions in aqueous solution from the 2D IR spectra and the vibrational lifetime (750 ± 3 fs) and the reorientation time (1108 ± 24 fs) from the PR-HDTG spectra.

  11. Rapid authentication of different ages of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium huoshanense as well as wild Dendrobium henanense using FTIR and 2D-COS IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nai-Dong; Chen, Nai-Fu; Li, Jun; Cao, Cai-Yun; Wang, Jin-Mei

    2015-12-01

    The accumulating of pharmaceutical chemicals in medicinal plants would greatly be affected by their ages and establishing a fast quality-identification method to evaluate the similarity of medicinal herbs at different cultivated ages is a critical step for assurance of quality and safety in the TCM industry. In this work, tri-step IR macro-fingerprinting and 2D-COS IR spectrum techniques combined with statistical pattern recognition were applied for discrimination and similarity evaluation of different ages of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium huoshanense C. Z. Tang et S. J. Cheng as well as Dendrobium henanense J.L.Lu et L.X Gao. Both tissue-cultured and wild D. huoshanense were easily differentiated from D. henanense by FTIR and SD-IR spectra, while it's quite difficult to discriminate different cultivated years of the three investigated Dendrobiums. In 2D-COS IR spectra, 1-5 auto-peaks with different indensity and positions were located in the region 1160-1030 cm-1 of the twelve Dendrobium samples and thus could be used to identify Dendrobium samples at different ages. Principle component analysis (PCA) of synchronous 2D-COS data showed that the twelve samples were effectively identified and evaluated. The results indicated that the tri-step infrared macro-fingerprinting combined with PCA method was suitable to differentiate the cultivated ages of Dendrobiums with species and orgins rapidly and nondestructively.

  12. Polarization shaping in the mid-IR and polarization-based balanced heterodyne detection with application to 2D IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Chris T; Strasfeld, David B; Zanni, Martin T

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate amplitude, phase and polarization shaping of femtosecond mid-IR pulses using a germanium acousto-optical modulator by independently shaping the frequency-dependent amplitudes and phases of two orthogonally polarized pulses which are then collinearly overlapped using a wire-grid polarizer. We use a feedback loop to set and stabilize the relative phase of the orthogonal pulses. We have also used a wire-grid polarizer to implement polarization-based balanced heterodyne detection for improved signal-to-noise of 2D IR spectra collected in a pump-probe geometry. Applications include coherent control of molecular vibrations and improvements in multidimensional IR spectroscopy.

  13. C2D Spitzer-IRS spectra of disks around T Tauri stars. V. Spectral decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, J.; Augereau, J.-C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Merín, B.; Grosso, N.; Ménard, F.; Blake, G. A.; Monin, J.-L.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Dust particles evolve in size and lattice structure in protoplanetary disks, due to coagulation, fragmentation and crystallization, and are radially and vertically mixed in disks due to turbulent diffusion and wind/radiation pressure forces. Aims: This paper aims at determining the mineralogical composition and size distribution of the dust grains in planet forming regions of disks around a statistical sample of 58 T Tauri stars observed with Spitzer/IRS as part of the Cores to Disks (c2d) Legacy Program. Methods: We present a spectral decomposition model, named “B2C”, that reproduces the IRS spectra over the full spectral range (5-35 μm). The model assumes two dust populations: a warm component responsible for the 10 μm emission arising from the disk inner regions (≲1 AU) and a colder component responsible for the 20-30 μm emission, arising from more distant regions (≲10 AU). The fitting strategy relies on a random exploration of parameter space coupled with a Bayesian inference method. Results: We show evidence for a significant size distribution flattening in the atmospheres of disks compared to the typical MRN distribution, providing an explanation for the usual flat, boxy 10 μm feature profile generally observed in T Tauri star spectra. We reexamine the crystallinity paradox, observationally identified by Olofsson et al. (2009 , A&A, 507, 327), and we find a simultaneous enrichment of the crystallinity in both the warm and cold regions, while grain sizes in both components are uncorrelated. We show that flat disks tend to have larger grains than flared disk. Finally our modeling results do not show evidence for any correlations between the crystallinity and either the star spectral type, or the X-ray luminosity (for a subset of the sample). Conclusions: The size distribution flattening may suggests that grain coagulation is a slightly more effective process than fragmentation (helped by turbulent diffusion) in disk atmospheres, and that

  14. Evaluation on intrinsic quality of licorice influenced by environmental factors by using FTIR combined with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying-qun; Yu, Hua; Zhang, Yan-ling; Sun, Su-qin; Chen, Shi-lin; Zhao, Run-huai; Zhou, Qun; Noda, Isao

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the intrinsic quality of licorice influenced by environmental factors, the spectral comparison of licorice from two typical ecological habitats was conducted by using FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy. There were differences in the peak intensities of 1155, 1076 and 1048 cm -1 of FTIR profiles. The difference was amplified by the second derivative spectrum for the peak intensities at 1370, 1365 and 1317 cm -1 and the peak shape in 958-920 cm -1 and 1050-988 cm -1. The synchronous 2D-IR spectra within the range of 860-1300 cm -1 were classified into type I and type II and their frequency in the two groups was noticeably different. Although the chemical compounds of licorice samples from two areas were generally similar, the contents of starch, calcium oxalate, and some chemical compounds containing alcohol hydroxyl group were different, indicating the influence of precipitation and temperature. This study demonstrates that the systematical analysis of FTIR, the second derivative spectrum and 2D-IR can effectively determine the differences in licorice samples from different ecological habitats.

  15. Molecular interactions in bacterial cellulose composites studied by 1D FT-IR and dynamic 2D FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kacuráková, Marta; Smith, Andrew C; Gidley, Michael J; Wilson, Reginald H

    2002-06-12

    Specific strain-induced orientation and interactions in three Acetobacter cellulose composites: cellulose (C), cellulose/pectin (CP) and cellulose/xyloglucan (CXG) were characterized by FT-IR and dynamic 2D FT-IR spectroscopies. On the molecular level, the reorientation of the cellulose fibrils occurred in the direction of the applied mechanical strain. The cellulose-network reorientation depends on the composition of the matrix, including the water content, which lubricates the motion of macromolecules in the network. At the submolecular level, dynamic 2D FT-IR data suggested that there was no interaction between cellulose and pectin in CP and that they responded independently to a small amplitude strain, while in CXG, cellulose and xyloglucan were uniformly strained along the sample length.

  16. Study on molecular structure and hydration mechanism of Domyoji-ko starch by IR and NIR hetero 2D analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Norihisa; Kondo, Miyuki; Miyazawa, Mitsuhiro

    2010-06-01

    The hydration structure of starch molecule in Domyoji-ko, which is made from gluey rice, was investigated by hetero 2D correlation analysis of IR and NIR spectroscopy. The feature near 1020 cm -1 in the IR spectra of Domyoji-ko is changed by rehydration process, indicating that the molecular structure of amylopectin in the starch has been varied by the hydration without heating. The intensity of a band at 4770 cm -1 in NIR spectra is decreasing with the increasing of either the heating time with water or rehydration time without heating. These results suggest that the hydration of Domyoji-ko has proceeded in similar mechanisms on these processes. The generalized hetero 2D IR-NIR correlation analysis for rehydration of Domyoji-ko has supported the assignments for NIR bands concerning the gelatinization of starch.

  17. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, Paul C.; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-05-20

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this Paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is used to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. Lastly, the simulated spectra indicate that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.

  18. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    DOE PAGES

    Burris, Paul C.; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-05-20

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this Paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is usedmore » to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. Lastly, the simulated spectra indicate that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.« less

  19. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, Paul C.; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-05-20

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this Paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is used to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. Lastly, the simulated spectra indicate that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.

  20. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores.

    PubMed

    Burris, Paul C; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H

    2016-05-21

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is used to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. The simulated spectra indicates that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.

  1. How to turn your pump–probe instrument into a multidimensional spectrometer: 2D IR and Vis spectroscopies via pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Sang-Hee; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We have recently developed a new and simple way of collecting 2D infrared and visible spectra that utilizes a pulse shaper and a partly collinear beam geometry. 2D IR and Vis spectroscopies are powerful tools for studying molecular structures and their dynamics. They can be used to correlate vibrational or electronic eigenstates, measure energy transfer rates, and quantify the dynamics of lineshapes, for instance, all with femtosecond time-resolution. As a result, they are finding use in systems that exhibit fast dynamics, such as sub-millisecond chemical and biological dynamics, and in hard-to-study environments, such as in membranes. While powerful, these techniques have been difficult to implement because they require a series of femtosecond pulses to be spatially and temporally overlapped with precise time-resolution and interferometric phase stability. However, many of the difficulties associated with implementing 2D spectroscopies are eliminated by using a pulse shaper and a simple beam geometry, which substantially lowers the technical barriers required for researchers to enter this exciting field while simultaneously providing many new capabilities. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the methods for collecting 2D spectra so that an outsider considering using 2D spectroscopy in their own research can judge which approach would be most suitable for their research aims. This paper focuses primarily on 2D IR spectroscopy, but also includes our recent work on adapting this technology to collecting 2D Vis spectra. We review work that has already been published as well as cover several topics that we have not reported previously, including phase cycling methods to remove background signals, eliminate unwanted scatter, and shift data collection into the rotating frame. PMID:19290321

  2. Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

  3. 2D-IR spectroscopy of the sulfhydryl band of cysteines in the hydrophobic core of proteins.

    PubMed

    Koziński, M; Garrett-Roe, S; Hamm, P

    2008-06-26

    We investigate the sulfhydryl band of cysteines as a new chromophore for two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) studies of the structure and dynamics of proteins. Cysteines can be put at almost any position in a protein by standard methods of site-directed mutagenesis and, hence, have the potential to be an extremely versatile local probe. Although being a very weak absorber in aqueous environment, the sulfhydryl group gets strongly polarized when situated in an alpha-helix inside the hydrophobic core of a protein because of a strong hydrogen bond to the backbone carbonyl group. The extinction coefficient (epsilon=150 M(-1) cm(-1)) then is sufficiently high to perform detailed 2D-IR studies even at low millimolar concentrations. Using porcine (carbonmonoxy)hemoglobin as an example, which contains two such cysteines in its wild-type form, we demonstrate that spectral diffusion deduced from the 2D-IR line shapes reports on the overall-breathing of the corresponding alpha-helix. The vibrational lifetime of the sulfhydryl group (T1 approximately 6 ps) is considerably longer than that of the much more commonly used amide I mode (approximately 1.0 ps), thereby significantly extending the time window in which spectral diffusion processes can be observed. The experiments are accompanied by molecular dynamics simulations revealing a good overall agreement.

  4. Sensitivity of 2D IR Spectra to Peptide Helicity: A Concerted Experimental and Simulation Study of an Octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Neelanjana; Maekawa, Hiroaki; Zhuang, Wei; Toniolo, Claudio; Mukamel, Shaul; Tobias, Douglas J.; Ge, Nien-Hui

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the sensitivity of two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy to peptide helicity with an experimental and theoretical study of Z-[L-(αMe)Val]8-OtBu in CDCl3. 2D IR experiments were carried out in the amide-I region under the parallel and the double-crossed polarization configurations. In the latter polarization configuration, the 2D spectra taken with the rephasing and nonrephasing pulse sequences exhibit a doublet feature and a single peak, respectively. These cross-peak patterns are highly sensitive to the underlying peptide structure. Spectral calculations were performed on the basis of a vibrational exciton model, with the local mode frequencies and couplings calculated from snapshots of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories using six different models for the Hamiltonian. Conformationally variant segments of the MD trajectory, while reproducing the main features of the experimental spectra, are characterized by extraneous features, suggesting that the structural ensembles sampled by the simulation are too broad. By imposing periodic restraints on the peptide dihedral angles with the crystal structure as a reference, much better agreement between the measured and the calculated spectra was achieved. The result indicates that the structure of Z-[L-(αMe)Val]8-OtBu in CDCl3 is a fully developed 310-helix with only a small fraction of α-helical or nonhelical conformations in the middle of the peptide. Of the four different combinations of pulse sequences and polarization configurations, the nonrephasing double-crossed polarization 2D IR spectrum exhibits the highest sensitivity in detecting conformational variation. Of the six local mode frequency models tested, the electrostatic maps of Mukamel and Cho perform the best. Our results show that the high sensitivity of 2D IR spectroscopy can provide a useful basis for developing methods to improve the sampling accuracy of force fields and for characterizing the relative merits of

  5. A 2-D Array of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) Far-IR Thermal Detectors for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, Brook

    2009-01-01

    A 2-D array of superconducting Magnesium Diboride(MgB2) far IR thermal detectors has been fabricated. Such an array is intended to be at the focal plane of future generation thermal imaging far-IR instruments that will investigate the outer planets and their icy moons. Fabrication and processing of the pixels of the array as well as noise characterization of architectured MgB2 thin films will be presented. Challenges and solutions for improving the performance of the array will be discussed.

  6. A 2-D Array of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) Far-IR Thermal Detectors for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, Brook

    2009-01-01

    A 2-D array of superconducting Magnesium Diboride(MgB2) far IR thermal detectors has been fabricated. Such an array is intended to be at the focal plane of future generation thermal imaging far-IR instruments that will investigate the outer planets and their icy moons. Fabrication and processing of the pixels of the array as well as noise characterization of architectured MgB2 thin films will be presented. Challenges and solutions for improving the performance of the array will be discussed.

  7. Vibrational dynamics and solvatochromism of the label SCN in various solvents and hemoglobin by time dependent IR and 2D-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Kern-Michler, Daniela; Müller-Werkmeister, Henrike M; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2014-09-28

    We investigated the characteristics of the thiocyanate (SCN) functional group as a probe of local structural dynamics for 2D-IR spectroscopy of proteins, exploiting the dependence of vibrational frequency on the environment of the label. Steady-state and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy are performed on the model compound methylthiocyanate (MeSCN) in solvents of different polarity, and compared to data obtained on SCN as a local probe introduced as cyanylated cysteine in the protein bovine hemoglobin. The vibrational lifetime of the protein label is determined to be 37 ps, and its anharmonicity is observed to be lower than that of the model compound (which itself exhibits solvent-independent anharmonicity). The vibrational lifetime of MeSCN generally correlates with the solvent polarity, i.e. longer lifetimes in less polar solvents, with the longest lifetime being 158 ps. However, the capacity of the solvent to form hydrogen bonds complicates this simplified picture. The long lifetime of the SCN vibration is in contrast to commonly used azide labels or isotopically-labeled amide I and better suited to monitor structural rearrangements by 2D-IR spectroscopy. We present time-dependent 2D-IR data on the labeled protein which reveal an initially inhomogeneous structure around the CN oscillator. The distribution becomes homogeneous after 5 picoseconds so that spectral diffusion has effectively erased the 'memory' of the CN stretching frequency. Therefore, the 2D-IR data of the label incorporated in hemoglobin demonstrate how SCN can be utilized to sense rearrangements in the local structure on a picosecond timescale.

  8. Hydrogen-bonding-induced enhancement of Fermi resonances: a linear IR and nonlinear 2D-IR study of aniline-d5.

    PubMed

    Greve, Christian; Nibbering, Erik T J; Fidder, Henk

    2013-12-12

    Hydrogen bonding of the amino group of aniline-d5 results in a huge enhancement of the NH2 bending overtone absorption strength, mainly attributed to the Fermi resonance effect. A quantitative analysis is presented, using a hybrid mode representation and encompassing experimental data on aniline with 0, 1, or 2 hydrogen bonds to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Changes in enthalpy, hydrogen-bonding-induced frequency shifts, and the transition dipole moment increase of the local N-H stretching oscillator all demonstrate that the hydrogen bond is strongest in the single hydrogen-bonded complex. Linear IR overtone spectra show that the oscillator strength decreases upon hydrogen bonding for the N-H stretching overtones, which is opposite to the effect on the fundamental N-H stretching transitions. Polarization resolved 2D-IR spectra provide detailed information on the N-H stretching overtone manifold and support the relative orientations of the various IR transitions.

  9. Rapid identification of Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii by FTIR and 2D correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang-Da; Xu, Chang-Hua; Li, Ming-Yu; Huang, An-Min; Sun, Su-Qin

    2014-07-01

    Since Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii, which are of precious Rosewood, are very similar in their appearance and anatomy characteristics, cheaper Hongmu D. louvelii is often illegally used to impersonate valuable P. santalinus, especially in Chinese furniture manufacture. In order to develop a rapid and effective method for easy confused wood furniture differentiation, we applied tri-step identification method, i.e., conventional infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared (SD-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2DCOS-IR) spectroscopy to investigate P. santalinus and D. louvelii furniture. According to FT-IR and SD-IR spectra, it has been found two unconditional stable difference at 848 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 and relative stable differences at 1735 cm-1, 1623 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, 1602 cm-1, 1509 cm-1, 1456 cm-1, 1200 cm-1, 1158 cm-1, 1055 cm-1, 1034 cm-1 and 895 cm-1 between D. louvelii and P. santalinus IR spectra. The stable discrepancy indicates that the category of extractives is different between the two species. Besides, the relative stable differences imply that the content of holocellulose in P. santalinus is more than that of D. louvelii, whereas the quantity of extractives in D. louvelii is higher. Furthermore, evident differences have been observed in their 2DCOS-IR spectra of 1550-1415 cm-1 and 1325-1030 cm-1. P. santalinus has two strong auto-peaks at 1459 cm-1 and 1467 cm-1, three mid-strong auto-peaks at 1518 cm-1, 1089 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1 and five weak auto-peaks at 1432 cm-1, 1437 cm-1, 1046 cm-1, 1056 cm-1 and 1307 cm-1 while D. louvelii has four strong auto-peaks at 1465 cm-1, 1523 cm-1, 1084 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1, four mid-strong auto-peaks at 1430 cm-1, 1499 cm-1, 1505 cm-1 and 1056 cm-1 and two auto-peaks at 1540 cm-1 and 1284 cm-1. This study has proved that FT-IR integrated with 2DCOS-IR could be applicable for precious wood furniture authentication in a direct, rapid and holistic manner.

  10. Unraveling the dynamics and structure of functionalized self-assembled monolayers on gold using 2D IR spectroscopy and MD simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chang; Yuan, Rongfeng; Pfalzgraff, William C.; Nishida, Jun; Wang, Lu; Markland, Thomas E.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are the focus of ongoing investigations because they can be chemically tuned to control their structure and dynamics for a wide variety of applications, including electrochemistry, catalysis, and as models of biological interfaces. Here we combine reflection 2D infrared vibrational echo spectroscopy (R-2D IR) and molecular dynamics simulations to determine the relationship between the structures of functionalized alkanethiol SAMs on gold surfaces and their underlying molecular motions on timescales of tens to hundreds of picoseconds. We find that at higher head group density, the monolayers have more disorder in the alkyl chain packing and faster dynamics. The dynamics of alkanethiol SAMs on gold are much slower than the dynamics of alkylsiloxane SAMs on silica. Using the simulations, we assess how the different molecular motions of the alkyl chain monolayers give rise to the dynamics observed in the experiments. PMID:27044113

  11. Differentiation of five species of Danggui raw materials by FTIR combined with 2D-COS IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Rui; Sun, Su-Qin; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Xu, Chang-Hua; Chen, Jian-Bo; Zhou, Qun; Lu, Guang-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Five herbs named as Chinese Danggui (CDG), Japanese Danggui (JDG), Korea Danggui (KDG), Lovage root (LR) and Angelica root (AR) are widely and confusedly used in eastern and western countries owing to their homonym. These herbs come from different plant species resulting in the variety of bioactive components and medical efficacy. A method combing tri-step IR macro-fingerprinting techniques with statistical pattern recognition was therefore employed discriminate the five herbs in order to assure their genuineness. A total of 26 samples were collected and identified by conventional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, second derivative infrared (SD-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-COS IR) spectroscopy. CDG and KDG were easily differentiated from others herbs by FTIR and SD-IR spectra. The characteristic peaks of CDG were located at 1068, 1051, 990, 909 and 867 cm-1, whilst KDG contained the peaks located at 1628, 1565, 1392, 1232 and 1136 cm-1. By 2D-COS IR spectra, the bands in the range of 950-1110 cm-1 could be a characteristic range to identify the five herbs. There were six auto-peaks located at 978, 991, 1028 (strongest), 1061, 1071 and 1097 cm-1 for CDG, six auto-peaks at 975, 991, 1026, 1053, 1070 (strongest) and 1096 cm-1 for KDG, five auto-peaks at 970, 1009, 1037, 1070 and 1096 (strongest) cm-1 for JDG, five auto-peaks at 973 (strongest), 1009, 1033, 1072 and 1099 cm-1 for LR, and five auto-peaks at 974 (strongest), 1010, 1033, 1072 and 1099 cm-1 for AR. Classification analysis of FTIR showed that these species located in different clusters. The results indicate the tri-step infrared macro-fingerprinting combines with principle component analysis (PCA) is suitable to rapidly and nondestructively differentiate these herbs.

  12. Frequency Comb Assisted IR Measurements of H_3^+, H_2D^+ and D_2H^+ Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusko, Pavol; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    We present recent measurements of the fundamental transitions of H_3^+, H_2D^+ and D_2H^+ in a 4 K 22-pole trap by action spectroscopic techniques. Either Laser Induced Inhibition of Cluster Growth (He attachment at T≈4 K), endothermic reaction of H_3^+ with O_2, or deuterium exchange has been used as measurement scheme. We used a 3 μm optical parametric oscillator coupled to a frequency comb in order to achieve accuracy generally below 1 MHz. Five transitions of H_3^+, eleven of H_2D^+ and ten of D_2H^+ were recorder in our spectral range. We compare our H_3^+ results with two previous frequency comb assisted works. Moreover, accurate determination of the frequency allows us to predict pure rotational transitions for H_2D^+ and D_2H^+ in the THz range. P. Jusko, C. Konietzko, S. Schlemmer, O. Asvany, J. Mol. Spec. 319 (2016) 55 O. Asvany, S. Brünken, L. Kluge, S. Schlemmer, Appl. Phys. B 114 (2014) 203 O. Asvany, J. Krieg, S. Schlemmer, Rev. Sci. Instr. 83 (2012) 093110 J.N. Hodges, A.J. Perry, P.A. Jenkins, B.M. Siller, B.J. McCall, J. Chem. Phys. 139 (2013) 164201 H.-C. Chen, C.-Y. Hsiao, J.-L. Peng, T. Amano, J.-T. Shy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 (2012) 263002

  13. 2D IR spectroscopy with phase-locked pulse pairs from a birefringent delay line.

    PubMed

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Manzoni, Cristian; Brida, Daniele; Helbing, Jan; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-04-21

    We introduce a new scheme for two-dimensional IR spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. Translating birefringent wedges allow generating phase-locked pump pulses with exceptional phase stability, in a simple and compact setup. A He-Ne tracking scheme permits to scan continuously the acquisition time. For a proof-of-principle demonstration we use lithium niobate, which allows operation up to 5 μm. Exploiting the inherent perpendicular polarizations of the two pump pulses, we also demonstrate signal enhancement and scattering suppression.

  14. Electrostatic interactions in phospholipid membranes revealed by coherent 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, V. V.; Chelli, R.; Zhuang, W.; Nuti, F.; Takaoka, Y.; Papini, A. M.; Mukamel, S.; Righini, R.

    2007-01-01

    The inter- and intramolecular interactions of the carbonyl moieties at the polar interface of a phospholipid membrane are probed by using nonlinear femtosecond infrared spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR correlation spectra separate homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and show a distinct cross-peak pattern controlled by electrostatic interactions. The inter- and intramolecular electrostatic interactions determine the inhomogeneous character of the optical response. Using molecular dynamics simulation and the nonlinear exciton equations approach, we extract from the spectra short-range structural correlations between carbonyls at the interface. PMID:17881567

  15. Construction and repair of highly ordered 2D covalent networks by chemical equilibrium regulation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cui-Zhong; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2012-03-21

    The construction of well-ordered 2D covalent networks via the dehydration of di-borate aromatic molecules was successfully realized through introducing a small amount of water into a closed reaction system to regulate the chemical equilibrium.

  16. Location detection and tracking of moving targets by a 2D IR-UWB radar system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Han; Pyun, Jae-Young

    2015-03-19

    In indoor environments, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and long-range tracking radar systems are not optimal, because of signal propagation limitations in the indoor environment. In recent years, the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) technology has become a possible solution for object detection, localization and tracking in indoor environments, because of its high range resolution, compact size and low cost. This paper presents improved target detection and tracking techniques for moving objects with impulse-radio UWB (IR-UWB) radar in a short-range indoor area. This is achieved through signal-processing steps, such as clutter reduction, target detection, target localization and tracking. In this paper, we introduce a new combination consisting of our proposed signal-processing procedures. In the clutter-reduction step, a filtering method that uses a Kalman filter (KF) is proposed. Then, in the target detection step, a modification of the conventional CLEAN algorithm which is used to estimate the impulse response from observation region is applied for the advanced elimination of false alarms. Then, the output is fed into the target localization and tracking step, in which the target location and trajectory are determined and tracked by using unscented KF in two-dimensional coordinates. In each step, the proposed methods are compared to conventional methods to demonstrate the differences in performance. The experiments are carried out using actual IR-UWB radar under different scenarios. The results verify that the proposed methods can improve the probability and efficiency of target detection and tracking.

  17. Location Detection and Tracking of Moving Targets by a 2D IR-UWB Radar System

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van-Han; Pyun, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    In indoor environments, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and long-range tracking radar systems are not optimal, because of signal propagation limitations in the indoor environment. In recent years, the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) technology has become a possible solution for object detection, localization and tracking in indoor environments, because of its high range resolution, compact size and low cost. This paper presents improved target detection and tracking techniques for moving objects with impulse-radio UWB (IR-UWB) radar in a short-range indoor area. This is achieved through signal-processing steps, such as clutter reduction, target detection, target localization and tracking. In this paper, we introduce a new combination consisting of our proposed signal-processing procedures. In the clutter-reduction step, a filtering method that uses a Kalman filter (KF) is proposed. Then, in the target detection step, a modification of the conventional CLEAN algorithm which is used to estimate the impulse response from observation region is applied for the advanced elimination of false alarms. Then, the output is fed into the target localization and tracking step, in which the target location and trajectory are determined and tracked by using unscented KF in two-dimensional coordinates. In each step, the proposed methods are compared to conventional methods to demonstrate the differences in performance. The experiments are carried out using actual IR-UWB radar under different scenarios. The results verify that the proposed methods can improve the probability and efficiency of target detection and tracking. PMID:25808773

  18. 2D IR spectroscopy of histidine: probing side-chain structure and dynamics via backbone amide vibrations.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Tucker, Matthew J; Gai, Feng

    2014-07-17

    It is well known that histidine is involved in many biological functions due to the structural versatility of its side chain. However, probing the conformational transitions of histidine in proteins, especially those occurring on an ultrafast time scale, is difficult. Herein we show, using a histidine dipeptide as a model, that it is possible to probe the tautomer and protonation status of a histidine residue by measuring the two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectrum of its amide I vibrational transition. Specifically, for the histidine dipeptide studied, the amide unit of the histidine gives rise to three spectrally resolvable amide I features at approximately 1630, 1644, and 1656 cm(-1), respectively, which, based on measurements at different pH values and frequency calculations, are assigned to a τ tautomer (1630 cm(-1) component) and a π tautomer with a hydrated (1644 cm(-1) component) or dehydrated (1656 cm(-1) component) amide. Because of the intrinsic ultrafast time resolution of 2D IR spectroscopy, we believe that the current approach, when combined with the isotope editing techniques, will be useful in revealing the structural dynamics of key histidine residues in proteins that are important for function.

  19. Direct observation of ground-state lactam–lactim tautomerization using temperature-jump transient 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chunte Sam; Baiz, Carlos R.; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We provide a systematic characterization of the nanosecond ground-state lactam–lactim tautomerization of pyridone derivatives in aqueous solution under ambient conditions using temperature-jump transient 2D IR spectroscopy. Although electronic excited-state tautomerization has been widely studied, experimental work on the ground electronic state, most relevant to chemistry and biology, is lacking. Using 2D IR spectroscopy, lactam and lactim tautomers of 6-chloro-2-pyridone and 2-chloro-4-pyridone are unambiguously identified by their unique cross-peak patterns. Monitoring the correlated exponential relaxation of these signals in response to a laser temperature jump provides a direct measurement of the nanosecond tautomerization kinetics. By studying the temperature, concentration, solvent, and pH dependence, we extract a thermodynamic and kinetic characterization and conclude that the tautomerization proceeds through a two-state concerted mechanism. We find that the intramolecular proton transfer is mediated by bridging water molecules and the reaction barrier is dictated by the release of a proton from pyridone, as would be expected for an efficient Grothuss-type proton transfer mechanism. PMID:23690588

  20. Dynamics of a Room Temperature Ionic Liquid in Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes vs the Bulk Liquid: 2D IR and Polarized IR Pump-Probe Experiments.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Yamada, Steven A; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-01-11

    Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) are membranes that have ionic liquids impregnated in their pores. SILMs have been proposed for advanced carbon capture materials. Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective IR pump-probe (PSPP) techniques were used to investigate the dynamics of reorientation and spectral diffusion of the linear triatomic anion, SeCN(-), in poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membranes and room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EmimNTf2). The dynamics in the bulk EmimNTf2 were compared to its dynamics in the SILM samples. Two PES membranes, PES200 and PES30, have pores with average sizes, ∼300 nm and ∼100 nm, respectively. Despite the relatively large pore sizes, the measurements reveal that the reorientation of SeCN(-) and the RTIL structural fluctuations are substantially slower in the SILMs than in the bulk liquid. The complete orientational randomization, slows from 136 ps in the bulk to 513 ps in the PES30. 2D IR measurements yield three time scales for structural spectral diffusion (SSD), that is, the time evolution of the liquid structure. The slowest decay constant increases from 140 ps in the bulk to 504 ps in the PES200 and increases further to 1660 ps in the PES30. The results suggest that changes at the interface propagate out and influence the RTIL structural dynamics even more than a hundred nanometers from the polymer surface. The differences between the IL dynamics in the bulk and in the membranes suggest that studies of bulk RTIL properties may be poor guides to their use in SILMs in carbon capture applications.

  1. Couplings Across the Vibrational Spectrum Caused by Strong Hydrogen Bonds: A Continuum 2D IR Study of the 7-Azaindole-Acetic Acid Heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Stingel, Ashley M; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-10-11

    Strongly hydrogen-bonded motifs provide structural stability and can act as proton transfer relays to drive chemical processes in biological and chemical systems. However, structures with medium and strong hydrogen bonds are difficult to study due to their characteristically broad vibrational bands and large anharmonicity. This is further complicated by strong interactions between the high-frequency hydrogen-bonded vibrational modes, fingerprint modes, and low-frequency intradimer modes that modulate the hydrogen-bonding. Understanding these structures and their associated dynamics requires studying much of the vibrational spectrum. Here, mid-IR continuum spectroscopy of the cyclic 7-azaindole-acetic acid (7AI-AcOH) heterodimer reveals the vibrational relaxation dynamics and couplings of this complex hydrogen-bonded system. Within this dimer, the NH bond of 7AI exhibits a band at 3250 cm(-1) caused by a medium strength hydrogen bond, while the strongly hydrogen-bonded OH modes of acetic acid exhibit a broad double-peaked vibrational feature spanning 1750 to 2750 cm(-1). Transient IR and 2D IR experiments were performed using three excitation frequencies, centered on the high-frequency OH and NH modes, and probed with a mid-IR continuum to measure the spectral response from 1000 to 3500 cm(-1). While the NH stretch is observed to relax in 300 fs, the strongly hydrogen-bonded OH modes relax within the time resolution of the experiment (sub-100 fs). The difference in the strength of the hydrogen bonds is also reflected in the coupling pattern in the fingerprint region observed with 2D IR spectroscopy. Here the NH is strongly coupled to fingerprint modes involving the 7AI monomer, while the OH vibrations are strongly coupled to vibrational modes across the entire dimer. Together, the results show strong coupling and rapid energy transfer across the hydrogen-bonded interface and through the structure of the 7-azaindole-acetic acid heterodimer, highlighting the need to

  2. Mid-IR semiconductor lasers for chemical sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The development of mid-IR semiconductor diode lasers based on type-II interband cascade structures is presented. How these diode lasers can be developed to meet the requirements in chemical sensing applications is discussed.

  3. Mid-IR semiconductor lasers for chemical sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The development of mid-IR semiconductor diode lasers based on type-II interband cascade structures is presented. How these diode lasers can be developed to meet the requirements in chemical sensing applications is discussed.

  4. c2d Spitzer IRS spectra of embedded low-mass young stars: gas-phase emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahuis, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Blake, G. A.; Evans, N. J.

    2010-09-01

    Context. A survey of mid-infrared gas-phase emission lines of H2, H2O and various atoms toward a sample of 43 embedded low-mass young stars in nearby star-forming regions is presented. The sources are selected from the Spitzer “Cores to Disks” (c2d) legacy program. Aims: The environment of embedded protostars is complex both in its physical structure (envelopes, outflows, jets, protostellar disks) and the physical processes (accretion, irradiation by UV and/or X-rays, excitation through slow and fast shocks) which take place. The mid-IR spectral range hosts a suite of diagnostic lines which can distinguish them. A key point is to spatially resolve the emission in the Spitzer-IRS spectra to separate extended PDR and shock emission from compact source emission associated with the circumstellar disk and jets. Methods: An optimal extraction method is used to separate both spatially unresolved (compact, up to a few hundred AU) and spatially resolved (extended, thousand AU or more) emission from the IRS spectra. The results are compared with the c2d disk sample and literature PDR and shock models to address the physical nature of the sources. Results: Both compact and extended emission features are observed. Warm (T_ex few hundred K) H2, observed through the pure rotational H2 S(0), S(1) and S(2) lines, and [S i] 25 μm emission is observed primarily in the extended component. [S i] is observed uniquely toward truly embedded sources and not toward disks. On the other hand hot (T_ex ⪆ 700 K) H2, observed primarily through the S(4) line, and [Ne ii] emission is seen mostly in the spatially unresolved component. [Fe ii] and [Si ii] lines are observed in both spatial components. Hot H2O emission is found in the spatially unresolved component of some sources. Conclusions: The observed emission on ≥1000 AU scales is characteristic of PDR emission and likely originates in the outflow cavities in the remnant envelope created by the stellar wind and jets from the embedded

  5. [Identification and analysis of genuine and false Flos Rosae Rugosae by FTIR and 2D correlation IR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Cai, Fang; Sun, Su-qin; Yan, Wen-rong; Niu, Shi-jie; Li, Xian-en

    2009-09-01

    The genuine and false Flos Rosae Rugosae (Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora) were examined in terms of their differences by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) combined with two-dimensional (2D) correlation IR spectroscopy. The three species were shown very similar in FTIR spectra. The peak of 1318 cm(-1) of genuine Flos Rosae Rugosae is not obvious but this peak could be found sharp in Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora. Generally, the second derivative IR spectrum can clearly enhance the spectral resolution. Flos Rosae Rugosae and Flos rosae Chinensis have aromatic compounds distinct fingerprint characteristics at 1 617 and 1 618 cm(-1), respectively. Nevertheless, FlosRosa multiflora has the peak at 1612 cm(-1). There is a discrepancy of 5 to 6 cm(-1). FlosRosa multiflora has glucide's distinct fingerprint characteristics at 1 044 cm(-1), but Flos Rosae Rugosae and Flos Rosae Chinensis don't. The second derivative infrared spectra indicated different fingerprint characteristics. Three of them showed aromatic compounds with autopeaks at 1620, 1560 and 1460 cm(-1). Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora have the shoulder peak at 1660 cm(-1). In the range of 850-1250 cm(-1), three of them are distinct different, Flos Rosae Rugosae has the strongest autopeak, Flos Rosae Chinensis has the feeble autopeak and Flos Rosa multiflora has no autopeak at 1050 cm(-1). In third-step identification, the different contents of aromatic compounds and glucide in Flos Rosae Rugosae, Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora were revealed. It is proved that the method is fast and effective for distinguishing and analyzing genuine Flos Rosae Rugosae and false Flos Rosae Rugosae (Flos Rosae Chinensis and Flos Rosa multiflora).

  6. Band Gap Engineering in a 2D Material for Solar-to-Chemical Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Guo, Zhenkun; Mcwilliams, Peter E; Darges, John E; Druffel, Daniel L; Moran, Andrew M; Warren, Scott C

    2016-01-13

    The electronic structure of 2D semiconductors depends on their thickness, providing new opportunities to engineer semiconductors for energy conversion, electronics, and catalysis. Here we show how a 3D semiconductor, black phosphorus, becomes active for solar-to-chemical energy conversion when it is thinned to a 2D material. The increase in its band gap, from 0.3 eV (3D) to 2.1 eV (2D monolayer), is accompanied by a 40-fold enhancement in the formation of chemical products. Despite this enhancement, smaller flakes also have shorter excited state lifetimes. We deduce a mechanism in which recombination occurs at flake edges, while the "van der Waals" surface of black phosphorus bonds to chemical intermediates and facilitates electron transfer. The unique properties of black phosphorus highlight its potential as a customizable material for solar energy conversion and catalysis, while also allowing us to identify design rules for 2D photocatalysts that will enable further improvements in these materials.

  7. Volatility-dependent 2D IR correlation analysis of traditional Chinese medicine ‘Red Flower Oil’ preparation from different manufacturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-Wen; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhou, Qun; Tao, Jia-Xun; Noda, Isao

    2008-06-01

    As a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), 'Red Flower Oil' preparation is widely used as a household remedy in China and Southeast Asia. Usually, the preparation is a mixture of several plant essential oils with different volatile features, such as wintergreen oil, turpentine oil and clove oil. The proportions of these plant essential oils in 'Red Flower Oil' vary from different manufacturers. Thus, it is important to develop a simple and rapid evaluation method for quality assurance of the preparations. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) was applied and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) based on the volatile characteristic of samples was used to enhance the resolution of FT-IR spectra. 2D IR technique could, not only easily provide the composition and their volatile sequences in 'Red flower Oil' preparations, but also rapidly discriminate the subtle differences in products from different manufacturers. Therefore, FT-IR combined with volatility-dependent 2D IR correlation analysis provides a very fast and effective method for the quality control of essential oil mixtures in TCM.

  8. The structure of salt bridges between Arg(+) and Glu(-) in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu(-)) and arginine (Arg(+)) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu(-) and Arg(+), which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu(-)⋯Arg(+) salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  9. The structure of salt bridges between Arg+ and Glu- in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R.; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu-) and arginine (Arg+) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu- and Arg+, which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu-⋯Arg+ salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  10. Chemical intercalation of zerovalent metals into 2D layered Bi2Se3 nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Koski, Kristie J; Wessells, Colin D; Reed, Bryan W; Cha, Judy J; Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2012-08-22

    We have developed a chemical method to intercalate a variety of zerovalent metal atoms into two-dimensional (2D) layered Bi(2)Se(3) chalcogenide nanoribbons. We use a chemical reaction, such as a disproportionation redox reaction, to generate dilute zerovalent metal atoms in a refluxing solution, which intercalate into the layered Bi(2)Se(3) structure. The zerovalent nature of the intercalant allows superstoichiometric intercalation of metal atoms such as Ag, Au, Co, Cu, Fe, In, Ni, and Sn. We foresee the impact of this methodology in establishing novel fundamental physical behaviors and in possible energy applications.

  11. Fully adiabatic 31P 2D-CSI with reduced chemical shift displacement error at 7 T--GOIA-1D-ISIS/2D-CSI.

    PubMed

    Chmelík, M; Kukurová, I Just; Gruber, S; Krššák, M; Valkovič, L; Trattnig, S; Bogner, W

    2013-05-01

    A fully adiabatic phosphorus (31P) two-dimensional (2D) chemical shift spectroscopic imaging sequence with reduced chemical shift displacement error for 7 T, based on 1D-image-selected in vivo spectroscopy, combined with 2D-chemical shift spectroscopic imaging selection, was developed. Slice-selective excitation was achieved by a spatially selective broadband GOIA-W(16,4) inversion pulse with an interleaved subtraction scheme before nonselective adiabatic excitation, and followed by 2D phase encoding. The use of GOIA-W(16,4) pulses (bandwidth 4.3-21.6 kHz for 10-50 mm slices) reduced the chemical shift displacement error in the slice direction ∼1.5-7.7 fold, compared to conventional 2D-chemical shift spectroscopic imaging with Sinc3 selective pulses (2.8 kHz). This reduction was experimentally demonstrated with measurements of an MR spectroscopy localization phantom and with experimental evaluation of pulse profiles. In vivo experiments in clinically acceptable measurement times were demonstrated in the calf muscle (nominal voxel volume, 5.65 ml in 6 min 53 s), brain (10 ml, 6 min 32 s), and liver (8.33 ml, 8 min 14 s) of healthy volunteers at 7 T. High reproducibility was found in the calf muscle at 7 T. In combination with adiabatic excitation, this sequence is insensitive to the B1 inhomogeneities associated with surface coils. This sequence, which is termed GOIA-1D-ISIS/2D-CSI (goISICS), has the potential to be applied in both clinical research and in the clinical routine. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Lipophilic chemical exposure as a cause of type 2 diabetes (T2D).

    PubMed

    Zeliger, Harold I

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide in pandemic-like numbers. It is considered, at least in part, to be an environmental illness. Recent research has shown that diabetes can be caused by exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs), exudates from common plastics, air pollution, primary and secondary tobacco smoke, and some pharmaceuticals. These chemicals vary widely in structure, chemical properties, and composition and are not currently believed to induce a similar effect. A unifying explanation for the induction of T2D by this diversified group of chemicals is proposed here. These toxicants have one thing in common. All are lipophilic species that permeate lipophilic body membranes, thereby promoting the absorption of toxic hydrophilic species that would otherwise not penetrate lipophilic membranes. It is further proposed that exposure to the lipophilic and hydrophilic species need not occur simultaneously but can occur sequentially, with the lipophile absorbed first and retained in body serum, followed by a subsequent exposure to the hydrophile. The lipophilic chemical can be one of the POPs (including dioxins, furans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or organochlorine pesticides); a more rapidly metabolized or eliminated species including plastic exudates like phthalate esters and bisphenol A; air pollutants and tobacco smoke components including aliphatic, aromatic, or polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons; or pharmaceuticals like some statins and second-generation antipsychotic drugs. This hypothesis suggests that the T2D pandemic as well as the rapid increase of other environmental disease prevalence is, at least in part, due to sequential exposure to levels of lipophilic and hydrophilic environmental pollutants that are much lower than those currently believed to be toxic. As a consequence of this hypothesis, the allowable levels of exposure to these pollutants should be

  13. Development of 2-D Array of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) for Far-IR Investigations of the Outer Planets and Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakew, Brook

    2009-09-01

    A 2-D array of superconducting Magnesium Diboride(MgB2) far -IR thermal detectors has been fabricated. Such an array is intended to be at the focal plane of future generation thermal imaging far-IR instruments that will investigate the outer planets and their icy moons. Fabrication and processing of the pixels of the array as well as noise characterization of architectured MgB2 thin films will be presented. Challenges and solutions for improving the performance of the array will be discussed.

