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Sample records for 2d network structure

  1. Spectral and structural properties of 2D network complex [Ni(4,4'-bipyridine) 2(NCS) 2] n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Jianmin, L.; Nishiura, M.; Imamoto, T.

    2000-02-01

    The complex [Ni(4,4'-bipyridine) 2(NCS) 2] n, in which nickel atoms are linked by two different Ni-4,4'-bpy-Ni assemblies to form two-dimensional distorted square net structure and the most effective packing of layers, has been isolated and structurally characterized. It represents the first example of Ni(II)-4,4'-bpy complex possesses 2D network. Crystal data for I: Fw=487.23, a=12.156(3), b=11.38(2), c=16.646(8) Å, β=100.43(3), V=2265(1) Å3, Z=4, space group=C2/c, T=298 K, λ((Mo-K α)=0.71070 Å, ρ calc=1.429 g cm -3, μ=10.62 cm-1, F(000)=1000, R=0.054, Rw=0.086, GOF=3.98. The UV-VIS absorption spectrum of the title complex is also reported and explained perfectly by the scaling radial theory which proposed by us. The strong and broad absorption bands occurred at 10433, 16830, 26556 cm -1, and they are assigned as d-d transitions of Ni(II) ion in octahedral field: 3A2g→ 3T2ga,b+ 3T2gc; 3A2g→ 3T1gz+ 3T1gy,x; 3A2g→ 3T1gz+ 3T1gy,x. The calculated results of the d-d transition energy levels agree well with the experimental values.

  2. Geometric Bioinspired Networks for Recognition of 2-D and 3-D Low-Level Structures and Transformations.

    PubMed

    Bayro-Corrochano, Eduardo; Vazquez-Santacruz, Eduardo; Moya-Sanchez, Eduardo; Castillo-Munis, Efrain

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the design of radial basis function geometric bioinspired networks and their applications. Until now, the design of neural networks has been inspired by the biological models of neural networks but mostly using vector calculus and linear algebra. However, these designs have never shown the role of geometric computing. The question is how biological neural networks handle complex geometric representations involving Lie group operations like rotations. Even though the actual artificial neural networks are biologically inspired, they are just models which cannot reproduce a plausible biological process. Until now researchers have not shown how, using these models, one can incorporate them into the processing of geometric computing. Here, for the first time in the artificial neural networks domain, we address this issue by designing a kind of geometric RBF using the geometric algebra framework. As a result, using our artificial networks, we show how geometric computing can be carried out by the artificial neural networks. Such geometric neural networks have a great potential in robot vision. This is the most important aspect of this contribution to propose artificial geometric neural networks for challenging tasks in perception and action. In our experimental analysis, we show the applicability of our geometric designs, and present interesting experiments using 2-D data of real images and 3-D screw axis data. In general, our models should be used to process different types of inputs, such as visual cues, touch (texture, elasticity, temperature), taste, and sound. One important task of a perception-action system is to fuse a variety of cues coming from the environment and relate them via a sensor-motor manifold with motor modules to carry out diverse reasoned actions.

  3. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  4. Molecular tectonics: formation and structural studies on a 2-D directional coordination network based on a non-centric metacyclophane based tecton and zinc cation.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Jérôme; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Kyritsakas-Gruber, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2010-02-28

    The combination of tectons based on the [1111]metacyclophane backbone blocked the 1,3-alternate conformation bearing two imidazoly or pyrazolyl groups located on the same side with metal halide complexes leads to the formation of either discrete metallmacrobicycles or infinite 1-D coordination networks. The same backbone bearing two sets of two different coordinating poles composed of two pyridyl and two pyrazolyl units, owing to its non-centrosymmetric nature, forms a directional 2-D network packed in an anti-parallel fashion.

  5. Exact Solution of Ising Model in 2d Shortcut Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, O.

    We give the exact solution to the Ising model in the shortcut network in the 2D limit. The solution is found by mapping the model to the square lattice model with Brascamp and Kunz boundary conditions.

  6. Molecular tectonics: generation and structural studies on 1- and 2D coordination networks based on a meta-cyclophane in 1,3-alternate conformation bearing four pyrazolyl units and cobalt, zinc and copper cations.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Jérôme; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Kyritsakas-Gruber, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2009-08-28

    The combination of a [1111] metacyclophane blocked in 1,3-alternate conformation and bearing four pyrazolyl coordinating units with MX(2) (M = Co, Zn and X = Cl or Br) leads to the formation of crystals formed by packing of 2D coordination networks. In the case of CuBr(2), the formation of a 1D network was observed. Structural studies by X-ray diffraction methods on single crystals were performed on all cases reported.

  7. Duality Between Spin Networks and the 2D Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Costantino, Francesco; Livine, Etera R.

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to exhibit a deep relation between the partition function of the Ising model on a planar trivalent graph and the generating series of the spin network evaluations on the same graph. We provide respectively a fermionic and a bosonic Gaussian integral formulation for each of these functions and we show that they are the inverse of each other (up to some explicit constants) by exhibiting a supersymmetry relating the two formulations. We investigate three aspects and applications of this duality. First, we propose higher order supersymmetric theories that couple the geometry of the spin networks to the Ising model and for which supersymmetric localization still holds. Secondly, after interpreting the generating function of spin network evaluations as the projection of a coherent state of loop quantum gravity onto the flat connection state, we find the probability distribution induced by that coherent state on the edge spins and study its stationary phase approximation. It is found that the stationary points correspond to the critical values of the couplings of the 2D Ising model, at least for isoradial graphs. Third, we analyze the mapping of the correlations of the Ising model to spin network observables, and describe the phase transition on those observables on the hexagonal lattice. This opens the door to many new possibilities, especially for the study of the coarse-graining and continuum limit of spin networks in the context of quantum gravity.

  8. 2D pattern evolution constrained by complex network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rocha, L. E. C.; Costa, L. da F.

    2007-03-01

    Complex networks have established themselves in recent years as being particularly suitable and flexible for representing and modelling several complex natural and artificial systems. In the same time in which the structural intricacies of such networks are being revealed and understood, efforts have also been directed at investigating how such connectivity properties define and constrain the dynamics of systems unfolding on such structures. However, less attention has been focused on hybrid systems, i.e. involving more than one type of network and/or dynamics. Several real systems present such an organization, e.g. the dynamics of a disease coexisting with the dynamics of the immune system. The current paper investigates a specific system involving diffusive (linear and nonlinear) dynamics taking place in a regular network while interacting with a complex network of defensive agents following Erdös Rényi (ER) and Barabási Albert (BA) graph models with moveable nodes. More specifically, the complex network is expected to control, and if possible, to extinguish the diffusion of some given unwanted process (e.g. fire, oil spilling, pest dissemination, and virus or bacteria reproduction during an infection). Two types of pattern evolution are considered: Fick and Gray Scott. The nodes of the defensive network then interact with the diffusing patterns and communicate between themselves in order to control the diffusion. The main findings include the identification of higher efficiency for the BA control networks and the presence of relapses in the case of the ER model.

  9. Synchronization of semiconductor laser arrays with 2D Bragg structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, V. R.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    A model of a planar semiconductor multi-channel laser is developed. In this model two-dimensional (2D) Bragg mirror structures are used for synchronizing radiation of multiple laser channels. Coupling of longitudinal and transverse waves can be mentioned as the distinguishing feature of these structures. Synchronization of 20 laser channels is demonstrated with a semi-classical approach based on Maxwell-Bloch equations.

  10. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  11. Band-structure engineering in conjugated 2D polymers.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico

    2016-10-26

    Conjugated polymers find widespread application in (opto)electronic devices, sensing, and as catalysts. Their common one-dimensional structure can be extended into the second dimension to create conjugated planar sheets of covalently linked molecules. Extending π-conjugation into the second dimension unlocks a new class of semiconductive polymers which as a consequence of their unique electronic properties can find usability in numerous applications. In this article the theoretical band structures of a set of conjugated 2D polymers are compared and information on the important characteristics band gap and valence/conduction band dispersion is extracted. The great variance in these characteristics within the investigated set suggests 2D polymers as exciting materials in which band-structure engineering can be used to tailor sheet-like organic materials with desired electronic properties.

  12. Structural Complexity and Phonon Physics in 2D Arsenenes.

    PubMed

    Carrete, Jesús; Gallego, Luis J; Mingo, Natalio

    2017-03-15

    In the quest for stable 2D arsenic phases, four different structures have been recently claimed to be stable. We show that, due to phonon contributions, the relative stability of those structures differs from previous reports and depends crucially on temperature. We also show that one of those four phases is in fact mechanically unstable. Furthermore, our results challenge the common assumption of an inverse correlation between structural complexity and thermal conductivity. Instead, a richer picture emerges from our results, showing how harmonic interactions, anharmonicity, and symmetries all play a role in modulating thermal conduction in arsenenes. More generally, our conclusions highlight how vibrational properties are an essential element to be carefully taken into account in theoretical searches for new 2D materials.

  13. Graphene band structure and its 2D Raman mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narula, Rohit; Reich, Stephanie

    2014-08-01

    High-precision simulations are used to generate the 2D Raman mode of graphene under a range of screening conditions and laser energies EL. We reproduce the decreasing trend of the 2D mode FWHM vs EL and the nearly linearly increasing dispersion ∂ω2D/∂EL seen experimentally in freestanding (unscreened) graphene, and propose relations between these experimentally accessible quantities and the local, two-dimensional gradients |∇ | of the electronic and TO phonon bands. In light of state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations that acutely treat the long-range e-e interactions of isolated graphene and its experimentally observed 2D Raman mode, our calculations determine a 40% greater slope of the TO phonons about K than given by explicit phonon measurements performed in graphite or GW phonon calculations in graphene. We also deduce the variation of the broadening energy γ [EL] for freestanding graphene and find a nominal value γ ˜140 meV, showing a gradually increasing trend for the range of frequencies available experimentally.

  14. Micro-structural Fluctuations in 2D Dusty Plasma Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    I Lin; Huang, Y.-H.; Teng, L.-W.

    2007-07-13

    We address structural fluctuations in a cold 2D dusty plasma liquid which is self-organized through the strong Coulomb coupling of the negatively charged micro-meter sized dust particles suspending in weakly ionized discharges. The 2D liquids consist of triangular type ordered domains surrounded by defect clusters, which can be reorganized through avalanche type hopping under the interplay of strong Coulomb coupling and thermal fluctuations. The spatio-temporal evolutions of the local bond-orientational order are directly tracked through digital optical microscopy. The power law scaling of the temporal persistence length of fluctuations is obtained for the cold liquid. The measurement of the conditional probability of the persistence lengths of the successive fluctuating cycles suggests certain types of the persistence length combinations are more preferred. The memory of persistence lasts a few fluctuating cycles.

  15. Calculation of 2D electronic band structure using matrix mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelich, R. L.; Marsiglio, F.

    2016-12-01

    We extend previous work, applying elementary matrix mechanics to one-dimensional periodic arrays (to generate energy bands), to two-dimensional arrays. We generate band structures for the square-lattice "2D Kronig-Penney model" (square wells), the "muffin-tin" potential (circular wells), and Gaussian wells. We then apply the method to periodic arrays of more than one atomic site in a unit cell, specifically to the case of materials with hexagonal lattices like graphene. These straightforward extensions of undergraduate-level calculations allow students to readily determine band structures of current research interest.

  16. Meshfree natural vibration analysis of 2D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosta, Tomislav; Tsukanov, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Determination of resonance frequencies and vibration modes of mechanical structures is one of the most important tasks in the product design procedure. The main goal of this paper is to describe a pioneering application of the solution structure method (SSM) to 2D structural natural vibration analysis problems and investigate the numerical properties of the method. SSM is a meshfree method which enables construction of the solutions to the engineering problems that satisfy exactly all prescribed boundary conditions. This method is capable of using spatial meshes that do not conform to the shape of a geometric model. Instead of using the grid nodes to enforce boundary conditions, it employs distance fields to the geometric boundaries and combines them with the basis functions and prescribed boundary conditions at run time. This defines unprecedented geometric flexibility of the SSM as well as the complete automation of the solution procedure. In the paper we will explain the key points of the SSM as well as investigate the accuracy and convergence of the proposed approach by comparing our results with the ones obtained using analytical methods or traditional finite element analysis. Despite in this paper we are dealing with 2D in-plane vibrations, the proposed approach has a straightforward generalization to model vibrations of 3D structures.

  17. HEXAGONAL ARRAY STRUCTURE FOR 2D NDE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewierz, J.; Ramadas, S. N.; Gachagan, A.; O'Leary, R. L.

    2010-02-22

    This paper describes a combination of simulation and experimentation to evaluate the advantages offered by utilizing a hexagonal shaped array element in a 2D NDE array structure. The active material is a 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composite structure incorporating triangular shaped pillars--each hexagonal array element comprising six triangular pillars. A combination of PZFlex, COMSOL and Matlab has been used to simulate the behavior of this device microstructure, for operation around 2.25 MHz, with unimodal behavior and low levels of mechanical cross-coupling predicted. Furthermore, the application of hexagonal array elements enables the array aperture to increase by approximately 30%, compared to a conventional orthogonal array matrix and hence will provide enhanced volumetric coverage and SNR. Prototype array configurations demonstrate good corroboration of the theoretically predicted mechanical cross-coupling between adjacent array elements (approx23 dB).

  18. 2D Radiative Transfer in Magnetically Confined Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.; Anzer, U.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetically confined structures in the solar atmosphere exhibit a large complexity in their shapes and physical conditions. As an example, we show the case of so-called magnetic dips in prominences which are in magnetohydrostatic equilibria. For such models we solve 2D non-LTE multilevel problem for hydrogen with PRD in Lyman resonance lines. The iterative technique used is based on the MALI approach with simple diagonal ALO and SC formal solver. To compute the hydrogen ionization balance, the preconditioned MALI equations are linearized with respect to atomic level populations and electron density and solved iteratively using the Newton-Raphson scheme. Two additional problems are addressed: (i) an adequate iteration method for cases when the column-mass scale is used in one of the two dimensions but varies along the other dimension (which has a geometrical scaling); and (ii) a possibility of using AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement) algorithms to account for steep 2D gradients of selected variables (temperature, density, etc.).

  19. Construction and repair of highly ordered 2D covalent networks by chemical equilibrium regulation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cui-Zhong; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2012-03-21

    The construction of well-ordered 2D covalent networks via the dehydration of di-borate aromatic molecules was successfully realized through introducing a small amount of water into a closed reaction system to regulate the chemical equilibrium.

  20. Photocarrier transport in 2D macroporous silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Onyshchenko, V.; Sachenko, A.

    2010-12-01

    The mechanisms of photocarrier transport through a barrier in the surface space-charge region (SCR) of 2D macroporous silicon structures have been studied at photon energies comparable to that of the silicon indirect band-to-band transition. It was found that the photoconductivity relaxation time was determined by the light modulation of barrier on the macropore surface; as a result, the relaxation itself obeyed the logarithmic law. The temperature dependence of the photoconductivity relaxation time was determined by the thermionic emission mechanism of the current transport in the SCR at temperatures T > 180 K, and by the tunnel current flow at T < 100 K, with temperature-independent tunnelling probability. The photo-emf was found to become saturated or reverse its sign to negative at temperatures below 130 K because of light absorption due to optical transitions via surface electronic states close to the silicon conduction band. In this case, the surface band bending increases due to the growth of a negative charge of the semiconductor surface. The equilibrium electrons in the bulk and photoexcited holes on the macropore surface recombine through the channel of multistage tunnel recombination between the conduction and valence bands.

  1. 2D-CELL: image processing software for extraction and analysis of 2-dimensional cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, F.; Telley, H.; Leibling, Th. M.; Mocellin, A.

    1992-01-01

    2D-CELL is a software package for the processing and analyzing of photographic images of cellular structures in a largely interactive way. Starting from a binary digitized image, the programs extract the line network (skeleton) of the structure and determine the graph representation that best models it. Provision is made for manually correcting defects such as incorrect node positions or dangling bonds. Then a suitable algorithm retrieves polygonal contours which define individual cells — local boundary curvatures are neglected for simplicity. Using elementary analytical geometry relations, a range of metric and topological parameters describing the population are then computed, organized into statistical distributions and graphically displayed.

  2. 2D image classification for 3D anatomy localization: employing deep convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; de Jong, Pim A.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Localization of anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) is a preprocessing step in many medical image analysis tasks. While trivial for humans, it is complex for automatic methods. Classic machine learning approaches require the challenge of hand crafting features to describe differences between ROIs and background. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) alleviate this by automatically finding hierarchical feature representations from raw images. We employ this trait to detect anatomical ROIs in 2D image slices in order to localize them in 3D. In 100 low-dose non-contrast enhanced non-ECG synchronized screening chest CT scans, a reference standard was defined by manually delineating rectangular bounding boxes around three anatomical ROIs -- heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Every anatomical ROI was automatically identified using a combination of three CNNs, each analyzing one orthogonal image plane. While single CNNs predicted presence or absence of a specific ROI in the given plane, the combination of their results provided a 3D bounding box around it. Classification performance of each CNN, expressed in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was >=0.988. Additionally, the performance of ROI localization was evaluated. Median Dice scores for automatically determined bounding boxes around the heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta were 0.89, 0.70, and 0.85 respectively. The results demonstrate that accurate automatic 3D localization of anatomical structures by CNN-based 2D image classification is feasible.

  3. 2D coordination polymers of macrocyclic oxamide with polycarboxylates: syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Qiu; Xu, Yan-Yan; Gao, Dong-Zhao; Zhang, Guo-Ying; Liu, Yiao-Xu; Wang, Jing; Liao, Dai-Zheng

    2012-05-14

    Five new 2D coordination polymers, [Co(nip)(CuL)(H(2)O)]·CH(3)OH (1), [Mn(ip)(NiL)]·0.63H(2)O (2), [Cu(ip)(CuL)] (3), [Mn(6)(CuL)(6)(btc)(4)(H(2)O)(4)]·7H(2)O (4), and [Cu(CuL)(Hbtc)(H(2)O)] (5)(ML, H(2)L = 2,3-dioxo-5,6,14,15-dibenzo-1,4,8,12-tetraazacyclo-pentadeca-7,13-diene; H(2)nip = 5-nitroisophthalic acid; H(2)ip = m-isophthalic acid; H(3)btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid) have been synthesized by a solvothermal method and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complexes 1-5 exhibit different 2D layered structures formed by Co(2)Cu(2) (1), Mn(2)Ni(2) (2), Cu(4) (3), Mn(3)Ni(3) (4), Cu(4) (5) units, respectively, via the oxamide and diverse carboxylic acid bridges. Compounds 1, 2, 3 and 5 are uninodal 4-connected (4, 4)-grids topology, while complex 4 possesses a 2D network with (3, 4)-connected (4(2).8)(4)(4(3).6(2).8)(3) topology. The results of magnetic determination show pronounced antiferromagnetic interactions in 1-4.

  4. Higher-Order Neural Networks Applied to 2D and 3D Object Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Reid, Max B.

    1994-01-01

    A Higher-Order Neural Network (HONN) can be designed to be invariant to geometric transformations such as scale, translation, and in-plane rotation. Invariances are built directly into the architecture of a HONN and do not need to be learned. Thus, for 2D object recognition, the network needs to be trained on just one view of each object class, not numerous scaled, translated, and rotated views. Because the 2D object recognition task is a component of the 3D object recognition task, built-in 2D invariance also decreases the size of the training set required for 3D object recognition. We present results for 2D object recognition both in simulation and within a robotic vision experiment and for 3D object recognition in simulation. We also compare our method to other approaches and show that HONNs have distinct advantages for position, scale, and rotation-invariant object recognition. The major drawback of HONNs is that the size of the input field is limited due to the memory required for the large number of interconnections in a fully connected network. We present partial connectivity strategies and a coarse-coding technique for overcoming this limitation and increasing the input field to that required by practical object recognition problems.

  5. Automatic angle measurement of a 2D object using optical correlator-neural networks hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, N.; Neil, M. A. A.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper a novel method is proposed and demonstrated for automatic rotation angle measurement of a 2D object using a hybrid architecture, consisting of a 4f optical correlator with a binary phase only multiplexed matched filter and a single layer neural network. The hybrid set-up can be considered as a two-layer perceptron-like neural network; an optical correlator is the first layer and the standard single layer neural network is the second layer. The training scheme used to train the hybrid architecture is a combination of a Direct Binary Search algorithm, to train the optical correlator, and an Error Back Propagation algorithm, to train the neural network. The aim is to perform the major information processing by the optical correlator with a small additional processing by the neural network stage. This allows the system to be used for real-time applications as optics has the inherent ability to process information in a parallel manner at high speed. The neural network stage gives an extra dimension of freedom so that complicated tasks like automatic rotation angle measurement can be achieved. Results of both computer simulation and experimental set-up are presented for rotation angle measurement of an English alphabetic character as a 2D object. The experimental set-up consists of a real optical correlator using two spatial light modulators for both input and frequency plane representations and a PC based model of a single layer network.

  6. Design of 2D chitosan scaffolds via electrochemical structuring

    PubMed Central

    Altomare, Lina; Guglielmo, Elena; Varoni, Elena Maria; Bertoldi, Serena; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia; De Nardo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) is a versatile biopolymer whose morphological and chemico-physical properties can be designed for a variety of biomedical applications. Taking advantage of its electrolytic nature, cathodic polarization allows CS deposition on electrically conductive substrates, resulting in thin porous structures with tunable morphology. Here we propose an easy method to obtain CS membranes with highly oriented micro-channels for tissue engineering applications, relying on simple control of process parameters and cathodic substrate geometry.   Cathodic deposition was performed on two different aluminum grids in galvanostatic conditions at 6.25 mA cm−2 from CS solution [1g L−1] in acetic acid (pH 3.5). Self-standing thin scaffolds were cross linked either with genipin or epichlorohydrin, weighted, and observed by optical and electron microscopy. Swelling properties at pH 5 and pH 7.4 have been also investigated and tensile tests performed on swollen samples at room temperature. Finally, direct and indirect assays have been performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity at 24 and 72 h. Thin scaffolds with two different oriented porosities (1000µm and 500µm) have been successfully fabricated by electrochemical techniques. Both cross-linking agents did not affected the mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of the resulting structures. Depending on the pH, these structures show interesting swelling properties that can be exploited for drug delivery systems. Moreover, thanks to the possibility of controlling the porosity and the micro-channel orientation, they should be used for the regeneration of tissues requiring a preferential cells orientation, e.g., cardiac patches or ligament regeneration. PMID:25093705

  7. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  8. Adaptive reorganization of 2D molecular nanoporous network induced by coadsorbed guest molecule.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing-Na; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Yu-Wu; Liu, Xuan-He; Chen, Ting; Yan, Hui-Juan; Wang, Dong; Yao, Jian-Nian; Wan, Li-Jun

    2014-03-25

    The ordered array of nanovoids in nanoporous networks, such as honeycomb, Kagome, and square, provides a molecular template for the accommodation of "guest molecules". Compared with the commonly studied guest molecules featuring high symmetry evenly incorporated into the template, guest molecules featuring lower symmetry are rare to report. Herein, we report the formation of a distinct patterned superlattice of guest molecules by selective trapping of guest molecules into the honeycomb network of trimesic acid (TMA). Two distinct surface patterns have been achieved by the guest inclusion induced adaptive reconstruction of a 2D molecular nanoporous network. The honeycomb networks can synergetically tune the arrangement upon inclusion of the guest molecules with different core size but similar peripherals groups, resulting in a trihexagonal Kagome or triangular patterns.

  9. Speckle lithography for fabricating Gaussian, quasi-random 2D structures and black silicon structures

    PubMed Central

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle pattern is a granular structure formed due to random coherent wavelet interference and generally considered as noise in optical systems including photolithography. Contrary to this, in this paper, we use the speckle pattern to generate predictable and controlled Gaussian random structures and quasi-random structures photo-lithographically. The random structures made using this proposed speckle lithography technique are quantified based on speckle statistics, radial distribution function (RDF) and fast Fourier transform (FFT). The control over the speckle size, density and speckle clustering facilitates the successful fabrication of black silicon with different surface structures. The controllability and tunability of randomness makes this technique a robust method for fabricating predictable 2D Gaussian random structures and black silicon structures. These structures can enhance the light trapping significantly in solar cells and hence enable improved energy harvesting. Further, this technique can enable efficient fabrication of disordered photonic structures and random media based devices. PMID:26679513

  10. Speckle lithography for fabricating Gaussian, quasi-random 2D structures and black silicon structures.

    PubMed

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2015-12-18

    Laser speckle pattern is a granular structure formed due to random coherent wavelet interference and generally considered as noise in optical systems including photolithography. Contrary to this, in this paper, we use the speckle pattern to generate predictable and controlled Gaussian random structures and quasi-random structures photo-lithographically. The random structures made using this proposed speckle lithography technique are quantified based on speckle statistics, radial distribution function (RDF) and fast Fourier transform (FFT). The control over the speckle size, density and speckle clustering facilitates the successful fabrication of black silicon with different surface structures. The controllability and tunability of randomness makes this technique a robust method for fabricating predictable 2D Gaussian random structures and black silicon structures. These structures can enhance the light trapping significantly in solar cells and hence enable improved energy harvesting. Further, this technique can enable efficient fabrication of disordered photonic structures and random media based devices.

  11. Structure of the novel ternary hydrides Li4Tt2D (Tt=Si and Ge).

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Hartman, Michael R; Udovic, Terrence J; Rush, John J; Zhou, Wei; Bowman, Robert C; Vajo, John J

    2007-02-01

    The crystal structures of newly discovered Li4Ge2D and Li4Si2D ternary phases were solved by direct methods using neutron powder diffraction data. Both structures can be described using a Cmmm orthorhombic cell with all hydrogen atoms occupying Li6-octahedral interstices. The overall crystal structure and the geometry of these interstices are compared with those of other related phases, and the stabilization of this novel class of ternary hydrides is discussed.

  12. Crystal Structure of Human Cytochrome P450 2D6 with Prinomastat Bound*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An; Savas, Uzen; Hsu, Mei-Hui; Stout, C. David; Johnson, Eric F.

    2012-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2D6 contributes to the metabolism of >15% of drugs used in clinical practice. This study determined the structure of P450 2D6 complexed with a substrate and potent inhibitor, prinomastat, to 2.85 Å resolution by x-ray crystallography. Prinomastat binding is well defined by electron density maps with its pyridyl nitrogen bound to the heme iron. The structure of ligand-bound P450 2D6 differs significantly from the ligand-free structure reported for the P450 2D6 Met-374 variant (Protein Data Bank code 2F9Q). Superposition of the structures reveals significant differences for β sheet 1, helices A, F, F′, G″, G, and H as well as the helix B-C loop. The structure of the ligand complex exhibits a closed active site cavity that conforms closely to the shape of prinomastat. The closure of the open cavity seen for the 2F9Q structure reflects a change in the direction and pitch of helix F and introduction of a turn at Gly-218, which is followed by a well defined helix F′ that was not observed in the 2F9Q structure. These differences reflect considerable structural flexibility that is likely to contribute to the catalytic versatility of P450 2D6, and this new structure provides an alternative model for in silico studies of substrate interactions with P450 2D6. PMID:22308038

  13. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  14. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: the SOLFRAC program.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-05

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL (labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm). It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments performed

  15. A series of 2D metal-quinolone complexes: Syntheses, structures, and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiang-Hong; Xiao, Dong-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Sun, Dian-Zhen; Yan, Shi-Wei; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhong-Li; Luo, Qun-Li; Wang, En-Bo

    2013-02-01

    Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes, namely [Cd(cfH)(bpdc)]rad H2O (1), [M(norfH)(bpdc)]rad H2O (M=Cd (2) and Mn (3)), [Mn2(cfH)(odpa)(H2O)3]rad 0.5H2O (4), [Co2(norfH)(bpta)(μ2-H2O)(H2O)2]rad H2O (5) and [Co3(saraH)2(Hbpta)2(H2O)4]rad 9H2O (6) (cfH=ciprofloxacin, norfH=norfloxacin, saraH=sarafloxacin, bpdc=4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylate, odpa=4,4'-oxydiphthalate, bpta=3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylate) have been synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1-3 consist of 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {M(COO)}nn+ chains. Compounds 4 and 5 display 2D structures based on tetranuclear manganese or cobalt clusters with (3,6)-connected kgd topology. Compound 6 exhibits a 2D bilayer structure, which represents the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. By inspection of the structures of 1-6, it is believed that the long aromatic polycarboxylate ligands are important for the formation of 2D metal-quinolone complexes. The magnetic properties of compounds 3-6 was studied, indicating the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions. Furthermore, the luminescent properties of compounds 1-2 are discussed.

  16. Laser fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A I; Kiyan, R; Chichkov, B N

    2010-09-27

    A novel method for fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays is proposed. This technique is based on laser-induced transfer of molten metal nanodroplets from thin metal films. Metal nanoparticles are produced by solidification of these nanodroplets. The size of the transferred nanoparticles can be controllably changed in the range from 180 nm to 1500 nm. Several examples of complex 2D and 3D microstructures generated form gold nanoparticles are demonstrated.

  17. Photo-and Electro-Switchable 1/2D Diffractive Structures Exploiting Soft-Matter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    again, a linear red-shift is observed, which clearly confirms that the behavior reported in Figure 4a is due to a photo - thermal mechanism; furthermore...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2013-0022 Photo -and Electro-Switchable 1/2D Diffractive Structures Exploiting Soft-Matter Luciano De Sio...TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 14 November 2011 – 13 November 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Photo -and Electro-Switchable 1/2D

  18. A series of 2D metal-quinolone complexes: Syntheses, structures, and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiang-Hong; Xiao, Dong-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Sun, Dian-Zhen; Yan, Shi-Wei; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhong-Li; Luo, Qun-Li; Wang, En-Bo

    2013-02-15

    Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes, namely [Cd(cfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (1), [M(norfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Cd (2) and Mn (3)), [Mn{sub 2}(cfH)(odpa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (4), [Co{sub 2}(norfH)(bpta)({mu}{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) and [Co{sub 3}(saraH){sub 2}(Hbpta){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O (6) (cfH=ciprofloxacin, norfH=norfloxacin, saraH=sarafloxacin, bpdc=4,4 Prime -biphenyldicarboxylate, odpa=4,4 Prime -oxydiphthalate, bpta=3,3 Prime ,4,4 Prime -biphenyltetracarboxylate) have been synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1-3 consist of 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Compounds 4 and 5 display 2D structures based on tetranuclear manganese or cobalt clusters with (3,6)-connected kgd topology. Compound 6 exhibits a 2D bilayer structure, which represents the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. By inspection of the structures of 1-6, it is believed that the long aromatic polycarboxylate ligands are important for the formation of 2D metal-quinolone complexes. The magnetic properties of compounds 3-6 was studied, indicating the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions. Furthermore, the luminescent properties of compounds 1-2 are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes have been prepared by self-assemblies of the quinolones and metal salts in the presence of long aromatic polycarboxylates. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-3 consist of novel 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 4 and 5 are two novel 2D layers based on tetranuclear Mn or Co clusters with kgd topology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 6 is the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-6 represent six unusual

  19. Insight into the crystallization of amorphous imine-linked polymer networks to 2D covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Overholts, Anna C; Hwang, Nicky; Dichtel, William R

    2016-03-04

    We explore the crystallization of a high surface area imine-linked two-dimensional covalent organic framework (2D COF). The growth process reveals rapid initial formation of an amorphous network that subsequently crystallizes into the layered 2D network. The metastable amorphous polymer may be isolated and resubjected to growth conditions to form the COF. These experiments provide the first mechanistic insight into the mechanism of imine-linked 2D COF formation, which is distinct from that of boronate-ester linked COFs.

  20. Bernstein copula approach to model direction-length dependency for 2D discrete fracture network simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Torres, F.; Diaz-Viera, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In many natural fractured porous media, such as aquifers, soils, oil and geothermal reservoirs, fractures play a crucial role in their flow and transport properties. An approach that has recently gained popularity for modeling fracture systems is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) model. This approach consists in applying a stochastic boolean simulation method, also known as object simulation method, where fractures are represented as simplified geometric objects (line segments in 2D and polygons in 3D). One of the shortcomings of this approach is that it usually does not consider the dependency relationships that may exist between the geometric properties of fractures (direction, length, aperture, etc), that is, each property is simulated independently. In this work a method for modeling such dependencies by copula theory is introduced. In particular, a nonparametric model using Bernstein copulas for direction-length fracture dependency in 2D is presented. The application of this method is illustrated in a case study for a fractured rock sample from a carbonate reservoir outcrop.

  1. Structure-From-Motion in 3D Space Using 2D Lidars

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Geol; Bok, Yunsu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Shim, Inwook; Kweon, In So

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel structure-from-motion methodology using 2D lidars (Light Detection And Ranging). In 3D space, 2D lidars do not provide sufficient information for pose estimation. For this reason, additional sensors have been used along with the lidar measurement. In this paper, we use a sensor system that consists of only 2D lidars, without any additional sensors. We propose a new method of estimating both the 6D pose of the system and the surrounding 3D structures. We compute the pose of the system using line segments of scan data and their corresponding planes. After discarding the outliers, both the pose and the 3D structures are refined via nonlinear optimization. Experiments with both synthetic and real data show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:28165372

  2. Deep structure of Eastern part of Bandung Basin based on 2D resistivity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harja, Asep

    2013-09-01

    Bandung basin is an intramontane basin located in West Java, extending from west to east along 35 km and north to south along 15 km distance, with elevation of 660-680 m. The plain in the eastern part is the basin center with lake deposit as primary sediment filling the basin. Investigation of the subsurface structure and thickness of the basin is the main topic in this research. Beside the deeper structure of the basin, the shallow structure is also very important to be revealed since human activities are concentrated in this part. The latter is supposed to explain phenomenon related to the flood and drought that frequently occur in the area. Controlled-source audio-frequency magneto telluric (CSAMT) is a highly effective electromagnetic (EM) method to deploy in this area. Its robustness toward electromagnetic noises related to human and industrial activities particularly in the eastern part of the basin is the strong point of this method. It uses a grounded horizontal electric dipole as artificial source of electromagnetic signal that ensures data with a high signal to noise (S/N) ratio. This method is capable to map subsurface resistivity structure with high sensitivity to resistivity contras and deeper penetration. 1D inversion scheme was used to the far-field component of CSAMT data (plane wave assumption) in order to obtain resistivity cross-sections that are more suitable with the basin's structure complexity. The results show that until the depth of more than 200 m, no high resistivity structure is found. This unlikely indicated the presence of volcanic rocks beneath the area. The subsurface resistivity distribution is dominated by tens of Om, indicating that the basement comprises deep marine sediment. In addition, clay lens are also indicated in the resulting resistivity structure. Based on 2D view of resistivity cross-sections based 1D inverted and 2D inversion, it is found that a low resistivity elongation extends in southeast-northwest direction at

  3. An effective structure prediction method for layered materials based on 2D particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanchao; Miao, Maosheng; Lv, Jian; Zhu, Li; Yin, Ketao; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming

    2012-12-14

    A structure prediction method for layered materials based on two-dimensional (2D) particle swarm optimization algorithm is developed. The relaxation of atoms in the perpendicular direction within a given range is allowed. Additional techniques including structural similarity determination, symmetry constraint enforcement, and discretization of structure constructions based on space gridding are implemented and demonstrated to significantly improve the global structural search efficiency. Our method is successful in predicting the structures of known 2D materials, including single layer and multi-layer graphene, 2D boron nitride (BN) compounds, and some quasi-2D group 6 metals(VIB) chalcogenides. Furthermore, by use of this method, we predict a new family of mono-layered boron nitride structures with different chemical compositions. The first-principles electronic structure calculations reveal that the band gap of these N-rich BN systems can be tuned from 5.40 eV to 2.20 eV by adjusting the composition.

  4. Toward IMRT 2D dose modeling using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantzis, Georgios; Vasquez-Quino, Luis A.; Zalman, Travis; Pratx, Guillem; Lei, Yu

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of artificial neural networks (ANN) to reconstruct dose maps for intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields compared with those of the treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: An artificial feed forward neural network and the back-propagation learning algorithm have been used to replicate dose calculations of IMRT fields obtained from PINNACLE{sup 3} v9.0. The ANN was trained with fluence and dose maps of IMRT fields for 6 MV x-rays, which were obtained from the amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device of Novalis TX. Those fluence distributions were imported to the TPS and the dose maps were calculated on the horizontal midpoint plane of a water equivalent homogeneous cylindrical virtual phantom. Each exported 2D dose distribution from the TPS was classified into two clusters of high and low dose regions, respectively, based on the K-means algorithm and the Euclidian metric in the fluence-dose domain. The data of each cluster were divided into two sets for the training and validation phase of the ANN, respectively. After the completion of the ANN training phase, 2D dose maps were reconstructed by the ANN and isodose distributions were created. The dose maps reconstructed by ANN were evaluated and compared with the TPS, where the mean absolute deviation of the dose and the {gamma}-index were used. Results: A good agreement between the doses calculated from the TPS and the trained ANN was achieved. In particular, an average relative dosimetric difference of 4.6% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 93% were obtained for low dose regions, and a dosimetric difference of 2.3% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 97% for high dose region. Conclusions: An artificial neural network has been developed to convert fluence maps to corresponding dose maps. The feasibility and potential of an artificial neural network to replicate complex convolution kernels in the TPS for IMRT dose calculations

  5. Probing the 2-D Kinematic Structure of Early-Type Galaxies Out to 3 Effective Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Robert N.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Spolaor, Max; Trevor Mendel, J.; Spitler, Lee

    2010-06-01

    We detail an innovative new technique for measuring the 2-D velocity moments (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion and Gauss-Hermite coefficients h3 and h4) using spectra from Keck DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopic observations. The data are used to reconstruct 2-D rotation velocity maps. Here we present data for one of five early-type galaxies whose kinematics we have measured out to ~3 effective radii (see [1]). From these data 2D kinematic maps are constructed. We show such analyses can provide significant insights into the global kinematic structure of galaxies, and, in some cases, challenge the accepted morphological classification. Our results are of particular importance to studies which attempt to classify galaxies by their kinematic structure within one effective radius, such as the recent definition of fast- and slow- rotator classes by the SAURON project.

  6. Interferometric 2D Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Reveals Structural Heterogeneity of Catalytic Monolayers on Transparent Materials.

    PubMed

    Vanselous, Heather; Stingel, Ashley M; Petersen, Poul B

    2017-02-16

    Molecular monolayers exhibit structural and dynamical properties that are different from their bulk counterparts due to their interaction with the substrate. Extracting these distinct properties is crucial for a better understanding of processes such as heterogeneous catalysis and interfacial charge transfer. Ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopic techniques such as 2D infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy are powerful tools for understanding molecular dynamics in complex bulk systems. Here, we build on technical advancements in 2D IR and heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to study a CO2 reduction catalyst on nanostructured TiO2 with interferometric 2D SFG spectroscopy. Our method combines phase-stable heterodyne detection employing an external local oscillator with a broad-band pump pulse pair to provide the first high spectral and temporal resolution 2D SFG spectra of a transparent material. We determine the overall molecular orientation of the catalyst and find that there is a static structural heterogeneity reflective of different local environments at the surface.

  7. Quantitative nanoscale visualization of heterogeneous electron transfer rates in 2D carbon nanotube networks

    PubMed Central

    Güell, Aleix G.; Ebejer, Neil; Snowden, Michael E.; McKelvey, Kim; Macpherson, Julie V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable interest for electrochemical, electrocatalytic, and sensing applications, yet there remains uncertainty concerning the intrinsic electrochemical (EC) activity. In this study, we use scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) to determine local heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) kinetics in a random 2D network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on an Si/SiO2 substrate. The high spatial resolution of SECCM, which employs a mobile nanoscale EC cell as a probe for imaging, enables us to sample the responses of individual portions of a wide range of SWNTs within this complex arrangement. Using two redox processes, the oxidation of ferrocenylmethyl trimethylammonium and the reduction of ruthenium (III) hexaamine, we have obtained conclusive evidence for the high intrinsic EC activity of the sidewalls of the large majority of SWNTs in networks. Moreover, we show that the ends of SWNTs and the points where two SWNTs cross do not show appreciably different HET kinetics relative to the sidewall. Using finite element method modeling, we deduce standard rate constants for the two redox couples and demonstrate that HET based solely on characteristic defects in the SWNT side wall is highly unlikely. This is further confirmed by the analysis of individual line profiles taken as the SECCM probe scans over an SWNT. More generally, the studies herein demonstrate SECCM to be a powerful and versatile method for activity mapping of complex electrode materials under conditions of high mass transport, where kinetic assignments can be made with confidence. PMID:22635266

  8. Unveiling Dimensionality Dependence of Glassy Dynamics: 2D Infinite Fluctuation Eclipses Inherent Structural Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Hayato; Yamada, Yasunori; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Kim, Kang

    2016-12-09

    By using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, the dynamics of two-dimensional (2D) supercooled liquids turns out to be dependent on the system size, while the size dependence is not pronounced in three-dimensional (3D) systems. It is demonstrated that the strong system-size effect in 2D amorphous systems originates from the enhanced fluctuations at long wavelengths which are similar to those of 2D crystal phonons. This observation is further supported by the frequency dependence of the vibrational density of states, consisting of the Debye approximation in the low-wave-number limit. However, the system-size effect in the intermediate scattering function becomes negligible when the length scale is larger than the vibrational amplitude. This suggests that the finite-size effect in a 2D system is transient and also that the structural relaxation itself is not fundamentally different from that in a 3D system. In fact, the dynamic correlation lengths estimated from the bond-breakage function, which do not suffer from those enhanced fluctuations, are not size dependent in either 2D or 3D systems.

  9. Unveiling Dimensionality Dependence of Glassy Dynamics: 2D Infinite Fluctuation Eclipses Inherent Structural Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Hayato; Yamada, Yasunori; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Kim, Kang

    2016-12-01

    By using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, the dynamics of two-dimensional (2D) supercooled liquids turns out to be dependent on the system size, while the size dependence is not pronounced in three-dimensional (3D) systems. It is demonstrated that the strong system-size effect in 2D amorphous systems originates from the enhanced fluctuations at long wavelengths which are similar to those of 2D crystal phonons. This observation is further supported by the frequency dependence of the vibrational density of states, consisting of the Debye approximation in the low-wave-number limit. However, the system-size effect in the intermediate scattering function becomes negligible when the length scale is larger than the vibrational amplitude. This suggests that the finite-size effect in a 2D system is transient and also that the structural relaxation itself is not fundamentally different from that in a 3D system. In fact, the dynamic correlation lengths estimated from the bond-breakage function, which do not suffer from those enhanced fluctuations, are not size dependent in either 2D or 3D systems.

  10. Multiple triangulation analysis: application to determine the velocity of 2-D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.-Z.; Zong, Q.-G.; Wang, J.; Pu, Z. Y.; Zhang, X. G.; Shi, Q. Q.; Cao, J. B.

    2006-11-01

    In order to avoid the ambiguity of the application of the Triangulation Method (multi-spacecraft timing method) to two-dimensional structures, another version of this method, the Multiple Triangulation Analysis (MTA) is used, to calculate the velocities of these structures based on 4-point measurements. We describe the principle of MTA and apply this approach to a real event observed by the Cluster constellation on 2 October 2003. The resulting velocity of the 2-D structure agrees with the ones obtained by some other methods fairly well. So we believe that MTA is a reliable version of the Triangulation Method for 2-D structures, and thus provides us a new way to describe their motion.

  11. Low band gap frequencies and multiplexing properties in 1D and 2D mass spring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the propagation of elastic waves in 1D and 2D mass spring structures. An analytical and computation model is presented for the 1D and 2D mass spring systems with different examples. An enhancement in the band gap values was obtained by modeling the structures to obtain low frequency band gaps at small dimensions. Additionally, the evolution of the band gap as a function of mass value is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the local resonance property in frequency ranges within the gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice in the 1D and 2D mass spring system. A linear defect formed of a row of specific masses produces an elastic waveguide that transmits at the narrow pass band frequency. The frequency of the waveguides can be selected by adjusting the mass and stiffness coefficients of the materials constituting the waveguide. Moreover, we pay more attention to analyze the wave multiplexer and DE-multiplexer in the 2D mass spring system. We show that two of these tunable waveguides with alternating materials can be employed to filter and separate specific frequencies from a broad band input signal. The presented simulation data is validated through comparison with the published research, and can be extended in the development of resonators and MEMS verification.

  12. A 2D zinc-organic network being easily exfoliated into isolated sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guihong; Li, Ruiqing; Leng, Zhihua; Gan, Shucai

    2016-08-01

    A metal-organic aggregate, namely {Zn2Cl2(BBC)}n (BBC = 4,4‧,4‧‧-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diyl))tribenzoate) was obtained by solvothermal synthesis. Its structure is featured with the Zn2(COO)3 paddle-wheels with two chloride anions on axial positions and hexagonal pores in the layers. The exclusion of water in the precursor and the solvent plays a crucial role in the formation of target compound. This compound can be easily dissolved in alkaline solution and exfoliated into isolated sheets, which shows a novel way for the preparation of 2D materials.

  13. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  14. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-31

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  15. Metal-organic extended 2D structures: Fe-PTCDA on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Lucía; Peláez, Samuel; Caillard, Renaud; Serena, Pedro A; Martín-Gago, José A; Méndez, Javier

    2010-07-30

    In this work we combine organic molecules of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) with iron atoms on an Au (111) substrate in ultra-high vacuum conditions at different temperatures. By means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) we study the formation of stable 2D metal-organic structures. We show that at certain growth conditions (temperature, time and coverage) stable 'ladder-like' nanostructures are obtained. These are the result of connecting together two metal-organic chains through PTCDA molecules placed perpendicularly, as rungs of a ladder. These structures, stable up to 450 K, can be extended in a 2D layer covering the entire surface and presenting different rotation domains. STM images at both polarities show a contrast reversal between the two molecules at the unit cell. By means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we confirm the stability of these structures and that their molecular orbitals are placed separately at the different molecules.

  16. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  17. Facial Sketch Synthesis Using 2D Direct Combined Model-Based Face-Specific Markov Network.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ching-Ting; Chan, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Chung

    2016-08-01

    A facial sketch synthesis system is proposed, featuring a 2D direct combined model (2DDCM)-based face-specific Markov network. In contrast to the existing facial sketch synthesis systems, the proposed scheme aims to synthesize sketches, which reproduce the unique drawing style of a particular artist, where this drawing style is learned from a data set consisting of a large number of image/sketch pairwise training samples. The synthesis system comprises three modules, namely, a global module, a local module, and an enhancement module. The global module applies a 2DDCM approach to synthesize the global facial geometry and texture of the input image. The detailed texture is then added to the synthesized sketch in a local patch-based manner using a parametric 2DDCM model and a non-parametric Markov random field (MRF) network. Notably, the MRF approach gives the synthesized results an appearance more consistent with the drawing style of the training samples, while the 2DDCM approach enables the synthesis of outcomes with a more derivative style. As a result, the similarity between the synthesized sketches and the input images is greatly improved. Finally, a post-processing operation is performed to enhance the shadowed regions of the synthesized image by adding strong lines or curves to emphasize the lighting conditions. The experimental results confirm that the synthesized facial images are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the input images as well as the ground-truth sketches provided by the same artist. The representing power of the proposed framework is demonstrated by synthesizing facial sketches from input images with a wide variety of facial poses, lighting conditions, and races even when such images are not included in the training data set. Moreover, the practical applicability of the proposed framework is demonstrated by means of automatic facial recognition tests.

  18. Fabrication of 2D and 3D photonic structures using laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaso, P.; Jandura, D.; Pudis, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate possibilities of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology based on two photon polymerization. We used three-dimensional dip-in direct-laser-writing (DLW) optical lithography to fabricate 2D and 3D optical structures for optoelectronics and for optical sensing applications. DLW lithography allows us use a non conventional way how to couple light into the waveguide structure. We prepared ring resonator and we investigated its transmission spectral characteristic. We present 3D inverse opal structure from its design to printing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. Finally, SEM images of some prepared photonic crystal structures were performed.

  19. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  20. Segmentation of Textures Defined on Flat vs. Layered Surfaces using Neural Networks: Comparison of 2D vs. 3D Representations.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sejong; Choe, Yoonsuck

    2007-08-01

    Texture boundary detection (or segmentation) is an important capability in human vision. Usually, texture segmentation is viewed as a 2D problem, as the definition of the problem itself assumes a 2D substrate. However, an interesting hypothesis emerges when we ask a question regarding the nature of textures: What are textures, and why did the ability to discriminate texture evolve or develop? A possible answer to this question is that textures naturally define physically distinct (i.e., occluded) surfaces. Hence, we can hypothesize that 2D texture segmentation may be an outgrowth of the ability to discriminate surfaces in 3D. In this paper, we conducted computational experiments with artificial neural networks to investigate the relative difficulty of learning to segment textures defined on flat 2D surfaces vs. those in 3D configurations where the boundaries are defined by occluding surfaces and their change over time due to the observer's motion. It turns out that learning is faster and more accurate in 3D, very much in line with our expectation. Furthermore, our results showed that the neural network's learned ability to segment texture in 3D transfers well into 2D texture segmentation, bolstering our initial hypothesis, and providing insights on the possible developmental origin of 2D texture segmentation function in human vision.

  1. A Deformed Shape Monitoring Model for Building Structures Based on a 2D Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Bub Ryur; Lee, Hong Min; Kim, Yousok; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-01-01

    High-rise buildings subjected to lateral loads such as wind and earthquake loads must be checked not to exceed the limits on the maximum lateral displacement or the maximum inter-story drift ratios. In this paper, a sensing model for deformed shapes of a building structure in motion is presented. The deformed shape sensing model based on a 2D scanner consists of five modules: (1) module for acquiring coordinate information of a point in a building; (2) module for coordinate transformation and data arrangement for generation of time history of the point; (3) module for smoothing by adjacent averaging technique; (4) module for generation of the displacement history for each story and deformed shape of a building, and (5) module for evaluation of the serviceability of a building. The feasibility of the sensing model based on a 2D laser scanner is tested through free vibration tests of a three-story steel frame structure with a relatively high slenderness ratio of 5.0. Free vibration responses measured from both laser displacement sensors and a 2D laser scanner are compared. In the experimentation, the deformed shapes were obtained from three different methods: the model based on the 2D laser scanner, the direct measurement based on laser displacement sensors, and the numerical method using acceleration data and the displacements from GPS. As a result, it is confirmed that the deformed shape measurement model based on a 2D laser scanner can be a promising alternative for high-rise buildings where installation of laser displacement sensors is impossible. PMID:23698269

  2. The influence of pressure on the structure of a 2D uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Elinor C.; Ross, Nancy L.; Surbella, Robert G.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2014-10-15

    We report the first quantitative analysis of the structural evolution of a uranyl bearing coordination polymer in response to pressure. The material that is central to this study, (UO{sub 2})(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CO{sub 2}H) (1), is constructed from rigid 2D inorganic layers comprising edge sharing UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids cross-linked by [PO{sub 3}(COOH)]{sup 2−} anions. Strong hydrogen bonding interactions exist between the pendent carboxylic acid groups on adjacent layers. Under pressure, 1 exhibits compressional behaviour primarily in the direction perpendicular to the inorganic layers, which is aided by a reduction in the interlayer distance and shifting of the layers with respect to each other. The bulk modulus for the 2D compound 1 is unexpectedly high [18.1(1) GPa] and is within the range reported for 3D CPs assembled from Zn{sup II} cations and inflexible imidazolate anions, and is at the lower end of the range of moduli observed for aluminosilicate zeolites (19–59 GPa). - Graphical Abstract: The compression mechanism and elastic constants for a 2D Uranium(VI) carboxyphosphonoate compound are reported. - Highlights: • The response to pressure of a uranium carboxyphosphonoate compound has been studied. • High-pressure single-crystal XRD data for this 2D uranium compound were collected. • Elastic constants for this material have been determined. • The compression mechanism for the compound has been elucidated.

  3. Lipid-gramicidin interactions: dynamic structure of the boundary lipid by 2D-ELDOR.

    PubMed

    Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Crepeau, Richard H; Borbat, Petr P; Ge, Mingtao; Freed, Jack H

    2003-05-01

    The use of 2D-electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) for the characterization of the boundary lipid in membrane vesicles of DPPC and gramicidin A' (GA) is reported. We show that 2D-ELDOR, with its enhanced spectral resolution to dynamic structure as compared with continuous-wave electron spin resonance, provides a reliable and useful way of studying lipid-protein interactions. The 2D-ELDOR spectra of the end-chain spin label 16-PC in DPPC/GA vesicles is composed of two components, which are assigned to the bulk lipids (with sharp auto peaks and crosspeaks) and to the boundary lipids (with broad auto peaks). Their distinction is clearest for higher temperatures and higher GA concentrations. The quantitative analysis of these spectra shows relatively faster motions and very low ordering for the end chain of the bulk lipids, whereas the boundary lipids show very high "y-ordering" and slower motions. The y-ordering represents a dynamic bending at the end of the boundary lipid acyl chain, which can then coat the GA molecules. These results are consistent with the previous studies by Ge and Freed (1999) using continuous-wave electron spin resonance, thereby supporting their model for GA aggregation and H(II) phase formation for high GA concentrations. Improved instrumental and simulation methods have been employed.

  4. Hydrogen-bond-assisted "gold cold fusion" for fabrication of 2D web structures.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Saikat; Shundo, Atsuomi; Acharya, Somobrata; Hill, Jonathan P; Ji, Qingmin; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2009-07-06

    Keeping their cool: Fabrication of a 2D weblike nanonetwork of gold was successfully demonstrated through a two-step procedure including complexation of gold precursors to a weblike supramolecular assembly of surfactant followed by in situ reduction of the precursors to gold. Molecular assemblies stabilized by hydrogen bonding provided a sound template, leading to the highly integrated structure of gold through room-temperature (cold) nanostructure fusion.

  5. Well-defined azazirconacyclopropane complexes supported on silica structurally determined by 2D NMR comparative elucidation.

    PubMed

    El Eter, Mohamad; Hamzaoui, Bilel; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Pelletier, Jérémie D A; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-05-21

    Grafting of Zr(NMe2)4 on mesoporous silica SBA-15 afforded selectively well-defined surface species [triple bond, length as m-dash]SiOZr(NMe2)(η2NMeCH2). 2D solid-state NMR ((1)H-(13)C HETCOR, Multiple Quantum) experiments have shown a unique structural rearrangement occurring on the immobilised zirconium bis methylamido ligand.

  6. Molecular tectonics: design of 2-D networks by simultaneous use of charge-assisted hydrogen and coordination bonds.

    PubMed

    Carpanese, Cristina; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Henry, Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2009-11-28

    Using a combination of charge-assisted H- and coordination-bonds, a tetra component system composed of a dicationic and a dianionic organic tecton, Ag(+) cation and XF(6)(-) (X= P, As, Sb) anion behaves as planned and leads to the formation of 2-D isostructural networks for which the energetic contributions of the two recognition events dominate the construction process.

