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Sample records for 2d nmr experiments

  1. In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Müntener, Thomas; Häussinger, Daniel; Selenko, Philipp; Theillet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-21

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples (∼50 μM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures. PMID:27379949

  2. Novel 2D Triple-Resonance NMR Experiments for Sequential Resonance Assignments of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Keyang; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2002-06-01

    We present 2D versions of the popular triple resonance HN(CO) CACB, HN(COCA)CACB, HN(CO)CAHA, and HN(COCA) CAHA experiments, commonly used for sequential resonance assignments of proteins. These experiments provide information about correlations between amino proton and nitrogen chemical shifts and the α- and β-carbon and α-proton chemical shifts within and between amino acid residues. Using these 2D spectra, sequential resonance assignments of H N, N, C α, C β, and H α nuclei are easily achieved. The resolution of these spectra is identical to the well-resolved 2D 15N- 1H HSQC and H(NCO)CA spectra, with slightly reduced sensitivity compared to their 3D and 4D versions. These types of spectra are ideally suited for exploitation in automated assignment procedures and thereby constitute a fast and efficient means for NMR structural determination of small and medium-sized proteins in solution in structural genomics programs.

  3. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  4. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.

  5. Hartmann-Hahn 2D-map to optimize the RAMP-CPMAS NMR experiment for pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuko; Martineau, Charlotte; Fink, Gerhard; Steuernagel, Stefan; Taulelle, Francis

    2012-02-01

    Cross polarization-magic angle spinning (CPMAS) is the most used experiment for solid-state NMR measurements in the pharmaceutical industry, with the well-known variant RAMP-CPMAS its dominant implementation. The experimental work presented in this contribution focuses on the entangled effects of the main parameters of such an experiment. The shape of the RAMP-CP pulse has been considered as well as the contact time duration, and a particular attention also has been devoted to the radio-frequency (RF) field inhomogeneity. (13)C CPMAS NMR spectra have been recorded with a systematic variation of (13)C and (1)H constant radiofrequency field pair values and represented as a Hartmann-Hahn matching two-dimensional map. Such a map yields a rational overview of the intricate optimal conditions necessary to achieve an efficient CP magnetization transfer. The map also highlights the effects of sweeping the RF by the RAMP-CP pulse on the number of Hartmann-Hahn matches crossed and how RF field inhomogeneity helps in increasing the CP efficiency by using a larger fraction of the sample. In the light of the results, strategies for optimal RAMP-CPMAS measurements are suggested, which lead to a much higher efficiency than constant amplitude CP experiment. PMID:22367881

  6. Reduced dimensionality (3,2)D NMR experiments and their automated analysis: implications to high-throughput structural studies on proteins.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jithender G; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2015-02-01

    Protein NMR spectroscopy has expanded dramatically over the last decade into a powerful tool for the study of their structure, dynamics, and interactions. The primary requirement for all such investigations is sequence-specific resonance assignment. The demand now is to obtain this information as rapidly as possible and in all types of protein systems, stable/unstable, soluble/insoluble, small/big, structured/unstructured, and so on. In this context, we introduce here two reduced dimensionality experiments – (3,2)D-hNCOcanH and (3,2)D-hNcoCAnH – which enhance the previously described 2D NMR-based assignment methods quite significantly. Both the experiments can be recorded in just about 2-3 h each and hence would be of immense value for high-throughput structural proteomics and drug discovery research. The applicability of the method has been demonstrated using alpha-helical bovine apo calbindin-D9k P43M mutant (75 aa) protein. Automated assignment of this data using AUTOBA has been presented, which enhances the utility of these experiments. The backbone resonance assignments so derived are utilized to estimate secondary structures and the backbone fold using Web-based algorithms. Taken together, we believe that the method and the protocol proposed here can be used for routine high-throughput structural studies of proteins. PMID:25178811

  7. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  8. Simultaneous Acquisition of 2D and 3D Solid-State NMR Experiments for Sequential Assignment of Oriented Membrane Protein Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, T.; Mote, Kaustubh R; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins aligned in mechanically or magnetically lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living 15N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through 15N-15N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish 15N-15N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR-mixing experiments. PMID:25749871