  14. D2d(23)-C84 versus Sc2C2@D2d(23)-C84: Impact of Endohedral Sc2C2 Doping on Chemical Reactivity in the Photolysis of Diazirine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michio; Tanabe, Yukiko; Dang, Jing-Shuang; Sato, Satoru; Mizorogi, Naomi; Hachiya, Makoto; Suzuki, Mitsuaki; Abe, Tsuneyuki; Kurihara, Hiroki; Maeda, Yutaka; Zhao, Xiang; Lian, Yongfu; Nagase, Shigeru; Akasaka, Takeshi

    2016-12-21

    We compared the chemical reactivity of D2d(23)-C84 and that of Sc2C2@D2d(23)-C84, both having the same carbon cage geometry, in the photolysis of 2-adamantane-2,3'-[3H]-diazirine, to clarify metal-atom doping effects on the chemical reactivity of the carbon cage. Experimental and computational studies have revealed that the chemical reactivity of the D2d(23)-C84 carbon cage is altered drastically by endohedral Sc2C2 doping. The reaction of empty D2d(23)-C84 with the diazirine under photoirradiation yields two adamantylidene (Ad) adducts. NMR spectroscopic studies revealed that the major Ad monoadduct (C84(Ad)-A) has a fulleroid structure and that the minor Ad monoadduct (C84(Ad)-B) has a methanofullerene structure. The latter was also characterized using X-ray crystallography. C84(Ad)-A is stable under photoirradiation, but it interconverted to C84(Ad)-B by heating at 80 °C. In contrast, the reaction of endohedral Sc2C2@D2d(23)-C84 with diazirine under photoirradiation affords four Ad monoadducts (Sc2C2@C84(Ad)-A, Sc2C2@C84(Ad)-B, Sc2C2@C84(Ad)-C, and Sc2C2@C84(Ad)-D). The structure of Sc2C2@C84(Ad)-C was characterized using X-ray crystallography. Thermal interconversion of Sc2C2@C84(Ad)-A and Sc2C2@C84(Ad)-B to Sc2C2@C84(Ad)-C was also observed. The reaction mechanisms of the Ad addition and thermal interconversion were elucidated from theoretical calculations. Calculation results suggest that C84(Ad)-B and Sc2C2@C84(Ad)-C are thermodynamically favorable products. Their different chemical reactivities derive from Sc2C2 doping, which raises the HOMO and LUMO levels of the D2d(23)-C84 carbon cage.

  15. Effect of solvent polarity on the vibrational dephasing dynamics of the nitrosyl stretch in an Fe(II) complex revealed by 2D IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Jennifer F; Slenkamp, Karla M; Lynch, Michael S; Khalil, Munira

    2013-07-25

    The vibrational dephasing dynamics of the nitrosyl stretching vibration (ν(NO)) in sodium nitroprusside (SNP, Na2[Fe(CN)5NO]·2H2O) are investigated using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy. The ν(NO) in SNP acts as a model system for the nitrosyl ligand found in metalloproteins which play an important role in the transportation and detection of nitric oxide (NO) in biological systems. We perform a 2D IR line shape study of the ν(NO) in the following solvents: water, deuterium oxide, methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol, formamide, and dimethyl sulfoxide. The frequency of the ν(NO) exhibits a large vibrational solvatochromic shift of 52 cm(-1), ranging from 1884 cm(-1) in dimethyl sulfoxide to 1936 cm(-1) in water. The vibrational anharmonicity of the ν(NO) varies from 21 to 28 cm(-1) in the solvents used in this study. The frequency-frequency correlation functions (FFCFs) of the ν(NO) in SNP in each of the seven solvents are obtained by fitting the experimentally obtained 2D IR spectra using nonlinear response theory. The fits to the 2D IR line shape reveal that the spectral diffusion time scale of the ν(NO) in SNP varies from 0.8 to 4 ps and is negatively correlated with the empirical solvent polarity scales. We compare our results with the experimentally determined FFCFs of other charged vibrational probes in polar solvents and in the active sites of heme proteins. Our results suggest that the vibrational dephasing dynamics of the ν(NO) in SNP reflect the fluctuations of the nonhomogeneous electric field created by the polar solvents around the nitrosyl and cyanide ligands. The solute solvent interactions occurring at the trans-CN ligand are sensed through the π-back-bonding network along the Fe-NO bond in SNP.

  16. Simulation of FT-IR spectra and 2D-COS analysis for the H/D exchange of two related ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iloro, Ibon; Pastrana-Rios, Belinda

    2006-11-01

    Two-dimensional IR correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) is a relatively novel method that provides the analysis of infrared spectra with the capacity to differentiate overlapping peaks and to distinguish between in-phase and out-of-phase spectral responses. The technique is becoming popular for protein dynamic studies, like H/D exchange attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform-infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy. The use of this technique provides the capability to resolve the dynamic molecular events that occur upon H → D exchange of accessible amide protons and exchangeable protons within side chain (Arg, Tyr) that are commonly overlapped. The value of the use of simulated spectra to generate the 2D-COS plots is that it allows for confirmation of the existence of the auto-peaks and its correlations. Because of this, we have employed the use of simulated spectra originated from backbone vibrational contributions such as amide I, I', II and II' bands for a case study presented herein. Intensity, bandwidth, and band position were the parameters used to study their variation in the correlation plots during a typical H/D exchange ATR-FT-IR experiment. These simulations are compared with experimental spectral data from ATR-FT-IR analysis in order to separate the backbone contribution from the highly overlapped side chain contributions (mainly Arg and Tyr).

  17. 2D NMR Barcoding and Differential Analysis of Complex Mixtures for Chemical Identification: The Actaea Triterpenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of NMR spectroscopic information for structure elucidation involves decoding of complex resonance patterns that contain valuable molecular information (δ and J), which is not readily accessible otherwise. We introduce a new concept of 2D-NMR barcoding that uses clusters of fingerprint signals and their spatial relationships in the δ−δ coordinate space to facilitate the chemical identification of complex mixtures. Similar to widely used general barcoding technology, the structural information of individual compounds is encoded as a specifics pattern of their C,H correlation signals. Software-based recognition of these patterns enables the structural identification of the compounds and their discrimination in mixtures. Using the triterpenes from various Actaea (syn. Cimicifuga) species as a test case, heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) barcodes were generated on the basis of their structural subtypes from a statistical investigation of their δH and δC data in the literature. These reference barcodes allowed in silico identification of known triterpenes in enriched fractions obtained from an extract of A. racemosa (black cohosh). After dereplication, a differential analysis of heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectra even allowed for the discovery of a new triterpene. The 2D barcoding concept has potential application in a natural product discovery project, allowing for the rapid dereplication of known compounds and as a tool in the search for structural novelty within compound classes with established barcodes. PMID:24673652

  18. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Feng; Chen, YiPing; You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)₃]₃[CoW₁₂O₄₀]·9H₂O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)₃]₂[FeW₁₂O₄₀]·H₃O·H₂O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)₃]²⁺ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm⁻¹, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  19. Physico-chemical spectroscopic mapping of the planetary nebula NGC 40 and the 2D_NEB, a new 2D algorithm to study ionized nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M. L.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Monteiro, H.; Richards, J. W.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the physical and chemical conditions of the planetary nebula NGC 40 through spatially resolved spectroscopic maps. We also introduce a new algorithm -2D_NEB- based on the well-established IRAF nebular package, which was developed to enable the use of the spectroscopic maps to easily estimate the astrophysical quantities of ionized nebulae. The 2D_NEB was benchmarked, and we clearly show that it works properly, since it compares nicely with the IRAF nebular software. Using this software, we derive the maps of several physical parameters of NGC 40. From these maps, we conclude that Te[N II] shows only a slight temperature variation from region to region, with its values constrained between ˜8000 and 9500 K. Electron densities, on the other hand, have a much more prominent spatial variation, as Ne[S II] values vary from ˜1000 to 3000 cm-3. Maps of the chemical abundances also show significant variations. From the big picture of our work, we strongly suggest that analysis with spatial resolution be mandatory for more complete study of the physical and chemical properties of planetary nebulae.

  20. Identification of the Excited-State C═C and C═O Modes of trans-β-Apo-8'-carotenal with Transient 2D-IR-EXSY and Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Ragnoni, Elena; Lapini, Andrea; Kardaś, Tomasz M; Ratajska-Gadomska, Boźena; Foggi, Paolo; Righini, Roberto

    2015-05-07

    Assigning the vibrational modes of molecules in the electronic excited state is often a difficult task. Here we show that combining two nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, transient 2D exchange infrared spectroscopy (T2D-IR-EXSY) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), the contribution of the C═C and C═O modes in the excited-state vibrational spectra of trans-β-apo-8'-carotenal can be unambiguously identified. The experimental results reported in this work confirm a previously proposed assignment based on quantum-chemical calculations and further strengthen the role of an excited state with charge-transfer character in the relaxation pathway of carbonyl carotenoids. On a more general ground, our results highlight the potentiality of nonlinear spectroscopic methods based on the combined use of visible and infrared pulses to correlate structural and electronic changes in photoexcited molecules.

  1. A 2-D Self-Consistent DSMC Model for Chemically Reacting Low Pressure Plasma Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, Timothy J.; Economou, Demetre; Johannes, Justine E.

    1999-06-17

    This paper will focus on the methodology of using a 2D plasma Direct Simulation Monte Carlo technique to simulate the species transport in an inductively coupled, low pressure, chemically reacting plasma system. The pressure in these systems is typically less than 20 mtorr with plasma densities of approximately 10{sup 17} {number_sign}/m{sup 3} and an ionization level of only 0.1%. This low ionization level tightly couples the neutral, ion, and electron chemistries and interactions in a system where the flow is subsonic. We present our strategy and compare simulation results to experimental data for Cl{sub 2} in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell modified with an inductive coil.

  2. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Wang, Jun; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin; DeGrado, William F.; Gai, Feng; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2014-06-01

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  3. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Gai, Feng E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin

    2014-06-21

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  4. Synthesis, structure and temperature-depended 2D IR correlation spectroscopy of an organo-bismuth benzoate with 1,10-phenanthroline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan-Qiong; Zhong, Jie-Cen; Liu, Le-Hui; Qiu, Xing-Tai; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2016-11-01

    An organo-bismuth benzoate with phen as auxiliary ligand, [Bi(phen)(C6H5COO)(C6H4COO)] (1) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) has been hydrothermally synthesized from bismuth nitrate, 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid with phen as auxiliary ligand and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, PXRD, IR spectra, TG analyses, temperature-depended 2D-IR COS (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Interestingly, benzoate anions in 1 came from the desulfuration reaction of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid under hydrothermal condition. Compound 1 is a discrete organo-bismuth compound with benzoate and phen ligands. The offset face-to-face π-π stacking interactions and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the isolate complex into a 3D supramolecular network. The temperature-depended 2D-IR COS indicates that the stretching vibrations of Cdbnd C/Cdbnd N of aromatic rings and Cdbnd O bonds are sensitive to the temperature change.

  5. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments.

  6. CHEM2D: a two-dimensional, three-phase, nine-component chemical flood simulator. Volume I. CHEM2D technical description and FORTRAN code

    SciTech Connect

    Fanchi, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, a publicly available chemical simulator has been evaluated and substantially enhanced to serve as a useful tool for projecting polymer or chemical flood performance. The program, CHEM2D, is a two-dimensional, three-phase, nine-component finite-difference numerical simulator. It can model primary depletion, waterfloods, polymer floods, and micellar/polymer floods using heterogeneous linear, areal, or cross-sectional reservoir descriptions. The user may specify well performance as either pressure or rate constrained. Both a constant time step size and a variable time step size based on extrapolation of concentration changes are available as options. A solution technique which is implicit in pressure and explicit in saturations and concentrations is used. The major physical mechanisms that are modeled include adsorption, capillary trapping, cation exchange, dilution, dispersion, interfacial tension, binary or ternary phase behavior, non-Newtonian polymer rheology, and two-phase or three-phase relative permeability. Typical components include water, oil, surfactant, polymer, and three ions (chloride, calcium, and sodium). Components may partition amongst the aqueous, oleic, and microemulsion phases. Volume I of this report provides a discussion of the formulation and algorithms used within CHEM2D. Included in Volume I are a number of validation and illustrative examples, as well as the FORTRAN code. The CHEM2D user's manual, Volume II, contains both the input data sets for the examples presented in Volume I and an example output. All appendices and a phase behavior calculation program are collected in Volume III. 20 references.

  7. 2D-Visualization of metabolic activity with planar optical chemical sensors (optodes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R. J.; Liebsch, G.

    2015-12-01

    Microbia plays an outstandingly important role in many hydrologic compartments, such as e.g. the benthic community in sediments, or biologically active microorganisms in the capillary fringe, in ground water, or soil. Oxygen, pH, and CO2 are key factors and indicators for microbial activity. They can be measured using optical chemical sensors. These sensors record changing fluorescence properties of specific indicator dyes. The signals can be measured in a non-contact mode, even through transparent walls, which is important for many lab-experiments. They can measure in closed (transparent) systems, without sampling or intruding into the sample. They do not consume the analytes while measuring, are fully reversible and able to measure in non-stirred solutions. These sensors can be applied as high precision fiberoptic sensors (for profiling), robust sensor spots, or as planar sensors for 2D visualization (imaging). Imaging enables to detect thousands of measurement spots at the same time and generate 2D analyte maps over a region of interest. It allows for comparing different regions within one recorded image, visualizing spatial analyte gradients, or more important to identify hot spots of metabolic activity. We present ready-to-use portable imaging systems for the analytes oxygen, pH, and CO2. They consist of a detector unit, planar sensor foils and a software for easy data recording and evaluation. Sensors foils for various analytes and measurement ranges enable visualizing metabolic activity or analyte changes in the desired range. Dynamics of metabolic activity can be detected in one shot or over long time periods. We demonstrate the potential of this analytical technique by presenting experiments on benthic disturbance-recovery dynamics in sediments and microbial degradation of organic material in the capillary fringe. We think this technique is a new tool to further understand how microbial and geochemical processes are linked in (not solely) hydrologic

  8. Tunable IR differential absorption lidar for remote sensing of chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Coorg R.; Kabro, Pierre; Mathur, Savyasachee L.

    1999-10-01

    Standoff sensors for rapid remote detection of chemical emissions from either clandestine chemical production sites, chemical and biological warfare agents, concealed internal combustion engine emissions or rocket propellants from missiles are required for several DoD applications. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) operating in the infrared wavelengths has established itself as a very effective tool for rapidly detecting many of the chemicals, with sufficient sensitivity with a range of several kilometers. The wavelengths required for this task lie within the atmospheric window regions 3 to 5 micrometers and 8 to 12 micrometers . We are currently developing a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) tunable in the 3 to 5 micrometers range for detecting low concentrations of chemical species with high sensitivity (5 ppb) and accuracy (error < 10%) measurements for greater than 5 km range. We have successfully established the feasibility of an innovative frequency agile laser source which is the crucial component of the infrared DIAL. A diode-pumped ytterbium YAG laser was built for pumping and rapidly tuning an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) over the mid-infra red region. Good performance (5 mJ/pulse) of the laser and low threshold wide infra red tuning of OPO (2.2 - 3.1 micrometers ) were demonstrated. The simulated performance of the topographical IR-DIAL showed that 5 ppb concentration can be measured at 5 km range with a 35 cm telescope.

  9. Identifying residual structure in intrinsically disordered systems: a 2D IR spectroscopic study of the GVGXPGVG peptide.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Joshua; Roy, Santanu; Reppert, Mike; Baer, Marcel; Marx, Dominik; Jansen, Thomas La Cour; Knoester, Jasper; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-03-21

    The peptide amide-I vibration of a proline turn encodes information on the turn structure. In this study, FTIR, two-dimensional IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations were employed to characterize the varying turn conformations that exist in the GVGX(L)PGVG family of disordered peptides. This analysis revealed that changing the size of the side chain at the X amino acid site from Gly to Ala to Val substantially alters the conformation of the peptide. To quantify this effect, proline peak shifts and intensity changes were compared to a structure-based spectroscopic model. These simulated spectra were used to assign the population of type-II β turns, bulged turns, and irregular β turns for each peptide. Of particular interest was the Val variant commonly found in the protein elastin, which contained a 25% population of irregular β turns containing two peptide hydrogen bonds to the proline C═O.

  10. High-power THz to IR emission by femtosecond laser irradiation of random 2D metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangliang; Mu, Kaijun; Zhou, Yunsong; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X.-C.

    2015-07-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopic sensing and imaging has identified its potentials in a number of areas such as standoff security screening at portals, explosive detection at battle fields, bio-medical research, and so on. With these needs, the development of an intense and broadband THz source has been a focus of THz research. In this work, we report an intense (~10 mW) and ultra-broadband (~150 THz) THz to infrared (IR) source with a Gaussian wavefront, emitted from nano-pore-structured metallic thin films with femtosecond laser pulse excitation. The underlying mechanism has been proposed as thermal radiation. In addition, an intense coherent THz signal was generated through the optical rectification process simultaneously with the strong thermal signal. This unique feature opens up new avenues in biomedical research.

  11. High-power THz to IR emission by femtosecond laser irradiation of random 2D metallic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Mu, Kaijun; Zhou, Yunsong; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X-C

    2015-07-24

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopic sensing and imaging has identified its potentials in a number of areas such as standoff security screening at portals, explosive detection at battle fields, bio-medical research, and so on. With these needs, the development of an intense and broadband THz source has been a focus of THz research. In this work, we report an intense (~10 mW) and ultra-broadband (~150 THz) THz to infrared (IR) source with a Gaussian wavefront, emitted from nano-pore-structured metallic thin films with femtosecond laser pulse excitation. The underlying mechanism has been proposed as thermal radiation. In addition, an intense coherent THz signal was generated through the optical rectification process simultaneously with the strong thermal signal. This unique feature opens up new avenues in biomedical research.

  12. Combination of transient 2D-IR experiments and ab initio computations sheds light on the formation of the charge-transfer state in photoexcited carbonyl carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Segado Centellas, Mireia; Lapini, Andrea; Lima, Manuela; Avila, Francisco; Santoro, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Chiara; Righini, Roberto

    2014-08-14

    The excited state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids is very complex because of the coupling of single- and doubly excited states and the possible involvement of intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) states. In this contribution we employ ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and theoretical computations to investigate the relaxation dynamics of trans-8'-apo-β-carotenal occurring on the picosecond time scale, after excitation in the S2 state. In a (slightly) polar solvent like chloroform, one-dimensional (T1D-IR) and two-dimensional (T2D-IR) transient infrared spectroscopy reveal spectral components with characteristic frequencies and lifetimes that are not observed in nonpolar solvents (cyclohexane). Combining experimental evidence with an analysis of CASPT2//CASSCF ground and excited state minima and energy profiles, complemented with TDDFT calculations in gas phase and in solvent, we propose a photochemical decay mechanism for this system where only the bright single-excited 1Bu(+) and the dark double-excited 2Ag(-) states are involved. Specifically, the initially populated 1Bu(+) relaxes toward 2Ag(-) in 200 fs. In a nonpolar solvent 2Ag(-) decays to the ground state (GS) in 25 ps. In polar solvents, distortions along twisting modes of the chain promote a repopulation of the 1Bu(+) state which then quickly relaxes to the GS (18 ps in chloroform). The 1Bu(+) state has a high electric dipole and is the main contributor to the charge-transfer state involved in the dynamics in polar solvents. The 2Ag(-) → 1Bu(+) population transfer is evidenced by a cross peak on the T2D-IR map revealing that the motions along the same stretching of the conjugated chain on the 2Ag(-) and 1Bu(+) states are coupled.

  13. Critical Slowing of Density Fluctuations Approaching the Isotropic-Nematic Transition in Liquid Crystals: 2D IR Measurements and Mode Coupling Theory.

    PubMed

    Sokolowsky, Kathleen P; Bailey, Heather E; Hoffman, David J; Andersen, Hans C; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) data are presented for a vibrational probe in three nematogens: 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 4-cyano-4'-octylbiphenyl, and 4-(trans-4-amylcyclohexyl)-benzonitrile. The spectral diffusion time constants in all three liquids in the isotropic phase are proportional to [T*/(T - T*)](1/2), where T* is 0.5-1 K below the isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature (TNI). Rescaling to a reduced temperature shows that the decays of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) for all three nematogens fall on the same curve, suggesting a universal dynamic behavior of nematogens above TNI. Spectral diffusion is complete before significant orientational relaxation in the liquid, as measured by optically heterodyne detected-optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) spectroscopy, and before any significant orientational randomization of the probe measured by polarization selective IR pump-probe experiments. To interpret the OHD-OKE and FFCF data, we constructed a mode coupling theory (MCT) schematic model for the relationships among three correlation functions: ϕ1, a correlator for large wave vector density fluctuations; ϕ2, the orientational correlation function whose time derivative is the observable in the OHD-OKE experiment; and ϕ3, the FFCF for the 2D IR experiment. The equations for ϕ1 and ϕ2 match those in the previous MCT schematic model for nematogens, and ϕ3 is coupled to the first two correlators in a straightforward manner. Resulting models fit the data very well. Across liquid crystals, the temperature dependences of the coupling constants show consistent, nonmonotonic behavior. A remarkable change in coupling occurs at ∼5 K above TNI, precisely where the rate of spectral diffusion in 5CB was observed to deviate from that of a similar nonmesogenic liquid.

  14. Carbon Dioxide in a Supported Ionic Liquid Membrane: Structural and Rotational Dynamics Measured with 2D IR and Pump-Probe Experiments.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Yamada, Steven A; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-08-16

    Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) are porous membranes impregnated with ionic liquids (ILs) and used as advanced carbon capture materials. Here, two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and IR polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) spectroscopies were used to investigate CO2 reorientation and spectral diffusion dynamics in SILMs. The SILM contained 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonly)imide in the poly(ether sulfone) membrane with average pore size of ∼350 nm. Two ensembles of CO2 were observed in the SILM, one in the IL phase in the membrane pores and the other in the supporting membrane polymer. CO2 in the polymer displayed a red-shifted IR absorption spectrum and a shorter vibrational lifetime of the asymmetric stretch mode compared to the IL phase. Despite the relatively large pore sizes, the complete orientational randomization of CO2 and structural fluctuations of the IL (spectral diffusion) in the pores are slower than in the bulk IL by ∼2-fold. The implication is that the IL structural change induced by the polymer interface can propagate out from the interface more than a hundred nanometers, influencing the dynamics. The dynamics in the polymer are even slower. This study demonstrates that there are significant differences in the dynamics of ILs in SILMs on a molecular level compared to the bulk IL, and the study of dynamics in SILMs can provide important information for the design of SILMs for CO2 capture.

  15. Initial results with the LLNL 2-D chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Connell, P.S.; Grant, K.E.; Tarp, R.; Taylor, K.E.

    1987-09-01

    Significant progress has been made at LLNL in the development of a zonally averaged (two-dimensional) chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere. Although further model development and refinement is being planned the LLNL 2-D model is currently ready to be applied to appropriately designed research studies of stratospheric chemical processes and interactions. Several such studies are now underway. This paper provides a description of the existing 2-D model and discusses some of the pertinent results for evaluating the capabilities of the model. Special attempts at improving the timing of the model are also discussed. 6 figs.

  16. Generalized Mechanistic Model for the Chemical Vapor Deposition of 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Govind Rajan, Ananth; Warner, Jamie H; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S

    2016-04-26

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) like molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) are layered materials capable of growth to one monolayer thickness via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Such CVD methods, while powerful, are notoriously difficult to extend across different reactor types and conditions, with subtle variations often confounding reproducibility, particularly for 2D TMD growth. In this work, we formulate the first generalized TMD synthetic theory by constructing a thermodynamic and kinetic growth mechanism linked to CVD reactor parameters that is predictive of specific geometric shape, size, and aspect ratio from triangular to hexagonal growth, depending on specific CVD reactor conditions. We validate our model using experimental data from Wang et al. (Chem. Mater. 2014, 26, 6371-6379) that demonstrate the systemic evolution of MoS2 morphology down the length of a flow CVD reactor where variations in gas phase concentrations can be accurately estimated using a transport model (CSulfur = 9-965 μmol/m(3); CMoO3 = 15-16 mmol/m(3)) under otherwise isothermal conditions (700 °C). A stochastic model which utilizes a site-dependent activation energy barrier based on the intrinsic TMD bond energies and a series of Evans-Polanyi relations leads to remarkable, quantitative agreement with both shape and size evolution along the reactor. The model is shown to extend to the growth of WS2 at 800 °C and MoS2 under varied process conditions. Finally, a simplified theory is developed to translate the model into a "kinetic phase diagram" of the growth process. The predictive capability of this model and its extension to other TMD systems promise to significantly increase the controlled synthesis of such materials.

  17. Mixed IR/Vis two-dimensional spectroscopy: chemical exchange beyond the vibrational lifetime and sub-ensemble selective photochemistry.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Messmer, Andreas T; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2014-03-03

    Two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy (2D EXSY) is a powerful method to study the interconversion (chemical exchange) of molecular species in equilibrium. This method has recently been realized in femtosecond 2D-IR spectroscopy, dramatically increasing the time resolution. However, current implementations allow the EXSY signal (and therefore the chemical process of interest) only to be tracked during the lifetime (T1 ) of the observed spectroscopic transition. This is a severe limitation, as typical vibrational T1 are only a few ps. An IR/Vis pulse sequence is presented that overcomes this limit and makes the EXSY signal independent of T1 . The same pulse sequence allows to collect time-resolved IR spectra after electronic excitation of a particular chemical species in a mixture of species with strongly overlapping UV/Vis spectra. Different photoreaction pathways and dynamics of coexisting isomers or of species involved in different intermolecular interactions can thus be revealed, even if the species cannot be isolated because they are in rapid equilibrium.

  18. Study of non-axisymmetric divertor footprints using 2-D IR and visible cameras and a 3-D heat conduction solver in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J-W.; Gan, K. F.; Scotti, F.; Lore, J. D.; Maingi, R.; Canik, J. M.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A. G.; Roquemore, A. L.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-01-12

    Toroidally non-axisymmetric divertor profiles during the 3-D field application and for ELMs are studied with simultaneous observation by a new wide angle visible camera and a high speed IR camera. A newly implemented 3-D heat conduction code, TACO, is used to obtain divertor heat flux. The wide angle camera data confirmed the previously reported result on the validity of vacuum field line tracing on the prediction of split strike point pattern by 3-D fields as well as the phase locking of ELM heat flux to the 3-D fields. TACO calculates the 2- D heat flux distribution allowing assessment of toroidal asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width. Lastly, the degree of asymmetry (εDA) is defined to quantify the asymmetric heat deposition on the divertor surface and is found to have a strong positive dependence on peak heat flux.

  19. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO2 in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide's point of view.

    PubMed

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A; Krisher, Cullen S; Lambrecht, Daniel S; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-06-07

    The CO2ν3 asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO2 is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C4C1im][X], where [X](-) is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF6 (-)), tetrafluoroborate (BF4 (-)), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf2N(-)), triflate (TfO(-)), trifluoroacetate (TFA(-)), dicyanamide (DCA(-)), and thiocyanate (SCN(-))). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν3 center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO2 and from CO2 to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO2, which in turn changes the ν3 frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν2 and ν3 normal modes of CO2. Thermal fluctuations in the ν2 population stochastically modulate the ν3 frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO2. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO2 are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations.

  20. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO2 in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide's point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J.; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A.; Krisher, Cullen S.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-06-01

    The CO2ν3 asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO2 is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C4C1im][X], where [X]- is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF 6- ), tetrafluoroborate (BF 4- ), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf2N-), triflate (TfO-), trifluoroacetate (TFA-), dicyanamide (DCA-), and thiocyanate (SCN-)). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν3 center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO2 and from CO2 to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO2, which in turn changes the ν3 frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν2 and ν3 normal modes of CO2. Thermal fluctuations in the ν2 population stochastically modulate the ν3 frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO2. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO2 are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations.

  1. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO{sub 2} in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide’s point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J.; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A.; Krisher, Cullen S.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-06-07

    The CO{sub 2}ν{sub 3} asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO{sub 2} is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C{sub 4}C{sub 1}im][X], where [X]{sup −} is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF{sub 6}{sup −}), tetrafluoroborate (BF{sub 4}{sup −}), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf{sub 2}N{sup −}), triflate (TfO{sup −}), trifluoroacetate (TFA{sup −}), dicyanamide (DCA{sup −}), and thiocyanate (SCN{sup −})). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν{sub 3} center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO{sub 2} and from CO{sub 2} to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO{sub 2}, which in turn changes the ν{sub 3} frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν{sub 2} and ν{sub 3} normal modes of CO{sub 2}. Thermal fluctuations in the ν{sub 2} population stochastically modulate the ν{sub 3} frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO{sub 2}. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO{sub 2} are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations.

  2. Hierarchical alignment and full resolution pattern recognition of 2D NMR spectra: application to nematode chemical ecology.

    PubMed

    Robinette, Steven L; Ajredini, Ramadan; Rasheed, Hasan; Zeinomar, Abdulrahman; Schroeder, Frank C; Dossey, Aaron T; Edison, Arthur S

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used nondestructive technique in analytical chemistry. In recent years, it has been applied to metabolic profiling due to its high reproducibility, capacity for relative and absolute quantification, atomic resolution, and ability to detect a broad range of compounds in an untargeted manner. While one-dimensional (1D) (1)H NMR experiments are popular in metabolic profiling due to their simplicity and fast acquisition times, two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra offer increased spectral resolution as well as atomic correlations, which aid in the assignment of known small molecules and the structural elucidation of novel compounds. Given the small number of statistical analysis methods for 2D NMR spectra, we developed a new approach for the analysis, information recovery, and display of 2D NMR spectral data. We present a native 2D peak alignment algorithm we term HATS, for hierarchical alignment of two-dimensional spectra, enabling pattern recognition (PR) using full-resolution spectra. Principle component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression of full resolution total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) spectra greatly aid the assignment and interpretation of statistical pattern recognition results by producing back-scaled loading plots that look like traditional TOCSY spectra but incorporate qualitative and quantitative biological information of the resonances. The HATS-PR methodology is demonstrated here using multiple 2D TOCSY spectra of the exudates from two nematode species: Pristionchus pacificus and Panagrellus redivivus. We show the utility of this integrated approach with the rapid, semiautomated assignment of small molecules differentiating the two species and the identification of spectral regions suggesting the presence of species-specific compounds. These results demonstrate that the combination of 2D NMR spectra with full-resolution statistical analysis provides a platform for chemical and

  3. AFM-IR: Technology and Applications in Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dazzi, Alexandre; Prater, Craig B

    2016-12-13

    Atomic force microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a rapidly emerging technique that provides chemical analysis and compositional mapping with spatial resolution far below conventional optical diffraction limits. AFM-IR works by using the tip of an AFM probe to locally detect thermal expansion in a sample resulting from absorption of infrared radiation. AFM-IR thus can provide the spatial resolution of AFM in combination with the chemical analysis and compositional imaging capabilities of infrared spectroscopy. This article briefly reviews the development and underlying technology of AFM-IR, including recent advances, and then surveys a wide range of applications and investigations using AFM-IR. AFM-IR applications that will be discussed include those in polymers, life sciences, photonics, solar cells, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, and cultural heritage. In the Supporting Information , the authors provide a theoretical section that reviews the physics underlying the AFM-IR measurement and detection mechanisms.

  4. Exfoliation of crystalline 2D carbon nitride: thin sheets, scrolls and bundles via mechanical and chemical routes.

    PubMed

    Bojdys, Michael J; Severin, Nikolai; Rabe, Jürgen P; Cooper, Andrew I; Thomas, Arne; Antonietti, Markus

    2013-05-27

    The carbon nitride poly(triazine imide) with intercalated bromide ions is a layered, graphitic material of 2D covalently bonded molecular sheets with an exceptionally large gallery height of 3.52 Å due to the intercalated bromide anions. The material can be cleaved both mechanically and chemically into thin sheets and scrolls analogous to the carbon-only systems graphite and graphene. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Parallel β-sheet vibrational couplings revealed by 2D IR spectroscopy of an isotopically labeled macrocycle: quantitative benchmark for the interpretation of amyloid and protein infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Woys, Ann Marie; Almeida, Aaron M; Wang, Lu; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; McGovern, Michael; de Pablo, Juan J; Skinner, James L; Gellman, Samuel H; Zanni, Martin T

    2012-11-21

    Infrared spectroscopy is playing an important role in the elucidation of amyloid fiber formation, but the coupling models that link spectra to structure are not well tested for parallel β-sheets. Using a synthetic macrocycle that enforces a two stranded parallel β-sheet conformation, we measured the lifetimes and frequency for six combinations of doubly (13)C═(18)O labeled amide I modes using 2D IR spectroscopy. The average vibrational lifetime of the isotope labeled residues was 550 fs. The frequencies of the labels ranged from 1585 to 1595 cm(-1), with the largest frequency shift occurring for in-register amino acids. The 2D IR spectra of the coupled isotope labels were calculated from molecular dynamics simulations of a series of macrocycle structures generated from replica exchange dynamics to fully sample the conformational distribution. The models used to simulate the spectra include through-space coupling, through-bond coupling, and local frequency shifts caused by environment electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. The calculated spectra predict the line widths and frequencies nearly quantitatively. Historically, the characteristic features of β-sheet infrared spectra have been attributed to through-space couplings such as transition dipole coupling. We find that frequency shifts of the local carbonyl groups due to nearest neighbor couplings and environmental factors are more important, while the through-space couplings dictate the spectral intensities. As a result, the characteristic absorption spectra empirically used for decades to assign parallel β-sheet secondary structure arises because of a redistribution of oscillator strength, but the through-space couplings do not themselves dramatically alter the frequency distribution of eigenstates much more than already exists in random coil structures. Moreover, solvent exposed residues have amide I bands with >20 cm(-1) line width. Narrower line widths indicate that the amide I backbone is solvent

  6. Integrated optical sensors for 2D spatial chemical mapping (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Raquel; Janeiro, Ricardo; Viegas, Jaime

    2017-02-01

    Sensors based on optical waveguides for chemical sensing have attracted increasing interest over the last two decades, fueled by potential applications in commercial lab-on-a-chip devices for medical and food safety industries. Even though the early studies were oriented for single-point detection, progress in device size reduction and device yield afforded by photonics foundries have opened the opportunity for distributed dynamic chemical sensing at the microscale. This will allow researchers to follow the dynamics of chemical species in field of microbiology, and microchemistry, with a complementary method to current technologies based on microfluorescence and hyperspectral imaging. The study of the chemical dynamics at the surface of photoelectrodes in water splitting cells are a good candidate to benefit from such optochemical sensing devices that includes a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) with multiple sensors for real-time detection and spatial mapping of chemical species. In this project, we present experimental results on a prototype integrated optical system for chemical mapping based on the interaction of cascaded resonant optical devices, spatially covered with chemically sensitive polymers and plasmon-enhanced nanostructured metal/metal-oxide claddings offering chemical selectivity in a pixelated surface. In order to achieve a compact footprint, the prototype is based in a silicon photonics platform. A discussion on the relative merits of a photonic platform based on large bandgap metal oxides and nitrides which have higher chemical resistance than silicon is also presented.

  7. Soy Protein Isolate and Glycerol Hydrogen Bonding Using Two-Dimensional Correlation (2D-COS) Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiwei; Li, Qian; Zhang, Pudun

    2017-01-01

    It is a trend to substitute bioplastics for petroleum-based plastics in food packaging. Glycerol-plasticized soy protein isolate (SPI) is promising as a replacement for traditional petroleum-based plastics. Hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) plays a key role in plasticization of SPI film. However, few publications are concerned with the interactions of SPI and glycerol at the molecular level. In this paper, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy was applied to investigate the effect of H-bonding on the secondary structures of glycerol-plasticized SPI films and thus on the plasticization. An "S" profile of the H-bonding between SPI and glycerol with an abrupt jump in the glycerol range of 10-30% was achieved. For more in-depth investigation of the H-bonding, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and perturbation-correlation moving-window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) analyses were applied to the amide I and II bands of SPI films spectra series. The conformation change sequences under the effect of H-bonding were revealed. When glycerol was involved, it entered into the β-sheet and the H-bonds of the SPI peptide backbone (C = O···H-N-) were replaced by the new H-bonds between SPI and glycerol (C = O···H-O-). The transformations of parallel β-sheet to β-turn in the range of 0-20% and anti-parallel β-sheet to β-turn in the range of 20-35% were obtained. In the 35-60% concentration range, the β-sheet was first changed to a transition state conformation, then together with the β-turn, to the random coil. The 2D-COS results clearly suggest that the conformations of SPI gradually change from the ordered to the less ordered and disordered, which significantly improve the plasticity of SPI film.

  8. Selection of the NIR region for a regression model of the ethanol concentration in fermentation process by an online NIR and mid-IR dual-region spectrometer and 2D heterospectral correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Takashi; Genkawa, Takuma; Watari, Masahiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    A new selection procedure of an informative near-infrared (NIR) region for regression model building is proposed that uses an online NIR/mid-infrared (mid-IR) dual-region spectrometer in conjunction with two-dimensional (2D) NIR/mid-IR heterospectral correlation spectroscopy. In this procedure, both NIR and mid-IR spectra of a liquid sample are acquired sequentially during a reaction process using the NIR/mid-IR dual-region spectrometer; the 2D NIR/mid-IR heterospectral correlation spectrum is subsequently calculated from the obtained spectral data set. From the calculated 2D spectrum, a NIR region is selected that includes bands of high positive correlation intensity with mid-IR bands assigned to the analyte, and used for the construction of a regression model. To evaluate the performance of this procedure, a partial least-squares (PLS) regression model of the ethanol concentration in a fermentation process was constructed. During fermentation, NIR/mid-IR spectra in the 10000 - 1200 cm(-1) region were acquired every 3 min, and a 2D NIR/mid-IR heterospectral correlation spectrum was calculated to investigate the correlation intensity between the NIR and mid-IR bands. NIR regions that include bands at 4343, 4416, 5778, 5904, and 5955 cm(-1), which result from the combinations and overtones of the C-H group of ethanol, were selected for use in the PLS regression models, by taking the correlation intensity of a mid-IR band at 2985 cm(-1) arising from the CH(3) asymmetric stretching vibration mode of ethanol as a reference. The predicted results indicate that the ethanol concentrations calculated from the PLS regression models fit well to those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. Thus, it can be concluded that the selection procedure using the NIR/mid-IR dual-region spectrometer combined with 2D NIR/mid-IR heterospectral correlation spectroscopy is a powerful method for the construction of a reliable regression model.

  9. Trace organic chemical attenuation during managed aquifer recharge: Insights from a variably saturated 2D tank experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnery, Julia; Lee, Jonghyun; Drumheller, Zachary W.; Drewes, Jörg E.; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Kitanidis, Peter K.; McCray, John E.; Smits, Kathleen M.

    2017-05-01

    Meaningful model-based predictions of water quality and quantity are imperative for the designed footprint of managed aquifer recharge installations. A two-dimensional (2D) synthetic MAR system equipped with automated sensors (temperature, water pressure, conductivity, soil moisture, oxidation-reduction potential) and embedded water sampling ports was used to test and model fundamental subsurface processes during surface spreading managed aquifer recharge operations under controlled flow and redox conditions at the meso-scale. The fate and transport of contaminants in the variably saturated synthetic aquifer were simulated using the finite element analysis model, FEFLOW. In general, the model concurred with travel times derived from contaminant breakthrough curves at individual sensor locations throughout the 2D tank. However, discrepancies between measured and simulated trace organic chemical concentrations (i.e., carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate, trimethoprim) were observed. While the FEFLOW simulation of breakthrough curves captured overall shapes of trace organic chemical concentrations well, the model struggled with matching individual data points, although compound-specific attenuation parameters were used. Interestingly, despite steady-state operation, oxidation-reduction potential measurements indicated temporal disturbances in hydraulic properties in the saturated zone of the 2D tank that affected water quality.

  10. Application and further development of diffusion based 2D chemical imaging techniques in the rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefer, Christoph; Santner, Jakob; Borisov, Sergey; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Wenzel, Walter; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Two dimensional chemical imaging of root processes refers to novel in situ methods to investigate and map solutes at a high spatial resolution (sub-mm). The visualization of these solutes reveals new insights in soil biogeochemistry and root processes. We derive chemical images by using data from DGT-LA-ICP-MS (Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) and POS (Planar Optode Sensors). Both technologies have shown promising results when applied in aqueous environment but need to be refined and improved for imaging at the soil-plant interface. Co-localized mapping using combined DGT and POS technologies and the development of new gel combinations are in our focus. DGTs are smart and thin (<0.4 mm) hydrogels; containing a binding resin for the targeted analytes (e.g. trace metals, phosphate, sulphide or radionuclides). The measurement principle is passive and diffusion based. The present analytes are diffusing into the gel and are bound by the resin. Thereby, the resin acts as zero sink. After application, DGTs are retrieved, dried, and analysed using LA-ICP-MS. The data is then normalized by an internal standard (e.g. 13C), calibrated using in-house standards and chemical images of the target area are plotted using imaging software. POS are, similar to DGT, thin sensor foils containing a fluorophore coating depending on the target analyte. The measurement principle is based on excitation of the flourophore by a specific wavelength and emission of the fluorophore depending on the presence of the analyte. The emitted signal is captured using optical filters and a DSLR camera. While DGT analysis is destructive, POS measurements can be performed continuously during the application. Both semi-quantitative techniques allow an in situ application to visualize chemical processes directly at the soil-plant interface. Here, we present a summary of results from rhizotron experiments with different plants in metal

  11. Thermal Shock Properties of a 2D-C/SiC Composite Prepared by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengyu; Wang, Xuanwei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Yongsheng; Han, Dong; Qiao, Shengru; Guo, Yong

    2013-06-01

    The thermal shock properties of a two-dimensional carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite with a multilayered self-healing coating (2D-C/SiC) were investigated in air. The composite was prepared by low-pressure chemical vapor infiltration. 2D-C/SiC specimens were thermally shocked for different cycles between 900 and 300 °C. The thermal shock resistance was characterized by residual tensile properties and mass variation. The change of the surface morphology and microstructural evolution of the composite were examined by a scanning electron microscope. In addition, the phase evolution on the surfaces was identified using an X-ray diffractometer. It is found that the composite retains its tensile strength within 20 thermal shock cycles. However, the modulus of 2D-C/SiC decreases gradually with increasing thermal shock cycles. Extensive pullout of fibers on the fractured surface and peeling off of the coating suggest that the damage caused by the thermal shock involves weakening of the bonding strength of coating/composite and fiber/matrix. In addition, the carbon fibers in the near-surface zone were oxidized through the matrix cracks, and the fiber/matrix interfaces delaminated when the composite was subjected to a larger number of thermal shock cycles.