  7. Formats and Network Protocols for Browser Access to 2D Raster Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesea, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tiled web maps in browsers are a major success story, forming the foundation of many current web applications. Enabling tiled data access is the next logical step, and is likely to meet with similar success. Many ad-hoc approaches have already started to appear, and something similar is explored within the Open Geospatial Consortium. One of the main obstacles in making browser data access a reality is the lack of a well-known data format. This obstacle also represents an opportunity to analyze the requirements and possible candidates, applying lessons learned from web tiled image services and protocols. Similar to the image counterpart, a web tile raster data format needs to have good intrinsic compression and be able to handle high byte count data types including floating point. An overview of a possible solution to the format problem, a 2D data raster compression algorithm called Limited Error Raster Compression (LERC) will be presented. In addition to the format, best practices for high request rate HTTP services also need to be followed. In particular, content delivery network (CDN) caching suitability needs to be part of any design, not an after-thought. Last but not least, HTML 5 browsers will certainly be part of any solution since they provide improved access to binary data, as well as more powerful ways to view and interact with the data in the browser. In a simple but relevant application, digital elevation model (DEM) raster data is served as LERC compressed data tiles which are used to generate terrain by a HTML5 scene viewer.

  8. Locally adaptive 2D-3D registration using vascular structure model for liver catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Jeongjin; Chung, Jin Wook; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) registration between intra-operative 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pre-operative 3D computed tomography angiography (CTA) can be used for roadmapping purposes. However, through the projection of 3D vessels, incorrect intersections and overlaps between vessels are produced because of the complex vascular structure, which makes it difficult to obtain the correct solution of 2D-3D registration. To overcome these problems, we propose a registration method that selects a suitable part of a 3D vascular structure for a given DSA image and finds the optimized solution to the partial 3D structure. The proposed algorithm can reduce the registration errors because it restricts the range of the 3D vascular structure for the registration by using only the relevant 3D vessels with the given DSA. To search for the appropriate 3D partial structure, we first construct a tree model of the 3D vascular structure and divide it into several subtrees in accordance with the connectivity. Then, the best matched subtree with the given DSA image is selected using the results from the coarse registration between each subtree and the vessels in the DSA image. Finally, a fine registration is conducted to minimize the difference between the selected subtree and the vessels of the DSA image. In experimental results obtained using 10 clinical datasets, the average distance errors in the case of the proposed method were 2.34±1.94mm. The proposed algorithm converges faster and produces more correct results than the conventional method in evaluations on patient datasets.

  9. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements of reciprocal space structure of 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Guo, F-W; Lu, T-M; Wang, G-C

    2016-12-02

    Knowledge on the symmetry and perfection of a 2D material deposited or transferred to a surface is very important and valuable. We demonstrate a method to map the reciprocal space structure of 2D materials using reflection high energy diffraction (RHEED). RHEED from a 2D material gives rise to 'streaks' patterns. It is shown that from these streaks patterns at different azimuthal rotation angles that the reciprocal space intensity distribution can be constructed as a function of momentum transfer parallel to the surface. To illustrate the principle, we experimentally constructed the reciprocal space structure of a commercial graphene/SiO2/Si sample in which the graphene layer was transferred to the SiO2/Si substrate after it was deposited on a Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition. The result reveals a 12-fold symmetry of the graphene layer which is a result of two dominant orientation domains with 30° rotation relative to each other. We show that the graphene can serve as a template to grow other materials such as a SnS film that follows the symmetry of graphene.

  10. 1d, 2d, and 3d periodic structures: Electromagnetic characterization, design, and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockett, Timothy John

    Periodic structures have many useful applications in electromagnetics including phased arrays, frequency selective surfaces, and absorbing interfaces. Their unique properties can be used to provide increased performance in antenna gain, electromagnetic propagation, and electromagnetic absorption. In antenna arrays, repeating elements create a larger eective aperture, increasing the gain of the antenna and the ability to scan the direction of the main beam. Three-dimensional periodic structures, such as an array of shaped pillars such as columns, cones, or prisms have the potential of improving electromagnetic absorption, improving performance in applications such as solar cell eciency and absorbing interfaces. Furthermore, research into periodic structures is a continuing endeavor where novel approaches and analysis in appropriate applications can be sought. This dissertation will address the analysis, diagnostics, and enhancement of 1D, 2D, and 3D periodic structures for antenna array applications and solar cell technology. In particular, a unique approach to array design will be introduced to prevent the appearance of undesirable grating lobes in large antenna arrays that employ subarrays. This approach, named the distortion diagnostic procedure, can apply directly to 1D and 2D periodic structures in the form of planar antenna arrays. Interesting corollaries included here are developments in millimeter-wave antenna measurements including spiral planar scanning, phaseless measurements, and addressing antennas that feature an internal source. Finally, analysis and enhancement of 3D periodic structures in nanostructure photovoltaic arrays and absorbing interfaces will be examined for their behavior and basic operation in regards to improved absorption of electromagnetic waves.

  11. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  12. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-12

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  13. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers. PMID:27403589

  14. Structural transformation in monolayer materials: a 2D to 1D transformation.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Kasra; Attariani, Hamed; LeSar, Richard A

    2016-07-20

    Reducing the dimensions of materials to atomic scales results in a large portion of atoms being at or near the surface, with lower bond order and thus higher energy. At such scales, reduction of the surface energy and surface stresses can be the driving force for the formation of new low-dimensional nanostructures, and may be exhibited through surface relaxation and/or surface reconstruction, which can be utilized for tailoring the properties and phase transformation of nanomaterials without applying any external load. Here we used atomistic simulations and revealed an intrinsic structural transformation in monolayer materials that lowers their dimension from 2D nanosheets to 1D nanostructures to reduce their surface and elastic energies. Experimental evidence of such transformation has also been revealed for one of the predicted nanostructures. Such transformation plays an important role in bi-/multi-layer 2D materials.

  15. Detection and assessment of damage in 2D structures using measured modal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banan, Mohammad Reza; Mehdi-pour, Yousef

    2007-10-01

    Motivated by one of the concepts in the field of health monitoring for structural systems, a damage detection procedure is developed. In order to perform the system health monitoring, structural health along with sensor and actuator malfunction must be continuously checked. As a step toward developing a system health-monitoring scheme, this paper investigated structural damage detection, using a constrained eigenstructure assignment. The proposed damage detection method is constructed based on a concept of control theory and subspace rotation for two-dimensional (2D)-structural systems. To demonstrate the capabilities of the developed damage detection algorithm, the behavior of a simulated degraded braced-frame structure is studied. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the performance of the approach is evaluated. It shows that the proposed algorithm is potentially promising for application to real cases.

  16. Robust 2D principal component analysis: a structured sparsity regularized approach.

    PubMed

    Yipeng Sun; Xiaoming Tao; Yang Li; Jianhua Lu

    2015-08-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is widely used to extract features and reduce dimensionality in various computer vision and image/video processing tasks. Conventional approaches either lack robustness to outliers and corrupted data or are designed for one-dimensional signals. To address this problem, we propose a robust PCA model for two-dimensional images incorporating structured sparse priors, referred to as structured sparse 2D-PCA. This robust model considers the prior of structured and grouped pixel values in two dimensions. As the proposed formulation is jointly nonconvex and nonsmooth, which is difficult to tackle by joint optimization, we develop a two-stage alternating minimization approach to solve the problem. This approach iteratively learns the projection matrices by bidirectional decomposition and utilizes the proximal method to obtain the structured sparse outliers. By considering the structured sparsity prior, the proposed model becomes less sensitive to noisy data and outliers in two dimensions. Moreover, the computational cost indicates that the robust two-dimensional model is capable of processing quarter common intermediate format video in real time, as well as handling large-size images and videos, which is often intractable with other robust PCA approaches that involve image-to-vector conversion. Experimental results on robust face reconstruction, video background subtraction data set, and real-world videos show the effectiveness of the proposed model compared with conventional 2D-PCA and other robust PCA algorithms.

  17. Allosteric pathway identification through network analysis: from molecular dynamics simulations to interactive 2D and 3D graphs.

    PubMed

    Allain, Ariane; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Langenfeld, Florent; Guarracino, Yann; Laine, Elodie; Tchertanov, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Allostery is a universal phenomenon that couples the information induced by a local perturbation (effector) in a protein to spatially distant regulated sites. Such an event can be described in terms of a large scale transmission of information (communication) through a dynamic coupling between structurally rigid (minimally frustrated) and plastic (locally frustrated) clusters of residues. To elaborate a rational description of allosteric coupling, we propose an original approach - MOdular NETwork Analysis (MONETA) - based on the analysis of inter-residue dynamical correlations to localize the propagation of both structural and dynamical effects of a perturbation throughout a protein structure. MONETA uses inter-residue cross-correlations and commute times computed from molecular dynamics simulations and a topological description of a protein to build a modular network representation composed of clusters of residues (dynamic segments) linked together by chains of residues (communication pathways). MONETA provides a brand new direct and simple visualization of protein allosteric communication. A GEPHI module implemented in the MONETA package allows the generation of 2D graphs of the communication network. An interactive PyMOL plugin permits drawing of the communication pathways between chosen protein fragments or residues on a 3D representation. MONETA is a powerful tool for on-the-fly display of communication networks in proteins. We applied MONETA for the analysis of communication pathways (i) between the main regulatory fragments of receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs), KIT and CSF-1R, in the native and mutated states and (ii) in proteins STAT5 (STAT5a and STAT5b) in the phosphorylated and the unphosphorylated forms. The description of the physical support for allosteric coupling by MONETA allowed a comparison of the mechanisms of (a) constitutive activation induced by equivalent mutations in two RTKs and (b) allosteric regulation in the activated and non

  18. Investigating fold structures of 2D materials by quantitative transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zengming; Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-04-01

    We report an approach developed for deriving 3D structural information of 2D membrane folds based on the recently-established quantitative transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Systematic multislice simulations reveal that the membrane folding leads to sufficiently strong electron scattering which enables a precise determination of bending radius. The image contrast depends also on the folding angles of 2D materials due to the variation of projection potentials, which however exerts much smaller effect compared with the bending radii. DFT calculations show that folded edges are typically characteristic of (fractional) nanotubes with the same curvature retained after energy optimization. Owing to the exclusion of Stobbs factor issue, numerical simulations were directly used in comparison with the experimental measurements on an absolute contrast scale, which results in a successful determination of bending radius of folded monolayer MoS2 films. The method should be applicable to characterizing all 2D membranes with 3D folding features.

  19. Biaxial Stretchability and Transparency of Ag Nanowire 2D Mass-Spring Networks Prepared by Floating Compression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung Soo; Pyo, Jun Beom; Son, Jeong Gon; Zi, Goangseup; Lee, Sang-Soo; Park, Jong Hyuk; Lee, Jonghwi

    2017-03-29

    Networks of silver nanowires (Ag NWs) have been considered as promising materials for stretchable and transparent conductors. Despite various improvements of their optoelectronic and electromechanical properties over the past few years, Ag NW networks with a sufficient stretchability in multiple directions that is essential for the accommodation of the multidirectional strains of human movement have seldom been reported. For this paper, biaxially stretchable, transparent conductors were developed based on 2D mass-spring networks of wavy Ag NWs. Inspired by the traditional papermaking process, the 2D wavy networks were produced by floating Ag NW networks on the surface of water and subsequently applying biaxial compression to them. It was demonstrated that this floating-compression process can reduce the friction between the Ag NW-water interfaces, providing a uniform and isotropic in-plane waviness for the networks without buckling or cracking. The resulting Ag NW networks that were transferred onto elastomeric substrates successfully acted as conductors with an excellent transparency, conductivity, and electromechanical stability under a biaxial strain of 30%. The strain sensors that are based on the prepared conductors demonstrated a great potential for the enhanced performances of future wearable devices.

  20. Artificial neural networks and model-based recognition of 3-D objects from 2-D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chih-Ho; Dhawan, Atam P.

    1992-09-01

    A computer vision system is developed for 3-D object recognition using artificial neural networks and a knowledge-based top-down feedback analysis system. This computer vision system can adequately analyze an incomplete edge map provided by a low-level processor for 3-D representation and recognition using key features. The key features are selected using a priority assignment and then used in an artificial neural network for matching with model key features. The result of such matching is utilized in generating the model-driven top-down feedback analysis. From the incomplete edge map we try to pick a candidate pattern utilizing the key feature priority assignment. The highest priority is given for the most connected node and associated features. The features are space invariant structures and sets of orientation for edge primitives. These features are now mapped into real numbers. A Hopfield network is then applied with two levels of matching to reduce the search time. The first match is to choose the class of possible model, the second match is then to find the model closest to the data patterns. This model is then rotated in 3-D to find the best match with the incomplete edge patterns and to provide the additional features in 3-D. In the case of multiple objects, a dynamically interconnected search strategy is designed to recognize objects using one pattern at a time. This strategy is also useful in recognizing occluded objects. The experimental results presented show the capability and effectiveness of this system.

  1. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    DOE PAGES

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; ...

    2016-03-25

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. Furthermore, the hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g–1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.

  2. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene).

    PubMed

    Mashtalir, O; Lukatskaya, M R; Kolesnikov, A I; Raymundo-Piñero, E; Naguib, M; Barsoum, M W; Gogotsi, Y

    2016-04-28

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g(-1) in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.

  3. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  4. Using artificial neural networks to invert 2D DC resistivity imaging data for high resistivity contrast regions: A MATLAB application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyamadpour, Ahmad; Taib, Samsudin; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2009-11-01

    MATLAB is a high-level matrix/array language with control flow statements and functions. MATLAB has several useful toolboxes to solve complex problems in various fields of science, such as geophysics. In geophysics, the inversion of 2D DC resistivity imaging data is complex due to its non-linearity, especially for high resistivity contrast regions. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of MATLAB to design, train and test a newly developed artificial neural network in inverting 2D DC resistivity imaging data. We used resilient propagation to train the network. The model used to produce synthetic data is a homogeneous medium of 100 Ω m resistivity with an embedded anomalous body of 1000 Ω m. The location of the anomalous body was moved to different positions within the homogeneous model mesh elements. The synthetic data were generated using a finite element forward modeling code by means of the RES2DMOD. The network was trained using 21 datasets and tested on another 16 synthetic datasets, as well as on real field data. In field data acquisition, the cable covers 120 m between the first and the last take-out, with a 3 m x-spacing. Three different electrode spacings were measured, which gave a dataset of 330 data points. The interpreted result shows that the trained network was able to invert 2D electrical resistivity imaging data obtained by a Wenner-Schlumberger configuration rapidly and accurately.

  5. Estimation of 3-D pore network coordination number of rocks from watershed segmentation of a single 2-D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, Arash; Ayatollahi, Shahab; Kharrat, Riyaz; Dashti, Nader

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we have utilized 3-D micro-tomography images of real and synthetic rocks to introduce two mathematical correlations which estimate the distribution parameters of 3-D coordination number using a single 2-D cross-sectional image. By applying a watershed segmentation algorithm, it is found that the distribution of 3-D coordination number is acceptably predictable by statistical analysis of the network extracted from 2-D images. In this study, we have utilized 25 volumetric images of rocks in order to propose two mathematical formulas. These formulas aim to approximate the average and standard deviation of coordination number in 3-D pore networks. Then, the formulas are applied for five independent test samples to evaluate the reliability. Finally, pore network flow modeling is used to find the error of absolute permeability prediction using estimated and measured coordination numbers. Results show that the 2-D images are considerably informative about the 3-D network of the rocks and can be utilized to approximate the 3-D connectivity of the porous spaces with determination coefficient of about 0.85 that seems to be acceptable considering the variety of the studied samples.

  6. Tight-Binding Approximations in 1D and 2D Coupled-Cavity Photonic Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Nicole C. L.

    Light confinement and controlling an optical field has numerous applications in the field of telecommunications for optical signals processing. When the wavelength of the electromagnetic field is on the order of the period of a photonic microstructure, the field undergoes reflection, refraction, and coherent scattering. This produces photonic bandgaps, forbidden frequency regions or spectral stop bands where light cannot exist. Dielectric perturbations that break the perfect periodicity of these structures produce what is analogous to an impurity state in the bandgap of a semiconductor. The defect modes that exist at discrete frequencies within the photonic bandgap are spatially localized about the cavity-defects in the photonic crystal. In this thesis the properties of two tight-binding approximations (TBAs) are investigated in one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled-cavity photonic crystal structures. We require an efficient and simple approach that ensures the continuity of the electromagnetic field across dielectric interfaces in complex structures. In this thesis we develop E- and D-TBAs to calculate the modes in finite 1D and 2D two-defect coupled-cavity photonic crystal structures. In the E- and D-TBAs we expand the coupled-cavity [vector electron]-modes in terms of the individual [vector electron]- and [vector D meson]-modes, respectively. We investigate the dependence of the defect modes, their frequencies and quality factors on the relative placement of the defects in the photonic crystal structures. We then elucidate the differences between the two TBA formulations, and describe the conditions under which these formulations may be more robust when encountering a dielectric perturbation. Our 1D analysis showed that the 1D modes were sensitive to the structure geometry. The antisymmetric D mode amplitudes show that the D. TBA did not capture the correct (tangential [vector electron]-field) boundary conditions. However, the D-TBA did not yield

  7. A New Family of 2-D Optical Orthogonal Codes and Analysis of Its Performance in Optical CDMA Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurong, Sun; Yin, Hongxi; Wang, Ziyu; Xu, Anshi

    2006-04-01

    A new family of two-dimensional optical orthogonal code (2-D OOC), one-coincidence frequency hop code (OCFHC)/OOC, which employs OCFHC and OOC as wavelengthhopping and time-spreading patterns, respectively, is proposed in this paper. In contrary to previously constructed 2-D OOCs, OCFHC/OOC provides more choices on the number of available wavelengths and its cardinality achieves the upper bound in theory without sacrificing good auto-and-cross correlation properties, i.e., the correlation properties of the code is still ideal. Meanwhile, we utilize a new method, called effective normalized throughput, to compare the performance of diverse codes applicable to optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) systems besides conventional measure bit error rate, and the results indicate that our code performs better than obtained OCDMA codes and is truly applicable to OCDMA networks as multiaccess codes and will greatly facilitate the implementation of OCDMA access networks.

  8. Extrapolation of fractal dimensions of natural fracture networks in dolomites from 1-D to 2-D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbovšek, T.

    2009-04-01

    Fractal dimensions of fracture networks (D) are usually determined from 2-D objects, like the digitized fracture traces in outcrops. Sometimes, extrapolations to higher dimensions are required if the measurements (for example fracture traces in the boreholes or in the scanlines) are performed in 1-D environment (D1-D) and are later upscaled to higher dimensions (D2-D). For isotropic fractals this relation should be straight-forward according to the theory: D2-D = D1-D +1, as the intersection of a 2-D fractal with a plane results in a fractal with D1-D equal to D2-D minus one. Some authors have questioned this relation and proposed different empirical relationships. Still, there exist very few field studies of natural fracture networks to support or test such a relationship. The study was therefore focused on the analysis of 23 natural fracture networks in Triassic dolomites in Slovenia. The traces of these fractures were analyzed separately in both 1-D and 2-D environments, and relationships between the obtained fractal dimensions were determined. For 2-D data, the digitized images of fracture traces in 2048x2048 pixel resolution were analyzed by the box-counting method, considering truncation and censoring effects (the 'cut-off' method, using only the valid data right of the cut-off points) and also by considering the complete data range interval (the 'full' method). These values were consequently compared to 1-D values. Those were obtained by dissecting images in both x- and y-directions into 2048 smaller linear images of 1-pixel width, simulating the intersection with a plane. Such line images were then examined by the fracture line-counting method, a 1-D equivalent of the box-counting technique. Results show that the values of all fractal dimensions, regardless of the different fracture networks or the method used, lie in a very narrow data range, and the standard deviations are very small (up to 0.03). The small range can be attributed to a similar fracturing

  9. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, M. R.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.; Naguib, M.; Barsoum, M. W.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization methods, additional XRD patterns (Fig. S1) and INS spectra (Fig. S2-S4). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01462c

  10. 2D warp-and-woof interwoven networks constructed by helical chains with different chirality.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuhua; Guo, Yang; OuYang, Yan; Liu, Zhanquan; Liao, Daizheng; Cheng, Peng; Yan, Shiping; Jiang, Zonghui

    2007-09-21

    Two unprecedented 2D entangled layers of warp-and-woof threads interwoven by left- and right-handed helical chains, {[Mn(salen)Au(CN)2]4(H2O)}n (salen = N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylideneaminato)) and {Mn(acacen)Ag(CN)2}n (acacen = N,N'-ethylenebis(acetylacetonylideneiminate)) 2, have been synthesized and characterized.

  11. Two 2D Cd(II) coordination polymers based on asymmetrical Schiff-base ligand: synthesis, crystal structures and luminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Dang, Dong-Bin; Li, Meng-Meng; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Rui-Min

    2013-02-15

    Two new two-dimensional coordination polymers [Cd(3)L(2)(SCN)(6)](n) (1) and [CdLI(2)](n) (2) have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, TG technique, XRPD and complete single crystal structure analysis, where L is 4-(pyridine-2-yl)methyleneamino-1,2,4-trizaole. Asymmetrical Schiff-base ligand L with five- and six-membered N-containing heterocyclic rings acts as a tridentate bridging ligand to bind two Cd(II) centers through one terminal N(triazolyl) and one pyridylimine chelate unit in 1 and 2. For polymer 1, tridentate bridging ligands link Cd-(1,3-μ-SCN(-)) 1D inorganic chains to form a 2D layer network. The existence of C-H···π and π-π stacking interactions between 2D hybrid layers further gives rise to a 3D supramolecular network. In comparison with 1, polymer 2 shows a 2D layer network containing hexanuclear macrometallacyclic units. The 2D layers are staggered together through the combination of C-H···π and π-π stacking interactions and forming a 3D supramolecular structure. The luminescent properties of the polymers 1 and 2 were investigated in the solid state at room temperature.

  12. Effects of Strike on Automatic Depth Estimation for 2D Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastani, M.; Kero, L.; Pedersen, L. B.; Johansson, R.

    2006-12-01

    Many analysis methods have been developed to process densely sampled magnetic and/or gravity data to estimate source parameters. Werner deconvolution (Werner, 1953), analytic signal (Nabighian, 1972) and Euler deconvolution(Thompson, 1983) are among the most popular methods. They work either on profile data (Bastani and Pedersen, 2001) or on a regular grid (Thurston et al., 2002). All methods developed to estimate source parameters of the 2D magnetic structures work in the strike co-ordinate system. Werner deconvolution makes use of profile data to locate and compute the depth to the top and dip of thin sheets (dikes) with infinite strike and depth extent. Nabighian (1972) introduced the analytic signal to calculate the dip and depth to a set of 2D magnetic sources. The strike angle is assumed to be the same for all the magnetic anomalies along the profile. These methods use the horizontal and vertical derivatives of the total magnetic field to estimate the source parameters. While the vertical derivative is independent of strike direction the horizontal derivative is proportional to the sine of the angle between the profile and strike directions: the profile angle. Bastani and Pedersen (2001) used the analytic signal of the total magnetic field anomaly along a profile to estimate the dip, depth, width and strike of dikes. They introduced a method to estimate the strike of various anomalies at selected points along profiles by searching for coherent signals in neighboring profiles. Here we have used the same method to estimate strike of 2D anomalies. In order to illustrate the importance of strike angle on the estimated source parameters we have constructed synthetic data from a model that comprises a set of thin dikes with the same physical characteristics but with different strikes. We then applied 2D Werner deconvolution, 2D analytic signal (by Bastani and Pedersen), 2D and 3D Euler deconvolution to the data set. As expected the depth estimates are highly biased

  13. Structural and magnetic properties of DyMn(2)D(6) synthesized under high deuterium pressure.

    PubMed

    Paul-Boncour, V; Filipek, S M; Wierzbicki, R; André, G; Bourée, F; Guillot, M

    2009-01-07

    DyMn(2)D(6) has been prepared by applying high gaseous deuterium pressure on DyMn(2). This phase is isostructural with other RMn(2)D(6) (R = Y, Er) compounds and crystallizes with a K(2)PtCl(6) type structure having an ordered anion and a partially disordered cation arrangement because Dy and half the Mn atoms are randomly substituted in the same 8c site. The reverse susceptibility follows a Curie-Weiss law with an effective moment of 10 μ(B) similar to that of DyMn(2). Short range magnetic order, corresponding to ferromagnetic correlations, is observed in the neutron patterns up to 10 K and can be attributed to Dy-Dy interactions. The decomposition of the deuteride into Mn and DyD(2), studied by thermal gravimetric analysis, occurs between 470 and 650 K. A further deuterium desorption takes place above 920 K.

  14. Structure and interaction in 2D assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Wang. S.; Masafumi, F.; Checco, A.; Zhongwei, N.; Wang, Q.

    2009-08-27

    We created two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) and characterized their structures using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray scattering. The TMVs were adsorbed on an oppositely charged, fluid lipid monolayer supported by a solid substrate and submerged in a buffer solution. The lipid monolayer confined the viral particles within a plane, while providing them with lateral mobility so that overall the TMV assembly behaved like a 2D liquid. We controlled the inter-particle interaction by adjusting the chemical condition in the buffer to induce ordered TMV assemblies. We found that the presence of the lipid layer was essential for forming ordered TMV assemblies. Packed TMV assemblies formed on the lipid layer, with an average inter-particle spacing of 42 nm. By introducing Ca2+ ions into the buffer solution, we were able to improve the in-plane order within the TMV assemblies and reduce the average inter-particle spacing to 20 nm, compared to the TMV diameter of 18 nm. Quantitative analysis of the X-ray scattering data shows that the structural order within the TMV assemblies prepared under a Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer solution is consistent with purely repulsive, electrostatic inter-particle interaction. In contrast, the structural order within Ca{sup 2+}-induced TMV assemblies is consistent with the behavior of a fluid of sticky rods, implying the presence of a strong attraction between TMVs. In addition to the screening of Coulomb repulsion, this behavior is likely the result of counterion-induced as well as membrane-mediated attractions.

  15. Structure and Interaction in 2D Assemblies of Tobacco Mosaic Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuto, M.; Yang, L.; Wang, S.; Fukuto, M.; Checco, A.; Niu, Z.; Wang, Q.

    2009-12-07

    We created two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) and characterized their structures using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray scattering. The TMVs were adsorbed on an oppositely charged, fluid lipid monolayer supported by a solid substrate and submerged in a buffer solution. The lipid monolayer confined the viral particles within a plane, while providing them with lateral mobility so that overall the TMV assembly behaved like a 2D liquid. We controlled the inter-particle interaction by adjusting the chemical condition in the buffer to induce ordered TMV assemblies. We found that the presence of the lipid layer was essential for forming ordered TMV assemblies. Packed TMV assemblies formed on the lipid layer, with an average inter-particle spacing of 42 nm. By introducing Ca{sup 2+} ions into the buffer solution, we were able to improve the in-plane order within the TMV assemblies and reduce the average inter-particle spacing to 20 nm, compared to the TMV diameter of 18 nm. Quantitative analysis of the X-ray scattering data shows that the structural order within the TMV assemblies prepared under a Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer solution is consistent with purely repulsive, electrostatic inter-particle interaction. In contrast, the structural order within Ca{sup 2+}-induced TMV assemblies is consistent with the behavior of a fluid of sticky rods, implying the presence of a strong attraction between TMVs. In addition to the screening of Coulomb repulsion, this behavior is likely the result of counterion-induced as well as membrane-mediated attractions.

  16. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    SciTech Connect

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Raymundo-Pinero, E.; Naguib, Michael; Barsoum, M. W.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2016-03-25

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. Furthermore, the hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g–1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.

  17. A novel simple procedure to consider seismic soil structure interaction effects in 2D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Juan Diego; Gómez, Juan David; Restrepo, Doriam; Rivera, Santiago

    2014-09-01

    A method is proposed to estimate the seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) effects for use in engineering practice. It is applicable to 2D structures subjected to vertically incident shear waves supported by homogenous half-spaces. The method is attractive since it keeps the simplicity of the spectral approach, overcomes some of the difficulties and inaccuracies of existing classical techniques and yet it considers a physically consistent excitation. This level of simplicity is achieved through a response spectra modification factor that can be applied to the free-field 5%-damped response spectra to yield design spectral ordinates that take into account the scattered motions introduced by the interaction effects. The modification factor is representative of the Transfer Function (TF) between the structural relative displacements and the free-field motion, which is described in terms of its maximum amplitude and associated frequency. Expressions to compute the modification factor by practicing engineers are proposed based upon a parametric study using 576 cases representative of actual structures. The method is tested in 10 cases spanning a wide range of common fundamental vibration periods.

  18. Molecular tectonics: p-H-thiacalix[4]arene pyridyl appended positional isomers as tectons for the formation of 1D and 2D mercury coordination networks.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikov, A; Ferlay, S; Solovieva, S E; Antipin, I S; Konovalov, A I; Kyritsakas, N; Hosseini, M W

    2013-07-21

    Three p-H-thiacalix[4]arene pyridyl appended coordinating tectons (2-4) in a 1,3-alternate conformation have been prepared and structurally characterised in the solid state. These compounds are positional isomers differing only by the position of the nitrogen atom on the pyridyl ring. Their combinations with HgCl2 lead to the formation of 1- and 2-D neutral mercury coordination networks. Whereas for tecton 2 (ortho isomer) a 2D architecture resulting from the bridging of consecutive tectons by the mononuclear HgCl2 unit is obtained, for tecton 3 (meta isomer) again a 2D network is formed. However, in that case, the interconnection of consecutive organic tectons 3 takes place through a binuclear Hg2Cl4 species. Finally, in the case of tecton 4 (para position), a 1D ribbon type double chain arrangement resulting from the bridging of consecutive tectons by trinuclear Hg3Cl6 units followed by the interconnection of two chains through the fusion of the trinuclear centres into a hexanuclear node is observed.

  19. Structure Integral Transform Versus Radon Transform: A 2D Mathematical Tool for Invariant Shape Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Gao, Yongsheng

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel mathematical tool, Structure Integral Transform (SIT), for invariant shape description and recognition. Different from the Radon Transform (RT), which integrates the shape image function over a 1D line in the image plane, the proposed SIT builds upon two orthogonal integrals over a 2D K -cross dissecting structure spanning across all rotation angles by which the shape regions are bisected in each integral. The proposed SIT brings the following advantages over the RT: 1) it has the extra function of describing the interior structural relationship within the shape which provides a more powerful discriminative ability for shape recognition; 2) the shape regions are dissected by the K -cross in a coarse to fine hierarchical order that can characterize the shape in a better spatial organization scanning from the center to the periphery; and 3) it is easier to build a completely invariant shape descriptor. The experimental results of applying SIT to shape recognition demonstrate its superior performance over the well-known Radon transform, and the well-known shape contexts and the polar harmonic transforms.

  20. Methods to determine the Orientation and Velocity of 2-D structures based on multi- spacecraft data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Pu, Z.; Zhou, X.; Wang, J.; Zong, Q.; Shi, Q.

    2006-12-01

    Many techniques have been developed to study the axial orientation and/or velocity of 2-D structures (flux ropes), by analyzing in situ data from single or multiple spacecraft. To obtain the axial orientation, there are magnetic based MVA (BMVA), current based MVA (CMVA), Minimum Direction Derivative (MDD) and Multiple Triangulation Analysis (MTA) as a modified version of timing method. To further calculate the velocity, we have DeHoffmann-Teller analysis, Spatio-Temporal Difference (STD) and several version of timing method including MTA. After a brief introduction on the principle of these methods, we theoretically estimate their error ranges based on modeled structures to examine the validity of these techniques. Because of their different principles, their error bars are shown to be distinct, depending on the parameters (such as radius, model selected and even the satellite crossing path) of the certain structure. The error estimation thus provides us some clue on the selection of methods under different conditions. Some real events are further analyzed using these techniques as the example.

  1. Tuning the resonance properties of 2D carbon nanotube networks towards a mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Guiyong; Zhang, Baocheng; Bell, John M.; Gu, Yuantong

    2015-08-01

    The capabilities of the mechanical resonator-based nanosensors in detecting ultra-small mass or force shifts have driven a continuing exploration of the palette of nanomaterials for such application purposes. Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we have assessed the applicability of a new class of carbon nanomaterials for nanoresonator usage, i.e. the single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) network. It is found that SWNT networks inherit excellent mechanical properties from the constituent SWNTs, possessing a high natural frequency. However, although a high quality factor is suggested from the simulation results, it is hard to obtain an unambiguous Q-factor due to the existence of vibration modes in addition to the dominant mode. The nonlinearities resulting from these extra vibration modes are found to exist uniformly under various testing conditions including different initial actuations and temperatures. Further testing shows that these modes can be effectively suppressed through the introduction of axial strain, leading to an extremely high quality factor in the order of 109 estimated from the SWNT network with 2% tensile strain. Additional studies indicate that the carbon rings connecting the SWNTs can also be used to alter the vibrational properties of the resulting network. This study suggests that the SWNT network can be a good candidate for applications as nanoresonators.

  2. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maskaly, Karlene Rosera

    2005-06-01

    increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

  3. Optimization of hybrid organic-inorganic interdigitated photovoltaic device structure using a 2D diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Krali, Emiljana; Curry, Richard J

    2011-04-26

    To improve the efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices the inclusion of semiconducting nanoparticles such as PbS has been used to enhance near-infrared absorption. Additionally the use of interdigitated heterojunctions has been explored as a means of improving charge extraction. In this paper we provide a two-dimensional model taking into account these approaches with the aim of predicting an optimized device geometry to maximize the efficiency. The steady-state exciton population has been calculated in each of the active regions taking into account the full optical response based on using a finite difference approach to obtain approximate numerical solutions to the 2D exciton diffusion equation. On the basis of this we calculate the contribution of each active material to the device short circuit current and power conversion efficiency. We show that optimized structures can lead to power conversions efficiencies of ∼50% compared to a maximum of ∼17% for planar heterojunction devices. To achieve this the interdigitated region thickness should be ∼800 nm with PbS and C(60) widths of ∼60 and 20 nm, respectively. Even modest nanopatterning using much thinner active regions provides improvements in efficiency and may be approached using a variety of methods including nanoimprinting lithography, nanotemplating, or the incorporation of presynthesized nanorod structures.

  4. Quantitative 2D HSQC NMR determination of polymer structures by selecting suitable internal standard references.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liming; Gellerstedt, Göran

    2007-01-01

    A new analytical method based on the 2D HSQC NMR sequence is presented, which can be applied for quantitative structural determination of complicated polymers. The influence of T1 and T2 relaxations, off-resonance effects, coupling constants and homonuclear couplings are discussed. It was found that the T2 values measured on polymeric samples with the conventional HSQC-CPMG sequence could not be used to correct the errors caused by T2 relaxations during the polarization transfer delay. A unique way of selecting the proper internal standard reference signal(s) is therefore proposed to eliminate the major errors caused by T2 relaxations, resonance offsets, coupling constant deviations and homonuclear couplings. Two polymer samples, a cellulose triacetate and an acetylated lignin, have been used to illustrate the principles. The methodology developed in this work is robust to instrument miss-setting and it can find wide-spread applications in areas where a quantitative analysis of structurally complicated polymers is necessary.

  5. 2D FT-IR Study of Compositional and Structural Change in Developing Cotton Fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis was applied to characterize the ATR spectral intensity fluctuations of immature and mature cotton fibers. Prior to 2D analysis, the spectra were leveled to zero at the peak intensity of 1800 cm-1 and then were normalized at the peak intensity of 660 cm-1 to ...

  6. Dynamic molecular structure and phase diagram of DPPC-cholesterol binary mixtures: a 2D-ELDOR study.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Freed, Jack H

    2007-09-27

    This paper is an application of 2D electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) with the "full Sc- method" to study model membranes. We obtain and confirm the phase diagram of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerophosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-cholesterol binary mixtures versus temperature and provide quantitative descriptions for its dynamic molecular structure using 2D-ELDOR at the Ku band. The spectra from the end-chain 16-PC spin label in multilamellar phospholipid vesicles are obtained for cholesterol molar concentrations ranging from 0 to 50% and from 25 to 60 degrees C. This phase diagram consists of liquid-ordered, liquid-disordered, and gel phases and phase coexistence regions. The phase diagram is carefully examined according to the spectroscopic evidence, and the rigorous interpretation for the line shape changes. We show that the 2D-ELDOR spectra differ markedly with variation in the composition. The extensive line shape changes in the 2D-plus-mixing-time representation provide useful information to define and characterize the membrane phases with respect to their dynamic molecular structures and to determine the phase boundaries. The homogeneous T2's are extracted from the pure absorption spectra and are used to further distinguish the membrane phases. These results show 2D-ELDOR to be naturally suitable for probing and reporting the dynamic structures of microdomains in model membrane systems and, moreover, providing a very detailed picture of their molecular dynamic structure, especially with the aid of the "full Sc- method".

  7. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  8. Model-based segmentation and quantification of subcellular structures in 2D and 3D fluorescent microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Heinzer, Stephan; Weiss, Matthias; Rohr, Karl

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a model-based approach for segmenting and quantifying GFP-tagged subcellular structures of the Golgi apparatus in 2D and 3D microscopy images. The approach is based on 2D and 3D intensity models, which are directly fitted to an image within 2D circular or 3D spherical regions-of-interest (ROIs). We also propose automatic approaches for the detection of candidates, for the initialization of the model parameters, and for adapting the size of the ROI used for model fitting. Based on the fitting results, we determine statistical information about the spatial distribution and the total amount of intensity (fluorescence) of the subcellular structures. We demonstrate the applicability of our new approach based on 2D and 3D microscopy images.

  9. Mercury (I) nitroprusside: A 2D structure supported on homometallic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Reguera, L.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Reguera, E.

    2015-01-15

    The pentacyanonitrosylferrate complex anion, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2−}, forms an insoluble solid with Hg(I) ion, of formula unit Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, whose crystal structure and related properties are unknown. This contribution reports the preparation of that compound by the precipitation method and its structural study from X-ray powder patterns complemented with spectroscopic information from IR, Raman, and UV–vis techniques. The crystal structure was solved ab initio and then refined using the Rietveld method. The solid crystallizes with a triclinic unit cell, in the P−1 space group, with cell parameters a=10.1202(12), b=10.1000(13), c=7.4704(11) Å; α=110.664(10), β=110.114(10), γ=104.724(8) °. Within the unit cell, two formula units are accommodated (Z=2). It adopts a layered structure related with the coordination of the equatorial CN groups at their N end to the Hg atoms while the axial CN ligand remains unlinked. Within the layers neighboring Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO] building units remain linked through four relatively strong Hg–Hg interactions, with an interatomic distance of 2.549(3) Å. The charge donation from the equatorial CN groups through their 5σ orbitals results into an increase for the electron density on the Hg atoms, which strengths the Hg–Hg bond. In the Raman spectrum, that metal–metal bond is detected as a stretching vibration band at 167 cm{sup −1}. The available free volume between neighboring layers accommodates two water molecules, which are stabilized within the framework through hydrogen bonds with the N end of the unlinked axial CN group. The removal of these weakly bonded water molecules results in structural disorder for the material 3D framework. - Graphical abstract: Assembling of Hg{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO] units through Hg–Hg interactions. - Highlights: • Homometallic Hg–Hg interactions in metal nitroprusside. • 2D structure supported on metal–metal interactions. • Crystal

  10. Guided Lamb wave based 2-D spiral phased array for structural health monitoring of thin panel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byungseok

    2011-12-01

    In almost all industries of mechanical, aerospace, and civil engineering fields, structural health monitoring (SHM) technology is essentially required for providing the reliable information of structural integrity of safety-critical structures, which can help reduce the risk of unexpected and sometimes catastrophic failures, and also offer cost-effective inspection and maintenance of the structures. State of the art SHM research on structural damage diagnosis is focused on developing global and real-time technologies to identify the existence, location, extent, and type of damage. In order to detect and monitor the structural damage in plate-like structures, SHM technology based on guided Lamb wave (GLW) interrogation is becoming more attractive due to its potential benefits such as large inspection area coverage in short time, simple inspection mechanism, and sensitivity to small damage. However, the GLW method has a few critical issues such as dispersion nature, mode conversion and separation, and multiple-mode existence. Phased array technique widely used in all aspects of civil, military, science, and medical industry fields may be employed to resolve the drawbacks of the GLW method. The GLW-based phased array approach is able to effectively examine and analyze complicated structural vibration responses in thin plate structures. Because the phased sensor array operates as a spatial filter for the GLW signals, the array signal processing method can enhance a desired signal component at a specific direction while eliminating other signal components from other directions. This dissertation presents the development, the experimental validation, and the damage detection applications of an innovative signal processing algorithm based on two-dimensional (2-D) spiral phased array in conjunction with the GLW interrogation technique. It starts with general backgrounds of SHM and the associated technology including the GLW interrogation method. Then, it is focused on the

  11. Monolignol acylation and lignin structure in some nonwoody plants: a 2D NMR study.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Angel T; Rencoret, Jorge; Marques, Gisela; Gutiérrez, Ana; Ibarra, David; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; del Río, José C

    2008-11-01

    Lignins from three nonwoody angiosperms were analyzed by 2D NMR revealing important differences in their molecular structures. The Musa textilis milled-wood-lignin (MWL), with a syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) ratio of 9, was strongly acylated (near 85% of side-chains) at the gamma-carbon by both acetates and p-coumarates, as estimated from (1)H-(13)C correlations in C(gamma)-esterified and C(gamma)-OH units. The p-coumarate H(3,5)-C(3,5) correlation signal was completely displaced by acetylation, and disappeared after alkali treatment, indicating that p-coumaric acid was esterified maintaining its free phenolic group. By contrast, the Cannabis sativa MWL (S/G approximately 0.8) was free of acylating groups, and the Agave sisalana MWL (S/G approximately 4) showed high acylation degree (near 80%) but exclusively with acetates. Extensive C(gamma)-acylation results in the absence (in M. textilis lignin) or low abundance (4% in A. sisalana lignin) of beta-beta' resinol linkages, which require free C(gamma)-OH to form the double tetrahydrofuran ring. However, minor signals revealed unusual acylated beta-beta' structures confirming that acylation is produced at the monolignol level, in agreement with chromatographic identification of gamma-acetylated sinapyl alcohol among the plant extractives. In contrast, resinol substructures involved 22% side-chains in the C.sativa MWL. The ratio between beta-beta' and beta-O-4' side-chains in these and other MWL varied from 0.32 in C.sativa MWL to 0.02 in M. textilis MWL, and was inversely correlated with the degree of acylation. The opposite was observed for the S/G ratio that was directly correlated with the acylation degree. Monolignol acylation is discussed as a mechanism potentially involved in the control of lignin structure.

  12. Ferrimagnetism in 2D networks of porphyrin-X and -XO (X=Sc,...,Zn) with acetylene bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbowska, Małgorzata; Sobolewski, Andrzej L.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetism in 2D networks of the acetylene-bridged transition metal porphyrins M(P)-2(C-C)-2 (denoted P-TM), and oxo-TM-porphyrins OM(P)-2(C-C)-2 (denoted P-TMO), is studied with the density functional theory (DFT) and the self-interaction corrected pseudopotential scheme (pSIC). Addition of oxygen lowers magnetism of P-TMO with respect to the corresponding P-TM for most of the first-half 3d-row TMs. In contrast, binding O with the second-half 3d-row TMs or Sc increases the magnetic moments. Ferrimagnetism is found for the porphyrin networks with the TMs from V to Co and also for these cases with oxygen. This is a long-range effect of the delocalized spin-polarization, extended even to the acetylene bridges.

  13. Topological defect formation in 1D and 2D spin chains realized by network of optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerly, Ryan; Inaba, Kensuke; Inagaki, Takahiro; Takesue, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    A network of optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) is used to simulate classical Ising and XY spin chains. The collective nonlinear dynamics of this network, driven by quantum noise rather than thermal fluctuations, seeks out the Ising/XY ground state as the system transitions from below to above the lasing threshold. We study the behavior of this “Ising machine” for three canonical problems: a 1D ferromagnetic spin chain, a 2D square lattice and problems where next-nearest-neighbor couplings give rise to frustration. If the pump turn-on time is finite, topological defects form (domain walls for the Ising model, winding number and vortices for XY) and their density can be predicted from a numerical model involving a linear “growth stage” and a nonlinear “saturation stage”. These predictions are compared against recent data for a 10,000-spin 1D Ising machine.

  14. Prestack depth migration for complex 2D structure using phase-screen propagators

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, P.; Huang, Lian-Jie; Burch, C.; Fehler, M.; Hildebrand, S.

    1997-11-01

    We present results for the phase-screen propagator method applied to prestack depth migration of the Marmousi synthetic data set. The data were migrated as individual common-shot records and the resulting partial images were superposed to obtain the final complete Image. Tests were performed to determine the minimum number of frequency components required to achieve the best quality image and this in turn provided estimates of the minimum computing time. Running on a single processor SUN SPARC Ultra I, high quality images were obtained in as little as 8.7 CPU hours and adequate images were obtained in as little as 4.4 CPU hours. Different methods were tested for choosing the reference velocity used for the background phase-shift operation and for defining the slowness perturbation screens. Although the depths of some of the steeply dipping, high-contrast features were shifted slightly the overall image quality was fairly insensitive to the choice of the reference velocity. Our jests show the phase-screen method to be a reliable and fast algorithm for imaging complex geologic structures, at least for complex 2D synthetic data where the velocity model is known.

  15. 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1) surface: atomic arrangement and electronic band structure.

    PubMed

    Gruznev, D V; Bondarenko, L V; Tupchaya, A Y; Eremeev, S V; Mihalyuk, A N; Chou, J P; Wei, C M; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2017-01-25

    Structural transformations and evolution of the electron band structure in the (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) system have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The two 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1), [Formula: see text]-(Tl, Pb) and [Formula: see text]-(Tl, Pb), have been found and their composition, atomic arrangement and electron properties has been characterized. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compound is almost identical to the alike (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] system from the viewpoint of its atomic structure and electronic properties. They contain 1.0 ML of Tl atoms arranged into a honeycomb network of chained trimers and 1/3 ML of Pb atoms occupying the centers of the honeycomb units. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compound contains six Tl atoms and seven Pb atoms per [Formula: see text] unit cell (i.e.  ∼0.67 ML Tl and  ∼0.78 ML Pb). Its atomic structure can be visualized as consisting of Pb hexagons surrounded by Tl trimers. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] and (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)[Formula: see text] compounds are metallic and their band structures contain spin-split surface-state bands. By analogy with the (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text], these (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) compounds are believed to be promising objects for prospective studies of superconductivity in one-atom-layer systems.

  16. 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1) surface: atomic arrangement and electronic band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruznev, D. V.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Eremeev, S. V.; Mihalyuk, A. N.; Chou, J. P.; Wei, C. M.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Structural transformations and evolution of the electron band structure in the (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) system have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The two 2D Tl-Pb compounds on Ge(1 1 1), \\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} -(Tl, Pb) and 3× 3 -(Tl, Pb), have been found and their composition, atomic arrangement and electron properties has been characterized. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} compound is almost identical to the alike (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} system from the viewpoint of its atomic structure and electronic properties. They contain 1.0 ML of Tl atoms arranged into a honeycomb network of chained trimers and 1/3 ML of Pb atoms occupying the centers of the honeycomb units. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)3× 3 compound contains six Tl atoms and seven Pb atoms per 3× 3 unit cell (i.e.  ˜0.67 ML Tl and  ˜0.78 ML Pb). Its atomic structure can be visualized as consisting of Pb hexagons surrounded by Tl trimers. The (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} and (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1)3× 3 compounds are metallic and their band structures contain spin-split surface-state bands. By analogy with the (Tl, Pb)/Si(1 1 1)\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3} , these (Tl, Pb)/Ge(1 1 1) compounds are believed to be promising objects for prospective studies of superconductivity in one-atom-layer systems.

  17. Probing Magnetism in 2D Molecular Networks after in Situ Metalation by Transition Metal Atoms.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, K; Ivanova, Ts; Li, Z; Iancu, V; Janssens, E; Van Haesendonck, C

    2015-03-19

    Metalated molecules are the ideal building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of, e.g., two-dimensional arrays of magnetic particles for spintronics applications. Compared to chemical synthesis, metalation after network formation by an atom beam can yield a higher degree of control and flexibility and allows for mixing of different types of magnetic atoms. We report on successful metalation of tetrapyridyl-porphyrins (TPyP) by Co and Cr atoms, as demonstrated by scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. For the metalation, large periodic networks formed by the TPyP molecules on a Ag(111) substrate are exposed in situ to an atom beam. Voltage-induced dehydrogenation experiments support the conclusion that the porphyrin macrocycle of the TPyP molecule incorporates one transition metal atom. The newly synthesized Co-TPyP and Cr-TPyP complexes exhibit striking differences in their electronic behavior, leading to a magnetic character for Cr-TPyP only as evidenced by Kondo resonance measurements.

  18. Application of conformal map theory for design of 2-D ultrasonic array structure for NDT imaging application: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Sivaram N; Jackson, Joseph C; Dziewierz, Jerzy; O'Leary, Richard; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasonic phased arrays are becoming increasingly popular in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Sparse array element configurations are required to fully exploit the potential benefits of 2-D phased arrays. This paper applies the conformal mapping technique as a means of designing sparse 2-D array layouts for NDE applications. Modeling using both Huygens' field prediction theory and 2-D fast Fourier transformation is employed to study the resulting new structure. A conformal power map was used that, for fixed beam width, was shown in simulations to have a greater contrast than rectangular or random arrays. A prototype aperiodic 2-D array configuration for direct contact operation in steel, with operational frequency ~3 MHz, was designed using the array design principle described in this paper. Experimental results demonstrate a working sparse-array transducer capable of performing volumetric imaging.

  19. Fracture network evaluation program (FraNEP): A software for analyzing 2D fracture trace-line maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeb, Conny; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Virgo, Simon; Blum, Philipp

    2013-10-01

    Fractures, such as joints, faults and veins, strongly influence the transport of fluids through rocks by either enhancing or inhibiting flow. Techniques used for the automatic detection of lineaments from satellite images and aerial photographs, LIDAR technologies and borehole televiewers significantly enhanced data acquisition. The analysis of such data is often performed manually or with different analysis software. Here we present a novel program for the analysis of 2D fracture networks called FraNEP (Fracture Network Evaluation Program). The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel™ and combines features from different existing software and characterization techniques. The main novelty of FraNEP is the possibility to analyse trace-line maps of fracture networks applying the (1) scanline sampling, (2) window sampling or (3) circular scanline and window method, without the need of switching programs. Additionally, binning problems are avoided by using cumulative distributions, rather than probability density functions. FraNEP is a time-efficient tool for the characterisation of fracture network parameters, such as density, intensity and mean length. Furthermore, fracture strikes can be visualized using rose diagrams and a fitting routine evaluates the distribution of fracture lengths. As an example of its application, we use FraNEP to analyse a case study of lineament data from a satellite image of the Oman Mountains.

  20. 2D and 3D GPR imaging of structural ceilings in historic and existing constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, Camilla

    2014-05-01

    GPR applications in civil engineering are to date quite diversified. With respect to civil constructions and monumental buildings, detection of voids, cavities, layering in structural elements, variation of geometry, of moisture content, of materials, areas of decay, defects, cracks have been reported in timber, concrete and masonry elements. Nonetheless, many more fields of investigation remain unexplored. This contribution gives an account of a variety of examples of structural ceilings investigation by GPR radar in reflection mode, either as 2D or 3D data acquisition and visualisation. Ceilings have a pre-eminent role in buildings as they contribute to a good structural behaviour of the construction. Primarily, the following functions can be listed for ceilings: a) they carry vertical dead and live loads on floors and distribute such loads to the vertical walls; b) they oppose to external horizontal forces such as wind loads and earthquakes helping to transfer such forces from the loaded element to the other walls; c) they contribute to create the box skeleton and behaviour of a building, connecting the different load bearing walls and reducing the slenderness and flexural instability of such walls. Therefore, knowing how ceilings are made in specific buildings is of paramount importance for architects and structural engineers. According to the type of building and age of construction, ceilings may present very different solutions and materials. Moreover, in existing constructions, ceilings may have been substituted, modified or strengthened due to material decay or to change of use of the building. These alterations may often go unrecorded in technical documentation or technical drawings may be unavailable. In many cases, the position, orientation and number of the load carrying elements in ceilings may be hidden or not be in sight, due for example to the presence of false ceilings or to technical plants. GPR radar can constitute a very useful tool for

  1. Temperature dependence of the partially localized state in a 2D molecular nanoporous network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio; Nowakowska, Sylwia; Ortega, J. Enrique; Stöhr, Meike; Gade, Lutz H.; Jung, Thomas A.; Lobo-Checa, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional organic and metal-organic nanoporous networks can scatter surface electrons, leading to their partial localization. Such quantum states are related to intrinsic surface states of the substrate material. We further corroborate this relation by studying the thermally induced energy shifts of the electronic band stemming from coupled quantum states hosted in a metal-organic array formed by a perylene derivative on Cu(111). We observe by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), that both, the Shockley and the partially localized states, shift by the same amount to higher binding energies upon decreasing the sample temperature, providing evidence of their common origin. Our experimental approach and results further support the use of surface states for modelling these systems, which are expected to provide new insight into the physics concerning partially confined electronic states: scattering processes, potential barrier strengths, excited state lifetimes or the influence of guest molecules.

  2. Community structure in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Mark

    2004-03-01

    Many networked systems, including physical, biological, social, and technological networks, appear to contain ``communities'' -- groups of nodes within which connections are dense, but between which they are sparser. The ability to find such communities in an automated fashion could be of considerable use. Communities in a web graph for instance might correspond to sets of web sites dealing with related topics, while communities in a biochemical network or an electronic circuit might correspond to functional units of some kind. We present a number of new methods for community discovery, including methods based on ``betweenness'' measures and methods based on modularity optimization. We also give examples of applications of these methods to both computer-generated and real-world network data, and show how our techniques can be used to shed light on the sometimes dauntingly complex structure of networked systems.

  3. Leader neurons in population bursts of 2D living neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, J.-P.; Jacobi, Shimshon; Marom, Shimon; Moses, Elisha; Zbinden, Cyrille

    2008-01-01

    Eytan and Marom (2006 J. Neurosci. 26 8465-76) recently showed that the spontaneous bursting activity of rat neuron cultures includes 'first-to-fire' cells that consistently fire earlier than others. Here, we analyze the behavior of these neurons in long-term recordings of spontaneous activity of rat hippocampal and rat cortical neuron cultures from three different laboratories. We identify precursor events that may either subside ('aborted bursts') or can lead to a full-blown burst ('pre-bursts'). We find that the activation in the pre-burst typically has a first neuron ('leader'), followed by a localized response in its neighborhood. Locality is diminished in the bursts themselves. The long-term dynamics of the leaders is relatively robust, evolving with a half-life of 23-34 h. Stimulation of the culture alters the leader distribution, but the distribution stabilizes within about 1 h. We show that the leaders carry information about the identity of the burst, as measured by the signature of the number of spikes per neuron in a burst. The number of spikes from leaders in the first few spikes of a precursor event is furthermore shown to be predictive with regard to the transition into a burst (pre-burst versus aborted burst). We conclude that the leaders play a role in the development of the bursts and conjecture that they are part of an underlying sub-network that is excited first and then acts as a nucleation center for the burst.