  9. Simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR experiments for sequential assignment of oriented membrane protein samples.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, T; Mote, Kaustubh R; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins reconstituted in mechanically or magnetically aligned lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living (15)N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through (15)N-(15)N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish (15)N-(15)N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR-mixing experiments. PMID:25749871

  10. Synthesis and Resolution of the Atropisomeric 1,1'-Bi-2-Naphthol: An Experiment in Organic Synthesis and 2-D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.

    2004-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is presented. It is seen that the experiment regarding the synthesis and resolution of 1,1'-Bi-2-naphtol presents a good experiment for teaching organic synthesis and NMR spectroscopy and provides a strategy for obtaining enantiopure compounds from achiral starting materials.

  11. Isolation and 2D NMR Studies of Alkaloids from Comptonella sessilifoliola1.

    PubMed

    Pusset, J; Lopez, J L; Pais, M; Neirabeyeh, M A; Veillon, J M

    1991-04-01

    Six known furanoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated from the wood and trunk bark of COMPTONELLA SESSILIFOLIOLA (Guillaumin) Hartley (Rutaceae). 2D NMR experiments gave the assignment of all the signals for both (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. Pteleine and kokusaginine were used as models. The two-dimensional carbon-proton correlation experiments, performed for the first time on furanoquinoline alkaloids, led us to correct (13)C-NMR assignments previously described in the literature. PMID:17226139

  12. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  13. Characterization of Porous Medium Properties Using 2D NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Boqin; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2003-03-01

    We have successfully applied the concept of 2D NMR to the characterization of properties of fluid-saturated porous medium. Using a two-windowed modified CPMG pulse sequence, we were able to explore the magnetic internal filed gradient distribution within the pore space of a fluid-saturated porous medium due to magnetic susceptibility contrast between the solid matrix and pore fluid. Similar scheme is used to identify and quantify different types of pore fluids, such as oil, water, and gas, based on the contrast in their diffusion coefficients. The magic angle spinning technique (MAS) can also be applied in the 2D NMR framework for delineating the chemical shift spectra of the pore fluids in a porous medium at different T1 or T2 relaxation times. The results can be displayed in a two-dimensional plot, with one axis being the T1 or T2 relaxation times, the other axis being the internal field gradient, diffusion coefficient, or chemical shift, and the third axis being the proton population. Our preliminary laboratory work indicates that the 2D NMR approach can be a powerful tool for the characterization of properties of fluid-saturated porous medium, such as fluid typing, oil viscosity determination, surface wettability, etc.

  14. 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening reveals polyketides in ladybugs

    PubMed Central

    Deyrup, Stephen T.; Eckman, Laura E.; McCarthy, Patrick H.; Smedley, Scott R.; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Small molecules of biological origin continue to yield the most promising leads for drug design, but systematic approaches for exploring nature’s cache of structural diversity are lacking. Here, we demonstrate the use of 2D NMR spectroscopy to screen a library of biorationally selected insect metabolite samples for partial structures indicating the presence of new chemical entities. This NMR-spectroscopic survey enabled detection of novel compounds in complex metabolite mixtures without prior fractionation or isolation. Our screen led to discovery and subsequent isolation of two families of tricyclic pyrones in Delphastus catalinae, a tiny ladybird beetle that is employed commercially as a biological pest control agent. The D. catalinae pyrones are based on 23-carbon polyketide chains forming 1,11-dioxo-2,6,10-trioxaanthracene and 4,8-dioxo-1,9,13-trioxaanthracene derivatives, representing ring systems not previously found in nature. This study highlights the utility of 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening for exploring nature’s structure space and suggests that insect metabolomes remain vastly underexplored. PMID:21646540

  15. 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening reveals polyketides in ladybugs.