  12. One pot sono-chemical synthesis of 2D layered MoS{sub 2} nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kapatel, Sanni; Sumesh, C. K.

    2016-05-06

    Two-dimensional nanocrystals and monolayer of transition metal dichalcogenides show fascinating changes in its properties such as transition from direct to the indirect bandgap material. Due to light interaction with these monolayers optical absorption is enhanced in visible range a lot. Here, we report the synthesis of molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) nanocrystals through a time dependent sono-chemical liquid exfoliation method and its structural and optical analysis. The prepared nanocrystals of MoS{sub 2} have exhibited high crystalline quality with strong diffraction to the (002) plane at 14.44° in the X-ray diffractrogram. It was observed that the concentration of nanocrystals in the dispersion inclined by increasing the sonication time. The optical absorption study revealed an optical band gap of 1.84 eV.

  13. Application of 2D-GCMS reveals many industrial chemicals in airborne particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammed S.; West, Charles E.; Scarlett, Alan G.; Rowland, Steven J.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2013-02-01

    Samples of airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) have been collected in Birmingham, UK and extracted with dichloromethane prior to analysis by two-dimensional GC separation and TOFMS analysis. Identification of compounds using the NIST spectral library has revealed a remarkable diversity of compounds, some of which have not been previously reported in airborne analyses. Groups of compounds identified in this study include a large number of oxygenated VOC including linear and branched compounds, substituted aromatic compounds and alicyclic compounds, oxygenated polycyclic aromatic and alicyclic compounds, organic nitrogen compounds, branched chain VOC and substituted aromatic VOC, phthalates, organo-phosphates and organo-sulphate compounds. Many of the compounds identified are mass production chemicals, which due to their semi-volatility enter the atmosphere and subsequently partition onto pre-existing aerosol. Their contribution to the toxicity of airborne particulate matter is currently unknown but might be significant. The diverse industrial uses and potential sources of the identified compounds are reported.

  14. Versatile Method for Producing 2D and 3D Conductive Biomaterial Composites Using Sequential Chemical and Electrochemical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Severt, Sean Y; Ostrovsky-Snider, Nicholas A; Leger, Janelle M; Murphy, Amanda R

    2015-11-18

    Flexible and conductive biocompatible materials are attractive candidates for a wide range of biomedical applications including implantable electrodes, tissue engineering, and controlled drug delivery. Here, we demonstrate that chemical and electrochemical polymerization techniques can be combined to create highly versatile silk-conducting polymer (silk-CP) composites with enhanced conductivity and electrochemical stability. Interpenetrating silk-CP composites were first generated via in situ deposition of polypyrrole during chemical polymerization of pyrrole. These composites were sufficiently conductive to serve as working electrodes for electropolymerization, which allowed an additional layer of CP to be deposited on the surface. This sequential method was applied to both 2D films and 3D sponge-like silk scaffolds, producing conductive materials with biomimetic architectures. Overall, this two-step technique expanded the range of available polymers and dopants suitable for the synthesis of mechanically robust, biocompatible, and highly conductive silk-based materials.

  15. Chemically modified IR-transparent fibers and their application as chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellner, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    With the advent of chalcogenide- (As-Se-Te), Silverhalide- (AgBrCl) and TeXAs-fibers, the optical window available for analytical chemistry was significantly extended into the MID- and FAR-IR range (2 to 20 {mu}m) recently. These fibers have been chemically modified in our laboratory at 10 cm-distances of their surfaces (A) by covering them with 10-100 {mu}m thick layers of a suitable polymer such as LDPE ({open_quotes}Thickfilm-Sensor{close_quotes}) and (B) by immobilizing specifically reacting enzyme-layers such as GOx ({open_quotes}Thinfilm-Sensor{close_quotes}). In the first case, where the penetration depth of the IR-beam is smaller than the thickness of the polymer layer, a sensor for the simultaneous in situ-determination of chlorinated hydrocarbon traces in water down to 500 ppb could be developed and tested. In the second case, a system for the determination of glucose in complex aqueous solutions was developed, based on the catalytic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide by the immobilized enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) in the physiological range. The GOx-density at the fibers could be significantly enlarged by using S-Layers instead of silanes for immobilization. Secondly, a flow injection-approach was developed recently, which allowed for an even further increase of the enzyme density by separating the reaction- and detection-part of our sensor, using controlled pore glass as carrier for the GOx and tapered chalcogenide fibers for detection. With this system, which works perfectly linear in the physiological range also for urea (with urease) a practical (multi)enzyme-based IR-sensor system is presented for the first time.

  16. Effect of excluded volume on 2D discrete stochastic chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampoudi, Sotiria; Gillespie, Dan T.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2009-06-01

    The stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) is widely used in the discrete stochastic simulation of chemical kinetics. The propensity functions which play a central role in this algorithm have been derived under the point-molecule assumption, i.e., that the total volume of the molecules is negligible compared to the volume of the container. It has been shown analytically that for a one-dimensional system and the A + A reaction, when the point-molecule assumption is relaxed, the propensity function need only be adjusted by replacing the total volume of the system with the free volume of the system. In this paper we investigate via numerical simulations the impact of relaxing the point-molecule assumption in two dimensions. We find that the distribution of times to the first collision is close to exponential in most cases, so that the formalism of the propensity function is still applicable. In addition, we find that the area excluded by the molecules in two dimensions is usually higher than their close-packed area, requiring a larger correction to the propensity function than just the replacement of the total volume by the free volume.

  17. IR LASER BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR THE COOPERATIVE MONITORING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A Whitaker

    2005-08-08

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the device properties of the quantum cascade laser (QCL), a type of laser invented at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies in the device physics research lab of Dr. Federico Capasso and more specifically to determine the remote sensing capability of this device. The PI and Stevens Institute of Technology collaborated with Dr. Capasso and Bell Laboratories to carry out this research project. The QCL is a unique laser source capable of generating laser radiation in the middle-infrared spectral region that overlaps the most important molecular absorption bands. With appropriate modulation techniques it is possible to use the laser to measure the concentration of many molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. In addition, the mid-IR emission wavelength is well suited to atmospheric transmission as mid-IR experiences much less scattering due to dust and fog. At the onset of this project little was known about several key device performance parameters of this family of lasers and the NNSA supported research enabled them to determine values of several of these characteristics.

  18. Instabilities of propagating quasi-2D gaseous flames and chemical fronts in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, Mohamed

    1999-12-01

    In order to examine systematically the effects of buoyancy and thermal expansion on propagating fronts, two types of fronts, one having small thermal expansion and one having large thermal expansion, were studied in two- dimensional Hele-Shaw cells (a narrow gap between two flat parallel plates). These cells were used because it is probably the simplest flow apparatus capable of exhibiting buoyancy effects. The small-expansion fronts employed were aqueous Autocatalytic Chemical Reaction fronts that produce propagating fronts, similar to premixed gas flame fronts. The aqueous systems have numerous advantages over gaseous fronts for obtaining fundamental data on the interaction between propagating fronts and buoyancy. These advantages include nearly constant density, nearly constant thermodynamic and transport properties, negligible influence of heat losses, and a high Schmidt number. Only upward propagating fronts exhibited wrinkling, indicating that buoyancy effects induced wrinkling. A well-defined characteristic wrinkle wavelength was found that was practically independent of the cell thickness and the laminar propagation rate but inversely proportional to the square root of the cosine angle between gravity and the propagating front. The only mechanism consistent with these observations is the presence of an effective surface tension at the interface between product and reactant, which, according to the Saffman-Taylor analysis, will produce a wavelength selection mechanism for buoyantly unstable flows. Correlation between a buoyancy parameter and the wrinkled front speed matched the Yakhot model for the effect of turbulence intensity on turbulent flame speed reasonably well even with no adjustable parameters. Experiments using gaseous flame fronts were also performed in order to compare with aqueous fronts to assess thermal expansion effects and heat losses. The gaseous flames were composed of CH4 or C3H 8 as fuel, O2 as oxidizer and N2 or CO2 as diluent

  19. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsching, K. J.; Yang, Y.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of 13C and 15N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D 13C–13C, 15N–13C, or 3D 15N–13C–13C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D 13C–13C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the Cα and Cβ chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40–60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO–Cα–Cβ or N–Cα–Cβ), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination. PMID:23625364

  20. QCLs and the future of IR chemical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlette, Jeremy A.; Fotheringham, Edeline; Weida, Miles J.; Chapman, William B.; Larson, Paul; Day, Tiim

    2016-09-01

    High-fidelity, broadly-tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are replacing thermal light sources in next-generation infrared chemical imaging and microscopy instrumentation. Their superior spectral brightness, beam quality, and reliability are enabling new applications in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and industrial markets which demand substantially better noise performance, higher throughput, and ease-of-use. In this talk we will discuss the state-of-the-art in QCL source technology and describe our systems approach to leveraging QCL sources in the next-generation of infrared chemical imaging microscopes.

  1. Dynamics-based selective 2D 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-01

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of 1H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of 1H/1H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials.

  2. [Revisiting the chemical diversity in prostatic calculi: a SEM and FT-IR investigation].

    PubMed

    Dessombz, A; Méria, P; Bazin, D; Foy, E; Rouzière, S; Weil, R; Daudon, M

    2011-12-01

    Revisiting the chemical diversity of the crystalline phases of prostatic calculi by means of SEM and FT-IR analysis. A set of 32 prostatic calculi has been studied by FT-IR and SEM. FT-IR analysis has determined the chemical composition of each prostatic calculus and the SEM observation has described the morphology of the calculi surfaces and layers. Infrared analysis revealed that 90.7% of the stones were mainly composed of calcium phosphates. However, several mineral phases previously not reported in prostatic calculi were observed, as brushite or octocalcium phosphate pentahydrate. Prostatic calculi exhibited a diversity of crystalline composition and morphology. As previously reported for urinary calculi, relationships between composition and morphology of prostatic stones and étiopathogenic conditions could be of interest in clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The ionized gas in the central region of NGC 5253. 2D mapping of the physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal-Ibero, A.; Walsh, J. R.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies constitute the ideal laboratories to test the interplay between massive star formation and the surrounding gas. As one of the nearest BCD galaxies, NGC 5253 was previously studied with the aim to elucidate in detail the starburst interaction processes. Some open issues regarding the properties of its ionized gas still remain to be addressed. Aims: The 2D structure of the main physical and chemical properties of the ionized gas in the core of NGC 5253 has been studied. Methods: Optical integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data has been obtained with FLAMES Argus and lower resolution gratings of the Giraffe spectrograph. Results: We derived 2D maps for different tracers of electron density (ne), electron temperature (Te) and ionization degree. The maps for ne as traced by [O ii], [S ii], [Fe iii], and [Ar iv] line ratios are compatible with a 3D stratified view of the nebula with the highest ne in the innermost layers and a decrease of ne outwards. 2D maps of Te were measured from [O iii] and [S ii] line ratios; to our knowledge, this is the first time that a Te map based on [S ii] lines for an extragalactic object has been presented. The joint interpretation of the Te([S ii]) and Te([O iii]) maps is consistent with a Te structure in 3D with higher temperatures close to the main ionizing source surrounded by a colder and more diffuse component. The highest ionization degree is found at the peak of emission for the gas with relatively high ionization in the main Giant H ii Region and lower ionization degree delineating the more extended diffuse component. We derived abundances of oxygen, neon, argon, and nitrogen. Abundances for O, Ne and Ar are constant over the mapped area within ≲0.1 dex. The mean 12 + log (O/H) is 8.26 ± 0.04 while the relative abundances of log (N/O), log (Ne/O) and log (Ar/O) were ~-1.32 ± 0.05, -0.65 ± 0.03 and -2.33 ± 0.06, respectively. There are two locations with enhanced N/O. The first (log (N

  4. Identification of Serine Conformers by Matrix-Isolation IR Spectroscopy Aided by Near-Infrared Laser-Induced Conformational Change, 2D Correlation Analysis, and Quantum Mechanical Anharmonic Computations.

    PubMed

    Najbauer, Eszter E; Bazsó, Gábor; Apóstolo, Rui; Fausto, Rui; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Tarczay, György

    2015-08-20

    The conformers of α-serine were investigated by matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy combined with NIR laser irradiation. This method, aided by 2D correlation analysis, enabled unambiguously grouping the spectral lines to individual conformers. On the basis of comparison of at least nine experimentally observed vibrational transitions of each conformer with empirically scaled (SQM) and anharmonic (GVPT2) computed IR spectra, six conformers were identified. In addition, the presence of at least one more conformer in Ar matrix was proved, and a short-lived conformer with a half-life of (3.7 ± 0.5) × 10(3) s in N2 matrix was generated by NIR irradiation. The analysis of the NIR laser-induced conversions revealed that the excitation of the stretching overtone of both the side chain and the carboxylic OH groups can effectively promote conformational changes, but remarkably different paths were observed for the two kinds of excitations.

  5. From 4d Yang-Mills to 2d ℂℙN - 1 model: IR problem and confinement at weak coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito; Yonekura, Kazuya

    2017-07-01

    We study four-dimensional SU( N) Yang-Mills theory on R× T^3=R× {S}_A^1× {S}_B^1× {S}_C^1 , with a twisted boundary condition by a ℤ N center symmetry imposed on S B 1 × S C 1 . This setup has no IR zero modes and hence is free from IR divergences which could spoil trans-series expansion for physical observables. Moreover, we show that the center symmetry is preserved at weak coupling regime. This is shown by first reducing the theory on T^2={S}_A× {S}_B , to connect the model to the two-dimensional ℂℙ N- 1-model. Then, we prove that the twisted boundary condition by the center symmetry for the Yang-Mills is reduced to the twisted boundary condition by the ℤ N global symmetry of ℂℙ N- 1. There are N classical vacua, and fractional instantons connecting those N vacua dynamically restore the center symmetry. We also point out the presence of singularities on the Borel plane which depend on the shape of the compactification manifold, and comment on its implications.

  6. IR/THz Double Resonance Spectroscopy Approach for Remote Chemical Detection at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Elizabeth A.; Phillips, Dane J.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Everitt, Henry O.

    2013-06-01

    A remote sensing methodology based on infrared/terahertz (IR/THz) double resonance (DR) spectroscopy is shown to overcome limitations traditionally associated with either IR or THz spectroscopic approaches for detecting trace gases in an atmosphere. The applicability of IR/THz DR spectroscopy is explored by estimating the IR and THz power requirements for detecting a 100 part-per-million-meter cloud of methyl fluoride, methyl chloride, or methyl bromide at ranges up to 1km in three atmospheric windows below 0.3 THz. These prototypical molecules are used to ascertain the dependence of the DR signal-to-noise ratio on IR and THz beam power. A line-tunable CO_2 laser with 100 ps pulse duration generates a DR signature in four rotational transitions on a time scale commensurate with collisional relaxations caused by atmospheric N_2 and O_2. A continuous wave THz beam is frequency tuned to probe one of these rotational transitions so that laser-induced absorption variations in the analyte cloud are detected as temporal power fluctuations synchronized with the laser pulses. A combination of molecule-specific physics and scenario-dependent atmospheric conditions are used to predict the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for detecting an analyte as a function of cloud column density. A methodology is presented by which the optimal IR/THz pump/probe frequencies are identified. These estimates show the potential for low concentration chemical detection in a challenging atmospheric scenario with currently available or near term hardware components.

  7. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  8. Atmospheric Nitrogen Trifluoride: Optimized emission estimates using 2-D and 3-D Chemical Transport Models from 1973-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy, D. J.; Rigby, M. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Muhle, J.; Weiss, R. F.

    2009-12-01

    We present optimized annual global emissions from 1973-2008 of nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), a powerful greenhouse gas which is not currently regulated by the Kyoto Protocol. In the past few decades, NF3 production has dramatically increased due to its usage in the semiconductor industry. Emissions were estimated through the 'pulse-method' discrete Kalman filter using both a simple, flexible 2-D 12-box model used in the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) network and the Model for Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART v4.5), a full 3-D atmospheric chemistry model. No official audited reports of industrial NF3 emissions are available, and with limited information on production, a priori emissions were estimated using both a bottom-up and top-down approach with two different spatial patterns based on semiconductor perfluorocarbon (PFC) emissions from the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR v3.2) and Semiconductor Industry Association sales information. Both spatial patterns used in the models gave consistent results, showing the robustness of the estimated global emissions. Differences between estimates using the 2-D and 3-D models can be attributed to transport rates and resolution differences. Additionally, new NF3 industry production and market information is presented. Emission estimates from both the 2-D and 3-D models suggest that either the assumed industry release rate of NF3 or industry production information is still underestimated.

  9. TREC Chemical IR Track 2009: A Distributed Dimensional Indexing Model for Chemical Patent Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Services (AWS) Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2) instances and 15 Elastic Block Storage (EBS) database shards to support efficient indexing and query... iodide (AgI), or silver fluorides. Chemical patent retrieval requires not only the identification of named entities, but the relationships between...MyISAM storage engine was used for index storage and retrieval. 15 Amazon Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2) m1.small instances based on the Ubuntu

  10. Status of the solar and infrared radiation submodels in the LLNL 1-D and 2-D chemical-transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Ellis, J.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have implemented a series of state of the art radiation transport submodels in previously developed one dimensional and two dimensional chemical transport models of the troposphere and stratosphere. These submodels provide the capability of calculating accurate solar and infrared heating rates. They are a firm basis for further radiation submodel development as well as for studying interactions between radiation and model dynamics under varying conditions of clear sky, clouds, and aerosols. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  11. 2D Lattice Boltzmann Simulation Of Chemical Reactions Within Rayleigh-Bénard And Poiseuille-Bénard Convection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya-Ventura, Gilberto; Rodríguez-Romo, Suemi

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with the computational simulation of the reaction-diffusion-advection phenomena emerging in Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) and Poiseuille-Bénard reactive convection systems. We use the Boussinesq's approximation for buoyancy forces and the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The first kinetic mesoscopic model proposed here is based on the discrete Boltzmann equation needed to solve the momentum balance coupled with buoyancy forces. Then, a second lattice Boltzmann algorithm is applied to solve the reaction-diffusion-advection equation to calculate the evolution of the chemical species concentration. We use a reactive system composed by nitrous oxide (so call laughing gas) in air as an example; its spatio-temporal decomposition is calculated. Two cases are considered, a rectangular enclosed cavity and an open channel. The simulations are performed at low Reynolds numbers and in a steady state between the first and second thermo-hydrodynamic instabilities. The results presented here, for the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior, are in good agreement with experimental data; while our| chemical kinetics simulation yields expected results. Some applications of our approach are related to chemical reactors and atmospheric phenomena, among others.

  12. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a solar flux induced chemical process

    SciTech Connect

    Markham, J.R.; Cosgrove, J.E.; Nelson, C.M.; Bonanno, A.S.; Schlief, R.E.; Stoy, M.A.; Glatzmaier, G.C.; Bingham, C.E.; Lewandowski, A.A.

    1997-08-01

    The capability to perform in-situ, on-line monitoring of processes induced by concentrated solar flux will enhance the development and utilization of solar technologies. Temperature measurements and chemical concentration measurements provide an understanding of the ongoing chemistry, process limits, and process reproducibility. A Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer was optically coupled to a quartz flow reactor at the High Flux Solar Furnace of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, CO. In-situ emission/transmission spectroscopy was utilized to simultaneously monitor steam temperature and the concentration of formed hydrogen bromide during the solar flux induced reaction of steam and bromine. The photochemical process is being investigated for the production of industrial quantities of hydrogen and oxygen, where downstream electrolysis of the formed hydrogen bromide provides the hydrogen and regenerates bromine. Steam temperature was measured to increase upon the addition of bromine to the reactor. Gas temperature increases of 200 C to 400 C were observed. Hydrogen bromide concentrations up to ten percent of the reactor gas volume was measured. The FT-IR system provided quantitative information of two critical parameters of the measured process and serves to accelerate this technology area.

  13. FT-IR Analysis of Urinary Stones: A Helpful Tool for Clinician Comparison with the Chemical Spot Test

    PubMed Central

    Primiano, Aniello; D'Addessi, Alessandro; Cocci, Andrea; Schiattarella, Arcangelo; Zuppi, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Kidney stones are a common illness with multifactorial etiopathogenesis. The determination of crystalline and molecular composition and the quantification of all stone components are important to establish the etiology of stones disease but it is often laborious to obtain using the chemical method. The aim of this paper is to compare chemical spot test with FT-IR spectroscopy, for a possible introduction in our laboratory. Methods. We analyzed 48 calculi using Urinary Calculi Analysis kit in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. The same samples were analyzed by FT-IR using the Perkin Elmer Spectrum One FT-IR Spectrometer. All FT-IR spectra of kidney stones were then computer matched against a library of spectra to generate a report on the various components. Results. On the basis of FT-IR analysis, the 48 calculi were divided into three groups: pure stone, mixed stone, and pure stone with substances in trace. Results of each group were compared with those obtained with chemical spot test. A general disagreement between methods was observed. Conclusions. According to our data, the introduction of the FT-IR technique in clinical chemistry laboratory may be more responsive to clinician expectations. PMID:24868112

  14. FT-IR analysis of urinary stones: a helpful tool for clinician comparison with the chemical spot test.

    PubMed

    Primiano, Aniello; Persichilli, Silvia; Gambaro, Giovanni; Ferraro, Pietro Manuel; D'Addessi, Alessandro; Cocci, Andrea; Schiattarella, Arcangelo; Zuppi, Cecilia; Gervasoni, Jacopo

    2014-01-01

    Kidney stones are a common illness with multifactorial etiopathogenesis. The determination of crystalline and molecular composition and the quantification of all stone components are important to establish the etiology of stones disease but it is often laborious to obtain using the chemical method. The aim of this paper is to compare chemical spot test with FT-IR spectroscopy, for a possible introduction in our laboratory. We analyzed 48 calculi using Urinary Calculi Analysis kit in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. The same samples were analyzed by FT-IR using the Perkin Elmer Spectrum One FT-IR Spectrometer. All FT-IR spectra of kidney stones were then computer matched against a library of spectra to generate a report on the various components. On the basis of FT-IR analysis, the 48 calculi were divided into three groups: pure stone, mixed stone, and pure stone with substances in trace. Results of each group were compared with those obtained with chemical spot test. A general disagreement between methods was observed. According to our data, the introduction of the FT-IR technique in clinical chemistry laboratory may be more responsive to clinician expectations.

  15. Chemical Sensors Based on IR Spectroscopy and Surface-Modified Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Gabriel P.; Niemczyk, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Sol-gel processing techniques have been used to apply thin porous films to the surfaces of planar infrared (IR) waveguides to produce widely useful chemical sensors. The thin- film coating serves to diminish the concentration of water and increase the concentration of the analyte in the region probed by the evanescent IR wave. These porous films are composed of silica, and therefore, conventional silica surface modification techniques can be used to give the surface a specific functional character. The sol-gel film was surface-modified to make the film highly hydrophobic. These sensors were shown to be capable of detecting non-polar organic analytes, such as benzonitrile, in aqueous solution with detection limits in the ppb range. Further, these porous sol-gel structures allow the analytes to diffuse into and out of the films rapidly, thus reaching equilibrium in less than ten seconds. These sensors are unique because of the fact that their operation is based on the measurement of an IR absorption spectrum. Thus, these sensors are able to identify the analytes as well as measure concentration with high sensitivity. These developments have been documented in previous reports and publications. Recently, we have also targeted detection of the polar organic molecules acetone and isopropanol in aqueous solution. Polar organics are widely used in industrial and chemical processes, hence it is of interest to monitor their presence in effluents or decontamination process flows. Although large improvements in detection limits were expected with non-polar organic molecules in aqueous solutions using very hydrophobic porous sol-gel films on silicon attenuated total reflectance (Si ATR) waveguides, it was not as clear what the detection enhancements might be for polar organic molecules. This report describes the use of modified sol-gel-coated Si ATR sensors for trace detection and quantitation of small polar organic molecules in aqueous solutions. The detection of both acetone

  16. The investigation of chemical structure of coal macerals via transmitted-light FT-IR microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuguang, Sun

    2005-11-01

    The Late Permian coals from South China are characterized by high content of the unique maceral "barkinite" and elemental hydrogen, typically produce high yields of tar, and exhibit significant oil-producing potential. "Barkinite" has been identified as suberinite for a long time, but now many Chinese workers have concluded that "barkinite" is not suberinite, rather it is a distinct maceral. The term "barkinite" was formally certified and named by the State Bureau of Technical Supervision of PR China in 1991, 1995, and 1999, however, it has not been recognized as a scientific term by international coal geologists and the ICCP. Transmitted-light FT-IR microspectroscopy and curve-fitting analysis were used to investigate the chemical structure of "barkinite"; at the same time, parallel studies were also carried out on vitrinite, fusinite, and sporinite. In comparison with other maceral types, the micro-FT-IR spectra of "barkinite" are characterized by very strong intensities of aliphatic CH x stretching vibrations at 3000-2800 cm -1 and deformations at 1460-1450 cm -1, less intense bands from aromatic C dbnd C ring stretching at 1610-1600 cm -1 and aromatic CH out-of-plane deformations at 900-700 cm -1. The aliphatic side-chains in the molecular structure of "barkinite" are longer and less branched. In addition, there also appear intense aliphatic ether C sbnd O sbnd C and alcohol C sbnd O stretching bands at 1100-1000 cm -1, notable aromatic CH stretching vibrations at 3050-3030 cm -1, weak OH stretching bands of water in the 3600-3200 cm -1 range, and rare acid C dbnd O group absorption at 1740-1700 cm -1. Collectively the IR spectral characteristics indicate that "barkinite" is composed of great numbers of long chain aliphatics, a fewer of aromatics and rare of oxygenate components. The chemical structure of "barkinite" show that the high tar yields and the relatively high oil-producing potential of the Late Permian coals from South China are attributable to the

  17. 2D_NEB package: a new tool for calculating physical and chemical maps of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M. L.; Goncalves, D. R.; Monteiro, H.

    In this work we present a new tool adapted from nebular, to determine, using two dimensional spatial data, the electron densities and temperatures, as well as ionic and total abundances of nebular objects. This algorithm is capable of performing the following operations: (i) to obtain the map of the c(Hβ) spatial distribution, based on two dimensional maps of the Balmer lines. (ii) Once the c(Hβ) map is determined, each emission-line map can be corrected by reddening. This operation allows different regions of the object to be corrected by the c(Hβ) value that better represents that given region. (iii) After all the emission-line maps are corrected, the package calculates the electron density and temperature maps, based on the main diagnostic ratios in the spectral range between ˜2,400 and 9,500 Å (e.g. Ne[OII], Ne[S II], Ne[Cl III], Te[N II], Te[O III], Te[S II]). (iv) Electron density and temperature maps can be used as input in the determination of the ionic abundances, using their respective emission-line maps. (v) Finally, our tool is also able of calculating maps of total chemical abundance making use of ionization correction factors from the literature. Results obtained from our package show no significant differences when compared with those obtained from nebular, the discrepancies being smaller than 1%. We used this new tool in the analysis of the planetary nebula NGC 40, where we obtained spatially resolved maps for its physical and chemical condition.

  18. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C.; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  19. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images.

    PubMed

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  20. Study of inclusion complex between 2,6-dinitrobenzoic acid and β-cyclodextrin by 1H NMR, 2D 1H NMR (ROESY), FT-IR, XRD, SEM and photophysical methods.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Krishnan; Stalin, Thambusamy

    2014-09-15

    The formation of host-guest inclusion complex of 2,6-dinitrobenzoic acid (2,6-DNB) with nano-hydrophobic cavity of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in solution phase has been studied by UV-visible spectroscopy and electrochemical analysis (cyclic voltammetry, CV). The effect of acid-base concentrations of 2,6-DNB has been studied in presence and absence of β-CD to determination for the ground state acidity constant (pKa). The binding constant of inclusion complex at 303 K was calculated using Benesi-Hildebrand plot and thermodynamic parameter (ΔG) was also calculated. The solid inclusion complex formation between β-CD and 2,6-DNB was confirmed by 1H NMR, 2D 1H NMR (ROESY), FT-IR, XRD and SEM analysis. A schematic representation of this inclusion process was proposed by molecular docking studies using patch dock server. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Characteristics of the complexing of chitosan with sodium dodecyl sulfate, according to IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilova, S. V.; Romanova, K. A.; Galyametdinov, Yu. G.; Tret'yakova, A. Ya.; Barabanov, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    The complexing of protonated chitosan with dodecyl sulfate ions in water solutions is studied using IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations. It is established that the electrostatic interaction between the protonated amino groups of chitosan and dodecyl sulfate ions is apparent in the IR spectrum as a band at 833 cm-1. The need to consider the effect the solvent has on the formation of hydrogen-bound ion pairs [CTS+ ṡ C12H25O 3 - ] is shown via a quantum-chemical simulation of the equilibrium geometry and the energy characteristics of complexing and hydration.

  2. Multi-GPU unsteady 2D flow simulation coupled with a state-to-state chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttafesta, Michele; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Colonna, Gianpiero

    2016-10-01

    In this work we are presenting a GPU version of a CFD code for high enthalpy reacting flow, using the state-to-state approach. In supersonic and hypersonic flows, thermal and chemical non-equilibrium is one of the fundamental aspects that must be taken into account for the accurate characterization of the plasma and state-to-state kinetics is the most accurate approach used for this kind of problems. This model consists in writing a continuity equation for the population of each vibrational level of the molecules in the mixture, determining at the same time the species densities and the distribution of the population in internal levels. An explicit scheme is employed here to integrate the governing equations, so as to exploit the GPU structure and obtain an efficient algorithm. The best performances are obtained for reacting flows in state-to-state approach, reaching speedups of the order of 100, thanks to the use of an operator splitting scheme for the kinetics equations.

  3. The chemical composition of animal cells reconstructed from 2D and 3D ToF-SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenstein, D.; Rommel, C. E.; Stolwijk, J.; Wegener, J.; Hagenhoff, B.

    2008-12-01

    This paper gives an overview on the progress achieved in our lab within the last two years in the analysis of single cells and tissue-like cell layers by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Basically two types of investigations were performed: on the one hand a two-dimensional imaging and on the other hand a three-dimensional microarea analysis. In both cases chemical fixation in combination with slow air-drying were used as easy sample preparation method. It was the goal of both approaches to identify the distribution of natural components as well as the localisation of xenobiotic fluorophors. In our experimental set-ups the distribution of phophatidylcholine and amino-acid signals were in line with the expectation. In contrast, the distribution of the fluorophor ethidiumhomodimer could only be detected within the two-dimensional imaging, whereas it was not detected in the three-dimensional analysis. Also four other fluorophors failed in the latter approach. Thus, in our hands the three-dimensional detection is to date limited to certain molecules with a comparably low mass and/or an intrinsical charge.

  4. Chemical curing in alkyd paints: an evaluation via FT-IR and NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, G; Marchiafava, V; Mirabello, V; Peruzzini, M; Picollo, M

    2014-01-24

    A study aimed at determining the time necessary for an alkyd paint to attain chemical curing is presented. In particular, the object of our investigation was an oil paint made by Winsor & Newton, namely French ultramarine (PB29) in the Griffin Alkyd "fast drying oil colour" series. Using this paint, we prepared several mock-ups on glass. These were left in the laboratory at room temperature in a piece of furniture with glass doors for a total of 70 days. Samples were taken at different times, and the changes in their composition were monitored by means of FT-IR and multinuclear NMR spectroscopic analyses. Since the cross-linking reactions involved in the formation of the pictorial film mainly affect the amount of carbon-carbon double bonds, we monitored the decrease in allyl, diallyl and vinyl protons and carbons. The data obtained from the use of both techniques led us to conclude that, in our particular experimental conditions, the chemical curing of the paint layer is reached within the first 70 days, thus establishing the beginning of the ageing phenomena. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical curing in alkyd paints: An evaluation via FT-IR and NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolozzi, G.; Marchiafava, V.; Mirabello, V.; Peruzzini, M.; Picollo, M.

    2014-01-01

    A study aimed at determining the time necessary for an alkyd paint to attain chemical curing is presented. In particular, the object of our investigation was an oil paint made by Winsor & Newton, namely French ultramarine (PB29) in the Griffin Alkyd “fast drying oil colour” series. Using this paint, we prepared several mock-ups on glass. These were left in the laboratory at room temperature in a piece of furniture with glass doors for a total of 70 days. Samples were taken at different times, and the changes in their composition were monitored by means of FT-IR and multinuclear NMR spectroscopic analyses. Since the cross-linking reactions involved in the formation of the pictorial film mainly affect the amount of carbon-carbon double bonds, we monitored the decrease in allyl, diallyl and vinyl protons and carbons. The data obtained from the use of both techniques led us to conclude that, in our particular experimental conditions, the chemical curing of the paint layer is reached within the first 70 days, thus establishing the beginning of the ageing phenomena.

  6. Detecting infrared luminescence and non-chemical signaling of living cells: single cell mid-IR spectroscopy in cryogenic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, Sergey

    2017-02-01

    Many life-relevant interaction energies are in IR range, and it is reasonable to believe that some biochemical reactions inside cells can results in emission of IR photons. Cells can use this emission for non-chemical and non-electrical signaling. Detecting weak infrared radiation from live cells is complicated because of strong thermal radiation background and absorption of radiation by tissues. A microfluidic device with live cells inside a vacuum cryogenic environment should suppress this background, and thereby permit observation of live cell auto-luminescence or signaling in the IR regime. One can make IR-transparent windows not emitting in this range, so only the cell and a small amount of liquid around it will emit infrared radiation. Currently mid-IR spectroscopy of single cells requires the use of a synchrotron source to measure absorption or reflection spectra. Decreasing of thermal radiation background will allow absorption and reflection spectroscopy of cells without using synchrotron light. Moreover, cell auto-luminescence can be directly measured. The complete absence of thermal background radiation for cryogenically cooled samples allows the use IR photon-sensitive detectors and obtaining single molecule sensitivity in IR photo-luminescence measurements. Due to low photon energies, photo-luminescence measurements will be non-distractive for pressures samples. The technique described here is based upon US patent 9366574.

  7. Online coupling of size-exclusion chromatography and IR spectroscopy to correlate molecular weight with chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Beskers, Timo F; Hofe, Thorsten; Wilhelm, Manfred

    2012-10-26

    The determination of molecular weight and correlated chemical composition is of major interest for the advanced analysis of copolymers, blends, or unknown samples. In this work, we present a new way of online coupling IR spectroscopy and SEC to achieve a chemically sensitive, universally applicable SEC detector. Our method overcomes the limitations of existing spectroscopy-SEC combinations. We solved the major problems, like huge intensity of solvent signals (polymer concentration in detector <1 g L(-1) ) and short measuring time (<30 s), by recording the IR spectra with fully optimized sensitivity and by following mathematical solvent suppression. The measuring time for a certain S/N was reduced in several optimization steps by a factor of more than 70 000. The resulting sensitivity allows online coupled IR-SEC measurements.

  8. An IR and Calorimetric Investigation of the Structural, Crystal-Chemical and Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrogrossular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, C. A.; Dachs, E.

    2012-04-01

    The garnet class of phases is extremely broad in terms of composition and structural properties. Garnet is found in nature and various synthetic garnet phases have a number of important technical applications. There exist the rock-forming silicate garnets that are so widespread geologically. An additional class is given by the so-called "hydrogarnets" in which the tetrahedral site (Wyckoff position 24d) is empty. At relatively low temperatures there is complete solid solution between Ca3Al2Si3O12 and Ca3Al2H12O12, for example. The substitution mechanism can be written as O4H4 \\lrarr SiO4. The latter, pure OH-containing end-member, which has not been found in nature, is termed katoite/hydrogrossular. Its structure has been investigated by various workers by X-ray and neutron diffraction and by proton NMR, IR and Raman spectroscopic methods. At ambient conditions the structure has the "standard" garnet cubic symmetry of Ia-3d. At high pressures, and possibly at low temperatures, a different structure may occur. We measured the low temperature IR spectra and heat capacity of katoite in order to understand its structural, crystal-chemical and thermophysical properties. A sample of Ca3Al2H12O12 was synthesized hydrothermally in Au capsules at 250 °C and 3 kb water pressure. X-ray powder measurements show that about 98-99% katoite was obtained. Powder IR spectra were recorded between 298 K and 10 K. The measured spectra are considerably different in the high wavenumber region, where O-H stretching modes occur, between 298 K and 10 K. At room temperature the IR-active O-H band located around 3662 cm-1 is broad and it narrows and shifts to higher wavenumbers and also develops structure below about 80 K. Concomitantly, additional weak intensity O-H bands located around 3600 cm-1 begin to appear and they become sharper and increase in intensity with further decreases in temperature down to 10 K. The spectra indicate that the vibrational behavior of individual OH groups and

  9. Construction of crystalline 2D covalent organic frameworks with remarkable chemical (acid/base) stability via a combined reversible and irreversible route.

    PubMed

    Kandambeth, Sharath; Mallick, Arijit; Lukose, Binit; Mane, Manoj V; Heine, Thomas; Banerjee, Rahul

    2012-12-05

    Two new chemically stable [acid and base] 2D crystalline covalent organic frameworks (COFs) (TpPa-1 and TpPa-2) were synthesized using combined reversible and irreversible organic reactions. Syntheses of these COFs were done by the Schiff base reactions of 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol (Tp) with p-phenylenediamine (Pa-1) and 2,5-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (Pa-2), respectively, in 1:1 mesitylene/dioxane. The expected enol-imine (OH) form underwent irreversible proton tautomerism, and only the keto-enamine form was observed. Because of the irreversible nature of the total reaction and the absence of an imine bond in the system, TpPa-1 and TpPa-2 showed strong resistance toward acid (9 N HCl) and boiling water. Moreover, TpPa-2 showed exceptional stability in base (9 N NaOH) as well.

  10. IR spectroscopy of physical and chemical transformations in cold hydrogen chloride and ammonia aerosols.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Evan G; Medcraft, Chris; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tuckermann, Rudolf; Thompson, Chris D; Bauerecker, Sigurd; McNaughton, Don

    2009-09-28

    Aerosol particles of hydrogen chloride corresponding to three distinct solid phases have been generated in a collisional cooling cell and observed via FTIR spectroscopy. The cubic phase of HCl was observed with cell temperatures of 90-100 K, while the highly ordered orthorhombic phase predominated below this temperature. The previously reported metastable phase was also observed under some conditions. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level were performed on HCl clusters with a planar, zig-zag arrangement. Computed IR spectra for chain lengths up to 15 converge to show a band shape that is characteristic of the orthorhombic HCl phase. Injection of water along with HCl was found to have little influence on the formation of HCl particles. The reaction between HCl and NH3 to produce NH4Cl particles was also examined and found to occur over a wide range of temperatures (80-300 K). The formation of homogenous particles of HCl and NH3 competed with this chemical reaction as the cell temperature was lowered and when higher pressures of N2 buffer gas were used.

  11. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde: IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Taherian, Fatemeh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-05-01

    The structural parameters, and vibrational frequencies of 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5NSA) were studied by the FT-IR and Raman spectra and the quantum chemical calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in order to investigate the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) present in its structure. The strength and nature of IHB in the optimized structure of 5NSA were studied in detail by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) and the natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches. The results obtained were then compared with the corresponding data for its parent molecule, salicylaldehyde (SA). Comparisons made between the geometrical structures for 5NSA and SA, their OH/OD stretching and out-of-plane bending modes, their enthalpies for the hydrogen bond, and their AIM parameters demonstrated a stronger H-bonding in 5NSA compared with that in SA. The calculated binding enthalpy (ΔHbind) for 5NSA was -10.92 kcal mol-1. The observed νOH and γOH appeared at about 3120 cm-1 and 786 cm-1 respectively. The stretching frequency shift of H-bond formation was 426 cm-1 which is consistent with ΔHbind and the strength of H-bond in 5NSA. The delocalization energies and electron delocalization indices derived by the NBO and AIM approaches indicate that the resonance effects were responsible for the stronger IHB in 5NSA than in SA.

  12. Chemically Tunable 2D Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    salts and colloidal compounds have been widely used in humans for treatment of skin lesions, syphilis, and gastrointestinal disorders . Due to limited...at neutral pH resulting in membrane disruption and dissociated silanols or siloxane- Sio- groups that are negatively-charged. This negative surface...oxidation state, namely ion dissociation or hydrolysis, often promoted by acidic or basic conditions. Fig. 7b shows solubilities by this simple (non-redox

  13. From Ultrafast Structure Determination to Steering Reactions: Mixed IR/Non-IR Multidimensional Vibrational Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-09-28

    Ultrafast multidimensional infrared spectroscopy is a powerful method for resolving features of molecular structure and dynamics that are difficult or impossible to address with linear spectroscopy. Augmenting the IR pulse sequences by resonant or nonresonant UV, Vis, or NIR pulses considerably extends the range of application and creates techniques with possibilities far beyond a pure multidimensional IR experiment. These include surface-specific 2D-IR spectroscopy with sub-monolayer sensitivity, ultrafast structure determination in non-equilibrium systems, triggered exchange spectroscopy to correlate reactant and product bands, exploring the interplay of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, investigation of interactions between Raman- and IR-active modes, imaging with chemical contrast, sub-ensemble-selective photochemistry, and even steering a reaction by selective IR excitation. We give an overview of useful mixed IR/non-IR pulse sequences, discuss their differences, and illustrate their application potential.

  14. Quantum chemical analysis of thermodynamics of 2D cluster formation of alkanes at the water/vapor interface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Kartashynska, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Fainerman, V B; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2015-11-21

    Using the quantum chemical semi-empirical PM3 method it is shown that aliphatic alcohols favor the spontaneous clusterization of vaporous alkanes at the water surface due to the change of adsorption from the barrier to non-barrier mechanism. A theoretical model of the non-barrier mechanism for monolayer formation is developed. In the framework of this model alcohols (or any other surfactants) act as 'floats', which interact with alkane molecules of the vapor phase using their hydrophobic part, whereas the hydrophilic part is immersed into the water phase. This results in a significant increase of contact effectiveness of alkanes with the interface during the adsorption and film formation. The obtained results are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. To test the model the thermodynamic and structural parameters of formation and clusterization are calculated for vaporous alkanes C(n)H(2n+2) (n(CH3) = 6-16) at the water surface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols C(n)H(2n+1)OH (n(OH) = 8-16) at 298 K. It is shown that the values of clusterization enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy per one monomer of the cluster depend on the chain lengths of corresponding alcohols and alkanes, the alcohol molar fraction in the monolayers formed, and the shift of the alkane molecules with respect to the alcohol molecules Δn. Two possible competitive structures of mixed 2D film alkane-alcohol are considered: 2D films 1 with single alcohol molecules enclosed by alkane molecules (the alcohols do not form domains) and 2D films 2 that contain alcohol domains enclosed by alkane molecules. The formation of the alkane films of the first type is nearly independent of the surfactant type present at the interface, but depends on their molar fraction in the monolayer formed and the chain length of the compounds participating in the clusterization, whereas for the formation of the films of the second type the interaction between the hydrophilic parts of the surfactant is

  15. Dynamics-based selective 2D {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-05-28

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of {sup 1}H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials.