  4. Smart time-pulse coding photoconverters as basic components 2D-array logic devices for advanced neural networks and optical computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolsky, Alexander I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.; Michalnichenko, Nikolay N.

    2004-04-01

    The article deals with a conception of building arithmetic-logic devices (ALD) with a 2D-structure and optical 2D-array inputs-outputs as advanced high-productivity parallel basic operational training modules for realization of basic operation of continuous, neuro-fuzzy, multilevel, threshold and others logics and vector-matrix, vector-tensor procedures in neural networks, that consists in use of time-pulse coding (TPC) architecture and 2D-array smart optoelectronic pulse-width (or pulse-phase) modulators (PWM or PPM) for transformation of input pictures. The input grayscale image is transformed into a group of corresponding short optical pulses or time positions of optical two-level signal swing. We consider optoelectronic implementations of universal (quasi-universal) picture element of two-valued ALD, multi-valued ALD, analog-to-digital converters, multilevel threshold discriminators and we show that 2D-array time-pulse photoconverters are the base elements for these devices. We show simulation results of the time-pulse photoconverters as base components. Considered devices have technical parameters: input optical signals power is 200nW_200μW (if photodiode responsivity is 0.5A/W), conversion time is from tens of microseconds to a millisecond, supply voltage is 1.5_15V, consumption power is from tens of microwatts to a milliwatt, conversion nonlinearity is less than 1%. One cell consists of 2-3 photodiodes and about ten CMOS transistors. This simplicity of the cells allows to carry out their integration in arrays of 32x32, 64x64 elements and more.

  5. The Role of the Impedivity in the Magnetotelluric Response of 1D and 2D Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Roberta; Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Troiano, Antonio; Patella, Domenico; Mariano Castelo Branco, Raimundo

    2014-05-01

    ambiguous. Successively, a 2D case is considered, consisting in a magma chamber at a depth of 1 km, buried into a soil. The synthetic responses were performed considering both the non-dispersive and the dispersive case and the differences of the modelled MT curves are compared. As for the 1D case, the dispersion alters the resistivity values, particularly at the boundary of the buried body, leading to an ambiguous interpretation. MT data alone are not sufficient to distinguish polarization effects or can induce to see dispersion where is not present. An approach to solve this problem consists of the combined interpretation of DC geoelectrical and MT data collected at the same site. Review of real cases is also shown.

  6. Annexin-A5 organized in 2D-network at the plasmalemma eases human trophoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Degrelle, Severine A.; Gerbaud, Pascale; Leconte, Ludovic; Ferreira, Fatima; Pidoux, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Only a limited number of human cells can fuse to form a multinucleated syncytium. Cell fusion occurs as part of the differentiation of some cell types, including myotubes in muscle and osteoclasts in remodeling bone. In the differentiation of the human placenta, mononuclear cytotrophoblasts aggregate and fuse to form endocrinologically active, non-proliferative, multinucleated syncytia. These syncytia allow the exchange of nutrients and gases between the maternal and fetal circulation. Alteration of syncytial formation during pregnancy affects fetal growth and the outcome of the pregnancy. Here, we demonstrate the role of annexin A5 (AnxA5) in syncytial formation by cellular delivery of recombinant AnxA5 and RNA interference. By a variety of co-immunoprecipitation, immunolocalization and proximity experiments, we show that a pool of AnxA5 organizes at the inner-leaflet of the plasma membrane in the vicinity of a molecular complex that includes E-Cadherin, α-Catenin and β-Catenin, three proteins previously shown to form adherens junctions implicated in cell fusion. A combination of knockdown and reconstitution experiments with AnxA5, with or without the ability to self-assemble in 2D-arrays, demonstrate that this AnxA5 2D-network mediates E-Cadherin mobility in the plasmalemma that triggers human trophoblasts aggregation and thereby cell fusion. PMID:28176826

  7. A Fast Parallel Algorithm for Selected Inversion of Structured Sparse Matrices with Application to 2D Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Lu, Jiangfeng; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan

    2009-09-25

    We present an efficient parallel algorithm and its implementation for computing the diagonal of $H^-1$ where $H$ is a 2D Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian discretized on a rectangular domain using a standard second order finite difference scheme. This type of calculation can be used to obtain an accurate approximation to the diagonal of a Fermi-Dirac function of $H$ through a recently developed pole-expansion technique \\cite{LinLuYingE2009}. The diagonal elements are needed in electronic structure calculations for quantum mechanical systems \\citeHohenbergKohn1964, KohnSham 1965,DreizlerGross1990. We show how elimination tree is used to organize the parallel computation and how synchronization overhead is reduced by passing data level by level along this tree using the technique of local buffers and relative indices. We analyze the performance of our implementation by examining its load balance and communication overhead. We show that our implementation exhibits an excellent weak scaling on a large-scale high performance distributed parallel machine. When compared with standard approach for evaluating the diagonal a Fermi-Dirac function of a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian associated a 2D electron quantum dot, the new pole-expansion technique that uses our algorithm to compute the diagonal of $(H-z_i I)^-1$ for a small number of poles $z_i$ is much faster, especially when the quantum dot contains many electrons.

  8. Extreme narrow photonic bands and strong photonic localization produced by 2D defect two-segment-connected quadrangular waveguide networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Yang, Xiangbo; Timon Liu, Chengyi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of optical transmission and photonic localization of two-dimensional (2D) defect two-segment-connected quadrangular waveguide networks (DTSCQWNs) and find that many groups of extreme narrow photonic bands are created in the middle of the transmission spectra. The electromagnetic (EM) waves in DTSCQWNs with the frequencies of extreme narrow photonic bands can produce strong photonic localizations by adjusting defect broken degree. On the other hand, we obtain the formula of extreme narrow photonic bands' frequencies dependent on defect broken degree and the formula of the largest intensity of photonic localization dependent on defect broken degree, respectively. It may possess potential application for designing all-optical devices based on strong photonic localizations. Additionally, we propose a so-called defecton mode to study the splitting rules of extreme narrow photonic bands, where decomposition-decimation method is expanded from the field of electronic energy spectra to that of optical transmission spectra.

  9. The conflicting role of buckled structure in phonon transport of 2D group-IV and group-V materials.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Dequan; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Ni, Gang; Zhu, Yongyuan; Zhu, Heyuan

    2017-03-20

    Controlling heat transport through material design is one important step toward thermal management in 2D materials. To control heat transport, a comprehensive understanding of how structure influences heat transport is required. It has been argued that a buckled structure is able to suppress heat transport by increasing the flexural phonon scattering. Using a first principles approach, we calculate the lattice thermal conductivity of 2D mono-elemental materials with a buckled structure. Somewhat counterintuitively, we find that although 2D group-V materials have a larger mass and higher buckling height than their group-IV counterparts, the calculated κ of blue phosphorene (106.6 W mK(-1)) is nearly four times higher than that of silicene (28.3 W mK(-1)), while arsenene (37.8 W mK(-1)) is more than fifteen times higher than germanene (2.4 W mK(-1)). We report for the first time that a buckled structure has three conflicting effects: (i) increasing the Debye temperature by increasing the overlap of the pz orbitals, (ii) suppressing the acoustic-optical scattering by forming an acoustic-optical gap, and (iii) increasing the flexural phonon scattering. The former two, corresponding to the harmonic phonon part, tend to enhance κ, while the last one, corresponding to the anharmonic part, suppresses it. This relationship between the buckled structure and phonon behaviour provides insight into how to control heat transport in 2D materials.

  10. 2D-RNA-coupling numbers: a new computational chemistry approach to link secondary structure topology with biological function.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Agüero-Chapin, Guillermín; Varona, Javier; Molina, Reinaldo; Delogu, Giovanna; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Podda, Gianni

    2007-04-30

    Methods for prediction of proteins, DNA, or RNA function and mapping it onto sequence often rely on bioinformatics alignment approach instead of chemical structure. Consequently, it is interesting to develop computational chemistry approaches based on molecular descriptors. In this sense, many researchers used sequence-coupling numbers and our group extended them to 2D proteins representations. However, no coupling numbers have been reported for 2D-RNA topology graphs, which are highly branched and contain useful information. Here, we use a computational chemistry scheme: (a) transforming sequences into RNA secondary structures, (b) defining and calculating new 2D-RNA-coupling numbers, (c) seek a structure-function model, and (d) map biological function onto the folded RNA. We studied as example 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidases known as ACO, which control fruit ripening having importance for biotechnology industry. First, we calculated tau(k)(2D-RNA) values to a set of 90-folded RNAs, including 28 transcripts of ACO and control sequences. Afterwards, we compared the classification performance of 10 different classifiers implemented in the software WEKA. In particular, the logistic equation ACO = 23.8 . tau(1)(2D-RNA) + 41.4 predicts ACOs with 98.9%, 98.0%, and 97.8% of accuracy in training, leave-one-out and 10-fold cross-validation, respectively. Afterwards, with this equation we predict ACO function to a sequence isolated in this work from Coffea arabica (GenBank accession DQ218452). The tau(1)(2D-RNA) also favorably compare with other descriptors. This equation allows us to map the codification of ACO activity on different mRNA topology features. The present computational-chemistry approach is general and could be extended to connect RNA secondary structure topology to other functions.

  11. Metal Decoration Effects on the Gas-Sensing Properties of 2D Hybrid-Structures on Flexible Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byungjin; Yoon, Jongwon; Lim, Sung Kwan; Kim, Ah Ra; Choi, Sun-Young; Kim, Dong-Ho; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ko, Heung Cho; Hahm, Myung Gwan

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of metal decoration on the gas-sensing properties of a device with two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) flake channels and graphene electrodes. The 2D hybrid-structure device sensitively detected NO2 gas molecules (>1.2 ppm) as well as NH3 (>10 ppm). Metal nanoparticles (NPs) could tune the electronic properties of the 2D graphene/MoS2 device, increasing sensitivity to a specific gas molecule. For instance, palladium NPs accumulate hole carriers of graphene/MoS2, electronically sensitizing NH3 gas molecules. Contrarily, aluminum NPs deplete hole carriers, enhancing NO2 sensitivity. The synergistic combination of metal NPs and 2D hybrid layers could be also applied to a flexible gas sensor. There was no serious degradation in the sensing performance of metal-decorated MoS2 flexible devices before/after 5000 bending cycles. Thus, highly sensitive and endurable gas sensor could be achieved through the metal-decorated 2D hybrid-structure, offering a useful route to wearable electronic sensing platforms. PMID:26404279

  12. Electronic structure of disordered CuPd alloys by positron-annihilation 2D-ACAR

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Benedek, R.; Siegel, R.W.; Legnini, D.G.; Stahulak, M.D.; Bansil, A.

    1988-01-01

    We report 2D-ACAR experiments and KKR CPA calculations on alpha-phase single-crystal Cu/sub 1-x/Pd/sub x/ in the range x less than or equal to 0.25. The flattening of the Fermi surface near (110) with increasing x predicted by theory is confirmed by our experimental results. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Two novel 2D lanthanide sulfate frameworks: Syntheses, structures, and luminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Fu-Li; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Zhang, Xiang-Fei; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Guang-Xiu; Zhai, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Two novel lanthanide-sulfate compounds, [Ln2(SO4)3(H2O)8] (Ln = Tb (1) and Dy (2)), have been synthesized under hydrothermal reactions. X-ray crystal structure analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are isomorphous and crystallize in monoclinic C2/c pace group, showing a layered structure. The layers bear a rare quasi-honeycomb metal arrangement, which is fastened by μ3 = η1:η1:η1 and μ2 = η1:η1 sulfates. If assigning the μ3 = η1:η1:η1 sulfate as a 3-connected node and the Ln3+ ion as a 4-connected node, the network can be rationalized as a binodal (3,4)-connected V2O5 topology with a Schäfli symbol of (42·63·8) (42·6). In addition, the infrared, thermogravimetric analysis and luminescent properties were also studied. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit outstanding thermal stability and characteristic terbium and dysprosium luminescence.

  14. Compelling experimental evidence of a Dirac cone in the electronic structure of a 2D Silicon layer

    PubMed Central

    Sadeddine, Sana; Enriquez, Hanna; Bendounan, Azzedine; Kumar Das, Pranab; Vobornik, Ivana; Kara, Abdelkader; Mayne, Andrew J.; Sirotti, Fausto; Dujardin, Gérald; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene stem from its two-dimensional (2D) structure, with a linear dispersion of the electronic states at the corners of the Brillouin zone (BZ) forming a Dirac cone. Since then, other 2D materials have been suggested based on boron, silicon, germanium, phosphorus, tin, and metal di-chalcogenides. Here, we present an experimental investigation of a single silicon layer on Au(111) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (HR-ARPES), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The HR-ARPES data show compelling evidence that the silicon based 2D overlayer is responsible for the observed linear dispersed feature in the valence band, with a Fermi velocity of comparable to that of graphene. The STM images show extended and homogeneous domains, offering a viable route to the fabrication of silicene-based opto-electronic devices. PMID:28281666

  15. Compelling experimental evidence of a Dirac cone in the electronic structure of a 2D Silicon layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeddine, Sana; Enriquez, Hanna; Bendounan, Azzedine; Kumar Das, Pranab; Vobornik, Ivana; Kara, Abdelkader; Mayne, Andrew J.; Sirotti, Fausto; Dujardin, Gérald; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2017-03-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene stem from its two-dimensional (2D) structure, with a linear dispersion of the electronic states at the corners of the Brillouin zone (BZ) forming a Dirac cone. Since then, other 2D materials have been suggested based on boron, silicon, germanium, phosphorus, tin, and metal di-chalcogenides. Here, we present an experimental investigation of a single silicon layer on Au(111) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (HR-ARPES), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The HR-ARPES data show compelling evidence that the silicon based 2D overlayer is responsible for the observed linear dispersed feature in the valence band, with a Fermi velocity of comparable to that of graphene. The STM images show extended and homogeneous domains, offering a viable route to the fabrication of silicene-based opto-electronic devices.

  16. Neural network system for 3-D object recognition and pose estimation from a single arbitrary 2-D view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotanzad, Alireza R.; Liou, James H.

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, a robust, and fast system for recognition as well as pose estimation of a 3-D object from a single 2-D perspective of it taken from an arbitrary viewpoint is developed. The approach is invariant to location, orientation, and scale of the object in the perspective. The silhouette of the object in the 2-D perspective is first normalized with respect to location and scale. A set of rotation invariant features derived from complex and orthogonal pseudo- Zernike moments of the image are then extracted. The next stage includes a bank of multilayer feed-forward neural networks (NN) each of which classifies the extracted features. The training set for these nets consists of perspective views of each object taken from several different viewing angles. The NNs in the bank differ in the size of their hidden layer nodes as well as their initial conditions but receive the same input. The classification decisions of all the nets are combined through a majority voting scheme. It is shown that this collective decision making yields better results compared to a single NN operating alone. After the object is classified, two of its pose parameters, namely elevation and aspect angles, are estimated by another module of NNs in a two-stage process. The first stage identifies the likely region of the space that the object is being viewed from. In the second stage, an NN estimator for the identified region is used to compute the pose angles. Extensive experimental studies involving clean and noisy images of seven military ground vehicles are carried out. The performance is compared to two other traditional methods, namely a nearest neighbor rule and a binary decision tree classifier and it is shown that our approach has major advantages over them.

  17. Transformation from a 2D stacked layer to 3D interpenetrated framework by changing the spacer functionality: synthesis, structure, adsorption, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Maji, Tapas Kumar; Ohba, Masaaki; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2005-12-12

    Two novel coordination polymers of Cu(II), viz. [Cu(bipy)(1,4-napdc)(H2O)2]n and {[Cu(bpe)1.5(1,4-napdc)](H2O)}n (bipy=4,4'-bipyridine; bpe=1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane; 1,4-napdc2-=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by changing only the pillar motifs. Both the compounds crystallize by slow evaporation from the ammoniacal solution of the as-synthesized solid. Framework 1 crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system, space group P2/n (No. 13), with a=11.028(19) A, b=11.16(3) A, c=7.678(13) A, beta=103.30(5) degrees, and Z=2. Framework 2 crystallizes in triclinic system, space group, P (No. 2), a=10.613(4) A, b=10.828(10) A, c=13.333(9) A, alpha=85.25(9) degrees, beta=82.59(6) degrees, gamma=60.37(5) degrees, and Z=2. The structure determination reveals that has a 2D network based on rectangular grids, where each Cu(II) is in 4+2 coordination mode. The 2D networks stacked in a staggered manner through the pi-pi interaction to form a 3D supramolecular network. In the case of, a {Cu(bpe)1.5}n ladder connected by 1,4-napdc2- results a 2D cuboidal bilayer network and each bilayer network is interlocked by two adjacent identical network (upper and lower) forming 3-fold interpenetrated 3D framework with small channel along the c-axis, which accommodates two water molecules. The TGA and XRPD measurements reveal that both the frameworks are stable after dehydration. Adsorption measurements (N2, CO2, and different solvents, like H2O, MeOH, etc.) were carried out for both frameworks. Framework shows type-II sorption profile with N2 in contrast to H2O and MeOH, which are chemisorbed in the framework. In case of, only H2O molecules can diffuse into the micropore, whereas N2, CO2, and MeOH cannot be adsorbed, as corroborated by the smaller channel aperture. The low-temperature (300-2 K) magnetic measurement of and reveals that both are weakly antiferromagnetically coupled (J=-1.85 cm-1, g=2.02; J=-0.153 cm-1, g=2.07), which is correlated

  18. Fabrication of high efficiency compact 90° bend waveguide by using a dielectric 2D-PC structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stomeo, Tiziana; Bergamo, Roberto; Martiradonna, Luigi; Cingolani, Roberto; De Vittorio, Massimo; D'Orazio, Antonella; Marrocco, Valeria

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we propose the design and the fabrication of 90° bend ridge waveguide (WG) assisted by a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PC). 2D-PCs act as efficient mirrors along the boundaries of the bend ridge thus reducing the in-plane losses. The ridge waveguide consists of a 3 μm x 0.75 μm titanium dioxide core on a silica bottom cladding. The 2D-PC structure surrounding the bend waveguide is composed of a triangular array of circular dielectric pillars having a height of 0.75 μm. The titanium dioxide waveguiding core layer is covered with PMMA in order to create a quasi-symmetric structure. A photonic band gap centered around 1.3 μm is obtained by a PC radius r = 0.33a and lattice period a = 0.450 μm. The design of the whole structure is subsequently optimized by using a 3D Finite Difference Time Domain based computer code. The ridge waveguide assisted by a 2D-PC has been fabricated by using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. For the pattern transfer we have used about 50 nm thin layer Cr metal etch mask obtained by means of a lift-off technique based on the use of bi-layer resist (PMMA/MMA). The presence of the 2D-PC around the bend waveguide leads to a sharp increase of the transmission efficiency around 1.3 μm for curvature radius of 2.5 μm. The bend transmission results to be in the range between 0.76 and 0.85 when the thickness of the ridge WG and of the 2D-PC pillars is between 0.75 and 1.3 μm. This value is more than twice with respect to the bend waveguide without 2D-PC.

  19. [Network structures in biological systems].

    PubMed

    Oleskin, A V

    2013-01-01

    Network structures (networks) that have been extensively studied in the humanities are characterized by cohesion, a lack of a central control unit, and predominantly fractal properties. They are contrasted with structures that contain a single centre (hierarchies) as well as with those whose elements predominantly compete with one another (market-type structures). As far as biological systems are concerned, their network structures can be subdivided into a number of types involving different organizational mechanisms. Network organization is characteristic of various structural levels of biological systems ranging from single cells to integrated societies. These networks can be classified into two main subgroups: (i) flat (leaderless) network structures typical of systems that are composed of uniform elements and represent modular organisms or at least possess manifest integral properties and (ii) three-dimensional, partly hierarchical structures characterized by significant individual and/or intergroup (intercaste) differences between their elements. All network structures include an element that performs structural, protective, and communication-promoting functions. By analogy to cell structures, this element is denoted as the matrix of a network structure. The matrix includes a material and an immaterial component. The material component comprises various structures that belong to the whole structure and not to any of its elements per se. The immaterial (ideal) component of the matrix includes social norms and rules regulating network elements' behavior. These behavioral rules can be described in terms of algorithms. Algorithmization enables modeling the behavior of various network structures, particularly of neuron networks and their artificial analogs.

  20. Postretinal Structure and Function in Severe Congenital Photoreceptor Blindness Caused by Mutations in the GUCY2D Gene

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Geoffrey K.; Butt, Omar H.; Datta, Ritobrato; Roman, Alejandro J.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To examine how severe congenital blindness resulting from mutations of the GUCY2D gene alters brain structure and function, and to relate these findings to the notable preservation of retinal architecture in this form of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Methods Six GUCY2D-LCA patients (ages 20–46) were studied with optical coherence tomography of the retina and multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Measurements from this group were compared to those obtained from populations of normally sighted controls and people with congenital blindness of a variety of causes. Results Patients with GUCY2D-LCA had preservation of the photoreceptors, ganglion cells, and nerve fiber layer. Despite this, visual function in these patients ranged from 20/160 acuity to no light perception, and functional MRI responses to light stimulation were attenuated and restricted. This severe visual impairment was reflected in substantial thickening of the gray matter layer of area V1, accompanied by an alteration of resting-state correlations within the occipital lobe, similar to a comparison group of congenitally blind people with structural damage to the retina. In contrast to the comparison blind population, however, the GUCY2D-LCA group had preservation of the size of the optic chiasm, and the fractional anisotropy of the optic radiations as measured with diffusion tensor imaging was also normal. Conclusions These results identify dissociable effects of blindness upon the visual pathway. Further, the relatively intact postgeniculate white matter pathway in GUCY2D-LCA is encouraging for the prospect of recovery of visual function with gene augmentation therapy.

  1. Study on molecular structure and hydration mechanism of Domyoji-ko starch by IR and NIR hetero 2D analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Norihisa; Kondo, Miyuki; Miyazawa, Mitsuhiro

    2010-06-01

    The hydration structure of starch molecule in Domyoji-ko, which is made from gluey rice, was investigated by hetero 2D correlation analysis of IR and NIR spectroscopy. The feature near 1020 cm -1 in the IR spectra of Domyoji-ko is changed by rehydration process, indicating that the molecular structure of amylopectin in the starch has been varied by the hydration without heating. The intensity of a band at 4770 cm -1 in NIR spectra is decreasing with the increasing of either the heating time with water or rehydration time without heating. These results suggest that the hydration of Domyoji-ko has proceeded in similar mechanisms on these processes. The generalized hetero 2D IR-NIR correlation analysis for rehydration of Domyoji-ko has supported the assignments for NIR bands concerning the gelatinization of starch.

  2. Low-cost chemiresistive sensor for volatile amines based on a 2D network of a zinc(II) Schiff-base complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabella, S.; Oliveri, I. P.; Ruffino, F.; Maccarrone, G.; Di Bella, S.

    2016-10-01

    A marked chemiresistive behavior is revealed in a nanostructured material obtained by spin-coating a solution of a bis(salycilaldiminato)Zn(II) Schiff-base (ZnSB) complex. The resulting submicron 2D network exhibits reversible changes in absorbance and resistance under the cycles of absorption and desorption of a volatile amine. These results are explained in terms of a Lewis donor-acceptor interaction between the ZnSB (acceptor) and the chemisorbed amine (donor). The 2D network of ZnSB was employed as a sensing element to fabricate a low-cost device for the volatile amines detection, showing promising results for food spoilage detection.

  3. Long-range alignments of single fullerenes by site-selective inclusion into a double-cavity 2D open network.

    PubMed

    Piot, Luc; Silly, Fabien; Tortech, Ludovic; Nicolas, Yohann; Blanchard, Philippe; Roncali, Jean; Fichou, Denis

    2009-09-16

    We show by means of STM that C(60) molecules can be trapped into specific sites of a 2D double-cavity open network, thus forming long-range alignments of single molecules. Since only one of the two cavities has the right size to host C(60), the smallest cavity remains empty and is thus available to trap additional species of smaller size. This novel 2D supramolecular network opens new perspectives in the design of multicomponent guest-host architectures with electronic functionalities.

  4. 2-D modelling of the anticlinal structures and structural development of the eastern fold belt of the Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikder, Arif Mohiuddin; Alam, M. Mustafa

    2003-02-01

    Structural architecture of the Bengal Basin has been strongly controlled by the collision pattern of the Indian plate with the Burma and Tibetan plates. The eastern fold belt (EFB) of the basin, comprising a series of north-south-trending curvilinear anticlines and synclines, represents a fold-and-thrust belt that constitutes the westward continuation of Arakan-Chin fold system of the Indo-Burman Ranges. The present study is mainly concerned with the 2-D modelling of the anticlinal structures in order to develop an understanding about the process-response relationships between the structural style and tectonic evolution of the eastern fold belt. The dominant fold-generating mechanism is believed to be the east-west-directed compressional force arising from oblique subduction of the Indian plate beneath the Burma plate that resulted in the growth of fault-propagation folds above a detachment or decollement at depth, giving rise to the Neogene accretionary prism complex development. A prominent feature of the region is the major east-dipping thrusts separating successive accretionary wedges. In seismic sections, evidence for several phases of compressional deformation suggests that multiphase stress conditions were responsible for the structural expression of the fold belt. Deep seismic sections reveal that the base of folding is characterized by a low-interval velocity horizon that represents a detachment separating the upper folded zone from the lower, seismically coherent, nearly unfolded zone. This detachment coincides with the undercompacted pressured shale unit, which is thought to have played an important role in the structural development of the eastern fold belt. Clay mineralogical analysis reveals the presence of a low-density shale horizon within the dense and thick shale sequence that is thought to be an undercompacted pressured shale during the geological past, and was responsible for the initiation of decollement and incipient diapirism involving thin

  5. 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface: a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yue; Wang, Shiqiang; Yin, Xianpeng; Liang, Yun; Dong, Hao; Gao, Ning; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2016-07-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that the combination of periodic dielectric structures with metallic structures provides an efficient means to yield a synergetic optical response or functionality in the resultant hybrid plasmonic-photonic systems. In this work, a new hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure of 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a flat gold surface was proposed, prepared, and theoretically and experimentally characterized. This hybrid structure supports two types of modes: surface plasmon polaritons bound at the metallic surface and waveguided mode of light confined in the cavity of bowls. Optical responses of this hybrid structure as well as the spatial electric field distribution of each mode are found to be strongly dependent on the structural parameters of this system, and thus could be widely modified on demand. Importantly, compared to the widely studied hybrid systems, namely the flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres, the waveguided mode with strong field enhancement appearing in the cavities of bowls is more facilely accessible and thus suitable for practical use. For demonstration, a 2D-ordered silica sub-micron bowl array deposited on a flat gold surface was fabricated and used as a regenerable platform for fluorescence enhancement by simply accommodating emitters in bowls. All the simulation and experiment results indicate that the 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface should be a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic system with great potential for applications such as sensors or tunable emitting devices if appropriate periods and materials are employed.Recently, it has been demonstrated that the combination of periodic dielectric structures with metallic structures provides an efficient means to yield a synergetic optical response or functionality in the resultant hybrid plasmonic-photonic systems. In this work, a new hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure of 2D-ordered dielectric sub

  6. Micro PIV measurements of turbulent flow over 2D structured roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenberger, Joel; Perlin, Marc

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the turbulent boundary layer over surfaces with 2D spanwise square and triangular protrusions having nominal heights of 100 - 300 microns for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ~ 1500 through Reτ ~ 4500 using a high speed, high magnification imaging system. Micro PIV analysis gives finely resolved velocity fields of the flow (on the order of 10 microns between vectors) enabling a detailed look at the inner region as well as the flow in the immediate vicinity of the roughness elements. Additionally, planar PIV with lower resolution is performed to capture the remainder of the boundary layer to the freestream flow. Varying the streamwise distance between individual roughness elements from one to ten times the nominal heights allows investigation of k-type and d-type roughness in both the transitionally rough and fully rough regimes. Preliminary results show a shift in the mean velocity profile similar to the results of previous studies. Turbulent statistics will be presented also. The authors would like to acknowledge the support of NAVSEA which funded this project through the Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC).

  7. Residual resistance of 2D and 3D structures and Joule heat release.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V L; Kozub, V I

    2011-06-22

    We consider a residual resistance and Joule heat release in 2D nanostructures as well as in ordinary 3D conductors. We assume that elastic scattering of conduction electrons by lattice defects is predominant. Within a rather intricate situation in such systems we discuss in detail two cases. (1) The elastic scattering alone (i.e. without regard of inelastic mechanisms of scattering) leads to a transition of the mechanical energy (stored by the electrons under the action of an electric field) into heat in a traditional way. This process can be described by the Boltzmann equation where it is possible to do the configuration averaging over defect positions in the electron-impurity collision term. The corresponding conditions are usually met in metals. (2) The elastic scattering can be considered with the help of the standard electron-impurity collision integral only in combination with some additional averaging procedure (possibly including inelastic scattering or some mechanisms of electron wavefunction phase destruction). This situation is typical for degenerate semiconductors with a high concentration of dopants and conduction electrons. Quite often, heat release can be observed via transfer of heat to the lattice, i.e. via inelastic processes of electron-phonon collisions and can take place at distances much larger than the size of the device. However, a direct heating of the electron system can be registered too by, for instance, local measurements of the current noise or direct measurement of an electron distribution function.

  8. A methodology for linking 2D overland flow models with the sewer network model SWMM 5.1 based on dynamic link libraries.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Jorge; Martins, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Pluvial flooding in urban areas is characterized by a gradually varying inundation process caused by surcharge of the sewer manholes. Therefore urban flood models need to simulate the interaction between the sewer network and the overland flow in order to accurately predict the flood inundation extents. In this work we present a methodology for linking 2D overland flow models with the storm sewer model SWMM 5. SWMM 5 is a well-known free open-source code originally developed in 1971. The latest major release saw its structure re-written in C ++ allowing it to be compiled as a command line executable or through a series of calls made to function inside a dynamic link library (DLL). The methodology developed herein is written inside the same DLL in C + +, and is able to simulate the bi-directional interaction between both models during simulation. Validation is done in a real case study with an existing urban flood coupled model. The novelty herein is that the new methodology can be added to SWMM without the need for editing SWMM's original code. Furthermore, it is directly applicable to other coupled overland flow models aiming to use SWMM 5 as the sewer network model.

  9. A Comparison of the Performance of 2D Square and Rectangular Dielectric Vein Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-27

    dielectric vein structure to approximate these photonic crystals. In this case, the numerical model is improved. A rectangular vein structure is...square dielectric vein structure to approximate these photonic crystals. In this case, the numerical model is improved. A rectangular vein...34 REFERENCES 1. Kawano, K. and Kitoh, T., Introduction to Optical Waveguide Analysis : Solving Maxwell’s Equations and the Schrödinger

  10. Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Frary, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Eisses, A.

    2016-08-01

    Roxanna Frary, John N. Louie, Sathish Pullammanappallil, Amy Eisses, 2011, Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract T13G-07.

  11. Structure of brain functional networks.

    PubMed

    Kuchaiev, Oleksii; Wang, Po T; Nenadic, Zoran; Przulj, Natasa

    2009-01-01

    Brain is a complex network optimized both for segregated and distributed information processing. To perform cognitive tasks, different areas of the brain must "cooperate," thereby forming complex networks of interactions also known as brain functional networks. Previous studies have shown that these networks exhibit "small-world" characteristics. Small-world topology, however, is a general property of all brain functional networks and does not capture structural changes in these networks in response to different stimuli or cognitive tasks. Here we show how novel graph theoretic techniques can be utilized for precise analysis of brain functional networks. These techniques allow us to detect structural changes in brain functional networks in response to different stimuli or cognitive tasks. For certain types of cognitive tasks we have found that these networks exhibit geometric structure in addition to the small-world topology. The method has been applied to the electrocorticographic signals of six epileptic patients.

  12. An algorithm for computing the 2D structure of fast rotating stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rieutord, Michel; Espinosa Lara, Francisco; Putigny, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Stars may be understood as self-gravitating masses of a compressible fluid whose radiative cooling is compensated by nuclear reactions or gravitational contraction. The understanding of their time evolution requires the use of detailed models that account for a complex microphysics including that of opacities, equation of state and nuclear reactions. The present stellar models are essentially one-dimensional, namely spherically symmetric. However, the interpretation of recent data like the surface abundances of elements or the distribution of internal rotation have reached the limits of validity of one-dimensional models because of their very simplified representation of large-scale fluid flows. In this article, we describe the ESTER code, which is the first code able to compute in a consistent way a two-dimensional model of a fast rotating star including its large-scale flows. Compared to classical 1D stellar evolution codes, many numerical innovations have been introduced to deal with this complex problem. First, the spectral discretization based on spherical harmonics and Chebyshev polynomials is used to represent the 2D axisymmetric fields. A nonlinear mapping maps the spheroidal star and allows a smooth spectral representation of the fields. The properties of Picard and Newton iterations for solving the nonlinear partial differential equations of the problem are discussed. It turns out that the Picard scheme is efficient on the computation of the simple polytropic stars, but Newton algorithm is unsurpassed when stellar models include complex microphysics. Finally, we discuss the numerical efficiency of our solver of Newton iterations. This linear solver combines the iterative Conjugate Gradient Squared algorithm together with an LU-factorization serving as a preconditioner of the Jacobian matrix.

  13. Analysis of simple 2-D and 3-D metal structures subjected to fragment impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witmer, E. A.; Stagliano, T. R.; Spilker, R. L.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical methods were developed for predicting the large-deflection elastic-plastic transient structural responses of metal containment or deflector (C/D) structures to cope with rotor burst fragment impact attack. For two-dimensional C/D structures both, finite element and finite difference analysis methods were employed to analyze structural response produced by either prescribed transient loads or fragment impact. For the latter category, two time-wise step-by-step analysis procedures were devised to predict the structural responses resulting from a succession of fragment impacts: the collision force method (CFM) which utilizes an approximate prediction of the force applied to the attacked structure during fragment impact, and the collision imparted velocity method (CIVM) in which the impact-induced velocity increment acquired by a region of the impacted structure near the impact point is computed. The merits and limitations of these approaches are discussed. For the analysis of 3-d responses of C/D structures, only the CIVM approach was investigated.

  14. Exploring group 14 structures: 1D to 2D to 3D.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Cahill, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Roald

    2010-06-11

    Various one-, two- and three-dimensional Group 14 (C, Si, Ge, Sn, and Pb) element structures at P = 1 atm are studied in this work. As expected, coordination number (CN)--not an unambiguous concept for extended structures--plays an important part in the stability of structures. Carbon not only favors four-coordination, but also is quite happy with pi-bonding, allowing three- and even two-coordination to compete. Highly coordinated (CN > 4) discrete carbon molecules are rare; that "saturation of valence" is reflected in the instability of C extended structures with CN > 4. Si and Ge are quite similar to each other in their preferences. They are less biased in their coordination than C, allowing (as their molecular structures do) CN = 5 and 6, but tending towards four-coordination. Sn and Pb 3D structures are very flexible in their bonding, so that in these elements four- to twelve-coordinate structures are close in energy. This lack of discrimination among ordered structures also points to an approach to the liquid state, consistent with the low melting point of Sn and Pb. The Group 14 liquid structures we simulate in molecular dynamics calculations show the expected, effective, first coordination number increase from 5.1 for Si to 10.4 for Pb. A special point of interest emerging from our study is the instability of potential multilayer graphene structures down Group 14. Only for C will these be stable; for all the other Group 14 elements pristine, unprotected, bi- and multilayer graphenes should collapse, forming "vertical" bonds as short as the in-plane ones.

  15. Anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)–organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Li-Wei; Luo, Tzuoo-Tsair; Wang, Chih-Min; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming; Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Sheng-Long; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2016-07-15

    A Cd(II)–organic framework {[Cd_2(tpim)_4(SO_4)(H_2O)_2]·(SO_4)·21H_2O}{sub n} (1) was synthesized by reacting CdSO{sub 4}·8/3H{sub 2}O and 2,4,5-tri(4-pyridyl)imidazole (tpim) under hydrothermal conditions. A structural analysis showed that compound 1 adopts a layered structure in which the [Cd(tpim){sub 2}]{sub n} chains are linked by sulfate anions. These 2D layers are further packed into a 3D supramolecular framework via π–π interactions. The structure contains two types of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions, i.e., bridging SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and free SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions, the latter of which are included in the large channels of the framework. Compound 1 exhibits interesting anion exchange behavior. In the presence of SCN{sup −} anions, both the bridging and free SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions in 1 were completely exchanged by SCN{sup −} ligands to form a 1D species [Cd(tpim){sub 2}(SCN){sub 2}] (1A), in which the SCN{sup –} moieties function as a monodentate ligand. On the other hand, when compound 1 was ion exchanged with N{sub 3}{sup −} anions in aqueous solution, the bridging SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} moieties remained intact, and only the free guest SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} were replaced by N{sub 3}{sup −} anions. The gas adsorption behavior of the activated compound 1 was also investigated. - Highlights: • An interesting anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)–organic framework is reported. • The sulfate-incorporated 2D layer compound exhibits very different anion exchange behavior with respect to SCN{sup −} and N{sub 3}{sup −}. • Both the bridging and free SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} anions in the 2D structure were completely exchanged by SCN{sup −} ligands, resulting in the formation of a 1D species. However, in the case of N{sub 3}{sup −} anions, only the free guest SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in the structure was replaced.

  16. 2-D Joint Structural Inversion of Cross-hole Electrical Resistance and Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchedda, Abderrezak; Chouteau, Michel; Giroux, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    We present a joint structural inversion algorithm for cross-hole electrical resistance tomography (ERT) and cross-hole radar travel time tomography (RTT). The algorithm proceeds by combining the exchange of structural information and a regularization method that consists of imposing an L1-norm penalty in the wavelet domain. The minimization of the L1-norm penalty is carried out using an iterative soft-thresholding algorithm. The thresholds are estimated by maximizing a structural similarity criterion, which is a function of the two (ERT and RTT) inverted models. To solve this optimization subproblem, we used the simultaneous perturbation stochastic approach. Besides, the regularization in the wavelet basis allows for the possibility of sharp discontinuities superimposed on a smoothly varying background. Hence the structural information is extracted from each model using a Canny edge detector. The detected edge is used to construct a weighting matrix that is applied to alter the smoothness matrix constraint. To validate our methodology and its implementation, responses from two models were modelled. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach improves the spatial resolution and quantitative estimation of physical parameters. In addition, in comparison with joint structural inversion with only the exchange of structural information, our method avoids undesirable bias introduced by the exchange of structural information when the boundaries are near each other. Finally, the proposed algorithm will be applied to real data in the near future to evaluate its performance.

  17. Modeling and characterization of 2-D and 3-D textile structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation studies the analytical modeling and experimental characterization of various two-dimensional and three-dimensional textile structure composites. In the analytical approach, various theoretical models were established to predict the stiffness, strength, nonlinear deformation, and failure behavior of triaxial woven-fabric composites, 3-D braided composites, and multilayer multidirectional warp knit fabric composites in polymer and metal matrices. The structure performance maps of various textile structural composites were also established, based upon these analytical methods. In the experimental approach, extensive mechanical testing and microstructural characterization were performed to investigate the thermomechanical properties and failure behavior of 3-D braided FP/Al composites. Results of this research will serve as the basis for assessing the potential of textile composites for structural applications.

  18. 2D and 3D reconstruction and geomechanical characterization of kilometre-scale complex folded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Villa, Alberto; Bistacchi, Andrea; Iudica, Gaetano

    2015-04-01

    The geometrical, structural and geomechanical characterization of large-scale folded structures in sedimentary rocks is an important issue for different geological and geo-hazard applications (e.g. hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoir exploitation, natural rock slope stability, mining, and tunnelling). Fold geometry controls topography and the spatial distribution of rock types with different strength and permeability. Fold-related fracture systems condition the fracture intensity, degree of freedom, and overall strength of rock masses. Nevertheless, scale issues and limited accessibility or partial exposure of structures often hamper a complete characterization of these complex structures. During the last years, advances in remote survey techniques as terrestrial Lidar (TLS) allowed significant improvements in the geometrical and geological characterization of large or inaccessible outcrops. However, sound methods relating structures to rock mass geomechanical properties are yet to be developed. Here we present results obtained by integrating remote survey and field assessment techniques to characterize a folded sedimentary succession exposed in unreachable vertical rock walls. The study area is located in the frontal part of the Southern Alps near Bergamo, Italy. We analysed large-scale detachment folds developed in the Upper Triassic sedimentary cover in the Zu Limestone. Folds are parallel and disharmonic, with regular wavelengths and amplitudes of about 200-250 m. We used a Riegl VZ-1000 long-range laser scanner to obtain points clouds with nominal spacings between 5 cm and 20 cm from 9 scan positions characterized by range between 350 m and 1300 m. We fixed shadowing and occlusion effects related to fold structure exposure by filling point clouds with data collected by terrestrial digital photogrammetry (TDP). In addition, we carried out field surveys of fold-related brittle structures and their geomechanical attributes at key locations. We classified cloud

  19. Three 2D Ag(I)-framework isomers with helical structures controlled by the chirality of camphor-10-sulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng

    2011-02-28

    Three 2D Ag(I)-framework isomers were constructed from enantiopure camphor-10-sulfonic acids or racemic camphor-10-sulfonic acids, together with achiral 4-aminobenzoic acids. In complex 1, (+)-camphor-10-sulfonic acids bridge the single left-handed helices that are made up of Ag ions and 4-aminobenzoic acids, generating a homochiral 2D layer. In such a structure, the interweaving of triple left-handed homohelices was also found. It is worth noting that the helicity of complex 2 could be controlled by the handedness of the camphor-10-sulfonic acid. In complex 2, there are right-handed helical structures, including single right-handed and triple right-handed helical structures connected by (-)-camphor-10-sulfonic acids. For a comparative study, (±)-camphor-10-sulfonic acids were utilized to synthesize complex 3, in which equal numbers of right-handed or left-handed double-helical chains are created. All the complexes were characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure determination, powder X-ray diffraction, IR, TGA and element analysis. Circular dichroism spectra of complexes 1 and 2 were been studied to confirm the fact that enantiopure bridging ligands do not racemize.

  20. Learning the 3-D structure of objects from 2-D views depends on shape, not format

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Moqian; Yamins, Daniel; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2016-01-01

    Humans can learn to recognize new objects just from observing example views. However, it is unknown what structural information enables this learning. To address this question, we manipulated the amount of structural information given to subjects during unsupervised learning by varying the format of the trained views. We then tested how format affected participants' ability to discriminate similar objects across views that were rotated 90° apart. We found that, after training, participants' performance increased and generalized to new views in the same format. Surprisingly, the improvement was similar across line drawings, shape from shading, and shape from shading + stereo even though the latter two formats provide richer depth information compared to line drawings. In contrast, participants' improvement was significantly lower when training used silhouettes, suggesting that silhouettes do not have enough information to generate a robust 3-D structure. To test whether the learned object representations were format-specific or format-invariant, we examined if learning novel objects from example views transfers across formats. We found that learning objects from example line drawings transferred to shape from shading and vice versa. These results have important implications for theories of object recognition because they suggest that (a) learning the 3-D structure of objects does not require rich structural cues during training as long as shape information of internal and external features is provided and (b) learning generates shape-based object representations independent of the training format. PMID:27153196

  1. New dicyano cyclometalated compounds containing Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds as building blocks in 2D extended structures: synthesis, structure, and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Fuertes, Sara; Martín, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    New mixed metal complexes [PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = 7,8-benzoquinolinate (bzq, 3); 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy, 4)] have been synthesized by reaction of their corresponding precursors (NBu(4))[Pd(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = bzq (1), ppy (2)] with TlPF(6). Compounds 3 and 4 were studied by X-ray diffraction, showing the not-so-common Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds. Both crystal structures exhibit 2-D extended networks fashioned by organometallic "PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)" units, each one containing a donor-acceptor Pd(II)-Tl(I) bond, which are connected through additional Tl···N≡C contacts and weak Tl···π (bzq) contacts in the case of 3. Solid state emissions are red-shifted compared with those of the precursors and have been assigned to metal-metal'-to-ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT [d/s σ*(Pd,Tl) → π*(C^N)]) mixed with some intraligand ((3)IL[π(C^N) → π*(C^N)]) character. In diluted solution either at room temperature or 77 K, the Pd-Tl bond is no longer retained as confirmed by mass spectrometry, NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques.

  2. Fringe structures and tunable bandgap width of 2D boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Peter; Sajjad, Muhammad; Li, Eric Yiming; Zhang, Hongxin; Chu, Jin; Aldalbahi, Ali; Morell, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    We report studies of the surface fringe structures and tunable bandgap width of atomic-thin boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs). BNNSs are synthesized by using digitally controlled pulse deposition techniques. The nanoscale morphologies of BNNSs are characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In general, the BNNSs appear microscopically flat in the case of low temperature synthesis, whereas at high temperature conditions, it yields various curved structures. Experimental data reveal the evolutions of fringe structures. Functionalization of the BNNSs is completed with hydrogen plasma beam source in order to efficiently control bandgap width. The characterizations are based on Raman scattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and FTIR transmittance spectra. Red shifts of spectral lines are clearly visible after the functionalization, indicating the bandgap width of the BNNSs has been changed. However, simple treatments with hydrogen gas do not affect the bandgap width of the BNNSs.

  3. Discrete hexamer water clusters and 2D water layer trapped in three luminescent Ag/tetramethylpyrazine/benzene-dicarboxylate hosts: 1D chain, 2D layer and 3D network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Hong-Xin; Zhang, Ting; Huang, Hua-Qi; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2016-03-01

    Three mix-ligand Ag(I) coordination compounds, namely, {[Ag10(tpyz) 5(L1) 5(H2 O)2].(H2 O)4}n (1, tpyz = 2,3,4,5-tetramethylpyrazine, H2 L1 = phthalic acid), [Ag4(tpyz) 2(L2) 2(H2 O)].(H2 O)5}n (2, H2 L2 = isophthalic acid) {[Ag2(tpyz) 2(L3) (H2 O)4].(H2 O)8}n (3, H2 L3 = terephthalic acid), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, PXRD and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. 1 exhibits a 2D layer which can be simplified as a (4,4) net. 2 is a 3D network which can be simplified as a (3,3)-connected 2-nodal net with a point symbol of {102.12}{102}. 3 consists of linear [Ag(tpyz) (H2 O)2]n chain. Of particular interest, discrete hexamer water clusters were observed in 1 and 2, while a 2D L10(6) water layer exists in 3. The results suggest that the benzene dicarboxylates play pivotal roles in the formation of the different host architectures as well as different water aggregations. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and emissive behaviors of these compounds were investigated.

  4. Structural study of synthetic mica montmorillonite by means of 2D MAS NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, M. D.; Castro, M. A.; Chain, P.; Naranjo, M.; Perdigón, A. C.

    2005-07-01

    Syn-1, is a synthetic mica montmorillonite interstratified mineral that forms one of the standard clay samples in the Clay Minerals Society Source Clays Project. However, there are still controversies regarding some structural aspects such as the interlayer composition or the location of the extra-aluminium determined by chemical analysis. The main objective of this paper is to shed light on those structural aspects that affect the reactivity of the interstratified minerals. For this purpose, we have used 1 H 29 Si and 1 H 27Al HETCOR MAS NMR to show that it is likely that the interlayer space of the beidellite part is composed of ammonium ions whereas ammonium and aluminium ions are responsible for the charge balance in the mica type layer.

  5. Electronic and structural properties of 3D, 2D and 1D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Filipe Joao

    In this work several applications of the ab initio pseudopotential density functional theory method are presented. With this method it is possible to calculate the electronic ground state properties of many systems like bulk solids, surfaces, nanotubes, and nanowires, and draw conclusions about the systems structural and electronic properties. With modifications of this approach excited states can also be treated. The first chapter of this thesis gives a brief description of the computational techniques employed. The second chapter describes results of calculations on the structural and electronic properties of carbon and germanium. We try to shed some light on a still poorly understood structural phase transition of graphite under pressure at low temperatures, which is different from the high temperature regime. Next, we study the phase transition path of germanium under pressure and predict the existence of a new phase. The following chapter explores the possibility of superconductivity in the graphite-like compound BC3 since there are many similarities between the electronic structure of this material and the 39 K superconductor MgB2. Subsequently, results of calculations on the adsorption of indium atoms on carbon nanotubes and graphite-like surfaces are presented. These studies explain some very interesting experimental results of In migration on nanotubes in an electrical potential. In the following chapters the electronic properties of very thin metallic MoSe nanowires are studied, and the different regimes of stability of metallic monatomic chains of Au, Al, Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru are investigated and compared. Chapter 7 addresses the possible polymerization of C60 molecules inside carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. Finally, the propagation of a light signal in a medium with gains and losses is investigated, and the possibility of a discontinuity in the index of refraction is discussed.

  6. Tuning the Structural Color of a 2D Photonic Crystal Using a Bowl-like Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Umh, Ha Nee; Yu, Sungju; Kim, Yong Hwa; Lee, Su Young; Yi, Jongheop

    2016-06-22

    Structural colors of the ordered photonic nanostructures are widely used as an effective platform for manipulating the propagation of light. Although several approaches have been explored in attempts to mimic the structural colors, improving the reproducibility, mechanical stability, and the economic feasibility of sophisticated photonic crystals prepared by complicated processes continues to pose a challenge. In this study, we report on an alternative, simple method for fabricating a tunable photonic crystal at room temperature. A bowl-like nanostructure of TiO2 was periodically arranged on a thin Ti sheet through a two-step anodization process where its diameters were systemically controlled by changing the applied voltage. Consequently, they displayed a broad color distribution, ranging from red to indigo, and the principal reason for color generation followed the Bragg diffraction theory. This noncolorant method was capable of reproducing a Mondrian painting on a centimeter scale without the need to employ complex architectures, where the generated structural colors were highly stable under mechanical or chemical influence. Such a color printing technique represents a potentially promising platform for practical applications for anticounterfeit trademarks, wearable sensors, and displays.

  7. Protein folding simulations of 2D HP model by the genetic algorithm based on optimal secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenhua; Yang, Xiangbo; He, Zhihong

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, based on the evolutionary Monte Carlo (EMC) algorithm, we have made four points of ameliorations and propose a so-called genetic algorithm based on optimal secondary structure (GAOSS) method to predict efficiently the protein folding conformations in the two-dimensional hydrophobic-hydrophilic (2D HP) model. Nine benchmarks are tested to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach and the results show that for the listed benchmarks GAOSS can find the best solutions so far. It means that reasonable, effective and compact secondary structures (SSs) can avoid blind searches and can reduce time consuming significantly. On the other hand, as examples, we discuss the diversity of protein GSC for the 24-mer and 85-mer sequences. Several GSCs have been found by GAOSS and some of the conformations are quite different from each other. It would be useful for the designing of protein molecules. GAOSS would be an efficient tool for the protein structure predictions (PSP).

  8. Improved 2-D attenuation analysis for Northern Italy using a merged dataset from selected regional seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasca, Paola; Massa, Marco; Laprocina, Enrica; Mayeda, Kevin; Phillips, Scott; Malagnini, Luca; Spallarossa, Daniele; Costa, Giovanni; Augliera, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    A merged, high-quality waveform dataset from different seismic networks has been used to improve our understanding of lateral seismic attenuation for Northern Italy. In a previous study on the same region, Morasca et al. (Bull Seismol Soc Am 98:1936-1946, 2008) were able to resolve only a small area due to limited data coverage. For this reason, the interpretation of the attenuation anomalies was difficult given the complexity of the region and the poor resolution of the available data. In order to better understand the lateral changes in the crustal structure and thickness of this region, we selected 770 earthquakes recorded by 54 stations for a total of almost 16,000 waveforms derived from seismic networks operating totally or partially in Northern Italy. Direct S-wave and coda attenuation images were obtained using an amplitude ratio technique that eliminates source terms from the formulation. Both direct and early-coda amplitudes are used as input for the inversions, and the results are compared. Results were obtained for various frequency bands ranging between 0.3 and 25.0 Hz and in all cases show significant improvement with respect to the previous study since the resolved area has been extended and more crossing paths have been used to image smaller scale anomalies. Quality-factor estimates are consistent with the regional tectonic structure exhibiting a general trend of low attenuation under the Po Plain basin and higher values for the Western Alps and Northern Apennines. The interpretation of the results for the Eastern Alps is not simple, possibly because our resolution for this area is still not adequate to resolve small-scale structures.

  9. Surviving structure in colloidal suspensions squeezed from 3D to 2D.

    PubMed

    Klapp, Sabine H L; Zeng, Yan; Qu, Dan; von Klitzing, Regine

    2008-03-21

    Combining colloidal-probe experiments and computer simulations, we analyze the solvation forces F of charged silica colloids confined in films of various thicknesses h. We show that the oscillations characterizing F(h), for sufficiently large h, are determined by the dominant wavelength of the bulk radial distribution function. As a consequence, both quantities display the same power-law density dependence. This is the first direct evidence, in a system treatable both by experiment and by simulation, that the structural wavelength in bulk and confinement coincide, in agreement with predictions from density functional theory. Moreover, theoretical and experimental data are in excellent quantitative agreement.

  10. 2-D Hierarchical Structure of a Block Copolymer and Bio-nanoparticle Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongseok; Lin, Yao; Wang, Qian; Russell, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    2-dimensional hierarchical structures were generated by combining two different self assembling systems; block copolymer and bio-nanoparticle. For this study, a block copolymer having a positively charged component, i.e. poly (styrene-b-N-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodide), was used. Thin film composites of this block copolymer and bio-nanoparticles were fabricated by adsorbing bio-particles on the polymer film and subsequently annealing the sample under the presence of solvent vapor. 2-dimensional hierarchical structures, where block copolymer chains microphase separated inside of discrete grains surrounded by bio-nanoparticles, were obtained with rod- like bio-particles (tobacco mosaic virus and M13 phage) as well as with spherical one (ferritin). The pH effect on the assembly of rod-like bio-particles and the morphology of composites was investigated. When the pH of the solution used for the adsorption of bio-particles was low, the bio-molecules aggregated and formed large bundles, while they were dispersed well at high pH. This difference was reflected in the morphology of the resultant complexes.

  11. Network model with structured nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisco, Pierluigi

    2011-08-01

    We present a network model in which words over a specific alphabet, called structures, are associated to each node and undirected edges are added depending on some distance measure between different structures. This model shifts the underlying principle of network generation from a purely mathematical one to an information-based one. It is shown how this model differs from the Barábasi-Albert and duplication models and how it can generate networks with topological features similar to biological networks: power law degree distribution, low average path length, clustering coefficient independent from the network size, etc. Two biological networks: S. cerevisiae gene network and E. coli protein-protein interaction network, are replicated using this model.