    PubMed

    Deyrup, Stephen T; Eckman, Laura E; McCarthy, Patrick H; Smedley, Scott R; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C

    2011-06-14

    Small molecules of biological origin continue to yield the most promising leads for drug design, but systematic approaches for exploring nature's cache of structural diversity are lacking. Here, we demonstrate the use of 2D NMR spectroscopy to screen a library of biorationally selected insect metabolite samples for partial structures indicating the presence of new chemical entities. This NMR-spectroscopic survey enabled detection of novel compounds in complex metabolite mixtures without prior fractionation or isolation. Our screen led to discovery and subsequent isolation of two families of tricyclic pyrones in Delphastus catalinae, a tiny ladybird beetle that is employed commercially as a biological pest control agent. The D. catalinae pyrones are based on 23-carbon polyketide chains forming 1,11-dioxo-2,6,10-trioxaanthracene and 4,8-dioxo-1,9,13-trioxaanthracene derivatives, representing ring systems not previously found in nature. This study highlights the utility of 2D NMR-spectroscopic screening for exploring nature's structure space and suggests that insect metabolomes remain vastly underexplored. PMID:21646540

  16. Fluorine detected 2D NMR experiments for the practical determination of size and sign of homonuclear F-F and heteronuclear C-F multiple bond J-coupling constants in multiple fluorinated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Dvortsak, Peter; Jaeger, Martin; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-06-01

    The use of fluorine in molecules obtained from chemical synthesis has become increasingly important within the pharmaceutical and agricultural industry. NMR characterization of these compounds is of great value with respect to their structure elucidation, their screening in metabolomics investigations and binding studies. The favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus make NMR with fluorine detection of great value in this respect. A suite of NMR 2D F-F- and F-C-correlation experiments with fluorine detection was applied to the assignment of resonances, nJCF- and nJFF-couplings as well as the determination of their size and sign. The utilization of this experiment suite was exemplarily demonstrated for a highly fluorinated vinyl alkyl ether. Especially F-C HSQC and J-scaled F-C HMBC experiments allowed determining the size of the J-couplings of this compound. The relative sign of its homo- and heteronuclear couplings was achieved by different combinations of 2D NMR experiments, including non-selective and F2-selective F-C XLOC, F2-selective F-C HMQC, and F-F COSY. The F2-one/two-site selective F-C XLOC versions were found highly useful, as they led to simplifications of the common E.COSY patterns and resulted in a higher confidence level of the assignment by using selective excitation. The combination of F2-one/two-site selective F-C XLOC experiments with a F2-one-site selective F-C HMQC experiment provided the signs of all nJCF- and nJFF-couplings in the vinyl moiety of the test compound. Other combinations of experiments were found useful as well for special purposes when focusing for example on homonuclear couplings a combination of F-F COSY-10 with a F2-one-site selective F-C HMQC could be used. The E.COSY patterns in the spectra demonstrated were analyzed by use of the spin-selective displacement vectors, and in case of the XLOC also by use of the DQ- and ZQ-displacement vectors. The variety of experiments presented shall contribute to facilitate the

  17. Optimizing water hyperpolarization and dissolution for sensitivity-enhanced 2D biomolecular NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Greg; Markhasin, Evgeny; Szekely, Or; Bretschneider, Christian; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    A recent study explored the use of hyperpolarized water, to enhance the sensitivity of nuclei in biomolecules thanks to rapid proton exchanges with labile amide backbone and sidechain groups. Further optimizations of this approach have now allowed us to achieve proton polarizations approaching 25% in the water transferred into the NMR spectrometer, effective water T1 times approaching 40 s, and a reduction in the dilution demanded for the cryogenic dissolution process. Further hardware developments have allowed us to perform these experiments, repeatedly and reliably, in 5 mm NMR tubes. All these ingredients - particularly the ⩾3000× 1H polarization enhancements over 11.7 T thermal counterparts, long T1 times and a compatibility with high-resolution biomolecular NMR setups - augur well for hyperpolarized 2D NMR studies of peptides, unfolded proteins and intrinsically disordered systems undergoing fast exchanges of their protons with the solvent. This hypothesis is here explored by detailing the provisions that lead to these significant improvements over previous reports, and demonstrating 1D coherence transfer experiments and 2D biomolecular HMQC acquisitions delivering NMR spectral enhancements of 100-500× over their optimized, thermally-polarized, counterparts.