  16. The chemical instability of Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} in air

    SciTech Connect

    Krizan, J.W. Roudebush, J.H.; Fox, G.M.; Cava, R.J.

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} decomposes rapidly in laboratory air. • The decomposition requires the simultaneous presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. • Decomposition results in a dramatic change in the magnetic properties. • Second 5 K feature in magnetic susceptibility not previously reported. - Abstract: We report that Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}, which has a layered honeycomb iridium oxide sublattice interleaved by Na planes, decomposes in laboratory air while maintaining the same basic crystal structure. The decomposition reaction was monitored by time-dependent powder X-ray diffraction under different ambient atmospheres, through which it was determined that it occurs only in the simultaneous presence of both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. A hydrated sodium carbonate is the primary decomposition product along with altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}. The diffraction signature of the altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} is quite similar to that of the pristine material, which makes the detection of decomposition difficult in a sample handled under ordinary laboratory conditions. The decomposed samples show a significantly decreased magnetic susceptibility and the disappearance of the low temperature antiferromagnetic transition considered to be characteristic of the phase. Samples that have never been exposed to air after synthesis display a previously unreported magnetic transition at 5 K.

  17. Surface chemical conversion of 3-glycidoxypropyldimethylethoxysilane on hydroxylated silicon surface: FT-IR, contact angle and ellipsometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Serkan; Kinali-Demirci, Selin; Caykara, Tuncer

    2012-12-01

    The chemical conversion of the top surface of 3-glycidoxypropyldimethylethoxysilane (GPDMES) on hyroxylated silicon surface has been studied as a function of reaction time. A multiple-step procedure was applied in this study. At first, GPDMES molecules were self-assembled on the hydroxylated silicon surface. The second step was the modification of epoxy groups with 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile and the last step was the amidoximation reaction of nitrile groups. Existence of the monolayers covalently attached to silicon surfaces were revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Modification, conversion and thickness of surfaces were followed by FT-IR and ellipsometry analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical and physical parameters affecting the performance of the Os-191/Ir-191m generator

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, A.B.; Treves, S.; O'Brien, G.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Butler, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of an Os-191/Ir-191m generator suitable for radionuclide angiography in humans has elicited much interest. This generator employs (OsO/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/)/sup 2 -/ on AG MP-1 anion exchange resin with a Dowex-2 scavenger column and is elute with normal saline at pH 1. The parent Os species is, however, neither well-defined nor homogeneous leading to less than optimal breakthrough of Os-191 (5 x 10/sup -3/%) and modest Ir-191m yield (10-15%). The effect of a range of parameters on generator performance has been evaluated as has been the way in which the assembly and loading process affects generator performance. In addition, a number of potential alternative generator systems have been evaluated. 11 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  19. Chemical analysis of solid materials by a LIMS instrument designed for space research: 2D elemental imaging, sub-nm depth profiling and molecular surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-García, Pavel; Grimaudo, Valentine; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B.; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Direct quantitative chemical analysis with high lateral and vertical resolution of solid materials is of prime importance for the development of a wide variety of research fields, including e.g., astrobiology, archeology, mineralogy, electronics, among many others. Nowadays, studies carried out by complementary state-of-the-art analytical techniques such as Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Glow Discharge Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GD-TOF-MS) or Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) provide extensive insight into the chemical composition and allow for a deep understanding of processes that might have fashioned the outmost layers of an analyte due to its interaction with the surrounding environment. Nonetheless, these investigations typically employ equipment that is not suitable for implementation on spacecraft, where requirements concerning weight, size and power consumption are very strict. In recent years Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) has re-emerged as a powerful analytical technique suitable not only for laboratory but also for space applications.[1-3] Its improved performance and measurement capabilities result from the use of cutting edge ultra-short femtosecond laser sources, improved vacuum technology and fast electronics. Because of its ultimate compactness, simplicity and robustness it has already proven to be a very suitable analytical tool for elemental and isotope investigations in space research.[4] In this contribution we demonstrate extended capabilities of our LMS instrument by means of three case studies: i) 2D chemical imaging performed on an Allende meteorite sample,[5] ii) depth profiling with unprecedented sub-nm vertical resolution on Cu electrodeposited interconnects[6,7] and iii) preliminary molecular desorption of polymers without assistance of matrix or functionalized substrates.[8] On the whole

  20. Binding of Co(II) and Cu(II) cations to chemically modified wool fibres: an IR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Paola; Monti, Patrizia; Freddi, Giuliano; Arai, Takayuki; Tsukada, Masuhiro

    2003-05-01

    Wool fibres were modified by treatment with tannic acid (TA) solution or by acylation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA) dianhydride. The unmodified and modified fibres were subsequently treated with Cu 2+ and Co 2+ solutions, at alkaline pH, and analysed by Attenuated Total Reflectance, ATR/IR spectroscopy to evaluate the changes induced in the structure of the fibre by metal binding. The spectral changes were correlated to metal adsorption results obtained by Inductive Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The IR results were discussed in relation to our previous findings on the metal binding mode of Bombyx mori and Tussah silk fibres; the changes observed in the spectra were explained by considering the different affinity of the fibres for the modifying reagent and the amount of the metal absorbed. More relevant spectral changes were observed upon Cu 2+ complexation rather than Co 2+ complexation, according to the metal absorption results. The most relevant changes were observed for the EDTA-modified wool sample treated with Cu 2+, according to the higher affinity of wool for EDTA. The IR spectra were quantitatively evaluated by the intensity ratio between the Amide I and Amide II bands (I AmideI/I AmideII) and its trend as a function of metal absorption was reported. The present investigation demonstrated that the interaction between fibre and metal and the subsequent fibre modification depend on the chemical nature of the fibre, the metal cation and the modifying reagent.

  1. Detection of Anisotropic Hyperfine Components of Chemically Prepared Carotenoid Radical Cations:1D and 2D ESEEM and Pulsed ENDOR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalova, Tatyana A.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Bowman, Michael K.; Kispert, Lowell D.

    2001-09-06

    Canthaxanthin and 8'-apo-B-caroten-8'-al radical cations chemically prepared on activated silica-alumina and in CH2CI2 solution containing A1C13 were studied by pulsed EPR and ENDOR spectroscopies. Both the 1D three-pulse ESEEM and the 2D HYSCORE spectra of the carotenoid-A1C13 mixtures exhibited the 27 A1 nuclei peak at 3.75 MHz. This indicates electron-transfer interactions between carotenoids and A1III ions resulting in the formation and stabilization of carotenoid radical cations. Davies ENDOR measurements of the canthaxanthin radical cation on silica-alumina determined the hyperfine couplings of B protons belonging to three different methyl groups with ahI=2.6 MHz, aH2=8.6MHz, and ah3 ca. 13 MHz. The principal components of the proton hyperfine tensors were obtained from HYSCORE spectra in A1C13 solutions and on the solid support. Identification of the protons was made on the basis of isotropic hyperfine couplings determined by RHF-INDO/SP molecular orbital calculations. In frozen A1C13 solution, the C(7, 7')Ha and C(14, 14')-Ha a protons were observed for Canthaxanthin and the C(8 or 14')-Ha, C(15')-Ha were observed for 8'-apo-B-caroten-8'-al. On the silica-alumina support, the C(10, 10')-Ha, C(11, 11')-Ha, and C(15,15')-Ha a protons were measured for Canthaxanthin and the C(12)-Ha and C(15')-Ha were measured for 8' apo-B-caroten-8'-al. Some protons with large isotropic couplings (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE analysis could be assigned to B protons, but the principal components of their hyperfine tensors are much more anisotropic than those reported previously for B protons. We suggest that cis/trans isomerization of carotenoids on silica-alumina results in stabilization of di-cis isomers with large isotropic couplings for some a protons which are comparable to those of B protons.

  2. Large-Size 2D β-Cu2 S Nanosheets with Giant Phase Transition Temperature Lowering (120 K) Synthesized by a Novel Method of Super-Cooling Chemical-Vapor-Deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Huang, Le; Zhao, Guangyao; Wei, Zhongming; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping; Wang, Lin-Wang; Li, Jingbo

    2016-10-01

    2D triangular β-Cu2 S nanosheets with large size and high quality are synthesized by a novel method of super-cooling chemical-vapor-deposition. The phase transition of this 2D material from β-Cu2 S to γ-Cu2 S occurs at 258 K (-15 °C), and such transition temperature is 120 K lower than that of its bulk counterpart (about 378 K). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Three-dimensional mapping of soil chemical characteristics at micrometric scale: Statistical prediction by combining 2D SEM-EDX data and 3D X-ray computed micro-tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapca, Simona

    2015-04-01

    Many soil properties and functions emerge from interactions of physical, chemical and biological processes at microscopic scales, which can be understood only by integrating techniques that traditionally are developed within separate disciplines. While recent advances in imaging techniques, such as X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), offer the possibility to reconstruct the 3D physical structure at fine resolutions, for the distribution of chemicals in soil, existing methods, based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray detection (EDX), allow for characterization of the chemical composition only on 2D surfaces. At present, direct 3D measurement techniques are still lacking, sequential sectioning of soils, followed by 2D mapping of chemical elements and interpolation to 3D, being an alternative which is explored in this study. Specifically, we develop an integrated experimental and theoretical framework which combines 3D X-ray CT imaging technique with 2D SEM-EDX and use spatial statistics methods to map the chemical composition of soil in 3D. The procedure involves three stages 1) scanning a resin impregnated soil cube by X-ray CT, followed by precision cutting to produce parallel thin slices, the surfaces of which are scanned by SEM-EDX, 2) alignment of the 2D chemical maps within the internal 3D structure of the soil cube, and 3) development, of spatial statistics methods to predict the chemical composition of 3D soil based on the observed 2D chemical and 3D physical data. Specifically, three statistical models consisting of a regression tree, a regression tree kriging and cokriging model were used to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron and oxygen in soil, these chemical elements showing a good spatial agreement between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the corresponding 2D SEM-EDX data. Due to the spatial correlation between the physical and chemical data, the regression-tree model showed a great potential

  4. The Physical and Chemical Conditions in Luminous Galaxies: A Systematic IR Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Alfonso, Eduardo

    Star formation, in both its normal and active burst phases, drives and is driven by the physical conditions in galaxies that are forming stars, from massive outflows to the heating of dust. It also governs the evolution of metallicity, enrichment of the IGM, and many other processes. To better understand the physical conditions that initiate - and quench - star formation, including its apparent symbiotic relationship with AGN activity in later-stage mergers, we propose the first large and coherent radiative transfer study of the extreme objects that are forming stars most rapidly: the luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs). Our study will be based on radiative transfer modeling of all (U)LIRGs with reliable archival Herschel/SPIRE and PACS molecular spectra. Our goals are to (1) model the conditions in the dense circumnuclear gas clouds as a function of LFIR, M(H2), and merger stage, and to derive star formation rates (SFR), radiation pressure, dust and gas temperatures, optical depths, and gas depletion rates; (2) understand the nuclear molecular outflow/inflow phenomena and how and why they differ for LIRGS (log[LIR/Lsun] > 11) and ULIRGs (log[LIR/Lsun] > 12); and (3) test the reality of the two putative modes of star formation (main sequence and starburst) as a function of galaxy luminosity and merger stage, quantify the differences, and reveal the physical causes (merger properties, IMF differences, etc.) Our modeling will emphasize radiatively excited molecular species - key diagnostics of the ISM components in star forming galaxies - and will include atomic features and the UV-submmillimeter continua. We have successfully used our radiative transfer code to probe compact components as small as tens of parsecs in diameter, scales that cannot be distinguished by the far-IR beams of any past or near future observatories. We will include photoionization modeling of the mid-IR lines and template modeling of PAH features for those objects

  5. Remote chemical monitoring in an industrial environment using eyesafe IR laser radar technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmanik, Guerman A.; Shklovsky, E. J.; Freidman, Gennady I.; Lozhkarev, Vladimir V.; Matveyev, Alexander Z.; Shilov, Alexander A.; Yakovlev, Ivan V.; Peterson, Darrel G.; Partin, Judy K.

    1997-07-01

    The brief description of new lidar prototype for remote chemical monitoring and profiling in the 8 - 12 micron range is given. The lidar includes a Nd:YAG laser (1 J per pulse) source, optical parametrical oscillator (0.2 J per pulse), and four-wave Raman emitter (20 mJ output per pulse). The receiver consists of the hydrogen SRS cells, pumped by an additional OPO pulse. Sensitivity of this receiver reaches approximately 1000 photons per pixel. The applications of this lidar for remote detection of chemicals in atmosphere will also be discussed.

  6. Rapid determination and chemical change tracking of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiao-Xi; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Sun, Su-Qin; Gu, Dong-Chen; He, Helen; Xu, Chang-Hua; Wang, Xi-Chang

    2016-02-01

    BPO is often added to wheat flour as flour improver, but its excessive use and edibility are receiving increasing concern. A multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting was employed to identify BPO in wheat flour and unveil its changes during storage. BPO contained in wheat flour (< 3.0 mg/kg) was difficult to be identified by infrared spectra with correlation coefficients between wheat flour and wheat flour samples contained BPO all close to 0.98. By applying second derivative spectroscopy, obvious differences among wheat flour and wheat flour contained BPO before and after storage in the range of 1500-1400 cm- 1 were disclosed. The peak of 1450 cm- 1 which belonged to BPO was blue shifted to 1453 cm- 1 (1455) which belonged to benzoic acid after one week of storage, indicating that BPO changed into benzoic acid after storage. Moreover, when using two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR) to track changes of BPO in wheat flour (0.05 mg/g) within one week, intensities of auto-peaks at 1781 cm- 1 and 669 cm- 1 which belonged to BPO and benzoic acid, respectively, were changing inversely, indicating that BPO was decomposed into benzoic acid. Moreover, another autopeak at 1767 cm- 1 which does not belong to benzoic acid was also rising simultaneously. By heating perturbation treatment of BPO in wheat flour based on 2DCOS-IR and spectral subtraction analysis, it was found that BPO in wheat flour not only decomposed into benzoic acid and benzoate, but also produced other deleterious substances, e.g., benzene. This study offers a promising method with minimum pretreatment and time-saving to identify BPO in wheat flour and its chemical products during storage in a holistic manner.

  7. Rapid determination and chemical change tracking of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Xi; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Sun, Su-Qin; Gu, Dong-Chen; He, Helen; Xu, Chang-Hua; Wang, Xi-Chang

    2016-02-05

    BPO is often added to wheat flour as flour improver, but its excessive use and edibility are receiving increasing concern. A multi-step IR macro-fingerprinting was employed to identify BPO in wheat flour and unveil its changes during storage. BPO contained in wheat flour (<3.0 mg/kg) was difficult to be identified by infrared spectra with correlation coefficients between wheat flour and wheat flour samples contained BPO all close to 0.98. By applying second derivative spectroscopy, obvious differences among wheat flour and wheat flour contained BPO before and after storage in the range of 1500-1400 cm(-1) were disclosed. The peak of 1450 cm(-1) which belonged to BPO was blue shifted to 1453 cm(-1) (1455) which belonged to benzoic acid after one week of storage, indicating that BPO changed into benzoic acid after storage. Moreover, when using two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR) to track changes of BPO in wheat flour (0.05 mg/g) within one week, intensities of auto-peaks at 1781 cm(-1) and 669 cm(-1) which belonged to BPO and benzoic acid, respectively, were changing inversely, indicating that BPO was decomposed into benzoic acid. Moreover, another autopeak at 1767 cm(-1) which does not belong to benzoic acid was also rising simultaneously. By heating perturbation treatment of BPO in wheat flour based on 2DCOS-IR and spectral subtraction analysis, it was found that BPO in wheat flour not only decomposed into benzoic acid and benzoate, but also produced other deleterious substances, e.g., benzene. This study offers a promising method with minimum pretreatment and time-saving to identify BPO in wheat flour and its chemical products during storage in a holistic manner.

  8. Molecular structure, IR spectra, and chemical reactivity of cisplatin and transplatin: DFT studies, basis set effect and solvent effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Qingzhu; Qiu, Ling; Wang, Tengfei; Yuan, Haoliang; Lin, Jianguo; Luo, Shineng

    2015-01-01

    Three different density functional theory (DFT) methods were employed to study the molecular structures of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) and trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (TDDP). The basis set effect on the structure was also investigated. By comparing the optimized structures with the experimental data, a relatively more accurate method was chosen for further study of the IR spectra and other properties as well as the solvent effect. Nineteen characteristic vibrational bands of the title compounds were assigned and compared with available experimental data. The number of characteristic peaks for the asymmetric stretching and deformation vibrations of N-H can serve as a judgment for the isomer between CDDP and TDDP. Significant solvent effect was observed on the molecular structures and IR spectra. The reduced density gradient analysis was performed to study the intramolecular interactions of CDDP and TDDP, and the nature of changes in the structures caused by the solvent was illustrated. Several descriptors determined from the energies of frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) were applied to describe the chemical reactivity of the title compounds. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) surfaces showed that the amino groups were the most favorable sites that nucleophilic reagents tend to attack, and CDDP was easier to be attacked by nucleophilic reagents than TDDP.

  9. Chemical Characterization of the Pyrotechnically Disseminated 66MM Red Phosphorous Smoke Screening IR, Vehicle Launched Grenade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    81mm), or 155 mm mortars. 5 The compound’s chemical reactivity is considered intermediate to the stable black allotropic and the highly reactive white... allotropic forms. The RP reacts slowly with oxygen and water vapor.5 This, along with the fact that RP is the most common allotrope found in nature...combustion of P4 (red allotrope ) to form phosphorous pentaoxide (P20 5), which chemisorbs with water to form phosphoric acid (H3PO4). Finally, condensation

  10. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible) and quantum chemical studies of 4-Chloro-3-iodobenzophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Prasad, K.; Muthu, S.; Santhamma, C.

    2017-01-01

    The vibrational analysis of the substituted Benzophenone molecule 4-Chloro-3-iodobenzophenone (4, 3-ClIBP) is carried out using both FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra and also quantum chemical calculations of the scaled frequencies using the DFT method B3LYP/LanL2DZ basis set. The natural bond orbital analysis of this molecule has been carried out to describe the various intramolecular interactions responsible for the stabilization of the molecule. The HOMO, LUMO energy gap have been computed with the TD-DFT theory and the differences are compared with UV-absorption spectra. The statistical thermodynamic functions are calculated for the range of 100-1000 k. The Fukui functions are evaluated to describe the activity of the sites.

  11. Infrared signatures of Bacillus bacteria: clear IR distinctions between sporulated and vegetative cells with chemical assignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Stephen D.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Su, Yin-Fong; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Wahl, Karen; Forrester, Joel B.

    2009-05-01

    This paper highlights the distinctions between the infrared (IR) absorption spectra of vegetative versus sporulated Bacillus bacteria. It is observed that there are unique signatures clearly associated with either the sporulated or the vegetative state, and that vegetative cells (and associated debris) can contribute to the spore spectra. A distinct feature at ~1739 cm-1 appears to be unique to vegetative cell spectra, and can also be used as an indicator of vegetative cells or cell debris in the spore spectra. The data indicate the band is caused by a phospholipid carbonyl bond and are consistent with, but do not prove it to be, either phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PE) or phosphatidyl glycerol (PG), the two major classes of phospholipids found in vegetative cells of Bacillus species. The endospore spectra show characteristic peaks at 1441, 1277, and 1015 cm-1 along with a distinct quartet of peaks at 766, 725, 701, and 659 cm-1. These are clearly associated with calcium dipicolinate trihydrate, CaDP•3H2O. We emphasize that the spore peaks, especially the quartet, arise from the calcium dipicolinate trihydrate and not from dipicolinic acid or other dipicolinate hydrate salts. The CaDP•3H2O vibrational peaks and the effects of hydration were studied using quantum chemistry in the PQS software package. The quartet is associated with many motions including contributions from the Ca2+ counterion and hydration waters including Ca-O-H bends, H2O-Ca-O torsions and O-C-O bends. The 1441 and 1015 cm-1 modes are planar pyridine modes with the 1441 mode primarily a ring C-N stretch and the 1015 mode primarily a ring C-C stretch.

  12. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of {alpha}- and {beta}-CeIr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} intermediate valence compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Matar, Samir F.; Poettgen, Rainer; Chevalier, Bernard

    2012-02-15

    The dimorphism of the intermediate valence ternary cerium silicide CeIr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} in the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} ({alpha}) and CaBe{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} ({beta}) modifications is addressed in the framework of the density functional theory. The geometry optimization is in good agreement with the experiment and the subsequent establishment of the energy-volume equation of state (EOS) indicates a stabilization of the {beta}-type relative to the {alpha}-type concomitant with the trend of the cerium valence, changing to tetravalent in {beta}-CeIr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. This is equally shown from the site projected DOS and from the large increase of the electronic contribution to the specific heat. The chemical bonding indicates the strongest bonding interactions within the Ir-Si substructure in both varieties. Stabilization of {beta}-CeIr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} with almost tetravalent cerium is in good agreement with Th{sup IV}Ir{sub 2}Si{sub 2} which exclusively crystallizes in the CaBe{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} type. The EOS behavior of different RIr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} (R=Th, Ce, La) is comparatively discussed. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structures of {alpha}- and {beta}-CeIr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. Relevant interatomic distances (A), the three-dimensional [Ir{sub 2}Si{sub 2}] networks and the crystallographically independent iridium and silicon sites are indicated. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy stabilization of (HT) {beta}-CeIr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} versus (LT) {alpha}-CeIr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} from DFT methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concomitant with the change of Ce valence to tetravalent (HT)-enhanced specific heat. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Equations of states for La, Ce and Th members with CeIr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} resembling tetravalent-Th. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical bonding shows changes on the {l_brace}Ir{sub 2}Si{sub 2}{r_brace} intralayer and Ce{sup IV}-Ir bonds.

  13. Modeling chemical interaction profiles: I. Spectral data-activity relationship and structure-activity relationship models for inhibitors and non-inhibitors of cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 isozymes.

    PubMed

    McPhail, Brooks; Tie, Yunfeng; Hong, Huixiao; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Ge, Weigong; Valerio, Luis G; Fuscoe, James C; Tong, Weida; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Fowler, Bruce A; Demchuk, Eugene; Beger, Richard D

    2012-03-15

    An interagency collaboration was established to model chemical interactions that may cause adverse health effects when an exposure to a mixture of chemicals occurs. Many of these chemicals--drugs, pesticides, and environmental pollutants--interact at the level of metabolic biotransformations mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. In the present work, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR) and structure-activity relationship (SAR) approaches were used to develop machine-learning classifiers of inhibitors and non-inhibitors of the CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 isozymes. The models were built upon 602 reference pharmaceutical compounds whose interactions have been deduced from clinical data, and 100 additional chemicals that were used to evaluate model performance in an external validation (EV) test. SDAR is an innovative modeling approach that relies on discriminant analysis applied to binned nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral descriptors. In the present work, both 1D ¹³C and 1D ¹⁵N-NMR spectra were used together in a novel implementation of the SDAR technique. It was found that increasing the binning size of 1D ¹³C-NMR and ¹⁵N-NMR spectra caused an increase in the tenfold cross-validation (CV) performance in terms of both the rate of correct classification and sensitivity. The results of SDAR modeling were verified using SAR. For SAR modeling, a decision forest approach involving from 6 to 17 Mold2 descriptors in a tree was used. Average rates of correct classification of SDAR and SAR models in a hundred CV tests were 60% and 61% for CYP3A4, and 62% and 70% for CYP2D6, respectively. The rates of correct classification of SDAR and SAR models in the EV test were 73% and 86% for CYP3A4, and 76% and 90% for CYP2D6, respectively. Thus, both SDAR and SAR methods demonstrated a comparable performance in modeling a large set of structurally diverse data. Based on unique NMR structural descriptors, the new SDAR modeling method complements the existing SAR

  14. Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Mineral to Matrix Ratios Correlate with Physical Chemical Properties of Model Compounds and Native Bone Tissue.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erik A; Lloyd, Ashley A; Salazar-Lara, Carolina; Donnelly, Eve

    2017-10-01

    Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging techniques can be used to characterize bone composition. In this study, our objective was to validate the Raman mineral:matrix ratios (ν1 PO4:amide III, ν1 PO4:amide I, ν1 PO4:Proline + hydroxyproline, ν1 PO4:Phenylalanine, ν1 PO4:δ CH2 peak area ratios) by correlating them to ash fraction and the IR mineral:matrix ratio (ν3 PO4:amide I peak area ratio) in chemical standards and native bone tissue. Chemical standards consisting of varying ratios of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) and collagen, as well as bone tissue from humans, sheep, and mice, were characterized with confocal Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy and gravimetric analysis. Raman and IR mineral:matrix ratio values from chemical standards increased reciprocally with ash fraction (Raman ν1 PO4/Amide III: P < 0.01, R(2 )= 0.966; Raman ν1 PO4/Amide I: P < 0.01, R(2 )= 0.919; Raman ν1 PO4/Proline + Hydroxyproline: P < 0.01, R(2 )= 0.976; Raman ν1 PO4/Phenylalanine: P < 0.01, R(2 )= 0.911; Raman ν1 PO4/δ CH2: P < 0.01, R(2 )= 0.894; IR P < 0.01, R(2 )= 0.91). Fourier transform infrared mineral:matrix ratio values from native bone tissue were also similar to theoretical mineral:matrix ratio values for a given ash fraction. Raman and IR mineral:matrix ratio values were strongly correlated ( P < 0.01, R(2 )= 0.82). These results were confirmed by calculating the mineral:matrix ratio for theoretical IR spectra, developed by applying the Beer-Lambert law to calculate the relative extinction coefficients of HA and collagen over the same range of wavenumbers (800-1800 cm(-1)). The results confirm that the Raman mineral:matrix bone composition parameter correlates strongly to ash fraction and to its IR counterpart. Finally, the mineral:matrix ratio values of the native bone tissue are similar to those of both chemical standards and theoretical values, confirming the

  15. The chemistry of episodic accretion in embedded objects. 2D radiation thermo-chemical models of the post-burst phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rab, Ch.; Elbakyan, V.; Vorobyov, E.; Güdel, M.; Dionatos, O.; Audard, M.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.; Postel, A.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Episodic accretion is an important process in the evolution of young stars and their environment. The observed strong luminosity bursts of young stellar objects likely have a long lasting (i.e. longer than the burst duration) impact on the chemical evolution of the disk and envelope of young stars. Aims: We aim to investigate the observational signatures of the chemical evolution in the post-burst phase for embedded sources. With such signatures it is possible to identify targets that experienced a recent luminosity burst. Methods: We present a new model for the chemistry of episodic accretion based on the two dimensional, radiation thermo-chemical disk code PRODIMO (PROtoplanetary DIsk MOdel). We have extended PRODIMO with a proper treatment for envelope structures. For a representative Class I model, we calculated the chemical abundances in the post-burst phase and produced synthetic observables such as intensity maps and radial intensity profiles. Results: During a burst, many chemical species, such as CO, sublimate from the dust surfaces. As the burst ends they freeze out again (post-burst phase). This freeze-out happens from inside-out due to the radial density gradient in the disk and envelope structure. This inside-out freeze-out produces clear observational signatures in spectral line emission, such as rings and distinct features in the slope of radial intensity profiles. We fitted synthetic C18O J = 2-1 observations with single and two component fits and find that post-burst images are much better matched by the latter. Comparing the quality of such fits therefore allows identification of post-burst targets in a model-independent way. Conclusions: Our models confirm that it is possible to identify post-burst objects from spatially resolved CO observations. However, to derive proper statistics, such as the strength and frequencies of bursts, from observations it is important to consider the inclination and structure of the target and dust

  16. IR and quantum-chemical studies of carboxylic acid and glycine adsorption on rutile TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ojamäe, Lars; Aulin, Christian; Pedersen, Henrik; Käll, Per-Olov

    2006-04-01

    Nanocrystalline TiO2 powders of the rutile polymorph, synthesized by a sol-gel method, were treated with water solutions containing, respectively, formic, acetic, and citric acid and glycine in order to study the adsorption properties of these organic species. The samples were characterized by FTIR, Raman, powder XRD, and TEM. It was found that HCOOH, CH3COOH and HOC(COOH)(CH2COOH)2--but not NH2CH2COOH--adsorbed onto TiO2. The adsorption of HCOOH, CH3COOH and NH2CH2COOH onto the (110) surface of rutile was also studied by quantum-chemical periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The organic molecules were from the computations found to adsorb strongly to the surfaces in a bridge-coordinating mode, where the two oxygens of the deprotonated carboxylic acid bind to two surface titanium ions. Surface relaxation is found to influence adsorption geometries and energies significantly. The results from DFT calculations and ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations of formic acid adsorption onto TiO2 are compared and match well with the experimental IR measurements, supporting the bridge-binding geometry of carboxylic-acid adsorption on the TiO2 nanoparticles.

  17. Mid-IR quantum cascade lasers as an enabling technology for a new generation of chemical analyzers for liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, B.; Reidl-Leuthner, C.; Ritter, W.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation introduces a chemical analyzer (The ERACHECK) which is based on quantum cascade laser technology for measuring oil-in-water. Using these mid-IR lasers, it was possible to develop a portable, robust and highly precise analyzer for the measurement of oil-in-water, a parameter which is vital in the petrochemical industry for process control and environmental analysis. The overall method employs a liquid-liquid extraction step of the aqueous sample using a cyclic, aliphatic hydrocarbon such as cyclohexane. Quantification is based on measurement of the C-H deformation vibrations of the extracted hydrocarbons in the cyclic extraction solvent. The developed method is linear from 0.5 - 2000 ppm of oil in water, with precisions well below 15% in terms of r.s.d for repeated measurements. The portability of the ERACHECK and its robustness has been key for its successful use on oil rigs as well as petrochemical production sites on land. The values provided by the ERACHECK correlate well with those obtained by the former CFC (Freon 113) based method for oil in water, which is no longer in use in industrialized countries due to the ozone depleting effect of the CFCs employed.

  18. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  19. Comparison of Brachionus calyciflorus 2-d and Microtox{reg{underscore}sign} chronic 22-H tests with Daphnia magna 21-d test for the chronic toxicity assessment of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Radix, P.; Leonard, M.; Papantoniou, C.; Roman, G.; Saouter, E.; Gallotti-Schmitt, S.; Thiebaud, H.; Vasseur, P.

    1999-10-01

    The Daphnia magna 21-d test may be required by European authorities as a criterion for the assessment of aquatic chronic toxicity for the notification of new substances. However, this test has several drawbacks. It is labor-intensive, relatively expensive, and requires the breeding of test organisms. The Brachionous calyciflorus 2-d test and Microtox chronic 22-h test do not suffer from these disadvantages and could be used as substitutes for the Daphnia 21-d test for screening assays. During this study, the toxicity of 25 chemicals was measured using both the microtox chronic toxicity and B. calyciflorus 2-d tests, and the no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) were compared to the D. magna 21-d test. The Brachionus test was slightly less sensitive than the Daphnia test, but the correlation between the two tests was relatively good (r{sup 2} = 0.54). The B. calyciflorus 2-d test, and to a lesser extent the Microtox chronic 22-h test, were able to predict the chronic toxicity values of the Daphnia 21-d test. They constitute promising cost-effective tools for chronic toxicity screening.

  20. In situ observation of reduction kinetics and 2D mapping of chemical state for heterogeneous reduction in iron-ore sinters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Murao, R.; Ohta, N.; Noami, K.; Uemura, Y.; Niwa, Y.; Kimijima, K.; Takeichi, Y.; Nitani, H.

    2016-05-01

    Iron-ore sinters constitute the major component of the iron-bearing burden in blast furnaces, and the mechanism of their reduction is one of the key processes in iron making. The heterogeneous reduction of sintered oxides was investigated by the combination of X-ray fluorescence and absorption fine structure, X-ray diffraction, and computed tomography. Two - dimensional mapping of the chemical states (CSs) was performed. The iron CSs FeIII, FeII, and Fe0 exhibited a heterogeneous distribution in a reduced sinter. The reduction started near micro pores, at iron-oxide grains rather than calcium-ferrite ones. The heterogeneous reduction among grains in a sinter may cause the formation of micro cracks. These results provide fundamental insights into heterogeneous reduction schemes for iron-ore sinters.

  1. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  2. Computational study of the transition state for H[sub 2] addition to Vaska-type complexes (trans-Ir(L)[sub 2](CO)X). Substituent effects on the energy barrier and the origin of the small H[sub 2]/D[sub 2] kinetic isotope effect

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Hasanayn, F.; Goldman, A.S.; Krogh-Jespersen, K. )

    1993-06-03

    Ab initio molecular orbital methods have been used to study transition state properties for the concerted addition reaction of H[sub 2] to Vaska-type complexes, trans-Ir(L)[sub 2](CO)X, 1 (L = PH[sub 3] and X = F, Cl, Br, I, CN, or H; L = NH[sub 3] and X = Cl). Stationary points on the reaction path retaining the trans-L[sub 2] arrangement were located at the Hartree-Fock level using relativistic effective core potentials and valence basis sets of double-[zeta] quality. The identities of the stationary points were confirmed by normal mode analysis. Activation energy barriers were calculated with electron correlation effects included via Moller-Plesset perturbation theory carried fully through fourth order, MP4(SDTQ). The more reactive complexes feature structurally earlier transition states and larger reaction exothermicities, in accord with the Hammond postulate. The experimentally observed increase in reactivity of Ir(PPh[sub 3])[sub 2](CO)X complexes toward H[sub 2] addition upon going from X = F to X = I is reproduced well by the calculations and is interpreted to be a consequence of diminished halide-to-Ir [pi]-donation by the heavier halogens. Computed activation barriers (L = PH[sub 3]) range from 6.1 kcal/mol (X = H) to 21.4 kcal/mol (X = F). Replacing PH[sub 3] by NH[sub 3] when X = Cl increases the barrier from 14.1 to 19.9 kcal/mol. Using conventional transition state theory, the kinetic isotope effects for H[sub 2]/D[sub 2] addition are computed to lie between 1.1 and 1.7 with larger values corresponding to earlier transition states. Judging from the computational data presented here, tunneling appears to be unimportant for H[sub 2] addition to these iridium complexes. 51 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Chemical imaging of the surface of self-assembled polystyrene-b-poly(methyl methacrylate) diblock copolymer films using apertureless near-field IR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kerstin; Yang, Xiujuan; Paulite, Melissa; Fakhraai, Zahra; Gunari, Nikhil; Walker, Gilbert C

    2008-06-01

    The nanoscale chemical composition variations of the surfaces of thin films of polystyrene- b-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS- b-PMMA) diblock copolymers are investigated using apertureless near-field IR microscopy. The scattering of the incident infrared beam from a modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip is probed using homodyne detection and demodulation at the tip oscillation frequency. An increase in the IR attenuation is observed in the PMMA-rich domains with a wavenumber dependence that is consistent with the bulk absorption spectrum. The results indicate that even though a small topography-induced artifact can be observed in the near-field images, the chemical signature of the sample is detected clearly.

  4. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  6. Probing the role of chemical enhancers in facilitating drug release from patches: Mechanistic insights based on FT-IR spectroscopy, molecular modeling and thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenting; Quan, Peng; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Chao; Lv, Siji; Zhao, Yongshan; Fang, Liang

    2016-04-10

    In patches, a drug must release from patches prior to its percutaneous absorption. Chemical enhancers have been used for several decades, but their roles in drug release from patches are poorly understood. In this work, the roles of chemical enhancers in bisoprolol tartrate (BSP-T) release from patches were probed in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, an innovative mechanism insight of chemical enhancers in drug release process was provided at molecular level. FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular modeling were employed to investigate the influence of chemical enhancers on drug-adhesive interaction. The results showed chemical enhancers like Span 80, which had a strong ability forming hydrogen bonds, could decrease drug-adhesive interaction leading to the release of drug from adhesive of patches. Thermal analysis was conducted to research the influence of chemical enhancers on the thermodynamic properties of patch system. It showed that chemical enhancers promoted the formation of free volume of adhesive, which facilitated drug release process. By contrast, the influence on the thermodynamic properties of BSP-T was less effective in influencing BSP-T release process. In conclusion, chemical enhancers played an important role in facilitating BSP-T release from the adhesive DURO-TAK® 87-2287 of patches by decreasing drug-adhesive interaction and promoting the formation of free volume of adhesive. This work may be an important step in understanding the important roles of chemical enhancers in drug release process.

  7. Inplementation of an automated signal processing approach for the analysis of chemical spectral signatures collected from FT-IR mounted in an aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Kroutil, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    The automated detection of chemical spectral signatures using a passive infrared Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer mounted in an aircraft is a difficult challenge due to the small total infrared energy contribution of a particular chemical species compared to the background signature. The detection of spectral signatures is complicated by the fact that a large, widely varying infrared background is present that is coupled with the presence of a number of chemical interferents in the atmosphere. This paper describes a mathematical technique that has been demonstrated to automatically detect specific chemical species in an automated processing environment. The data analysis methodology has been demonstrated to be effective using data of low spectral resolution at low aircraft altitudes. An overview of the implementation and basic concepts of the approach are presented.

  8. Hydrogen bonding between acetate-based ionic liquids and water: Three types of IR absorption peaks and NMR chemical shifts change upon dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Cao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yuwei; Mu, Tiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen-bonding interaction between acetate-based ionic liquids (AcIL) and water was investigated by attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) and 1H NMR. Interestingly, the relative change of chemical shift δ of 1H NMR upon dilution could be divided into three regions. All the H show an upfield shift in Regions 1 and 2 while a different tendency in Region 3 (upfield, no, and downfield shift classified as Types 1, 2, 3, respectively). For ATR-IR, the red, no, or blue shift of νOD (IR absorption peak of OD in D2O) and ν± (IR absorption peak of AcILs) also have three types, respectively. Two-Times Explosion Mechanism (TTEM) was proposed to interpret the dynamic processes of AcILs upon dilution macroscopically, meanwhile an Inferior Spring Model (ISM) was proposed to help to understand the TTEM microscopically, All those indicate that AcILs present the state of network, sub-network, cluster, sub-cluster, ion pairs and sub-ion pairs in sequence upon dilution by water and the elongation of hydrogen bonding between AcILs-water, between cation-anion of AcILs is plastic deformation rather than elastic deformation.

  9. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  10. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  11. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  12. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L.; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi -Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomas; Kong, Jing

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  13. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  14. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  15. Relationship between chemical structure and biological activity of alkali metal o-, m- and p-anisates. FT-IR and microbiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowska, M.; Piekut, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2011-11-01

    In this work we investigated relationship between molecular structure of alkali metal o-, m-, p-anisate molecules and their antimicrobial activity. For this purpose FT-IR spectra for lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium anisates in solid state and solution were recorded, assigned and analysed. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris. In order to evaluate the dependency between chemical structure and biological activity of alkali metal anisates the statistical analysis (multidimensional regression and principal component) was performed for selected wavenumbers from FT-IR spectra and parameters that describe microbial activity of anisates. The obtained statistical equations show the existence of correlation between molecular structure of anisates and their biological properties.

  16. Relationship between chemical structure and biological activity of alkali metal o-, m- and p-anisates. FT-IR and microbiological studies.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, M; Piekut, J; Lewandowski, W

    2011-11-01

    In this work we investigated relationship between molecular structure of alkali metal o-, m-, p-anisate molecules and their antimicrobial activity. For this purpose FT-IR spectra for lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium anisates in solid state and solution were recorded, assigned and analysed. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris. In order to evaluate the dependency between chemical structure and biological activity of alkali metal anisates the statistical analysis (multidimensional regression and principal component) was performed for selected wavenumbers from FT-IR spectra and parameters that describe microbial activity of anisates. The obtained statistical equations show the existence of correlation between molecular structure of anisates and their biological properties.

  17. Frontiers in Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowlan, Pamela Renee

    2016-05-02

    These are slides dealing with frontiers in chemical physics. The following topics are covered: Time resolving chemistry with ultrashort pulses in the 0.1-40 THz spectral range; Example: Mid-infrared absorption spectrum of the intermediate state CH2OO; Tracking reaction dynamics through changes in the spectra; Single-shot measurement of the mid-IR absorption dynamics; Applying 2D coherent mid-IR spectroscopy to learn more about transition states; Time resolving chemical reactions at a catalysis using mid-IR and THz pulses; Studying topological insulators requires a surface sensitive probe; Nonlinear phonon dynamics in Bi2Se3; THz-pump, SHG-probe as a surface sensitive coherent 2D spectroscopy; Nanometer and femtosecond spatiotemporal resolution mid-IR spectroscopy; Coherent two-dimensional THz/mid-IR spectroscopy with 10nm spatial resolution; Pervoskite oxides as catalysts; Functionalized graphene for catalysis; Single-shot spatiotemporal measurements; Spatiotemporal pulse measurement; Intense, broad-band THz/mid-IR generation with organic crystals.

  18. Pharmaceutical evaluation of steroidal ointments by ATR-IR chemical imaging: distribution of active and inactive pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Fukami, Toshiro; Koide, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Toyofumi; Hiyama, Yukio; Tomono, Kazuo

    2012-04-15

    We recently used micro attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to conduct imaging analysis of ointments and evaluate the distributions of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and excipients. An alclometasone dipropionate (ALC) ointment was used as a model product. Almeta, a brand-name product, had a domain with absorbance at 1656 cm(-1) attributable to the carbonyl group of ALC, the API. Absorbances at 1040 and 3300 cm(-1) were also noted in this domain, indicating the presence of the solubilizer, propylene glycol. Data also suggested the presence of benzyl alcohol in this domain. More detailed analysis showed the distribution of surfactants and other excipients in the base. Similar results were obtained for Vitra, a generic version of Almeta. Imaging analysis with micro ATR-IR confirmed that both ointments are liquid droplet dispersions with ALC dissolved in propylene glycol and dispersed in a base. However, minor differences in the ingredient distributions of the two ointments were detected and reflect differences in excipient concentrations and type, or manufacturing differences. In summary, we used micro ATR-IR for imaging analysis of an original ointment, Almeta, and its generic form Vitra, and established a method for visually evaluating the distributions of the API and excipients in these ointments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantum-chemical, NMR, FT IR, and ESI MS studies of complexes of colchicine with Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Wojciech; Kurek, Joanna; Barczyński, Piotr; Hoffmann, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    Colchicine is a tropolone alkaloid from Colchicinum autumnale. It shows antifibrotic, antimitotic, and anti-inflammatory activities, and is used to treat gout and Mediterranean fever. In this work, complexes of colchicine with zinc(II) nitrate were synthesized and investigated using DFT, (1)H and (13)C NMR, FT IR, and ESI MS. The counterpoise-corrected and uncorrected interaction energies of these complexes were calculated. We also calculated their (1)H, (13)C NMR, and IR spectra and compared them with the corresponding experimentally obtained data. According to the ESI MS mass spectra, colchicine forms stable complexes with zinc(II) nitrate that have various stoichiometries: 2:1, 1:1:1, and 2:1:1 with respect to colchichine, Zn(II), and nitrate ion. All of the complexes were investigated using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). The calculated and the measured spectra showed differences before and after the complexation process. Calculated electron densities and bond critical points indicated the presence of bonds between the ligands and the central cation in the investigated complexes that satisfied the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Graphical Abstract DFT, NMR, FT IR, ESI MS, QTAIM and puckering studies of complexes of colchicine with Zn(II).