  12. Ellipse fitting of short light stripe for structured-light-based 2D vision inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Wei, Zhenzhong

    2003-09-01

    Structured light based 3D vision has wide applications in inspecting the form and position errors like straightness and coaxiality of cylindrical workpieces. But for these applications, the light stripe on the workpiece's surface is much too short, and contains inadequate data information, even with some noise. Under such circumstances, the ellipse fitting to the scattered data of the light stripe is not efficient enough, and its fitting accuracy is usually poor. To address this problem, a new least-square fitting method based on the constraint of ellipse minor axis (called CEMA method) is proposed in detail in this paper. Simulations are given for the proposed method and for five other popular methods described in the literature. The results show that the proposed method can efficiently improve the accuracy and the robustness of ellipse fitting to the scattered data of short light stripe.

  13. Algorithms for the automatic generation of 2-D structured multi-block grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Thilo; Weinerfelt, Per; Jenssen, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    Two different approaches to the fully automatic generation of structured multi-block grids in two dimensions are presented. The work aims to simplify the user interactivity necessary for the definition of a multiple block grid topology. The first approach is based on an advancing front method commonly used for the generation of unstructured grids. The original algorithm has been modified toward the generation of large quadrilateral elements. The second method is based on the divide-and-conquer paradigm with the global domain recursively partitioned into sub-domains. For either method each of the resulting blocks is then meshed using transfinite interpolation and elliptic smoothing. The applicability of these methods to practical problems is demonstrated for typical geometries of fluid dynamics.

  14. TUNABLE Band Structures of 2d Multi-Atom Archimedean-Like Phononic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. L.; Chen, C. Q.; Tian, X. G.

    2012-06-01

    Two dimensional multi-atom Archimedean-like phononic crystals (MAPCs) can be obtained by adding "atoms" at suitable positions in primitive cells of traditional simple lattices. Band structures of solid-solid and solid-air MAPCs are computed by the finite element method in conjunction with the Bloch theory. For the solid-solid system, our results show that the MAPCs can be suitably designed to split and shift band gaps of the corresponding traditional simple phononic crystal (i.e., with only one scatterer inside a primitive cell). For the solid-air system, the MAPCs have more and wider band gaps than the corresponding traditional simple phononic crystal. Numerical calculations for both solid-solid and solid-air MAPCs show that the band gap of traditional simple phononic crystal can be tuned by appropriately adding "atoms" into its primitive cell.

  15. Structure elucidation of organic compounds from natural sources using 1D and 2D NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Gulacti; Ulubelen, Ayhan

    2007-05-01

    In our continuing studies on Lamiaceae family plants including Salvia, Teucrium, Ajuga, Sideritis, Nepeta and Lavandula growing in Anatolia, many terpenoids, consisting of over 50 distinct triterpenoids and steroids, and over 200 diterpenoids, several sesterterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids along with many flavonoids and other phenolic compounds have been isolated. For Salvia species abietanes, for Teucrium and Ajuga species neo-clerodanes for Sideritis species ent-kaurane diterpenes are characteristic while nepetalactones are specific for Nepeta species. In this review article, only some interesting and different type of skeleton having constituents, namely rearranged, nor- or rare diterpenes, isolated from these species will be presented. For structure elucidation of these natural diterpenoids intensive one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ( 1H, 13C, APT, DEPT, NOE/NOESY, 1H- 1H COSY, HETCOR, COLOC, HMQC/HSQC, HMBC, SINEPT) were used besides mass and some other spectroscopic methods.

  16. Solving structure in the CP29 light harvesting complex with polarization-phased 2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Naomi S.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2011-01-01

    The CP29 light harvesting complex from green plants is a pigment-protein complex believed to collect, conduct, and quench electronic excitation energy in photosynthesis. We have spectroscopically determined the relative angle between electronic transition dipole moments of its chlorophyll excitation energy transfer pairs in their local protein environments without relying on simulations or an X-ray crystal structure. To do so, we measure a basis set of polarized 2D electronic spectra and isolate their absorptive components on account of the tensor relation between the light polarization sequences used to obtain them. This broadly applicable advance further enhances the acuity of polarized 2D electronic spectroscopy and provides a general means to initiate or feed back on the structural modeling of electronically-coupled chromophores in condensed phase systems, tightening the inferred relations between the spatial and electronic landscapes of ultrafast energy flow. We also discuss the pigment composition of CP29 in the context of light harvesting, energy channeling, and photoprotection within photosystem II. PMID:21321222

  17. 2D IR spectroscopy of histidine: probing side-chain structure and dynamics via backbone amide vibrations.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Tucker, Matthew J; Gai, Feng

    2014-07-17

    It is well known that histidine is involved in many biological functions due to the structural versatility of its side chain. However, probing the conformational transitions of histidine in proteins, especially those occurring on an ultrafast time scale, is difficult. Herein we show, using a histidine dipeptide as a model, that it is possible to probe the tautomer and protonation status of a histidine residue by measuring the two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectrum of its amide I vibrational transition. Specifically, for the histidine dipeptide studied, the amide unit of the histidine gives rise to three spectrally resolvable amide I features at approximately 1630, 1644, and 1656 cm(-1), respectively, which, based on measurements at different pH values and frequency calculations, are assigned to a τ tautomer (1630 cm(-1) component) and a π tautomer with a hydrated (1644 cm(-1) component) or dehydrated (1656 cm(-1) component) amide. Because of the intrinsic ultrafast time resolution of 2D IR spectroscopy, we believe that the current approach, when combined with the isotope editing techniques, will be useful in revealing the structural dynamics of key histidine residues in proteins that are important for function.

  18. Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural chemistry and generalized 2D FTIR correlation spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Ran; Chai Xiaochuan; Mei Hongxin; Zhang Hanhui; Chen Yiping; Sun Yanqiong

    2010-07-15

    Four divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonates, [Ni(4,4'-bipy)H{sub 2}L{sup 1}(HL{sup 1}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O 1, [Ni{sub 2}(4,4'-bipy)(L{sup 2})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O 2, Mn(phen){sub 2}(H{sub 2}L{sup 1}){sub 2}3 and Mn(phen)(HL{sup 2}) 4 (H{sub 3}L{sup 1}=p-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, H{sub 3}L{sup 2}=m-H{sub 2}O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COOH, 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. 1 features 1D linear chains built from Ni(II) ions bridging 4,4'-bipy. In 2, neighboring Ni{sub 4} cluster units are connected by pairs of H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands to form 1D double-crankshaft chains, which are interconnected by pairs of 4,4'-bipy into 2D sheets. 3 exhibits 2D supramolecular layers via the R{sub 2}{sup 2}(8) ringed hydrogen bonding units. 4 has 1D ladderlike chains, in which the 4-membered rings are cross-linked by the organic moieties of the H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands. Additionally, 2D FTIR correlation analysis is applied with thermal and magnetic perturbation to clarify the structural changes of functional groups from H{sub 3}L{sup 1} and H{sub 3}L{sup 2} ligands in the compounds more efficiently. - Graphical abstract: A series of divalent transition metal carboxyarylphosphonate compounds were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The figure displays 2D sheet structure with large windows in compound 2.

  19. The Structure and Stability of Selected, 2-D Self-Gravitating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andalib, Saied W.

    1998-12-01

    Models of radially and vertically extended self-gravitating disks orbiting around a central point mass are relevant to the dynamics of astrophysical systems and are thought to be common in many galaxies. The gravity driven instabilities in these accretion disks are now believed to be a possible mechanism for star formation via disk fragmentation (Shu, Adams, & Lizano 1987, Adams, Rudin & Shu 1989; Christodoulou 1995). We quantify these regions of instability using a simple toroidal model of an accretion disk. We choose the two-dimensional axisymmetric, incompressible slender disks to examine and map out these principal modes of gravity driven instabilities. Through stability analyses and numerical simulations we have found that only the gravity driven 'intermediate' modes (see Goodman and Narayan 1988) are important in all self-gravitating accretion disks with small or moderate axis ratios. The P-mode instability found by Papalaizou and Pringle (1983) is unlikely to play a role in the dynamics of realistic disk systems. Next, we extend the existing numerical methods for constructing equilibrium structures to include nonaxisymmetric systems. We have developed a new computational technique to obtain two-dimensional, nonaxisymmetric, compressible systems with nontrivial internal motions. We have constructed two types of two-dimensional configurations: infinite cylinders and infinitesimally thin disks. The infinite cylinders have been primarily restricted to elliptic-like boundaries but the disks have exhibited much more flexibility in their geometries. At smaller axis ratios, they become dumbbells or loosely coupled binaries. The topology and dynamics of the flow is governed by the presence of vortices and stagnation points. In our simulation it is shown that there are equilibrium configurations that can only exist in the presence of internal differential motions and not in uniformly rotating models. This indicates that in general, the equilibrium structures of these

  20. Structure and properties of phosphorene-like IV-VI 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhinan; Wang, Bo; Ou, Liangkai; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-14

    Because of the excellent physical and chemical properties of phosphorene, phosphorene and phosphorene-like materials have attracted extensive attention. Since phosphorus belongs to group V, some group IV-VI compounds could also form phosphorene-like configurations. In this work, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS monolayers were constructed to investigate the structural and electronic properties by employing first-principles computations. Phonon spectra suggest that these monolayers are dynamically stable and could be realized in experiments. These monolayers are all semiconductors with the band gaps of 2.26 ∼ 4.13 eV. Based on the monolayers, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS bilayers were also constructed. The band gaps of these bilayers are smaller than those of the corresponding monolayers. Moreover, the optical properties of these monolayers and bilayers were calculated, and the results indicate that the SnO, GeS and SnS bilayers exhibit obvious optical absorption in the visible spectrum. All the results suggest that phosphorene-like IV-VI materials are promising candidates for electronic and optical devices.

  1. A novel 2-D transition metal cyanide membrane: Modeling, structural, magnetic, and functional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Marcus

    A novel 2-dimensional crystalline material composed of cyanide-bridged metal nanosheets with a square planar framework has been prepared. This material, similar to Hofmann clathrates, has a variety of interesting properties. The material is crystalline and possesses characteristics that include magnetic properties, electronic properties and useful structural features. They have recently been exfoliated into individual crystalline sheets. These sheets show a strong potential for use as ion selective membranes. Performance improvements in water purification and desalination by reverse osmosis methods owing to their single atom thickness is possible. A series of dynamic molecular simulations has provided an understanding of the mechanism for water permeability and salt rejection. Energy profiles for the passage of water and ionic species through the porous areas of these nanosheets have been built and reported. Performance estimates of the efficacy of this novel material for use as an ion selective membrane such as an improved desalination RO membrane are presented. Experiments in synthesis and exfoliation of this class of cyanide-bridged transition metal complex were conducted and the results are presented. A preliminary investigation into the magnetic properties of these materials is included.

  2. Characterization of Unsteady Flow Structures Near Landing-Edge Slat. Part 2; 2D Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2004-01-01

    In our previous computational studies of a generic high-lift configuration, quasi-laminar (as opposed to fully turbulent) treatment of the slat cove region proved to be an effective approach for capturing the unsteady dynamics of the cove flow field. Combined with acoustic propagation via Ffowes Williams and Hawkings formulation, the quasi-laminar simulations captured some important features of the slat cove noise measured with microphone array techniques. However. a direct assessment of the computed cove flow field was not feasible due to the unavailability of off-surface flow measurements. To remedy this shortcoming, we have undertaken a combined experiment and computational study aimed at characterizing the flow structures and fluid mechanical processes within the slat cove region. Part I of this paper outlines the experimental aspects of this investigation focused on the 30P30N high-lift configuration; the present paper describes the accompanying computational results including a comparison between computation and experiment at various angles of attack. Even through predictions of the time-averaged flow field agree well with the measured data, the study indicates the need for further refinement of the zonal turbulence approach in order to capture the full dynamics of the cove's fluctuating flow field.

  3. Stability and electronic properties of SiGe-based 2D layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdagni, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Thakur, Anil; Pandey, Ravindra; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of the in-plane hybrids consisting of siligene (SiGe), and its derivatives in both mono and bilayer forms are investigated within density functional theory. Among several pristine and hydrogenated configurations, the so-called chair conformation is energetically favorable for monolayers. On the other hand, the bilayer siligane (HSiGeH) prefers AB-stacked chair conformation and bilayer siligone (HSiGe) prefers AA-stacked buckled conformation. In SiGe, the Dirac-cone character is predicted to be retained. HSiGe is a magnetic semiconductor with a band gap of ˜0.6 eV. The electronic properties show tunability under mechanical strain and transverse electric field; (i) the energy gap opens up in the SiGe bilayer, (ii) a direct-to-indirect gap transition is predicted by the applied strain in the HSiGeH bilayer, and (iii) a semiconductor-to-metal transition is predicted for HSiGe and HSiGeH bilayers under the application of strain and electric field, thus suggesting SiGe and its derivatives to be a potential candidate for electronic devices at nanoscale.

  4. Electrophysiological and Structural Remodeling in Heart Failure Modulate Arrhythmogenesis. 2D Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan F.; Cardona, Karen; Martinez, Laura; Saiz, Javier; Trenor, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is operationally defined as the inability of the heart to maintain blood flow to meet the needs of the body and it is the final common pathway of various cardiac pathologies. Electrophysiological remodeling, intercellular uncoupling and a pro-fibrotic response have been identified as major arrhythmogenic factors in heart failure. Objective In this study we investigate vulnerability to reentry under heart failure conditions by incorporating established electrophysiological and anatomical remodeling using computer simulations. Methods The electrical activity of human transmural ventricular tissue (5 cm×5 cm) was simulated using the human ventricular action potential model Grandi et al. under control and heart failure conditions. The MacCannell et al. model was used to model fibroblast electrical activity, and their electrotonic interactions with myocytes. Selected degrees of diffuse fibrosis and variations in intercellular coupling were considered and the vulnerable window (VW) for reentry was evaluated following cross-field stimulation. Results No reentry was observed in normal conditions or in the presence of HF ionic remodeling. However, defined amount of fibrosis and/or cellular uncoupling were sufficient to elicit reentrant activity. Under conditions where reentry was generated, HF electrophysiological remodeling did not alter the width of the VW. However, intermediate fibrosis and cellular uncoupling significantly widened the VW. In addition, biphasic behavior was observed, as very high fibrotic content or very low tissue conductivity hampered the development of reentry. Detailed phase analysis of reentry dynamics revealed an increase of phase singularities with progressive fibrotic components. Conclusion Structural remodeling is a key factor in the genesis of vulnerability to reentry. A range of intermediate levels of fibrosis and intercellular uncoupling can combine to favor reentrant activity. PMID:25054335

  5. Unusual Domain Structure and Filamentary Superfluidity for 2D Hard-Core Bosons in Insulating Charge-Ordered Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Yu. D.; Moskvin, A. S.; Rybakov, F. N.; Borisov, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    We made use of a special algorithm for compute unified device architecture for NVIDIA graphics cards, a nonlinear conjugate-gradient method to minimize energy functional, and Monte-Carlo technique to directly observe the forming of the ground state configuration for the 2D hard-core bosons by lowering the temperature and its evolution with deviation away from half-filling. The novel technique allowed us to examine earlier implications and uncover novel features of the phase transitions, in particular, look upon the nucleation of the odd domain structure, emergence of filamentary superfluidity nucleated at the antiphase domain walls of the charge-ordered phase, and nucleation and evolution of different topological structures.

  6. Bifurcations of edge states—topologically protected and non-protected—in continuous 2D honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, C. L.; Lee-Thorp, J. P.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Edge states are time-harmonic solutions to energy-conserving wave equations, which are propagating parallel to a line-defect or ‘edge’ and are localized transverse to it. This paper summarizes and extends the authors’ work on the bifurcation of topologically protected edge states in continuous two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures. We consider a family of Schrödinger Hamiltonians consisting of a bulk honeycomb potential and a perturbing edge potential. The edge potential interpolates between two different periodic structures via a domain wall. We begin by reviewing our recent bifurcation theory of edge states for continuous 2D honeycomb structures (http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06111). The topologically protected edge state bifurcation is seeded by the zero-energy eigenstate of a one-dimensional Dirac operator. We contrast these protected bifurcations with (more common) non-protected bifurcations from spectral band edges, which are induced by bound states of an effective Schrödinger operator. Numerical simulations for honeycomb structures of varying contrasts and ‘rational edges’ (zigzag, armchair and others), support the following scenario: (a) for low contrast, under a sign condition on a distinguished Fourier coefficient of the bulk honeycomb potential, there exist topologically protected edge states localized transverse to zigzag edges. Otherwise, and for general edges, we expect long lived edge quasi-modes which slowly leak energy into the bulk. (b) For an arbitrary rational edge, there is a threshold in the medium-contrast (depending on the choice of edge) above which there exist topologically protected edge states. In the special case of the armchair edge, there are two families of protected edge states; for each parallel quasimomentum (the quantum number associated with translation invariance) there are edge states which propagate in opposite directions along the armchair edge.

  7. Ab Initio Based 2D Continuum Mechanics - Sensitivity Prediction for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy Based Structure Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Lopes, J. Marcelo J.; Zauscher, Stefan; Blum, Volker

    Contact resonance AFM is demonstrated as a powerful tool for mapping differences in the mechanical properties of 2D materials and heterostructures, permitting to resolve surface and subsurface structural differences of different domains. Measured contact resonance frequencies are related to the contact stiffness of the combined tip-sample system. Based on first principles predicted elastic properties and a continuum approach to model the mechanical impedance, we find contact stiffness ratios between different domains of few-layer graphene on 3C-SiC(111) in excellent agreement with experiment. We next demonstrate that the approach is able to quantitatively resolve differences between other 2D materials domains, e.g., for h-BN, MoS2 and MoO3 on graphene on SiC. We show that the combined effect of several materials parameters, especially the in-plane elastic properties and the layer thickness, determines the contact stiffness, therefore boosting the sensitivity even if the out-of-plane elastic properties are similar.

  8. Controlled Self-Assembly of Cyclophane Amphiphiles: From 1D Nanofibers to Ultrathin 2D Topological Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhengxu; Li, Lianwei; Lo, Wai-Yip; Zhao, Donglin; Wu, Qinghe; Zhang, Na; Su, Yu-An; Chen, Wei; Yu, Luping

    2016-07-05

    A novel series of amphiphilic TC-PEG molecules were designed and synthesized based on the orthogonal cyclophane unit. These molecules were able to self-assemble from 1D nanofibers and nanobelts to 2D ultrathin nanosheets (3 nm thick) in a controlled way by tuning the length of PEG side chains. The special structure of the cyclophane moiety allowed control in construction of nanostructures through programmed noncovalent interactions (hydrophobic hydrophilic interaction and pi-pi interaction). The self-assembled nanostructures were characterized by combining real space imaging (TEM, SEM, and AFM) and reciprocal space scattering (GIWAXS) techniques. This unique supramolecular system may provide a new strategy for the design of materials with tunable nanomorphology and functionality.

  9. Structural, electronic transport and optical properties of functionalized quasi-2D TiC2 from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiyorov, G. R.; Madjet, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Using the first-principles density functional theory, we study the effect of surface functionalization on the structural and optoelectronic properties of recently proposed quasi-two-dimensional material TiC2 [T. Zhao, S. Zhang, Y. Guo, Q. Wang, Nanoscale 8 (2016) 233]. Hydrogenated, fluorinated, oxidized and hydroxylated surfaces are considered. Significant changes in the lattice parameters and partial charge distributions are found due to the surface termination. Direct contribution of the adatoms to the system density of states near the Fermi level is obtained, which has a major impact on the optoelectronic properties of the material. For example, surface termination results in larger absorption in the visible range of the spectrum. The electronic transport is also affected by the surface functionalization: the current in the system can be reduced by an order of magnitude. These findings indicate the importance of the effects of surface passivation on optoelectronic properties of this quasi-2D material.

  10. The electronic structure and spin states of 2D graphene/VX2 (X = S, Se) heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Popov, Z I; Mikhaleva, N S; Visotin, M A; Kuzubov, A A; Entani, S; Naramoto, H; Sakai, S; Sorokin, P B; Avramov, P V

    2016-12-07

    The structural, magnetic and electronic properties of 2D VX2 (X = S, Se) monolayers and graphene/VX2 heterostructures were studied using a DFT+U approach. It was found that the stability of the 1T phases of VX2 monolayers is linked to strong electron correlation effects. The study of vertical junctions comprising of graphene and VX2 monolayers demonstrated that interlayer interactions lead to the formation of strong spin polarization of both graphene and VX2 fragments while preserving the linear dispersion of graphene-originated bands. It was found that the insertion of Mo atoms between the layers leads to n-doping of graphene with a selective transformation of graphene bands keeping the spin-down Dirac cone intact.

  11. Coherent phenomena in terahertz 2D plasmonic structures: strong coupling, plasmonic crystals, and induced transparency by coupling of localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gregory C.; Aizin, Gregory R.; Allen, S. James; Grine, Albert D.; Bethke, Don; Reno, John L.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2014-05-01

    The device applications of plasmonic systems such as graphene and two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in III-V heterostructures include terahertz detectors, mixers, oscillators and modulators. These two dimensional (2D) plasmonic systems are not only well-suited for device integration, but also enable the broad tunability of underdamped plasma excitations via an applied electric field. We present demonstrations of the coherent coupling of multiple voltage tuned GaAs/AlGaAs 2D plasmonic resonators under terahertz irradiation. By utilizing a plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism to downconvert the near field of plasma waves to a DC signal, we directly detect the spectrum of coupled plasmonic micro-resonator structures at cryogenic temperatures. The 2DEG in the studied devices can be interpreted as a plasmonic waveguide where multiple gate terminals control the 2DEG kinetic inductance. When the gate tuning of the 2DEG is spatially periodic, a one-dimensional finite plasmonic crystal forms. This results in a subwavelength structure, much like a metamaterial element, that nonetheless Bragg scatters plasma waves from a repeated crystal unit cell. A 50% in situ tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges is observed. By introducing gate-controlled defects or simply terminating the lattice, localized states arise in the plasmonic crystal. Inherent asymmetries at the finite crystal boundaries produce an induced transparency-like phenomenon due to the coupling of defect modes and crystal surface states known as Tamm states. The demonstrated active control of coupled plasmonic resonators opens previously unexplored avenues for sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detection, planar metamaterials, and slow-light devices.

  12. Kohn-Sham Band Structure Benchmark Including Spin-Orbit Coupling for 2D and 3D Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, William; Blum, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Accurate electronic band structures serve as a primary indicator of the suitability of a material for a given application, e.g., as electronic or catalytic materials. Computed band structures, however, are subject to a host of approximations, some of which are more obvious (e.g., the treatment of the exchange-correlation of self-energy) and others less obvious (e.g., the treatment of core, semicore, or valence electrons, handling of relativistic effects, or the accuracy of the underlying basis set used). We here provide a set of accurate Kohn-Sham band structure benchmarks, using the numeric atom-centered all-electron electronic structure code FHI-aims combined with the ``traditional'' PBE functional and the hybrid HSE functional, to calculate core, valence, and low-lying conduction bands of a set of 2D and 3D materials. Benchmarks are provided with and without effects of spin-orbit coupling, using quasi-degenerate perturbation theory to predict spin-orbit splittings. This work is funded by Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft.

  13. Discovering Network Structure Beyond Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2011-11-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes characterized by common network properties, including but not limited to communities of densely connected nodes. Without any prior information about the nature of the groups, the method simultaneously identifies the number of groups, the group assignment, and the properties that define these groups. The results of applying our method to real networks suggest the possibility that most group structures lurk undiscovered in the fast-growing inventory of social, biological, and technological networks of scientific interest.

  14. Controllability of structural brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Cieslak, Matthew; Telesford, Qawi K.; Yu, Alfred B.; Kahn, Ari E.; Medaglia, John D.; Vettel, Jean M.; Miller, Michael B.; Grafton, Scott T.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive function is driven by dynamic interactions between large-scale neural circuits or networks, enabling behaviour. However, fundamental principles constraining these dynamic network processes have remained elusive. Here we use tools from control and network theories to offer a mechanistic explanation for how the brain moves between cognitive states drawn from the network organization of white matter microstructure. Our results suggest that densely connected areas, particularly in the default mode system, facilitate the movement of the brain to many easily reachable states. Weakly connected areas, particularly in cognitive control systems, facilitate the movement of the brain to difficult-to-reach states. Areas located on the boundary between network communities, particularly in attentional control systems, facilitate the integration or segregation of diverse cognitive systems. Our results suggest that structural network differences between cognitive circuits dictate their distinct roles in controlling trajectories of brain network function.

  15. Network Structure and City Size

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, David

    2012-01-01

    Network structure varies across cities. This variation may yield important knowledge about how the internal structure of the city affects its performance. This paper systematically compares a set of surface transportation network structure variables (connectivity, hierarchy, circuity, treeness, entropy, accessibility) across the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. A set of scaling parameters are discovered to show how network size and structure vary with city size. These results suggest that larger cities are physically more inter-connected. Hypotheses are presented as to why this might obtain. This paper then consistently measures and ranks access to jobs across 50 US metropolitan areas. It uses that accessibility measure, along with network structure variables and city size to help explain journey-to-work time and auto mode share in those cities. A 1 percent increase in accessibility reduces average metropolitan commute times by about 90 seconds each way. A 1 percent increase in network connectivity reduces commute time by 0.1 percent. A 1 percent increase in accessibility results in a 0.0575 percent drop in auto mode share, while a 1 percent increase in treeness reduces auto mode share by 0.061 percent. Use of accessibility and network structure measures is important for planning and evaluating the performance of network investments and land use changes. PMID:22253764

  16. Collective network for computer structures

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Coteus, Paul W.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2011-08-16

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices ate included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network and class structures. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to needs of a processing algorithm.

  17. Anion-induced structural transformation of a sulfate-incorporated 2D Cd(II)-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Li-Wei; Luo, Tzuoo-Tsair; Wang, Chih-Min; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming; Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Sheng-Long; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2016-07-01

    A Cd(II)-organic framework {[Cd2(tpim)4(SO4)(H2O)2]·(SO4)·21H2O}n (1) was synthesized by reacting CdSO4·8/3H2O and 2,4,5-tri(4-pyridyl)imidazole (tpim) under hydrothermal conditions. A structural analysis showed that compound 1 adopts a layered structure in which the [Cd(tpim)2]n chains are linked by sulfate anions. These 2D layers are further packed into a 3D supramolecular framework via π-π interactions. The structure contains two types of SO42- anions, i.e., bridging SO42- and free SO42- anions, the latter of which are included in the large channels of the framework. Compound 1 exhibits interesting anion exchange behavior. In the presence of SCN- anions, both the bridging and free SO42- anions in 1 were completely exchanged by SCN- ligands to form a 1D species [Cd(tpim)2(SCN)2] (1A), in which the SCN- moieties function as a monodentate ligand. On the other hand, when compound 1 was ion exchanged with N3- anions in aqueous solution, the bridging SO42- moieties remained intact, and only the free guest SO42- were replaced by N3- anions. The gas adsorption behavior of the activated compound 1 was also investigated.

  18. Automatic classification of pulmonary peri-fissural nodules in computed tomography using an ensemble of 2D views and a convolutional neural network out-of-the-box.

    PubMed

    Ciompi, Francesco; de Hoop, Bartjan; van Riel, Sarah J; Chung, Kaman; Scholten, Ernst Th; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Jong, Pim A; Prokop, Mathias; van Ginneken, Bram

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of automatic classification of pulmonary peri-fissural nodules (PFNs). The classification problem is formulated as a machine learning approach, where detected nodule candidates are classified as PFNs or non-PFNs. Supervised learning is used, where a classifier is trained to label the detected nodule. The classification of the nodule in 3D is formulated as an ensemble of classifiers trained to recognize PFNs based on 2D views of the nodule. In order to describe nodule morphology in 2D views, we use the output of a pre-trained convolutional neural network known as OverFeat. We compare our approach with a recently presented descriptor of pulmonary nodule morphology, namely Bag of Frequencies, and illustrate the advantages offered by the two strategies, achieving performance of AUC = 0.868, which is close to the one of human experts.

  19. Advanced Polymer Network Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Polymer networks and gels are important classes of materials for defense applications . In an effort to......it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7612 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Advanced Polymer

  20. Collective network for computer structures

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A; Coteus, Paul W; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D; Vranas, Pavlos M

    2014-01-07

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to the needs of a processing algorithm.

  1. 3D spin-flop transition in enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z.; Xia, Z.-C.; Wei, M.; Yang, J.-H.; Chen, B.; Huang, S.; Shang, C.; Wu, H.; Zhang, X.-X.; Huang, J.-W.; Ouyang, Z.-W.

    2016-10-01

    The enhanced 2D layered structure single crystalline TlCo2Se2 has been successfully fabricated, which exhibits field-induced 3D spin-flop phase transitions. In the case of the magnetic field parallel to the c-axis (B//c), the applied magnetic field induces the evolution of the noncollinear helical magnetic coupling into a ferromagnetic (FM) state with all the magnetization of the Co ion parallel to the c-axis. A striking variation of the field-induced strain within the ab-plane is noticed in the magnetic field region of 20-30 T. In the case of the magnetic field perpendicular to the c-axis (B  ⊥  c), the inter-layer helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling may transform to an initial canted AFM coupling, and then part of it transforms to an intermediate metamagnetic phase with the alignment of two-up-one-down Co magnetic moments and finally to an ultimate FM coupling in higher magnetic fields. The robust noncollinear AFM magnetic coupling is completely destroyed above 30 T. In combination with the measurements of magnetization, magnetoresistance and field-induced strain, a complete magnetic phase diagram of the TlCo2Se2 single crystal has been depicted, demonstrating complex magnetic structures even though the crystal geometry itself gives no indication of the magnetic frustration.

  2. Improved structural quality of AlN grown on sapphire by 3D/2D alternation growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanmin; Fang, Yulong; Yin, Jiayun; Zhang, Zhirong; Wang, Bo; Li, Jia; Lu, Weili; Feng, Zhihong

    2017-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) and two dimensional (2D) alternation growth was used to grow AlN epitaxial layers on sapphire substrates. AlN samples grown using this technique have higher crystalline quality and lower dislocation density than samples grown using only 3D or 2D growth modes as witnessed by the high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Smooth atomic terraces with root mean square roughness of 0.107 nm were observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) when the 3D and 2D AlN were 75 nm and 425 nm, respectively. This sample possesses single crystallographic orientation along the c-axis identified by Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, the 3D/2D alternating growth mode modulates internal stress in AlN epitaxial layer by adjusting 2D AlN thickness, and the mechanism was studied in detail.

  3. Structure of the HCMV UL16-MICB Complex Elucidates Select Binding of a Viral Immunoevasin to Diverse NKG2D Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Steffen; Zocher, Georg; Steinle, Alexander; Stehle, Thilo

    2010-01-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D promotes elimination of infected or malignant cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes through engagement of stress-induced MHC class I-related ligands. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded immunoevasin UL16 subverts NKG2D-mediated immune responses by retaining a select group of diverse NKG2D ligands inside the cell. We report here the crystal structure of UL16 in complex with the NKG2D ligand MICB at 1.8 Å resolution, revealing the molecular basis for the promiscuous, but highly selective, binding of UL16 to unrelated NKG2D ligands. The immunoglobulin-like UL16 protein utilizes a three-stranded β-sheet to engage the α-helical surface of the MHC class I-like MICB platform domain. Intriguingly, residues at the center of this β-sheet mimic a central binding motif employed by the structurally unrelated C-type lectin-like NKG2D to facilitate engagement of diverse NKG2D ligands. Using surface plasmon resonance, we find that UL16 binds MICB, ULBP1, and ULBP2 with similar affinities that lie in the nanomolar range (12–66 nM). The ability of UL16 to bind its ligands depends critically on the presence of a glutamine (MICB) or closely related glutamate (ULBP1 and ULBP2) at position 169. An arginine residue at this position however, as found for example in MICA or ULBP3, would cause steric clashes with UL16 residues. The inability of UL16 to bind MICA and ULBP3 can therefore be attributed to single substitutions at key NKG2D ligand locations. This indicates that selective pressure exerted by viral immunoevasins such as UL16 contributed to the diversification of NKG2D ligands. PMID:20090832

  4. A 2-D Pore-Network Model of the Drying of Single-Component Liquids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Yanic C.; Yiotis, A.G.; Stubos, A.K.; Boundovis, A.G.

    2000-01-20

    The drying of liquid-saturated porous media is typically approaching using macroscopic continuum models involving phenomenological coefficients. Insight on these coefficients can be obtained by a more fundamental study at the pore- and pore-network levels. In this report, a model based on pore-network representation of porous media that accounts for various process at the pore-scale is presented. These include mass transfer by advection and diffusion in the gas phase, viscous flow in liquid and gas phases and capillary effects at the gas-liquid menisci in the pore throats.

  5. Terrace Zone Structure in the Chicxulub Impact Crater Based on 2-D Seismic Reflection Profiles: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Gorney, D. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Barton, P. J.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Melosh, H. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Surendra, A. T.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    Terrace zones, central peaks, and flat floors characterize complex craters like the Chicxulub impact crater located near the northeast coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The subsurface crater structure was studied using seismic reflection surveying in Jan/Feb 2005 by the R/V Maurice Ewing. We present 2-D seismic profiles including constant radius, regional, and grid profiles encompassing the 195 km width of the crater. These diversely oriented lines clearly show the terrace zones and aid in the search for crater ejecta as we investigate the formation of the crater including the incidence angle and direction of the extraterrestrial object that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 65 million years ago (K-T boundary). Terrace zones form in complex craters after the modification stage as a result of the gravitational collapse of overextended sediment back into the crater cavity. The terrace zone is clearly imaged on seismic profiles confirming the complex structure of the Chixculub crater. Recent work on reprocessed 1996 profiles found different sizes and spacing of the terraces and concluded that the variations in radial structure are a result of an oblique impact. A SW-NE profile from this study was the only line to show a concentration of deformation near the crater rim hinting that the northeast was the downrange direction of impact. We confirm this narrowing in terrace spacing using a profile with a similar orientation in the 2005 images. Through integration of the new dense grid of profiles and radial lines from the 1996 and 2005 surveys we map the 3-D variability of the terrace zones to further constrain impact direction and examine the formative processes of the Chixculub and other large impact craters.

  6. Inhomogeneous 2D linear intergrowth structures among novel Y-Cu-Mg ternary compounds with yttrium/copper equiatomic ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solokha, Pavlo; De Negri, Serena; Pavlyuk, Volodymyr; Saccone, Adriana

    2009-04-01

    Single crystals of the Y 5Cu 5Mg 8, Y 5Cu 5Mg 13, Y 5Cu 5Mg 16 and YCuMg 4 compounds were synthesized by heating in a resistance furnace evacuated quartz vials containing Ta-crucibles with element pieces. SEM-EDXS analyses were performed to check phases composition. The structures were refined from X-ray single crystal diffraction data. Y 5Cu 5Mg 8, Y 5Cu 5Mg 13 and Y 5Cu 5Mg 16 represent new structure types: Y 5Cu 5Mg 8 - orthorhombic, Pmma, oP36, a = 2.63723(15), b = 0.40066(2), c = 0.74115(6) nm, Z = 2, wR2 = 0.0597, 939 F2 values, 60 variables; Y 5Cu 5Mg 13 - orthorhombic, Cmcm, oS92, a = 0.40973(2), b = 1.92794(8), c = 2.57907(11) nm, Z = 4, wR2 = 0.1134, 1208 F2 values, 75 variables; Y 5Cu 5Mg 16 - orthorhombic, Cmcm, oS104, a = 0.41360(8), b = 1.9239(4), c = 2.9086(6) nm, Z = 4, wR2 = 0.0760, 1383 F2 values, 84 variables. YCuMg 4 crystallizes in the TbCuMg 4 structure type ( Cmmm, oS48, a = 1.35754(4), b = 2.03153(6), c = 0.39060(1) nm, Z = 8, wR2 = 0.0401, 661 F2 values, 45 variables). The crystal chemistry of these two-layer structures is comparatively discussed. Majority of novel compounds were characterized as members of inhomogeneous 2D intergrowth structure series of R 5M 5X 5, X 4 (Mg 4) and empty Mg octahedra building blocks of general formula R 5 kM 5 kX 5 k + 4 l + m. The common pentagonal prism derivative structural fragments around the most electropositive yttrium atoms were outlined in all these intermetallics.

  7. Syntheses, structures, photoluminescence and photocatalysis of 2D layered lanthanide-carboxylates with 2, 2‧-dithiodibenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ling; Zhong, Jie-Cen; Qiu, Xing-Tai; Sun, Yan-Qiong; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Two series of lanthanide-carboxylates, [Ln(2,2‧-dtba)(2,2‧-Hdtba)(EtOH)]n (I:Ln=Eu(1a), Dy(1b)) and [Ln(2,2‧-dtba)(2,2‧-Hdtba)(4,4‧-bpy)0.5]n (II:Ln=Eu(2a), Dy(2b), Tb(2c) 2,2‧-H2dtba=2,2‧-dithiodibenzoic acid, 4,4‧-bpy=4,4‧-bipyridine) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Interestingly, the H2dtba organic ligand was generated by in situ S-S reaction of 2-mercaptobenzoic acid. Compounds I and II possess different 2D layered structures based on similar 1D [Ln(2,2‧-dtba)]+ chains. Photoluminescence studies reveal that compounds I and II exhibit strong lanthanide characteristic emission bands. Remarkably, Compounds 1b and 2a both exhibit good photocatalytic activity for degradation of Rhodamine-B (Rh-B) under the simulated sunlight irradiation.

  8. Quantification of network structural dissimilarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, Tiago A.; Carpi, Laura; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Pardalos, Panos M.; Masoller, Cristina; Ravetti, Martín G.

    2017-01-01

    Identifying and quantifying dissimilarities among graphs is a fundamental and challenging problem of practical importance in many fields of science. Current methods of network comparison are limited to extract only partial information or are computationally very demanding. Here we propose an efficient and precise measure for network comparison, which is based on quantifying differences among distance probability distributions extracted from the networks. Extensive experiments on synthetic and real-world networks show that this measure returns non-zero values only when the graphs are non-isomorphic. Most importantly, the measure proposed here can identify and quantify structural topological differences that have a practical impact on the information flow through the network, such as the presence or absence of critical links that connect or disconnect connected components.

  9. Quantification of network structural dissimilarities

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Tiago A.; Carpi, Laura; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Pardalos, Panos M.; Masoller, Cristina; Ravetti, Martín G.

    2017-01-01

    Identifying and quantifying dissimilarities among graphs is a fundamental and challenging problem of practical importance in many fields of science. Current methods of network comparison are limited to extract only partial information or are computationally very demanding. Here we propose an efficient and precise measure for network comparison, which is based on quantifying differences among distance probability distributions extracted from the networks. Extensive experiments on synthetic and real-world networks show that this measure returns non-zero values only when the graphs are non-isomorphic. Most importantly, the measure proposed here can identify and quantify structural topological differences that have a practical impact on the information flow through the network, such as the presence or absence of critical links that connect or disconnect connected components. PMID:28067266

  10. Structurally Dynamic Spin Market Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Denis; Kuscsik, Zoltán

    The agent-based model of stock price dynamics on a directed evolving complex network is suggested and studied by direct simulation. The stationary regime is maintained as a result of the balance between the extremal dynamics, adaptivity of strategic variables and reconnection rules. The inherent structure of node agent "brain" is modeled by a recursive neural network with local and global inputs and feedback connections. For specific parametric combination the complex network displays small-world phenomenon combined with scale-free behavior. The identification of a local leader (network hub, agent whose strategies are frequently adapted by its neighbors) is carried out by repeated random walk process through network. The simulations show empirically relevant dynamics of price returns and volatility clustering. The additional emerging aspects of stylized market statistics are Zipfian distributions of fitness.

  11. A neural network-based 2D/3D image registration quality evaluator for pediatric patient setup in external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Su, Zhong; Li, Zuofeng

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose was to develop a neural network-based registration quality evaluator (RQE) that can improve the 2D/3D image registration robustness for pediatric patient setup in external beam radiotherapy. Orthogonal daily setup X-ray images of six pediatric patients with brain tumors receiving proton therapy treatments were retrospectively registered with their treatment planning computed tomography (CT) images. A neural network-based pattern classifier was used to determine whether a registration solution was successful based on geometric features of the similarity measure values near the point-of-solution. Supervised training and test datasets were generated by rigidly registering a pair of orthogonal daily setup X-ray images to the treatment planning CT. The best solution for each registration task was selected from 50 optimizing attempts that differed only by the randomly generated initial transformation parameters. The distance from each individual solution to the best solution in the normalized parametrical space was compared to a user-defined error tolerance to determine whether that solution was acceptable. A supervised training was then used to train the RQE. Performance of the RQE was evaluated using test dataset consisting of registration results that were not used in training. The RQE was integrated with our in-house 2D/3D registration system and its performance was evaluated using the same patient dataset. With an optimized sampling step size (i.e., 5 mm) in the feature space, the RQE has the sensitivity and the specificity in the ranges of 0.865-0.964 and 0.797-0.990, respectively, when used to detect registration error with mean voxel displacement (MVD) greater than 1 mm. The trial-to-acceptance ratio of the integrated 2D/3D registration system, for all patients, is equal to 1.48. The final acceptance ratio is 92.4%. The proposed RQE can potentially be used in a 2D/3D rigid image registration system to improve the overall robustness by rejecting

  12. Divide and Conquer Approach to Contact Map Overlap Problem Using 2D-Pattern Mining of Protein Contact Networks.

    PubMed

    Koneru, Suvarna Vani; Bhavani, Durga S

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach to Contact Map Overlap (CMO) problem is proposed using the two dimensional clusters present in the contact maps. Each protein is represented as a set of the non-trivial clusters of contacts extracted from its contact map. The approach involves finding matching regions between the two contact maps using approximate 2D-pattern matching algorithm and dynamic programming technique. These matched pairs of small contact maps are submitted in parallel to a fast heuristic CMO algorithm. The approach facilitates parallelization at this level since all the pairs of contact maps can be submitted to the algorithm in parallel. Then, a merge algorithm is used in order to obtain the overall alignment. As a proof of concept, MSVNS, a heuristic CMO algorithm is used for global as well as local alignment. The divide and conquer approach is evaluated for two benchmark data sets that of Skolnick and Ding et al. It is interesting to note that along with achieving saving of time, better overlap is also obtained for certain protein folds.

  13. Crystal structures and fluorescence properties of two 2D MnII/CdII trimellitic complexes containing terpyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yixia; Chai, Hongmei; Hou, Xiangyang; Wang, Jijiang; Fu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of manganese (II)/cadmium(II) salts with 1,2,4-trimellitic acid (H3tma) and 2,2‧:6‧,2-terpyridine (tpy) result in two novel complexes formulated with [M(Htma)(tpy)]·H2O (M = Mn(1) and Cd(2)). X-ray diffraction structural analyses of two complexes reveal they are isomorphic except for the different center metal ions and crystallize in the monoclinic crystal system of P(2)/n space group. The metal ion lies in a six-coordinated distorted octahedral environment coordinated with three Htma2- anions and one tpy ligand. There is an infinite two-dimensional rhombic network based on the metallic dimmers and Htma2- anions with the tpy ligands in void. Furthermore, the tpy ligands from the adjacent network weakly interact each other by π⋯π packing interactions into 3D supramolecular structure. The fluorescence properties could be assigned to the π - π* transition of organic ligands.

  14. Upper Crustal Structure of the Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge using 2D Streamer travel time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Canales, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    We use long off-set (6 km) multichannel seismic reflection data to obtain the P-wave seismic structure of the upper ~2 km of the crust along the southern part of the intermediate-spreading Juan de Fuca Ridge (Cleft segment). Along this segment, the top of the Axial Magma Chamber (AMC) deepens from south to north from about 2.0 km at the southern end of the segment to about 2.3 km at the northern end. Both segment ends are characterized by high-temperature hydrothermal venting. Our objective is to study the effects of high temperature hydrothermal circulation on the seismic structure of the shallow crust. We jointly inverted refracted and reflected travel times (from the top of the AMC) to obtain the 2 dimensional velocity structure of the earth along ~60 km of the ridge axis. Prior to tomographic inversion, processing of marine seismic data included trace editing, trapezoidal band pass filtering (3-5-15-30 Hz), formation of partial off-set stacks of 5 shots (i.e, supershots) to increase the signal to noise ratio and downward continuation of the wavefield to a datum just above the sea floor (i.e, phase shift in the frequency-wave number domain of both source and receiver gathers to extract travel time information from refracted arrivals at near offset. Traveltime picking of the arrivals was done using a semi automated first break routine. The picked travel times of the first refracted arrivals and the reflected arrivals from the AMC are then input into a tomography inversion algorithm to build a 2D velocity model. Our results do not show detectable velocity variations associated with the presence of active high-temperature hydrothermal discharge, probably because the length scale of hydrothermal alteration is smaller than the resolving power of traveltime tomography. However our results are a first step towards higher-resolution seismic imaging models using waveform inversion. We will also present results from off-axis data to understand the early evolution of the

  15. 3D assembly based on 2D structure of Cellulose Nanofibril/Graphene Oxide Hybrid Aerogel for Adsorptive Removal of Antibiotics in Water

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qiufang; Fan, Bitao; Xiong, Ye; Jin, Chunde; Sun, Qingfeng; Sheng, Chengmin

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose nanofibril/graphene oxide hybrid (CNF/GO) aerogel was fabricated via a one-step ultrasonication method for adsorptive removal of 21 kinds of antibiotics in water. The as-prepared CNF/GO aerogel possesses interconnected 3D network microstructure, in which GO nanosheets with 2D structure were intimately grown along CNF through hydrogen bonds. The aerogel exhibited superior adsorption capacity toward the antibiotics. The removal percentages (R%) of the antibiotics were more than 69% and the sequence of six categories antibiotics according to the adsorption efficiency was as follows: Tetracyclines > Quinolones > Sulfonamides > Chloramphenicols > β-Lactams > Macrolides. The adsorption mechanism was proposed to be electrostatic attraction, p-π interaction, π-π interaction and hydrogen bonds. In detail, the adsorption capacities of CNF/GO aerogel were 418.7 mg·g−1 for chloramphenicol, 291.8 mg·g−1 for macrolides, 128.3 mg·g−1 for quinolones, 230.7 mg·g−1 for β-Lactams, 227.3 mg·g−1 for sulfonamides, and 454.6 mg·g−1 for tetracyclines calculated by the Langmuir isotherm models. Furthermore, the regenerated aerogels still could be repeatedly used after ten cycles without obvious degradation of adsorption performance. PMID:28368045

  16. 3D assembly based on 2D structure of Cellulose Nanofibril/Graphene Oxide Hybrid Aerogel for Adsorptive Removal of Antibiotics in Water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiufang; Fan, Bitao; Xiong, Ye; Jin, Chunde; Sun, Qingfeng; Sheng, Chengmin

    2017-04-03

    Cellulose nanofibril/graphene oxide hybrid (CNF/GO) aerogel was fabricated via a one-step ultrasonication method for adsorptive removal of 21 kinds of antibiotics in water. The as-prepared CNF/GO aerogel possesses interconnected 3D network microstructure, in which GO nanosheets with 2D structure were intimately grown along CNF through hydrogen bonds. The aerogel exhibited superior adsorption capacity toward the antibiotics. The removal percentages (R%) of the antibiotics were more than 69% and the sequence of six categories antibiotics according to the adsorption efficiency was as follows: Tetracyclines > Quinolones > Sulfonamides > Chloramphenicols > β-Lactams > Macrolides. The adsorption mechanism was proposed to be electrostatic attraction, p-π interaction, π-π interaction and hydrogen bonds. In detail, the adsorption capacities of CNF/GO aerogel were 418.7 mg·g(-1) for chloramphenicol, 291.8 mg·g(-1) for macrolides, 128.3 mg·g(-1) for quinolones, 230.7 mg·g(-1) for β-Lactams, 227.3 mg·g(-1) for sulfonamides, and 454.6 mg·g(-1) for tetracyclines calculated by the Langmuir isotherm models. Furthermore, the regenerated aerogels still could be repeatedly used after ten cycles without obvious degradation of adsorption performance.

  17. Prediction of P53 Mutants (Multiple Sites) Transcriptional Activity Based on Structural (2D&3D) Properties

    PubMed Central

    Geetha Ramani, R.; Jacob, Shomona Gracia

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of secondary site mutations that reinstate mutated p53 to normalcy has been the focus of intense research in the recent past owing to the fact that p53 mutants have been implicated in more than half of all human cancers and restoration of p53 causes tumor regression. However laboratory investigations are more often laborious and resource intensive but computational techniques could well surmount these drawbacks. In view of this, we formulated a novel approach utilizing computational techniques to predict the transcriptional activity of multiple site (one-site to five-site) p53 mutants. The optimal MCC obtained by the proposed approach on prediction of one-site, two-site, three-site, four-site and five-site mutants were 0.775,0.341,0.784,0.916 and 0.655 respectively, the highest reported thus far in literature. We have also demonstrated that 2D and 3D features generate higher prediction accuracy of p53 activity and our findings revealed the optimal results for prediction of p53 status, reported till date. We believe detection of the secondary site mutations that suppress tumor growth may facilitate better understanding of the relationship between p53 structure and function and further knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and biological activity of p53, a targeted source for cancer therapy. We expect that our prediction methods and reported results may provide useful insights on p53 functional mechanisms and generate more avenues for utilizing computational techniques in biological data analysis. PMID:23468845

  18. Structural reducibility of multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Domenico, Manlio; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Arenas, Alexandre; Latora, Vito

    2015-04-01

    Many complex systems can be represented as networks consisting of distinct types of interactions, which can be categorized as links belonging to different layers. For example, a good description of the full protein-protein interactome requires, for some organisms, up to seven distinct network layers, accounting for different genetic and physical interactions, each containing thousands of protein-protein relationships. A fundamental open question is then how many layers are indeed necessary to accurately represent the structure of a multilayered complex system. Here we introduce a method based on quantum theory to reduce the number of layers to a minimum while maximizing the distinguishability between the multilayer network and the corresponding aggregated graph. We validate our approach on synthetic benchmarks and we show that the number of informative layers in some real multilayer networks of protein-genetic interactions, social, economical and transportation systems can be reduced by up to 75%.

  19. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huai-Xia; Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian; Meng, Xiang-Ru

    2014-10-15

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, ([Ni(btec)(Himb){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Cd(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)(H{sub 2}O)]·1.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2), and ([Zn(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) (H{sub 4}btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (5{sup 3}·6{sup 2}·7)(5{sup 2}·6{sup 4}). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·6{sup 4}·8)(4{sup 2}·6{sup 2}·8{sup 2}). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three new 1D to 3D complexes with different structural and topological motifs have been obtained by modifying the central metal ions. Additionally, their IR, TG analyses and fluorescent properties are also investigated. - Highlights: • Three complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands. • The complexes are characterized by IR, luminescence and TGA techniques. • Benzenetetracarboxylates display different coordination modes in complexes 1–3. • Changing the metal ions can result in complexes with completely different structures.

  20. Watching Silica's Dance: Imaging the Structure and Dynamics of the Atomic (Re-) Arrangements in 2D Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, David

    2014-03-01

    Even though glasses are almost ubiquitous--in our windows, on our iPhones, even on our faces--they are also mysterious. Because glasses are notoriously difficult to study, basic questions like: ``How are the atoms arranged? Where and how do glasses break?'' are still under contention. We use aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image the atoms in a new two-dimensional phase of silica glass - freestanding it becomes the world's thinnest pane of glass at only 3-atoms thick, and take a unique look into these questions. Using atom-by-atom imaging and spectroscopy, we are able to reconstruct the full structure and bonding of this 2D glass and identify it as a bi-tetrahedral layer of SiO2. Our images also strikingly resemble Zachariasen's original cartoon models of glasses, drawn in 1932. As such, our work realizes an 80-year-old vision for easily understandable glassy systems and introduces promising methods to test theoretical predictions against experimental data. We image atoms in the disordered solid and track their motions in response to local strain. We directly obtain ring statistics and pair distribution functions that span short-, medium-, and long-range order, and test these against long-standing theoretical predictions of glass structure and dynamics. We use the electron beam to excite atomic rearrangements, producing surprisingly rich and beautiful videos of how a glass bends and breaks, as well as the exchange of atoms at a solid/liquid interface. Detailed analyses of these videos reveal a complex dance of elastic and plastic deformations, phase transitions, and their interplay. These examples illustrate the wide-ranging and fundamental materials physics that can now be studied at atomic-resolution via transmission electron microscopy of two-dimensional glasses. Work in collaboration with: S. Kurasch, U. Kaiser, R. Hovden, Q. Mao, J. Kotakoski, J. S. Alden, A. Shekhawat, A. A. Alemi, J. P. Sethna, P. L. McEuen, A.V. Krasheninnikov

  1. 2D-ELDOR study of heterogeneity and domain structure changes in plasma membrane vesicles upon cross-linking of receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Baird, Barbara; Freed, Jack H

    2011-09-08

    2D electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) with the "full Sc-" method of analysis is applied to the study of plasma membrane vesicles. Membrane structural changes upon antigen cross-linking of IgE receptors (IgE-FcεRI) in plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) isolated from RBL-2H3 mast cells are investigated, for the first time, by means of these 2D-ELDOR techniques. Spectra of 1-palmitoyl-2-(16-doxyl stearoyl) phosphatidylcholine (16-PC) from PMVs before and after this stimulation at several temperatures are reported. The results demonstrate a coexistence of liquid-ordered (L(o)) and liquid-disordered (L(d)) components. We find that upon cross-linking, the membrane environment is remodeled to become more disordered, as shown by a moderate increase in the population of the L(d) component. This change in the relative amount of the L(o) versus L(d) components upon cross-linking is consistent with a model wherein the IgE receptors, which when clustered by antigen to cause cell stimulation, lead to more disordered lipids, and their dynamic and structural properties are slightly altered. This study demonstrates that 2D-ELDOR, analyzed by the full Sc- method, is a powerful approach for capturing the molecular dynamics in biological membranes. This is a particular case showing how 2D-ELDOR can be applied to study physical processes in complex systems that yield subtle changes.

  2. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.; Parent, Jack M.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Zochowski, Michal R.; Sander, Leonard M.

    2010-12-01

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells.

  3. Gold-induced nanowires on the Ge(100) surface yield a 2D and not a 1D electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, N.; Heimbuch, R.; Eliëns, S.; Smit, S.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Caux, J.-S.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Golden, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    Atomic nanowires on semiconductor surfaces induced by the adsorption of metallic atoms have attracted a lot of attention as possible hosts of the elusive, one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The Au/Ge(100) system in particular is the subject of controversy as to whether the Au-induced nanowires do indeed host exotic, 1D (one-dimensional) metallic states. In light of this debate, we report here a thorough study of the electronic properties of high quality nanowires formed at the Au/Ge(100) surface. The high-resolution ARPES data show the low-lying Au-induced electronic states to possess a dispersion relation that depends on two orthogonal directions in k space. Comparison of the E (kx,ky) surface measured using high-resolution ARPES to tight-binding calculations yields hopping parameters in the two different directions that differ by approximately factor of two. Additionally, by pinpointing the Au-induced surface states in the first, second, and third surface Brillouin zones and analyzing their periodicity in k||, the nanowire propagation direction seen clearly in STM can be imported into the ARPES data. We find that the larger of the two hopping parameters corresponds, in fact, to the direction perpendicular to the nanowires (tperp). This proves that the Au-induced electron pockets possess a two-dimensional, closed Fermi surface, and this firmly places the Au/Ge(100) nanowire system outside potential hosts of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. We combine these ARPES data with scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of the spatially resolved electronic structure and find that the spatially straight—wirelike—conduction channels observed up to energies of order one electron volt below the Fermi level do not originate from the Au-induced states seen in the ARPES data. The former are rather more likely to be associated with bulk Ge states that are localized to the subsurface region. Despite our proof of the 2D (two-dimentional) nature of the Au

  4. Wannier-Stark electro-optical effect, quasi-guided and photonic modes in 2D macroporous silicon structures with SiO2 coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Goltviansky, Yu.; Sapelnikova, O.; Lytvynenko, O.; Stronska, O.; Bo, Wang; Kartel, M.