  18. Optimizing water hyperpolarization and dissolution for sensitivity-enhanced 2D biomolecular NMR.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Greg; Markhasin, Evgeny; Szekely, Or; Bretschneider, Christian; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    A recent study explored the use of hyperpolarized water, to enhance the sensitivity of nuclei in biomolecules thanks to rapid proton exchanges with labile amide backbone and sidechain groups. Further optimizations of this approach have now allowed us to achieve proton polarizations approaching 25% in the water transferred into the NMR spectrometer, effective water T1 times approaching 40s, and a reduction in the dilution demanded for the cryogenic dissolution process. Further hardware developments have allowed us to perform these experiments, repeatedly and reliably, in 5mm NMR tubes. All these ingredients--particularly the ⩾ 3000× (1)H polarization enhancements over 11.7T thermal counterparts, long T1 times and a compatibility with high-resolution biomolecular NMR setups - augur well for hyperpolarized 2D NMR studies of peptides, unfolded proteins and intrinsically disordered systems undergoing fast exchanges of their protons with the solvent. This hypothesis is here explored by detailing the provisions that lead to these significant improvements over previous reports, and demonstrating 1D coherence transfer experiments and 2D biomolecular HMQC acquisitions delivering NMR spectral enhancements of 100-500× over their optimized, thermally-polarized, counterparts. PMID:26920830

  19. Determination of the Rotational Barrier for Kinetically Stable Conformational Isomers via NMR and 2D TLC: An Introductory Organic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Burns, William G.; Lavin, Judi M.; Chong, Yong S.; Pellechia, Perry; Shimizu, Ken D.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment to determine the rotational barrier about a C[subscript aryl]-N[subscript imide] single bond that is suitable for first-semester organic chemistry students is presented. The investigation begins with the one-step synthesis of a N,N'-diaryl naphthalene diimide, which exists as two room temperature-stable atropisomers (syn and anti).…

  20. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient Gint can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T2 in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of Gint2D and T2 by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between Gint and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz 1H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint2D-T2 maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity.

  1. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient G(int) can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T(2) in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of G(int)(2)D and T(2) by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between G(int) and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz (1)H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint(2)D-T(2) maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity. PMID:25723135

  2. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  3. Application of quantitative artificial neural network analysis to 2D NMR spectra of hydrocarbon mixtures.

    PubMed

    Väänänen, Taito; Koskela, Harri; Hiltunen, Yrjö; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2002-01-01

    Understanding relationships between the structure and composition of molecular mixtures and their chemical properties is a main industrial aim. One central field of research is oil chemistry where the key question is how the molecular characteristics of composite hydrocarbon mixtures can be associated with the macroscopic properties of the oil products. Apparently these relationships are complex and often nonlinear and therefore call for advanced spectroscopic techniques. An informative and an increasingly used approach is two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. In the case of composite hydrocarbons the application of 2D NMR methodologies in a quantitative manner pose many technical difficulties, and, in any case, the resulting spectra contain many overlapping resonances that challenge the analytical work. Here, we present a general methodology, based on quantitative artificial neural network (ANN) analysis, to resolve overlapping information in 2D NMR spectra and to simultaneously assess the relative importance of multiple spectral variables on the sample properties. The results in a set of 2D NMR spectra of oil samples illustrate, first, that use of ANN analysis for quantitative purposes is feasible also in 2D and, second, that this methodology offers an intrinsic opportunity to assess the complex and nonlinear relationships between the molecular composition and sample properties. The presented ANN methodology is not limited to the analysis of NMR spectra but can also be applied in a manner similar to other (multidimensional) spectroscopic data. PMID:12444730