  20. Classification of edible oils and modeling of their physico-chemical properties by chemometric methods using mid-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Aderval S.; da Silva, Arnaldo P.; Ferré, Joan; Boqué, Ricard

    This research work describes two studies for the classification and characterization of edible oils and its quality parameters through Fourier transform mid infrared spectroscopy (FT-mid-IR) together with chemometric methods. The discrimination of canola, sunflower, corn and soybean oils was investigated using SVM-DA, SIMCA and PLS-DA. Using FT-mid-IR, DPLS was able to classify 100% of the samples from the validation set, but SIMCA and SVM-DA were not. The quality parameters: refraction index and relative density of edible oils were obtained from reference methods. Prediction models for FT-mid-IR spectra were calculated for these quality parameters using partial least squares (PLS) and support vector machines (SVM). Several preprocessing alternatives (first derivative, multiplicative scatter correction, mean centering, and standard normal variate) were investigated. The best result for the refraction index was achieved with SVM as well as for the relative density except when the preprocessing combination of mean centering and first derivative was used. For both of quality parameters, the best results obtained for the figures of merit expressed by the root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) and prediction (RMSEP) were equal to 0.0001.

  1. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  2. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  3. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  4. Deducing the molecular properties of zwitterionic, protonated, deprotonated, and double-deprotonated forms of L-cysteine from vibrational spectroscopy (IR, Raman, VCD) and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Moreno, María Mar; Avilés-Moreno, Juan Ramón; Márquez-García, A A; López-González, Juan Jesús

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of L-cysteine (C3H7NO2S, (2R)-2-amino-3-sulfanylpropanoic acid) in water at different pH values was analyzed both experimentally and theoretically. The behavior was studied at pH values of 5.21 (at this pH, L-cysteine is a zwitterionic species), 1.00 (protonated species), 8.84 (monodeprotonated species), and 13.00 (dideprotonated species). We carried out a vibrational study using nonchiroptical (IR-Raman) and chiroptical (VCD) techniques complemented by quantum chemical calculations. We adopted a dual strategy, as follows. (i) The hybrid density functionals B3LYP and M062X and the ab initio MP2 method were employed, with the same 6-311++G (d,p) basis set, in order to characterize the relative energies and structures of an extensive set of conformers of L-cysteine. The presence of water was included by utilizing the IEF-PCM implicit solvation model. (ii) The vibrational analysis was made using a chirality-sensitive using a chirality-sensitive technique (VCD) and chirality-insensitive techniques (IR, including MIR and FIR, and Raman), especially in aqueous solution. The results obtained theoretically and experimentally were compared in order to deduce the most stable structures at each pH. Moreover, for the first time, the monodeprotonated anion of L-cysteine was detected in aqueous solution by means of IR, Raman and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). Finally, analysis of the low-frequency region using the IR and Raman techniques was shown to be a very important way to understanding the conformational preference of the zwitterionic species.

  5. The mouse ruby-eye 2(d) (ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) ) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-09-01

    The novel mutation named ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) , characterized by light-colored coats and ruby-eyes, prohibits differentiation of melanocytes by inhibiting tyrosinase (Tyr) activity, expression of Tyr, Tyr-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), Tyrp2, and Kit. However, it is not known whether the ru2(d) allele affects pheomelanin synthesis in recessive yellow (e/Mc1r(e) ) or in pheomelanic stage in agouti (A) mice. In this study, effects of the ru2(d) allele on pheomelanin synthesis were investigated by chemical analysis of melanin present in dorsal hairs of 5-week-old mice from F2 generation between C57BL/10JHir (B10)-co-isogenic ruby-eye 2(d) and B10-congenic recessive yellow or agouti. Eumelanin content was decreased in ruby-eye 2(d) and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice, whereas pheomelanin content in ruby-eye 2(d) recessive yellow and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice did not differ from the corresponding Ru2(d) /- mice, suggesting that the ru2(d) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Matrix IR spectra and quantum-chemical calculations of the products of small nickel cluster interactions with water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrennikov, L. V.; Dalvyatshin, D. I.; Golovkin, A. V.

    2010-12-01

    Reactions of Ni n clusters with water molecules were studied by IR spectroscopy in inert matrices and quantum chemistry methods. The geometric configurations, total energies, and vibrational frequencies of all the possible Ni2(H2O) and Ni3(H2O) isomers were calculated. For both systems, the main minima and transition states were found. Water was shown to dissociate to hydrogen and hydroxyl in the reactions, and, in all the complexes formed, hydrogen is situated in the bridge position on the Ni-Ni bond.

  7. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  8. Confined-plume chemical deposition: rapid synthesis of crystalline coatings of known hard or superhard materials on inorganic or organic supports by resonant IR decomposition of molecular precursors.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Borislav L; Wellons, Matthew S; Lukehart, Charles M

    2009-08-26

    A one-step process for preparing microcrystalline coatings of known superhard, very hard, or ultraincompressible ceramic compositions on either inorganic or organic supports is reported. Midinfrared pulsed-laser irradiation of preceramic chemical precursors layered between IR-transmissive hard/soft supports under temporal and spatial confinement at a laser wavelength resonant with a precursor vibrational band gives one-step deposition of crystalline ceramic coatings without incurring noticeable collateral thermal damage to the support material. Reaction plume formation at the precursor/laser beam interface initiates confined-plume, chemical deposition (CPCD) of crystalline ceramic product. Continuous ceramic coatings are produced by rastering the laser beam over a sample specimen. CPCD processing of the Re-B single-source precursor, (B(3)H(8))Re(CO)(4), the dual-source mixtures, Ru(3)(CO)(12)/B(10)H(14) or W(CO)(6)/B(10)H(14), and the boron/carbon single-source precursor, o-B(10)C(2)H(12), confined between Si wafer or NaCl plates gives microcrystalline deposits of ReB(2), RuB(2), WB(4), or B(4)C, respectively. CPCD processing of Kevlar fabric wetted by (B(3)H(8))Re(CO)(4) produces an oriented, microcrystalline coating of ReB(2) on the Kevlar fabric without incurring noticeable thermal damage of the polymer support. Similarly, microcrystalline coatings of ReB(2) can be formed on IR-transmissive IR2, Teflon, or Ultralene polymer films.

  9. Combined experimental and quantum chemical studies on spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis, and NMR) and structural characteristics of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet; Kocademir, Mustafa; Küçük, Vesile; Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Şaşmaz, İbrahim

    2016-12-01

    Comparative experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the structure and spectral (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis and NMR) features of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde. Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out at Hartree-Fock and density functional B3LYP levels with the triple-zeta 6-311++G** basis set. Two stable conformers of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde arising from the orientation of the carboxaldehyde moiety have been located at the room temperature. The energetic separation of these conformers is as small as 2.5 kcal/mol with a low transition barrier (around 9 kcal/mol). Therefore, these conformers are expected to coexist at the room temperature. Several molecular characteristics of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde obtained through B3LYP and time-dependent B3LYP calculations, such as conformational stability, key geometry parameters, vibrational frequencies, IR and Raman intensities, UV-Vis vertical excitation energies and the corresponding oscillator strengths have been analyzed. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde were also investigated.

  10. Cell-specific chemotyping and multivariate imaging by combined FT-IR microspectroscopy and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) analysis reveals the chemical landscape of secondary xylem.

    PubMed

    Gorzsás, András; Stenlund, Hans; Persson, Per; Trygg, Johan; Sundberg, Björn

    2011-06-01

    Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy combined with microscopy enables chemical information to be acquired from native plant cell walls with high spatial resolution. Combined with a 64 × 64 focal plane array (FPA) detector, 4096 spectra can be simultaneously obtained from a 0.3 × 0.3 mm image; each spectrum represents a compositional and structural 'fingerprint' of all cell wall components. For optimal use and analysis of such a large amount of information, multivariate approaches are preferred. Here, FT-IR microspectroscopy with FPA detection is combined with orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). This allows for: (i) the extraction of spectra from single cell types, (ii) identification and characterization of different chemotypes using the full spectral information, and (iii) further visualization of the pattern of identified chemotypes by multivariate imaging. As proof of concept, the chemotypes of Populus tremula xylem cell types are described. The approach revealed unknown features about chemical plasticity and patterns of lignin composition in wood fibers that would have remained hidden in the dataset with traditional data analysis. The applicability of the method to Arabidopsis xylem and its usefulness in mutant chemotyping is also demonstrated. The methodological approach is not limited to xylem tissues but can be applied to any plant organ/tissue also using other techniques such as Raman and UV microspectroscopy.

  11. Experimental IR and Raman spectra and quantum chemical studies of molecular structures, conformers and vibrational characteristics of L-ascorbic acid and its anion and cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. A.; Rani, P.; Kumar, M.; Singh, R.; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, N. P.

    2011-12-01

    IR and spectra of the L-ascorbic acid ( L-AA) also known as vitamin C have been recorded in the region 4000-50 cm -1. In order to make vibrational assignments of the observed IR and Raman bands computations were carried out by employing the RHF and DFT methods to calculate the molecular geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies along with other related parameters for the neutral L-AA and its singly charged anionic ( L-AA -) and cationic ( L-AA +) species. Significant changes have been found for different characteristics of a number of vibrational modes. The four ν(O-H) modes of the L-AA molecule are found in the order ν(O 9-H 10) > ν(O 19-H 20) > ν(O 7-H 8) > ν(O 14-H 15) which could be due to complexity of hydrogen bonding in the lactone ring and the side chain. The C dbnd O stretching wavenumber ( ν46) decreases by 151 cm -1 in going from the neutral to the anionic species whereas it increases by 151 cm -1 in going from the anionic to the cationic species. The anionic radicals have less kinetic stabilities and high chemical reactivity as compared to the neutral molecule. It is found that the cationic radical of L-AA is kinetically least stable and chemically most reactive as compared to its neutral and anionic species.

  12. Subcellular Localized Chemical Imaging of Benthic Algal Nutritional Content via HgCdTe Array FT-IR

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Murdock, J; Dodds, W

    2008-01-01

    Algae respond rapidly and uniquely to changes in nutrient availability by adjusting pigment, storage product, and organelle content and quality. Cellular and subcellular variability of the relative abundance of macromolecular pools (e.g. protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and phosphodiesters) within the benthic (bottom dwelling) alga Cladophora glomerata (a common nuisance species in fresh and saline waters) was revealed by FT-IR microspectroscopic imaging. Nutrient heterogeneity was compared at the filament, cellular, and subcellular level, and localized nutrient uptake kinetics were studied by detecting the gradual incorporation of isotopically labeled nitrogen (N) (as K15NO3) from surrounding water into cellular proteins. Nutritional content differed substantially among filament cells, with differences driven by protein and lipid abundance. Whole cell imaging showed high subcellular macromolecular variability in all cells, including adjacent cells on a filament that developed clonally. N uptake was also very heterogeneous, both within and among cells, and did not appear to coincide with subcellular protein distribution. Despite high intercellular variability, some patterns emerged. Cells acquired more 15N the further they were away from the filament attachment point, and 15N incorporation was more closely correlated with phosphodiester content than protein, lipid, or carbohydrate content. Benthic algae are subject to substantial environmental heterogeneity induced by microscale hydrodynamic factors and spatial variability in nutrient availability. Species specific responses to nutrient heterogeneity are central to understanding this key component of aquatic ecosystems. FT-IR microspectroscopy, modified for benthic algae, allows determination of algal physiological responses at scales not available using current techniques.

  13. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  14. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  15. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  16. Observation of chemical modification of Asian Dust particles during long-range transport by the combined use of quantitative ED-EPMA and ATR-FT-IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Chul; Eom, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Hae-Jin; Malek, Md Abdul; Kim, HyeKyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    2012-10-01

    In our previous works, it was demonstrated that the combined use of quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), which is also known as low-Z particle EPMA, and attenuated total reflectance FT-IR (ATR-FT-IR) imaging has great potential for a detailed characterization of individual aerosol particles. In this study, individual Asian Dust particles collected during an Asian Dust storm event on 11 November 2011 in Korea were characterized by the combined use of low-Z particle EPMA and ATR-FT-IR imaging. The combined use of the two single-particle analytical techniques on the same individual particles showed that Asian Dust particles had experienced extensive chemical modification during long-range transport. Overall, 109 individual particles were classified into four particle types based on their morphology, elemental concentrations, and molecular species and/or functional groups of individual particles available from the two analytical techniques: Ca-containing (38%); NaNO3-containing (30%); silicate (22%); and miscellaneous particles (10%). Among the 41 Ca-containing particles, 10, 8, and 14 particles contained nitrate, sulfate, and both, respectively, whereas only two particles contained unreacted CaCO3. Airborne amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles were observed in this Asian Dust sample for the first time, where their IR peaks for the insufficient symmetric environment of CO32- ions of ACC were clearly differentiated from those of crystalline CaCO3. This paper also reports the field observations of CaCl2 particles converted from CaCO3 for the Asian Dust sample collected in the planetary boundary layer. Thirty three particles contained NaNO3, which are the reaction products of sea-salt and NOx/HNO3, whereas no genuine sea-salt particles were encountered, indicating that sea-salt particles are more reactive than CaCO3 particles. Some silicate particles were observed to contain nitrate, sulfate, and water. Among 24 silicate

  17. The investigation of chemical structure of coal macerals via transmitted-light FT-IR microscopy by X. Sun

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Mastalerz, Maria; Cook, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    A recent paper by Sun [X. Sun, Spectrochim. Acta A 62 (1-3) (2005) 557] attempts to characterize a variety of liptinite, termed "barkinite", from Chinese Permian coals. The component identified does not appear to fundamentally differ from previously-described liptinite macerals included in the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology's system of maceral nomenclature. Further, chemical comparisons made with macerals from coals of different rank and age are flawed because the author did not account for changes in chemistry with rank or for the chemical changes associated with botanical changes through geologic time. The author has not satisfactorily proved his hypothesis that the component differs morphologically or chemically from known liptinite-group macerals. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The investigation of chemical structure of coal macerals via transmitted-light FT-IR microscopy by X. Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hower, James C.; Suárez-Ruiz, Isabel; Mastalerz, Maria; Cook, Alan C.

    2007-08-01

    A recent paper by Sun [X. Sun, Spectrochim. Acta A 62 (1-3) (2005) 557] attempts to characterize a variety of liptinite, termed "barkinite", from Chinese Permian coals. The component identified does not appear to fundamentally differ from previously-described liptinite macerals included in the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology's system of maceral nomenclature. Further, chemical comparisons made with macerals from coals of different rank and age are flawed because the author did not account for changes in chemistry with rank or for the chemical changes associated with botanical changes through geologic time. The author has not satisfactorily proved his hypothesis that the component differs morphologically or chemically from known liptinite-group macerals.

  19. Molecular tectonics: heterometallic (Ir,Cu) grid-type coordination networks based on cyclometallated Ir(III) chiral metallatectons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaojie; Guenet, Aurélie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-10-11

    A chiral-at-metal Ir(III) organometallic metallatecton was synthesised as a racemic mixture and as enantiopure complexes and combined with Cu(II) to afford a heterobimetallic (Ir,Cu) grid-type 2D coordination network.

  20. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  1. Study of Chemical Intermediates by Means of ATR-IR Spectroscopy and Hybrid Hard- and Soft-Modelling Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junxiu; Qi, Juan; Gao, Xinyu; Yan, Chunhua; Zhang, Tianlong; Tang, Hongsheng

    2017-01-01

    3,5-Diamino-1,2,4-triazole (DAT) became a significant energetic materials intermediate, and the study of its reaction mechanism has fundamental significance in chemistry. The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of online attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy combined with the novel approach of hybrid hard- and soft-modelling multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (HS-MCR) analysis to monitor and detect changes in structural properties of compound during 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole (DAT) synthesis processes. The subspace comparison method (SCM) was used to obtain the principal components number, and then the pure IR spectra of each substance were obtained by independent component analysis (ICA) and HS-MCR. The extent of rotation ambiguity was estimated from the band boundaries of feasible solutions calculated using the MCR-BANDS procedure. There were five principal components including two intermediates in the process in the results. The reaction rate constants of DAT formation reaction were also obtained by HS-MCR. HS-MCR was used to analyze spectroscopy data in chemical synthesis process, which not only increase the information domain but also reduce the ambiguities of the obtained results. This study provides the theoretical basis for the optimization of synthesis process and technology of energetic materials and provides a strong technical support of research and development of energy material with extraordinary damage effects. PMID:28386512

  2. Study of Chemical Intermediates by Means of ATR-IR Spectroscopy and Hybrid Hard- and Soft-Modelling Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxiu; Qi, Juan; Gao, Xinyu; Yan, Chunhua; Zhang, Tianlong; Tang, Hongsheng; Li, Hua

    2017-01-01

    3,5-Diamino-1,2,4-triazole (DAT) became a significant energetic materials intermediate, and the study of its reaction mechanism has fundamental significance in chemistry. The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of online attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy combined with the novel approach of hybrid hard- and soft-modelling multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (HS-MCR) analysis to monitor and detect changes in structural properties of compound during 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole (DAT) synthesis processes. The subspace comparison method (SCM) was used to obtain the principal components number, and then the pure IR spectra of each substance were obtained by independent component analysis (ICA) and HS-MCR. The extent of rotation ambiguity was estimated from the band boundaries of feasible solutions calculated using the MCR-BANDS procedure. There were five principal components including two intermediates in the process in the results. The reaction rate constants of DAT formation reaction were also obtained by HS-MCR. HS-MCR was used to analyze spectroscopy data in chemical synthesis process, which not only increase the information domain but also reduce the ambiguities of the obtained results. This study provides the theoretical basis for the optimization of synthesis process and technology of energetic materials and provides a strong technical support of research and development of energy material with extraordinary damage effects.

  3. Ab-initio investigation of the influence of chemical compounds on graphene layer properties in fabricated IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruta, L.; Wozny, J.; Szczecinska, N.; Lisik, Z.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the influence of H2O, NaOH and propanol on properties of graphene layer placed on SiO2 has been investigated. These chemical particles are present during technological steps required for a device fabrication and may lead to significant changes of graphene properties. The investigation has been done by means of ab-initio simulation based on the DFT method. A MedeA-VASP package was used to investigate behavior of graphene layer in the vicinity of chemical compounds. Presented studies show that properties of graphene are significantly modified when particles of H2O and NaOH are captured in-between graphene layer and SiO2. Special attention should be paid to NaOH which, according to simulations, decays and modifies the properties of graphene layer.

  4. LDRD final report on high power broadly tunable Mid-IR quantum cascade lasers for improved chemical species detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Hudgens, James J.; Fuller, Charles T.; Samora, Sally; Klem, John Frederick; Young, Erik W.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of our project was to examine a novel quantum cascade laser design that should inherently increase the output power of the laser while simultaneously providing a broad tuning range. Such a laser source enables multiple chemical species identification with a single laser and/or very broad frequency coverage with a small number of different lasers, thus reducing the size and cost of laser based chemical detection systems. In our design concept, the discrete states in quantum cascade lasers are replaced by minibands made of multiple closely spaced electron levels. To facilitate the arduous task of designing miniband-to-miniband quantum cascade lasers, we developed a program that works in conjunction with our existing modeling software to completely automate the design process. Laser designs were grown, characterized, and iterated. The details of the automated design program and the measurement results are summarized in this report.

  5. Chemical changes in the photoreceptor outer segments due to iron induced oxidative stress: analysis by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Homan, J A; Radel, J D; Wallace, D D; Wetzel, D L; LeVine, S M

    2000-05-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be an important pathogenic mechanism in many diseases of the retina. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical changes that are present in the photoreceptor outer segments of the retina following exposure to oxidative stress. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy enables the characterization and semi-quantitation of chemical functional groups in microscopic regions of tissue sections. This technique was used to evaluate the chemical changes in the outer segments following exposure to ferrous sulfate, which promotes oxidative tissue damage. A reduction of C=C-H and C=O functional groups was observed in the outer segments of iron-injected eyes compared to vehicle-injected eyes at 3 days following injection, which is prior to major histological changes that occur by 7 days. These functional groups are found in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is present at a high concentration in the outer segments. DHA contains a series of six cis-conjugated double bonds, which are vulnerable to free radical attack, and the reduction of these unsaturation group absorptions suggests that DHA was degraded and/or removed from the outer segments. An unexpected finding was that several other chemical functional groups increased in concentration over time in the outer segments of vehicle-injected eyes compared to non-injected eyes. These increases generally did not include C=C-H or C=O, which suggests that either DHA was being degraded while other organic molecules were being concentrated, or that production of DHA failed to be upregulated in vehicle-injected eyes. In summary, there was a loss of both C=C-H and C=O functional group concentrations in the outer segments of iron-injected eyes, and there was an increased concentration of several other chemical functional groups following trauma induced by vehicle injection.

  6. Comparison of NIR chemical imaging with conventional NIR, Raman and ATR-IR spectroscopy for quantification of furosemide crystal polymorphs in ternary powder mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schönbichler, S A; Bittner, L K H; Weiss, A K H; Griesser, U J; Pallua, J D; Huck, C W

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI), near-infrared (NIR), Raman and attenuated-total-reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to quantify three polymorphic forms (I, II, III) of furosemide in ternary powder mixtures. For this purpose, partial least-squares (PLS) regression models were developed, and different data preprocessing algorithms such as normalization, standard normal variate (SNV), multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) and 1st to 3rd derivatives were applied to reduce the influence of systematic disturbances. The performance of the methods was evaluated by comparison of the standard error of cross-validation (SECV), R(2), and the ratio performance deviation (RPD). Limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) of all methods were determined. For NIR-CI, a SECVcorr-spec and a SECVsingle-pixel corrected were calculated to assess the loss of accuracy by taking advantage of the spatial information. NIR-CI showed a SECVcorr-spec (SECVsingle-pixel corrected) of 2.82% (3.71%), 3.49% (4.65%), and 4.10% (5.06%) for form I, II, III. NIR had a SECV of 2.98%, 3.62%, and 2.75%, and Raman reached 3.25%, 3.08%, and 3.18%. The SECV of the ATR-IR models were 7.46%, 7.18%, and 12.08%. This study proves that NIR-CI, NIR, and Raman are well suited to quantify forms I-III of furosemide in ternary mixtures. Because of the pressure-dependent conversion of form II to form I, ATR-IR was found to be less appropriate for an accurate quantification of the mixtures. In this study, the capability of NIR-CI for the quantification of polymorphic ternary mixtures was compared with conventional spectroscopic techniques for the first time. For this purpose, a new way of spectra selection was chosen, and two kinds of SECVs were calculated to achieve a better comparability of NIR-CI to NIR, Raman, and ATR-IR.

  7. Solvent effect on molecular structure, IR spectra, thermodynamic properties and chemical stability of zoledronic acid: DFT study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingzhu; Qiu, Ling; Wang, Yang; Lv, Gaochao; Liu, Guiqing; Wang, Shanshan; Lin, Jianguo

    2016-04-01

    Zoledronic acid (ZL) has been used widely for treating skeletal diseases because of its high potency in inhibiting bone resorption. A detailed understanding of its physicochemical characteristics may be of great significance in both medicinal chemistry and structural biology for the design of novel bisphosphonates with higher activity. In the present work, the monoclinic (IM) and triclinic (IT) polymorphs of ZL in the gas phase and the aqueous phase were studied by density functional theory (DFT) method at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. The polarizable continuum model (PCM) was employed to study the solvent effect on structures and properties. The optimized IM and IT conformations in both phases are in reasonable agreement with the experimental structures with the overall mean absolute percent deviation (MAPD%) less than 3.1 %. The presence of intramolecular hydrogen bond within both conformations was identified in the solvent. The IR spectra were simulated and assigned in detail, which agreed well with the experimental data. The intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions resulted in the shift of vibrational frequencies of hydroxyl to the low band by 12-22 cm(-1) and 24-26 cm(-1) for IM and IT conformations, respectively. Their thermodynamic properties were also calculated based on the harmonic vibrational analysis, including standard heat capacity (C(°)p,m), entropy (S(°)m), and enthalpy (H(°)m). The molecular stability, hydrogen bonding interaction and other electronic properties have been further analyzed by the natural bond orbital (NBO), atoms in molecules (AIM), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and frontier molecular orbital (FMO) analysis.

  8. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  9. IR and UV laser-induced chemical vapor deposition: Chemical mechanism for a-Si:H and Cr (O,C) film formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    The characteristic features of laser-induced chemical vapor deposition in the parallel and perpendicular laser beam/surface configurations are discussed. Low temperature chemical processing with directed and spatially localized energy deposition in the system is investigated. Results obtained for the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films in the parallel configuration employing CO 2 and KrFlasers and SiH 4 and Si 2H 6 as precursors are presented. As a second example, the growth of oxygen- and carbon-containing chromium films Cr(O,C) from chromium hexacarbonyl as the precursor using cw and pulse uv lasers is discussed. The chemical pathways leasing to film formation are investigated in detail.

  10. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  11. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  12. Noninvasive deep Raman detection with 2D correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Min; Park, Hyo Sun; Cho, Youngho; Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Kang Taek; Jung, Young Mee; Suh, Yung Doug

    2014-07-01

    The detection of poisonous chemicals enclosed in daily necessaries is prerequisite essential for homeland security with the increasing threat of terrorism. For the detection of toxic chemicals, we combined a sensitive deep Raman spectroscopic method with 2D correlation analysis. We obtained the Raman spectra from concealed chemicals employing spatially offset Raman spectroscopy in which incident line-shaped light experiences multiple scatterings before being delivered to inner component and yielding deep Raman signal. Furthermore, we restored the pure Raman spectrum of each component using 2D correlation spectroscopic analysis with chemical inspection. Using this method, we could elucidate subsurface component under thick powder and packed contents in a bottle.

  13. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  14. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  15. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  16. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    and Homeland Defense. As a part of the E-2D AHE radar modernization effort, the Navy also invested in integrating a full glass cockpit and full...Communication Navigation Surveillance/Air Traffic Management capability. The glass cockpit will also provide the capability for the pilot or co-pilot to...hours at a station distance of 200nm Flat Turn Service Ceiling =>25,000 feet above MSL at mission profile =>25,000 feet above MSL at mission

  17. The conformational analysis of push-pull enaminoketones using Fourier transform IR and NMR spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations: II. Beta-dimethylaminoacrolein.

    PubMed

    Vdovenko, Sergey I; Gerus, Igor I; Fedorenko, Elena A

    2009-12-01

    IR Fourier and (1)H NMR spectra of beta-dimethylaminoacrolein (DMAA) were investigated in various pure solvents. Quantum chemical calculations by the method AM1 also was carried out to evaluate relative energy and dipole moment of each conformer. On the basis of NMR and IR-spectra we showed that the (DMAA) presented in solutions as equilibrium of two conformers, (E-s-Z) <==> (E-s-E). Constant of this equilibrium, K(eq) = C(E-s-E)/C(E-s-Z), depended strongly on the total (DMAA) concentration: ln K(eq) = ln K(eq0) + a(1 - e(-bC) total). Besides, (E-s-Z) conformer of the (DMAA) was more polar and more stable than the (E-s-E) conformer. Correlation of the out-of-phase nu(C=O) and in-phase nu(C=C) vibrations with solvatochromic parameters of Kamlet, Abbot, and Taft (KAT) revealed that the main contribution to the shift of the out-of-phase nu(C=O) vibrations of the both conformers made solvent's hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) (beta) term, whereas hydrogen bond donor (HBD) acidity (alpha) term influenced predominantly on the shift of the in-phase nu(C=C) vibrations of the conformers. Moreover, influence of these dominated terms was more pronounced for the (E-s-Z) conformer in comparison with the (E-s-E) conformer, hence the first conformer was more polarized than the last. Investigations of the enthalpies of the (E-s-Z) <==> (E-s-E) equilibrium in carbon tetrachloride, 1,4-dioxane and their mixtures showed that these enthalpies depended predominantly on the solvent's atomic and electronic polarization and dispersive interactions.

  18. Spectroscopic [FT-IR and FT-Raman] and molecular modeling (MM) study of benzene sulfonamide molecule using quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, K. S.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.

    2016-07-01

    The spectroscopic and molecular modeling (MM) study includes, FT-IR, FT-Raman and 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectra of the Benzene sulfonamide were recorded for the analysis. The observed experimental and theoretical frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctive region. The present study of this title molecule have been carried out by hybrid computational calculations of HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods with 6-311+G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results are tabulated. The structural modifications of the compound due to the substitutions of NH2 and SO2 were investigated. The minimum energy conformers of the compound were studied using conformational analysis. The alternations of the vibrational pattern of the base structure related to the substitutions were analyzed. The thermodynamic parameters (such as zero-point vibrational energy, thermal energy, specific heat capacity, rotational constants, entropy, and dipole moment) of Benzene sulfonamide have been calculated. The donor acceptor interactions of the compound and the corresponding UV transitions are found out using NBO analysis. The NMR spectra were simulated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP methods and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their spectra were simulated and the chemical shifts related to TMS were compared. A quantum computational study on the electronic and optical properties absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The energy gap of the present compound was calculated related to HOMO and LUMO energies which confirm the occurring of charge transformation between the base and ligand group. Besides frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. The thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated in gas phase and

  19. Gas sensing in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengxue; Jiang, Chengbao; Wei, Su-huai

    2017-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered inorganic nanomaterials have attracted huge attention due to their unique electronic structures, as well as extraordinary physical and chemical properties for use in electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics, catalysts, energy generation and storage, and chemical sensors. Graphene and related layered inorganic analogues have shown great potential for gas-sensing applications because of their large specific surface areas and strong surface activities. This review aims to discuss the latest advancements in the 2D layered inorganic materials for gas sensors. We first elaborate the gas-sensing mechanisms and introduce various types of gas-sensing devices. Then, we describe the basic parameters and influence factors of the gas sensors to further enhance their performance. Moreover, we systematically present the current gas-sensing applications based on graphene, graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), functionalized GO or rGO, transition metal dichalcogenides, layered III-VI semiconductors, layered metal oxides, phosphorene, hexagonal boron nitride, etc. Finally, we conclude the future prospects of these layered inorganic materials in gas-sensing applications.

  20. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  1. Ir/IrSi3/Si Schottky-Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1991-01-01

    Quantum efficiency increased. Proposed Schottky-barrier infrared detector has double metallic layer of Ir and IrSi3 instead of single metallic layer of Ir, IrSi, or IrSi3. Offers advantages of both relatively high infrared absorption in thin film of Ir and stability and reproducibility of layer of IrSi3 in contact with Si. Also serves as barrier to chemical reactions between Ir overlayer and Si substrate. Detectors used to form focal-plane array integrated with charge-coupled-device-addressing and image-processing circuitry.

  2. NASA High-Speed 2D Photogrammetric Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismond, Harriett R.

    2012-01-01

    The object of this report is to provide users of the NASA high-speed 2D photogrammetric measurement system with procedures required to obtain drop-model trajectory and impact data for full-scale and sub-scale models. This guide focuses on use of the system for vertical drop testing at the NASA Langley Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility.

  3. Time-resolved mid-IR spectroscopy of (bio)chemical reactions in solution utilizing a new generation of continuous-flow micro-mixers.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Christoph; Buchegger, Wolfgang; Vellekoop, Michael; Kraft, Martin; Lendl, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    A specially designed micro-mixer made of silicon, calcium fluoride, and silicone with an optical transmission path of 8 μm has been used for mid-IR spectroscopy monitoring of mixing-induced chemical reactions in the low millisecond time regime. The basic principle of the proposed continuous-flow technique is to mix two liquids introduced in two times two alternatingly stacked layers through diffusion at the entrance of a 200 μm wide, 1 cm long micro-fluidic channel also serving as measurement area. By using this special, dedicated arrangement, diffusion lengths and hence the mixing times can be significantly shortened and the overall performance improved in comparison to previous systems and alternative methods. Measurements were carried out in transmission mode using an Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscope, recording spectra with spot sizes of 180 × 100 μm(2) each at defined spots along this channel. Each of these spots corresponds to a specific reaction time: moving the measurement spot towards the entry yields shorter reaction times, moving it towards the channel's end gives longer reaction times. This principle is generic in nature and provides a solution for accurate, chemically induced triggering of reactions requiring the mixing of two liquid reagents or reagent solutions. A typical experiment thus yields up to 85 time-coded data points, covering a time span from 1 to 80 ms at a total reagent consumption of only about 125 μL. Using the fast neutralization reaction of acetic acid with sodium hydroxide as a model, the time required for 90% mixing was determined to be around 4 ms. Additionally, first experiments on ubiquitin changing its secondary structure from native to "A-state" were carried out, illustrating the potential for time-resolved measurements of proteins in aqueous solutions.

  4. Ultrafast two dimensional infrared chemical exchange spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The method of ultrafast two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is described. Three ultrashort IR pulses tuned to the frequencies of the vibrational transitions of interest are directed into the sample. The interaction of these pulses with the molecular vibrational oscillators produces a polarization that gives rise to a fourth pulse, the vibrational echo. The vibrational echo pulse is combined with another pulse, the local oscillator, for heterodyne detection of the signal. For fixed time between the second and third pulses, the waiting time, the first pulse is scanned. Two Fourier transforms of the data yield a 2D IR spectrum. The waiting time is increased, and another spectrum is obtained. The change in the 2D IR spectra with increased waiting time provides information on the time evolution of the structure of the molecular system under observation. In a 2D IR chemical exchange experiment, two species A and B, are undergoing chemical exchange. A's are turning into B's, and B's are turning into A's, but the overall concentrations of the species are not changing. The kinetics of the chemical exchange on the ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions can be obtained 2D IR spectroscopy. A vibration that has a different frequency for the two species is monitored. At very short time, there will be two peaks on the diagonal of the 2D IR spectrum, one for A and one for B. As the waiting time is increased, chemical exchange causes off-diagonal peaks to grow in. The time dependence of the growth of these off-diagonal peaks gives the chemical exchange rate. The method is applied to organic solute-solvent complex formation, orientational isomerization about a carbon-carbon single bond, migration of a hydrogen bond from one position on a molecule to another, protein structural substate interconversion, and water hydrogen bond switching between ions and water molecules. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific

  5. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  6. Quantum chemical modeling of new derivatives of (E,E)-azomethines: Synthesis, spectroscopic (FT-IR, UV/Vis, polarization) and thermophysical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Siyamak; Sheikhi, Masoome; Filippovich, Liudmila; Anatol'evich, Dikusar Evgenij; Yahyaei, Hooriye

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, the molecular structures of three new azomethine dyes: N-benzylidene-4-((E)-phenyldiazenyl)aniline (PAZB-1), 2-methoxy-4-(((4-((E)- phenyldiazenyl)phenyl)imino)methyl)phenol (PAZB-2) and 2-methoxy-5-((E)-((4-((E)- phenyldiazenyl)phenyl)imino)methyl)phenol (PAZB-8) have been predicted and investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) in dimethylformamide (DMF). The geometries of the azomethine dyes were optimized by PBE0/6-31 + G* level of theory. The electronic spectra of these azomethine dyes in a DMF solution was carried out by TDPBE0/6-31 + G* method. After quantum-chemical calculations three new azomethine dyes for optoelectronic applications were synthesized. FT-IR spectra of the title compounds are recorded and discussed. The computed absorption spectral data of the azomethine dyes are in good agreement with the experimental data, thus allowing an assignment of the UV/Vis spectra. On the basis of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and the new synthesized azomethine dyes polarizing films for Visible region of spectrum were developed. The main optical parameters of polarizing PVA-films (Transmittance, Polarization Efficiency and Dichroic Ratio) have been measured and discussed. Anisotropy of thermal conductivity of the PVA-films has been studied.

  7. FT-IR, micro-Raman and UV-vis spectroscopic and quantum chemical calculation studies on the 6-chloro-4-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyridazine compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarıkaya, Ebru Karakaş; Bahçeli, Semiha; Varkal, Döndü; Dereli, Ömer

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the study of the6-chloro-4-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyridazine compound, (C10 H7 N2 O Cl with synonym 4-pyridazinol, 6-chloro-3-phenyl-), was verified experimentally by using the Fourier Transformed Infrared (FT-IR), micro-Raman and UV/vis (in N,N-dimethylformamide solvent) spectroscopies. Furthermore, the optimized molecular geometry, conformatinal analysis, vibrational frequencies, the simulated UV/vis spectra (in gas and in N,N-dimethylformamide solvent), 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift (in gas, in chloroform and N,N-dimethylformamide in solvents) values, HOMO-LUMO analysis, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surface and thermodynamic parameters ofthe6-chloro-4-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyridazine compound were calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in ground state. The comparison of the calculated and vibrational frequencies with the experimental values provides important information about the title compound.

  8. Early detection of the chemical changes occurring during the induction and prevention of autoimmune-mediated demyelination detected by FT-IR imaging.

    PubMed

    Heraud, Philip; Caine, Sally; Campanale, Naomi; Karnezis, Tara; McNaughton, Don; Wood, Bayden R; Tobin, Mark J; Bernard, Claude C A

    2010-01-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Despite progress in understanding immunogenetic aspects of this disease, the mechanisms involved in lesion formation are unknown. To gain new insights into the neuropathology of MS, we used an innovative integration of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, bioinformatics, and a synchrotron light source to analyze macromolecular changes in the CNS during the course and prevention of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. We report that subtle chemical and structural changes not observed by conventional histology were detected before the onset of clinical signs of EAE. Moreover, trained artificial neural networks (ANNs) could discriminate, with excellent sensitivity and specificity, pathology from surrounding tissues and the early stage of the disease progression. Notably, we show that this novel measurement platform can detect characteristic differences in biochemical composition of lesion pathology in animals partially protected against EAE by vaccination with Nogo-A, an inhibitor of neural outgrowth, demonstrating the potential for automated screening and evaluation of new therapeutic agents.

  9. Recent developments in 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Late, Dattatray J.; Morgan, Hywel; Rout, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional layered inorganic nanomaterials (2D-LINs) have recently attracted huge interest because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties and potential technological applications. The properties of these layered materials can be tuned via both physical and chemical processes. Some 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials like MoS2, WS2 and SnS2 have been recently developed and employed in various applications, including new sensors because of their layer-dependent electrical properties. This article presents a comprehensive overview of recent developments in the application of 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials as sensors. Some of the salient features of 2D materials for different sensing applications are discussed, including gas sensing, electrochemical sensing, SERS and biosensing, SERS sensing and photodetection. The working principles of the sensors are also discussed together with examples.

  10. 2d-retrieval For Mipas-envisat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, T.; von Clarmann, T.; Grabowski, U.; Höpfner, M.

    Limb sounding of the Earth's atmosphere provides vertically high resolved profiles of geophysical parameters. The long ray path through the atmosphere makes limb sounders sensitive to even little abundant species. On the other hand, horizontal in- homogeneities, if not taken into account properly, can cause systematic errors within the retrieval process. Especially for limb emission measurements in the mid IR, at- mopheric temperature gradients result in considerable vmr retrieval errors if they are neglected. We present a dedicated method of taking full 2D fields of state parameters (indepen- dent of tangent points) into account in the forward model and in the retrieval. The basic idea is that the 2D state vector is updated sequentially for each limb scan. This method is applied to the 2D retrieval of temperature and vmr for simulated radiances as expected from MIPAS-ENVISAT.

  11. The Dependence of Nucleation Density on the Bias Voltage in the Growth of High Quality Thick Heteroepitaxial Diamond Films on Ir/YSZ/Si(100) Substrates Using Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Murari; More, Karren Leslie; Eres, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    We report nucleation densities on Ir(100) surfaces that exceed 1011 cm-2 and remain roughly unchanged in a narrow bias voltage range of 50 V starting at 125 V. At lower and higher bias voltages outside of this window the nucleation density drops to values near zero within a 25 V step and remains independent of the bias voltage. We attribute this extreme sensitivity to a delicate nanostructured active Ir phase that is both formed and destroyed by ion bombardment with specific energies. The role of this phase is to mediate the formation of chemically specific carbon that is the precursor for diamond crystallite formation in the subsequent bias free growth stage.

  12. Antimycobacterial, antimicrobial activity, experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV-Vis, DSC) and DFT (transition state, chemical reactivity, NBO, NLO).

    PubMed

    Rawat, Poonam; Singh, R N; Ranjan, Alok; Ahmad, Sartaj; Saxena, Rajat

    2017-02-11

    As part of a study of pyrrole hydrazone, we have investigated quantum chemical calculations, molecular geometry, relative energy, vibrational properties and antimycobacterial/antimicrobial activity of pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde isonicotinyl hydrazone (PCINH), by applying the density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree Fock (HF). Good reproduction of experimental values is obtained and with small percentage error in majority of the cases in comparison to theoretical result (DFT). The experimental FT-IR and Raman wavenumbers were compared with the respective theoretical values obtained from DFT calculations and found to agree well. In crystal structure studies the hydrated PCINH (syn-syn conformer) shows different conformation than from anhydrous form (syn-anti conformer). The rotational barrier between syn-syn and syn-anti conformers of PCINH is 12.7kcal/mol in the gas phase. In this work, use of FT-IR, FT-Raman, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopies has been made for full characterization of PCINH. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectrum was carried out with the aid of normal coordinate analysis using single scaling factor. Our results support the hydrogen bonding pattern proposed by reported crystalline structure. The calculated nature of electronic transitions within molecule found to be π→π*. The electronic descriptors study indicates that PCINH can be used as robust synthon for synthesis of new heterocyclic compounds. The first static hyperpolarizability (β0) of PCINH is calculated as 33.89×10(-30)esu, (gas phase); 68.79×10(-30) (CHCl3), esu; 76.76×10(-30)esu (CH2Cl2), 85.16×10(-30)esu (DMSO). The solvent induced effects on the first static hyperpolarizability were studied and found to increase as dielectric constants of the solvents increases. Investigated molecule shows better NLO value than Para nitroaniline (PNA). The compound PCINH shows good antifungal and antibacterial activity against Aspergillus niger and gram

  13. Aristoxazole analogues. Conversion of 8-nitro-1-naphthoic acid to 2-methylnaphtho[1,2-d]oxazole-9-carboxylic acid: comments on the chemical mechanism of formation of DNA adducts by the aristolochic acids.