    2016-12-01

    Opportunities to enhance the properties of structured surfaces were demonstrated on 2D macroporous silicon structures with SiO2 coatings. We investigated the IR light absorption oscillations in macroporous silicon structures with SiO2 coatings 0-800 nm thick. The Wannier-Stark electro-optical effect due to strong electric field on Si-SiO2boundary and an additional electric field of quasi-guided optical modes were taken into account. The photonic modes and band gaps were also considered as peculiarities in absorbance spectra of macroporous silicon structures with a thick SiO2 coating. The photonic modes do not coincide with the quasi-guided modes in the silicon matrix and do not appear in absorption spectra of 2D macroporous silicon structures with surface nanocrystals.

  5. Development of hydraulic fracture network propagation model in shale gas reservoirs: 2D, single-phase and 3D, multi-phase model development, parametric studies, and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Chong Hyun

    The most effective method for stimulating shale gas reservoirs is a massive hydraulic fracture treatment. Recent analysis using microseismic technology have shown that complex fracture networks are commonly created in the field as a result of the stimulation of shale wells. The interaction between pre-existing natural fractures and the propagating hydraulic fracture is a critical factor affecting the created complex fracture network; however, many existing numerical models simulate only planar hydraulic fractures without considering the pre-existing fractures in the formation. The shale formations already contain a large number of natural fractures, so an accurate fracture propagation model needs to be developed to optimize the fracturing process. In this research, we first characterized the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing and fluid flow in the shale gas reservoir. Then, a 2D, single-phase numerical model and a 3D, 2-phase coupled model were developed, which integrate dynamic fracture propagation, interactions between hydraulic fractures and pre-existing natural fractures, fracture fluid leakoff, and fluid flow in a petroleum reservoir. By using the developed model, we conducted parametric studies to quantify the effects of treatment rate, treatment size, fracture fluid viscosity, differential horizontal stress, natural fracture spacing, fracture toughness, matrix permeability, and proppant size on the geometry of the hydraulic fracture network. The findings elucidate important trends in hydraulic fracturing of shale reservoirs that are useful in improving the design of treatments for specific reservoir settings.

  6. Structural Transitions in Densifying Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambiotte, R.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Bhat, U.; Redner, S.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a minimal generative model for densifying networks in which a new node attaches to a randomly selected target node and also to each of its neighbors with probability p . The networks that emerge from this copying mechanism are sparse for p <1/2 and dense (average degree increasing with number of nodes N ) for p ≥1/2 . The behavior in the dense regime is especially rich; for example, individual network realizations that are built by copying are disparate and not self-averaging. Further, there is an infinite sequence of structural anomalies at p =2/3 , 3/4 , 4/5 , etc., where the N dependences of the number of triangles (3-cliques), 4-cliques, undergo phase transitions. When linking to second neighbors of the target can occur, the probability that the resulting graph is complete—all nodes are connected—is nonzero as N →∞ .

  7. Residue-Specific Structural Kinetics of Proteins through the Union of Isotope Labeling, Mid-IR Pulse Shaping, and Coherent 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a methodology for studying protein kinetics using a rapid-scan technology for collecting 2D IR spectra. In conjunction with isotope labeling, 2D IR spectroscopy is able to probe the secondary structure and environment of individual residues in polypeptides and proteins. It is particularly useful for membrane and aggregate proteins. Our rapid-scan technology relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that computer generates the pulse shapes, much like in an NMR spectrometer. With this device, data collection is faster, easier, and more accurate. We describe our 2D IR spectrometer, as well as protocols for 13C=18O isotope labeling, and then illustrate the technique with an application to the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide form type 2 diabetes. PMID:20472067

  8. Discrimination of adulterated milk based on two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) combined with kernel orthogonal projection to latent structure (K-OPLS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Renjie; Liu, Rong; Xu, Kexin; Yang, Yanrong

    2013-12-01

    A new method for discrimination analysis of adulterated milk and pure milk is proposed by combining two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) with kernel orthogonal projection to latent structure (K-OPLS). Three adulteration types of milk with urea, melamine, and glucose were prepared, respectively. The synchronous 2D spectra of adulterated milk and pure milk samples were calculated. Based on the characteristics of 2D correlation spectra of adulterated milk and pure milk, a discriminant model of urea-tainted milk, melamine-tainted milk, glucose-tainted milk, and pure milk was built by K-OPLS. The classification accuracy rates of unknown samples were 85.7, 92.3, 100, and 87.5%, respectively. The results show that this method has great potential in the rapid discrimination analysis of adulterated milk and pure milk.

  9. 2D modeling of DC potential structures induced by RF sheaths with transverse currents in front of ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2005-09-26

    Understanding DC potential generation in front of ICRF antennas is crucial for long pulse high RF power systems. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. To reach this goal, near RF parallel electric fields have to be computed in 3D and integrated along open magnetic field lines to yield a 2D RF potential map in a transverse plane. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. As RF potentials are spatially inhomogeneous, transverse polarization currents are created, modifying RF and DC maps. Such modifications are quantified on a 'test map' having initially a Gaussian shape and assuming that the map remains Gaussian near its summit,the time behavior of the peak can be estimated analytically in presence of polarization current as a function of its width r0 and amplitude {phi}0 (normalized to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature). A 'peaking factor' is built from the DC peak potential normalized to {phi}0, and validated with a 2D fluid code and a 2D PIC code (XOOPIC). In an unexpected way transverse currents can increase this factor. Realistic situations of a Tore Supra antenna are also studied, with self-consistent near fields provided by ICANT code. Basic processes will be detailed and an evaluation of the 'peaking factor' for ITER will be presented for a given configuration.

  10. 2D MI-DRAGON: a new predictor for protein-ligands interactions and theoretic-experimental studies of US FDA drug-target network, oxoisoaporphine inhibitors for MAO-A and human parasite proteins.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prado, Francisco; García-Mera, Xerardo; Escobar, Manuel; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Yañez, Matilde; Riera-Fernandez, Pablo; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2011-12-01

    There are many pairs of possible Drug-Proteins Interactions that may take place or not (DPIs/nDPIs) between drugs with high affinity/non-affinity for different proteins. This fact makes expensive in terms of time and resources, for instance, the determination of all possible ligands-protein interactions for a single drug. In this sense, we can use Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models to carry out rational DPIs prediction. Unfortunately, almost all QSAR models predict activity against only one target. To solve this problem we can develop multi-target QSAR (mt-QSAR) models. In this work, we introduce the technique 2D MI-DRAGON a new predictor for DPIs based on two different well-known software. We use the software MARCH-INSIDE (MI) to calculate 3D structural parameters for targets and the software DRAGON was used to calculated 2D molecular descriptors all drugs showing known DPIs present in the Drug Bank (US FDA benchmark dataset). Both classes of parameters were used as input of different Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms to seek an accurate non-linear mt-QSAR predictor. The best ANN model found is a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) with profile MLP 21:21-31-1:1. This MLP classifies correctly 303 out of 339 DPIs (Sensitivity = 89.38%) and 480 out of 510 nDPIs (Specificity = 94.12%), corresponding to training Accuracy = 92.23%. The validation of the model was carried out by means of external predicting series with Sensitivity = 92.18% (625/678 DPIs; Specificity = 90.12% (730/780 nDPIs) and Accuracy = 91.06%. 2D MI-DRAGON offers a good opportunity for fast-track calculation of all possible DPIs of one drug enabling us to re-construct large drug-target or DPIs Complex Networks (CNs). For instance, we reconstructed the CN of the US FDA benchmark dataset with 855 nodes 519 drugs+336 targets). We predicted CN with similar topology (observed and predicted values of average distance are equal to 6.7 vs. 6.6). These CNs can be used to explore

  11. Learning in Structured Connectionist Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    the structure is too rigid and learning too difficult for cognitive modeling. Two algorithms for learning simple, feature-based concept descriptions...and learning too difficult for cognitive model- ing. Two algorithms for learning simple, feature-based concept descriptions were also implemented. The...Term Goals Recent progress in connectionist research has been encouraging; networks have success- fully modeled human performance for various cognitive

  12. S-band NPOL and Iowa XPOL Radar Observations over Rain Gauge and 2D Video Disdrometer Networks during the IFloodS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurai, Merhala; Bringi, Viswanathan; Galvez, Miguel; Vijay Mishra, Kumar; Krajewski, Witold; Goska, Radoslaw; Petersen, Walt

    2015-04-01

    As part of the GPM ground validation campaign, the Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) was conducted in eastern Iowa from May to June 2013. This was the first GPM campaign focused on hydrology studies and featured four units of Iowa XPOL radars and several ground-based instruments for in situ observations. In this paper, we analyze radar observations from the S-band NPOL radar and the Iowa XPOLs at locations that hosted a network of 2D video disdrometers. Three events during May 2013 have been analyzed using NPOL radar data and the measurements from the 2DVDs, in terms of drop size distribution parameters and rainfall rates. Based on these results, we derive rain rate estimators for both NPOL and XPOL radars. The estimators were then applied to radar observations for another event (12 June 2013) and compared with rain gauge measurements. Reasonable agreement is found for both NPOL and for XPOL radars, especially after taking into account the time taken for drops to fall from the radar pulse volume over the gauge network to ground level.

  13. Reconstruction of multidimensional carbon hosts with combined 0D, 1D and 2D networks for enhanced lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. H.; Xia, X. H.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, X. L.; Tu, J. P.

    2017-02-01

    It is a core task to find solutions to suppress the ;shuttle effect; of polysulfides and improve high rate capability at the sulfur cathode of lithium sulfur batteries. Herein we first time propose a concept of multileveled blocking ;dams; to suppress the diffusion of polysulfides. We report a facile and effective strategy to construct multidimensional conductive carbon hosts for accommodation of active sulfur. Multidimensional ternary carbon networks (MTCNs) with 0D nanospheres, 1D nanotubes and 2D nanoflakes are organically combined together to provide multileveled conductive channels to reserve active sulfur and promote stable sustained reactions. In the light of enhanced conductivity and multileveled blocking ;dams; for polysulfides, the designed MTCNs/S cathode has been demonstrated with noticeable improvement in discharge capacity (1472 mAh g-1 at 0.l C) and long-term cycling stability (65% retention at 5.0 C after 500 cycles). Our research may provide a new insight in the gradient blocking of polysulfides with the help of multidimensional carbon networks.

  14. The structure of salt bridges between Arg(+) and Glu(-) in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu(-)) and arginine (Arg(+)) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu(-) and Arg(+), which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu(-)⋯Arg(+) salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  15. The structure of salt bridges between Arg+ and Glu- in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R.; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu-) and arginine (Arg+) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu- and Arg+, which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu-⋯Arg+ salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  16. Isolation and structural and pharmacological characterization of α-elapitoxin-Dpp2d, an amidated three finger toxin from black mamba venom.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Reeks, Timothy; Vetter, Irina; Vergara, Irene; Kovtun, Oleksiy; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Durek, Thomas

    2014-06-17

    We isolated a novel, atypical long-chain three-finger toxin (TFT), α-elapitoxin-Dpp2d (α-EPTX-Dpp2d), from black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) venom. Proteolytic digestion with trypsin and V8 protease, together with MS/MS de novo sequencing, indicated that the mature toxin has an amidated C-terminal arginine, a posttranslational modification rarely observed for snake TFTs. α-EPTX-Dpp2d was found to potently inhibit α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR; IC₅₀, 58 ± 24 nM) and muscle-type nAChR (IC₅₀, 114 ± 37 nM) but did not affect α3β2 and α3β4 nAChR isoforms at 1 μM concentrations. Competitive radioligand binding assays demonstrated that α-EPTX-Dpp2d competes with epibatidine binding to the Lymnea stagnalis acetylcholine-binding protein (Ls-AChBP; IC₅₀, 4.9 ± 2.3 nM). The activity profile and binding data are reminiscent of classical long-chain TFTs with a free carboxyl termini, suggesting that amidation does not significantly affect toxin selectivity. The crystal structure of α-EPTX-Dpp2d was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and displayed a dimeric toxin assembly with each monomer positioned in an antiparallel orientation. The dimeric structure is stabilized by extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, which raised the possibility that the toxin may exist as a noncovalent homodimer in solution. However, chemical cross-linking and size-exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle laser light scattering (MALLS) data indicated that the toxin is predominantly monomeric under physiological conditions. Because of its high potency and selectivity, we expect this toxin to be a valuable pharmacological tool for studying the structure and function of nAChRs.

  17. revealing H{sub 2}D{sup +} depletion and compact structure in starless and protostellar cores with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R. K.; Di Francesco, J.; Bourke, T. L.; Caselli, P.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Pineda, J. E.; Wong, M.

    2014-12-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the submillimeter dust continuum and H{sub 2}D{sup +} 1{sub 10}-1{sub 11} emission toward two evolved, potentially protostellar cores within the Ophiuchus molecular cloud, Oph A SM1 and SM1N. The data reveal small-scale condensations within both cores, with mass upper limits of M ≲ 0.02 M {sub ☉} (∼20 M {sub Jup}). The SM1 condensation is consistent with a nearly symmetric Gaussian source with a width of only 37 AU. The SM1N condensation is elongated and extends 500 AU along its major axis. No evidence for substructure is seen in either source. A Jeans analysis indicates that these sources are unlikely to fragment, suggesting that both will form single stars. H{sub 2}D{sup +} is only detected toward SM1N, offset from the continuum peak by ∼150-200 AU. This offset may be due to either heating from an undetected, young, low-luminosity protostellar source or first hydrostatic core, or HD (and consequently H{sub 2}D{sup +}) depletion in the cold center of the condensation. We propose that SM1 is protostellar and that the condensation detected by ALMA is a warm (T ∼ 30-50 K) accretion disk. The less concentrated emission of the SM1N condensation suggests that it is still starless, but we cannot rule out the presence of a low-luminosity source, perhaps surrounded by a pseudodisk. These data observationally reveal the earliest stages of the formation of circumstellar accretion regions and agree with theoretical predictions that disk formation can occur very early in the star formation process, coeval with or just after the formation of a first hydrostatic core or protostar.

  18. Hamiltonian structure of Dubrovin{close_quote}s equation of associativity in 2-d topological field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, C.A.; Nutku, Y.

    1996-12-01

    mA third order Monge-Amp{grave e}re type equation of associativity that Dubrovin has obtained in 2-d topological field theory is formulated in terms of a variational principle subject to second class constraints. Using Dirac{close_quote}s theory of constraints this degenerate Lagrangian system is cast into Hamiltonian form and the Hamiltonian operator is obtained from the Dirac bracket. There is a new type of Kac-Moody algebra that corresponds to this Hamiltonian operator. In particular, it is not a W-algebra. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Synthesis and structure of a 2D → 3D framework with coexistence of hydrogen bonds and polythreading character

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming-Dao Zhuang, Qi-Fan; Xu, Jing; Cao, Hui

    2015-12-15

    The title complex, ([Co(BPPA)(5-OH-bdc)] · (H{sub 2}O)){sub n} was prepared under hydrothermal conditions based on two ligands, namely, bis(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)amine (BPPA) and 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (5-OH-H{sub 2}bdc). 5-OH-bdc{sup 2–} anions coordinated to Co atoms to give layers in crystal. BPPA ligands coordinate to Co atoms and thread into the adjacent layers. There are hydrogen bonds between adjacent layers, giving rise to a 2D → 3D framework.

  20. Social structure of Facebook networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traud, Amanda L.; Mucha, Peter J.; Porter, Mason A.

    2012-08-01

    We study the social structure of Facebook “friendship” networks at one hundred American colleges and universities at a single point in time, and we examine the roles of user attributes-gender, class year, major, high school, and residence-at these institutions. We investigate the influence of common attributes at the dyad level in terms of assortativity coefficients and regression models. We then examine larger-scale groupings by detecting communities algorithmically and comparing them to network partitions based on user characteristics. We thereby examine the relative importance of different characteristics at different institutions, finding for example that common high school is more important to the social organization of large institutions and that the importance of common major varies significantly between institutions. Our calculations illustrate how microscopic and macroscopic perspectives give complementary insights on the social organization at universities and suggest future studies to investigate such phenomena further.

  1. Synthesizing 2D and 3D Selenidostannates in Ionic Liquids: The Synergistic Structure-Directing Effects of Ionic Liquids and Metal-Amine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Du, Cheng-Feng; Shen, Nan-Nan; Li, Jian-Rong; Hao, Min-Ting; Wang, Zi; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2016-05-20

    Presented are the ionothermal syntheses, characterizations, and properties of a series of two- and three-dimensional selenidostannate compounds synergistically directed by metal-amine complex (MAC) cations and ionic liquids (ILs) of [Bmmim]Cl (Bmmim=1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium). Four selenidostannates, namely, 2D-(Bmmim)3 [Ni(en)3 ]2 [Sn9 Se21 ]Cl (1, en=ethylenediamine), 2D-(Bmmim)8 [Ni2 (teta)2 (μ-teta)]Sn18 Se42 (2, teta=triethylenetetramine), 2D-(Bmmim)4 [Ni(tepa)Cl]2 [Ni(tepa)Sn12 Se28 ] (3, tepa=tetraethylenepentamine), and 3D-(Bmmim)2 [Ni(1,2-pda)3 ]Sn8 Se18 (4, 1,2-pda=1,2-diaminopropane), were obtained. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compounds 1 and 2 possess a lamellar anionic [Sn3 Se7 ]n (2n-) structure comprising distinct eight-membered ring units, whereas 3 features a MAC-decorated anionic [Ni(tepa)Sn12 Se28 ]n (6n-) layered structure. In contrast to 1-3, compound 4 exhibits a 3D open framework of anionic [Sn4 Se9 ]n (2n-) . The structural variation from 1 to 4 clearly indicates that on the basis of the synergistic structure-directing ability of the MACs and ILs, variation of the organic polyamine ligand has a significant impact on the formation of selenidostannates.

  2. Social network structures and bank runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; Li, Jiaheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the impact of social network structures of depositors on bank runs. The analyzed network structures include random networks, small-world networks and scale-free networks. Simulation results show that the probability of bank run occurrence in random networks is larger than that in small-world networks, but the probability of bank run occurrence in scale-free networks drops from the highest to the lowest among the three types of network structures with the increase of the proportion of impatient depositors. The average degree of depositor networks has a significant impact on bank runs, but this impact is related to the proportion of impatient depositors and the confidence levels of depositors in banks.

  3. Two-dimensional (2D) infrared correlation study of the structural characterization of a surface immobilized polypeptide film stimulated by pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Boknam; Son, Seok Ho; Kwak, Young Jun; Jung, Young Mee; Lee, Seung Woo

    2016-11-01

    The pH-induced structural changes to surface immobilized poly (L-glutamic acid) (PLGA) films were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis. Significant spectral changes were observed in the FTIR spectra of the surface immobilized PLGA film between pH 6 and 7. The 2D correlation spectra constructed from the pH-dependent FTIR spectra of the surface immobilized PLGA films revealed the spectral changes induced by the alternations of the protonation state of the carboxylic acid group in the PLGA side chain. When the pH was increased from 6 to 8, weak spectral changes in the secondary structure of the PLGA main chain were induced by deprotonation of the carboxylic acid side group.

  4. Unraveling the dynamics and structure of functionalized self-assembled monolayers on gold using 2D IR spectroscopy and MD simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chang; Yuan, Rongfeng; Pfalzgraff, William C.; Nishida, Jun; Wang, Lu; Markland, Thomas E.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are the focus of ongoing investigations because they can be chemically tuned to control their structure and dynamics for a wide variety of applications, including electrochemistry, catalysis, and as models of biological interfaces. Here we combine reflection 2D infrared vibrational echo spectroscopy (R-2D IR) and molecular dynamics simulations to determine the relationship between the structures of functionalized alkanethiol SAMs on gold surfaces and their underlying molecular motions on timescales of tens to hundreds of picoseconds. We find that at higher head group density, the monolayers have more disorder in the alkyl chain packing and faster dynamics. The dynamics of alkanethiol SAMs on gold are much slower than the dynamics of alkylsiloxane SAMs on silica. Using the simulations, we assess how the different molecular motions of the alkyl chain monolayers give rise to the dynamics observed in the experiments. PMID:27044113

  5. Closed-shell and open-shell 2D nanographenes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhe; Wu, Jishan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a series of two-dimensional (2D) expanded arene networks, also known as nanographenes, with either closed-shell or open-shell electronic structure in the ground state. These systems are further categorized into three classes on a basis of different edge structures: those with zigzag edges only, those with armchair edges only, and those possessing both. Distinctive physical properties of these 2D aromatic systems are closely related to their structural characteristics and provide great potential for them as materials for different applications.

  6. Structures and Luminescent Properties of Two 2D Coordination Polymers Containing Tb(III) or Dy(III) Ions.

    PubMed

    An, Xiaoping; Wang, Hongsheng; Li, Gongchun

    2014-03-01

    Two 2D rare earth terbium and dysprosium coordination polymers with 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylate and oxalate anions have been synthesized by hydrothermal method, the formula is {[RE(pda)(ox)0.5(H2O)4]·2H2O}n (RE = Tb (1) and Dy (2); H2pda = 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid; ox = oxalate anion). The two complexes are isomorphic and crystallized in monoclinic system, P21/c space group. Each pda anion connects two rare earth ions with 2- carboxyl group and the nitrogen atom but the 4- carboxyl group does not coordinate with rare earth ions. Each ox anion connects two rare earth ions by μ 2-bridge way. Both the complexes exhibit intense characteristic luminescence of Tb(III) or Dy(III) ion with excitation of UV-rays.

  7. From 2D graphene to 1D graphene nanoribbons: dimensional crossover signals in the structural thermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobry, Ariel; Costamagna, Sebastián

    2011-03-01

    I this work, by analyzing the thermal excited rippling in the graphene honeycomb lattice, we find clear signals of an existing dimensional crossover from 2D to 1D while reducing one of the dimensions of the graphene layer. Trough a joint study, using montecarlo atomistic simulations and analytical calculation based, we find that the normal-normal correlation function G (q) does not change the power law behavior valid on the long wavelength limit, however the system size dependency of the quadratic out of plane displacement h2 shows a breakdown of its corresponding scaling law. In this case we show that a new scaling law appear which correspond to a truly 1D system. On the basis of these results, and having explored a wide number of realistic systems size, we conclude that narrow nanoribbons presents strongest corrugations than the square graphene sheets. This result could have important consequences on the electron transport properties of freestanding graphene systems.

  8. Global Electricity Trade Network: Structures and Implications.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ling; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S F; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nations increasingly trade electricity, and understanding the structure of the global power grid can help identify nations that are critical for its reliability. This study examines the global grid as a network with nations as nodes and international electricity trade as links. We analyze the structure of the global electricity trade network and find that the network consists of four sub-networks, and provide a detailed analysis of the largest network, Eurasia. Russia, China, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan have high betweenness measures in the Eurasian sub-network, indicating the degrees of centrality of the positions they hold. The analysis reveals that the Eurasian sub-network consists of seven communities based on the network structure. We find that the communities do not fully align with geographical proximity, and that the present international electricity trade in the Eurasian sub-network causes an approximately 11 million additional tons of CO2 emissions.

  9. Global Electricity Trade Network: Structures and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ling; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nations increasingly trade electricity, and understanding the structure of the global power grid can help identify nations that are critical for its reliability. This study examines the global grid as a network with nations as nodes and international electricity trade as links. We analyze the structure of the global electricity trade network and find that the network consists of four sub-networks, and provide a detailed analysis of the largest network, Eurasia. Russia, China, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan have high betweenness measures in the Eurasian sub-network, indicating the degrees of centrality of the positions they hold. The analysis reveals that the Eurasian sub-network consists of seven communities based on the network structure. We find that the communities do not fully align with geographical proximity, and that the present international electricity trade in the Eurasian sub-network causes an approximately 11 million additional tons of CO2 emissions. PMID:27504825

  10. Analyzing network reliability using structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Khorramzadeh, Yasamin; Youssef, Mina; Eubank, Stephen; Mowlaei, Shahir

    2015-04-01

    This paper uses the reliability polynomial, introduced by Moore and Shannon in 1956, to analyze the effect of network structure on diffusive dynamics such as the spread of infectious disease. We exhibit a representation for the reliability polynomial in terms of what we call structural motifs that is well suited for reasoning about the effect of a network's structural properties on diffusion across the network. We illustrate by deriving several general results relating graph structure to dynamical phenomena.

  11. A Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Imidazole-5-Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists Combining 2D and 3D QSAR Methods.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh C

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were performed for correlating the chemical composition of imidazole-5-carboxylic acid analogs and their angiotensin II [Formula: see text] receptor antagonist activity using partial least squares and k-nearest neighbor, respectively. For comparing the three different feature selection methods of 2D-QSAR, k-nearest neighbor models were used in conjunction with simulated annealing (SA), genetic algorithm and stepwise coupled with partial least square (PLS) showed variation in biological activity. The statistically significant best 2D-QSAR model having good predictive ability with statistical values of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] was developed by SA-partial least square with the descriptors like [Formula: see text]count, 5Chain count, SdsCHE-index, and H-acceptor count, showing that increase in the values of these descriptors is beneficial to the activity. The 3D-QSAR studies were performed using the SA-PLS. A leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient [Formula: see text] and predicate activity [Formula: see text] = 0.7226 were obtained. The information rendered by QSAR models may lead to a better understanding of structural requirements of substituted imidazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives and also aid in designing novel potent antihypertensive molecules.

  12. Monitoring guanidinium-induced structural changes in ribonuclease proteins using Raman spectroscopy and 2D correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Victoria L; Ashton, Lorna; Goodacre, Royston

    2013-04-02

    Assessing the stability of proteins by comparing their unfolding profiles is a very important characterization and quality control step for any biopharmaceutical, and this is usually measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. In this paper we propose Raman spectroscopy as a rapid, noninvasive alternative analytical method and we shall show this has enhanced sensitivity and can therefore reveal very subtle protein conformational changes that are not observed with fluorescence measurements. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful nondestructive method that has a strong history of applications in protein characterization. In this work we describe how Raman microscopy can be used as a fast and reliable method of tracking protein unfolding in the presence of a chemical denaturant. We have compared Raman spectroscopic data to the equivalent samples analyzed using fluorescence spectroscopy in order to validate the Raman approach. Calculations from both Raman and fluorescence unfolding curves of [D]50 values and Gibbs free energy correlate well with each other and more importantly agree with the values found in the literature for these proteins. In addition, 2D correlation analysis has been performed on both Raman and fluorescence data sets in order to allow further comparisons of the unfolding behavior indicated by each method. As many biopharmaceuticals are glycosylated in order to be functional, we compare the unfolding profiles of a protein (RNase A) and a glycoprotein (RNase B) as measured by Raman spectroscopy and discuss the implications that glycosylation has on the stability of the protein.

  13. Self-assembly of alternating left- and right-handed infinite Cd(II) helicates into a 2D open framework structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sujit K.; Bharadwaj, Parimal K.

    2006-08-01

    Pyrazine-2,3,5,6-tetracarboxylic acid (ptcH 4) reacts with Cd(NO 3) 2·6H 2O at room temperature in the presence of pyridine to form a 2D open framework built from alternating left- and right-handed helicates with the empirical formula, {[Cd 2(ptc)·(py) 5·H 2O]·5H 2O·py} n, 1. Lattice water and pyridine molecules form an intricate array of H-bonding with the 2D sheets leading to a 3D structure. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/ c with the following lattice parameters— a=24.103(2), b=13.480(5), c=29.176(4) Å, β=109.427(3)°, V=8940(4) Å 3, Z=8, R1=0.0513, wR2=0.1552, S=1.085.

  14. Taxonomies of networks from community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Fenn, Daniel J.; Reid, Stephen; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2012-09-01

    The study of networks has become a substantial interdisciplinary endeavor that encompasses myriad disciplines in the natural, social, and information sciences. Here we introduce a framework for constructing taxonomies of networks based on their structural similarities. These networks can arise from any of numerous sources: They can be empirical or synthetic, they can arise from multiple realizations of a single process (either empirical or synthetic), they can represent entirely different systems in different disciplines, etc. Because mesoscopic properties of networks are hypothesized to be important for network function, we base our comparisons on summaries of network community structures. Although we use a specific method for uncovering network communities, much of the introduced framework is independent of that choice. After introducing the framework, we apply it to construct a taxonomy for 746 networks and demonstrate that our approach usefully identifies similar networks. We also construct taxonomies within individual categories of networks, and we thereby expose nontrivial structure. For example, we create taxonomies for similarity networks constructed from both political voting data and financial data. We also construct network taxonomies to compare the social structures of 100 Facebook networks and the growth structures produced by different types of fungi.

  15. Robustness and structure of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my PhD research on statistical physics and complex networks: i) modeling a new type of attack -- localized attack, and investigating robustness of complex networks under this type of attack; ii) discovering the clustering structure in complex networks and its influence on the robustness of coupled networks. Complex networks appear in every aspect of our daily life and are widely studied in Physics, Mathematics, Biology, and Computer Science. One important property of complex networks is their robustness under attacks, which depends crucially on the nature of attacks and the structure of the networks themselves. Previous studies have focused on two types of attack: random attack and targeted attack, which, however, are insufficient to describe many real-world damages. Here we propose a new type of attack -- localized attack, and study the robustness of complex networks under this type of attack, both analytically and via simulation. On the other hand, we also study the clustering structure in the network, and its influence on the robustness of a complex network system. In the first part, we propose a theoretical framework to study the robustness of complex networks under localized attack based on percolation theory and generating function method. We investigate the percolation properties, including the critical threshold of the phase transition pc and the size of the giant component Pinfinity. We compare localized attack with random attack and find that while random regular (RR) networks are more robust against localized attack, Erdoḧs-Renyi (ER) networks are equally robust under both types of attacks. As for scale-free (SF) networks, their robustness depends crucially on the degree exponent lambda. The simulation results show perfect agreement with theoretical predictions. We also test our model on two real-world networks: a peer-to-peer computer network and an airline network, and find that the real-world networks

  16. Structure and inference in annotated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Clauset, Aaron

    2016-06-01

    For many networks of scientific interest we know both the connections of the network and information about the network nodes, such as the age or gender of individuals in a social network. Here we demonstrate how this `metadata' can be used to improve our understanding of network structure. We focus in particular on the problem of community detection in networks and develop a mathematically principled approach that combines a network and its metadata to detect communities more accurately than can be done with either alone. Crucially, the method does not assume that the metadata are correlated with the communities we are trying to find. Instead, the method learns whether a correlation exists and correctly uses or ignores the metadata depending on whether they contain useful information. We demonstrate our method on synthetic networks with known structure and on real-world networks, large and small, drawn from social, biological and technological domains.

  17. Structure and inference in annotated networks

    PubMed Central

    Newman, M. E. J.; Clauset, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    For many networks of scientific interest we know both the connections of the network and information about the network nodes, such as the age or gender of individuals in a social network. Here we demonstrate how this ‘metadata' can be used to improve our understanding of network structure. We focus in particular on the problem of community detection in networks and develop a mathematically principled approach that combines a network and its metadata to detect communities more accurately than can be done with either alone. Crucially, the method does not assume that the metadata are correlated with the communities we are trying to find. Instead, the method learns whether a correlation exists and correctly uses or ignores the metadata depending on whether they contain useful information. We demonstrate our method on synthetic networks with known structure and on real-world networks, large and small, drawn from social, biological and technological domains. PMID:27306566

  18. Simultaneous imaging of the topography and electrochemical activity of a 2D carbon nanotube network using a dual functional L-shaped nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjoo; Sung, Jungwoo; An, Taechang; Shin, Heungjoo; Nam, Hong Gil; Lim, Geunbae

    2015-05-07

    The application of nanomaterials for biosensors and fuel cells is becoming more common, but it requires an understanding of the relationship between the structure and electrochemical characteristics of the materials at the nanoscale. Herein, we report the development of scanning electrochemical microscopy-atomic force microscopy (SECM-AFM) nanoprobes for collecting spatially resolved data regarding the electrochemical activity of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube (CNT) networks. The fabrication of the nanoprobe begins with the integration of a CNT-bundle wire into a conventional AFM probe followed by the deposition of an insulating layer and cutting of the probe end. In addition, a protrusive insulating tip is integrated at the end of the insulated CNT-bundle wire to maintain a constant distance between the nanoelectrode and the substrate; this yields an L-shaped nanoprobe. The resulting nanoprobes produced well-fitted maps of faradaic current data with less than 300 nm spatial resolution and topographical images of CNT networks owing to the small effective distance (of the order of tens of nanometers) between the electrode and the substrate. Electrochemical imaging using the L-shaped nanoprobe revealed that the electrochemical activity of the CNT network is not homogeneous and provided further understanding of the relationship between the topography and electrochemical characteristics of CNT networks.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of Asymmetric Poly(styrene-b-1,4-isoprene) Diblock Copolymer under 1D and 2D Nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Kipnusu, Wycliffe K; Elmahdy, Mahdy M; Mapesa, Emmanuel U; Zhang, Jianqi; Böhlmann, Winfried; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Papadakis, Christine M; Kremer, Friedrich

    2015-06-17

    The impact of 1- and 2-dimensional (2D) confinement on the structure and dynamics of poly(styrene-b-1,4-isoprene) P(S-b-I) diblock copolymer is investigated by a combination of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Grazing-Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS), and Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS). 1D confinement is achieved by spin coating the P(S-b-I) to form nanometric thin films on silicon substrates, while in the 2D confinement, the copolymer is infiltrated into cylindrical anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanopores. After dissolving the AAO matrix having mean pore diameter of 150 nm, the SEM images of the exposed P(S-b-I) show straight nanorods. For the thin films, GISAXS and AFM reveal hexagonally packed cylinders of PS in a PI matrix. Three dielectrically active relaxation modes assigned to the two segmental modes of the styrene and isoprene blocks and the normal mode of the latter are studied selectively by BDS. The dynamic glass transition, related to the segmental modes of the styrene and isoprene blocks, is independent of the dimensionality and the finite sizes (down to 18 nm) of confinement, but the normal mode is influenced by both factors with 2D geometrical constraints exerting greater impact. This reflects the considerable difference in the length scales on which the two kinds of fluctuations take place.

  20. Structure-Activity Relationships and Pharmacophore Model of a Non-Competitive Pyrazoline Containing Class of GluN2C/GluN2D Selective Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Timothy M.; Khatri, Alpa; Vance, Katie M.; Slabber, Cathryn; Bacsa, John; Snyder, James P.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the synthesis and structure-activity relationship for a class of pyrazoline-containing dihydroquinolone negative allosteric modulators of the NMDA receptor that show strong subunit-selectivity for GluN2C- and GluN2D-containing receptors over GluN2A-and GluN2B-containing receptors. Several members of this class inhibit NMDA receptor responses in the nanomolar range, and are more than 50-fold selective over GluN1/GluN2A and GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptors, as well as AMPA, kainate, GABA, glycine, nicotinic, serotonin, and purinergic receptors. Analysis of the purified enantiomers of one of the more potent and selective compounds shows that the S-enantiomer is both more potent and more selective than the R-enantiomer. The S-enantiomer had an IC50 value of 0.17–0.22 µM at GluN2D- and GluN2C-containing receptors, respectively, and showed over 70-fold selectivity over other NMDA receptor subunits. The subunit-selectivity of this class of compounds should be useful in defining the role of GluN2C- and GluN2D-containing receptors in specific brain circuits in both physiological and patho-physiological conditions. PMID:23909910

  1. Genetic Network Inference Using Hierarchical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Shuhei; Tokuhisa, Masato; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Many methods for inferring genetic networks have been proposed, but the regulations they infer often include false-positives. Several researchers have attempted to reduce these erroneous regulations by proposing the use of a priori knowledge about the properties of genetic networks such as their sparseness, scale-free structure, and so on. This study focuses on another piece of a priori knowledge, namely, that biochemical networks exhibit hierarchical structures. Based on this idea, we propose an inference approach that uses the hierarchical structure in a target genetic network. To obtain a reasonable hierarchical structure, the first step of the proposed approach is to infer multiple genetic networks from the observed gene expression data. We take this step using an existing method that combines a genetic network inference method with a bootstrap method. The next step is to extract a hierarchical structure from the inferred networks that is consistent with most of the networks. Third, we use the hierarchical structure obtained to assign confidence values to all candidate regulations. Numerical experiments are also performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of using the hierarchical structure in the genetic network inference. The improvement accomplished by the use of the hierarchical structure is small. However, the hierarchical structure could be used to improve the performances of many existing inference methods. PMID:26941653

  2. Molecular phylogenetics in 2D: ITS2 rRNA evolution and sequence-structure barcode from Veneridae to Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Daniele; Mariottini, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed the nuclear ITS2 rRNA primary sequence and secondary structure in Veneridae and comparatively with 20 Bivalvia taxa to test the phylogenetic resolution of this marker and its suitability for molecular diagnosis at different taxonomic levels. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian trees based on primary sequences were congruent with (profile-) neighbor-joining trees based on a combined model of sequence-structure evolution. ITS2 showed higher resolution below the subfamily level, providing a phylogenetic signal comparable to (mitochondrial/nuclear) gene fragments 2-5 times longer. Structural elements of the ITS2 folding, such as specific mismatch pairing and compensatory base changes, provided further support for the monophyly of some groups and for their phylogenetic relationships. Veneridae ITS2 folding is structured in six domains (DI-VI) and shows five striking sequence-structure features. Two of them, the Basal and Apical STEMs, are common to Bivalvia, while the presence of both the Branched STEM and the Y/R stretches occurs in five superfamilies of the two Heterodonta orders Myoida and Veneroida, thus questioning their reciprocal monophyly. Our results validated the ITS2 as a suitable marker for venerids phylogenetics and taxonomy, and underlined the significance of including secondary structure information for both applications at several systematic levels within bivalves.

  3. Self-assembly of 2D sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene composites for high-performance lithium storage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Songmei Wang, Bo; Li, Bin; Liu, Jianhua; Yu, Mei; Wu, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • MFO/GN composites were synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach. • The MFO microspheres are sandwiched between the graphene layers. • Each MFO microsphere is an interstitial cluster of nanoparticles. • The MFO/GN electrode exhibits an enhanced cyclability for Li-ion batteries anodes. - Abstract: In this study, two-dimensional (2D) sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene (MFO/GN) composites are synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach, using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as cationic surfactant. As a consequence, the nanocomposites of MFO/GN self-assembled into a 2D sandwich structure, in which the interstitial cluster structure of microsphere-type MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is sandwiched between the graphene layers. This special structure of the MFO/GN composites used as anodes for lithium-ion batteries will be favorable for the maximum accessible surface of electroactive materials, fast diffusion of lithium ions and migration of electron, and elastomeric space to accommodate volume changes during the discharge–charge processes. The as-synthesized MFO/GN composites deliver a high specific reversible capacity of 987.95 mA h g{sup −1} at a current density of 200 mA g{sup −1}, a good capacity retention of 69.27% after 80 cycles and excellent rate performance for lithium storage.

  4. Band structure of a 2D photonic crystal based on ferrofluids of Co(1-x)Znx Fe2O4 nanoparticles under perpendicular applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Javier; Gonzalez, Luz Esther; Quinonez, Mario; Porras, Nelson; Zambrano, Gustavo; Gomez, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Using a ferrfluid of cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles Co(1 - x)ZnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid and suspended in ethanol, we have fabricated a 2D photonic crystal (PC) by the application of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the ferrofluid. The 2D PC is made by rods of nanoparticles organized in a hexagonal structure. By means of the plane-wave expansion method, we study its photonic band structure (PBS) which depends on the effective permittivity and on the area ratio of the liquid phase. Additionaly, taking into account the Maxwell-Garnett theory we calculated the effective permittivity of the rods. We have found that the effective refractive index of the ferrofluid increases with its magnetization. Using these results we calculate the band structure of the photonic crystal at different applied magnetic fields, finding that the increase of the applied magnetic field shifts the band structure to lower frequencies with the appearance of more band gaps. Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali, Colombia

  5. Hydrophobic cluster analysis: procedures to derive structural and functional information from 2-D-representation of protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Lemesle-Varloot, L; Henrissat, B; Gaboriaud, C; Bissery, V; Morgat, A; Mornon, J P

    1990-08-01

    Hydrophobic cluster analysis (HCA) [15] is a very efficient method to analyse and compare protein sequences. Despite its effectiveness, this method is not widely used because it relies in part on the experience and training of the user. In this article, detailed guidelines as to the use of HCA are presented and include discussions on: the definition of the hydrophobic clusters and their relationships with secondary and tertiary structures; the length of the clusters; the amino acid classification used for HCA; the HCA plot programs; and the working strategies. Various procedures for the analysis of a single sequence are presented: structural segmentation, structural domains and secondary structure evaluation. Like most sequence analysis methods, HCA is more efficient when several homologous sequences are compared. Procedures for the detection and alignment of distantly related proteins by HCA are described through several published examples along with 2 previously unreported cases: the beta-glucosidase from Ruminococcus albus is clearly related to the beta-glucosidases from Clostridum thermocellum and Hansenula anomala although they display a reverse organization of their constitutive domains; the alignment of the sequence of human GTPase activating protein with that of the Crk oncogene is presented. Finally, the pertinence of HCA in the identification of important residues for structure/function as well as in the preparation of homology modelling is discussed.

  6. Self-assembly of polydimethylsiloxane structures from 2D to 3D for bio-hybrid actuation.

    PubMed

    Vannozzi, L; Ricotti, L; Cianchetti, M; Bearzi, C; Gargioli, C; Rizzi, R; Dario, P; Menciassi, A

    2015-08-20

    This work aims to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel approach for the development of 3D self-assembled polydimethylsiloxane structures, to be used as engineered flexible matrices for bio-hybrid actuation. We described the fabrication of engineered bilayers, organized in a 3D architecture by means of a stress-induced rolling membrane technique. Such structures were provided with ad hoc surface topographies, for both cell alignment and cell survival after membrane rolling. We reported the results of advanced finite element model simulations, predicting the system behavior in terms of overall contraction, induced by the contractile activity of muscle cells seeded on the membrane. Then, we tested in vitro the structure with primary cardiomyocytes to evaluate the real bio-actuator contraction, thus validating the simulation results. At a later stage, we provided the samples with a stable fibronectin coating, by covalently binding the protein on the polymer surface, thus enabling long-term cultures with C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, a more controllable cell type. These tests revealed cell viability and alignment on the rolled structures, but also the ability of cells to differentiate and to form multinucleated and oriented myotubes on the polymer surface, also supported by a fibroblast feeder layer. Our results highlighted the possibility of developing 3D rolled PDMS structures, characterized by different mechanical properties, as novel bio-hybrid actuators.

  7. Consensus between Pipelines in Structural Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Christopher S.; Deligianni, Fani; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Daga, Pankaj; Modat, Marc; Dayan, Michael; Clark, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    Structural brain networks may be reconstructed from diffusion MRI tractography data and have great potential to further our understanding of the topological organisation of brain structure in health and disease. Network reconstruction is complex and involves a series of processesing methods including anatomical parcellation, registration, fiber orientation estimation and whole-brain fiber tractography. Methodological choices at each stage can affect the anatomical accuracy and graph theoretical properties of the reconstructed networks, meaning applying different combinations in a network reconstruction pipeline may produce substantially different networks. Furthermore, the choice of which connections are considered important is unclear. In this study, we assessed the similarity between structural networks obtained using two independent state-of-the-art reconstruction pipelines. We aimed to quantify network similarity and identify the core connections emerging most robustly in both pipelines. Similarity of network connections was compared between pipelines employing different atlases by merging parcels to a common and equivalent node scale. We found a high agreement between the networks across a range of fiber density thresholds. In addition, we identified a robust core of highly connected regions coinciding with a peak in similarity across network density thresholds, and replicated these results with atlases at different node scales. The binary network properties of these core connections were similar between pipelines but showed some differences in atlases across node scales. This study demonstrates the utility of applying multiple structural network reconstrution pipelines to diffusion data in order to identify the most important connections for further study. PMID:25356977

  8. Investigation of mechanical strength of 2D nanoscale structures using a molecular dynamics based computational intelligence approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, A.; Vijayaraghavan, V.; Wong, C. H.; Tai, K.; Singru, Pravin M.; Mahapatra, S. S.; Sangwan, K. S.

    2015-09-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) based computational intelligence (CI) approach is proposed to investigate the Young modulus of two graphene sheets: Armchair and Zigzag. In this approach, the effect of aspect ratio, the temperature, the number of atomic planes and the vacancy defects on the Young modulus of two graphene sheets are first analyzed using the MD simulation. The data obtained using the MD simulation is then fed into the paradigm of a CI cluster comprising of genetic programming, which was specifically designed to formulate the explicit relationship of Young modulus of two graphene structures. We find that the MD-based-CI model is able to model the Young modulus of two graphene structures very well, which compiles in good agreement with that of experimental results obtained from the literature. Additionally, we also conducted sensitivity and parametric analysis and found that the number of defects has the most dominating influence on the Young modulus of two graphene structures.

  9. LOW-Tg Bismuth Phosphate Glasses for Glass-Imprinting and Fabrication of 2d Sub-Wavelength Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Naoyuki; Fukumi, Kohei; Nakamura, Junichi; Hidaka, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Takurou; Hashima, Hidekazu; Nishii, Junji

    We have developed zinc-bismuth-phosphate glasses, which have deformation temperatures under 450°C and refractive indices higher than 1.7, in order to produce an antireflection structure on the surface by a glass-imprinting process. Two-dimensionally arrayed conical cavities of sub-wavelength size were fabricated on a SiC mold by electron lithography and dry etching techniques. The sub-wavelength periodic structure was transferred onto the glass surface by a glass-imprinting process using the mold. The sub-wavelength structure suppressed the reflectance by approximately 90%. A weak maximum was observed in the reflection spectra around 400-500 nm, which decreased in intensity and shifted toward shorter wavelengths with decreasing pitch.

  10. Temporal changes of the structure of a loamy soil tilled layers as described by 2D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, Arlène; Seger, Maud; Richard, Guy; Nicoullaud, Bernard; Giot, Guillaume; Cousin, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    The soil structure is complex, heterogeneous, space and time scale dependent, submitted to the climate, biological activity and human practices. For instance, in agricultural context, when soil management practices aim at developing desirable soil conditions for a seedbed and establishing specific surface configuration for planting, drainage or harvesting operations, they can also induce soil structural disturbances, as compaction resulting on in-field wheel traffic. These intense soil degradations have a drastic impact on soil functioning and plant growth but are not absolutely irreversible. Indeed, earthworm's activity, root growth and climate improve the soil structure by cracking, by developing voids, channels, by a progressive fragmentation and disaggregation of the initial dense matrix. Despite this natural structural resilience process of soils is well known, its empirical evidence at the macroscopic scale remains challenging. This requires a well detailed characterization of structural components in space and time. The objective of this study was to monitor the structural changes of a loamy tilled layer initially compacted locally by wheel traffic. In the field, two zones were analysed: (1) a bare soil in view of describing mainly the impact of the climate on the soil structure and (2) a cultivated soil in view of describing the cumulative effect of the climate and root growth on the soil structure. For both, the non destructive and exhaustive method of Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) has been used to monitor the structural changes from April to August, i.e. during the complete growing season. In addition, the interpretation of ERT was comforted by several visual descriptions of soil structure, realized on soil pits dug at the same location than the ERT profiles and by bulk density measurements from soil samples. Due to their high impact on electrical resistivity, water content and soil temperature were also monitored during the experiment. The

  11. Synthesis, structure and temperature-depended 2D IR correlation spectroscopy of an organo-bismuth benzoate with 1,10-phenanthroline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan-Qiong; Zhong, Jie-Cen; Liu, Le-Hui; Qiu, Xing-Tai; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2016-11-01

    An organo-bismuth benzoate with phen as auxiliary ligand, [Bi(phen)(C6H5COO)(C6H4COO)] (1) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) has been hydrothermally synthesized from bismuth nitrate, 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid with phen as auxiliary ligand and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, PXRD, IR spectra, TG analyses, temperature-depended 2D-IR COS (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Interestingly, benzoate anions in 1 came from the desulfuration reaction of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid under hydrothermal condition. Compound 1 is a discrete organo-bismuth compound with benzoate and phen ligands. The offset face-to-face π-π stacking interactions and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the isolate complex into a 3D supramolecular network. The temperature-depended 2D-IR COS indicates that the stretching vibrations of Cdbnd C/Cdbnd N of aromatic rings and Cdbnd O bonds are sensitive to the temperature change.

  12. Controls on the Flow Regime and Thermal Structure of the Subduction Zone Mantle Wedge: A Systematic 2-D and 3-D Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voci, Giuseppe; Davies, Rhodri; Goes, Saskia; Kramer, Stephan; Wilson, Cian

    2014-05-01

    Arc volcanism at subduction zones is likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure and, hence, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the principal controls on mantle wedge conditions. Here, we build on these previous studies by undertaking the first systematic 2-D and 3-D numerical investigation, across a wide parameter-space, into how hydration and thermal buoyancy influence the wedge's flow regime and associated thermal structure, above a kinematically driven subducting plate. We find that small-scale convection (SSC), resulting from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, or drips, off the base of the overriding lithosphere, is a typical occurrence, if: (i) viscosities are < 5×1018 Pa s; and (ii) hydrous weakening of wedge rheology extends at least 100-150 km from the trench. In 2-D models, instabilities generally take the form of 'drips'. Although along-strike averages of wedge velocities and temperature in 3-D structure are consistent with those in 2-D, fluctuations are larger in 3-D. Furthermore, in 3-D, two separate, but interacting, longitudinal Richter roll systems form (with their axes aligned perpendicular to the trench), the first below the arc region and the second below the back-arc region. These instabilities result in transient and spatial temperature fluctuations of 100-150K, which are sufficient to influence melting, the stability of hydrous minerals and the dehydration of crustal material. Furthermore, they are efficient at eroding the overriding lithosphere, particularly in 3-D and, thus, provide a means to explain observations of high heat flow and thin back-arc lithosphere at many subduction zones, if back-arc mantle is hydrated.

  13. Deep crustal structure of magma-rich passive margin as revealed by the Northeast GreenlandSPAN 2D seismic survey and airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Stanislaw; Rippington, Stephen; Silva, Mercia; Houghton, Phill; Helwig, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The objective of our project was to integrate the results from the Northeast GreenlandSPAN™ 2D seismic survey with newly acquired airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (FTG) and Magnetic potential field data over the Danmarkshaven Ridge area, NE Greenland. The potential field data were constrained by 32 long offset pre stack depth migrated seismic profiles selected from the Northeast GreenlandSPAN™ survey. The results provide a new insight in the deep crustal architecture of the Greenland passive margin. They also shed a new light on crustal-scale deformation and igneous activity in a magma-rich continental margin. The structural data set is based on the integrated interpretation of 2D seismic data and FTG data, which was further supplemented by the airborne magnetic data plus the gravity and magnetic shipborne data. 2D gravity and magnetic forward modelling was used for testing geological/seismic models against the potential field data. A regional Moho grid derived from 3D gravity inversion was as a starting point and reference for the 2D modelling. The resultant horizons from the 2D potential fields models were subsequently gridded to help create a 3D structural model. The computed residual signal from the 3D model, the difference between the observed gravity and the forward calculated model response, allowed the accuracy of the structural interpretation to be tested. The area is dominated by three structural trends: (1) N-S to NNE-SSW, (2) WNW-ESE, and (3) NW-SE. The first trend is represented by Early Cretaceous normal faults defining the Danmarkshaven Ridge whereas the second set of structures corresponds to the WNW-ESE oriented right-lateral strike slip faults. The third structural trend is delineated by the NW-SE oriented Greenland Fracture Zone (GFZ). Importantly, a distinct step in the COB suggests post-break-up reactivation of the GFZ with left-lateral kinematics. There is a good match between the modelled Moho and the GFZ suggesting its continuation

  14. Structure and function of complex brain networks.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf

    2013-09-01

    An increasing number of theoretical and empirical studies approach the function of the human brain from a network perspective. The analysis of brain networks is made feasible by the development of new imaging acquisition methods as well as new tools from graph theory and dynamical systems. This review surveys some of these methodological advances and summarizes recent findings on the architecture of structural and functional brain networks. Studies of the structural connectome reveal several modules or network communities that are interlinked by hub regions mediating communication processes between modules. Recent network analyses have shown that network hubs form a densely linked collective called a "rich club," centrally positioned for attracting and dispersing signal traffic. In parallel, recordings of resting and task-evoked neural activity have revealed distinct resting-state networks that contribute to functions in distinct cognitive domains. Network methods are increasingly applied in a clinical context, and their promise for elucidating neural substrates of brain and mental disorders is discussed.

  15. Sparsity-based Ankylography for Recovering 3D molecular structures from single-shot 2D scattered light intensity

    PubMed Central

    Mutzafi, Maor; Shechtman, Yoav; Eldar, Yonina C.; Cohen, Oren; Segev, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the three-dimensional (3D) structure of complex molecules is of major importance, typically accomplished with X-ray crystallography. Unfortunately, many important molecules cannot be crystallized, hence their 3D structure is unknown. Ankylography presents an alternative, relying on scattering an ultrashort X-ray pulse off a single molecule before it disintegrates, measuring the far-field intensity on a two-dimensional surface, followed by computation. However, significant information is absent due to lower dimensionality of the measurements and the inability to measure the phase. Recent Ankylography experiments attracted much interest, but it was counter-argued that Ankylography is valid only for objects containing a small number of volume pixels. Here, we propose a sparsity-based approach to reconstruct the 3D structure of molecules. Sparsity is natural for Ankylography, because molecules can be represented compactly in stoichiometric basis. Utilizing sparsity, we surpass current limits on recoverable information by orders of magnitude, paving the way for deciphering the 3D structure of macromolecules. PMID:26289358

  16. Effects of complex internal structures on rheology of multiple emulsions particles in 2D from a boundary integral method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingtao; Liu, Jinxia; Han, Junjie; Guan, Jing

    2013-02-08

    A boundary integral method is developed to investigate the effects of inner droplets and asymmetry of internal structures on rheology of two-dimensional multiple emulsion particles with arbitrary numbers of layers and droplets within each layer. Under a modest extensional flow, the number increment of layers and inner droplets, and the collision among inner droplets subject the particle to stronger shears. In addition, the coalescence or release of inner droplets changes the internal structure of the multiple emulsion particles. Since the rheology of such particles is sensitive to internal structures and their change, modeling them as the core-shell particles to obtain the viscosity equation of a single particle should be modified by introducing the time-dependable volume fraction Φ(t) of the core instead of the fixed Φ. An asymmetric internal structure induces an oriented contact and merging of the outer and inner interface. The start time of the interface merging is controlled by adjusting the viscosity ratio and enhancing the asymmetry, which is promising in the controlled release of inner droplets through hydrodynamics for targeted drug delivery.