  4. Numerical simulation of ( T 2, T 1) 2D NMR and fluid responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mao-Jin; Zou, You-Long; Zhang, Jin-Yan; Zhao, Xin

    2012-12-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology is limited for fluid typing, while two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) logging can provide more parameters including longitudinal relaxation time ( T 1) and transverse relaxation time ( T 2) relative to fluid types in porous media. Based on the 2D NMR relaxation mechanism in a gradient magnetic field, echo train simulation and 2D NMR inversion are discussed in detail. For 2D NMR inversion, a hybrid inversion method is proposed based on the damping least squares method (LSQR) and an improved truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) algorithm. A series of spin echoes are first simulated with multiple waiting times ( T W s) in a gradient magnetic field for given fluid models and these synthesized echo trains are inverted by the hybrid method. The inversion results are consistent with given models. Moreover, the numerical simulation of various fluid models such as the gas-water, light oil-water, and vicious oil-water models were carried out with different echo spacings ( T E s) and T W s by this hybrid method. Finally, the influences of different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) on inversion results in various fluid models are studied. The numerical simulations show that the hybrid method and optimized observation parameters are applicable to fluid typing of gas-water and oil-water models.

  5. Theory for spiralling ions for 2D FT-ICR and comparison with precessing magnetization vectors in 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Akansha Ashvani; Pelupessy, Philippe; Rolando, Christian; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) offers an approach to mass spectrometry (MS) that pursuits similar objectives as MS/MS experiments. While the latter must focus on one ion species at a time, 2D FT ICR can examine all possible correlations due to ion fragmentation in a single experiment: correlations between precursors, charged and neutral fragments. We revisited the original 2D FT-ICR experiment that has hitherto fallen short of stimulating significant analytical applications, probably because it is technically demanding. These shortcomings can now be overcome by improved FT-ICR instrumentation and computer hard- and software. We seek to achieve a better understanding of the intricacies of the behavior of ions during a basic two-dimensional ICR sequence comprising three simple monochromatic pulses. Through simulations based on Lorentzian equations, we have mapped the ion trajectories for different pulse durations and phases. PMID:26974979

  6. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Combined analysis of C-18 unsaturated fatty acids using natural abundance deuterium 2D NMR spectroscopy in chiral oriented solvents.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Baillif, Vincent; Billault, Isabelle

    2008-04-15

    The quantitative determination of isotopic (2H/1H)i ratios at natural abundance using the SNIF-NMR protocol is a well-known method for understanding the enzymatic biosynthesis of metabolites. However, this approach is not always successful for analyzing large solutes and, specifically, is inadequate for prochiral molecules such as complete essential unsaturated fatty acids. To overcome these analytical limitations, we use the natural abundance deuterium 2D NMR (NAD 2D NMR) spectroscopy on solutes embedded in polypeptide chiral liquid crystals. This approach, recently explored for measuring (2H/1H)i ratios of small analytes (Lesot, P.; Aroulanda, C.; Billault, I. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 2827-2835), is a powerful way to separate the 2H signals of all nonequivalent enantioisotopomers on the basis both of the 2H quadrupolar interactions and of the 2H chemical shift. Two significant advances over our previous work are presented here and allow the complete isotopic analysis of four mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters: methyl oleate (1), methyl linoleate (2), methyl linolenate (3), and methyl vernoleate (4). The first consists of using NMR spectrometers operating at higher magnetic field strength (14.1 T) and equipped with a selective cryoprobe optimized for deuterium nuclei. The second is the development of Q-COSY Fz 2D NMR experiments able to produce phased 2H 2D maps after a double Fourier transformation. This combination of modern hardware and efficient NMR sequences provides a unique tool to analyze the (2H/1H)i ratios of large prochiral molecules (C-18) dissolved in organic solutions of poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) and requires smaller amounts of solute than previous study on fatty acids. For each compound (1-4), all 2H quadrupolar doublets visible in the 2D spectra have been assigned on the basis of 2H chemical shifts, isotopic data obtained from isotropic quantitative NAD NMR, and by an interspectral comparison of the anisotropic NAD spectra of four