    PubMed

    Priestap, Horacio A; Barbieri, Manuel A; Johnson, Francis

    2012-07-27

    2-Methylnaphtho[1,2-d]oxazole-9-carboxylic acid was obtained by reduction of 8-nitro-1-naphthoic acid with zinc-acetic acid. This naphthoxazole is a condensation product between an 8-nitro-1-naphthoic acid reduction intermediate and acetic acid and is a lower homologue of aristoxazole, a similar condensation product of aristolochic acid I with acetic acid that was previously reported. Both oxazoles are believed to arise via a common nitrenium/carbocation ion mechanism that is likely related to that which leads to aristolochic acid-DNA-adducts.

  14. Study on Angelica and its different extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-xia; Sun, Su-qin; Lv, Guang-hua; Chan, Kelvin K. C.

    2006-05-01

    In order to develop a rapid and effective analysis method for studying integrally the main constituents in the medicinal materials and their extracts, discriminating the extracts from different extraction process, comparing the categories of chemical constituents in the different extracts and monitoring the qualities of medicinal materials, we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) associated with second derivative infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) to study the main constituents in traditional Chinese medicine Angelica and its different extracts (extracted by petroleum ether, ethanol and water in turn). The findings indicated that FT-IR spectrum can provide many holistic variation rules of chemical constituents. Use of the macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectrum can not only identify the main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their different extracts, but also compare the components differences among the similar samples. This analytical method is highly rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research.

  15. Rapid discrimination of three Uighur medicine of Eremurus by FT-IR combined with 2DCOS-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yun; Xu, Chang-hua; Huang, Jian; Li, Guo-yu; Zhou, Qun; Liu, Xin-Hu; Sun, Su-qin; Wang, Jin-hui

    2014-07-01

    As complicated mixture systems, traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) are difficult to be identified and discriminated, especially for the drug samples originated from the same source. In this study, a tri-step infrared spectroscopy method, i.e., conventional infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with second derivatives spectra and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR), was employed to study and identify three Uighur drugs of Eremurus in Xinjiang, i.e. Eremurus altaicus (Pall.) Stev (AET), E. inderiensis (M.Bieb.)Regel(CB), E. anisopterus (Kar.et Kir.) Regel(YC). It was founded that the conventional IR spectra of the three species Eremurus were very similar based on the peak positions and shapes, indicating that the three had similar chemical profiles. On the basis of the different IR spectra of reference compounds and microscopic identification, the roots of YC, CB and AET all have comparable amount of calcium oxalate. The second derivative spectra of Eremurus enhanced the spectral resolution and amplified the small differences, especially at about 1468 cm-1, 1454 cm-1, and 1164 cm-1, and subsequently provided some dissimilarity in their calcium oxalate content. AET has relatively higher content of calcium oxalate but the lower content of anthraquinones. Moreover, the 2D-IR spectra revealed tiny differences among the three species by providing dynamic structural information of their chemical components in a more direct and visual way. The differences embodied mainly on the intensity of the auto-peaks at 971 cm-1, 1008 cm-1, 1468 cm-1 and 1578 cm-1. As a result, it was demonstrated that the macroscopic IR fingerprint method could discriminate the three similar Uighur drugs, YC, CB and AET.

  16. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  17. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  18. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  19. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model.

  20. Diffraction-limited IR Microspectroscopy with IRENI

    Treesearch

    J. Sedlmair; B. Illman; M. Unger; C. Hirschmugl

    2012-01-01

    In a unique way, IRENI (Infrared environmental Imaging), operated at the Synchrotron Radiation Center in Madison, combines IR spectroscopy and IR imaging, revealing the chemical morphology of a sample. Most storage ring based IR confocal microscopes have to overcome a trade-off between spatial resolution versus...

  1. Rapid discrimination of cultivated Codonopsis lanceolata in different ages by FT-IR and 2DCOS-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yun; Xu, Chang-hua; Huang, Jian; Li, Guo-yu; Liu, Xin-Hu; Sun, Su-qin; Wang, Jin-hui

    2014-07-01

    Deodeok (Codonopsis lanceolata) root, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has been used to treat lung ailments, rheumatism, menstrual disturbance and bruises with a long history in China and some other Asian countries. In this study, four types of Deodeok with different growth years were discriminated and identified by a Tri-step infrared spectroscopy method (Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (conventional FT-IR) coupled with second derivative infrared spectroscopy (SD-IR) and two dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy(2DCOS-IR) under thermal perturbation. Although only small differences were found in the FT-IR spectra of the samples, the positions and intensities of peaks around 1736, 1634, 1246, 1055, 1033, 818, 779 cm-1 could be considered as the key factors for discriminating them. The differences among them were amplified by their SD-IR spectra. The 2DCOS-IR spectra provided obvious dynamic chemical structure information of Deodeok samples, which present different particular auto peak clusters in the range of 875-1130 cm-1 and 1170-1630 cm-1, respectively. It was demonstrated that the content of triterpene were decreasing when C. lanceolata were growing older, but the relative content of saccharides initially increased and decreased significantly afterwards. It indicated a general trend that the content of polysaccharides accumulated with increasing years. Specifically, the content of polysaccharides accumulated in the root of 2-year-old plant was the lowest, 4-years-old was the highest, and then the content decreased gradually. Furthermore, according to the differences of locations and intensities of auto-peaks in 2D-IR spectra, the integral changes of components were revealed. This study offers a promising method inherent with cost-effective and time-saving to characterize and discriminate the complicated system like Deodeok.

  2. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  3. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  4. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  5. Quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FT-IR and FT-Raman) investigations of 3-methyl-3h-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Turgay; Yurdakul, Şenay

    2014-12-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3-methyl-3h-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde (3M3HI4C) were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-50 cm-1, respectively. Optimized geometric parameters, conformational equilibria, normal mode frequencies, and corresponding vibrational assignments of 3M3HI4C were theoretically examined by quantum chemical methods for the first time. All vibrational frequencies were assigned in detail with the help of total energy distribution (TEDs). The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT/B3LYP method. The results showed that the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method predicts vibrational frequencies and the structural parameters effectively. The most stable conformer of the title compound was determined. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule were constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. The lower energy band was assigned to the HOMO → LUMO transition. Natural bond orbital analysis of title molecule has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. Energies, relative stabilities, and dipole moments of title molecule were also compared and analyzed in the gas phase and in solvents. Furthermore, solvent effects on the geometry and vibrational frequency of 3M3HI4C were studied theoretically at the DFT/B3LYP level in combination with the conductor polarizable continuum model (C-PCM).

  6. Quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FT-IR and FT-Raman) investigations of 3-methyl-3h-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Polat, Turgay; Yurdakul, Şenay

    2014-12-10

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3-methyl-3h-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde (3M3HI4C) were recorded in the region 4000-400cm(-1) and 3500-50cm(-1), respectively. Optimized geometric parameters, conformational equilibria, normal mode frequencies, and corresponding vibrational assignments of 3M3HI4C were theoretically examined by quantum chemical methods for the first time. All vibrational frequencies were assigned in detail with the help of total energy distribution (TEDs). The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT/B3LYP method. The results showed that the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method predicts vibrational frequencies and the structural parameters effectively. The most stable conformer of the title compound was determined. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule were constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. The lower energy band was assigned to the HOMO→LUMO transition. Natural bond orbital analysis of title molecule has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. Energies, relative stabilities, and dipole moments of title molecule were also compared and analyzed in the gas phase and in solvents. Furthermore, solvent effects on the geometry and vibrational frequency of 3M3HI4C were studied theoretically at the DFT/B3LYP level in combination with the conductor polarizable continuum model (C-PCM). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular structure, electronic properties, NLO, NBO analysis and spectroscopic characterization of Gabapentin with experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Leena; Karabacak, Mehmet; Narayan, V.; Cinar, Mehmet; Prasad, Onkar

    2013-05-01

    Gabapentin (GP), structurally related to the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), mimics the activity of GABA and is also widely used in neurology for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. It exists in zwitterionic form in solid state. The present communication deals with the quantum chemical calculations of energies, geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers of GP using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In view of the fact that amino acids exist as zwitterions as well as in the neutral form depending on the environment (solvent, pH, etc.), molecular properties of both the zwitterionic and neutral form of GP have been analyzed. The fundamental vibrational wavenumbers as well as their intensities were calculated and compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The fundamental assignments were done on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The electric dipole moment, polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability values of the GP have been calculated at the same level of theory and basis set. The nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior of zwitterionic and neutral form has been compared. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrum of the title molecule has also been calculated using TD-DFT method. The thermodynamic properties of both the zwitterionic and neutral form of GP at different temperatures have been calculated.

  8. Perspective: Echoes in 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter; Shalit, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    Recently, various spectroscopic techniques have been developed, which can measure the 2D response of the inter-molecular degrees of freedom of liquids in the THz regime. By employing hybrid Raman-THz pulse sequences, the inherent experimental problems of 2D-Raman spectroscopy are circumvented completely, culminating in the recent measurement of the 2D-Raman-THz responses of water and aqueous salt solutions. This review article focuses on the possibility to observe echoes in such experiments, which would directly reveal the inhomogeneity of the typically extremely blurred THz bands of liquids, and hence the heterogeneity of local structures that are transiently formed, in particular, in a hydrogen-bonding liquid such as water. The generation mechanisms of echoes in 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy are explained, which differ from those in "conventional" 2D-IR spectroscopy in a subtle but important manner. Subsequently, the circumstances are discussed, under which echoes are expected, revealing a physical picture of the information content of an echo. That is, the echo decay reflects the lifetime of local structures in the liquid on a length scale that equals the delocalization length of the intermolecular modes. Finally, recent experimental results are reviewed from an echo perspective.

  9. Collisions of slow polyatomic ions with surfaces: dissociation and chemical reactions of C2H2+*, C2H3+, C2H4+*, C2H5+, and their deuterated variants C2D2+* and C2D4+* on room-temperature and heated carbon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jasík, Juraj; Zabka, Jan; Feketeova, Linda; Ipolyi, Imre; Märk, Tilmann D; Herman, Zdenek

    2005-11-17

    Interaction of C2Hn+ (n = 2-5) hydrocarbon ions and some of their isotopic variants with room-temperature and heated (600 degrees C) highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces was investigated over the range of incident energies 11-46 eV and an incident angle of 60 degrees with respect to the surface normal. The work is an extension of our earlier research on surface interactions of CHn+ (n = 3-5) ions. Mass spectra, translational energy distributions, and angular distributions of product ions were measured. Collisions with the HOPG surface heated to 600 degrees C showed only partial or substantial dissociation of the projectile ions; translational energy distributions of the product ions peaked at about 50% of the incident energy. Interactions with the HOPG surface at room temperature showed both surface-induced dissociation of the projectiles and, in the case of radical cation projectiles C2H2+* and C2H4+*, chemical reactions with the hydrocarbons on the surface. These reactions were (i) H-atom transfer to the projectile, formation of protonated projectiles, and their subsequent fragmentation and (ii) formation of a carbon chain build-up product in reactions of the projectile ion with a terminal CH3-group of the surface hydrocarbons and subsequent fragmentation of the product ion to C3H3+. The product ions were formed in inelastic collisions in which the translational energy of the surface-excited projectile peaked at about 32% of the incident energy. Angular distributions of reaction products showed peaking at subspecular angles close to 68 degrees (heated surfaces) and 72 degrees (room-temperature surfaces). The absolute survival probability at the incident angle of 60 degrees was about 0.1% for C2H2+*, close to 1% for C2H4+* and C2H5+, and about 3-6% for C2H3+.

  10. 2D transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzeli, Sajedeh; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Pasquier, Diego; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2017-08-01

    Graphene is very popular because of its many fascinating properties, but its lack of an electronic bandgap has stimulated the search for 2D materials with semiconducting character. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), which are semiconductors of the type MX2, where M is a transition metal atom (such as Mo or W) and X is a chalcogen atom (such as S, Se or Te), provide a promising alternative. Because of its robustness, MoS2 is the most studied material in this family. TMDCs exhibit a unique combination of atomic-scale thickness, direct bandgap, strong spin-orbit coupling and favourable electronic and mechanical properties, which make them interesting for fundamental studies and for applications in high-end electronics, spintronics, optoelectronics, energy harvesting, flexible electronics, DNA sequencing and personalized medicine. In this Review, the methods used to synthesize TMDCs are examined and their properties are discussed, with particular attention to their charge density wave, superconductive and topological phases. The use of TMCDs in nanoelectronic devices is also explored, along with strategies to improve charge carrier mobility, high frequency operation and the use of strain engineering to tailor their properties.

  11. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  12. Effect of adding ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate on the coordination environment of Li+ ions in propylene carbonate, according to data from IR spectroscopy and quantum chemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A. F.; Yudina, A. V.; Tulibaeva, G. Z.; Shul'ga, Yu. M.; Ignatova, A. A.; Yarmolenko, O. V.

    2017-08-01

    The effect ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate has on the coordination environment of Li+ cations in carbonate solvents is studied by means of IR spectroscopy and quantum chemical modeling using the example of propylene carbonate (PC). LiBF4 is used as the lithium salt. This system is promising for use as an electrolyte in lithium power sources (LPSs), but the mechanism of ionic conductivity by Li+ ions in such systems has yet to be studied in full.

  13. Controlling Structural Anisotropy of Anisotropic 2D Layers in Pseudo-1D/2D Material Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Wu, Kedi; Suslu, Aslihan; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Yano, Aliya; Soignard, Emmanuel; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Shen, Yuxia; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2017-07-10

    Chemical vapor deposition and growth dynamics of highly anisotropic 2D lateral heterojunctions between pseudo-1D ReS2 and isotropic WS2 monolayers are reported for the first time. Constituent ReS2 and WS2 layers have vastly different atomic structure, crystallizing in anisotropic 1T' and isotropic 2H phases, respectively. Through high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and angle-resolved Raman spectroscopy, this study is able to provide the very first atomic look at intimate interfaces between these dissimilar 2D materials. Surprisingly, the results reveal that ReS2 lateral heterojunctions to WS2 produce well-oriented (highly anisotropic) Re-chains perpendicular to WS2 edges. When vertically stacked, Re-chains orient themselves along the WS2 zigzag direction, and consequently, Re-chains exhibit six-fold rotation, resulting in loss of macroscopic scale anisotropy. The degree of anisotropy of ReS2 on WS2 largely depends on the domain size, and decreases for increasing domain size due to randomization of Re-chains and formation of ReS2 subdomains. Present work establishes the growth dynamics of atomic junctions between novel anisotropic/isotropic 2D materials, and overall results mark the very first demonstration of control over anisotropy direction, which is a significant leap forward for large-scale nanomanufacturing of anisotropic systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. 2D Hybrid Nanostructured Dirac Materials for Broadband Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunfan; Lin, Li; Zhao, Shuli; Deng, Bing; Chen, Hongliang; Ma, Bangjun; Wu, Jinxiong; Yin, Jianbo; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2015-08-05

    Broadband transparent electrodes based on 2D hybrid nanostructured Dirac materials between Bi2 Se3 and graphene are synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Bi2 Se3 nanoplates are preferentially grown along graphene grain boundaries as "smart" conductive patches to bridge the graphene boundary. These hybrid films increase by one- to threefold in conductivity while remaining highly transparent over broadband wavelength. They also display outstanding chemical stability and mechanical flexibility.

  15. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  16. IR Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    This infrared image shows windstreaks in the region between Gordii Dorsum and Amazonis Mensa.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -15.8, Longitude 215 East (145 West). 97 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. IR Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    This infrared image shows windstreaks in the region between Gordii Dorsum and Amazonis Mensa.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -15.8, Longitude 215 East (145 West). 97 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Silicene, a promising new 2D material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughaddou, Hamid; Enriquez, Hanna; Tchalala, Mohammed Rachid; Yildirim, Handan; Mayne, Andrew J.; Bendounan, Azzedine; Dujardin, Gérald; Ait Ali, Mustapha; Kara, Abdelkader

    2015-02-01

    Silicene is emerging as a two-dimensional material with very attractive electronic properties for a wide range of applications; it is a particularly promising material for nano-electronics in silicon-based technology. Over the last decade, the existence and stability of silicene has been the subject of much debate. Theoretical studies were the first to predict a puckered honeycomb structure with electronic properties resembling those of graphene. Though these studies were for free-standing silicene, experimental fabrication of silicene has been achieved so far only through epitaxial growth on crystalline surfaces. Indeed, it was only in 2010 that researchers presented the first experimental evidence of the formation of silicene on Ag(1 1 0) and Ag(1 1 1), which has launched silicene in a similar way to graphene. This very active field has naturally led to the recent growth of silicene on Ir(1 1 1), ZrB2(0 0 0 1) and Au(1 1 0) substrates. However, the electronic properties of epitaxially grown silicene on metal surfaces are influenced by the strong silicene-metal interactions. This has prompted experimental studies of the growth of multi-layer silicene, though the nature of its "silicene" structure remains questionable. Of course, like graphene, synthesizing free-standing silicene represents the ultimate challenge. A first step towards this has been reported recently through chemical exfoliation from calcium disilicide (CaSi2). In this review, we discuss the experimental and theoretical studies of silicene performed to date. Special attention is given to different experimental studies of the electronic properties of silicene on metal substrates. New avenues for the growth of silicene on other substrates with different chemical characteristics are presented along with foreseeable applications such as nano-devices and novel batteries.

  19. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  20. IUPAP Award: Ion transport in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Intercalation in 2D materials drastically influences both physical and chemical properties, which leads to a new degree of freedom for fundamental studies and expands the potential applications of 2D materials. In this talk, I will discuss our work in the past two years related to ion intercalation of 2D materials, including insertion of Li and Na ions in graphene and MoS2. We focused on both fundamental mechanism and potential application, e.g. we measured in-situ optical transmittance spectra and electrical transport properties of few-layer graphene (FLG) nanostructures upon electrochemical lithiation/delithiation. By observing a simultaneous increase of both optical transmittance and DC conductivity, strikingly different from other materials, we proposed its application as a next generation transparent electrode.

  1. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  2. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  3. 2D nanomaterials based electrochemical biosensors for cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Xiong, Qirong; Xiao, Fei; Duan, Hongwei

    2017-03-15

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that early diagnosis holds the key towards effective treatment outcome. Cancer biomarkers are extensively used in oncology for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Electrochemical sensors play key roles in current laboratory and clinical analysis of diverse chemical and biological targets. Recent development of functional nanomaterials offers new possibilities of improving the performance of electrochemical sensors. In particular, 2D nanomaterials have stimulated intense research due to their unique array of structural and chemical properties. The 2D materials of interest cover broadly across graphene, graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide), and graphene-like nanomaterials (i.e., 2D layered transition metal dichalcogenides, graphite carbon nitride and boron nitride nanomaterials). In this review, we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of 2D nanomaterials and their applications in electrochemical biosensing of cancer biomarkers (nucleic acids, proteins and some small molecules), and present a personal perspective on the future direction of this area.

  4. Hyperhoneycomb iridate beta-Li2 IrO3 as a platform for Kitaev spin liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Tomohiro

    Realization of quantum spin liquid has been a long-sought dream in condensed matter physics, where exotic excitations and unconventional superconductivity upon doping are expected. Honeycomb iridates recently emerged as a possible materialization of Kitaev spin liquid with frustrated `` bond - dependent ferromagnetic interaction ''. However, the real materials, α-Na2IrO3 and α-Li2IrO3, undergo antiferromagnetic ordering likely due to the presence of other dominant magnetic interactions and lattice distortion. We discovered a new form of Li2IrO3, β-Li2IrO3, which comprises a three-dimensional analogue of honeycomb lattice dubbed as ''hyperhoneycomb''. Each Ir4+ ion of the hyperhoneycomb lattice has three neighboring like ions rotated by 120° and thus the local structure is identical with 2D honeycomb, indicating that the hyperhoneycomb lattice is a new platform for Kitaev physics. β-Li2IrO3 diplays a spiral magnetic order below 38 K, which likely originates from dominance of ferromagnetic Kitaev interaction. We argure that β-Li2IrO3 locates in a close proximity to Kitaev spin liquid. We also discuss the spin liquid behavior observed in a new honeycomb iridate obtained by chemical modulation.

  5. Molecular structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 9-methoxy-2H-furo[3,2-g]chromen-2-one with experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) techniques and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Swarnalatha, N; Gunasekaran, S; Muthu, S; Nagarajan, M

    2015-02-25

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on the molecular structure, electronic and vibrational characteristics of 9-methoxy-2H-furo[3,2-g]chromen-2-one (9M2HFC) were presented. The vibrational frequencies were obtained by DFT/B3LYP calculations employing 6-311++G(d,p) basis set, were compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral data. The FT-IR spectrum (4000-400 cm(-1)) and FT-Raman spectrum (4000-100 cm(-1)) in solid phase were recorded for 9M2HFC. The geometry of the title compound was fully optimized. Quantum chemical calculations of the equilibrium geometry, the complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers using potential energy distribution (PED) calculated with scaled quantum mechanics infrared intensities, Raman activities of the title molecule was reported. HOMO-LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential, Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, non linear optical behavior in terms of first order hyperpolarizability, and thermodynamic properties of the title molecule were carried out. Finally, simulated FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra showed good agreement with the observed spectra. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Study on molecular structure, spectroscopic investigation (IR, Raman and NMR), vibrational assignments and HOMO-LUMO analysis of L-sodium folinate using DFT: a combined experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Cai, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, an exhaustive conformational search of N-[4-[[(2-amino-5-formyl-(6S)-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-6-pteridinyl)methyl]amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid disodium salt (L-SF) has been preformed. The optimized structure of the molecule, vibrational frequencies and NMR spectra studies have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. IR and FT-Raman spectra for L-SF have been recorded in the region of 400-4000 cm(-1) and 100-3500 cm(-1), respectively. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated based on the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Finally all of the calculation results were applied to simulate IR, Raman, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectrum of the title compound which showed excellent agreement with observed spectrum. Furthermore, reliable vibrational assignments which have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) and characteristic vibratinonal absorption bands of the title compound in IR and Raman have been figured out. HOMO-LUMO energy and Mulliken atomic charges have been evaluated, either.

  7. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan Dt; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-04-29

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity.

  8. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13254.001 PMID:27126188

  9. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  10. Towards functional assembly of 3D and 2D nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.; Wang, Kai; Ievlev, Anton V.; Muckley, Eric S.; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-09-01

    Functional assemblies of materials can be realized by tuning the work function and band gap of nanomaterials by rational material selection and design. Here we demonstrate the structural assembly of 2D and 3D nanomaterials and show that layering a 2D material monolayer on a 3D metal oxide leads to substantial alteration of both the surface potential and optical properties of the 3D material. A 40 nm thick film of polycrystalline NiO was produced by room temperature rf-sputtering, resulting in a 3D nanoparticle assembly. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown 10-30 μm WS2 flakes (2D material) were placed on the NiO surface using a PDMS stamp transfer technique. The 2D/3D WS2/NiO assembly was characterized using confocal micro Raman spectroscopy to evaluate the vibrational properties and using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to evaluate the surface potential. Raman maps of the 2D/3D assembly show spatial non-uniformity of the A1g mode ( 418 cm-1) and the disorder-enhanced longitudinal acoustic mode, 2LA(M) ( 350 cm-1), suggesting that the WS2 exists in a strained condition on when transferred onto 3D polycrystalline NiO. KPFM measurements show that single layer WS2 on SiO2 has a surface potential 75 mV lower than that of SiO2, whereas the surface potential of WS2 on NiO is 15 mV higher than NiO, indicating that WS2 could act as electron donor or acceptor depending on the 3D material it is interfaced with. Thus 2D and 3D materials can be organized into functional assemblies with electron flow controlled by the WS2 either as the electron donor or acceptor.

  11. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  12. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  13. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  14. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) studies, Hirshfeld surfaces analysis, and quantum chemical calculations of m-acetotoluidide and m-thioacetotoluidide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiszek-Lindert, Wioleta Edyta; Chełmecka, Elżbieta; Góralczyk, Stefan; Kaczmarek, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the m-acetotoluidide and m-thioacetotoluidide isolated molecules were performed by using density functional theory (DFT) method at B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G (3df,2pd) basis set levels. The Hirshfeld surfaces analysis and FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy studies have been reported. The geometrical parameters of the title amide and thioamide are in a good agreement with the XRD experiment. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and scaled, and subsequently values have been compared with the experimental Infrared and Raman spectra. The observed and calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The analysis of the Hirshfeld surface has been well correlated to the spectroscopic studies. Additionally, the highest occupied molecular orbital energy (EHOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (ELUMO) and the energy gap between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔEHOMO-LUMO) have been calculated.

  16. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR), HOMO and LUMO analysis of 3-ethynylthiophene with DFT quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Mavis, Tugba; Eskici, Mustafa; Atac, Ahmet

    2013-11-01

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR spectra of 3-ethynylthiophene (3-ETP, C6H4S) were carried out by using density functional theory DFT/B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311+G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the regions of 3500-400 cm-1 and 3500-50 cm-1, respectively. The geometrical parameters, energies and wavenumbers were obtained and the complete assignments of fundamental vibrations were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. The 1H, 13C and HMQC (1H-13C correlation) NMR spectra in chloroform (CDCl3) were recorded and calculated. The UV spectrum of investigated compound were recorded in the region of 200-400 nm in ethanol solution. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, absorption wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT/B3LYP approach and the results were compared with experimental observations. The thermodynamic properties such zero-point vibrational energy, thermal energy, specific heat capacity, rotational constants, entropy, and dipole moment of the studied compound were calculated. As a result, the calculated results were compared with the observed data and found to be in good agreement.

  17. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR), HOMO and LUMO analysis of 3-ethynylthiophene with DFT quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Mavis, Tugba; Eskici, Mustafa; Atac, Ahmet

    2013-11-01

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR spectra of 3-ethynylthiophene (3-ETP, C6H4S) were carried out by using density functional theory DFT/B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311+G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the regions of 3500-400cm(-1) and 3500-50cm(-1), respectively. The geometrical parameters, energies and wavenumbers were obtained and the complete assignments of fundamental vibrations were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. The (1)H, (13)C and HMQC ((1)H-(13)C correlation) NMR spectra in chloroform (CDCl3) were recorded and calculated. The UV spectrum of investigated compound were recorded in the region of 200-400nm in ethanol solution. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, absorption wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT/B3LYP approach and the results were compared with experimental observations. The thermodynamic properties such zero-point vibrational energy, thermal energy, specific heat capacity, rotational constants, entropy, and dipole moment of the studied compound were calculated. As a result, the calculated results were compared with the observed data and found to be in good agreement.

  18. The chemistry of H2D(+) in cold clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, L.; Salez, M.; Wannier, P. G.

    1992-05-01

    A simple gas-phase, steady-state chemical model of H2D(+) is presented where the ortho/para ratio is investigated in detail. We show that thermal equilibrium should prevail above 20 K but that it is in cold clouds that the ortho form should be the most abundant contrarily to what is expected from thermal equilibrium alone, its abundance being several orders of magnitude larger than previously thought, in which case, cold clouds with high column densities should be the best places to search for this species. We discuss the upper limits derived from our observations (Pagani et al., 1992) in comparison with our model and also reexamine the relations between H2D(+) measurements, the DCO(+)/HCO(+) ratio and the abundances of H3(+), H2D(+), and of electrons in dark clouds. Recent findings in observational, theoretical and laboratory astrochemistry make it difficult to derive H3 and e(-) abundances from these measurements and thus make it difficult to derive the important H2D(+)/H3(+) ratio.

  19. Hard and Soft Physics with 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEuen, Paul

    With their remarkable structural, thermal, mechanical, optical, chemical, and electronic properties, 2D materials are truly special. For example, a graphene sheet can be made into a high-performance transistor, but it is also the ultimate realization of a thin mechanical sheet. Such sheets, first studied in detail by August Föppl over a hundred years ago, are notoriously complex, since they can bend, buckle, and crumple in a variety of ways. In this talk, I will discuss a number of experiments to probe these unusual materials, from the effects of ripples on the mechanical properties of a graphene sheet, to folding with atomically thin bimorphs, to the electronic properties of bilayer graphene solitons. Finally, I discuss how the Japanese paper art of kirigami (kiru = `to cut', kami = `paper') applied to 2D materials offers a route to mechanical metamaterials and the construction of nanoscale machines.

  20. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  1. Quantum chemical calculation (electronic and topologic) and experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) analysis of isonicotinic acid N-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaca, Caglar; Atac, Ahmet; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic analysis of isonicotinic acid N-oxide (iso-NANO) were presented in the ground state using experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The geometry optimization and energies associated possible two conformers (Rot-I and Rot-II) were computed. The vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. The obtained structures were analyzed with the Atoms in Molecules (AIMs) methodology. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of iso-NANO as the Rot-I form. Total density of state (TDOS) and partial density of state (PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis for the most stable conformer (Rot-I) were calculated using the same method. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated. As a result, the optimized geometry and calculated spectroscopic data show a good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. FT-IR, Laser-Raman spectra and quantum chemical calculations of methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate-A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Yusuf; Sreenivasa, S.; Doğan, H.; Manojkumar, K. E.; Suchetan, P. A.; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    In this study the experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory agent namely, methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate have been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and Laser-Raman spectra (4000-100 cm-1) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr and DFT/M06-2X: highly parameterized, empirical exchange correlation function) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and results in the literature. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy and the other related molecular energy values of the compound have been investigated using the same theoretical calculations.

  3. Molecular geometry and vibrational studies of 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole using quantum chemical calculations and FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guennoun, L.; El jastimi, J.; Guédira, F.; Marakchi, K.; Kabbaj, O. K.; El Hajji, A.; Zaydoun, S.

    2011-01-01

    The 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole (guanazole) was investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and quantum methods. The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm -1 and 3600-50 cm -1 respectively, and the band assignments were supported by deuteration effects. The results of energy calculations have shown that the most stable form is 1H-3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole under C 1 symmetry. For this form, the molecular structure, harmonic vibrational wave numbers, infrared intensities and Raman activities were calculated by the ab initio/HF and DFT/B3LYP methods using 6-31G* basis set. The calculated geometrical parameters of the guanazole molecule using B3LYP methodology are in good agreement with the previously reported X-ray data, and the scaled vibrational wave number values are in good agreement with the experimental data. The normal vibrations were characterized in terms of potential energy distribution (PEDs) using VEDA 4 program.

  4. FT-IR, Laser-Raman spectra and quantum chemical calculations of methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate-A DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Sert, Yusuf; Sreenivasa, S; Doğan, H; Manojkumar, K E; Suchetan, P A; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-05

    In this study the experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory agent namely, methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate have been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400cm(-1)) and Laser-Raman spectra (4000-100cm(-1)) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr and DFT/M06-2X: highly parameterized, empirical exchange correlation function) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and results in the literature. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy and the other related molecular energy values of the compound have been investigated using the same theoretical calculations.

  5. Molecular geometry and vibrational studies of 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole using quantum chemical calculations and FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Guennoun, L; El jastimi, J; Guédira, F; Marakchi, K; Kabbaj, O K; El Hajji, A; Zaydoun, S

    2011-01-01

    The 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole (guanazole) was investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and quantum methods. The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3600-50 cm(-1) respectively, and the band assignments were supported by deuteration effects. The results of energy calculations have shown that the most stable form is 1H-3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole under C1 symmetry. For this form, the molecular structure, harmonic vibrational wave numbers, infrared intensities and Raman activities were calculated by the ab initio/HF and DFT/B3LYP methods using 6-31G* basis set. The calculated geometrical parameters of the guanazole molecule using B3LYP methodology are in good agreement with the previously reported X-ray data, and the scaled vibrational wave number values are in good agreement with the experimental data. The normal vibrations were characterized in terms of potential energy distribution (PEDs) using VEDA 4 program.

  6. Quantum chemical studies on molecular structure, spectroscopic (IR, Raman, UV-Vis), NBO and HOMO-LUMO analysis of 1-benzyl-3-(2-furoyl) thiourea.

    PubMed

    Gil, Diego M; Defonsi Lestard, M E; Estévez-Hernández, O; Duque, J; Reguera, E

    2015-06-15

    Vibrational and electronic spectra for 1-benzyl-3-(2-furoyl) thiourea were calculated by using density functional method (B3LYP) with different basis sets. The complete assignment of all vibrational modes was performed on basis of the calculated frequencies and comparing with the reported IR and Raman spectra for that thiourea derivative. UV-visible absorption spectra of the compound dissolved in methanol were recorded and analyzed using time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The calculated values for the geometrical parameters of the title compound are consistent with the ones reported from XRD studies. The stability of the molecule, related to hyper-conjugative interactions, and electron delocalization were evaluated using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Intra-molecular interactions were studied by AIM approach. The HOMO and LUMO analysis are used to determine the charge transfer within the molecule. Molecular electrostatic potential map was performed by the DFT method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectroscopic investigation, electronic properties, electric moments, and NBO analysis of anethole using quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sinha, L; Prasad, O; Chand, S; Sachan, A K; Pathak, S K; Shukla, V K; Karabacak, M; Asiri, A M

    2014-12-10

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of anethole (1-Methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)benzene), a flavoring agent of commercial value, have been recorded in the regions 4000-400 and 4000-100cm(-1) respectively. The structure of the title molecule has been optimized and the structural parameters have been calculated by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The fundamental vibrational wavenumbers as well as their intensities were calculated and a good agreement between observed and scaled calculated wavenumbers has been achieved. UV-Vis spectrum of the title compound was recorded in the region 200-500nm and the electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies and associated energy gap were calculated by Time dependent-density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach. Nonlinear optical (NLO) study divulges the nonlinear properties of the molecule. Stability of the title molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been investigated using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The theoretical results were found to be in coherence with the measured experimental data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantum chemical calculation (electronic and topologic) and experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) analysis of isonicotinic acid N-oxide.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Caglar; Atac, Ahmet; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2015-04-05

    In this work, the molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic analysis of isonicotinic acid N-oxide (iso-NANO) were presented in the ground state using experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The geometry optimization and energies associated possible two conformers (Rot-I and Rot-II) were computed. The vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. The obtained structures were analyzed with the Atoms in Molecules (AIMs) methodology. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of iso-NANO as the Rot-I form. Total density of state (TDOS) and partial density of state (PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis for the most stable conformer (Rot-I) were calculated using the same method. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated. As a result, the optimized geometry and calculated spectroscopic data show a good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  10. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  11. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  12. Spectroscopic properties of multilayered gold nanoparticle 2D sheets.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihito; Imazu, Keisuke; Li, Xinheng; Okamoto, Koichi; Tamada, Kaoru

    2012-12-11

    We report the fabrication technique and optical properties of multilayered two-dimensional (2D) gold nanoparticle sheets ("Au nanosheet"). The 2D crystalline monolayer sheet composed of Au nanoparticles shows an absorption peak originating from a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). It was found that the absorption spectra dramatically change when the monolayers are assembled into the multilayers on different substrates (quartz or Au). In the case of the multilayers on Au thin film (d = 200 nm), the LSPR peak is shifted to longer wavelength at the near-IR region by increasing the number of layers. The absorbance also depends on the layer number and shows the nonlinear behavior. On the other hand, the multilayers on quartz substrate show neither such LSPR peak shift nor nonlinear response of absorbance. The layer number dependence on metal surfaces can be interpreted as the combined effects between the near-field coupling of the LSPR and the far-field optics of the stratified metamaterial films, as proposed in our previous study. We also report the spectroscopic properties of hybrid multilayers composed of two kinds of monolayers, i.e., Au nanosheet and Ag nanosheet. The combination of the different metal nanoparticle sheets realizes more flexible plasmonic color tuning.

  13. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  14. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  15. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) investigations and quantum chemical calculations of 4-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinoline-7-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Ulahannan, Rajeev T; Panicker, C Yohannan; Varghese, Hema Tresa; Van Alsenoy, C; Musiol, Robert; Jampilek, Josef; Anto, P L

    2014-01-01

    Quinoline derivatives have good nonlinear optical properties and have been extensively studied due to their great potential application in the field of organic light emitting diodes. Quantum chemical calculations of the equilibrium geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman activities of 4-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinoline-7-carboxylic acid in the ground state were reported. Potential energy distribution of normal modes of vibrations was done using GAR2PED program. The synthesis, (1)H NMR and PES scan results are also discussed. Nonlinear optical behavior of the examined molecule was investigated by the determination of first hyperpolarizability. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show the chemical activity of the molecule. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The calculated geometrical parameters are in agreement with that of similar derivatives.

  16. Synthesis, structural, and spectroscopic (FT-IR, NMR, and UV) Characterization of 1-(Cyclohexylmethyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole by experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Namık; Dayan, Osman; Demirmen, Selin

    2016-05-01

    The title compound ( II), 1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole (C19H21N3), was synthesized via N-alkylation of 2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1 H-benzo[ d]imidazole ( I). Both compounds I and II were characterized by IR, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy. Solid-state structure of compound II was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Furthermore, quantum chemical calculations employing density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-311++ G( d, p) basis set were performed for the theoretical characterization of the molecular and spectroscopic features of the compounds. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the compounds have been predicted at same level. When the obtained results were compared with the experimental findings, it is seen that theoretical results support the experimental data and a good agreement exists between them.

  17. Analysis of molecular structure, spectroscopic properties (FT-IR, micro-Raman and UV-vis) and quantum chemical calculations of free and ligand 2-thiopheneglyoxylic acid in metal halides (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni and Zn).

    PubMed

    Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2013-12-01

    In this study, molecular geometries, experimental vibrational wavenumbers, electronic properties and quantum chemical calculations of 2-thiopheneglyoxylic acid molecule, (C6H4O3S), and its metal halides (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni and Zn) which are used as pharmacologic agents have been investigated experimentally by FT-IR, micro-Raman and UV-visible spectroscopies and elemental analysis. Meanwhile the vibrational calculations were verified by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets in the ground state, for free TPGA molecule and its metal halide complexes, respectively, for the first time. The calculated fundamental vibrational frequencies for the title compounds are in a good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Vibrational spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, SERS) and quantum chemical calculations of 3-(10,10-dimethyl-anthracen-9-ylidene)-N,N,N-trimethylpropanaminiium chloride (Melitracenium chloride).

    PubMed

    Mary, Y Shyma; Jojo, P J; Van Alsenoy, Christian; Kaur, Manpreet; Siddegowda, M S; Yathirajan, H S; Nogueira, Helena I S; Cruz, Sandra M A

    2014-01-01

    FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra of Melitracenium chloride were recorded and analyzed. SERS spectrum was recorded in silver colloid. The vibrational wavenumbers were computed using DFT quantum chemical calculations. The data obtained from wavenumber calculations are used to assign vibrational bands obtained in infrared and Raman spectra as well as in SERS of the studied molecule. Potential energy distribution was done using GAR2PED program. The geometrical parameters (SDD) of the title compound are in agreement with the XRD results. The presence anthracene ring modes in the SERS spectrum suggest a tilted orientation with respect to the metal surface. The methyl groups in the title molecule are also close to the metal surface. The first hyperpolarizability, NBO analysis and molecular electrostatic potential results are also reported.

  19. IR Cards: Inquiry-Based Introduction to Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Forster, Tabetha

    2010-01-01

    As infrared spectroscopy (IR) is frequently used in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, an inductive introduction to IR spectroscopy that uses index cards printed with spectra, structures, and chemical names is described. Groups of students are given an alphabetized deck of these "IR cards" to sort into functional groups. The students then…

  20. IR Cards: Inquiry-Based Introduction to Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Forster, Tabetha

    2010-01-01

    As infrared spectroscopy (IR) is frequently used in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, an inductive introduction to IR spectroscopy that uses index cards printed with spectra, structures, and chemical names is described. Groups of students are given an alphabetized deck of these "IR cards" to sort into functional groups. The students then…

  1. Quantum-chemical (DFT, MP2) and spectroscopic studies (FT-IR and UV) of monomeric and dimeric structures of 2(3H)-Benzothiazolone.

    PubMed

    Sinha, L; Prasad, O; Karabacak, M; Mishra, H N; Narayan, V; Asiri, A M

    2014-01-01

    Molecular geometry and vibrational wavenumbers of 2(3H)-Benzothiazolone (C7H5NSO, HBT) was investigated using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational wavenumbers are found to be in good agreement with experimental FT-IR spectra. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of HBT, optimized by counterpoise correction, was studied by MP2 and DFT/B3LYP at the 6-311+G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through NH---O hydrogen bonding were discussed. A detailed analysis of the nature of the hydrogen bonding, using topological parameters, such as electronic charge density, Laplacian, kinetic and potential energy density evaluated at bond critical points (BCP) has also been presented. The UV absorption spectra of the compound dissolved in ethanol and chloroform solutions were recorded in the range of 200-600 nm. The UV-vis spectrum of the title molecule was also calculated using TD-DFT method. The calculated energy and oscillator strength almost exactly reproduce the experimental data. Total and partial density of state (TDOS, PDOS) of the HBT in terms of HOMOs and LUMOs and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were calculated and analyzed. The electric dipole moment, polarizability and the first static hyper-polarizability values for HBT were calculated at the DFT/B3LYP with 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The results also show that the HBT molecule may have nonlinear optical (NLO) comportment with non-zero values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization was analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis.

  2. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  3. Ultrafast 2D-IR and simulation investigations of preferential solvation and cosolvent exchange dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Josef A; Arthur, Evan J; White, Aaron M; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2015-05-21

    Using a derivative of the vitamin biotin labeled with a transition-metal carbonyl vibrational probe in a series of aqueous N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solutions, we observe a striking slowdown in spectral diffusion dynamics with decreased DMF concentration. Equilibrium solvation dynamics, measured with the rapidly acquired spectral diffusion (RASD) technique, a variant of heterodyne-detected photon-echo peak shift experiments, range from 1 ps in neat DMF to ∼3 ps in 0.07 mole fraction DMF/water solution. Molecular dynamics simulations of the biotin-metal carbonyl solute in explicit aqueous DMF solutions show marked preferential solvation by DMF, which becomes more pronounced at lower DMF concentrations. The simulations and the experimental data are consistent with an interpretation where the slowdown in spectral diffusion is due to solvent exchange involving distinct cosolvent species. A simple two-component model reproduces the observed spectral dynamics as well as the DMF concentration dependence, enabling the extraction of the solvent exchange time scale of 8 ps. This time scale corresponds to the diffusive motion of a few Å, consistent with a solvent-exchange mechanism. Unlike most previous studies of solvation dynamics in binary mixtures of polar solvents, our work highlights the ability of vibrational probes to sense solvent exchange as a new, slow component in the spectral diffusion dynamics.