  17. Assembly of 1D, 2D and 3D lanthanum(iii) coordination polymers with perchlorinated benzenedicarboxylates: positional isomeric effect, structural transformation and ring-opening polymerisation of glycolide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chun; Dai, An-Qi; Huang, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Cui, Ai-Jun; He, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qun

    2016-02-28

    Utilizing a series of positional isomers of tetrachlorinated benzenedicarboxylic acid ligands, seven La(iii)-based coordination polymers were solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Their structural dimensionalities varying from 1D double chains, to the 2D 3,4,5-connected network, to 3D 6-connected pcu topological nets are only governed by the positions of carboxyl groups on the tetrachlorinated benzene ring. A comprehensive analysis and comparison reveals that the size of the carbonyl solvent molecules (DMF, DEF, DMA, and NMP) can affect the coordination geometries around the La(iii) ions, the coordination modes of carboxylate groups, the packing arrangements, and the void volumes of the overall crystal lattices. One as-synthesized framework further shows an unprecedented structural transformation from a 3D 6-connected network to a 3D 4,5-connected net through the dissolution and reformation pathway in water, suggesting that these easily hydrolyzed lanthanide complexes may serve as precursors to produce new high-dimensional frameworks. The bulk solvent-free melt polymerisation of glycolide utilizing these La(iii) complexes as initiators has been reported herein for the first time. All complexes were found to promote the polymerization of glycolide over a temperature range of 200 to 220 °C, producing poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) with a molecular weight up to 93,280. Under the same experimental conditions, the different catalytic activities for these complexes may result from their structural discrepancy.

  18. Numerical investigation of ultrasonic attenuation through 2D trabecular bone structures reconstructed from CT scans and random realizations.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert P; Guyenne, Philippe; Li, Jing

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we compare ultrasound interrogations of actual CT-scanned images of trabecular bone with artificial randomly constructed bone. Even though it is known that actual bone does not have randomly distributed trabeculae, we find that the ultrasound attenuations are close enough to cast doubt on any microstructural information, such as trabeculae width and distance between trabeculae, being gleaned from such experiments. More precisely, we perform numerical simulations of ultrasound interrogation on cancellous bone to investigate the phenomenon of ultrasound attenuation as a function of excitation frequency and bone porosity. The theoretical model is based on acoustic propagation equations for a composite fluid-solid material and is solved by a staggered-grid finite-difference scheme in the time domain. Numerical experiments are performed on two-dimensional bone samples reconstructed from CT-scanned images of real human calcaneus and from random distributions of fluid-solid particles generated via the turning bands method. A detailed comparison is performed on various parameters such as the attenuation rate and speed of sound through the bone samples as well as the normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation coefficient. Comparing results from these two types of bone samples allows us to assess the role of bone microstructure in ultrasound attenuation. It is found that the random model provides suitable bone samples for ultrasound interrogation in the transverse direction of the trabecular network.

  19. 3D and 2D structural characterization of 1D Al/Al2 O3 biphasic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Miró, M Martinez; Veith, M; Lee, J; Soldera, F; Mücklich, F; Bennewitz, R; Aktas, C

    2015-05-01

    1D Al/Al2 O3 nanostructures have been synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of the molecular precursor [(t) BuOAlH2 ]2 . The deposited nanostructures grow chaotically on the substrate forming a layer with a high porosity (80%). Depending on the deposition time, diverse nanostructured surfaces with different distribution densities were achieved. A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction has been evaluated for every nanostructure density using the Focus Ion Beam (FIB) tomography technique and reconstruction software tools. Several structural parameters such as porosity, Euler number, geometrical tortuosity and aspect ratio have been quantified through the analysis with specified software of the reconstructions. Additionally roughness of the prepared surfaces has been characterized at micro- and nanoscale using profilometry and AFM techniques, respectively. While high aspects ratio around 20-30 indicates a strong anisotropy in the structure, high porosity values (around 80%) is observed as a consequence of highly tangled geometry of such 1D nanostructures.

  20. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    DOE PAGES

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; ...

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involvingmore » with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.« less

  1. Identifying residual structure in intrinsically disordered systems: a 2D IR spectroscopic study of the GVGXPGVG peptide.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Joshua; Roy, Santanu; Reppert, Mike; Baer, Marcel; Marx, Dominik; Jansen, Thomas La Cour; Knoester, Jasper; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-03-21

    The peptide amide-I vibration of a proline turn encodes information on the turn structure. In this study, FTIR, two-dimensional IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations were employed to characterize the varying turn conformations that exist in the GVGX(L)PGVG family of disordered peptides. This analysis revealed that changing the size of the side chain at the X amino acid site from Gly to Ala to Val substantially alters the conformation of the peptide. To quantify this effect, proline peak shifts and intensity changes were compared to a structure-based spectroscopic model. These simulated spectra were used to assign the population of type-II β turns, bulged turns, and irregular β turns for each peptide. Of particular interest was the Val variant commonly found in the protein elastin, which contained a 25% population of irregular β turns containing two peptide hydrogen bonds to the proline C═O.

  2. 2D 31P solid state NMR spectroscopy, electronic structure and thermochemistry of PbP7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benndorf, Christopher; Hohmann, Andrea; Schmidt, Peer; Eckert, Hellmut; Johrendt, Dirk; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Phase pure polycrystalline PbP7 was prepared from the elements via a lead flux. Crystalline pieces with edge-lengths up to 1 mm were obtained. The assignment of the previously published 31P solid state NMR spectrum to the seven distinct crystallographic sites was accomplished by radio-frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) experiments. As commonly found in other solid polyphosphides there is no obvious correlation between the 31P chemical shift and structural parameters. PbP7 decomposes incongruently under release of phosphorus forming liquid lead as remainder. The thermal decomposition starts at T>550 K with a vapor pressure almost similar to that of red phosphorus. Electronic structure calculations reveal PbP7 as a semiconductor according to the Zintl description and clearly shows the stereo-active Pb-6s2 lone pairs in the electron localization function ELF.

  3. From 1D and 2D ZnO nanostructures to 3D hierarchical structures with enhanced gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, Mohammad R; Henley, Simon J; Emerson, Neil G; Silva, S Ravi P

    2014-01-07

    Facile and low cost hydrothermal routes are developed to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical ZnO structures with high surface-to-volume ratios and an increased fraction of (0001) polar surfaces. Hierarchical ZnO nanowires (ZNWs) and nanodisks (ZNDs) assembled from initial ZnO nanostructures are prepared from sequential nucleation and growth following a hydrothermal process. These hierarchical ZnO structures display an enhancement of gas sensing performance and exhibit significantly improved sensitivity and fast response to acetone in comparison to other mono-morphological ZnO, such as nanoparticles, NWs, or NDs. In addition to the high surface-to-volume ratio due to its small size, the nanowire building blocks show the enhanced gas sensing properties mainly ascribed to the increased proportion of exposed active (0001) planes, and the formation of many nanojunctions at the interface between the initial ZnO nanostructure and secondary NWs. This work provides the route for structure induced enhancement of gas sensing performance by designing a desirable nanostructure, which could also be extended to synthesize other metal oxide nanostructures with superior gas sensing performance.

  4. Quantitative Subsurface Atomic Structure Fingerprint for 2D Materials and Heterostructures by First-Principles-Calibrated Contact-Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qing; Lange, Björn; Parlak, Zehra; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J; Blum, Volker; Zauscher, Stefan

    2016-07-26

    Interfaces and subsurface layers are critical for the performance of devices made of 2D materials and heterostructures. Facile, nondestructive, and quantitative ways to characterize the structure of atomically thin, layered materials are thus essential to ensure control of the resultant properties. Here, we show that contact-resonance atomic force microscopy-which is exquisitely sensitive to stiffness changes that arise from even a single atomic layer of a van der Waals-adhered material-is a powerful experimental tool to address this challenge. A combined density functional theory and continuum modeling approach is introduced that yields sub-surface-sensitive, nanomechanical fingerprints associated with specific, well-defined structure models of individual surface domains. Where such models are known, this information can be correlated with experimentally obtained contact-resonance frequency maps to reveal the (sub)surface structure of different domains on the sample.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of the non-linear dynamic viscoplastic response of 2-d structures with respect to material parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Makarand; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the viscoplastic response of structures subjected to dynamic loading. A state of plane stress is assumed to exist in the structure, a velocity strain-Cauchy stress formulation is used, and the geometric non-linearities arising from large strains are incorporated. The Jaumann rate is used as a frame indifferent stress rate. The material model is chosen to be isothermal viscoplasticity, and an associated flow rule is used with a von Mises effective stress. The equations of motion emanating from a finite element semi-discretization are integrated using an explicit central difference scheme with an implicit stress update. The sensitivity coefficients are evaluated using a direct differentiation approach. Since the domain of integration is the current configuration, the sensitivity coefficients of the spatial derivatives of the shape functions must be included. Numerical results are presented for a thin plate with a central cutout subjected to an in-plane compressive loading. The sensitivity coefficients are generated by evaluating the derivatives of the response quantities with respect to Young's modulus, and two of the material parameters characterizing the viscoplastic response. Time histories of the response and sensitivity coefficients, and spatial distributions at selected times are presented.

  6. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involving with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.

  7. Facile synthesis of 2-D Cu doped WO3 nanoplates with structural, optical and differential anti cancer characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Faisal; Iqbal, Javed; Gul, Asma; Ahmed, Waqqar; Ismail, M.

    2017-04-01

    Simple chemical co-precipitation method has been employed to synthesize two dimensional copper (Cu) doped tungsten oxide (WO3) nanoplates. A numbers of characterization techniques have been used to investigate their structural, optical and biocompatible anti cancer properties. The XRD results have confirmed the monoclinic crystal structure of WO3 nanoplates, and also successful doping of Cu ions into the WO3 crystal lattice. The presence of functional groups and chemical bonding have been verified through FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM images demonstrate that both undoped and Cu doped WO3 samples have squares plate like morphology. The EDX spectra confirm the presence of Cu, W and O ions. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) analysis has revealed a substantial red-shift in the absorption edge and a decrease in the band gap energy of nanoplates with Cu doping. Photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to study the presence of defects like oxygen vacancies. Furthermore, the differential cytotoxic properties of Cu doped WO3 samples have been evaluated against human breast (MCF-7) and liver (Hep-2) cancer cells with ectocervical epithelial (HECE) healthy cells. The present findings confirm that the Cu doped WO3 nanoplates can be used as an efficient biocompatible anti cancer agent.

  8. Origin and Structure of Dynamic Cooperative Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wardil, Lucas; Hauert, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Societies are built on social interactions among individuals. Cooperation represents the simplest form of a social interaction: one individual provides a benefit to another one at a cost to itself. Social networks represent a dynamical abstraction of social interactions in a society. The behaviour of an individual towards others and of others towards the individual shape the individual's neighbourhood and hence the local structure of the social network. Here we propose a simple theoretical framework to model dynamic social networks by focussing on each individual's actions instead of interactions between individuals. This eliminates the traditional dichotomy between the strategy of individuals and the structure of the population and easily complements empirical studies. As a consequence, altruists, egoists and fair types are naturally determined by the local social structures, while globally egalitarian networks or stratified structures arise. Cooperative interactions drive the emergence and shape the structure of social networks. PMID:25030202

  9. Origin and Structure of Dynamic Cooperative Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardil, Lucas; Hauert, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    Societies are built on social interactions among individuals. Cooperation represents the simplest form of a social interaction: one individual provides a benefit to another one at a cost to itself. Social networks represent a dynamical abstraction of social interactions in a society. The behaviour of an individual towards others and of others towards the individual shape the individual's neighbourhood and hence the local structure of the social network. Here we propose a simple theoretical framework to model dynamic social networks by focussing on each individual's actions instead of interactions between individuals. This eliminates the traditional dichotomy between the strategy of individuals and the structure of the population and easily complements empirical studies. As a consequence, altruists, egoists and fair types are naturally determined by the local social structures, while globally egalitarian networks or stratified structures arise. Cooperative interactions drive the emergence and shape the structure of social networks.

  10. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  11. Probing the 2D temperature structure of protoplanetary disks with Herschel observations of high-J CO lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The gas temperature structure of protoplanetary disks is a key ingredient for interpreting various disk observations and for quantifying the subsequent evolution of these systems. The comparison of low- and mid-J CO rotational lines is a powerful tool for assessing the temperature gradient in the warm molecular layer of disks. Spectrally resolved high-J (Ju> 14) CO lines probe intermediate distances and heights from the star that are not sampled by (sub-)millimeter CO spectroscopy. This paper presents new Herschel/HIFI and archival PACS observations of 12CO, 13CO, and [C ii] emission in four Herbig AeBe disks (HD 100546, HD 97048, IRS 48, HD 163296) and three T Tauri disks (AS 205, S CrA, TW Hya). In the case of the T Tauri systems AS 205 and S CrA, the CO emission has a single-peaked profile, likely due to a slow wind. For all the other systems, the Herschel CO spectra are consistent with pure disk emission and the spectrally resolved lines (HIFI) and the CO rotational ladder (PACS) are analyzed simultaneously assuming power-law temperature and column density profiles, using the velocity profile to locate the emission in the disk. The temperature profile varies substantially from disk to disk. In particular, Tgas in the disk surface layers can differ by up to an order of magnitude among the four Herbig AeBe systems; HD 100546 is the hottest and HD 163296 the coldest disk in the sample. Clear evidence of a warm disk layer where Tgas>Tdust is found in all the Herbig Ae disks. The observed CO fluxes and line profiles are compared to predictions of physical-chemical models. The primary parameters affecting the disk temperature structure are the flaring angle, the gas-to-dust mass ratio, the scale height, and the dust settling.

  12. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T.; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2014-03-15

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  13. Effect of network structure on phase transitions in queuing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barankai, Norbert; Fekete, Attila; Vattay, Gábor

    2012-12-01

    Recently, De Martino [J. Stat. Mech.1742-546810.1088/1742-5468/2009/08/P08023 (2009) P08023; Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.79.015101 79, 015101 (2009)] have presented a general framework for the study of transportation phenomena on random networks with annealed disorder. One of their most significant achievements was a deeper understanding of the phase transition from the uncongested to the congested phase at a critical traffic load on uncorrelated networks. In this paper, we also study phase transition in transportation networks using a discrete time random walk model. Our aim is to establish a direct connection between the structure of an uncorrelated random graph with quenched disorder and the value of the critical traffic load. We show that if the network is dense, the quenched and annealed formulas for the critical loading probability coincide. For sparse graphs, higher-order corrections, related to the local structure of the network, appear.

  14. Network structure and travel time perception.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathi, Pavithra; Levinson, David; Hochmair, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street network along the identified commute route. T-test comparisons are conducted to identify statistically significant differences in estimated network measures between the two traveler groups. The combined effect of these estimated network measures on travel time is then analyzed using regression models. The results from the t-test and regression analyses confirm the influence of the underlying network structure on the perception of travel time.

  15. Network Structure and Travel Time Perception

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathi, Pavithra; Levinson, David; Hochmair, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street network along the identified commute route. T-test comparisons are conducted to identify statistically significant differences in estimated network measures between the two traveler groups. The combined effect of these estimated network measures on travel time is then analyzed using regression models. The results from the t-test and regression analyses confirm the influence of the underlying network structure on the perception of travel time. PMID:24204932

  16. Modularity and community structure in networks

    PubMed Central

    Newman, M. E. J.

    2006-01-01

    Many networks of interest in the sciences, including social networks, computer networks, and metabolic and regulatory networks, are found to divide naturally into communities or modules. The problem of detecting and characterizing this community structure is one of the outstanding issues in the study of networked systems. One highly effective approach is the optimization of the quality function known as “modularity” over the possible divisions of a network. Here I show that the modularity can be expressed in terms of the eigenvectors of a characteristic matrix for the network, which I call the modularity matrix, and that this expression leads to a spectral algorithm for community detection that returns results of demonstrably higher quality than competing methods in shorter running times. I illustrate the method with applications to several published network data sets. PMID:16723398

  17. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Feng; Chen, YiPing; You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)₃]₃[CoW₁₂O₄₀]·9H₂O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)₃]₂[FeW₁₂O₄₀]·H₃O·H₂O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)₃]²⁺ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm⁻¹, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  18. Observation of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling in 1-D and 2-D extended structures of copper(II) terephthalates

    SciTech Connect

    Deakin, L.; Arif, A.M.; Miller, J.S.

    1999-11-01

    The reaction between CuCl{sub 2}{center{underscore}dot}2H{sub 2}O and disodium terephthalate, Na{sub 2}tp, in aqueous solution simultaneously produces chain, bis(aqua)[{mu}-(terephthalato-{kappa}O:{kappa}O{prime})]copper(II), monohydrate, Cutp(OH{sub 2}){sub 2}{center{underscore}dot}H{sub 2}O (1), and layered, bis(aqua)[{mu}-(terephthalato-{kappa}O)]copper(II), Cutp(OH{sub 2}){sub 2} (2), structured materials. 1 (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}CuO{sub 7}) belongs to the orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 space group [a = 6.3015(4) {angstrom}, b = 6.8743(4) {angstrom}, c = 22.9972(14) {angstrom}, and Z = 4] and incorporates tp in a bridging bis-monodentate binding mode and Cu(II) in a tetragonally elongated octahedron. 2 (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}CuO{sub 6}) which belongs to the orthorhombic Pmc2{sub 1} space group [a = 10.7421(8) {angstrom}, b = 7.2339(10) {angstrom}, c = 5.7143(13) {angstrom}, and Z = 2] incorporates tp in a mono-bidentate binding mode and Cu(II) in a distorted square pyramid. 1 and 2 exhibit axial X-band powder EPR spectra with G{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.08, g{sub {parallel}} = 2.29 (1) and g{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.07, g{sub {parallel}} = 2.29 (2) at 300 K. 1 obeys the Curie-Weiss law at high temperatures ({theta} = {minus}7.2 K) and at low temperatures behaves as 1-D magnetic chains with an exchange-coupling constant of J/k{sub B} = {minus}9.15 K (H = {minus}2JS{sub 1}{center{underscore}dot}S{sub 2}). This material displays a spontaneous moment below 2 K under small applied magnetic fields, consistent with the presence of spin canting. 2 exhibits ferromagnetic interactions with {theta} = +0.8 K. Along the 1-D chain where coordinated water forms the bridge between metal centers, the coupling between Cu(II) is J/k{sub B} = +0.6 K. The fit of the magnetic susceptibility for 2 using a molecular field correction, which takes into consideration antiferromagnetic interactions between chains via the tp ligand, yields J{prime}/k{sub B} = {minus}0.13 K.

  19. Crystal structure and antiferromagnetic ordering of quasi-2D [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]TaF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine).

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; McDonald, R. D.; Singleton, J.; Materials Science Division; Eastern Washington Univ.; LANL

    2010-04-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound was determined by X-ray diffraction at 90 and 295 K. Copper(II) ions are coordinated to four bridging pyz ligands to form square layers in the ab-plane. Bridging HF{sub 2}{sup -} ligands join the layers together along the c-axis to afford a tetragonal, three-dimensional (3D) framework that contains Taf{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every cavity. At 295 K, the pyz rings lie exactly perpendicular to the layers and cooling to 90 K induces a canting of those rings. Magnetically, the compound exhibits 2D antiferromagnetic correlations within the 2D layers with an exchange interaction of -13.1(1) K. Weak interlayer interactions, as mediated by Cu-F-H-F-Cu, leads to long-range magnetic order below 4.2 K. Pulsed-field magnetization data at 0.5 K show a concave curvature with increasing B and reveal a saturation magnetization at 35.4 T.

  20. Momentum-resolved view of mixed 2D and nonbulklike 3D electronic structure of the surface state on SrTiO3 (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, N. C.; Salluzzo, M.; Razzoli, E.; Mansson, M.; Krempasky, J.; Matt, C. E.; Schmitt, T.; Shi, M.; Mesot, J.; Patthey, L.; Radovic, M.

    2014-03-01

    The recent discovery of a metallic surface state on SrTiO3 may open a route to simplified low-dimensional oxide-based conductors, as well as give new insights into interfacial phenomena in heterostructures such as LaAlO3/SrTiO3. Our recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study demonstrates that not only quasi-2D but also non-bulklike 3D Fermi surface components make up the surface state. Like their more 2D counterparts, the size and character of the 3D components are fixed with respect to a broad range of sample preparations. As seen in previous studies, the surface state can be ``prepared'' by photon irradiation under UHV conditions. An extremely high fraction of the surface valence states are affected by this process, especially in relation to the stability of oxygen core level intensity during the same exposure, which points to a key role of electronic/structural changes that spread over the surface as the metal emerges.

  1. An analysis of electrochemical energy storage using electrodes fabricated from atomically thin 2D structures of MoS2, graphene and MoS2/graphene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffstutler, Jacob D.

    The behavior of 2D materials has become of great interest in the wake of development of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and the discovery of monolayer graphene by Geim and Novoselov. This study aims to analyze the response variance of 2D electrode materials for EDLCs prepared through the liquid-phase exfoliation method when subjected to differing conditions. Once exfoliated, samples are tested with a series of structural characterization methods, including tunneling electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A new ionic liquid for EDLC use, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate is compared in performance to 6M potassium hydroxide aqueous electrolyte. Devices composed of liquid-phase exfoliated graphene / MoS2 composites are analyzed by concentration for ideal performance. Device performance under cold extreme temperatures for the ionic fluid is presented as well. A brief overview of by-layer analysis of graphene electrode materials is presented as-is. All samples were tested with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, with good capacitive results. The evolution of electrochemical behavior through the altered parameters is tracked as well.

  2. Information transfer in community structured multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé Ribalta, Albert; Granell, Clara; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The study of complex networks that account for different types of interactions has become a subject of interest in the last few years, specially because its representational power in the description of users interactions in diverse online social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.). The mathematical description of these interacting networks has been coined under the name of multilayer networks, where each layer accounts for a type of interaction. It has been shown that diffusive processes on top of these networks present a phenomenology that cannot be explained by the naive superposition of single layer diffusive phenomena but require the whole structure of interconnected layers. Nevertheless, the description of diffusive phenomena on multilayer networks has obviated the fact that social networks have strong mesoscopic structure represented by different communities of individuals driven by common interests, or any other social aspect. In this work, we study the transfer of information in multilayer networks with community structure. The final goal is to understand and quantify, if the existence of well-defined community structure at the level of individual layers, together with the multilayer structure of the whole network, enhances or deteriorates the diffusion of packets of information.

  3. Global optimization of data quality checks on 2-D and 3-D networks of GPR cross-well tomographic data for automatic correction of unknown well deviations

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, D. S.; Peterson, J. E.

    2010-03-15

    .g. Bautu et al., 2006). In the technique of algebraic reconstruction tomography (ART), which is used herein for the travel time inversion (Peterson et al., 1985), a small relaxation parameter will smooth imaging artifacts caused by data errors at the expense of resolution and contrast (Figure 2). However, large data errors such as unaccounted well deviations cannot be adequately suppressed through inversion weighting schemes. Previously, problems with tomograms were treated manually. However, in large data sets and/or networks of data sets, trial and error changes to well geometries become increasingly difficult and ineffective. Mislocation of the transmitter and receiver stations of GPR cross-well tomography data sets can lead to serious imaging artifacts if not accounted for prior to inversion. Previously, problems with tomograms have been treated manually prior to inversion. In large data sets and/or networks of tomographic data sets, trial and error changes to well geometries become increasingly difficult and ineffective. Our approach is to use cross-well data quality checks and a simplified model of borehole deviation with particle swarm optimization (PSO) to automatically correct for source and receiver locations prior to tomographic inversion. We present a simple model of well deviation, which is designed to minimize potential corruption of actual data trends. We also provide quantitative quality control measures based on minimizing correlations between take-off angle and apparent velocity, and a quality check on the continuity of velocity between adjacent wells. This methodology is shown to be accurate and robust for simple 2-D synthetic test cases. Plus, we demonstrate the method on actual field data where it is compared to deviation logs. This study shows the promise for automatic correction of well deviations in GPR tomographic data. Analysis of synthetic data shows that very precise estimates of well deviation can be made for small deviations, even in the

  4. Simple synthesis of PbSe nanocrystals and their self-assembly into 2D ‘flakes’ and 1D ‘ribbons’ structures

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Torres, E.; Ortega-López, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • PbSe is obtained in a simple way by the co-precipitation method at low-temperature. • The structural, morphological and optical properties of PbSe were studied. • Adding NH{sub 4}OH to the precursor solutions influences on the morphology. • 2D- and 1D-PbSe structures assemble by oriented attachment. • PbSe can be a potential candidate for thermoelectric applications. - Abstract: This work presents a simple and low-temperature method to prepare a variety of Lead selenide (PbSe) nanostructures, using aqueous solutions of Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and NaHSe. Nanostructures with different morphology were obtained by varying the Pb:Se molar ratio, as well as the mixing sequence of NH{sub 4}OH with either Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} or NaHSe. Nanoparticles with different shapes (spherical and octahedral), and self-assembled structures (flakes and ribbons) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. X-ray results confirmed that the PbSe rock-salt crystalline structure was obtained for all of the prepared samples. The crystal size is in the order of 7.3 to 8.9 nm for single nanocrystals. The absorption spectra of the samples show exciton absorption bands at 1395 nm and 1660 nm. This material could be used to develop more advanced structures for thermoelectric generators.

  5. Determination of optimum structure of backpropagation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phien, Huynh N.; Sureerattanan, Songyot

    2000-10-01

    The paper proposes the use of the Baysian Information Criterion (BIC), along with an algorithm to systematically select the appropriate structure of the backpropagation (BP) network for a given set of data. Simulation results with hydrological and economic data show that the algorithm performs very satisfactorily. Moreover, it compares with the method of Daqi and Shouyi for one hidden layer network and it is also used for the networks with more than one hidden layer.

  6. Network Ecology and Adolescent Social Structure

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Daniel A.; Moody, James; Diehl, David; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, Reuben J.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent societies—whether arising from weak, short-term classroom friendships or from close, long-term friendships—exhibit various levels of network clustering, segregation, and hierarchy. Some are rank-ordered caste systems and others are flat, cliquish worlds. Explaining the source of such structural variation remains a challenge, however, because global network features are generally treated as the agglomeration of micro-level tie-formation mechanisms, namely balance, homophily, and dominance. How do the same micro-mechanisms generate significant variation in global network structures? To answer this question we propose and test a network ecological theory that specifies the ways features of organizational environments moderate the expression of tie-formation processes, thereby generating variability in global network structures across settings. We develop this argument using longitudinal friendship data on schools (Add Health study) and classrooms (Classroom Engagement study), and by extending exponential random graph models to the study of multiple societies over time. PMID:25535409

  7. Deciphering Network Community Structure by Surprise

    PubMed Central

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Marín, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of complex networks permeates all sciences, from biology to sociology. A fundamental, unsolved problem is how to characterize the community structure of a network. Here, using both standard and novel benchmarks, we show that maximization of a simple global parameter, which we call Surprise (S), leads to a very efficient characterization of the community structure of complex synthetic networks. Particularly, S qualitatively outperforms the most commonly used criterion to define communities, Newman and Girvan's modularity (Q). Applying S maximization to real networks often provides natural, well-supported partitions, but also sometimes counterintuitive solutions that expose the limitations of our previous knowledge. These results indicate that it is possible to define an effective global criterion for community structure and open new routes for the understanding of complex networks. PMID:21909420

  8. Industrial entrepreneurial network: Structural and functional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, M. A.; Davletbaev, R. H.; Berg, D. B.; Nazarova, J. J.; Parusheva, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Structure and functioning of two model industrial entrepreneurial networks are investigated in the present paper. One of these networks is forming when implementing an integrated project and consists of eight agents, which interact with each other and external environment. The other one is obtained from the municipal economy and is based on the set of the 12 real business entities. Analysis of the networks is carried out on the basis of the matrix of mutual payments aggregated over the certain time period. The matrix is created by the methods of experimental economics. Social Network Analysis (SNA) methods and instruments were used in the present research. The set of basic structural characteristics was investigated: set of quantitative parameters such as density, diameter, clustering coefficient, different kinds of centrality, and etc. They were compared with the random Bernoulli graphs of the corresponding size and density. Discovered variations of random and entrepreneurial networks structure are explained by the peculiarities of agents functioning in production network. Separately, were identified the closed exchange circuits (cyclically closed contours of graph) forming an autopoietic (self-replicating) network pattern. The purpose of the functional analysis was to identify the contribution of the autopoietic network pattern in its gross product. It was found that the magnitude of this contribution is more than 20%. Such value allows using of the complementary currency in order to stimulate economic activity of network agents.

  9. Exploiting Recurring Structure in a Semantic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Shawn R.; Keller, Richard M.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing popularity of the Semantic Web, an increasing amount of information is becoming available in machine interpretable, semantically structured networks. Within these semantic networks are recurring structures that could be mined by existing or novel knowledge discovery methods. The mining of these semantic structures represents an interesting area that focuses on mining both for and from the Semantic Web, with surprising applicability to problems confronting the developers of Semantic Web applications. In this paper, we present representative examples of recurring structures and show how these structures could be used to increase the utility of a semantic repository deployed at NASA.

  10. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  11. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D.; Hong, Mei

    2017-01-01

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D 13C-13C correlation spectra of uniformly 13C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose 13C chemical shifts differ significantly from the 13C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D 13C-13C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Cellulose f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, cellulose a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of bacterial, algal

  12. Structural correlations in bacterial metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evolution of metabolism occurs through the acquisition and loss of genes whose products acts as enzymes in metabolic reactions, and from a presumably simple primordial metabolism the organisms living today have evolved complex and highly variable metabolisms. We have studied this phenomenon by comparing the metabolic networks of 134 bacterial species with known phylogenetic relationships, and by studying a neutral model of metabolic network evolution. Results We consider the 'union-network' of 134 bacterial metabolisms, and also the union of two smaller subsets of closely related species. Each reaction-node is tagged with the number of organisms it belongs to, which we denote organism degree (OD), a key concept in our study. Network analysis shows that common reactions are found at the centre of the network and that the average OD decreases as we move to the periphery. Nodes of the same OD are also more likely to be connected to each other compared to a random OD relabelling based on their occurrence in the real data. This trend persists up to a distance of around five reactions. A simple growth model of metabolic networks is used to investigate the biochemical constraints put on metabolic-network evolution. Despite this seemingly drastic simplification, a 'union-network' of a collection of unrelated model networks, free of any selective pressure, still exhibit similar structural features as their bacterial counterpart. Conclusions The OD distribution quantifies topological properties of the evolutionary history of bacterial metabolic networks, and lends additional support to the importance of horizontal gene transfer during bacterial metabolic evolution where new reactions are attached at the periphery of the network. The neutral model of metabolic network growth can reproduce the main features of real networks, but we observe that the real networks contain a smaller common core, while they are more similar at the periphery of the network. This suggests

  13. Structural requirements of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolones as potential antimalarials from 2D and 3D QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Li, Shuyan; Bai, Chongliang; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-07-01

    Malaria is a fatal tropical and subtropical disease caused by the protozoal species Plasmodium. Many commonly available antimalarial drugs and therapies are becoming ineffective because of the emergence of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, which drives the need for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Recently, a series of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolone analogs, derived from the famous compound endochin, were reported as promising candidates for orally efficacious antimalarials. In this study, to analyze the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these quinolones and investigate the structural requirements for antimalarial activity, the 2D multiple linear regressions (MLR) method and 3D comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods are employed to evolve different QSAR models. All these models give satisfactory results with highly accurate fitting and strong external predictive abilities for chemicals not used in model development. Furthermore, the contour maps from 3D models can provide an intuitive understanding of the key structure features responsible for the antimalarial activities. In conclusion, we summarize the detailed position-specific structural requirements of these derivatives accordingly. All these results are helpful for the rational design of new compounds with higher antimalarial bioactivities.

  14. Self-assembly and morphology change of four organic-polyoxometalate hybrids with different solid structures from 2D lamellar to 3D hexagonal forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TAN, Chunxia

    2017-02-01

    A series of organic-polyoxometalate hybrids L-EuW11, L-EuW10, L-EuW22 and L-Mo132 were fabricated by the same organic cations with different polyoxometalate anions from K5[Eu(SiW11O39)(H2O)2], K13[Eu(SiW11O39)2]·15H2O, Na9[EuW10O36]·36H2O to "Keplerate" -type (NH4)72[Mo132O372(SO4)30(H2O)72]. The structures of hybrids were characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), infrared spectra (IR) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Self-assembly behaviors and aggregates morphology of these hybrids in mixed solution of chloroform-methanol are obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). L-EuW11, L-EuW10 and L-EuW22 have different aggregation morphology but the similarly layered structures. Micron-sized vesicular structures of L-Mo132 rupture in solvent and eventually turn into approximate hexagon. SAXS analysis of L-EuW11, L-EuW10 and L-EuW22 shows that these hybrids aggregates change from two-dimensional (2D) lamellar to three-dimensional (3D) hexagonal structure in solid state.

  15. Network models of soil porous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, M.; Santiago, A.; Cardenas, J. P.; Benito, R. M.; Tarquis, A. M.; Mooney, S. J.; Korošak, D.

    2010-05-01

    Soils sustain life on Earth. In times of increasing anthropogenic demands on soils [1] there is growing need to seek for novel approaches to understand the relationships between the soil porous structure and specific soil functions. Recently [2-4], soil pore structure was described as a complex network of pores using spatially embedded varying fitness network model [2] or heterogeneous preferential attachment scheme [3-4], both approaches revealing the apparent scale-free topology of soils. Here, we show, using a large set of soil images of structures obtained by X-ray computed tomography that both methods predict topological similar networks of soil pore structures. Furthermore, by analyzing the node-node link correlation properties of the obtained networks we suggest an approach to quantify the complexity of soil pore structure. [1] R. Lal, Soil science and the carbon civilization, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J., 71: 1425-1437, 2007. [2] S. J. Mooney, D. Korošak, Using Complex Networks to Model Two- and Three-Dimensional Soil Porous Architecture, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J., 73: 1094-1100, 2009. [3] A. Santiago, J. P. Cardenas, J. C. Losada, R. M. Benito, A. M. Tarquis, F. Borondo, Multiscaling of porous soils as heterogeneous complex networks, Nonlin. Proc. Geophys., 15: 893-902, 2008. [4] A. Santiago, R. M. Benito, An extended formalism for preferential attachment in heterogeneous complex networks, Eur. Phys. Lett., 82: 58004, 2008.

  16. Nonparametric inference of network structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    The network structure of complex systems determine their function and serve as evidence for the evolutionary mechanisms that lie behind them. Despite considerable effort in recent years, it remains an open challenge to formulate general descriptions of the large-scale structure of network systems, and how to reliably extract such information from data. Although many approaches have been proposed, few methods attempt to gauge the statistical significance of the uncovered structures, and hence the majority cannot reliably separate actual structure from stochastic fluctuations. Due to the sheer size and high-dimensionality of many networks, this represents a major limitation that prevents meaningful interpretations of the results obtained with such nonstatistical methods. In this talk, I will show how these issues can be tackled in a principled and efficient fashion by formulating appropriate generative models of network structure that can have their parameters inferred from data. By employing a Bayesian description of such models, the inference can be performed in a nonparametric fashion, that does not require any a priori knowledge or ad hoc assumptions about the data. I will show how this approach can be used to perform model comparison, and how hierarchical models yield the most appropriate trade-off between model complexity and quality of fit based on the statistical evidence present in the data. I will also show how this general approach can be elegantly extended to networks with edge attributes, that are embedded in latent spaces, and that change in time. The latter is obtained via a fully dynamic generative network model, based on arbitrary-order Markov chains, that can also be inferred in a nonparametric fashion. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the application of the methods with many empirical networks such as the internet at the autonomous systems level, the global airport network, the network of actors and films, social networks, citations among

  17. Static network structure can stabilize human cooperation.

    PubMed

    Rand, David G; Nowak, Martin A; Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2014-12-02

    The evolution of cooperation in network-structured populations has been a major focus of theoretical work in recent years. When players are embedded in fixed networks, cooperators are more likely to interact with, and benefit from, other cooperators. In theory, this clustering can foster cooperation on fixed networks under certain circumstances. Laboratory experiments with humans, however, have thus far found no evidence that fixed network structure actually promotes cooperation. Here, we provide such evidence and help to explain why others failed to find it. First, we show that static networks can lead to a stable high level of cooperation, outperforming well-mixed populations. We then systematically vary the benefit that cooperating provides to one's neighbors relative to the cost required to cooperate (b/c), as well as the average number of neighbors in the network (k). When b/c > k, we observe high and stable levels of cooperation. Conversely, when b/c ≤ k or players are randomly shuffled, cooperation decays. Our results are consistent with a quantitative evolutionary game theoretic prediction for when cooperation should succeed on networks and, for the first time to our knowledge, provide an experimental demonstration of the power of static network structure for stabilizing human cooperation.

  18. Nano-structured metallic amyloid fibril networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzli, Kiersten; Love, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Amyloid proteins form high aspect ratio fibrillar structures with great chemical and physical stability under specific conditions. By examining the produced networks as novel materials we can envision uses for these high aspect ratio fibrillar structures. Produced fibril networks can be used as templates for the creation of high surface area metallic meshes that may be of use as catalysts or in electronic applications. We have formed fibrillar networks from porcine insulin and have characterized them by TEM, showing that by varying environmental conditions, such as strain rate, the resulting network morphologies may be influenced. We have used electroless deposition techniques to coat insulin fibrils with platinum to produce metallized networks thought to have high catalytic activity. We will present our experience using these coated fibrils to facilitate the reduction of nitrophenol to aminophenol using UV-visible spectroscopy as a gauge.

  19. Dynamics of overlapping structures in modular networks.

    PubMed

    Almendral, J A; Leyva, I; Li, D; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Havlin, S; Boccaletti, S

    2010-07-01

    Modularity is a fundamental feature of real networks, being intimately bounded to their functionality, i.e., to their capability of performing parallel tasks in a coordinated way. Although the modular structure of real graphs has been intensively studied, very little is known on the interactions between functional modules of a graph. Here, we present a general method based on synchronization of networking oscillators, that is able to detect overlapping structures in multimodular environments. We furthermore report the full analytical and theoretical description on the relationship between the overlapping dynamics and the underlying network topology. The method is illustrated by means of a series of applications.

  20. Evaluating the structural identifiability of the parameters of the EBPR sub-model in ASM2d by the differential algebra method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Daijun; Li, Zhenliang; Cai, Qing

    2010-05-01

    The calibration of ASMs is a prerequisite for their application to simulation of a wastewater treatment plant. This work should be made based on the evaluation of structural identifiability of model parameters. An EBPR sub-model including denitrification phosphorus removal has been incorporated in ASM2d. Yet no report is presented on the structural identifiability of the parameters in the EBPR sub-model. In this paper, the differential algebra approach was used to address this issue. The results showed that the structural identifiability of parameters in the EBPR sub-model could be improved by increasing the measured variables. The reduction factor eta(NO)(3) was identifiable when combined data of aerobic process and anoxic process were assumed. For K(PP), X(PAO) and q(PHA) of the anaerobic process to be uniquely identifiable, one of them is needed to be determined by other ways. Likewise, if prior information on one of the parameters, K(PHA), X(PAO) and q(PP) of the aerobic process, is known, all the parameters are identifiable. The above results could be of interest to the parameter estimation of the EBPR sub-model. The algorithm proposed in the paper is also suitable for other sub-models of ASMs.

  1. Alternating zinc fingers in the human male associated protein ZFY: 2D NMR structure of an even finger and implications for jumping-linker DNA recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Kochoyan, M.; Havel, T.F.; Dahl, C.E. ); Nguyen, D.T.; Keutmann, H.T. ); Weiss, M.A. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston )

    1991-04-09

    ZFY, a sex-related Zn-finger protein encoded by the human Y chromosome, is distinguished from the general class of Zn-finger proteins by the presence of a two-finger repeat. Whereas odd-numbered domains and linkers fit a general consensus, even-numbered domains and linkers exhibit systematic differences. Because this alternation may have fundamental implications for the mechanism of protein-DNA recognition, the authors have undertaken biochemical and structural studies of fragments of ZFY. They describe here the solution structure of a representative nonconsensus (even-numbered) Zn finger based on 2D NMR studies of a 30-residue peptide. Structural modeling by distance geometry and simulated annealing (DG/SA) demonstrates that this peptide folds as a miniglobular domain containing a C-terminal {beta}-hairpin and N-terminal {alpha}-helix ({beta}{beta}{alpha} motif). These features are similar to (but not identical with) those previously described in consensus-type Zn fingers (derived from ADR1 and Xfin); the similarities suggest that even and odd ZFY domains bind DNA by a common mechanism. A model of the protein-DNA complex (designated the jumping-linker model) is presented and discussed in terms of the ZFY two-finger repeat. In this model every other linker is proposed to cross the minor groove by means of a putative finger/linker submotif HX{sub 4}HX{sub 3}-hydrophobic residue-X{sub 3}.

  2. 2D magnetotelluric imaging of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, Yangtze metallogenic belt, eastern China: An insight into the crustal structure and tectonic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangbin; Yan, Jiayong

    2016-08-01

    Two parallel NW-trending magnetotelluric (MT) profiles were placed perpendicularly to the main structures of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, one of the seven ore districts in the middle-lower Yangtze River metallogenic belt of eastern China. In October-December 2013, the MT data acquisition was carried out at 117 sites with 0.5-1 km site spacing. The MT data has a good quality in the frequency range between 320 and 0.01 Hz. The dimensionality analysis and 2D resistivity inversion results indicate that: (1) the deep of the ore district with three-dimensional structural characteristics, but two-dimensional structural characteristics for shallow; (2) there is a clear correlation between resistivity and the main geological units of the ore district, as well as correlation with mapped surface faults; (3) the Gandan deep fault (GDF) and Jiangnan deep fault (JNF) extend from the surface to 10 km deep, with dip of NW45°, and dip angles larger than 60°. A series of NE-trending acidic intrusive rocks were controlled by the GDF.

  3. Hybrid materials based on novel 2D lanthanide coordination polymers covalently bonded to amine-modified SBA-15 and MCM-41: assembly, characterization, structural features, thermal and luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Dou, Wei; Kirillov, Alexander M; Liu, Weisheng; Xu, Cailing; Fang, Ran; Yang, Lizi

    2016-11-22

    Three novel 2D coordination polymers [Tb2(μ4-L)2(μ-HL)(μ-HCOO)(DEF)]n (Tb-L), [Eu(μ4-L)(L)(H2O)2]n (Eu-L), and [Nd(μ4-L)(L)(H2O)2]n (Nd-L) were assembled from the corresponding lanthanide(iii) nitrates and 5 methoxy-(4-benzaldehyde)-1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid (H2L) as a main multifunctional building block bearing carboxylate and aldehyde functional groups, using H2O/DEF {DEF = N,N-diethylformamide} as a reaction medium. The obtained coordination polymers were isolated as stable microcrystalline solids and fully characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA, BET, PXRD, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Their structures feature intricate 2D metal-organic networks, which were topologically classified as underlying layers with the 4,6L26 (for Tb-L) or sql (for Eu-L and Nd-L) topologies. Besides, a novel series of mesoporous hybrid materials wherein the Tb-L, Eu-L, or Nd-L coordination polymers are covalently grafted into the amine-functionalized SBA-15-NH2 or MCM-41-NH2 matrices (via the formation of Schiff-base groups) was also synthesized and fully characterized. These hybrid materials show high thermal and photoluminescence stability, as well as remarkable chemical resistance to boiling water, and acidic or alkaline medium. Luminescent properties of the parent coordination polymers and derived hybrid materials are investigated in detail, showing that the latter combine the luminescent characteristics (intense green or red emissions and excellent stability) of lanthanide coordination polymers and structural features of ordered mesoporous silica molecular sieves. Moreover, light emitting devices were assembled, by coating the hybrid materials onto the surface of UV-LED bulbs, and showed excellent light emitting properties.

  4. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  5. Resolving 2D Amorphous Materials with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Buechner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) materials have garnered significant scientific interest due to their potential technological applications. Alongside the emphasis on crystalline materials, such as graphene and hexagonal BN, a new class of 2D amorphous materials must be pursued. For amorphous materials, a detailed understanding of the complex structure is necessary. Here we present a structural study of 2D bilayer silica on Ru(0001), an insulating material which is weakly coupled to the substrate. Atomic structure has been determined with a dual mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) sensor in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperatures, revealing a network of different ring sizes. Liquid AFM measurements with sub-nanometer resolution bridge the gap between clean UHV conditions and the environments that many material applications demand. Samples are grown and characterized in vacuum and subsequently transferred to the liquid AFM. Notably, the key structural features observed, namely nanoscale ring networks and larger holes to the substrate, show strong quantitative agreement between the liquid and UHV microscopy measurements. This provides direct evidence for the structural stability of these silica films for nanoelectronics and other applications. KMB acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  6. Structural measures for multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Federico; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Many real-world complex systems consist of a set of elementary units connected by relationships of different kinds. All such systems are better described in terms of multiplex networks, where the links at each layer represent a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes rather than in terms of (single-layer) networks. In this paper we present a general framework to describe and study multiplex networks, whose links are either unweighted or weighted. In particular, we propose a series of measures to characterize the multiplexicity of the systems in terms of (i) basic node and link properties such as the node degree, and the edge overlap and reinforcement, (ii) local properties such as the clustering coefficient and the transitivity, and (iii) global properties related to the navigability of the multiplex across the different layers. The measures we introduce are validated on a genuinely multiplex data set of Indonesian terrorists, where information among 78 individuals are recorded with respect to mutual trust, common operations, exchanged communications, and business relationships.

  7. Structure and function of complex brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Sporns, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of theoretical and empirical studies approach the function of the human brain from a network perspective. The analysis of brain networks is made feasible by the development of new imaging acquisition methods as well as new tools from graph theory and dynamical systems. This review surveys some of these methodological advances and summarizes recent findings on the architecture of structural and functional brain networks. Studies of the structural connectome reveal several modules or network communities that are interlinked by hub regions mediating communication processes between modules. Recent network analyses have shown that network hubs form a densely linked collective called a “rich club,” centrally positioned for attracting and dispersing signal traffic. In parallel, recordings of resting and task-evoked neural activity have revealed distinct resting-state networks that contribute to functions in distinct cognitive domains. Network methods are increasingly applied in a clinical context, and their promise for elucidating neural substrates of brain and mental disorders is discussed. PMID:24174898

  8. Characterizing the Community Structure of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; Kivelä, Mikko; Saramäki, Jari; Fortunato, Santo

    2010-01-01

    Background Community structure is one of the key properties of complex networks and plays a crucial role in their topology and function. While an impressive amount of work has been done on the issue of community detection, very little attention has been so far devoted to the investigation of communities in real networks. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a systematic empirical analysis of the statistical properties of communities in large information, communication, technological, biological, and social networks. We find that the mesoscopic organization of networks of the same category is remarkably similar. This is reflected in several characteristics of community structure, which can be used as “fingerprints” of specific network categories. While community size distributions are always broad, certain categories of networks consist mainly of tree-like communities, while others have denser modules. Average path lengths within communities initially grow logarithmically with community size, but the growth saturates or slows down for communities larger than a characteristic size. This behaviour is related to the presence of hubs within communities, whose roles differ across categories. Also the community embeddedness of nodes, measured in terms of the fraction of links within their communities, has a characteristic distribution for each category. Conclusions/Significance Our findings, verified by the use of two fundamentally different community detection methods, allow for a classification of real networks and pave the way to a realistic modelling of networks' evolution. PMID:20711338

  9. How Structure Determines Correlations in Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, Volker; Staude, Benjamin; Cardanobile, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Networks are becoming a ubiquitous metaphor for the understanding of complex biological systems, spanning the range between molecular signalling pathways, neural networks in the brain, and interacting species in a food web. In many models, we face an intricate interplay between the topology of the network and the dynamics of the system, which is generally very hard to disentangle. A dynamical feature that has been subject of intense research in various fields are correlations between the noisy activity of nodes in a network. We consider a class of systems, where discrete signals are sent along the links of the network. Such systems are of particular relevance in neuroscience, because they provide models for networks of neurons that use action potentials for communication. We study correlations in dynamic networks with arbitrary topology, assuming linear pulse coupling. With our novel approach, we are able to understand in detail how specific structural motifs affect pairwise correlations. Based on a power series decomposition of the covariance matrix, we describe the conditions under which very indirect interactions will have a pronounced effect on correlations and population dynamics. In random networks, we find that indirect interactions may lead to a broad distribution of activation levels with low average but highly variable correlations. This phenomenon is even more pronounced in networks with distance dependent connectivity. In contrast, networks with highly connected hubs or patchy connections often exhibit strong average correlations. Our results are particularly relevant in view of new experimental techniques that enable the parallel recording of spiking activity from a large number of neurons, an appropriate interpretation of which is hampered by the currently limited understanding of structure-dynamics relations in complex networks. PMID:21625580

  10. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrum of Propene-3-d1 (CH2=CHCH2D), Quadrupole Coupling Constants of Deuterium and a Semiexperimental Equilibrium Structure of Propene.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Gurusinghe, Ranil Malaka; Tubergen, Michael John; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter; Coudert, Laurent H; Szalay, Peter G; Császár, Attila G

    2017-04-03

    The ground state rotational spectrum of propene-3-d1, CH2=CHCH2D, was measured by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Transitions were assigned for the two conformers, one with the D atom in the symmetry plane (S) and the other with the D atom out of plane (A). The energy difference between the two conformers was calculated to be 6.5 cm-1, the S conformer having lower energy. The quadrupole hyperfine structure due to deuterium was resolved and analyzed for the two conformers. The experimental quadrupole coupling and the centrifugal distortion constants compared favorably to their ab initio counterparts. Ground state rotational constants for the S conformer are 40582.157(9), 9067.024(1), and 7766.0165(12) MHz. Ground state rotational constants for the A conformer are 43403.75(3), 8658.961(2), and 7718.247(2) MHz. For the A conformer, a small tunneling splitting (19 MHz) due to internal rotation was observed and analyzed. Using the new rotational constants of this work as well as those previously determined for the 13C species and for some deuterium-substituted species from the literature, a new semiexperimental equilibrium structure was determined and its high accuracy was confirmed. The difficulty in obtaining accurate coordinates for the out-of-plane hydrogen atom is discussed.

  11. Structural and dynamical properties of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Gourab

    Recent years have witnessed a substantial amount of interest within the physics community in the properties of networks. Techniques from statistical physics coupled with the widespread availability of computing resources have facilitated studies ranging from large scale empirical analysis of the worldwide web, social networks, biological systems, to the development of theoretical models and tools to explore the various properties of these systems. Following these developments, in this dissertation, we present and solve for a diverse set of new problems, investigating the structural and dynamical properties of both model and real world networks. We start by defining a new metric to measure the stability of network structure to disruptions, and then using a combination of theory and simulation study its properties in detail on artificially generated networks; we then compare our results to a selection of networks from the real world and find good agreement in most cases. In the following chapter, we propose a mathematical model that mimics the structure of popular file-sharing websites such as Flickr and CiteULike and demonstrate that many of its properties can solved exactly in the limit of large network size. The remaining part of the dissertation primarily focuses on the dynamical properties of networks. We first formulate a model of a network that evolves under the addition and deletion of vertices and edges, and solve for the equilibrium degree distribution for a variety of cases of interest. We then consider networks whose structure can be manipulated by adjusting the rules by which vertices enter and leave the network. We focus in particular on degree distributions and show that, with some mild constraints, it is possible by a suitable choice of rules to arrange for the network to have any degree distribution we desire. In addition we define a simple local algorithm by which appropriate rules can be implemented in practice. Finally, we conclude our

  12. A Topological Perspective of Neural Network Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Ann; Giusti, Chad; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott; Bassett, Danielle

    The wiring patterns of white matter tracts between brain regions inform functional capabilities of the neural network. Indeed, densely connected and cyclically arranged cognitive systems may communicate and thus perform distinctly. However, previously employed graph theoretical statistics are local in nature and thus insensitive to such global structure. Here we present an investigation of the structural neural network in eight healthy individuals using persistent homology. An extension of homology to weighted networks, persistent homology records both circuits and cliques (all-to-all connected subgraphs) through a repetitive thresholding process, thus perceiving structural motifs. We report structural features found across patients and discuss brain regions responsible for these patterns, finally considering the implications of such motifs in relation to cognitive function.

  13. WN4 longitudinal structure in the O (5S - 3P) and O+ (2P - 2D) ionospheric emissions as simulated by the C-IAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Oleg; Ward, William E.; Shepherd, Gordon; Cho, Young-Min; Namgaladze, Alexander; Fomichev, Victor; McConnell, John; Semeniuk, Kirill; Beagley, Stephen

    A newly developed Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) is introduced. It is being developed on the basis of two existing first principle models: the extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) and the ionospheric part of the Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM). The model extends from the surface to the inner magnetosphere and hence, is able to describe in a self-consistent way how lower atmosphere dynamical variability propagates into and affects the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The C-IAM was applied to model the spatial structure of two different ionospheric emissions: the nighttime 135.6 nm O ( (5) S - (3) P) and daytime 732 nm O (+) ( (2) P - (2) D) emissions. The IMAGE satellite observations showed a wave number 4 (WN4) longitudinal structure in the 135.6 nm ionospheric emission emanating from the equatorial ionization anomaly at 350-400 km near 20:00 local time at each longitude. C-IAM simulations are in a good agreement with the observations. Model result analysis reveals that the main mechanism for generating the WN4 structure in the 135.6 nm emission is a modification of the ionospheric dynamo field caused by longitudinal variation of the zonal wind due to waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. It was also shown, that during geomagnetic storms and substorms the high-latitudinal electric field fully suppresses the dynamo, so that the emission intensity dramatically decreases and the WN4 structure does not appear. The 732 nm emission simulated with the C-IAM also reveals the WN4 structure. Similar to the 135.6 nm emission, this structure is caused by waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. However, the mechanism of excitation is quite different. The 732 nm emission is produced by the instant local ionization and excitation, and, hence, its variation is caused by the neutral density variability in the F2 region (above 200 km) without any involvement of the electric field effects. Correspondingly, latitudinal distribution of this

  14. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. These structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been much less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs. PMID:26497381

  15. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi -Zhong; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-10-26

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. In addition, these structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been much less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs.

  16. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-10-26

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. These structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been much less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs.

  17. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; ...

    2015-10-26

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. In addition, these structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been muchmore » less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs.« less

  18. Identifying community structure in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chenxi; Duan, Yubing

    2015-07-01

    A wide variety of applications could be formulated to resolve the problem of finding all communities from a given network, ranging from social and biological network analysis to web mining and searching. In this study, we propose the concept of virtual attractive strength between each pair of node in networks, and then give the definition of community structure based on the proposed attractive strength. Furthermore, we present a community detection method by moving vertices to the clusters that produce the largest attractive strengths to them until the division of network reaches unchanged. Experimental results on synthetic and real networks indicate that the proposed approach has favorite effectiveness and fast convergence speed, which provides an efficient method for exploring and analyzing complex systems.

  19. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  20. NAPS: Network Analysis of Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Broto; Parekh, Nita

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, protein structures have been analysed by the secondary structure architecture and fold arrangement. An alternative approach that has shown promise is modelling proteins as a network of non-covalent interactions between amino acid residues. The network representation of proteins provide a systems approach to topological analysis of complex three-dimensional structures irrespective of secondary structure and fold type and provide insights into structure-function relationship. We have developed a web server for network based analysis of protein structures, NAPS, that facilitates quantitative and qualitative (visual) analysis of residue–residue interactions in: single chains, protein complex, modelled protein structures and trajectories (e.g. from molecular dynamics simulations). The user can specify atom type for network construction, distance range (in Å) and minimal amino acid separation along the sequence. NAPS provides users selection of node(s) and its neighbourhood based on centrality measures, physicochemical properties of amino acids or cluster of well-connected residues (k-cliques) for further analysis. Visual analysis of interacting domains and protein chains, and shortest path lengths between pair of residues are additional features that aid in functional analysis. NAPS support various analyses and visualization views for identifying functional residues, provide insight into mechanisms of protein folding, domain-domain and protein–protein interactions for understanding communication within and between proteins. URL:http://bioinf.iiit.ac.in/NAPS/. PMID:27151201

  1. The structure and evolution of story networks.

    PubMed

    Karsdorp, Folgert; van den Bosch, Antal

    2016-06-01

    With this study, we advance the understanding about the processes through which stories are retold. A collection of story retellings can be considered as a network of stories, in which links between stories represent pre-textual (or ancestral) relationships. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the structure and evolution of such story networks: we construct a story network for a large diachronic collection of Dutch literary retellings of Red Riding Hood, and compare this network to one derived from a corpus of paper chain letters. In the analysis, we first provide empirical evidence that the formation of these story networks is subject to age-dependent selection processes with a strong lopsidedness towards shorter time-spans between stories and their pre-texts (i.e. 'young' story versions are preferred in producing new versions). Subsequently, we systematically compare these findings with and among predictions of various formal models of network growth to determine more precisely which kinds of attractiveness are also at play or might even be preferred as explicatory models. By carefully studying the structure and evolution of the two story networks, then, we show that existing stories are differentially preferred to function as a new version's pre-text given three types of attractiveness: (i) frequency-based and (ii) model-based attractiveness which (iii) decays in time.

  2. Structural control of reaction-diffusion networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Du, Fang; Dong, Hui; Yu, Li; Chen, Guanrong

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies revealed that reaction-diffusion (RD) dynamics can be significantly influenced by the structure of the underlying network. In this paper, a framework is established to study a closely related problem, i.e., to control the proportion of active particles in an RD process by adjusting the structure of the underlying diffusion network. Both distributed and centralized rewiring and reweighting control schemes are proposed for unweighted and weighted networks, respectively. Simulations show that the proportion of active particles can indeed be controlled to a certain extent even when the distributed control mechanism is totally random, while quite high precision can be achieved by centralized control schemes. More interestingly, it is found that the reactants in heterogeneous networks have wider controllable ranges than those in homogeneous networks with similar numbers of nodes and links, if only the weights of links are changed with a fixed bound. Therefore, it is believed that heterogeneous networks fit the changeable environment better, which provides another explanation for some common observations on many heterogeneous real-world networks.

  3. Structural network efficiency predicts conversion to dementia

    PubMed Central

    Tuladhar, Anil M.; van Uden, Ingeborg W.M.; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C.A.; Lawrence, Andrew; van der Holst, Helena; van Norden, Anouk; de Laat, Karlijn; van Dijk, Ewoud; Claassen, Jurgen A.H.R.; Kessels, Roy P.C.; Markus, Hugh S.; Norris, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether structural network connectivity at baseline predicts incident all-cause dementia in a prospective hospital-based cohort of elderly participants with MRI evidence of small vessel disease (SVD). Methods: A total of 436 participants from the Radboud University Nijmegen Diffusion Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Cohort (RUN DMC), a prospective hospital-based cohort of elderly without dementia with cerebral SVD, were included in 2006. During follow-up (2011–2012), dementia was diagnosed. The structural network was constructed from baseline diffusion tensor imaging followed by deterministic tractography and measures of efficiency using graph theory were calculated. Cox proportional regression analyses were conducted. Results: During 5 years of follow-up, 32 patients developed dementia. MRI markers for SVD were strongly associated with network measures. Patients with dementia showed lower total network strength and global and local efficiency at baseline as compared with the group without dementia. Lower global network efficiency was independently associated with increased risk of incident all-cause dementia (hazard ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.42–0.96, p = 0.032); in contrast, individual SVD markers including lacunes, white matter hyperintensities volume, and atrophy were not independently associated. Conclusions: These results support a role of network disruption playing a pivotal role in the genesis of dementia in SVD, and suggest network analysis of the connectivity of white matter has potential as a predictive marker in the disease. PMID:26888983

  4. The structure and evolution of story networks

    PubMed Central

    Karsdorp, Folgert; van den Bosch, Antal

    2016-01-01

    With this study, we advance the understanding about the processes through which stories are retold. A collection of story retellings can be considered as a network of stories, in which links between stories represent pre-textual (or ancestral) relationships. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the structure and evolution of such story networks: we construct a story network for a large diachronic collection of Dutch literary retellings of Red Riding Hood, and compare this network to one derived from a corpus of paper chain letters. In the analysis, we first provide empirical evidence that the formation of these story networks is subject to age-dependent selection processes with a strong lopsidedness towards shorter time-spans between stories and their pre-texts (i.e. ‘young’ story versions are preferred in producing new versions). Subsequently, we systematically compare these findings with and among predictions of various formal models of network growth to determine more precisely which kinds of attractiveness are also at play or might even be preferred as explicatory models. By carefully studying the structure and evolution of the two story networks, then, we show that existing stories are differentially preferred to function as a new version's pre-text given three types of attractiveness: (i) frequency-based and (ii) model-based attractiveness which (iii) decays in time. PMID:27429767

  5. Cationic Mn2+/H+ exchange leading a slow solid-state transformation of a 2D porphyrinic network at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amayuelas, Eder; Fidalgo-Marijuan, Arkaitz; Bazán, Begoña; Urtiaga, Miren Karmele; Barandika, Gotzone; Lezama, Luis; Arriortua, María Isabel

    2017-03-01

    Metalloporphyrins exhibit outstanding chemical, physical and biological properties in dissolution, however, it is a challenge to synthesize them as stable solid frameworks. Long-time stability is crucial for future applications of these materials, and we have detected a slow, solid-state transformation of a 2D MnII-porphyrin at RT. The remarkable point is that this transformation showed up as a result of Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance measurements. Otherwise, the evolution of the system could have remained undetected. Thus, 2D [Mn3(TCPP)(H2O)4]·nD (1) (where TCPP is meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin and D is the solvent) has been synthesized hydrothermally, and characterised by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermogravimetry and X-ray thermodiffractometry (XRTD). This compound slowly transforms into [Mn(H4TCPP)(H2O)2]·nD (2) according to the equilibrium [Mn3(TCPP)]+4H+ ↔ [Mn(H4TCPP)]+2Mn2+. The evolution of the system has been studied through analysis of the distortion (both of the coordination sphere and the tetrapyrrolic macrocycle) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum mechanical calculations.

  6. Quantification of transition dipole strengths using 1D and 2D spectroscopy for the identification of molecular structures via exciton delocalization: Application to α-helices

    PubMed Central

    Grechko, Maksim; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrational and electronic transition dipole strengths are often good probes of molecular structures, especially in excitonically coupled systems of chromophores. One cannot determine transition dipole strengths using linear spectroscopy unless the concentration is known, which in many cases it is not. In this paper, we report a simple method for measuring transition dipole moments from linear absorption and 2D IR spectra that does not require knowledge of concentrations. Our method is tested on several model compounds and applied to the amide I′ band of a polypeptide in its random coil and α-helical conformation as modulated by the solution temperature. It is often difficult to confidently assign polypeptide and protein secondary structures to random coil or α-helix by linear spectroscopy alone, because they absorb in the same frequency range. We find that the transition dipole strength of the random coil state is 0.12 ± 0.013 D2, which is similar to a single peptide unit, indicating that the vibrational mode of random coil is localized on a single peptide unit. In an α-helix, the lower bound of transition dipole strength is 0.26 ± 0.03 D2. When taking into account the angle of the amide I′ transition dipole vector with respect to the helix axis, our measurements indicate that the amide I′ vibrational mode is delocalized across a minimum of 3.5 residues in an α-helix. Thus, one can confidently assign secondary structure based on exciton delocalization through its effect on the transition dipole strength. Our method will be especially useful for kinetically evolving systems, systems with overlapping molecular conformations, and other situations in which concentrations are difficult to determine. PMID:23163364

  7. The structure and stratigraphy of the sedimentary succession in the Swedish sector of the Baltic Basin: New insights from vintage 2D marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopher, Daniel; Erlström, Mikael; Bell, Nicholas; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present five interpreted regional seismic profiles, describing the full sedimentary sequence across the Swedish sector of the Baltic Sea. The data for the study are part of an extensive and largely unpublished 2D seismic dataset acquired between 1970 and 1990 by the Swedish Oil Prospecting Company (OPAB). The Baltic Basin is an intracratonic basin located in northern Europe. Most of the Swedish sector of the basin constitutes the NW flank of a broad synclinal depression, the Baltic Basin. In the SW of the Swedish sector lies the Hanö Bay Basin, formed by subsidence associated with inversion of the Tornquist Zone during the Late Cretaceous. The geological history presented here is broadly consistent with previously published works. We observe an area between the Hanö Bay and the Baltic Basin where the Palaeozoic strata has been affected by transpression and subsequent inversion, associated with the Tornquist Zone during the late Carboniferous-Early Permian and Late Cretaceous, respectively. We propose that the Christiansø High was a structural low during the Late Jurassic, which was later inverted in the Late Cretaceous. We suggest that a fan shaped feature in the seismic data, adjacent to the Christiansø Fault within the Hanö Bay Basin, represents rapidly deposited, coarse-grained sediments eroded from the inverted Christiansø High during the Late Cretaceous. We identify a number of faults within the deeper part of the Baltic Basin, which we also interpret to be transpressional in nature, formed during the Caledonian Orogeny in the Late Silurian-Early Devonian. East of Gotland a number of sedimentary structures consisting of Silurian carbonate reefs and Ordovician carbonate mounds, as well as a large Quaternary glacial feature are observed. Finally, we use the seismic interpretation to infer the structural and stratigraphic history of the Baltic and Hanö Bay basins within the Swedish sector.

  8. Community Structure in Online Collegiate Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traud, Amanda; Kelsic, Eric; Mucha, Peter; Porter, Mason

    2009-03-01

    Online social networking sites have become increasingly popular with college students. The networks we studied are defined through ``friendships'' indicated by Facebook users from UNC, Oklahoma, Caltech, Georgetown, and Princeton. We apply the tools of network science to study the Facebook networks from these five different universities at a single point in time. We investigate each single-institution network's community structure, which we obtain through partitioning the graph using an eigenvector method. We use both graphical and quantitative tools, including pair-counting methods, which we interpret through statistical analysis and permutation tests to measure the correlations between the network communities and a set of characteristics given by each user (residence, class year, major, and high school). We also analyze the single gender subsets of these networks, and the impact of missing demographical data. Our study allows us to compare the online social networks for the five schools as well as infer differences in offline social interactions. At the schools studied, we were able to define which characteristics of the Facebook users correlate best with friendships.

  9. 2D Modelling of the Gorkha earthquake through the joint exploitation of Sentinel 1-A DInSAR measurements and geological, structural and seismological information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Novellis, Vincenzo; Castaldo, Raffaele; Solaro, Giuseppe; De Luca, Claudio; Pepe, Susi; Bonano, Manuela; Casu, Francesco; Zinno, Ivana; Manunta, Michele; Lanari, Riccardo; Tizzani, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    A Mw 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal on 25 April 2015 at 06:11:26 UTC, killing more than 9,000 people, injuring more than 23,000 and producing extensive damages. The main seismic event, known as the Gorkha earthquake, had its epicenter localized at ~82 km NW of the Kathmandu city and the hypocenter at a depth of approximately 15 km. After the main shock event, about 100 aftershocks occurred during the following months, propagating toward the south-east direction; in particular, the most energetic shocks were the Mw 6.7 and Mw 7.3 occurred on 26 April and 12 May, respectively. In this study, we model the causative fault of the earthquake by jointly exploiting surface deformation retrieved by the DInSAR measurements collected through the Sentinel 1-A (S1A) space-borne sensor and the available geological, structural and seismological information. We first exploit the analytical solution performing a back-analysis of the ground deformation detected by the first co-seismic S1A interferogram, computed by exploiting the 17/04/2015 and 29/04/2015 SAR acquisitions and encompassing the main earthquake and some aftershocks, to search for the location and geometry of the fault plane. Starting from these findings and by benefiting from the available geological, structural and seismological data, we carry out a Finite Element (FE)-based 2D modelling of the causative fault, in order to evaluate the impact of the geological structures activated during the seismic event on the distribution of the ground deformation field. The obtained results show that the causative fault has a rather complex compressive structure, dipping northward, formed by segments with different dip angles: 6° the deep segment and 60° the shallower one. Therefore, although the hypocenters of the main shock and most of the more energetic aftershocks are located along the deeper plane, corresponding to a segment of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), the FE solution also indicates the contribution of the shallower

  10. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-07-03

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach.

  11. Synthesis and structural characterization of homochiral 2D coordination polymers of zinc and copper with conformationally flexible ditopic imidazolium-based dicarboxylate ligands.

    PubMed

    Nicasio, Antonio I; Montilla, Francisco; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Colodrero, Rosario P; Galindo, Agustín

    2017-01-03

    Different novel coordination polymers containing zinc, 1-4, and copper, 5-8, metals, connected via chiral imidazolium-based dicarboxylate ligands, [L(R)](-), were isolated by reaction between zinc acetate or copper acetate and enantiomerically pure HL(R) compounds. They were characterised and structurally identified by X-ray diffraction methods (single crystal and powder). These compounds are two-dimensional homochiral coordination polymers, [M(L(R))2]n, in which the metal ions are coordinated by the two carboxylate groups of [L(R)](-) anions in a general bridging monodentate μ(2)-κ(1)-O(1),κ(1)-O(3) fashion that afforded tetrahedral metal coordination environments for zinc, 1-4, and square planar for copper, 5-8, complexes. In all the compounds the 3D supramolecular architecture is constructed by non-covalent interactions between the hydrophobic parts (R groups) of the homochiral 2D coordination polymers and, in some cases, by weak C-HO non-classical hydrogen bonds that provided, in general, a dense crystal packing. DFT calculations on the [L(R)](-) anions confirmed their conformational flexibility as ditopic linkers and this fact makes possible the formation of different coordination polymers for four-coordinated metal centers. Preliminary studies on the Zn-catalyzed synthesis of chiral α-aminophosphonates were carried out and, unfortunately, no enantioselectivity was observed in these reactions.

  12. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  13. A frequency-based approach to locate common structure for 2D-3D intensity-based registration of setup images in prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Munbodh, Reshma; Chen Zhe; Jaffray, David A.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Knisely, Jonathan P. S.; Duncan, James S.

    2007-07-15

    In many radiotherapy clinics, geometric uncertainties in the delivery of 3D conformal radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy of the prostate are reduced by aligning the patient's bony anatomy in the planning 3D CT to corresponding bony anatomy in 2D portal images acquired before every treatment fraction. In this paper, we seek to determine if there is a frequency band within the portal images and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the planning CT in which bony anatomy predominates over non-bony anatomy such that portal images and DRRs can be suitably filtered to achieve high registration accuracy in an automated 2D-3D single portal intensity-based registration framework. Two similarity measures, mutual information and the Pearson correlation coefficient were tested on carefully collected gold-standard data consisting of a kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) and megavoltage portal images in the anterior-posterior (AP) view of an anthropomorphic phantom acquired under clinical conditions at known poses, and on patient data. It was found that filtering the portal images and DRRs during the registration considerably improved registration performance. Without filtering, the registration did not always converge while with filtering it always converged to an accurate solution. For the pose-determination experiments conducted on the anthropomorphic phantom with the correlation coefficient, the mean (and standard deviation) of the absolute errors in recovering each of the six transformation parameters were {theta}{sub x}:0.18(0.19) deg., {theta}{sub y}:0.04(0.04) deg., {theta}{sub z}:0.04(0.02) deg., t{sub x}:0.14(0.15) mm, t{sub y}:0.09(0.05) mm, and t{sub z}:0.49(0.40) mm. The mutual information-based registration with filtered images also resulted in similarly small errors. For the patient data, visual inspection of the superimposed registered images showed that they were correctly aligned in all instances. The results presented in this

  14. Morphisms of reaction networks that couple structure to function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms underlying complex biological systems are routinely represented as networks. Network kinetics is widely studied, and so is the connection between network structure and behavior. However, similarity of mechanism is better revealed by relationships between network structures. Results We define morphisms (mappings) between reaction networks that establish structural connections between them. Some morphisms imply kinetic similarity, and yet their properties can be checked statically on the structure of the networks. In particular we can determine statically that a complex network will emulate a simpler network: it will reproduce its kinetics for all corresponding choices of reaction rates and initial conditions. We use this property to relate the kinetics of many common biological networks of different sizes, also relating them to a fundamental population algorithm. Conclusions Structural similarity between reaction networks can be revealed by network morphisms, elucidating mechanistic and functional aspects of complex networks in terms of simpler networks. PMID:25128194

  15. Structurally robust control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called controllers. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on complex networks including scale-free topologies. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied in engineering. The developed analytical tools, computer simulations, and real network analyses lead herein to the discovery that robust control can be achieved in scale-free networks with exactly the same order of controllers required in a standard nonrobust configuration by adjusting only the minimum degree. The presented methodology also addresses the probabilistic failure of links in real systems, such as neural synaptic unreliability in Caenorhabditis elegans, and suggests a new direction to pursue in studies of complex networks in which control theory has a role.

  16. The structure of scientific collaboration networks

    PubMed Central

    Newman, M. E. J.

    2001-01-01

    The structure of scientific collaboration networks is investigated. Two scientists are considered connected if they have authored a paper together and explicit networks of such connections are constructed by using data drawn from a number of databases, including MEDLINE (biomedical research), the Los Alamos e-Print Archive (physics), and NCSTRL (computer science). I show that these collaboration networks form “small worlds,” in which randomly chosen pairs of scientists are typically separated by only a short path of intermediate acquaintances. I further give results for mean and distribution of numbers of collaborators of authors, demonstrate the presence of clustering in the networks, and highlight a number of apparent differences in the patterns of collaboration between the fields studied. PMID:11149952

  17. Self-healing networks: redundancy and structure.

    PubMed

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. We then analyze the effect of the level of redundancy on the resilience to multiple failures; in particular, we measure the fraction of nodes still served for increasing levels of network damages. Finally, we study the effects of redundancy under different connectivity patterns-from planar grids, to small-world, up to scale-free networks-on healing performances. Small-world topologies show that introducing some long-range connections in planar grids greatly enhances the resilience to multiple failures with performances comparable to the case of the most resilient (and least realistic) scale-free structures. Obvious applications of self-healing are in the important field of infrastructural networks like gas, power, water, oil distribution systems.

  18. Uncovering the spatial structure of mobility networks.

    PubMed

    Louail, Thomas; Lenormand, Maxime; Picornell, Miguel; García Cantú, Oliva; Herranz, Ricardo; Frias-Martinez, Enrique; Ramasco, José J; Barthelemy, Marc

    2015-01-21

    The extraction of a clear and simple footprint of the structure of large, weighted and directed networks is a general problem that has relevance for many applications. An important example is seen in origin-destination matrices, which contain the complete information on commuting flows, but are difficult to analyze and compare. We propose here a versatile method, which extracts a coarse-grained signature of mobility networks, under the form of a 2 × 2 matrix that separates the flows into four categories. We apply this method to origin-destination matrices extracted from mobile phone data recorded in 31 Spanish cities. We show that these cities essentially differ by their proportion of two types of flows: integrated (between residential and employment hotspots) and random flows, whose importance increases with city size. Finally, the method allows the determination of categories of networks, and in the mobility case, the classification of cities according to their commuting structure.

  19. Discovering and Analyzing Network Function and Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-08

    detecting spam web pages. It has also supported the development of faster algorithms for determining which edges are most critical to the structure of a...link structure to estimate the likelihood that other webpages are spam. This is possible because legitimate webpages are unlikely to link to spam web ...pages, so a link to a spam web page is evidence of spam. Similarly, a link from a legitimate webpage is evidence of legitimacy. Network interpolation

  20. Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

  1. HOTCFGM-2D: A Coupled Higher-Order Theory for Cylindrical Structural Components with Bi-Directionally Components with Bi-Directionally Graded Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this two-year project was to develop and deliver to the NASA-Glenn Research Center a two-dimensional higher-order theory, and related computer codes, for the analysis and design of cylindrical functionally graded materials/structural components for use in advanced aircraft engines (e.g., combustor linings, rotor disks, heat shields, brisk blades). To satisfy this objective, two-dimensional version of the higher-order theory, HOTCFGM-2D, and four computer codes based on this theory, for the analysis and design of structural components functionally graded in the radial and circumferential directions were developed in the cylindrical coordinate system r-Theta-z. This version of the higher-order theory is a significant generalization of the one-dimensional theory, HOTCFGM-1D, developed during the FY97 for the analysis and design of cylindrical structural components with radially graded microstructures. The generalized theory is applicable to thin multi-phased composite shells/cylinders subjected to steady-state thermomechanical, transient thermal and inertial loading applied uniformly along the axial direction such that the overall deformation is characterized by a constant average axial strain. The reinforcement phases are uniformly distributed in the axial direction, and arbitrarily distributed in the radial and circumferential direction, thereby allowing functional grading of the internal reinforcement in the r-Theta plane. The four computer codes fgmc3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmp3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmgvips3dq.cylindrical.f, and fgmc3dq.cylindrical.transient.f are research-oriented codes for investigating the effect of functionally graded architectures, as well as the properties of the multi-phase reinforcement, in thin shells subjected to thermomechanical and inertial loading, on the internal temperature, stress and (inelastic) strain fields. The reinforcement distribution in the radial and circumferential directions is specified by the user. The thermal

  2. Fine-scale thermohaline ocean structure retrieved with 2-D prestack full-waveform inversion of multichannel seismic data: Application to the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagnino, D.; Sallarès, V.; Biescas, B.; Ranero, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of 2-D time-domain, adjoint-state acoustic full-waveform inversion (FWI) to retrieve high-resolution models of ocean physical parameters such as sound speed, temperature and salinity. The proposed method is first described and then applied to prestack multichannel seismic (MCS) data acquired in the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia) in 2007 in the framework of the Geophysical Oceanography project. The inversion strategy flow includes specifically designed data preconditioning for acoustic noise reduction, followed by the inversion of sound speed in the shotgather domain. We show that the final sound speed model has a horizontal resolution of ˜ 70 m, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the initial model constructed with coincident eXpendable Bathy Thermograph (XBT) data, and close to the theoretical resolution of O(λ). Temperature (T) and salinity (S) are retrieved with the same lateral resolution as sound speed by combining the inverted sound speed model with the thermodynamic equation of seawater and a local, depth-dependent T-S relation derived from regional conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) measurements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) database. The comparison of the inverted T and S models with XBT and CTD casts deployed simultaneously to the MCS acquisition shows that the thermohaline contrasts are resolved with an accuracy of 0.18oC for temperature and 0.08 PSU for salinity. The combination of oceanographic and MCS data into a common, pseudo-automatic inversion scheme allows to quantitatively resolve submeso-scale features that ought to be incorporated into larger-scale ocean models of oceans structure and circulation.

  3. Modeling Insurgent Network Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Michael; Thirkill-Mackelprang, Ashley

    2010-03-01

    We present a methodology for mapping insurgent network structure based on their public rhetoric. Indicators of cooperative links between insurgent groups at both the leadership and rank-and-file levels are used, such as joint policy statements or joint operations claims. In addition, a targeting policy measure is constructed on the basis of insurgent targeting claims. Network diagrams which integrate these measures of insurgent cooperation and ideology are generated for different periods of the Iraqi and Afghan insurgencies. The network diagrams exhibit meaningful changes which track the evolution of the strategic environment faced by insurgent groups. Correlations between targeting policy and network structure indicate that insurgent targeting claims are aimed at establishing a group identity among the spectrum of rank-and-file insurgency supporters. A dynamical systems model of insurgent alliance formation and factionalism is presented which evolves the relationship between insurgent group dyads as a function of their ideological differences and their current relationships. The ability of the model to qualitatively and quantitatively capture insurgent network dynamics observed in the data is discussed.

  4. Information diffusion in structured online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Zhang, Yini; Qiao, Fengcai; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, due to the word-of-mouth effect, online social networks have been considered to be efficient approaches to conduct viral marketing, which makes it of great importance to understand the diffusion dynamics in online social networks. However, most research on diffusion dynamics in epidemiology and existing social networks cannot be applied directly to characterize online social networks. In this paper, we propose models to characterize the information diffusion in structured online social networks with push-based forwarding mechanism. We introduce the term user influence to characterize the average number of times that messages are browsed which is incurred by a given type user generating a message, and study the diffusion threshold, above which the user influence of generating a message will approach infinity. We conduct simulations and provide the simulation results, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis results perfectly. These results are of use in understanding the diffusion dynamics in online social networks and also critical for advertisers in viral marketing who want to estimate the user influence before posting an advertisement.

  5. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks.

    PubMed

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2016-09-06

    Social systems are in a constant state of flux, with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns present on the timescale of years. Accurate models of social dynamics are important for understanding the spreading of influence or diseases, formation of friendships, and the productivity of teams. Although there has been much progress on understanding complex networks over the past decade, little is known about the regularities governing the microdynamics of social networks. Here, we explore the dynamic social network of a densely-connected population of ∼1,000 individuals and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection unnecessary. Starting from 5-min time slices, we uncover dynamic social structures expressed on multiple timescales. On the hourly timescale, we find that gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. Each core represents a social context. Cores exhibit a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework, we explore the complex interplay between social and geospatial behavior, documenting how the formation of cores is preceded by coordination behavior in the communication networks and demonstrating that social behavior can be predicted with high precision.

  6. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    PubMed Central

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2016-01-01

    Social systems are in a constant state of flux, with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns present on the timescale of years. Accurate models of social dynamics are important for understanding the spreading of influence or diseases, formation of friendships, and the productivity of teams. Although there has been much progress on understanding complex networks over the past decade, little is known about the regularities governing the microdynamics of social networks. Here, we explore the dynamic social network of a densely-connected population of ∼1,000 individuals and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection unnecessary. Starting from 5-min time slices, we uncover dynamic social structures expressed on multiple timescales. On the hourly timescale, we find that gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. Each core represents a social context. Cores exhibit a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework, we explore the complex interplay between social and geospatial behavior, documenting how the formation of cores is preceded by coordination behavior in the communication networks and demonstrating that social behavior can be predicted with high precision. PMID:27555584

  7. Watershed hydrology, network allometry and ecosystem structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.

    2003-04-01

    The lecture covers recent advances relevant to watershed hydrology, in particular derived from the realm of data now available, covering a wide range of scales and objectively collected and analyzed. It is intended to summarize results that are, in the lecturer's opinion, crucial to our current understanding of a variety of issues. Key among them, landscape evolution models, models of the hydrologic response and, indeed a scientific challenge, ecosystem structure. In particular, a new allometric scaling law for loopless networks, confirmed through studies on rivers, exact network results and computer simulations, offers unique insight on a variety of phenomena, ranging from the ubiquity of the 'quarter-power' law in biology to the origin of scaling size spectra in marine microbial ecosystems, to the proper geomorphological description of a river basin and its hydrological implications. In a sense, networks are a byproduct of the hydrologic dynamics, and indeed can be shown to be related to ecosystem structure. Si parva licet, I will provide evidence suggesting that ensemble averaging of the allometric property (where individual realizations are different networks) leads to results in excellent accord with the known limit scaling of efficient and compact networks with remarkably little scatter with implications of somewhat general character. Such results complement recent work suggesting that scaling features are quite robust to geometrical fluctuations of network properties. Finally, I shall gather from the morphological analysis on river networks the potential for predicting the main characters of the hydrologic response in ungauged basins - a task of practical nature with many social implications, possibly relevant to the Session's aims.

  8. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  9. Network structure of multivariate time series

    PubMed Central

    Lacasa, Lucas; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of a variety of phenomena in physics, biology and economics crucially depends on the analysis of multivariate time series. While a wide range tools and techniques for time series analysis already exist, the increasing availability of massive data structures calls for new approaches for multidimensional signal processing. We present here a non-parametric method to analyse multivariate time series, based on the mapping of a multidimensional time series into a multilayer network, which allows to extract information on a high dimensional dynamical system through the analysis of the structure of the associated multiplex network. The method is simple to implement, general, scalable, does not require ad hoc phase space partitioning, and is thus suitable for the analysis of large, heterogeneous and non-stationary time series. We show that simple structural descriptors of the associated multiplex networks allow to extract and quantify nontrivial properties of coupled chaotic maps, including the transition between different dynamical phases and the onset of various types of synchronization. As a concrete example we then study financial time series, showing that a multiplex network analysis can efficiently discriminate crises from periods of financial stability, where standard methods based on time-series symbolization often fail. PMID:26487040

  10. Network structure of multivariate time series.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Lucas; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-10-21

    Our understanding of a variety of phenomena in physics, biology and economics crucially depends on the analysis of multivariate time series. While a wide range tools and techniques for time series analysis already exist, the increasing availability of massive data structures calls for new approaches for multidimensional signal processing. We present here a non-parametric method to analyse multivariate time series, based on the mapping of a multidimensional time series into a multilayer network, which allows to extract information on a high dimensional dynamical system through the analysis of the structure of the associated multiplex network. The method is simple to implement, general, scalable, does not require ad hoc phase space partitioning, and is thus suitable for the analysis of large, heterogeneous and non-stationary time series. We show that simple structural descriptors of the associated multiplex networks allow to extract and quantify nontrivial properties of coupled chaotic maps, including the transition between different dynamical phases and the onset of various types of synchronization. As a concrete example we then study financial time series, showing that a multiplex network analysis can efficiently discriminate crises from periods of financial stability, where standard methods based on time-series symbolization often fail.

  11. The Ordered Network Structure and Prediction Summary for M≥7 Earthquakes in Xinjiang Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Ke-Pei; Zhao, Kai

    2014-12-01

    M ≥7 earthquakes have showed an obvious commensurability and orderliness in Xinjiang of China and its adjacent region since 1800. The main orderly values are 30 a × k (k = 1,2,3), 11 ~ 12 a, 41 ~ 43 a, 18 ~ 19 a, and 5 ~ 6 a. In the guidance of the information forecasting theory of Wen-Bo Weng, based on previous research results, combining ordered network structure analysis with complex network technology, we focus on the prediction summary of M ≥ 7 earthquakes by using the ordered network structure, and add new information to further optimize network, hence construct the 2D- and 3D-ordered network structure of M ≥ 7 earthquakes. In this paper, the network structure revealed fully the regularity of seismic activity of M ≥ 7 earthquakes in the study region during the past 210 years. Based on this, the Karakorum M7.1 earthquake in 1996, the M7.9 earthquake on the frontier of Russia, Mongol, and China in 2003, and two Yutian M7.3 earthquakes in 2008 and 2014 were predicted successfully. At the same time, a new prediction opinion is presented that the future two M ≥ 7 earthquakes will probably occur around 2019 - 2020 and 2025 - 2026 in this region. The results show that large earthquake occurred in defined region can be predicted. The method of ordered network structure analysis produces satisfactory results for the mid-and-long term prediction of M ≥ 7 earthquakes.

  12. High-throughput critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) measurement of two-dimensional (2D) structures using scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullam, Jennifer; Boye, Carol; Standaert, Theodorus; Gaudiello, John; Tomlinson, Derek; Xiao, Hong; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we tested a novel methodology of measuring critical dimension (CD) uniformity, or CDU, with electron beam (e-beam) hotspot inspection and measurement systems developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). The systems were used to take images of two-dimensional (2D) array patterns and measure CDU values in a custom designated fashion. Because this methodology combined imaging of scanning micro scope (SEM) and CD value averaging over a large array pattern of optical CD, or OCD, it can measure CDU of 2D arrays with high accuracy, high repeatability and high throughput.

  13. Improving resource utilization in hierarchy network by optimizing topological structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. L.; Peng, H. P.; Li, L. X.; Sun, F.; Yang, Y. X.

    2012-02-01

    We study the performance of peer-to-peer (P2P) network built on the top of hierarchy topological structure of local area networks (LAN). We find that the topological structure of the underlying physical network has significant impacts on the resource utilization of the P2P overlay network. The larger size of the physical network is, the lower resource utilization of the overlay network is. Through optimizing the topological structure of physical network, we propose two novel schemes to improve the resource utilization. The experimental results show that in any case the resource utilization of P2P network can always achieve 100% by these two schemes.

  14. Cu-PDC-bpa solid coordination frameworks (PDC=2,5-pyrindinedicarboxylate; bpa=1,2-DI(4-pyridil)ethane)): 2D and 3D structural flexibility producing a 3-c herringbone array next to ideal

    SciTech Connect

    Llano-Tomé, Francisco; Bazán, Begoña; Urtiaga, Miren-Karmele; Barandika, Gotzone; Antonia Señarís-Rodríguez, M.; and others

    2015-10-15

    Combination of polycarboxylate anions and dipyridyl ligands is an effective strategy to produce solid coordination frameworks (SCF) which are crystalline materials based on connections between metal ions through organic ligands. In this context, this work is focused on two novel Cu{sup II}-based SCFs exhibiting PDC (2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate) and bpa (1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane), being the first structures reported in literature containing both ligands. Chemical formula are [Cu{sub 2}[(PDC){sub 2}(bpa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·3H{sub 2}O·DMF (1), and [Cu{sub 2}(PDC){sub 2}(bpa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·7H{sub 2}O (2), where DMF is dimethylformamide. Compounds 1 and 2 have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and dielectric measurements. The crystallographic analysis revealed that compounds 1 and 2 can be described as herringbone-type layers formed by helicoidal Cu-PDC-Cu chains connected through bpa ligands. Solvent molecules are crystallized between the layers, providing the inter-layer connections through hydrogen bonds. Differences between both compounds are attributable to the flexibility of bpa (in 2D) as well as to the 3D packing of the layers which is solvent dependent. This fact results in the fact that compound 2 is the most regular 3-c herringbone array reported so far. The structural dynamism of these networks is responsible for the crystalline to-amorphous to-crystalline (CAC) transformation from compound 1 to compound 2. Crystallochemical features for both compounds have also been studied and compared to similar 3-connected herringbone-arrays. - Graphical abstract: Cu-PDC-bpa 3-c herringbone arrays. - Highlights: • The most ideal herringbone array reported so far is a Cu-PDC-bpa SCF. • Conformational freedom of bpa results in 2D and 3D flexibility of the SCFs. • The flexibility of the SCFs is related to a phase transformation. • Dielectric

  15. Self-Healing Networks: Redundancy and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. We then analyze the effect of the level of redundancy on the resilience to multiple failures; in particular, we measure the fraction of nodes still served for increasing levels of network damages. Finally, we study the effects of redundancy under different connectivity patterns—from planar grids, to small-world, up to scale-free networks—on healing performances. Small-world topologies show that introducing some long-range connections in planar grids greatly enhances the resilience to multiple failures with performances comparable to the case of the most resilient (and least realistic) scale-free structures. Obvious applications of self-healing are in the important field of infrastructural networks like gas, power, water, oil distribution systems. PMID:24533065

  16. Design and characterization of low-loss 2D grating couplers for silicon photonics integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, C.; Carrol, L.; Bozzola, A.; Marchetti, R.; Minzioni, P.; Cristiani, I.; Fournier, M.; Bernabe, S.; Gerace, D.; Andreani, L. C.

    2016-03-01

    We present the characterization of Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic-crystal based 2D grating-couplers (2D-GCs) fabricated by CEA-Leti in the frame of the FP7 Fabulous project, which is dedicated to the realization of devices and systems for low-cost and high-performance passives-optical-networks. On the analyzed samples different test structures are present, including 2D-GC connected to another 2D-GC by different waveguides (in a Mach-Zehnder like configuration), and 2D-GC connected to two separate 2D-GCs, so as to allow a complete assessment of different parameters. Measurements were carried out using a tunable laser source operating in the extended telecom bandwidth and a fiber-based polarization controlling system at the input of device-under-test. The measured data yielded an overall fiber-to-fiber loss of 7.5 dB for the structure composed by an input 2D-GC connected to two identical 2D-GCs. This value was obtained at the peak wavelength of the grating, and the 3-dB bandwidth of the 2D-GC was assessed to be 43 nm. Assuming that the waveguide losses are negligible, so as to make a worst-case analysis, the coupling efficiency of the single 2D-GC results to be equal to -3.75 dB, constituting, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest value ever reported for a fully CMOS compatible 2D-GC. It is worth noting that both the obtained values are in good agreement with those expected by the numerical simulations performed using full 3D analysis by Lumerical FDTD-solutions.

  17. Structural determinants of criticality in biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Sergi; Ohse, Sebastian; Turalska, Malgorzata; West, Bruce J.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness, and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behavior in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organization can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system toward criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality. PMID:26005422

  18. Effect of solvent evaporation temperature on the structure of two-dimensional melamine networks on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Arifumi; Nakata, Yohei; Minou, Kosuke; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Kadono, Kohei

    2016-12-01

    By scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we investigated two-dimensional (2D) structures of melamine formed on Au(111) surfaces by solvent evaporation. By increasing the evaporation temperature, the well-known ordered honeycomb 2D molecular phase, in which all molecules are linked by hydrogen bonding, changes to four coexisting phases, i.e., a 2D network consisting of linear segments, 1D molecular rows, and hexagonal and distorted hexagonal structures. The first two phases are sometimes observed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) on metallic substrates other than Au. The last two phases have lattice parameters close to those of the well-known honeycomb structure. The structural change observed in this study is attributed to local temperature and concentration distributions of the solution and substrate surface during solvent evaporation. From the results, we found that the molecular nanostructures can be tailored by the solvent evaporation method with small changes in temperature.

  19. Cu-PDC-bpa solid coordination frameworks (PDC=2,5-pyrindinedicarboxylate; bpa=1,2-DI(4-pyridil)ethane)): 2D and 3D structural flexibility producing a 3-c herringbone array next to ideal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llano-Tomé, Francisco; Bazán, Begoña; Urtiaga, Miren-Karmele; Barandika, Gotzone; Antonia Señarís-Rodríguez, M.; Sánchez-Andújar, Manuel; Arriortua, María-Isabel

    2015-10-01

    Combination of polycarboxylate anions and dipyridyl ligands is an effective strategy to produce solid coordination frameworks (SCF) which are crystalline materials based on connections between metal ions through organic ligands. In this context, this work is focused on two novel CuII-based SCFs exhibiting PDC (2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate) and bpa (1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane), being the first structures reported in literature containing both ligands. Chemical formula are [Cu2[(PDC)2(bpa)(H2O)2]·3H2O·DMF (1), and [Cu2(PDC)2(bpa)(H2O)2]·7H2O (2), where DMF is dimethylformamide. Compounds 1 and 2 have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and dielectric measurements. The crystallographic analysis revealed that compounds 1 and 2 can be described as herringbone-type layers formed by helicoidal Cu-PDC-Cu chains connected through bpa ligands. Solvent molecules are crystallized between the layers, providing the inter-layer connections through hydrogen bonds. Differences between both compounds are attributable to the flexibility of bpa (in 2D) as well as to the 3D packing of the layers which is solvent dependent. This fact results in the fact that compound 2 is the most regular 3-c herringbone array reported so far. The structural dynamism of these networks is responsible for the crystalline to-amorphous to-crystalline (CAC) transformation from compound 1 to compound 2. Crystallochemical features for both compounds have also been studied and compared to similar 3-connected herringbone-arrays.

  20. Formation and properties of a terpyridine-based 2D MOF on the surface of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koitz, Ralph; Hutter, Jürg; Iannuzzi, Marcella

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional networks inspired by graphene are of prime importance in nanoscience. We present a computational study of an infinite molecular sheet confined on a water surface to assess its properties and formation mechanism. Terpyridine-based ligand molecules are interlinked by Zn ions to form an extended 2D metal-organic framework. We show that the network is stable on the water surface, and that the substrate affects the dynamic properties of the sheet, exhibiting a confining effect and flattening the sheet by 30%. We use metadynamics to characterize the process of network formation and breaking and determine an intra-network binding energy of 143 kJ mol-1. Based on this mechanistic insight we propose that the 2D network strength can be tuned by varying the rigidity of the ligand through its chemical structure.

  1. Structural Connectivity Networks of Transgender People.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Küblböck, Martin; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-10-01

    Although previous investigations of transsexual people have focused on regional brain alterations, evaluations on a network level, especially those structural in nature, are largely missing. Therefore, we investigated the structural connectome of 23 female-to-male (FtM) and 21 male-to-female (MtF) transgender patients before hormone therapy as compared with 25 female and 25 male healthy controls. Graph theoretical analysis of whole-brain probabilistic tractography networks (adjusted for differences in intracranial volume) showed decreased hemispheric connectivity ratios of subcortical/limbic areas for both transgender groups. Subsequent analysis revealed that this finding was driven by increased interhemispheric lobar connectivity weights (LCWs) in MtF transsexuals and decreased intrahemispheric LCWs in FtM patients. This was further reflected on a regional level, where the MtF group showed mostly increased local efficiencies and FtM patients decreased values. Importantly, these parameters separated each patient group from the remaining subjects for the majority of significant findings. This work complements previously established regional alterations with important findings of structural connectivity. Specifically, our data suggest that network parameters may reflect unique characteristics of transgender patients, whereas local physiological aspects have been shown to represent the transition from the biological sex to the actual gender identity.

  2. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  3. A structural insight into mechanical strength of graphene-like carbon and carbon nitride networks.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Mortazavi, Bohayra; Dianat, Arezoo; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-02-03

    Graphene, one of the strongest materials ever discovered, triggered the exploration of many 2D materials in the last decade. However, the successful synthesis of a stable nanomaterial requires a rudimentary understanding of the relationship between its structure and strength. In the present study, we investigate the mechanical properties of eight different carbon-based 2D nanomaterials by performing extensive density functional theory calculations. The considered structures were just recently either experimentally synthesized or theoretically predicted. The corresponding stress-strain curves and elastic moduli are reported. They can be useful in training force field parameters for large scale simulations. A comparative analysis of these results revealed a direct relationship between atomic density per area and elastic modulus. Furthermore, for the networks that have an armchair and a zigzag orientation, we observed that they were more stretchable in the zigzag direction than the armchair direction. A critical analysis of the angular distributions and radial distribution functions suggested that it could be due to the higher ability of the networks to suppress the elongations of the bonds in the zigzag direction by deforming the bond angles. The structural interpretations provided in this work not only improve the general understanding of a 2D material's strength but also enables us to rationally design them for higher qualities.

  4. A structural insight into mechanical strength of graphene-like carbon and carbon nitride networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Mortazavi, Bohayra; Dianat, Arezoo; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-02-01

    Graphene, one of the strongest materials ever discovered, triggered the exploration of many 2D materials in the last decade. However, the successful synthesis of a stable nanomaterial requires a rudimentary understanding of the relationship between its structure and strength. In the present study, we investigate the mechanical properties of eight different carbon-based 2D nanomaterials by performing extensive density functional theory calculations. The considered structures were just recently either experimentally synthesized or theoretically predicted. The corresponding stress-strain curves and elastic moduli are reported. They can be useful in training force field parameters for large scale simulations. A comparative analysis of these results revealed a direct relationship between atomic density per area and elastic modulus. Furthermore, for the networks that have an armchair and a zigzag orientation, we observed that they were more stretchable in the zigzag direction than the armchair direction. A critical analysis of the angular distributions and radial distribution functions suggested that it could be due to the higher ability of the networks to suppress the elongations of the bonds in the zigzag direction by deforming the bond angles. The structural interpretations provided in this work not only improve the general understanding of a 2D material’s strength but also enables us to rationally design them for higher qualities.

  5. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  6. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  7. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  8. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  9. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  10. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  11. Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Deepjyoti; Chertkov, Michael; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2015-01-13

    Traditionally power distribution networks are either not observable or only partially observable. This complicates development and implementation of new smart grid technologies, such as these related to demand response, outage detection and management, and improved load-monitoring. Here, inspired by proliferation of the metering technology, we discuss statistical estimation problems in structurally loopy but operationally radial distribution grids consisting in learning operational layout of the network from measurements, e.g. voltage data, which are either already available or can be made available with a relatively minor investment. Our newly suggested algorithms apply to a wide range of realistic scenarios. The algorithms are also computationally efficient – polynomial in time – which is proven theoretically and illustrated computationally on a number of test cases. The technique developed can be applied to detect line failures in real time as well as to understand the scope of possible adversarial attacks on the grid.

  12. The Network Structure of Human Personality According to the NEO-PI-R: Matching Network Community Structure to Factor Structure

    PubMed Central

    Goekoop, Rutger; Goekoop, Jaap G.; Scholte, H. Steven

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Human personality is described preferentially in terms of factors (dimensions) found using factor analysis. An alternative and highly related method is network analysis, which may have several advantages over factor analytic methods. Aim To directly compare the ability of network community detection (NCD) and principal component factor analysis (PCA) to examine modularity in multidimensional datasets such as the neuroticism-extraversion-openness personality inventory revised (NEO-PI-R). Methods 434 healthy subjects were tested on the NEO-PI-R. PCA was performed to extract factor structures (FS) of the current dataset using both item scores and facet scores. Correlational network graphs were constructed from univariate correlation matrices of interactions between both items and facets. These networks were pruned in a link-by-link fashion while calculating the network community structure (NCS) of each resulting network using the Wakita Tsurumi clustering algorithm. NCSs were matched against FS and networks of best matches were kept for further analysis. Results At facet level, NCS showed a best match (96.2%) with a ‘confirmatory’ 5-FS. At item level, NCS showed a best match (80%) with the standard 5-FS and involved a total of 6 network clusters. Lesser matches were found with ‘confirmatory’ 5-FS and ‘exploratory’ 6-FS of the current dataset. Network analysis did not identify facets as a separate level of organization in between items and clusters. A small-world network structure was found in both item- and facet level networks. Conclusion We present the first optimized network graph of personality traits according to the NEO-PI-R: a ‘Personality Web’. Such a web may represent the possible routes that subjects can take during personality development. NCD outperforms PCA by producing plausible modularity at item level in non-standard datasets, and can identify the key roles of individual items and clusters in the network. PMID:23284713

  13. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  14. Study of the structure and dynamics of complex biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, Areejit

    2008-12-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the large scale structure and system level dynamics of certain biological networks using tools from graph theory, computational biology and dynamical systems. We study the structure and dynamics of large scale metabolic networks inside three organisms, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Staphylococcus aureus. We also study the dynamics of the large scale genetic network controlling E. coli metabolism. We have tried to explain the observed system level dynamical properties of these networks in terms of their underlying structure. Our studies of the system level dynamics of these large scale biological networks provide a different perspective on their functioning compared to that obtained from purely structural studies. Our study also leads to some new insights on features such as robustness, fragility and modularity of these large scale biological networks. We also shed light on how different networks inside the cell such as metabolic networks and genetic networks are interrelated to each other.

  15. Structure and Response in the World Trade Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiankui; Deem, Michael W.

    2010-11-01

    We examine how the structure of the world trade network has been shaped by globalization and recessions over the last 40 years. We show that by treating the world trade network as an evolving system, theory predicts the trade network is more sensitive to recessionary shocks and recovers more slowly from them now than it did 40 years ago, due to structural changes in the world trade network induced by globalization. We also show that recession-induced change to the world trade network leads to an increased hierarchical structure of the global trade network for a few years after the recession.

  16. Soil Porous Structure as Heterogeneous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, J. P.; Santiago, A.; Losada, J. C.; Borondo, F.; Benito, R. M.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present an application of the Complex Network theory to Geosciences. In particular, we show the implementation of the Heterogeneous Preferential Attachment (HPA) model [1] as a new way to quantify the structure of porous soils and closer relate them with soil texture. In the HPA model, already introduced in this context [2], pores are considered as nodes and their properties, such as position and size, are described by fixed states in a metric space. An affinity function is introduced in the HPA soil model in order to bias the attachment probabilities of links between pores according to their properties and soil texture. We perform an analytical study of the connectivity distributions of pores, P(k), and develop a numerical analysis for the HPA soil model considering a combination of parameters corresponding to eleven empirical soil samples with different physical properties and five different textures. [1] A. Santiago and R. M. Benito, An extended formalism for preferential attachment in heterogeneous complex networks, Europhysics Letters, 82 (2008) 58004. [2] A. Santiago, J.P. Cárdenas, J.C. Losada, R.M. Benito, A.M. Tarquis and F. Borondo, Multiscaling of porous soils as heterogeneous complex networks, Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics, 15 (2008) 893-902.

  17. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  18. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  19. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  20. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    PubMed Central

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity. PMID:27230125

  1. Computing with structured connections networks. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, J.A.; Fanty, M.A.; Goddard, N.; Lynne, K.

    1987-04-01

    Rapid advances both in the neurosciences and in computer science are beginning to lead to a new interest in computational models linking animal brains and behavior. In computer science, there is a large and growing body of knowledge about parallel computation and another, largely separate, science of artificial intelligence. The idea of looking directly at massively parallel realizations of intelligent activity promises to be fruitful for the study of both natural and artificial computations. Much attention has been directed towards the biological implications of this interdisciplinary effort, but there are equally important relations with computational theory, hardware and software. This article focuses on the design and use of massively parallel computational models, particularly in artificial intelligence. Much of the recent work on massively parallel computation has been carried out by physicists and examines the emergent behavior of large, unstructured collections of computing units. We are more concerned with how one can design, realize and analyze networks that embody the specific computational structures needed to solve hard problems. Adaptation and learning are treated as ways to improve structured networks, not as a replacement for analysis and design.

  2. Electrical Conductivity Beneath the Andean Back-arc in Argentina Near 36.5°S: Creation of Minimum Structure 2D Model Across EW Transect Based on Significantly 3D Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, A.; Booker, J.; Favetto, A.; Pomposiello, M.; Giordanengo, G.; Larsen, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    S. Mendoza Province, south of the Nazca flat slab, has widespread recent basaltic volcanism, but no historic activity. Over the last 1 MY, the basalt has evolved from having a slab signature to OIB. In early 2005, we collected 18 MT sites from 67 to 70°W along 36.7°S, near the large caldera Payún Matrú. Significantly 3D data cause difficulty identifying regional strike and performing minimum structure 2D inversions. Use of phase tensors and induction vectors allow identification of possible regional strikes. Various starting models for the minimum structure inversion allow comparison of effect of different regional strikes on the resulting electrical conductivity models. Preliminary analysis of a piecewise-2D region at the center of the profile suggests the west end of the profile to contain lower crustal to upper mantle conductivity which decreases and deepens to the east.

  3. Low-rank network decomposition reveals structural characteristics of small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranca, Victor J.; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2015-12-01

    Small-world networks occur naturally throughout biological, technological, and social systems. With their prevalence, it is particularly important to prudently identify small-world networks and further characterize their unique connection structure with respect to network function. In this work we develop a formalism for classifying networks and identifying small-world structure using a decomposition of network connectivity matrices into low-rank and sparse components, corresponding to connections within clusters of highly connected nodes and sparse interconnections between clusters, respectively. We show that the network decomposition is independent of node indexing and define associated bounded measures of connectivity structure, which provide insight into the clustering and regularity of network connections. While many existing network characterizations rely on constructing benchmark networks for comparison or fail to describe the structural properties of relatively densely connected networks, our classification relies only on the intrinsic network structure and is quite robust with respect to changes in connection density, producing stable results across network realizations. Using this framework, we analyze several real-world networks and reveal new structural properties, which are often indiscernible by previously established characterizations of network connectivity.

  4. Social inheritance can explain the structure of animal social networks.

    PubMed

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Akçay, Erol

    2016-06-28

    The social network structure of animal populations has major implications for survival, reproductive success, sexual selection and pathogen transmission of individuals. But as of yet, no general theory of social network structure exists that can explain the diversity of social networks observed in nature, and serve as a null model for detecting species and population-specific factors. Here we propose a simple and generally applicable model of social network structure. We consider the emergence of network structure as a result of social inheritance, in which newborns are likely to bond with maternal contacts, and via forming bonds randomly. We compare model output with data from several species, showing that it can generate networks with properties such as those observed in real social systems. Our model demonstrates that important observed properties of social networks, including heritability of network position or assortative associations, can be understood as consequences of social inheritance.

  5. Social inheritance can explain the structure of animal social networks

    PubMed Central

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Akçay, Erol

    2016-01-01

    The social network structure of animal populations has major implications for survival, reproductive success, sexual selection and pathogen transmission of individuals. But as of yet, no general theory of social network structure exists that can explain the diversity of social networks observed in nature, and serve as a null model for detecting species and population-specific factors. Here we propose a simple and generally applicable model of social network structure. We consider the emergence of network structure as a result of social inheritance, in which newborns are likely to bond with maternal contacts, and via forming bonds randomly. We compare model output with data from several species, showing that it can generate networks with properties such as those observed in real social systems. Our model demonstrates that important observed properties of social networks, including heritability of network position or assortative associations, can be understood as consequences of social inheritance. PMID:27352101

  6. Functional approximation using artificial neural networks in structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, Javed; Berke, Laszlo

    1993-01-01

    The artificial neural networks (ANN) methodology is an outgrowth of research in artificial intelligence. In this study, the feed-forward network model that was proposed by Rumelhart, Hinton, and Williams was applied to the mapping of functions that are encountered in structural mechanics problems. Several different network configurations were chosen to train the available data for problems in materials characterization and structural analysis of plates and shells. By using the recall process, the accuracy of these trained networks was assessed.

  7. Protein Structure Network-based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhongjie; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Although structure-based drug design (SBDD) has become an indispensable tool in drug discovery for a long time, it continues to pose major challenges to date. With the advancement of "omics" techniques, systems biology has enriched SBDD into a new era, called polypharmacology, in which multi-targets drug or drug combination is designed to fight complex diseases. As a preliminary tool in systems biology, protein structure networks (PSNs) treat a protein as a set of residues linked by edges corresponding to the intramolecular interactions existing in folded structures between the residues. The PSN offers a computationally efficient tool to study the structure and function of proteins, and thus may facilitate structurebased drug design. Herein, we provide an overview of recent advances in PSNs, from predicting functionally important residues, to charactering protein-protein interactions and allosteric communication paths. Furthermore, we discuss potential pharmacological applications of PSN concepts and tools, and highlight the application to two families of drug targets, GPCRs and Hsp90. Although the application of PSNs as a framework for computer-aided drug discovery has been limited to date, we put forward the potential utility value in the near future and propose the PSNs could also serve as a new tool for polypharmacology research.