  4. Structural Disorder of Folded Proteins: Isotope-Edited 2D IR Spectroscopy and Markov State Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The conformational heterogeneity of the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 (NTL91-39) in its folded state is investigated using isotope-edited two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. Backbone carbonyls are isotope-labeled (13C=18O) at five selected positions (V3, V9, V9G13, G16, and G24) to provide a set of localized spectroscopic probes of the structure and solvent exposure at these positions. Structural interpretation of the amide I line shapes is enabled by spectral simulations carried out on structures extracted from a recent Markov state model. The V3 label spectrum indicates that the β-sheet contacts between strands I and II are well folded with minimal disorder. The V9 and V9G13 label spectra, which directly probe the hydrogen-bond contacts across the β-turn, show significant disorder, indicating that molecular dynamics simulations tend to overstabilize ideally folded β-turn structures in NTL91-39. In addition, G24-label spectra provide evidence for a partially disordered α-helix backbone that participates in hydrogen bonding with the surrounding water. PMID:25863066

  5. Ribonuclease S dynamics measured using a nitrile label with 2D IR vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Sayan; Boxer, Steven G; Fayer, Michael D

    2012-04-05

    A nitrile-labeled amino acid, p-cyanophenylalanine, is introduced near the active site of the semisynthetic enzyme ribonuclease S to serve as a probe of protein dynamics and fluctuations. Ribonuclease S is the limited proteolysis product of subtilisin acting on ribonuclease A, and consists of a small fragment including amino acids 1-20, the S-peptide, and a larger fragment including residues 21-124, the S-protein. A series of two-dimensional vibrational echo experiments performed on the nitrile-labeled S-peptide and the RNase S are described. The time-dependent changes in the two-dimensional infrared vibrational echo line shapes are analyzed using the center line slope method to obtain the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF). The observations show that the nitrile probe in the S-peptide has dynamics that are similar to, but faster than, those of the single amino acid p-cyanophenylalanine in water. In contrast, the dynamics of the nitrile label when the peptide is bound to form ribonuclease S are dominated by homogeneous dephasing (motionally narrowed) contributions with only a small contribution from very fast inhomogeneous structural dynamics. The results provide insights into the nature of the structural dynamics of the ribonuclease S complex. The equilibrium dynamics of the nitrile labeled S-peptide and the ribonuclease S complex are also investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The experimentally determined FFCFs are compared to the FFCFs obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, thereby testing the capacity of simulations to determine the amplitudes and time scales of protein structural fluctuations on fast time scales under thermal equilibrium conditions.

  6. 2D-IR spectroscopy of hydrogen-bond-mediated vibrational excitation transfer.

    PubMed

    Chuntonov, Lev

    2016-05-18

    Vibrational excitation transfer along the hydrogen-bond-mediated pathways in the complex of methyl acetate (MA) and 4-cyanophenol (4CP) was studied by dual-frequency femtosecond two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. We excited the energy-donating ester carbonyl stretching vibrational mode and followed the transfer to the energy-accepting benzene ring and cyano stretching vibrations. The complexes with no, one, and two hydrogen-bonded 4CP molecules were studied. Vibrational relaxation of the carbonyl mode is more efficient in both hydrogen-bonded complexes as compared with free MA molecules. The inter-molecular transport in a hydrogen-bonded complex involving a single 4CP molecule is slower than that in a complex with two 4CP molecules. In the former, vibrational relaxation leads to local heating, as shown by the spectroscopy of the carbonyl mode, whereas the local heating is suppressed in the latter because the excitation redistribution is more efficient. At early times, the transfer to the benzene ring is governed by its direct coupling with the energy-donating carbonyl mode, whereas at later times intermediate states are involved. The transfer to a more distant site of the cyano group in 4CP involves intermediate states at all times, since no direct coupling between the energy-donating and accepting modes was observed. We anticipate that our findings will be of importance for spectroscopic studies of bio-molecular structures and dynamics, and inter- and intra-molecular signaling pathways, and for developing molecular networking applications.

  7. Ultrafast slaving dynamics at the protein-water interface studied with 2D-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. T.; Kubarych, K. J.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of hen egg white lysozyme in D2O/glycerol mixtures is studied using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. The hydration dynamics and the protein dynamics are studied simultaneously through vibrational probes attached to the protein surface.

  8. A Systolic 2-D Convolution Chip.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    University Pittsburgh. Pa. 15213 Lat Revised M~arch 1981 DEPARTMENT SSEP 3 0198 COMPUTER SCIENCE A This doow~ ~sb. for P~11 ~e.and sit d~stri~t~.~is...author is currently on leave from Carnegie-Mcllon University at ESI.’s Ad anced Processor Iechnology Group in San Jose. California. ( tESI . is a su,,idi;ir

  9. Interferometric 2D Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Reveals Structural Heterogeneity of Catalytic Monolayers on Transparent Materials.

    PubMed

    Vanselous, Heather; Stingel, Ashley M; Petersen, Poul B

    2017-02-16

    Molecular monolayers exhibit structural and dynamical properties that are different from their bulk counterparts due to their interaction with the substrate. Extracting these distinct properties is crucial for a better understanding of processes such as heterogeneous catalysis and interfacial charge transfer. Ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopic techniques such as 2D infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy are powerful tools for understanding molecular dynamics in complex bulk systems. Here, we build on technical advancements in 2D IR and heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to study a CO2 reduction catalyst on nanostructured TiO2 with interferometric 2D SFG spectroscopy. Our method combines phase-stable heterodyne detection employing an external local oscillator with a broad-band pump pulse pair to provide the first high spectral and temporal resolution 2D SFG spectra of a transparent material. We determine the overall molecular orientation of the catalyst and find that there is a static structural heterogeneity reflective of different local environments at the surface.

  10. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  11. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  12. Quantum Chemical Study of the Solvent Effect on the Anticancer Active Molecule of Iproplatin: Structural, Electronic, and Spectroscopic Properties (IR, 1H NMR, UV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, N.; Ghiasi, R.; Fazaeli, R.; Jamehbozorgi, S.

    2017-01-01

    The structural, electronic, and spectroscopic properties of the anticancer active molecule of iproplatin were investigated in the gas and liquid phases. Based on the polarizable continuum model (PCM), the solvent effect on the structural parameters, frontier orbitals, and spectroscopic parameters of the complex was investigated. The results indicate that the polarity of solvents plays a significant role in the structure and pro perties of the complex. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the Gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Pt-Cl and Pt-OH bonds were investigated through a vibrational analysis. Moreover, time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) was used to calculate the energy, oscillatory strength, and wavelength absorption maximum (λmax) of electronic transitions and its nature within the complex.

  13. 2-D linear motion system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program requires buildings to be decontaminated, decommissioned, and surveyed for radiological contamination in an expeditious and cost-effective manner. Simultaneously, the health and safety of personnel involved in the D and D activities is of primary concern. D and D workers must perform duties high off the ground, requiring the use of manlifts or scaffolding, often, in radiologically or chemically contaminated areas or in areas with limited access. Survey and decontamination instruments that are used are sometimes heavy or awkward to use, particularly when the worker is operating from a manlift or scaffolding. Finding alternative methods of performing such work on manlifts or scaffolding is important. The 2-D Linear Motion System (2-D LMS), also known as the Wall Walker{trademark}, is designed to remotely position tools and instruments on walls for use in such activities as radiation surveys, decontamination, and painting. Traditional (baseline) methods for operating equipment for these tasks require workers to perform duties on elevated platforms, sometimes several meters above the ground surface and near potential sources of contamination. The Wall Walker 2-D LMS significantly improves health and safety conditions by facilitating remote operation of equipment. The Wall Walker 2-D LMS performed well in a demonstration of its precision, accuracy, maneuverability, payload capacity, and ease of use. Thus, this innovative technology is demonstrated to be a viable alternative to standard methods of performing work on large, high walls, especially those that have potential contamination concerns. The Wall Walker was used to perform a final release radiological survey on over 167 m{sup 2} of walls. In this application, surveying using a traditional (baseline) method that employs an aerial lift for manual access was 64% of the total cost of the improved technology

  14. Detect changes in protein structure of carinata meal during rumen fermentation in relation to basic chemical profile and comparison with canola meal using ATR-FT/IR molecular spectroscopy with chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-08-01

    As far as we know, no study has been carried out on whether protein structure changes in the feed during rumen fermentation from other research team. This study was conducted to characterize protein structure spectral changes in carinata meal during ruminal fermentation using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT/IR) technique with ATR. The objectives were to find out whether (1) protein internal structure (in terms of protein amide profile and protein secondary structure profile) changed after in situ ruminal fermentation at 0, 12, 24 and 48 h in carinata meal and conventional canola meal was used as a reference; (2) there was any correlation between protein spectral parameters and basic chemical profile in in situ rumen residue samples; and (3) the protein structural chemical make-up of carinata meal differed from canola meal during 48 h rumen incubation. The results showed that protein structure features in both carinata meal and canola meal were altered as incubation time increased (P < 0.0001) and linear and curvilinear relationships (P < 0.05) on amide II height and area, height and area ratio of amide I and II as well as height ratio of α-helix and β-sheet were observed within 48 h ruminal fermentation. And the amide I height and area as well as α-helix height and β-sheet height were in the highest level of IR absorbance at 0 h and then gradually declined linearly (P < 0.0001) by 30-38% after 48 h incubation. These results indicated that not only quantities decreased but also inherent structure changed in protein chemical make-up during ruminal fermentation. Meanwhile, strong correlations were found between protein spectral parameters and some basic nutrients profile such as CP (positively) and NDF (negatively). And both AHCA and PCA results showed that in situ rumen residues from carinata meal was not distinguished from those from canola meal, suggesting some relationship in structural make-up exhibited between them within protein region during 48

  15. Detect changes in protein structure of carinata meal during rumen fermentation in relation to basic chemical profile and comparison with canola meal using ATR-FT/IR molecular spectroscopy with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-08-01

    As far as we know, no study has been carried out on whether protein structure changes in the feed during rumen fermentation from other research team. This study was conducted to characterize protein structure spectral changes in carinata meal during ruminal fermentation using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT/IR) technique with ATR. The objectives were to find out whether (1) protein internal structure (in terms of protein amide profile and protein secondary structure profile) changed after in situ ruminal fermentation at 0, 12, 24 and 48 h in carinata meal and conventional canola meal was used as a reference; (2) there was any correlation between protein spectral parameters and basic chemical profile in in situ rumen residue samples; and (3) the protein structural chemical make-up of carinata meal differed from canola meal during 48 h rumen incubation. The results showed that protein structure features in both carinata meal and canola meal were altered as incubation time increased (P<0.0001) and linear and curvilinear relationships (P<0.05) on amide II height and area, height and area ratio of amide I and II as well as height ratio of α-helix and β-sheet were observed within 48 h ruminal fermentation. And the amide I height and area as well as α-helix height and β-sheet height were in the highest level of IR absorbance at 0 h and then gradually declined linearly (P<0.0001) by 30-38% after 48 h incubation. These results indicated that not only quantities decreased but also inherent structure changed in protein chemical make-up during ruminal fermentation. Meanwhile, strong correlations were found between protein spectral parameters and some basic nutrients profile such as CP (positively) and NDF (negatively). And both AHCA and PCA results showed that in situ rumen residues from carinata meal was not distinguished from those from canola meal, suggesting some relationship in structural make-up exhibited between them within protein region during 48 h

  16. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  17. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  18. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Esteves, Richard J; Arachchige, Indika U.; Pestov, Dmitry; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-11

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe{sub 2} framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  19. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  20. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  1. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  2. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  3. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  4. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  5. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  6. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Suneev Anil Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-06

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  7. 2dF mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg; Lankshear, Allan

    1998-07-01

    2dF is a multi-object instrument mounted at prime focus at the AAT capable of spectroscopic analysis of 400 objects in a single 2 degree field. It also prepares a second 2 degree 400 object field while the first field is being observed. At its heart is a high precision robotic positioner that places individual fiber end magnetic buttons on one of two field plates. The button gripper is carried on orthogonal gantries powered by linear synchronous motors and contains a TV camera which precisely locates backlit buttons to allow placement in user defined locations to 10 (mu) accuracy. Fiducial points on both plates can also be observed by the camera to allow repeated checks on positioning accuracy. Field plates rotate to follow apparent sky rotation. The spectrographs both analyze light from the 200 observing fibers each and back- illuminate the 400 fibers being re-positioned during the observing run. The 2dF fiber position and spectrograph system is a large and complex instrument located at the prime focus of the Anglo Australian Telescope. The mechanical design has departed somewhat from the earlier concepts of Gray et al, but still reflects the audacity of those first ideas. The positioner is capable of positioning 400 fibers on a field plate while another 400 fibers on another plate are observing at the focus of the telescope and feeding the twin spectrographs. When first proposed it must have seemed like ingenuity unfettered by caution. Yet now it works, and works wonderfully well. 2dF is a system which functions as the result of the combined and coordinated efforts of the astronomers, the mechanical designers and tradespeople, the electronic designers, the programmers, the support staff at the telescope, and the manufacturing subcontractors. The mechanical design of the 2dF positioner and spectrographs was carried out by the mechanical engineering staff of the AAO and the majority of the manufacture was carried out in the AAO workshops.

  8. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  9. Irreversibility-inversions in 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We consider a recent theoretical prediction that for inertial particles in 2D turbulence, the nature of the irreversibility of their pair dispersion inverts when the particle inertia exceeds a certain value. In particular, when the particle Stokes number, St , is below a certain value, the forward-in-time (FIT) dispersion should be faster than the backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion, but for St above this value, this should invert so that BIT becomes faster than FIT dispersion. This non-trivial behavior arises because of the competition between two physically distinct irreversibility mechanisms that operate in different regimes of St . In 3D turbulence, both mechanisms act to produce faster BIT than FIT dispersion, but in 2D, the two mechanisms have opposite effects because of the inverse energy cascade in the turbulent velocity field. We supplement the qualitative argument given by Bragg et al. by deriving quantitative predictions of this effect in the short-time dispersion limit. These predictions are then confirmed by results of inertial particle dispersion in a direct numerical simulation of 2D turbulence.

  10. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Chemical dynamics of the CH(X2Π) + C2H4(X1A1g), CH(X2Π) + C2D4(X1A1g), and CD(X2Π) + C2H4(X1A1g) reactions studied under single collision conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangtong; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2012-01-14

    The crossed beam reactions of the methylidyne radical with ethylene (CH(X(2)Π) + C(2)H(4)(X(1)A(1g))), methylidyne with D4-ethylene (CH(X(2)Π) + C(2)D(4)(X(1)A(1g))), and D1-methylidyne with ethylene (CD(X(2)Π) + C(2)H(4)(X(1)A(1g))) were conducted at nominal collision energies of 17-18 kJ mol(-1) to untangle the chemical dynamics involved in the formation of distinct C(3)H(4) isomers methylacetylene (CH(3)CCH), allene (H(2)CCCH(2)), and cyclopropene (c-C(3)H(4)) via C(3)H(5) intermediates. By tracing the atomic hydrogen and deuterium loss pathways, our experimental data suggest indirect scattering dynamics and an initial addition of the (D1)-methylidyne radical to the carbon-carbon double bond of the (D4)-ethylene reactant forming a cyclopropyl radical intermediate (c-C(3)H(5)/c-C(3)D(4)H/c-C(3)H(4)D). The latter was found to ring-open to the allyl radical (H(2)CCHCH(2)/D(2)CCHCD(2)/H(2)CCDCH(2)). This intermediate was found to be long lived with life times of at least five times its rotational period and decomposed via atomic hydrogen/deuterium loss from the central carbon atom (C2) to form allene via a rather loose exit transition state in an overall strongly exoergic reaction. Based on the experiments with partially deuterated reactants, no compelling evidence could be provided to support the formation of the cyclopropene and methylacetylene isomers under single collision conditions. Likewise, hydrogen/deuterium shifts in the allyl radical intermediates or an initial insertion of the (D1)-methylidyne radical into the carbon-hydrogen/deuterium bond of the (D4)-ethylene reactant were found to be-if at all-of minor importance. Our experiments propose that in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Saturn's satellite Titan, the reaction of methylidyne radicals should lead predominantly to the hitherto elusive allene molecule in these reducing environments.

  12. Detect changes in lipid-related structure of brown- and yellow-seeded Brassica Carinata seed during rumen fermentation in relation to basic chemical profile using ATR-FT/IR molecular spectroscopy with chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-12-01

    In this experiment, brown- and yellow-seeded Brassica carinata were selected to use as a model to investigate whether there were any changes in lipid-related structure make-up (including CH3 and CH2 asymmetric and symmetric stretching bands ca. 3010-2765 cm-1, unsaturated lipid band ca. 3043-2987 cm-1 and carbonyl Cdbnd O ester band ca. 1789-1701 cm-1) of oilseed tissue during rumen in situ incubation using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR). Correlations of lipid spectral characteristics with basic chemical profile and multivariate analyses for clarifying structural differences within lipid regions between two carinata seeds were also measured. The results showed that most spectral parameters in both carinata seeds were reduced as incubation time increased. However, the extent of changes in peak intensity of carbonyl Cdbnd O ester group of brown-seeded carinata was not in fully accordance with that of yellow-seeded carinata. Additionally, these lipid structure features were highly correlated with the concentrations of OM (positively), CP (positively), NDF (negatively) and EE (positively) in carinata seeds after 0, 12, 24 and 48 h of incubation. Based on the results from multivariate analyses, neither AHCA nor PCA could produce any distinctions in rumen residues between brown- and yellow-seeded carinata in spectra at lipid regions. It was concluded that besides for original feed samples, spectroscopic technique of ATR-FT/IR could also be used for rumen degradation residues in detecting changes in lipid-related molecular structure make-up. Further studies are needed to explore more details in lipid metabolism during ruminal fermentation with the combined consideration on both metabolic basis and molecular structural basis.

  13. Detect changes in lipid-related structure of brown- and yellow-seeded Brassica Carinata seed during rumen fermentation in relation to basic chemical profile using ATR-FT/IR molecular spectroscopy with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-12-10

    In this experiment, brown- and yellow-seeded Brassica carinata were selected to use as a model to investigate whether there were any changes in lipid-related structure make-up (including CH3 and CH2 asymmetric and symmetric stretching bands ca. 3010-2765cm(-1), unsaturated lipid band ca. 3043-2987cm(-1) and carbonyl CO ester band ca. 1789-1701cm(-1)) of oilseed tissue during rumen in situ incubation using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR). Correlations of lipid spectral characteristics with basic chemical profile and multivariate analyses for clarifying structural differences within lipid regions between two carinata seeds were also measured. The results showed that most spectral parameters in both carinata seeds were reduced as incubation time increased. However, the extent of changes in peak intensity of carbonyl CO ester group of brown-seeded carinata was not in fully accordance with that of yellow-seeded carinata. Additionally, these lipid structure features were highly correlated with the concentrations of OM (positively), CP (positively), NDF (negatively) and EE (positively) in carinata seeds after 0, 12, 24 and 48h of incubation. Based on the results from multivariate analyses, neither AHCA nor PCA could produce any distinctions in rumen residues between brown- and yellow-seeded carinata in spectra at lipid regions. It was concluded that besides for original feed samples, spectroscopic technique of ATR-FT/IR could also be used for rumen degradation residues in detecting changes in lipid-related molecular structure make-up. Further studies are needed to explore more details in lipid metabolism during ruminal fermentation with the combined consideration on both metabolic basis and molecular structural basis.

  14. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  15. Dephosphorylation of MAP2D enhances its binding to vimentin in preovulatory ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Maxfield P; Fiedler, Sarah E; Karlsson, Amelia B; Carr, Daniel W; Maizels, Evelyn T; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Preovulatory granulosa cells express the low-molecular-mass MAP2D variant of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2). Activation of the luteinizing hormone choriogonadotropin receptor by human choriogonadotropin (hCG) promotes dephosphorylation of MAP2D on Thr256 and Thr259. We sought to evaluate the association of MAP2D with the cytoskeleton, and the effect of hCG on this association. MAP2D partially colocalized, as assessed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, with the vimentin intermediate filament and microtubule cytoskeletons in naive cells. In vitro binding studies showed that MAP2D bound directly to vimentin and β-tubulin. Phosphorylation of recombinant MAP2D on Thr256 and Thr259, which mimics the phosphorylation status of MAP2D in naive cells, reduces binding of MAP2D to vimentin and tubulin by two- and three-fold, respectively. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (Ser32 and Ser38) promoted binding of vimentin to MAP2D and increased contraction of granulosa cells with reorganization of vimentin filaments and MAP2D from the periphery into a thickened layer surrounding the nucleus and into prominent cellular extensions. Chemical disruption of vimentin filament organization increased progesterone production. Taken together, these results suggest that hCG-stimulated dephosphorylation of MAP2D at Thr256 and Thr259, phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser38 and Ser72, and the resulting enhanced binding of MAP2D to vimentin might contribute to the progesterone synthetic response required for ovulation.

  16. Dephosphorylation of MAP2D enhances its binding to vimentin in preovulatory ovarian granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preovulatory granulosa cells express the low-molecular-mass MAP2D variant of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2). Activation of the luteinizing hormone choriogonadotropin receptor by human choriogonadotropin (hCG) promotes dephosphorylation of MAP2D on Thr256 and Thr259. We sought to evaluate the association of MAP2D with the cytoskeleton, and the effect of hCG on this association. MAP2D partially colocalized, as assessed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, with the vimentin intermediate filament and microtubule cytoskeletons in naive cells. In vitro binding studies showed that MAP2D bound directly to vimentin and β-tubulin. Phosphorylation of recombinant MAP2D on Thr256 and Thr259, which mimics the phosphorylation status of MAP2D in naive cells, reduces binding of MAP2D to vimentin and tubulin by two- and three-fold, respectively. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (Ser32 and Ser38) promoted binding of vimentin to MAP2D and increased contraction of granulosa cells with reorganization of vimentin filaments and MAP2D from the periphery into a thickened layer surrounding the nucleus and into prominent cellular extensions. Chemical disruption of vimentin filament organization increased progesterone production. Taken together, these results suggest that hCG-stimulated dephosphorylation of MAP2D at Thr256 and Thr259, phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser38 and Ser72, and the resulting enhanced binding of MAP2D to vimentin might contribute to the progesterone synthetic response required for ovulation. PMID:27335427

  17. Adaptive and Nonadaptive Feedback Control of Global Instabilities with Application to a Heated 2-D Jet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    1984. [41 P. Henrici , Applied and computational complex analysis , pp. 193-213. Vol. 3, John Wiley and Sons, 1986. [5] S. Raghu and P. A. Monkewitz...unlimited IrAS I = 0= Close to the onset of self-excited fluid oscillations the generic complex Ginzburg-Landau is proposed as the lowest order model for...heated 2-D jet ..................... 16 2.1. Related publications auid presentations ........................... 16 2.2. Introduction and the analysis of

  18. 2D non-separable linear canonical transform (2D-NS-LCT) based cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Healy, John J.; Malallah, Ra'ed; Cui, Xiao-Guang; Ryle, James P.; Sheridan, John T.

    2017-05-01

    The 2D non-separable linear canonical transform (2D-NS-LCT) can describe a variety of paraxial optical systems. Digital algorithms to numerically evaluate the 2D-NS-LCTs are not only important in modeling the light field propagations but also of interest in various signal processing based applications, for instance optical encryption. Therefore, in this paper, for the first time, a 2D-NS-LCT based optical Double-random- Phase-Encryption (DRPE) system is proposed which offers encrypting information in multiple degrees of freedom. Compared with the traditional systems, i.e. (i) Fourier transform (FT); (ii) Fresnel transform (FST); (iii) Fractional Fourier transform (FRT); and (iv) Linear Canonical transform (LCT), based DRPE systems, the proposed system is more secure and robust as it encrypts the data with more degrees of freedom with an augmented key-space.

  19. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  20. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  1. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  2. Graphene, other 2D atomic crystals and their heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya S.

    2014-03-01

    Probably the most important ``property'' of graphene is that it has opened a floodgate of experiments on many other 2D atomic crystals: BN, NbSe2, TaS2, MoS2, etc. One can use similar strategies to those applied to graphene and obtain new materials by mechanical or liquid phase exfoliation of layered materials or CVD growth. An alternative strategy to create new 2D crystals is to start with an existing one (like graphene) and use it as an atomic scaffolding to modify it by chemical means (graphane and fluorographene are good examples). The resulting pool of 2D crystals is huge, and they cover a massive range of properties: from the most insulating to the most conductive, from the strongest to the softest. If 2D materials provide a large range of different properties, sandwich structures made up of 2, 3, 4 ...different layers of such materials can offer even greater scope. Since these 2D-based heterostructures can be tailored with atomic precision and individual layers of very different character can be combined together, - the properties of these structures can be tuned to study novel physical phenomena (Coulomb drag, Hostadter butterfly, metal-insulator transition, etc) or to fit an enormous range of possible applications, with the functionality of heterostructure stacks is ``embedded'' in their design (tunnelling or hot-electron transistors, photovoltaic devices). Of particular interest are the tunnelling structures. Being able to control the thickness with atomic precision and having a variety of different material in disposal allows us to modify both the height and the width of the tunnelling barrier in the wide range. The use of graphene as electrodes and utilising insulating (BN) or semiconducting (MoS2, WS2) materials as the tunnelling barrier led to the creation of tunnelling transistors and tunnelling photovoltaic devices and the observation of the resonance tunnelling associated with momentum conservation. We will also consider tunnelling in magnetic

  3. Search for H2D(+) at 372 GHz in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, L.; Wannier, P. G.; Frerking, M. A.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Gulkis, S.; Zimmermann, P.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Whiteoak, J. B.; Destombes, J. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1992-05-01

    The 1(10)-1(11) transition of ortho-H2D(+) at 372 GHz has been sought in several dark clouds. The transition was not detected; the best upper limits obtained are about 0.3 K (3 sigma). We derive upper limits for the ortho-H2D(+) column density and briefly discuss their meaning in comparison with a simple chemical model we have developed (Pagani et al., 1992).

  4. Search for H2D(+) at 372 GHz in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagani, L.; Wannier, P. G.; Frerking, M. A.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Gulkis, S.; Zimmermann, P.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Whiteoak, J. B.; Destombes, J. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    The 1(10)-1(11) transition of ortho-H2D(+) at 372 GHz has been sought in several dark clouds. The transition was not detected; the best upper limits obtained are about 0.3 K (3 sigma). We derive upper limits for the ortho-H2D(+) column density and briefly discuss their meaning in comparison with a simple chemical model we have developed (Pagani et al., 1992).

  5. Search for H2D(+) at 372 GHz in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagani, L.; Wannier, P. G.; Frerking, M. A.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Gulkis, S.; Zimmermann, P.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Whiteoak, J. B.; Destombes, J. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    The 1(10)-1(11) transition of ortho-H2D(+) at 372 GHz has been sought in several dark clouds. The transition was not detected; the best upper limits obtained are about 0.3 K (3 sigma). We derive upper limits for the ortho-H2D(+) column density and briefly discuss their meaning in comparison with a simple chemical model we have developed (Pagani et al., 1992).

  6. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  7. Large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin Mo2C superconducting crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuan; Wang, Libin; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Long; Guo, Jingkun; Kang, Ning; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-11-01

    Transition metal carbides (TMCs) are a large family of materials with many intriguing properties and applications, and high-quality 2D TMCs are essential for investigating new physics and properties in the 2D limit. However, the 2D TMCs obtained so far are chemically functionalized, defective nanosheets having maximum lateral dimensions of ~10 μm. Here we report the fabrication of large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin α-Mo2C crystals by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The crystals are a few nanometres thick, over 100 μm in size, and very stable under ambient conditions. They show 2D characteristics of superconducting transitions that are consistent with Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless behaviour and show strong anisotropy with magnetic field orientation; moreover, the superconductivity is also strongly dependent on the crystal thickness. Our versatile CVD process allows the fabrication of other high-quality 2D TMC crystals, such as ultrathin WC and TaC crystals, which further expand the large family of 2D materials.

  8. Large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin Mo2C superconducting crystals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuan; Wang, Libin; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Long; Guo, Jingkun; Kang, Ning; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-11-01

    Transition metal carbides (TMCs) are a large family of materials with many intriguing properties and applications, and high-quality 2D TMCs are essential for investigating new physics and properties in the 2D limit. However, the 2D TMCs obtained so far are chemically functionalized, defective nanosheets having maximum lateral dimensions of ∼10 μm. Here we report the fabrication of large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin α-Mo2C crystals by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The crystals are a few nanometres thick, over 100 μm in size, and very stable under ambient conditions. They show 2D characteristics of superconducting transitions that are consistent with Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless behaviour and show strong anisotropy with magnetic field orientation; moreover, the superconductivity is also strongly dependent on the crystal thickness. Our versatile CVD process allows the fabrication of other high-quality 2D TMC crystals, such as ultrathin WC and TaC crystals, which further expand the large family of 2D materials.

  9. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  10. 2D packing using the Myriad framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatburn, Luke T.; Batchelor, Bruce G.

    2004-02-01

    Myriad is a framework for building networked and distributed vision systems and is described in a companion paper in this conference. Myriad allows the components of a multi-camera, multi-user vision system (web-cameras, image processing engines, intelligent device controllers, databases and the user interface terminals) to be interconnected and operated together, even if they are physically separated by many hundreds, or thousands, of kilometres. This is achieved by operating them as Internet services. The principal objective in this article is to illustrate the simplicity of harmonising visual control with an existing system using Myriad. However, packing of 2-dimensional blob-like objects is of considerable commercial importance in some industries and involves robotic handling and/or cutting. The shapes to be packed may be cut from sheet metal, glass, cloth, leather, wood, card, paper, composite board, or flat food materials. In addition, many 3D packing applications can realistically be tackled only by regarding them as multi-layer 2D applications. Using Myriad to perform 2D packing, a set of blob-like input objects ("shapes") can be digitised using a standard camera (e.g. a "webcam"). The resulting digital images are then analysed, using a separate processing engine, perhaps located on a different continent. The packing is planned by another processing system, perhaps on a third continent. Finally, the assembly is performed using a robot, usually but not necessarily, located close to the camera.

  11. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  12. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  13. Hydrophobic fluorine mediated switching of the hydrogen bonding site as well as orientation of water molecules in the aqueous mixture of monofluoroethanol: IR, molecular dynamics and quantum chemical studies.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Saptarsi; Biswas, Biswajit; Nandy, Tonima; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2017-08-31

    The local structures between water-water, alcohol-water and alcohol-alcohol have been investigated for aqueous mixtures of ethanol (ETH) and monofluoroethanol (MFE) by the deconvolution of IR bands in the OH stretching region, molecular dynamics simulation and quantum chemical calculations. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of ETH into the aqueous medium increases the strength of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules. In an aqueous mixture of MFE, the substitution of a single fluorine induces a change in the orientation as well as the hydrogen bonding site of water molecules from the oxygen to the fluorine terminal of MFE. The switching of the hydrogen bonding site of water in the aqueous mixture of MFE results in comparatively strong hydrogen bonds between MFE and water molecules as well as less clustering of water molecules, unlike the case of the aqueous mixture of ETH. These findings about the modification of a hydrogen bond network by the hydrophobic fluorine group probably make fluorinated molecules useful for pharmaceutical as well as biological applications.

  14. FT-Raman, FT-IR, UV spectroscopic, NBO and DFT quantum chemical study on the molecular structure, vibrational and electronic transitions of clopidogrel hydrogen sulfate form 1: A comparison to form 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Mishra, Rashmi; Tandon, Poonam; Bansal, A. K.

    2013-03-01

    Clopidogrel hydrogen sulfate (+)-(S)-(2-chlorophenyl)-6,7-dihydrothieno[3,2-c]pyridine-5(4H)-acetate sulfate (1:1), is a selective adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonist often used in the treatment of coronary artery, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular diseases. In the present communication, a comparative study of two polymorphic forms (forms 1 and 2) of clopidogrel hydrogen sulfate (CLP) has been reported. There is difference in conformation and intermolecular hydrogen bonding pattern of two forms. These differences are nicely reflected in the vibrational spectra. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands of CLP form 1 are interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal mode analysis based on ab initio HF and DFT method employing 6-311++G(d,p) basis. Polymorphism in CLP have been studied using various characterization tools like FT-Raman, FT-IR spectroscopy and DSC in combination with the quantum chemical calculations. UV-vis spectroscopic studies along with HOMO-LUMO analysis of both polymorphs were performed. The solvent effect calculated by TD-DFT/IEF-PCM/6-31G model results complements with the experimental findings. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis.

  15. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, and UV-visible) and quantum chemical studies on molecular geometry, Frontier molecular orbitals, NBO, NLO and thermodynamic properties of 1-acetylindole.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Vikas K; Al-Abdullah, Ebtehal S; El-Emam, Ali A; Sachan, Alok K; Pathak, Shilendra K; Kumar, Amarendra; Prasad, Onkar; Bishnoi, Abha; Sinha, Leena

    2014-12-10

    Quantum chemical calculations of ground state energy, geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers of 1-acetylindole were carried out using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the condensed state. The fundamental vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and a good correlation between experimental and scaled calculated wavenumbers has been accomplished. Electric dipole moment, polarizability and first static hyperpolarizability values of 1-acetylindole have been calculated at the same level of theory and basis set. The results show that the 1-acetylindole molecule possesses nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non-zero values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. UV-Visible spectrum of the molecule was recorded in the region 200-500nm and the electronic properties like HOMO and LUMO energies and composition were obtained using TD-DFT method. The calculated energies and oscillator strengths are in good correspondence with the experimental data. The thermodynamic properties of the compound under investigation were calculated at different temperatures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  17. 2D/2D graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) heterojunction nanocomposites for photocatalysis: Why does face-to-face interface matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Wee-Jun

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, two-dimensional (2D) graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has elicited interdisciplinary research fascination among the scientific communities due to its attractive properties such as appropriate band structures, visible-light absorption, and high chemical and thermal stability. At present, research aiming at engineering 2D g-C3N4 photocatalysts at an atomic and molecular level in conquering the global energy demand and environmental pollution has been thriving. In this review, the cutting-edge research progress on the 2D/2D g-C3N4-based hybrid nanoarchitectures will be systematically highlighted with a specific emphasis on a multitude of photocatalytic applications, not only in waste degradation for pollution alleviation, but also in renewable energy production (e.g. water splitting and carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction). By reviewing the substantial developments on this hot research platform, it is envisioned that the review will shed light and pave a new prospect for constructing high photocatalytic performance of 2D/2D g-C3N4-based system, which could also be extended to other related energy fields, namely solar cells, supercapacitors and electrocatalysis.

  18. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse.

  19. Variational regularized 2-D nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Woo, W L; Dlay, S S

    2012-05-01

    A novel approach for adaptive regularization of 2-D nonnegative matrix factorization is presented. The proposed matrix factorization is developed under the framework of maximum a posteriori probability and is adaptively fine-tuned using the variational approach. The method enables: (1) a generalized criterion for variable sparseness to be imposed onto the solution; and (2) prior information to be explicitly incorporated into the basis features. The method is computationally efficient and has been demonstrated on two applications, that is, extracting features from image and separating single channel source mixture. In addition, it is shown that the basis features of an information-bearing matrix can be extracted more efficiently using the proposed regularized priors. Experimental tests have been rigorously conducted to verify the efficacy of the proposed method.

  20. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  1. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  2. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  3. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  4. Transition to turbulence: 2D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Matthew; Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2016-11-01

    The transition to turbulence in simple shear flows has been studied for well over a century, yet in the last few years has seen major leaps forward. In pipe flow, this transition shows the hallmarks of (1 + 1) D directed percolation, a universality class of continuous phase transitions. In spanwisely confined Taylor-Couette flow the same class is found, suggesting the phenomenon is generic to shear flows. However in plane Couette flow the largest simulations and experiments to-date find evidence for a discrete transition. Here we study a planar shear flow, called Waleffe flow, devoid of walls yet showing the fundamentals of planar transition to turbulence. Working with a quasi-2D yet Navier-Stokes derived model of this flow we are able to attack the (2 + 1) D transition problem. Going beyond the system sizes previously possible we find all of the required scalings of directed percolation and thus establish planar shears flow in this class.

  5. Jamming in 2D Prolate Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Scott

    2003-11-01

    We have been looking at how 2D piles of prolate (L/D>1) granular materials respond when disturbed. A test object is pushed slowly through a horizontal network of particles; the packing fraction and particle aspect ratio can be varied independently. Particles are cut from square brass rods; the square cross-section reduces the chances of a particle rolling on top of another and keeps the pile two-dimensinal. The initial condition of the pile is quantified with an orientational order parameter which measures the inter-particle alignment. At a critical packing fraction the pile jams and the force needed to push the test object through the pile increases. The jammed state also corresponds to an increase in the number of particles undergoing large-scale motion. This is revealed both in video analysis, which measures particle rearrangments within the pile, and in the number of particles that are pushed off the end of the table.

  6. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  7. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  8. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  9. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

    PubMed Central

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M.; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics. PMID:26846617

  10. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-02-05

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics.

  11. Soft tubular microfluidics for 2D and 3D applications.

    PubMed

    Xi, Wang; Kong, Fang; Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Longteng; Sonam, Surabhi; Dao, Ming; Gong, Xiaobo; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2017-09-18

    Microfluidics has been the key component for many applications, including biomedical devices, chemical processors, microactuators, and even wearable devices. This technology relies on soft lithography fabrication which requires cleanroom facilities. Although popular, this method is expensive and labor-intensive. Furthermore, current conventional microfluidic chips precludes reconfiguration, making reiterations in design very time-consuming and costly. To address these intrinsic drawbacks of microfabrication, we present an alternative solution for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic elements such as microtubes, valves, and pumps. In addition, we demonstrate how microtubes with channels of various lengths and cross-sections can be attached modularly into 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for functional applications. We introduce a facile method of fabricating elastomeric microtubes as the basic building blocks for microfluidic devices. These microtubes are transparent, biocompatible, highly deformable, and customizable to various sizes and cross-sectional geometries. By configuring the microtubes into deterministic geometry, we enable rapid, low-cost formation of microfluidic assemblies without compromising their precision and functionality. We demonstrate configurable 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for applications in different domains. These include microparticle sorting, microdroplet generation, biocatalytic micromotor, triboelectric sensor, and even wearable sensing. Our approach, termed soft tubular microfluidics, provides a simple, cheaper, and faster solution for users lacking proficiency and access to cleanroom facilities to design and rapidly construct microfluidic devices for their various applications and needs.

  12. 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening reveals polyketides in ladybugs.

    PubMed

    Deyrup, Stephen T; Eckman, Laura E; McCarthy, Patrick H; Smedley, Scott R; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C

    2011-06-14

    Small molecules of biological origin continue to yield the most promising leads for drug design, but systematic approaches for exploring nature's cache of structural diversity are lacking. Here, we demonstrate the use of 2D NMR spectroscopy to screen a library of biorationally selected insect metabolite samples for partial structures indicating the presence of new chemical entities. This NMR-spectroscopic survey enabled detection of novel compounds in complex metabolite mixtures without prior fractionation or isolation. Our screen led to discovery and subsequent isolation of two families of tricyclic pyrones in Delphastus catalinae, a tiny ladybird beetle that is employed commercially as a biological pest control agent. The D. catalinae pyrones are based on 23-carbon polyketide chains forming 1,11-dioxo-2,6,10-trioxaanthracene and 4,8-dioxo-1,9,13-trioxaanthracene derivatives, representing ring systems not previously found in nature. This study highlights the utility of 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening for exploring nature's structure space and suggests that insect metabolomes remain vastly underexplored.

  13. 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening reveals polyketides in ladybugs

    PubMed Central

    Deyrup, Stephen T.; Eckman, Laura E.; McCarthy, Patrick H.; Smedley, Scott R.; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Small molecules of biological origin continue to yield the most promising leads for drug design, but systematic approaches for exploring nature’s cache of structural diversity are lacking. Here, we demonstrate the use of 2D NMR spectroscopy to screen a library of biorationally selected insect metabolite samples for partial structures indicating the presence of new chemical entities. This NMR-spectroscopic survey enabled detection of novel compounds in complex metabolite mixtures without prior fractionation or isolation. Our screen led to discovery and subsequent isolation of two families of tricyclic pyrones in Delphastus catalinae, a tiny ladybird beetle that is employed commercially as a biological pest control agent. The D. catalinae pyrones are based on 23-carbon polyketide chains forming 1,11-dioxo-2,6,10-trioxaanthracene and 4,8-dioxo-1,9,13-trioxaanthracene derivatives, representing ring systems not previously found in nature. This study highlights the utility of 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening for exploring nature’s structure space and suggests that insect metabolomes remain vastly underexplored. PMID:21646540

  14. Antimycobacterial, antimicrobial activity, experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV-Vis, DSC) and DFT (transition state, chemical reactivity, NBO, NLO) studies on pyrrole-isonicotinyl hydrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Poonam; Singh, R. N.; Ranjan, Alok; Ahmad, Sartaj; Saxena, Rajat

    2017-05-01

    As part of a study of pyrrole hydrazone, we have investigated quantum chemical calculations, molecular geometry, relative energy, vibrational properties and antimycobacterial/antimicrobial activity of pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde isonicotinyl hydrazone (PCINH), by applying the density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree Fock (HF). Good reproduction of experimental values is obtained and with small percentage error in majority of the cases in comparison to theoretical result (DFT). The experimental FT-IR and Raman wavenumbers were compared with the respective theoretical values obtained from DFT calculations and found to agree well. In crystal structure studies the hydrated PCINH (syn-syn conformer) shows different conformation than from anhydrous form (syn-anti conformer). The rotational barrier between syn-syn and syn-anti conformers of PCINH is 12.7 kcal/mol in the gas phase. In this work, use of FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopies has been made for full characterization of PCINH. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectrum was carried out with the aid of normal coordinate analysis using single scaling factor. Our results support the hydrogen bonding pattern proposed by reported crystalline structure. The calculated nature of electronic transitions within molecule found to be π → π*. The electronic descriptors study indicates that PCINH can be used as robust synthon for synthesis of new heterocyclic compounds. The first static hyperpolarizability (β0) of PCINH is calculated as 33.89 × 10- 30 esu, (gas phase); 68.79 × 10- 30 (CHCl3), esu; 76.76 × 10- 30 esu (CH2Cl2), 85.16 × 10- 30 esu (DMSO). The solvent induced effects on the first static hyperpolarizability were studied and found to increase as dielectric constants of the solvents increases. Investigated molecule shows better NLO value than Para nitroaniline (PNA). The compound PCINH shows good antifungal and antibacterial activity against Aspergillus niger and gram

  15. Monomeric and dimeric structures analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid with experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Kurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid (3,5-DFPBA, C6H3F2B(OH)2) were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase and 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO solution were recorded. The UV spectra that dissolved in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule have been obtained for possible three conformers from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of title molecule, optimized by counterpoise correction, was also studied B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. The effects due to the substitutions of boric acid group and halogen were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nonlinear optical properties (NLO) and thermodynamic features were performed.