  8. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  9. Numerical simulation of fibrous biomaterials with randomly distributed fiber network structure.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Stanciulescu, Ilinca

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a computational framework to simulate the mechanical behavior of fibrous biomaterials with randomly distributed fiber networks. A random walk algorithm is implemented to generate the synthetic fiber network in 2D used in simulations. The embedded fiber approach is then adopted to model the fibers as embedded truss elements in the ground matrix, which is essentially equivalent to the affine fiber kinematics. The fiber-matrix interaction is partially considered in the sense that the two material components deform together, but no relative movement is considered. A variational approach is carried out to derive the element residual and stiffness matrices for finite element method (FEM), in which material and geometric nonlinearities are both included. Using a data structure proposed to record the network geometric information, the fiber network is directly incorporated into the FEM simulation without significantly increasing the computational cost. A mesh sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the influence of mesh size on various simulation results. The proposed method can be easily combined with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to include the influence of the stochastic nature of the network and capture the material behavior in an average sense. The computational framework proposed in this work goes midway between homogenizing the fiber network into the surrounding matrix and accounting for the fully coupled fiber-matrix interaction at the segment length scale, and can be used to study the connection between the microscopic structure and the macro-mechanical behavior of fibrous biomaterials with a reasonable computational cost.

  10. Seismic Velocity Structure Across the Quebrada and Gofar Oceanic Transform Faults from 2D Refraction Tomography - A Comparison of Faults with High and Low Seismic Slip Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2009-12-01

    We perform two 2-D tomographic inversions using data collected as a part of the Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar (QDG) Transform Fault Active/Passive Experiment. The QDG transform faults are located in the southern Pacific Ocean and offset the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at approximately 4° south. In the spring of 2008, two ~100 km refraction profiles were collected, each using 8 short period Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) from OBSIP and over 900 shots from the RV Marcus Langseth, across the easternmost segments of the Quebrada and Gofar transform faults. The two refraction profiles are modeled using a 2-D tomographic code that allows joint inversion of the Pg, PmP, and Pn arrivals (Korenaga et al., 2000). Variations in crustal velocity and thickness, as well as the width and depth extent of a significant low velocity zone within and below the transform valley provide some insight into the material properties of each of the fault-zones. Reduced seismic velocities that are 0.5 to over 1.0 km/s slower than velocities associated with the oceanic crust outside the fault zone may indicate the highly fractured fault zone lithology. The low velocity zone associated with the Quebrada fault also extends to the south of the active fault zone, beneath a fossil fault trace. Because Gofar is offset by an intratransform spreading center, we are able to compare ‘normal’ oceanic crust produced at the EPR to the south of the fault with crust associated with the ~15 km intratransform spreading center to the north. These two high slip rate (14 cm/yr) faults look similar morphologically and demonstrate comparable microseismicity characteristics, however their abilities to generate large earthquakes differ significantly. Gofar generates large earthquakes (Mw ~6) regularly every few years, but in the past 24 years only one large (Mw 5.6) event has been reliably located on Quebrada. The contrasting seismic behavior of these faults represents the range of behavior observed in the global

  11. Epidemic spreading on complex networks with community structures

    PubMed Central

    Stegehuis, Clara; van der Hofstad, Remco; van Leeuwaarden, Johan S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks display a community structure. We study two random graph models that create a network with similar community structure as a given network. One model preserves the exact community structure of the original network, while the other model only preserves the set of communities and the vertex degrees. These models show that community structure is an important determinant of the behavior of percolation processes on networks, such as information diffusion or virus spreading: the community structure can both enforce as well as inhibit diffusion processes. Our models further show that it is the mesoscopic set of communities that matters. The exact internal structures of communities barely influence the behavior of percolation processes across networks. This insensitivity is likely due to the relative denseness of the communities. PMID:27440176

  12. Structural and functional clusters of complex brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemanová, Lucia; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    Recent research using the complex network approach has revealed a rich and complicated network topology in the cortical connectivity of mammalian brains. It is of importance to understand the implications of such complex network structures in the functional organization of the brain activities. Here we study this problem from the viewpoint of dynamical complex networks. We investigate synchronization dynamics on the corticocortical network of the cat by modeling each node (cortical area) of the network with a sub-network of interacting excitable neurons. We find that the network displays clustered synchronization behavior, and the dynamical clusters coincide with the topological community structures observed in the anatomical network. Our results provide insights into the relationship between the global organization and the functional specialization of the brain cortex.

  13. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  14. Generalized hypercube structures and hyperswitch communication network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses an ongoing study that uses a recent development in communication control technology to implement hybrid hypercube structures. These architectures are similar to binary hypercubes, but they also provide added connectivity between the processors. This added connectivity increases communication reliability while decreasing the latency of interprocessor message passing. Because these factors directly determine the speed that can be obtained by multiprocessor systems, these architectures are attractive for applications such as remote exploration and experimentation, where high performance and ultrareliability are required. This paper describes and enumerates these architectures and discusses how they can be implemented with a modified version of the hyperswitch communication network (HCN). The HCN is analyzed because it has three attractive features that enable these architectures to be effective: speed, fault tolerance, and the ability to pass multiple messages simultaneously through the same hyperswitch controller.

  15. Utilizing Structures of CYP2D6 and BACE1 Complexes To Reduce Risk of Drug–Drug Interactions with a Novel Series of Centrally Efficacious BACE1 Inhibitors

    DOE PAGES

    Brodney, Michael A.; Beck, Elizabeth M.; Butler, Christopher R.; ...

    2015-03-17

    In recent years, the first generation of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors advanced into clinical development for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the alignment of drug-like properties and selectivity remains a major challenge. Here in this paper, we describe the discovery of a novel class of potent, low clearance, CNS penetrant BACE1 inhibitors represented by thioamidine 5. Further profiling suggested that a high fraction of the metabolism (>95%) was due to CYP2D6, increasing the potential risk for victim-based drug–drug interactions (DDI) and variable exposure in the clinic due to the polymorphic nature of this enzyme. To guide future design, wemore » solved crystal structures of CYP2D6 complexes with substrate 5 and its corresponding metabolic product pyrazole 6, which provided insight into the binding mode and movements between substrate/inhibitor complexes. Guided by the BACE1 and CYP2D6 crystal structures, we designed and synthesized analogues with reduced risk for DDI, central efficacy, and improved hERG therapeutic margins.« less

  16. Utilizing Structures of CYP2D6 and BACE1 Complexes To Reduce Risk of Drug–Drug Interactions with a Novel Series of Centrally Efficacious BACE1 Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Brodney, Michael A.; Beck, Elizabeth M.; Butler, Christopher R.; Barreiro, Gabriela; Johnson, Eric F.; Riddell, David; Parris, Kevin; Nolan, Charles E.; Fan, Ying; Atchison, Kevin; Gonzales, Cathleen; Robshaw, Ashley E.; Doran, Shawn D.; Bundesmann, Mark W.; Buzon, Leanne; Dutra, Jason; Henegar, Kevin; LaChapelle, Erik; Hou, Xinjun; Rogers, Bruce N.; Pandit, Jayvardhan; Lira, Ricardo; Martinez-Alsina, Luis; Mikochik, Peter; Murray, John C.; Ogilvie, Kevin; Price, Loren; Sakya, Subas M.; Yu, Aijia; Zhang, Yong; O’Neill, Brian T.

    2015-03-17

    In recent years, the first generation of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors advanced into clinical development for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the alignment of drug-like properties and selectivity remains a major challenge. Here in this paper, we describe the discovery of a novel class of potent, low clearance, CNS penetrant BACE1 inhibitors represented by thioamidine 5. Further profiling suggested that a high fraction of the metabolism (>95%) was due to CYP2D6, increasing the potential risk for victim-based drug–drug interactions (DDI) and variable exposure in the clinic due to the polymorphic nature of this enzyme. To guide future design, we solved crystal structures of CYP2D6 complexes with substrate 5 and its corresponding metabolic product pyrazole 6, which provided insight into the binding mode and movements between substrate/inhibitor complexes. Guided by the BACE1 and CYP2D6 crystal structures, we designed and synthesized analogues with reduced risk for DDI, central efficacy, and improved hERG therapeutic margins.

  17. Utilizing structures of CYP2D6 and BACE1 complexes to reduce risk of drug-drug interactions with a novel series of centrally efficacious BACE1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brodney, Michael A; Beck, Elizabeth M; Butler, Christopher R; Barreiro, Gabriela; Johnson, Eric F; Riddell, David; Parris, Kevin; Nolan, Charles E; Fan, Ying; Atchison, Kevin; Gonzales, Cathleen; Robshaw, Ashley E; Doran, Shawn D; Bundesmann, Mark W; Buzon, Leanne; Dutra, Jason; Henegar, Kevin; LaChapelle, Erik; Hou, Xinjun; Rogers, Bruce N; Pandit, Jayvardhan; Lira, Ricardo; Martinez-Alsina, Luis; Mikochik, Peter; Murray, John C; Ogilvie, Kevin; Price, Loren; Sakya, Subas M; Yu, Aijia; Zhang, Yong; O'Neill, Brian T

    2015-04-09

    In recent years, the first generation of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors advanced into clinical development for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the alignment of drug-like properties and selectivity remains a major challenge. Herein, we describe the discovery of a novel class of potent, low clearance, CNS penetrant BACE1 inhibitors represented by thioamidine 5. Further profiling suggested that a high fraction of the metabolism (>95%) was due to CYP2D6, increasing the potential risk for victim-based drug-drug interactions (DDI) and variable exposure in the clinic due to the polymorphic nature of this enzyme. To guide future design, we solved crystal structures of CYP2D6 complexes with substrate 5 and its corresponding metabolic product pyrazole 6, which provided insight into the binding mode and movements between substrate/inhibitor complexes. Guided by the BACE1 and CYP2D6 crystal structures, we designed and synthesized analogues with reduced risk for DDI, central efficacy, and improved hERG therapeutic margins.

  18. Evolving networks-Using past structure to predict the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ke-ke; Yan, Wei-sheng; Small, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Many previous studies on link prediction have focused on using common neighbors to predict the existence of links between pairs of nodes. More broadly, research into the structural properties of evolving temporal networks and temporal link prediction methods have recently attracted increasing attention. In this study, for the first time, we examine the use of links between a pair of nodes to predict their common neighbors and analyze the relationship between the weight and the structure in static networks, evolving networks, and in the corresponding randomized networks. We propose both new unweighted and weighted prediction methods and use six kinds of real networks to test our algorithms. In unweighted networks, we find that if a pair of nodes connect to each other in the current network, they will have a higher probability to connect common nodes both in the current and the future networks-and the probability will decrease with the increase of the number of neighbors. Furthermore, we find that the original networks have their particular structure and statistical characteristics which benefit link prediction. In weighted networks, the prediction algorithm performance of networks which are dominated by human factors decrease with the decrease of weight and are in general better in static networks. Furthermore, we find that geographical position and link weight both have significant influence on the transport network. Moreover, the evolving financial network has the lowest predictability. In addition, we find that the structure of non-social networks has more robustness than social networks. The structure of engineering networks has both best predictability and also robustness.

  19. Estimates of the statistical two-dimensional spatial structure in rain over a small network of disdrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, A. R.; Larsen, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    Microphysical understanding of the variability in rain requires a statistical characterization of different drop sizes both in time and in all dimensions of space. Temporally, there have been several statistical characterizations of raindrop counts. However, temporal and spatial structures are neither equivalent nor readily translatable. While there are recent reports of the one-dimensional spatial correlation functions in rain, they can only be assumed to represent the two-dimensional (2D) correlation function under the assumption of spatial isotropy. To date, however, there are no actual observations of the (2D) spatial correlation function in rain over areas. Two reasons for this deficiency are the fiscal and the physical impossibilities of assembling a dense network of instruments over even hundreds of meters much less over kilometers. Consequently, all measurements over areas will necessarily be sparsely sampled. A dense network of data must then be estimated using interpolations from the available observations. In this work, a network of 19 optical disdrometers over a 100 m by 71 m area yield observations of drop spectra every minute. These are then interpolated to a 1 m resolution grid. Fourier techniques then yield estimates of the 2D spatial correlation functions. Preliminary examples using this technique found that steadier, light rain decorrelates spatially faster than does the convective rain, but in both cases the 2D spatial correlation functions are anisotropic, reflecting an asymmetry in the physical processes influencing the rain reaching the ground not accounted for in numerical microphysical models.

  20. Modeling and Analysis of Modular Structure in Diverse Biological Networks.

    PubMed

    Bader, Al-Anzi; Sherif, Gerges; Noah, Olsman; Christopher, Ormerod; Georgios, Piliouras; John, Ormerod; Kai, Zinn

    2017-04-07

    Biological networks, like most engineered networks, are not the product of a singular design but rather are the result of a long process of refinement and optimization. Many large real-world networks are comprised of well-defined and meaningful smaller modules. While engineered networks are designed and refined by humans with particular goals in mind, biological networks are created by the selective pressures of evolution. In this paper, we seek to define aspects of network architecture that are shared among different types of evolved biological networks. First, we developed a new mathematical model, the Stochastic Block Model with Path Selection (SBM-PS) that simulates biological network formation based on the selection of edges that increase clustering. SBM-PS can produce modular networks whose properties resemble those of real networks. Second, we analyzed three real networks of very different types, and showed that all three can be fit well by the SBM-PS model. Third, we showed that modular elements within the three networks correspond to meaningful biological structures. The networks chosen for analysis were a proteomic network composed of all proteins required for mitochondrial function in budding yeast, a mesoscale anatomical network composed of axonal connections among regions of the mouse brain, and the connectome of individual neurons in the nematode C. elegans. We find that the three networks have common architectural features, and each can be divided into subnetworks with characteristic topologies that control specific phenotypic outputs.

  1. Health and the Structure of Adolescent Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Steven A.; Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Much research has explored the role of social networks in promoting health through the provision of social support. However, little work has examined how social networks themselves may be structured by health. This article investigates the link between individuals' health and the characteristics of their social network positions.We first develop…

  2. Structure-function clustering in multiplex brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crofts, J. J.; Forrester, M.; O'Dea, R. D.

    2016-10-01

    A key question in neuroscience is to understand how a rich functional repertoire of brain activity arises within relatively static networks of structurally connected neural populations: elucidating the subtle interactions between evoked “functional connectivity” and the underlying “structural connectivity” has the potential to address this. These structural-functional networks (and neural networks more generally) are more naturally described using a multilayer or multiplex network approach, in favour of standard single-layer network analyses that are more typically applied to such systems. In this letter, we address such issues by exploring important structure-function relations in the Macaque cortical network by modelling it as a duplex network that comprises an anatomical layer, describing the known (macro-scale) network topology of the Macaque monkey, and a functional layer derived from simulated neural activity. We investigate and characterize correlations between structural and functional layers, as system parameters controlling simulated neural activity are varied, by employing recently described multiplex network measures. Moreover, we propose a novel measure of multiplex structure-function clustering which allows us to investigate the emergence of functional connections that are distinct from the underlying cortical structure, and to highlight the dependence of multiplex structure on the neural dynamical regime.

  3. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  4. The Structure and Rigidity of Network Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, M. F.; Jacobs, D. J.; DjordjeviĆ, B. R.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Continuous Random Networks * Hand-built CRN models * Computer-built CRN models * Guttman model * Wooten-Weaire method * Constraint Counting * Generic Rigidity Percolation * The pebble game * Two dimensional central force networks * Three dimensional bond bending networks * Surface Floppy Modes * Basic counting techniques * Problems with periodic boundary conditions * Experiments * Bulk materials * Correction for dangling bonds * Silicate networks * Summary * Acknowledgments * References

  5. Structures and Statistics of Citation Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    oriented perspectives, demonstrating how different networks can be extracted from actual text contexts and what can be inferred from the text data... demonstrates the existence of scale power laws in dynamic, real life complex networks and explains the reason behind this phenomenon by the rule of...example, (11) studies the evolution of social networks in scientific collaboration (co-authorship) networks and present results that demonstrate the

  6. Physics textbooks from the viewpoint of network structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Králiková, Petra; Teleki, Aba

    2017-01-01

    We can observe self-organized networks all around us. These networks are, in general, scale invariant networks described by the Bianconi-Barabasi model. The self-organized networks (networks formed naturally when feedback acts on the system) show certain universality. These networks, in simplified models, have scale invariant distribution (Pareto distribution type I) and parameter α has value between 2 and 5. The textbooks are extremely important in the learning process and from this reason we studied physics textbook at the level of sentences and physics terms (bipartite network). The nodes represent physics terms, sentences, and pictures, tables, connected by links (by physics terms and transitional words and transitional phrases). We suppose that learning process are more robust and goes faster and easier if the physics textbook has a structure similar to structures of self-organized networks.

  7. Health and the structure of adolescent social networks.

    PubMed

    Haas, Steven A; Schaefer, David R; Kornienko, Olga

    2010-12-01

    Much research has explored the role of social networks in promoting health through the provision of social support. However, little work has examined how social networks themselves may be structured by health. This article investigates the link between individuals' health and the characteristics of their social network positions. We first develop theoretical predictions for how health may influence the structure of adolescent networks. We then test these predictions using longitudinal analysis of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). We find important relationships between the health status of adolescents and the characteristics of the social network positions within which they are embedded. Overall we find that adolescents in poor health form smaller local networks and occupy less central global positions than their healthy peers. These results also have implications for social network research, expanding the scope of factors responsible for the network positions individuals occupy.

  8. Structural analysis of behavioral networks from the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiss, M. R.; Menczer, F.; Vespignani, A.

    2008-06-01

    In spite of the Internet's phenomenal growth and social impact, many aspects of the collective communication behavior of its users are largely unknown. Understanding the structure and dynamics of the behavioral networks that connect users with each other and with services across the Internet is key to modeling the network and designing future applications. We present a characterization of the properties of the behavioral networks generated by several million users of the Abilene (Internet2) network. Structural features of these networks offer new insights into scaling properties of network activity and ways of distinguishing particular patterns of traffic. For example, we find that the structure of the behavioral network associated with Web activity is characterized by such extreme heterogeneity as to challenge any simple attempt to model Web server traffic.

  9. The National Biomedical Communications Network as a Developing Structure *

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ruth M.

    1971-01-01

    The National Biomedical Communications Network has evolved both from a set of conceptual recommendations over the last twelve years and an accumulation of needs manifesting themselves in the requests of members of the medical community. With a short history of three years this network and its developing structure have exhibited most of the stresses of technology interfacing with customer groups, and of a structure attempting to build itself upon many existing fragmentary unconnected segments of a potentially viable resourcesharing capability. In addition to addressing these topics, the paper treats a design appropriate to any network devoted to information transfer in a special interest user community. It discusses fundamentals of network design, highlighting that network structure most appropriate to a national information network. Examples are given of cost analyses of information services and certain conjectures are offered concerning the roles of national networks. PMID:5542912

  10. Influence of choice of null network on small-world parameters of structural correlation networks.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, S M Hadi; Kesler, Shelli R

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness) have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1) networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP), 2) networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS), and 3) networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR). The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures.

  11. The relevance of network micro-structure for neural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, Volker; Deger, Moritz; Cardanobile, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The activity of cortical neurons is determined by the input they receive from presynaptic neurons. Many previous studies have investigated how specific aspects of the statistics of the input affect the spike trains of single neurons and neurons in recurrent networks. However, typically very simple random network models are considered in such studies. Here we use a recently developed algorithm to construct networks based on a quasi-fractal probability measure which are much more variable than commonly used network models, and which therefore promise to sample the space of recurrent networks in a more exhaustive fashion than previously possible. We use the generated graphs as the underlying network topology in simulations of networks of integrate-and-fire neurons in an asynchronous and irregular state. Based on an extensive dataset of networks and neuronal simulations we assess statistical relations between features of the network structure and the spiking activity. Our results highlight the strong influence that some details of the network structure have on the activity dynamics of both single neurons and populations, even if some global network parameters are kept fixed. We observe specific and consistent relations between activity characteristics like spike-train irregularity or correlations and network properties, for example the distributions of the numbers of in- and outgoing connections or clustering. Exploiting these relations, we demonstrate that it is possible to estimate structural characteristics of the network from activity data. We also assess higher order correlations of spiking activity in the various networks considered here, and find that their occurrence strongly depends on the network structure. These results provide directions for further theoretical studies on recurrent networks, as well as new ways to interpret spike train recordings from neural circuits. PMID:23761758

  12. Exploring community structure in biological networks with random graphs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community structure is ubiquitous in biological networks. There has been an increased interest in unraveling the community structure of biological systems as it may provide important insights into a system’s functional components and the impact of local structures on dynamics at a global scale. Choosing an appropriate community detection algorithm to identify the community structure in an empirical network can be difficult, however, as the many algorithms available are based on a variety of cost functions and are difficult to validate. Even when community structure is identified in an empirical system, disentangling the effect of community structure from other network properties such as clustering coefficient and assortativity can be a challenge. Results Here, we develop a generative model to produce undirected, simple, connected graphs with a specified degrees and pattern of communities, while maintaining a graph structure that is as random as possible. Additionally, we demonstrate two important applications of our model: (a) to generate networks that can be used to benchmark existing and new algorithms for detecting communities in biological networks; and (b) to generate null models to serve as random controls when investigating the impact of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and modularity in empirical biological networks. Conclusion Our model allows for the systematic study of the presence of community structure and its impact on network function and dynamics. This process is a crucial step in unraveling the functional consequences of the structural properties of biological systems and uncovering the mechanisms that drive these systems. PMID:24965130

  13. Multiple regimes of robust patterns between network structure and biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jover, Luis F.; Flores, Cesar O.; Cortez, Michael H.; Weitz, Joshua S.

    2015-12-01

    Ecological networks such as plant-pollinator and host-parasite networks have structured interactions that define who interacts with whom. The structure of interactions also shapes ecological and evolutionary dynamics. Yet, there is significant ongoing debate as to whether certain structures, e.g., nestedness, contribute positively, negatively or not at all to biodiversity. We contend that examining variation in life history traits is key to disentangling the potential relationship between network structure and biodiversity. Here, we do so by analyzing a dynamic model of virus-bacteria interactions across a spectrum of network structures. Consistent with prior studies, we find plausible parameter domains exhibiting strong, positive relationships between nestedness and biodiversity. Yet, the same model can exhibit negative relationships between nestedness and biodiversity when examined in a distinct, plausible region of parameter space. We discuss steps towards identifying when network structure could, on its own, drive the resilience, sustainability, and even conservation of ecological communities.

  14. Basement blocks and basin inversion structures mapped using reprocessed Gulfrex 2D seismic data, Caribbean-South American oblique collisional zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalona, A.; Sena, A.; Mann, P.

    2003-12-01

    We have reprocessed and reinterpreted more than 10,000 km of "Gulfrex" multi-channel 2D seismic reflection lines collected by Gulf Oil Corporation in 1972 along the northern margin of South America (offshore Venezuela and Trinidad). These digital data were donated to the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics and represent the largest single, digital reflection survey of the region. Reprocessing of these data included: format correction, filtering, post-stack multiple suppression, and fk migration. Reprocessed data were loaded and interpreted on a workstation. The data straddle a 2,000,000 km2 zone of Paleocene-Recent, time-transgressive, oblique collision between the Caribbean arc system and the passive continental margin of northern South America. Free-air, satellite gravity data shows the remarkable 1000-km-scale continuity of four basement ridges between the uncollided part of the Caribbean arc system (NS-trending Lesser Antilles arc) and the EW-trending collisional area north of Venezuela. The basement ridges involved in the Venezuelan collisional zone include: 1) Aruba-Bonaire-Curacao ridge that can be traced as a continuous feature to the Aves ridge remnant arc of the Lesser Antilles; 2) the partially inverted Blanquilla-Bonaire basin that can be traced into the Grenada back-arc basin; 3) Margarita-Los Testigos platform that can be traced to the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc; and 4) foreland basins and fold-thrust belts of eastern Venezuela (Serrania del Interior and Maturin basin) that can be traced to the Tobago forearc basin and Barbados accretionary prism. Gulfrex data document the progressive change of basinal fault systems from NS-striking normal faults formed in extensional, Lesser Antilles intra-arc settings to rotated and inverted, NE and EW-striking normal faults deformed in the collisional area north of Venezuela. Age of initial shortening of basinal areas and inversion of normal faults setting does not follow the simple, expected pattern of

  15. Structural factoring approach for analyzing stochastic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Shier, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of finding the distribution of the shortest path length through a stochastic network is investigated. A general algorithm for determining the exact distribution of the shortest path length is developed based on the concept of conditional factoring, in which a directed, stochastic network is decomposed into an equivalent set of smaller, generally less complex subnetworks. Several network constructs are identified and exploited to reduce significantly the computational effort required to solve a network problem relative to complete enumeration. This algorithm can be applied to two important classes of stochastic path problems: determining the critical path distribution for acyclic networks and the exact two-terminal reliability for probabilistic networks. Computational experience with the algorithm was encouraging and allowed the exact solution of networks that have been previously analyzed only by approximation techniques.

  16. 3DProIN: Protein-Protein Interaction Networks and Structure Visualization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Liu, Chunmei

    2014-06-14

    3DProIN is a computational tool to visualize protein-protein interaction networks in both two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) view. It models protein-protein interactions in a graph and explores the biologically relevant features of the tertiary structures of each protein in the network. Properties such as color, shape and name of each node (protein) of the network can be edited in either 2D or 3D views. 3DProIN is implemented using 3D Java and C programming languages. The internet crawl technique is also used to parse dynamically grasped protein interactions from protein data bank (PDB). It is a java applet component that is embedded in the web page and it can be used on different platforms including Linux, Mac and Window using web browsers such as Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome and Safari. It also was converted into a mac app and submitted to the App store as a free app. Mac users can also download the app from our website. 3DProIN is available for academic research at http://bicompute.appspot.com.

  17. Exploring network structure, dynamics, and function using networkx

    SciTech Connect

    Hagberg, Aric; Swart, Pieter; S Chult, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    NetworkX is a Python language package for exploration and analysis of networks and network algorithms. The core package provides data structures for representing many types of networks, or graphs, including simple graphs, directed graphs, and graphs with parallel edges and self loops. The nodes in NetworkX graphs can be any (hashable) Python object and edges can contain arbitrary data; this flexibility mades NetworkX ideal for representing networks found in many different scientific fields. In addition to the basic data structures many graph algorithms are implemented for calculating network properties and structure measures: shortest paths, betweenness centrality, clustering, and degree distribution and many more. NetworkX can read and write various graph formats for eash exchange with existing data, and provides generators for many classic graphs and popular graph models, such as the Erdoes-Renyi, Small World, and Barabasi-Albert models, are included. The ease-of-use and flexibility of the Python programming language together with connection to the SciPy tools make NetworkX a powerful tool for scientific computations. We discuss some of our recent work studying synchronization of coupled oscillators to demonstrate how NetworkX enables research in the field of computational networks.

  18. Structural comparison of biological networks based on dominant vertices.

    PubMed

    Luna, Beatriz; Galán-Vásquez, Edgardo; Ugalde, Edgardo; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino

    2013-07-01

    It is a current practice to organize biological data in a network structure where vertices represent biological components and arrows represent their interactions. A great diversity of graph theoretical notions, such as clustering coefficient, network motifs, centrality, degree distribution, etc., have been developed in order to characterize the structure of these networks. However, none of the existent characterizations allow us to determine global similarity among networks of different sizes. It is the aim of the present paper to introduce a mathematical tool to compare networks not only with regard to their topological structure, but also in their dynamical capabilities. For this reason we aim to propose a pseudo-distance between networks, built around the notions of determination and dominancy, concepts recently introduced in the context of regulatory dynamics on networks. We use our proposed pseudo-distance to compare networks from the following bacteria: E. coli, B. subtilis, P. aeruginosa, M. tuberculosis, S. aureus and C. glutamicum. We also use this pseudo-distance to compare these real bacterial networks with equivalent homogeneous, scale-free and geometric three dimensional random networks. We found that even when bacterial networks are characterized with different levels of detail, have different sizes and represent different aspects of the organisms, the proposed pseudo-distance captures all these characteristics, and indicates how similar they are or not from random networks.

  19. Image-Based Structural Modeling of the Cardiac Purkinje Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Benjamin R.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    The Purkinje network is a specialized conduction system within the heart that ensures the proper activation of the ventricles to produce effective contraction. Its role during ventricular arrhythmias is less clear, but some experimental studies have suggested that the Purkinje network may significantly affect the genesis and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmias. Despite its importance, few structural models of the Purkinje network have been developed, primarily because current physical limitations prevent examination of the intact Purkinje network. In previous modeling efforts Purkinje-like structures have been developed through either automated or hand-drawn procedures, but these networks have been created according to general principles rather than based on real networks. To allow for greater realism in Purkinje structural models, we present a method for creating three-dimensional Purkinje networks based directly on imaging data. Our approach uses Purkinje network structures extracted from photographs of dissected ventricles and projects these flat networks onto realistic endocardial surfaces. Using this method, we create models for the combined ventricle-Purkinje system that can fully activate the ventricles through a stimulus delivered to the Purkinje network and can produce simulated activation sequences that match experimental observations. The combined models have the potential to help elucidate Purkinje network contributions during ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26583120

  20. Measuring the robustness of network community structure using assortativity

    PubMed Central

    Shizuka, Daizaburo; Farine, Damien R.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of discrete social clusters, or ‘communities’, is a common feature of social networks in human and nonhuman animals. The level of such community structure in networks is typically measured using an index of modularity, Q. While modularity quantifies the degree to which individuals associate within versus between social communities and provides a useful measure of structure in the social network, it assumes that the network has been well sampled. However, animal social network data is typically subject to sampling errors. In particular, the associations among individuals are often not sampled equally, and animal social network studies are often based on a relatively small set of observations. Here, we extend an existing framework for bootstrapping network metrics to provide a method for assessing the robustness of community assignment in social networks using a metric we call community assortativity (rcom). We use simulations to demonstrate that modularity can reliably detect the transition from random to structured associations in networks that differ in size and number of communities, while community assortativity accurately measures the level of confidence based on the detectability of associations. We then demonstrate the use of these metrics using three publicly available data sets of avian social networks. We suggest that by explicitly addressing the known limitations in sampling animal social network, this approach will facilitate more rigorous analyses of population-level structural patterns across social systems. PMID:26949266

  1. Subsurface structure and tectonic style of the NE Outer Carpathians (Poland) on the basis of integrated 2D interpretation of geological and geophysical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuśmierek, Jan

    2010-02-01

    Integration of the information from surface and subsurface geological exploration (maps and well sections) and results of geological reinterpretation of more than ten archival seismic sections and several dozen magnetotelluric soundings (MT; published and archival) implies a new structural picture of the Carpathian tectogene, interpreted to depths exceeding 10 km. The tectonics of nappes and their basement is illustrated by four regional cross-sections (derived from geological and petroleum-exploration traverses) and examples of detailed interpretation of zones with complicated structure, as well as results of testing the initial structural models with application of the balanced cross-section method and gravimetric modelling. In the tectonics, a complicated system of overthrusts and detachments of sedimentary covers (from their heterogeneous basement) represents a predominant feature. It induced, within particular nappes and tectonically altered structural-facies units, specific systems of narrow folds with diversified geometries. Broad folds of the intermediate structural stage, which are gently sloping in the hinterland of the nappes, were interpreted on the basis of geophysics as paraautochthonous elements. They cover deep-seated faults with large throws, which obliquely or subvertically dip to the SW and were distinguished in the basement on the grounds of extreme contrasts at the resistivity boundaries. Zones of dramatically low resistivities, which separate blocks of the uplifted basement, were interpreted as tectonic sutures with geometry rebuilt in the stage of the Neogene lithosphere subduction. Therefore, the structural layout of the sedimentary cover is characterized by more gently dipping nappe overthrusts of the sequential type and secondary, out-of-sequence thrust slices, most frequently imbricate ones. The flysch covers resting over the tectonic sutures, particularly in margins of inherited structural depressions, are characterized by more

  2. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Austin R.; Gleich, David F.; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms. PMID:27812399

  3. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures.

    PubMed

    Benson, Austin R; Gleich, David F; Leskovec, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms.

  4. Fabrication and investigation of 1D and 2D structures in LiNbO 3 thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriche, F.; Boudrioua, A.; Kremer, R.; Dogheche, E.; Neiss-Clauss, E.; Mouras, R.; Fischer, A.; Beghoul, M.-R.; Fogarassy, E.; Boutaoui, N.

    2010-09-01

    Lithium niobate thin films were deposited on sapphire substrate by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. One and two dimensional structures have been made using a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm and 6 ns pulse width, under various conditions of ablation, in order to assess the applicability of laser direct-writing of photonic waveguides. The optical and waveguiding properties of LiNbO 3 thin films were studied by prism-coupling technique, while micro-Raman spectroscopy was used for structural and composition characterization, as well as laser processing mechanism investigation. The surface morphology of the processed structures was obtained by a Nomarski optical microscope, an atomic force microscope and a White Light Interferometer Microscope.

  5. Commensurate Superstructure of the {Cu(NO3)(H2O)}(HTae)(Bpy) Coordination Polymer: An Example of 2D Hydrogen-Bonding Networks as Magnetic Exchange Pathway.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Luis, Roberto; Larrea, Edurne S; Orive, Joseba; Lezama, Luis; Arriortua, María I

    2016-11-21

    The average and commensurate superstructures of the one-dimensional coordination polymer {Cu(NO3)(H2O)}(HTae)(Bpy) (H2Tae = 1,1,2,2-tetraacetylethane, Bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine) were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and the possible symmetry relations between the space group of the average structure and the superstructure were checked. The crystal structure consists in parallel and oblique {Cu(HTae)(Bpy)} zigzag metal-organic chains stacked along the [100] crystallographic direction. The origin of the fivefold c axis in the commensurate superstructure is ascribed to a commensurate modulation of the coordination environment of the copper atoms. The commensurately ordered nitrate groups and coordinated water molecules establish a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network. Moreover, the crystal structure shows a commensurate to incommensurate transition at room temperature. The release of the coordination water molecules destabilizes the crystal framework, and the compound shows an irreversible structure transformation above 100 °C. Despite the loss of crystallinity, the spectroscopic studies indicate that the main building blocks of the crystal framework are retained after the transformation. The hydrogen-bonding network not only plays a crucial role stabilizing the crystal structure but also is an important pathway for magnetic exchange transmission. In fact, the magnetic susceptibility curves indicate that after the loss of coordinated water molecules, and hence the collapse of the hydrogen-bonding network, the weak anti-ferromagnetic coupling observed in the initial compound is broken. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra are the consequence of the average signals from Cu(II) with different orientations, indicating that the magnetic coupling is effective between them. In fact, X- and Q-band data are reflecting different situations; the X-band spectra show the characteristics of an exchange g-tensor, while the Q-band signals are coming from both

  6. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fry, D C; Byler, D M; Susi, H; Brown, E M; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694], appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase [Sachsenheimer, W., & Schulz, G.E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 23-26], with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of beta-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% alpha-helix, 38% beta-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possibly due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. On this basis, the peptide consists of 35 +/- 10% beta-structure, 60 +/- 12% turns and aperiodic structure, and not more than 10% alpha-helix. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% alpha-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% beta-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformational changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assessed by CD. Detailed assignments of resonances in the peptide spectrum and intermolecular NOEs between protons of bound MgATP and

  7. Syntheses, structures and properties of two 2-D layered hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on different V4O12 building units.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wentao; Guo, Jiuyu; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Zuoxiang; Zhang, Deng; Wan, Hongxiang; Song, You; Zhu, Dunru; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-14

    Two new layered hybrid organic-inorganic compounds [Zn(pyim)]2V4O12 () (pyim = 2-(2-pyridyl)imidazole) and [Cu(bim)2]2V4O12(H2O)·CH3CH2OH () (bim = bis(1-imidazolyl)methane) based on polyoxovanadates (POVs) and organic ligands decorated transition metal units have been synthesized by hydrothermal and solvothermal methods respectively. Single crystal XRD, fluorescence spectrum, magnetic measurement, IR spectra, powder XRD and thermogravimetric (TG) measurements were performed to analyze the structures and properties of and . The structural analysis reveals that compound features a two-dimensional {[Zn(pyim)]2V4O12}n layered structure, constructed by sine wave-like {V4O12}n(4n-) chains, Zn(2+) ions and pyim ligands. In the layered structure of , {V4O12}(4-) circles are connected by Cu(2+) ions to form {Cu(V4O12)}n(2n-) chains, which are further linked by {Cu(bim)4}(2+) subunits to generate a hybrid layer of . The magnetic susceptibility measurement indicates strong antiferromagnetic interactions between Cu(2+) ions in .

  8. Topological effects of network structure on long-term social network dynamics in a wild mammal.

    PubMed

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Booms, Andrew S; Holekamp, Kay E

    2015-07-01

    Social structure influences ecological processes such as dispersal and invasion, and affects survival and reproductive success. Recent studies have used static snapshots of social networks, thus neglecting their temporal dynamics, and focused primarily on a limited number of variables that might be affecting social structure. Here, instead we modelled effects of multiple predictors of social network dynamics in the spotted hyena, using observational data collected during 20 years of continuous field research in Kenya. We tested the hypothesis that the current state of the social network affects its long-term dynamics. We employed stochastic agent-based models that allowed us to estimate the contribution of multiple factors to network changes. After controlling for environmental and individual effects, we found that network density and individual centrality affected network dynamics, but that social bond transitivity consistently had the strongest effects. Our results emphasise the significance of structural properties of networks in shaping social dynamics.

  9. Modeling chemical interaction profiles: I. Spectral data-activity relationship and structure-activity relationship models for inhibitors and non-inhibitors of cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 isozymes.

    PubMed

    McPhail, Brooks; Tie, Yunfeng; Hong, Huixiao; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Ge, Weigong; Valerio, Luis G; Fuscoe, James C; Tong, Weida; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Fowler, Bruce A; Demchuk, Eugene; Beger, Richard D

    2012-03-15

    An interagency collaboration was established to model chemical interactions that may cause adverse health effects when an exposure to a mixture of chemicals occurs. Many of these chemicals--drugs, pesticides, and environmental pollutants--interact at the level of metabolic biotransformations mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. In the present work, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR) and structure-activity relationship (SAR) approaches were used to develop machine-learning classifiers of inhibitors and non-inhibitors of the CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 isozymes. The models were built upon 602 reference pharmaceutical compounds whose interactions have been deduced from clinical data, and 100 additional chemicals that were used to evaluate model performance in an external validation (EV) test. SDAR is an innovative modeling approach that relies on discriminant analysis applied to binned nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral descriptors. In the present work, both 1D ¹³C and 1D ¹⁵N-NMR spectra were used together in a novel implementation of the SDAR technique. It was found that increasing the binning size of 1D ¹³C-NMR and ¹⁵N-NMR spectra caused an increase in the tenfold cross-validation (CV) performance in terms of both the rate of correct classification and sensitivity. The results of SDAR modeling were verified using SAR. For SAR modeling, a decision forest approach involving from 6 to 17 Mold2 descriptors in a tree was used. Average rates of correct classification of SDAR and SAR models in a hundred CV tests were 60% and 61% for CYP3A4, and 62% and 70% for CYP2D6, respectively. The rates of correct classification of SDAR and SAR models in the EV test were 73% and 86% for CYP3A4, and 76% and 90% for CYP2D6, respectively. Thus, both SDAR and SAR methods demonstrated a comparable performance in modeling a large set of structurally diverse data. Based on unique NMR structural descriptors, the new SDAR modeling method complements the existing SAR

  10. Stochastic margin-based structure learning of Bayesian network classifiers.

    PubMed

    Pernkopf, Franz; Wohlmayr, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The margin criterion for parameter learning in graphical models gained significant impact over the last years. We use the maximum margin score for discriminatively optimizing the structure of Bayesian network classifiers. Furthermore, greedy hill-climbing and simulated annealing search heuristics are applied to determine the classifier structures. In the experiments, we demonstrate the advantages of maximum margin optimized Bayesian network structures in terms of classification performance compared to traditionally used discriminative structure learning methods. Stochastic simulated annealing requires less score evaluations than greedy heuristics. Additionally, we compare generative and discriminative parameter learning on both generatively and discriminatively structured Bayesian network classifiers. Margin-optimized Bayesian network classifiers achieve similar classification performance as support vector machines. Moreover, missing feature values during classification can be handled by discriminatively optimized Bayesian network classifiers, a case where purely discriminative classifiers usually require mechanisms to complete unknown feature values in the data first.

  11. Multicast and Bulk Lookup in Structured Overlay Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsi, Ali

    Structured overlay networks are often used to implement a Distributed Hash Table (DHT) abstraction. In this chapter, we argue that structured overlay networks are suitable for doing efficient group communication. We provide algorithms that enable a node to efficiently broadcast a message to all other nodes in a structured overlay network, without inducing any redundant messages. We also provide algorithms that enasble any node to efficiently send a message to all nodes in a specified set of identifiers. Such algorithms have found usage in many structured overlay networks that implement range queries. Similarly, we provide algorithms that enable any node to efficiently send a message to the nodes responsible for any of the identifiers in a specified set of identifiers. Finally, we look at a case study of implementing efficient Application Level Multicast (ALM) using the group communication algorithms on top of structured overlay networks.

  12. Stochastic margin-based structure learning of Bayesian network classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Pernkopf, Franz; Wohlmayr, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The margin criterion for parameter learning in graphical models gained significant impact over the last years. We use the maximum margin score for discriminatively optimizing the structure of Bayesian network classifiers. Furthermore, greedy hill-climbing and simulated annealing search heuristics are applied to determine the classifier structures. In the experiments, we demonstrate the advantages of maximum margin optimized Bayesian network structures in terms of classification performance compared to traditionally used discriminative structure learning methods. Stochastic simulated annealing requires less score evaluations than greedy heuristics. Additionally, we compare generative and discriminative parameter learning on both generatively and discriminatively structured Bayesian network classifiers. Margin-optimized Bayesian network classifiers achieve similar classification performance as support vector machines. Moreover, missing feature values during classification can be handled by discriminatively optimized Bayesian network classifiers, a case where purely discriminative classifiers usually require mechanisms to complete unknown feature values in the data first. PMID:24511159

  13. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  14. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  15. Network versus portfolio structure in financial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Teruyoshi

    2013-10-01

    The question of how to stabilize financial systems has attracted considerable attention since the global financial crisis of 2007-2009. Recently, Beale et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 12647 (2011)] demonstrated that higher portfolio diversity among banks would reduce systemic risk by decreasing the risk of simultaneous defaults at the expense of a higher likelihood of individual defaults. In practice, however, a bank default has an externality in that it undermines other banks’ balance sheets. This paper explores how each of these different sources of risk, simultaneity risk and externality, contributes to systemic risk. The results show that the allocation of external assets that minimizes systemic risk varies with the topology of the financial network as long as asset returns have negative correlations. In the model, a well-known centrality measure, PageRank, reflects an appropriately defined “infectiveness” of a bank. An important result is that the most infective bank needs not always to be the safest bank. Under certain circumstances, the most infective node should act as a firewall to prevent large-scale collective defaults. The introduction of a counteractive portfolio structure will significantly reduce systemic risk.

  16. Structural permeability of complex networks to control signals

    PubMed Central

    Lo Iudice, Francesco; Garofalo, Franco; Sorrentino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Many biological, social and technological systems can be described as complex networks. The goal of affecting their behaviour has motivated recent work focusing on the relationship between the network structure and its propensity to be controlled. While this work has provided insight into several relevant problems, a comprehensive approach to address partial and complete controllability of networks is still lacking. Here, we bridge this gap by developing a framework to maximize the diffusion of the control signals through a network, while taking into account physical and economic constraints that inevitably arise in applications. This approach allows us to introduce the network permeability, a unified metric of the propensity of a network to be controllable. The analysis of the permeability of several synthetic and real networks enables us to extract some structural features that deepen our quantitative understanding of the ease with which specific controllability requirements can be met. PMID:26391186

  17. Structural determination of prunusins A and B, new C-alkylated flavonoids from Prunus domestica, by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Azhar; Fatima, Itrat; Kosar, Shaheen; Ahmed, Rehana; Malik, Abdul

    2010-02-01

    Prunusins A (1) and B (2), the new C-alkylated flavonoids, have been isolated from the seed kernels of Prunus domestica. Their structures were assigned from (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonating spectra, DEPT and by correlation spectroscopy, HMQC and HMBC experiments. 3, 5, 7, 4'-Tetrahydroxyflavone (3) and 3, 5, 7-trihydroxy-8, 4'-dimethoxyflavone (4) have also been reported from this species. Both compounds (1) and (2) showed significant antifungal activity against pathogenic fungus Trichophyton simmi.

  18. Integrated well log and 2-D seismic data interpretation to image the subsurface stratigraphy and structure in north-eastern Bornu (Chad) basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isyaku, Aminu A.; Rust, Derek; Teeuw, Richard; Whitworth, Malcolm

    2016-09-01

    Structural and stratigraphic mapping within the Bornu Basin in north east Nigeria was commonly carried out using traditional field geological methods. However, such traditional approaches remain inadequate in the semi-arid region characterised by topographically flat areas and lack of continuous bedrock outcrops that are mostly concealed beneath sand cover. Previous studies in the north-eastern part of the basin carried out using ditch cuttings from few wells and disconnected seismic data were largely inadequate and the resulting stratigraphic analyses were more often generalised. This paper presents an integrated structural and stratigraphic study of the basin using combined subsurface geophysical datasets. A Combined Log Pattern (CLP) method is a well log analysis, which utilises various well log data including gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and sonic logs to identify lithology and stratigraphic boundaries of subsurface formations. This method is applied to constrain the subsurface stratigraphy of the north-eastern part of the Bornu Basin bordering the Lake Chad. In addition to qualitative combined well log analysis, the time-depth relationship of the sonic log and seismic data was quantitatively determined by tying a well with an intersecting seismic section to validate the stratigraphic facies horizons identified. Four well log facies and their environments of deposition were characterised from the combined well log analysis of the different log types. It is discovered that the Cretaceous basement structural features controlled the deposition of overlying formations in the basin. Without intact core data, the shallower wells were discovered to have bottomed over subsurface horst features while deeper wells penetrated into the basal facies contained mainly within the grabens. Main subsurface structural lineaments in the area include NW-SE, NE-SW and NNW-SSE trending faults, which mainly formed the horst and graben features. Some stratigraphic formations

  19. Magnetic structure and domain conversion of the quasi-2D frustrated antiferromagnet CuCrO{sub 2} probed by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sakhratov, Yu. A.; Svistov, L. E.; Kuhns, P. L.; Zhou, H. D.; Reyes, A. P.

    2014-11-15

    We have carried out {sup 63,65}Cu NMR spectra measurements in a magnetic field up to about 15.5 T on a single crystal of the multiferroic triangular-lattice antiferromagnet CuCrO{sub 2}. The measurements were performed for perpendicular and parallel orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the c axis of the crystal, and the detailed angle dependence of the spectra on the magnetic field direction in the ab plane was studied. The shape of the spectra can be well described in the model of spiral spin structure proposed by recent neutron diffraction experiments. When the field is rotated perpendicular to the crystal c axis, we observed, directly for the first time, a remarkable reorientation of the spin plane simultaneous with rotation of the incommensurate wavevector, by quantitatively deducing the conversion of the energetically less favorable domain to a more favorable one. At high enough fields parallel to the c axis, the data are consistent with either a field-induced commensurate spiral magnetic structure or an incommensurate spiral magnetic structure with a disorder in the c direction, suggesting that high fields may have influence on interplanar ordering.

  20. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  1. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  2. Structural and robustness properties of smart-city transportation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Zhuo; Fan, Jing-Fang; Meng, Jun; Ding, Yi-Min; Ye, Fang-Fu; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2015-09-01

    The concept of smart city gives an excellent resolution to construct and develop modern cities, and also demands infrastructure construction. How to build a safe, stable, and highly efficient public transportation system becomes an important topic in the process of city construction. In this work, we study the structural and robustness properties of transportation networks and their sub-networks. We introduce a complementary network model to study the relevance and complementarity between bus network and subway network. Our numerical results show that the mutual supplement of networks can improve the network robustness. This conclusion provides a theoretical basis for the construction of public traffic networks, and it also supports reasonable operation of managing smart cities. Project supported by the Major Projects of the China National Social Science Fund (Grant No. 11 & ZD154).

  3. 1D and 2D assembly structures by imidazole···chloride hydrogen bonds of iron(II) complexes [Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))3]Cl·Y (HL(n-Pr) = 2-methylimidazol-4-yl-methylideneamino-n-propyl; Y = AsF6, BF4) and their spin states.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Takeshi; Nishi, Koshiro; Matsumoto, Naohide; Iijima, Seiichiro; Halcrow, Malcolm A; Sunatsuki, Yukinari; Kojima, Masaaki

    2011-12-07

    Two Fe(II) complexes fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)]Cl·Y (Y = AsF(6) (1) and BF(4) (2)) were synthesized, where HL(n-Pr) is 2-methylimidazole-4-yl-methylideneamino-n-propyl. Each complex-cation has the same octahedral N(6) geometry coordinated by three bidentate ligands and assumes facial-isomerism, fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) with Δ- and Λ-enantiomorphs. Three imidazole groups per Δ- or Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) are hydrogen-bonded to three Cl(-) ions or, from the viewpoint of the Cl(-) ion, one Cl(-) ion is hydrogen-bonded to three neighbouring fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) cations. The 3 : 3 NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds between Δ- or Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) and Cl(-) generate two kinds of assembly structures. The directions of the 3 : 3 NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds and hence the resulting assembly structures are determined by the size of the anion Y, though Y is not involved into the network structure and just accommodated in the cavity. Compound 1 has a 1D ladder structure giving a larger cavity, in which the Δ- and Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) enantiomorphs are bridged by two NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds. Compound 2 has a 2D network structure with a net unit of a cyclic trimer of {fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+)···Cl(-)}(3) giving a smaller cavity, in which Δ- or Λ-fac-[Fe(II)(HL(n-Pr))(3)](2+) species with the same chirality are linked by NH···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds to give a homochiral 2D network structure. Magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectral measurements demonstrated that compound 1 showed an abrupt one-step spin crossover with 4.0 K thermal hysteresis of T(c↓) = 125.5 K and T(c↑) = 129.5 K and compound 2 showed no spin transition and stayed in the high-spin state over the 5-300 K temperature range.

  4. The Growth Mechanism of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by using Sulfurization of Pre-deposited Transition Metals and the 2D Crystal Hetero-structure Establishment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chong-Rong; Chang, Xiang-Rui; Wu, Chao-Hsin; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2017-01-01

    A growth model is proposed for the large-area and uniform MoS2 film grown by using sulfurization of pre-deposited Mo films on sapphire substrates. During the sulfurization procedure, the competition between the two mechanisms of the Mo oxide segregation to form small clusters and the sulfurization reaction to form planar MoS2 film is determined by the amount of background sulfur. Small Mo oxide clusters are observed under the sulfur deficient condition, while large-area and complete MoS2 films are obtained under the sulfur sufficient condition. Precise layer number controllability is also achieved by controlling the pre-deposited Mo film thicknesses. The drain currents in positive dependence on the layer numbers of the MoS2 transistors with 1-, 3- and 5- layer MoS2 have demonstrated small variation in material characteristics between each MoS2 layer prepared by using this growth technique. By sequential transition metal deposition and sulfurization procedures, a WS2/MoS2/WS2 double hetero-structure is demonstrated. Large-area growth, layer number controllability and the possibility of hetero-structure establishment by using sequential metal deposition and following sulfurization procedures have revealed the potential of this growth technique for practical applications. PMID:28176836

  5. Cornered Quadtrees/Octrees and Multiple Gateways Between Each Two Nodes; A Structure for Path Planning in 2D and 3D Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdari, Mohammad Hasan; Hejazi, Seyed Reza; Palhang, Maziar

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, modified versions of quadtree/octree, as structures used in path planning, are proposed which we call them cornered quadtree/octree. Also a new method of creating paths in quadtrees/octrees, once quadrants/octants to be passed are determined, is proposed both to improve traveled distance and path smoothness. In proposed modified versions of quadtree/octree, four corner cells of quadrants and eight corner voxels of octants are also considered as nodes of the graph to be searched for finding the shortest path. This causes better quadrant/octant selection during graph search relative to simple quadtrees and octrees. On the other hand, after that all quadrants/octants are determined, multiple gateways are nominated between each two selected nodes and path is constructed by passing through the gateway which its selection leads in shorter and smoother path. Proposed structures in this paper alongside the utilized path construction approach, creates better paths in terms of path length than those created if simple trees are used, somehow equal to the quality of the achieved paths by framed trees, meanwhile interestingly, consumed time and memory in our proposed method are closer to the used time and memory if simple trees are used.

  6. The Growth Mechanism of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by using Sulfurization of Pre-deposited Transition Metals and the 2D Crystal Hetero-structure Establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chong-Rong; Chang, Xiang-Rui; Wu, Chao-Hsin; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2017-02-01

    A growth model is proposed for the large-area and uniform MoS2 film grown by using sulfurization of pre-deposited Mo films on sapphire substrates. During the sulfurization procedure, the competition between the two mechanisms of the Mo oxide segregation to form small clusters and the sulfurization reaction to form planar MoS2 film is determined by the amount of background sulfur. Small Mo oxide clusters are observed under the sulfur deficient condition, while large-area and complete MoS2 films are obtained under the sulfur sufficient condition. Precise layer number controllability is also achieved by controlling the pre-deposited Mo film thicknesses. The drain currents in positive dependence on the layer numbers of the MoS2 transistors with 1-, 3- and 5- layer MoS2 have demonstrated small variation in material characteristics between each MoS2 layer prepared by using this growth technique. By sequential transition metal deposition and sulfurization procedures, a WS2/MoS2/WS2 double hetero-structure is demonstrated. Large-area growth, layer number controllability and the possibility of hetero-structure establishment by using sequential metal deposition and following sulfurization procedures have revealed the potential of this growth technique for practical applications.

  7. Covariance, correlation matrix, and the multiscale community structure of networks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Xue-Qi; Fang, Bin-Xing

    2010-07-01

    Empirical studies show that real world networks often exhibit multiple scales of topological descriptions. However, it is still an open problem how to identify the intrinsic multiple scales of networks. In this paper, we consider detecting the multiscale community structure of network from the perspective of dimension reduction. According to this perspective, a covariance matrix of network is defined to uncover the multiscale community structure through the translation and rotation transformations. It is proved that the covariance matrix is the unbiased version of the well-known modularity matrix. We then point out that the translation and rotation transformations fail to deal with the heterogeneous network, which is very common in nature and society. To address this problem, a correlation matrix is proposed through introducing the rescaling transformation into the covariance matrix. Extensive tests on real world and artificial networks demonstra