  16. Molecular structure, spectral investigation (1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Visible, FT-IR, FT-Raman), NBO, intramolecular hydrogen bonding, chemical reactivity and first hyperpolarizability analysis of formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone]: A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Mishra, Rashmi; Kumar, Sudhir; Dev, Kapil; Tandon, Poonam; Maurya, Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone or 4‧-methoxy daidzein] is a soy isoflavonoid that is found abundantly in traditional Chinese medicine Astragalus mongholicus (Bunge) and Trifolium pretense L. (red clover), and in an Indian medicinal plant, Butea (B.) monosperma. Crude extract of B.monosperma is used for rapid healing of fracture in Indian traditional medicine. In this study, a combined theoretical and experimental approach is used to study the properties of formononetin. The optimized geometry was calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) as a large basis set. The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were recorded in the solid phase, and interpreted in terms of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) is applied to explore the nonlinear optical properties of the molecule. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and observed data for the electronic absorption, IR and Raman spectra. The solvent effects have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with the integral equation formalism polarized continuum model, and the results are in good agreement with observed measurements. The double well potential energy curve of the molecule about the respective bonds, have been plotted, as obtained from DFT/6-31G basis set. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of formononetin. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap of possible conformers has been calculated for comparing their chemical activity. Chemical reactivity has been measured by reactivity descriptors and molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEP). The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Furthermore, the role of CHsbnd O intramolecular hydrogen bond in the stability of molecule is investigated on the basis of the results of topological properties of AIM theory and NBO analysis. The calculated first hyperpolarizability shows

  17. DUTIR at TREC 2009: Chemical IR Track

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    We set the Dirichlet prior empirically at 1,500 as recommended in [2]. For example, Topic 15 “ Betaines for peripheral arterial disease” is...converted into the following Indri query: # (combine betaines for peripheral arterial disease ) which produces results rank-equivalent to a simple query

  18. A 2D dust chemistry of the inner Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatale, F. C.; Liffman, K.; Maddison, S. T.; Brooks, G.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical composition of the dust in the inner layers of protoplanetary discs is unknown since infrared observation only probe the chemistry of the thin surface layer of discs. Given that planets formation occurs in the midplane, direct important information from the bulk chemistry of the disc is missing, and modelling is required. We compute for the first time the 2D chemical distribution of condensates in the inner Solar Nebula using a thermodynamic equilibrium model, and derive timescales for vertical settling and radial migration of the dust to predict the chemical evolution of the dust. We find two enstatite-rich zones within 1 AU from the protosun: a band ˜0.1 AU thick in the upper layer of the disc interior to 0.8 AU, and in the disc midplane out to ˜0.4 AU. Our results are consistent with infrared observation of protoplanetary disc which show emission of enstatite-rich dust arising from the inner warmer surface of the disc. The inner midplane of the disc is a chemically diverse zone in which enstatite-rich dust coexists with sulfides and unprocessed material. Our finding of two enstatite-rich zones in the disc supports recent evidence that Mercury and enstatite chondrites shared a bulk material with similar composition. The derived timescales for vertical settling suggest that dust can be chemically sorted in the hotter, inner surface of the disc leading to fractionated Mg-Fe-poor gas which can produce enstatite-rich dust. We suggest that the migration of enstatite-rich grains toward the midplane and-or condensation after gas fractionation may account for the formation of the bulk material which then formed the EL (low-Fe) chondrites.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: c2d Spitzer final data release (DR4) (Evans+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. J., II; Allen, L. E.; Blake, G. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Bourke, T.; Harvey, P. M.; Kessler, J. E.; Koerner, D. W.; Lee, C. W.; Mundy, L. G.; Myers, P. C.; Padgett, D. L.; Pontoppidan, K.; Sargent, A. I.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Young, C. H.; Young, K. E.

    2014-05-01

    This is the final delivery (DR4, Fall 2006 and Fall 2007) of the Spitzer Space Telescope "From Molecular Cores to Planet-Forming Disks" (c2d) Legacy Project. The data are also available as Enhanced Products from the Spitzer Science Center (SSC). c2d has delivered 867 catalogs. IRSA has merged these delivered catalogs into four groups - Clouds, Off-Cloud, Cores, Stars - and serves them through the general catalog search engine Gator. Many of the delivered catalogs, images and spectra are accessible through IRSA's general search service, Atlas. As a service to its users, the CDS has downloaded a dataset containing most of the c2d data (but not all columns) from the IRSA archive. The individual catalogs are listed below: C2D Fall '07 Full CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 High Reliability (HREL) CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) CLOUDS Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 Full OFF-CLOUD Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) OFF-CLOUD Catalog (CHA_II, LUP, OPH, PER, SER) C2D Fall '07 Full CORES Catalog C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) CORES Catalog C2D Fall '07 Full STARS Catalog C2D Fall '07 candidate Young Stellar Objects (YSO) STARS Catalog These tables have been merged into a single table at CDS. All three SIRTF instruments (Infrared Array Camera [IRAC], Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF [MIPS], and Infrared Spectrograph [IRS]) were used to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. (1 data file).

  20. IR in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haakenaasen, Randi; Lovold, Stian

    2003-01-01

    Infrared technology in Norway started at the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment (FFI) in the 1960s, and has since then spread to universities, other research institutes and industry. FFI has a large, integrated IR activity that includes research and development in IR detectors, optics design, optical coatings, advanced dewar design, modelling/simulation of IR scenes, and image analysis. Part of the integrated activity is a laboratory for more basic research in materials science and semiconductor physics, in which thin films of CdHgTe are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and processed into IR detectors by various techniques. FFI also has a lot of experience in research and development of tunable infrared lasers for various applications. Norwegian industrial activities include production of infrared homing anti-ship missiles, laser rangefinders, various infrared gas sensors, hyperspectral cameras, and fiberoptic sensor systems for structural health monitoring and offshore oil well diagnostics.

  1. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Edwards, A.L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available. The material thermal property data base, Chapter 4, included in this manual was originally published in 1969 by Art Edwards for use with his TRUMP finite difference heat transfer code. The format of the data has been altered to be compatible with TOPAZ2D. Bob Bailey is responsible for adding the high explosive thermal property data.

  2. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory, and Madelung potential analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3, both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axis directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. The spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed.

  3. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory and Madelung potential analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Koehler, Jurgen; ...

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of DFT calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3,more » both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axes directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. As a result, the spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed lately.« less

  4. IR Linearity Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 19 non-linearity monitor, program 12696.

  5. IR linearity monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 20 non-linearity monitor, program 13079.

  6. Comparative metabolic capabilities and inhibitory profiles of CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.10, and CYP2D6.17.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongwu; He, Minxia M; Liu, Houfu; Wrighton, Steven A; Wang, Li; Guo, Bin; Li, Chuan

    2007-08-01

    Polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) gene are a major cause of pharmacokinetic variability in human. Although the poor metabolizer phenotype is known to be caused by two null alleles leading to absence of functional CYP2D6 protein, the large variability among individuals with functional alleles remains mostly unexplained. Thus, the goal of this study was to examine the intrinsic enzymatic differences that exist among the several active CYP2D6 allelic variants. The relative catalytic activities (enzyme kinetics) of three functionally active human CYP2D6 allelic variants, CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.10, and CYP2D6.17, were systematically investigated for their ability to metabolize a structurally diverse set of clinically important CYP2D6-metabolized drugs [atomoxetine, bufuralol, codeine, debrisoquine, dextromethorphan, (S)-fluoxetine, nortriptyline, and tramadol] and the effects of various CYP2D6-inhibitors [cocaine, (S)-fluoxetine, (S)-norfluoxetine, imipramine, quinidine, and thioridazine] on these three variants. The most significant difference observed was a consistent but substrate-dependent decease in the catalytic efficiencies of cDNA-expressed CYP2D6.10 and CYP2D6.17 compared with CYP2D6.1, yielding 1.32 to 27.9 and 7.33 to 80.4% of the efficiency of CYP2D6.1, respectively. The most important finding from this study is that there are mixed effects on the functionally reduced allelic variants in enzyme-substrate affinity or enzyme-inhibitor affinity, which is lower, higher, or comparable to that for CYP2D6.1. Considering the rather high frequencies of CYP2D6*10 and CYP2D6*17 alleles for Asians and African Americans, respectively, these data provide further insight into ethnic differences in CYP2D6-mediated drug metabolism. However, as with all in vitro to in vivo extrapolations, caution should be applied to the clinical consequences.

  7. Xe irradiation of graphene on Ir(111): From trapping to blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Ã hlgren, E. Harriet; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Arman, Mohammad A.; Kotakoski, Jani; Knudsen, Jan; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Michely, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy, we show that upon keV Xe+ irradiation of graphene on Ir(111), Xe atoms are trapped under the graphene. Upon annealing, aggregation of Xe leads to graphene bulges and blisters. The efficient trapping is an unexpected and remarkable phenomenon given the absence of chemical binding of Xe to Ir and to graphene, the weak interaction of a perfect graphene layer with Ir(111), as well as the substantial damage to graphene due to irradiation. By combining molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations with our experiments, we uncover the mechanism of trapping. We describe ways to avoid blister formation during graphene growth, and also demonstrate how ion implantation can be used to intentionally create blisters without introducing damage to the graphene layer. Our approach may provide a pathway to synthesize new materials at a substrate—2D material interface or to enable confined reactions at high pressures and temperatures.

  8. The IDOL–UBE2D complex mediates sterol-dependent degradation of the LDL receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Goult, Benjamin T.; Calkin, Anna C.; Hong, Cynthia; Millard, Christopher J.; Tontonoz, Peter; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL as a sterol-dependent regulator of the LDL receptor (LDLR). The molecular pathway underlying IDOL action, however, remains to be determined. Here we report the identification and biochemical and structural characterization of an E2–E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for LDLR degradation. We identified the UBE2D family (UBE2D1–4) as E2 partners for IDOL that support both autoubiquitination and IDOL-dependent ubiquitination of the LDLR in a cell-free system. NMR chemical shift mapping and a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the IDOL RING domain–UBE2D1 complex revealed key interactions between the dimeric IDOL protein and the E2 enzyme. Analysis of the IDOL–UBE2D1 interface also defined the stereochemical basis for the selectivity of IDOL for UBE2Ds over other E2 ligases. Structure-based mutations that inhibit IDOL dimerization or IDOL–UBE2D interaction block IDOL-dependent LDLR ubiquitination and degradation. Furthermore, expression of a dominant-negative UBE2D enzyme inhibits the ability of IDOL to degrade the LDLR in cells. These results identify the IDOL–UBE2D complex as an important determinant of LDLR activity, and provide insight into molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cholesterol uptake. PMID:21685362

  9. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  10. SEM signal emulation for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Evgenii; Muelders, Thomas; Klostermann, Ulrich; Gao, Weimin; Braylovska, Mariya

    2016-03-01

    The application of accurate and predictive physical resist simulation is seen as one important use model for fast and efficient exploration of new patterning technology options, especially if fully qualified OPC models are not yet available at an early pre-production stage. The methodology of using a top-down CD-SEM metrology to extract the 3D resist profile information, such as the critical dimension (CD) at various resist heights, has to be associated with a series of presumptions which may introduce such small, but systematic CD errors. Ideally, the metrology effects should be carefully minimized during measurement process, or if possible be taken into account through proper metrology modeling. In this paper we discuss the application of a fast SEM signal emulation describing the SEM image formation. The algorithm is applied to simulated resist 3D profiles and produces emulated SEM image results for 1D and 2D patterns. It allows estimating resist simulation quality by comparing CDs which were extracted from the emulated and from the measured SEM images. Moreover, SEM emulation is applied for resist model calibration to capture subtle error signatures through dose and defocus. Finally, it should be noted that our SEM emulation methodology is based on the approximation of physical phenomena which are taking place in real SEM image formation. This approximation allows achieving better speed performance compared to a fully physical model.

  11. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  12. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  13. 2D Radiative Processes Near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, T.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance and complexity of dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes taking place near cloud edges, the transition zone between clouds and cloud free air has been the subject of intense research both in the ASR program and in the wider community. One challenge in this research is that the one-dimensional (1D) radiative models widely used in both remote sensing and dynamical simulations become less accurate near cloud edges: The large horizontal gradients in particle concentrations imply that accurate radiative calculations need to consider multi-dimensional radiative interactions among areas that have widely different optical properties. This study examines the way the importance of multidimensional shortwave radiative interactions changes as we approach cloud edges. For this, the study relies on radiative simulations performed for a multiyear dataset of clouds observed over the NSA, SGP, and TWP sites. This dataset is based on Microbase cloud profiles as well as wind measurements and ARM cloud classification products. The study analyzes the way the difference between 1D and 2D simulation results increases near cloud edges. It considers both monochromatic radiances and broadband radiative heating, and it also examines the influence of factors such as cloud type and height, and solar elevation. The results provide insights into the workings of radiative processes and may help better interpret radiance measurements and better estimate the radiative impacts of this critical region.

  14. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  15. Raman enhancement by graphene-Ga2O3 2D bilayer film

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    2D β-Ga2O3 flakes on a continuous 2D graphene film were prepared by a one-step chemical vapor deposition on liquid gallium surface. The composite was characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental results indicate that Ga2O3 flakes grew on the surface of graphene film during the cooling process. In particular, tenfold enhancement of graphene Raman scattering signal was detected on Ga2O3 flakes, and XPS indicates the C-O bonding between graphene and Ga2O3. The mechanism of Raman enhancement was discussed. The 2D Ga2O3-2D graphene structure may possess potential applications. PMID:24472433

  16. Raman enhancement by graphene-Ga2O3 2D bilayer film.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Yu, Qing-Kai; Ding, Gu-Qiao; Xu, Xu-Guang; Wu, Tian-Ru; Gong, Qian; Yuan, Ning-Yi; Ding, Jian-Ning; Wang, Shu-Min; Xie, Xiao-Ming; Jiang, Mian-Heng

    2014-01-28

    2D β-Ga2O3 flakes on a continuous 2D graphene film were prepared by a one-step chemical vapor deposition on liquid gallium surface. The composite was characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental results indicate that Ga2O3 flakes grew on the surface of graphene film during the cooling process. In particular, tenfold enhancement of graphene Raman scattering signal was detected on Ga2O3 flakes, and XPS indicates the C-O bonding between graphene and Ga2O3. The mechanism of Raman enhancement was discussed. The 2D Ga2O3-2D graphene structure may possess potential applications.

  17. Stabilizing Ir(001) Epitaxy on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using a Thin Ir Seed Layer Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Lisha; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Eres, Gyula

    2016-11-18

    In this paper, we demonstrate the reproducible epitaxial growth of 100 nm thick Ir(001) films on a heteroepitaxial stack consisting of 5 nm Ir and 100 nm yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) grown on Si(001) substrates. It is shown that a 5 nm thick Ir layer grown by pulsed laser deposition in the same chamber as the YSZ film without breaking the vacuum is the key to stabilizing Ir(001) epitaxial growth. Growth of the Ir seed layer with pure (001) orientation occurs only in a narrow growth temperature window from 550 to 750 °C, and the fraction of Ir(111) increases at substrate temperatures outside of this window. The Ir seed layer prevents exposure of the YSZ film to air during sample transfer and enables highly reproducible Ir(001) heteroepitaxy on YSZ buffered Si(001). In contrast, if Ir is grown directly on a bare YSZ layer that was exposed to ambient conditions, the films are prone to change orientation to (111). These results reveal that preserving the chemical and structural purity of the YSZ surface is imperative for achieving Ir(001) epitaxy. The narrow range of the mosaic spread values from eight experiments demonstrates the high yield and high reproducibility of Ir(001) heteroepitaxy by this approach. Lastly, the improved Ir(001) epitaxial growth method is of great significance for integrating a variety of technologically important materials such as diamond, graphene, and functional oxides on a Si platform.

  18. Stabilizing Ir(001) Epitaxy on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using a Thin Ir Seed Layer Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Lisha; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; ...

    2016-11-18

    In this paper, we demonstrate the reproducible epitaxial growth of 100 nm thick Ir(001) films on a heteroepitaxial stack consisting of 5 nm Ir and 100 nm yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) grown on Si(001) substrates. It is shown that a 5 nm thick Ir layer grown by pulsed laser deposition in the same chamber as the YSZ film without breaking the vacuum is the key to stabilizing Ir(001) epitaxial growth. Growth of the Ir seed layer with pure (001) orientation occurs only in a narrow growth temperature window from 550 to 750 °C, and the fraction of Ir(111) increases at substratemore » temperatures outside of this window. The Ir seed layer prevents exposure of the YSZ film to air during sample transfer and enables highly reproducible Ir(001) heteroepitaxy on YSZ buffered Si(001). In contrast, if Ir is grown directly on a bare YSZ layer that was exposed to ambient conditions, the films are prone to change orientation to (111). These results reveal that preserving the chemical and structural purity of the YSZ surface is imperative for achieving Ir(001) epitaxy. The narrow range of the mosaic spread values from eight experiments demonstrates the high yield and high reproducibility of Ir(001) heteroepitaxy by this approach. Lastly, the improved Ir(001) epitaxial growth method is of great significance for integrating a variety of technologically important materials such as diamond, graphene, and functional oxides on a Si platform.« less

  19. Thermally Conductive Structural 2D Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-14

    5 Figure 3. Micrographs of Carbon Nanostructures Grown on Carbon Fibers Using Microwave Generated Plasmas at MSU...methods provided in literature, however, utilize a microwave plasma technique, not conducive to continuous manufacturing. Therefore, in the current work...carbon fibers per the methodologies reported by Bhuvana et al. [1], which used microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The MSU unit is a “cold

  20. 2D-MoO3 nanosheets for superior gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Fangxu; Ren, Xianpei; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Liu, Yucheng; Pang, Liuqing; Jiang, Jiaxing; Liu, Shengzhong (Frank)

    2016-04-01

    By taking advantages of both grinding and sonication, an effective exfoliation process is developed to prepare two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum oxide (MoO3) nanosheets. The approach avoids high-boiling-point solvents that would leave a residue and cause aggregation. Gas sensors fabricated using the 2D-MoO3 nanosheets provide a significantly enhanced chemical sensor performance. Compared with the sensors using bulk MoO3, the response of the 2D-MoO3 sensor increases from 7 to 33; the sensor response time is reduced from 27 to 21 seconds, and the recovery time is shortened from 26 to 10 seconds. We attribute the superior performance to the 2D-structure with a much increased surface area and reactive sites.By taking advantages of both grinding and sonication, an effective exfoliation process is developed to prepare two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum oxide (MoO3) nanosheets. The approach avoids high-boiling-point solvents that would leave a residue and cause aggregation. Gas sensors fabricated using the 2D-MoO3 nanosheets provide a significantly enhanced chemical sensor performance. Compared with the sensors using bulk MoO3, the response of the 2D-MoO3 sensor increases from 7 to 33; the sensor response time is reduced from 27 to 21 seconds, and the recovery time is shortened from 26 to 10 seconds. We attribute the superior performance to the 2D-structure with a much increased surface area and reactive sites. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00880a

  1. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  2. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculation assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  3. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  4. 2D discrete Fourier transform on sliding windows.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-03-01

    Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is the most widely used method for determining the frequency spectra of digital signals. In this paper, a 2D sliding DFT (2D SDFT) algorithm is proposed for fast implementation of the DFT on 2D sliding windows. The proposed 2D SDFT algorithm directly computes the DFT bins of the current window using the precalculated bins of the previous window. Since the proposed algorithm is designed to accelerate the sliding transform process of a 2D input signal, it can be directly applied to computer vision and image processing applications. The theoretical analysis shows that the computational requirement of the proposed 2D SDFT algorithm is the lowest among existing 2D DFT algorithms. Moreover, the output of the 2D SDFT is mathematically equivalent to that of the traditional DFT at all pixel positions.

  5. NIKE2D96. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.; Engelmann, B.; Halquist, J.O.

    1992-01-24

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  6. Is maternal periconceptional smoking associated with 2D:4D digit ratio in their children?

    PubMed

    Velez, M P; Arbuckle, T E; Monnier, P; Fraser, W D

    2017-05-23

    The 2nd--4th finger ratio (2D:4D) has been proposed as a potential indicator of greater androgen exposure during fetal development. Maternal periconceptional smoking may alter the homeostasis of fetal androgens, which could in turn result in differential development of 2D:4Ds in utero. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of maternal periconceptional smoking (i.e. 1 year before through the first trimester of pregnancy) on the 2D:4D of children within The Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study. Maternal smoking history was obtained through questionnaires during the first trimester of pregnancy in 2001 women from 10 cities across Canada. The periconceptional smoking prevalence was 12%. A follow-up study was conducted to measure growth and development up to 5 years of age in a subsample of some 800 MIREC children (MIREC-CD Plus), and digital pictures of the ventral surface of both hands were obtained in mothers and children (2-5 years). The 2D:4D was calculated as the ratio of the 2nd and 4th fingers of each hand. Boys had lower mean 2D:4Ds compared with girls in both hands. Age and maternal 2D:4D were strong determinants of the children's 2D:4D, however, the mean 2D:4D did not differ among children whose mothers had smoked during the periconceptional period compared with those who had not, irrespective of sex. In conclusion, we did not find an association between maternal periconceptional smoking and children's 2D:4D, although the smoking prevalence was low.

  7. Towards universal enrichment nanocoating for IR-ATR waveguides.

    PubMed

    Giammarco, James; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Petit, Laeticia; Musgraves, J David; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anu; Kimerling, Lionel; Richardson, Kathleen; Luzinov, Igor

    2011-08-28

    Polymer multilayered nanocoating capable of concentrating various chemical substances at IR-ATR waveguide surfaces is described. The coating affinity to an analyte played a pivotal role in sensitivity enhancement of the IR-ATR measurements, since the unmodified waveguide did not show any analyte detection.

  8. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  9. Development of a 2D precision cryogenic chopper for METIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paalvast, Sander L.; Janssen, Huub; Teuwen, Maurice; Huisman, Robert; Brandl, Bernhard; Molster, Frank; Venema, Lars

    2012-09-01

    The Mid-infrared E-ELT Imager and Spectrograph, or METIS, is foreseen as the third instrument for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). A key part of METIS is the Cold Chopper (MCC) which switches the optical beam between the target and a nearby reference sky during observation for elimination of the fluctuating IR background signal in post-processing. This paper discusses the development of the MCC demonstrator. The chopper mirror (Ø64mm) has to tip/tilt in 2D with a combined angle of up to 13.6mrad with 1.7μrad stability and repeatability within 5ms (95% duty cycle at 5Hz) at 80K. As these requirements cannot be met in the presence of friction or backlash, the mirror is guided by a monolithically integrated flexure mechanism. The angular position is actuated by three linear actuators and measured by three linear position sensors, resulting in a fast tip, tilt, and focus mirror. Using the third actuator to introduce symmetry, homogeneity in forces and heat flux is obtained. Both the actuators and the sensors are key components. A voice coil actuator had to be custom designed, to achieve the required acceleration force within the specified 1W heat load. The requirements for the displacement measurement can be met with a commercially available, fiber interferometry system. For integration of this system, stray light elimination is a critical design aspect and retro-reflectors have been used to reflect sufficient power into the fiber at large tip/tilt angles.

  10. Geometrical Correlation and Matching of 2d Image Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizilter, Y. V.; Zheltov, S. Y.

    2012-07-01

    The problem of image correspondence measure selection for image comparison and matching is addressed. Many practical applications require image matching "just by shape" with no dependence on the concrete intensity or color values. Most popular technique for image shape comparison utilizes the mutual information measure based on probabilistic reasoning and information theory background. Another approach was proposed by Pytiev (so called "Pytiev morphology") based on geometrical and algebraic reasoning. In this framework images are considered as piecewise-constant 2D functions, tessellation of image frame by the set of non-intersected connected regions determines the "shape" of image and the projection of image onto the shape of other image is determined. Morphological image comparison is performed using the normalized morphological correlation coefficients. These coefficients estimate the closeness of one image to the shape of other image. Such image analysis technique can be characterized as an ""ntensity-to-geometry" matching. This paper generalizes the Pytiev morphological approach for obtaining the pure "geometry-to-geometry" matching techniques. The generalized intensity-geometrical correlation coefficient is proposed including the linear correlation coefficient and the square of Pytiev correlation coefficient as its partial cases. The morphological shape correlation coefficient is proposed based on the statistical averaging of images with the same shape. Centered morphological correlation coefficient is obtained under the condition of intensity centering of averaged images. Two types of symmetric geometrical normalized correlation coefficients are proposed for comparison of shape-tessellations. The technique for correlation and matching of shapes with ordered intensities is proposed with correlation measures invariant to monotonous intensity transformations. The quality of proposed geometrical correlation measures is experimentally estimated in the task of

  11. IR Materials Producibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    Arlington, VA 22203-1714 Attn: Mr. Raymond Balcerak ARPA Order No. 8557; Program Code Nos. 2H20, 2D1 0 Contract MDA972-92- C -0053 Covering the period: 12...Code Nos. 2H20, 2D10 . . Issued by DARPAICMO under Contract MDA972-92- C -0053 Covering the period: 12 August through 31 October 1992 The views and...analyses. • Initial calculation of the properties of ZnSe, including new gradient correction terms. iv CONTENTS 1. IN TR O D U C TIO N

  12. An effective placental cotyledons proteins extraction method for 2D gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Niu J; Daim, Leona D J; Jamil, Amilia A M; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Thilakavathy, Karuppiah

    2017-03-01

    Effective protein extraction is essential especially in producing a well-resolved proteome on 2D gels. A well-resolved placental cotyledon proteome, with good reproducibility, have allowed researchers to study the proteins underlying the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy. The aim of this study is to determine the best protein extraction protocol for the extraction of protein from placental cotyledons tissues for a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). Based on widely used protein extraction strategies, 12 different extraction methodologies were carefully selected, which included one chemical extraction, two mechanical extraction coupled protein precipitations, and nine chemical extraction coupled protein precipitations. Extracted proteins were resolved in a one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and 2D-GE; then, it was compared with set criteria: extraction efficacy, protein resolution, reproducibility, and recovery efficiency. Our results revealed that a better profile was obtained by chemical extraction in comparison to mechanical extraction. We further compared chemical extraction coupled protein precipitation methodologies, where the DNase/lithium chloride-dense sucrose homogenization coupled dichloromethane-methanol precipitation (DNase/LiCl-DSH-D/MPE) method showed good protein extraction efficiency. This, however, was carried out with the best protein resolution and proteome reproducibility on 2D-gels. DNase/LiCl-DSH-D/MPE was efficient in the extraction of proteins from placental cotyledons tissues. In addition, this methodology could hypothetically allow the protein extraction of any tissue that contains highly abundant lipid and glycogen.

  13. Amorphous Boron Nitride: A Universal, Ultrathin Dielectric for 2D Nanoelectronics (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-21

    single crystal h-BN. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nanoelectronics; 2D materials; dielectrics; transistor gate barriers; environmental passivation layers; boron...than previously reported chemical vapor depos- ited h -BN and nearing single crystal h -BN. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201505455 N. R. Glavin, Dr. M. L...see Table 1 ). The amorphous material possesses a density similar to the crystal - line phases, and retains much of the valued chemical inert- ness and

  14. Laboratory studies on N(2D) reactions of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, N.; Casavecchia, P.

    Molecular nitrogen is a very stable molecule, practically inert from a chemical point of view. For a nitrogen chemistry to occur in the planetary atmospheres which contain N2 , it is necessary to transform it into an active form, such as atoms or ions. As far as the production of atomic nitrogen in the upper atmospheres of planets (like Mars) or moons (like Titan) is concerned, several processes - as N2 dissociation induced by electron impact, EUV photolysis (λ <80 nm) and dissociative photoionization, or galactic cosmic ray absorption and N+ dissociative recombination all 2 lead to atomic nitrogen, notably in the ground, 4 S3/2 , and first electronically excited, 2 D3/2,5/2 , states with comparable yields. The radiative lifetimes of the metastable states 2 D3/2 and 2 D5/2 are quite long (12.3 and 48 hours, respectively), because the transition from a doublet to a quartet state is strongly forbidden. In addition, the physical quenching of N(2 D) is often a slow process and in some important cases the main fate of N(2 D) is chemical reaction with other constituents of the planetary atmospheres. The production of N atoms in the 2 D state is an important fact, because N(4 S) atoms exhibit very low reactivity with closed-shell molecules and the probability of collision with an open-shell radical is small. Unfortunately laboratory experiments on the gas-phase reactions of N(2 D) have been lacking until recently, because of serious experimental difficulties in studying these reactive systems. Accurate kinetic data on the reactions of N(2 D) with the some molecules of relevance to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres have finally become available in the late 90's, but a better knowledge of the reactive behavior requires a dynamical investigation of N(2 D) reactions. The capability of generating intense continuous beams of N(2 D) achieved in our laboratory some years ago has opened up the possibility of studying the reactive scattering of this species under single

  15. FT-IR analysis of phosphorylated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshihashi, Sachiko S.; Chihara, Kunihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are the most remarkable posttranslational modifications, are considered to be important chemical reactions that control the activation of proteins. We examine the phosphorylation analysis method by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group that observed at about 1070cm-1 (9.4μm) with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). This study indicates that it is possible to identify a phosphorylation by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group observed at about 1070 cm-1 with FT-IR method. As long as target peptides have the same amino acid sequence, it is possible to identify the phosphorylated sites (threonine, serine and tyrosine).

  16. Downregulation of Ubiquitin-conjugating Enzyme UBE2D3 Promotes Telomere Maintenance and Radioresistance of Eca-109 Human Esophageal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Wu, Lin; Ke, Shaobo; Wang, Wenbo; Yang, Lei; Gao, Xiaojia; Fang, Hongyan; Yu, Haijun; Zhong, Yahua; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Fuxiang; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2D3 is an important member of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathways. Our previous study showed that the expression of UBE2D3 was negatively related to human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and radioresistance in human breast cancer cells. However, in esophageal carcinoma, the exact effects and mechanisms of UBE2D3 in radioresistance remain unclear. This study shows that UBE2D3 knockdown was associated with significant increases in radioresistance to X-rays, telomerase activity, telomere length, and telomere shelterins. UBE2D3 knockdown-mediated radioresistance was related to a decrease in the spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting from a decrease in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Furthermore, UBE2D3 downregulation was associated with increased G1-S phase transition and prolonged IR-induced G2/M arrest through over expression of cyclin D1, decrease of CDC25A expression and promotion of the ATM/ATR-Chk1-CDC25C pathway. Moreover, UBE2D3 downregulation reduced spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks and accelerated the repair of DNA damage induced by IR. The current data thus demonstrate that UBE2D3 downregulation enhances radioresistance by increased telomere homeostasis and prolonged IR-induced G2/M arrest, but decreases the IR-induced apoptosis and the number of DNA damage foci. These results suggest that UBE2D3 might be a potential molecular target to improve radiotherapy effects in esophageal carcinoma. PMID:27326259

  17. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2004-12-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  18. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2005-01-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  19. TECHNICAL DESIGN NOTE: Currency verification by a 2D infrared barcode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirripa Spagnolo, Giuseppe; Cozzella, Lorenzo; Simonetti, Carla

    2010-10-01

    Nowadays all the National Central Banks are continuously studying innovative anti-counterfeiting systems for banknotes. In this note, an innovative solution is proposed, which combines the potentiality of a hylemetric approach (methodology conceptually similar to biometry), based on notes' intrinsic characteristics, with a well-known and consolidated 2D barcode identification system. In particular, in this note we propose to extract from the banknotes a univocal binary control sequence (template) and insert an encrypted version of it in a barcode printed on the same banknote. For a more acceptable look and feel of a banknote, the superposed barcode can be stamped using IR ink that is visible to near-IR image sensors. This makes the banknote verification simpler.

  20. Piezoelectricity of 2D nanomaterials: characterization, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Meguid, S. A.

    2017-04-01

    The discovery of piezoelectricity in 2D nanomaterials represents a milestone towards embedding low-dimensional materials into future technologies. This article reviews recent progress in the characterization, properties evaluation, and applications of piezoelectricity of 2D piezoelectric nanomaterials (PNs). To begin, an introduction to the existing 2D PNs, which exhibit a wide range of atomic structures and configurations, is presented. The nanoscale measurements and associated experimental techniques as well as the atomic simulations of the piezoelectric properties of 2D PNs are then summarized. Some of the pertinent parameters, which govern the piezoelectric properties of 2D PNs, are discussed. Furthermore, our article concludes with some potential applications including piezotronics, piezophototronics, and energy harvesting of 2D PNs, which can open the doors to the innovative design of next-generation nanoelectronics and nanodevices. Finally, we highlight perspectives and challenges for the future development of 2D PNs.

  1. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  2. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  3. IR Gain Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain.

  4. IR gain monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain. This continues the strategy of last cycle's gain monitor, in proposal 13080.

  5. Engineering 1D Quantum Stripes from Superlattices of 2D Layered Materials.

    PubMed

    Gruenewald, John H; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Heung Sik; Johnson, Jared M; Hwang, Jinwoo; Souri, Maryam; Terzic, Jasminka; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Said, Ayman; Brill, Joseph W; Cao, Gang; Kee, Hae-Young; Seo, Sung S Ambrose

    2017-01-01

    Dimensional tunability from two dimensions to one dimension is demonstrated for the first time using an artificial superlattice method in synthesizing 1D stripes from 2D layered materials. The 1D confinement of layered Sr2 IrO4 induces distinct 1D quantum-confined electronic states, as observed from optical spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. This 1D superlattice approach is generalizable to a wide range of layered materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. 2D molecular graphics: a flattened world of chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Shang, Zhicai

    2009-05-01

    Molecular graphics provides an intuitive way for representation, modeling and analysis of complex chemical and biological systems. It is now widely used in the theoretical chemistry, structural biology, molecular modeling and drug design communities. Traditional molecular graphics techniques mainly dedicate to showing molecular architectures at three-dimensional (3D) level. However, in some occasions the two-dimensional (2D) representation of molecular configurations, profiles, behaviors and interactions may be more readily acceptable for audiences, especially when we need to describe abstract information in a straightforward way or to present numerous data in schematic diagrams. In recent years, 2D representation methods/tools have been developed rapidly for various purposes, ranging from the aesthetic depiction of atomic arrangement for small organic molecules to schematic layout of complicated nonbonding network across the biomolecular binding interfaces, and have received considerable interest in the fields of chemistry, biology and medicine. In this article we first propose the term of 2D molecular graphics to cover the spectrum of 2D representing chemical and biological systems, we also give a comprehensive review on the methods, tools and applications of 2D molecular graphics.

  7. Single-scan 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing an increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago a so-called “ultrafast” (UF) approach was proposed, capable to deliver arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or hetero-nuclear correlations, in a single scan. During the intervening years the performance of this sub-second 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool witnessing an expanded scope of applications. The present reviews summarizes the principles and the main developments which have contributed to the success of this approach, and focuses on applications which have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry –from the real time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  8. Local Mode Analysis: Decoding IR Spectra by Visualizing Molecular Details.

    PubMed

    Massarczyk, M; Rudack, T; Schlitter, J; Kuhne, J; Kötting, C; Gerwert, K

    2017-02-08

    Integration of experimental and computational approaches to investigate chemical reactions in proteins has proven to be very successful. Experimentally, time-resolved FTIR difference-spectroscopy monitors chemical reactions at atomic detail. To decode detailed structural information encoded in IR spectra, QM/MM calculations are performed. Here, we present a novel method which we call local mode analysis (LMA) for calculating IR spectra and assigning spectral IR-bands on the basis of movements of nuclei and partial charges from just a single QM/MM trajectory. Through LMA the decoding of IR spectra no longer requires several simulations or optimizations. The novel approach correlates the motions of atoms of a single simulation with the corresponding IR bands and provides direct access to the structural information encoded in IR spectra. Either the contributions of a particular atom or atom group to the complete IR spectrum of the molecule are visualized, or an IR-band is selected to visualize the corresponding structural motions. Thus, LMA decodes the detailed information contained in IR spectra and provides an intuitive approach for structural biologists and biochemists. The unique feature of LMA is the bidirectional analysis connecting structural details to spectral features and vice versa spectral features to molecular motions.

  9. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  10. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  11. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  12. High-performance supported Ir-oxohydroxide water oxidation electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Massue, Cyriac; Pfeifer, Verena; Huang, Xing; Noack, Johannes; Tarasov, Andrey; Cap, Sebastien; Schlögl, Robert

    2017-02-05

    The synthesis of a highly active and yet stable electrocatalyst for the anodic oxygen evolution reaction (OER) remains a major challenge for acidic water splitting on an industrial scale. Addressing this challenge, we obtained an outstanding high-performance OER-electrocatalyst by loading Ir on conductive antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO)-nanoparticles via a microwave (MW)-supported hydrothermal route. The obtained Ir-phase was identified as an XRD-amorphous, highly hydrated Ir(III/IV)-oxohydroxide. In order to identify chemical and structural features responsible for the high activity and exceptional stability under acidic OER-conditions at loadings as low as 20 μg(Ir) cm-2, we used stepwise thermal treatment to gradually alter the XRD-amorphous Ir-phase via dehydroxylation and crystallization of IrO2. This resulted in dramatic depletion of OER-performance, indicating that the outstanding electrocatalytic properties of the MW-produced Ir(III/IV)-oxohydroxide are prominently linked to the nature of the produced Ir-phase. This finding is in contrast with the often reported stable but poor OER-performance of crystalline IrO2-based compounds produced via more classical calcination routes. Our investigation demonstrates the immense potential of Ir-oxohydroxide-based OER electrocatalysts for stable high-current water electrolysis under acidic conditions.

  13. Pulsed IR inductive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed inductive discharge is a new alternative method of pumping active gas laser media. The work presents results of experimental investigations of near, mid, and far IR inductive gas lasers (H2, HF, and CO2) operating at different transitions of atoms and molecules with different mechanisms of formation of inversion population. The excitation systems of a pulsed inductive cylindrical discharge (pulsed inductively coupled plasma) and pulsed RF inductive discharge in the gases are developed. Various gas mixtures including H2, N2, He, Ne, F2, NF3, and SF6 are used. Characteristics of near IR H2 laser radiation are investigated. Maximal pulse peak power of 7 kW is achieved. The possibility of using a pulsed inductive discharge as a new method of pumping HF laser active medium is demonstrated. The pulsed RF inductive CO2 laser is created and a total efficiency of 17% is achieved.

  14. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  15. 2D-fractal based algorithms for nanoparticles characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-02-01

    Fractal geometry concerns the study of non-Euclidean geometrical figures generated by a recursive sequence of mathematical operations. The proposed 2D-fractal approach was applied to characterise the image structure and texture generated by fine and ultra-fine particles when impacting on a flat surface. The work was developed with reference to particles usually produced by ultra-fine milling addressed to generate nano-particles population. In order to generate different particle populations to utilize in the study, specific milling actions have been thus performed adopting different milling actions and utilising different materials, both in terms of original size class distribution and chemical-physical attributes. The aim of the work was to develop a simple, reliable and low cost analytical set of procedures with the ability to establish correlations between particles detected by fractal characteristics and their milled-induced-properties (i.e. size class distribution, shape, surface properties, etc.). Such logic should constitute the core of a control engine addressed to realize a full monitoring of the milling process as well as to establish correlation between operative parameters, fed and resulting products characteristics.

  16. Interaction mechanism of biomolecules on vacancy defected 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan; Salmankurt, Bahadır

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present a first principles study of the adsorption of Adenine which is a nucleobases, Histide and Leucine molecules, which are the amino acids, on vacancy defected single layer materials such as graphene and phosphorene. Among these materials, graphene, which is a single layer honeycomb structure of carbon. Also, phosphorene is recently synthesized by mechanical exfoliation of the black phosphorus. Phosphorene forming a puckered honeycomb structure similar to silicene. However, unlike zero-bandgap graphene and silicene, phosphorene is a direct band gap semiconductor, which makes it very attractive for the nanoelectronic devices. According to the studies, local defects can always exist at any temperature. The most probable defect type is the single vacancy in the single layer honeycomb structures. Vacancy defects can be emerged during growth process and they change the properties of materials significantly. In this study, we show that how to manipulate interaction and binding mechanisms of biomolecules with 2D materials with increased chemical activity by vacancy defects.

  17. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anasori, Babak; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-01-01

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  18. Dunes in IR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-09

    This image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows an infrared image of Kaiser Crater and the dune field on the crater floor. Brighter tones in the image are warmer surfaces. The basaltic dunes are dark in the visible, but bright in infrared. Orbit Number: 66814 Latitude: -47.0992 Longitude: 19.782 Instrument: IR Captured: 2017-01-05 08:54 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21504

  19. IR Detectors Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...2 1. Introduction The final report summarizes the results of continuing research and development of CZT substrates for fabrication of IR focal...agreed, that tasks 3 and 4 will be done in the first half of September based on time availability of the polishing lab and the summary will be sent

  20. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  1. Differential cytochrome P450 2D metabolism alters tafenoquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Chau; Xie, Lisa H; Potter, Brittney M J; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Smith, Bryan; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D metabolism is required for the liver-stage antimalarial efficacy of the 8-aminoquinoline molecule tafenoquine in mice. This could be problematic for Plasmodium vivax radical cure, as the human CYP 2D ortholog (2D6) is highly polymorphic. Diminished CYP 2D6 enzyme activity, as in the poor-metabolizer phenotype, could compromise radical curative efficacy in humans. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism for tafenoquine liver-stage efficacy, the exact role that CYP 2D metabolism plays in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of tafenoquine and other 8-aminoquinoline molecules has not been extensively studied. In this study, a series of tafenoquine pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with different CYP 2D metabolism statuses, including wild-type (WT) (reflecting extensive metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) and CYPmouse 2D knockout (KO) (reflecting poor metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single 20-mg/kg of body weight dose of tafenoquine differed between the strains; however, the differences were less striking than previous results obtained for primaquine in the same model. Additionally, the presence of a 5,6-ortho-quinone tafenoquine metabolite was examined in both mouse strains. The 5,6-ortho-quinone species of tafenoquine was observed, and concentrations of the metabolite were highest in the WT extensive-metabolizer phenotype. Altogether, this study indicates that CYP 2D metabolism in mice affects tafenoquine pharmacokinetics and could have implications for human tafenoquine pharmacokinetics in polymorphic CYP 2D6 human populations. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.