  8. Acid epimerization of 20-keto pregnane glycosides is determined by 2D-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    García, Víctor P

    2011-05-01

    Carbohydrates influence many essential biological events such as apoptosis, differentiation, tumor metastasis, cancer, neurobiology, immunology, development, host-pathogen interactions, diabetes, signal transduction, protein folding, and many other contexts. We now report on the structure determination of pregnane glycosides isolated from the aerial parts of Ceropegia fusca Bolle (Asclepiadaceae). The observation of cicatrizant, vulnerary and cytostatic activities in some humans and animals of Ceropegia fusca Bolle, a species endemic to the Canary Islands, encouraged us to begin a pharmacological study to determine their exact therapeutic properties. High resolution (1)H-NMR spectra of pregnane glycosides very often display well-resolved signals that can be used as starting points in several selective NMR experiments to study scalar (J coupling), and dipolar (NOE) interactions. ROESY is especially suited for molecules such that ωτ(c) ~ 1, where τ(c) are the motional correlation times and ω is the angular frequency. In these cases the NOE is nearly zero, while the rotating-frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) is always positive and increases monotonically for increasing values of τ(c). The ROESY shows dipolar interactions cross peaks even in medium-sized molecules which are helpful in unambiguous assignment of all the interglycosidic linkages. Selective excitation was carried out using a double pulsed-field gradient spin-echo sequence (DPFGSE) in which 180° Gaussian pulses are sandwiched between sine shaped z-gradients. Scalar interactions were studied by homonuclear DPFGSE-COSY and DPFGSE-TOCSY experiments, while DPFGSE-ROESY was used to monitor the spatial environment of the selectively excited proton. Dipolar interactions between nuclei close in space can be detected by the 1D GROESY experiment, which is a one-dimensional counterpart of the 2D ROESY method. The C-12 and C-17 configurations were determined by ROESY experiments. PMID:21431831

  9. Gated cardiac NMR imaging and 2D echocardiography in the detection of intracardial neoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Go, R.T.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Salcedo, E.E.; Feiglin, D.H.; Underwood, D.A.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Meaney, T.F.

    1985-05-01

    Noninvasive 2D echocardiography has replaced contrast angiography as the procedure of choice in the diagnosis of intracardiac neoplasm. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intracardiac neoplasm can be detected as well by gated cardiac NMR. Four patients with known intracardiac neoplasm previously diagnosed by 2D echocardiography had gated cardiac NMR imaging using a superconductive 0.6 Tesla magnet. All patients were performed using a Tl weighted spin echo pulse sequence with a TE of 30 msec and TR of one R-R interval. Two-dimensional planar single or multiple slice techniques were used. In one patient, imaging at different times along the R-R interval were performed for cine display. The results of the present study show detection of the intracardiac neoplasm in all four cases by gated cardiac NMR imaging and the results were comparable to 2D echocardiography. The former imaging technique showed superior spatial resolution. Despite its early stage of development, gated cardiac NMR imaging appears at least equal to 2D echocardiography in the detection of intracardiac neoplasm. The availability of multislice coupled with multiframe acquisition techniques now being developed will provide a cinematic display that will be more effective in the display of the tumor in motion within the cardiac chamber involved and facilitate visualization of the relationship of the tumor to adjacent cardiac structures.

  10. 2D NMR spectroscopic analyses of archangelicin from the seeds of Angelica archangelica.

    PubMed

    Muller, Melanie; Byres, Maureenx; Jaspars, Marcel; Kumarasamy, Yashodharan; Middleton, Moira; Nahar, Lutfun; Shoeb, Mohammad; Sarker, Satyajit D

    2004-12-01

    A total of six coumarins, bergapten (1), xanthotoxin (2), imperatorin (3), isoimperatorin (4), phellopterin (5) and archangelicin (6), have been isolated from an n-hexane extract of the seeds of Angelica archangelica. The results of comprehensive 2D NMR analyses of archangelicin are discussed. PMID:15634612

  11. In situ fluid typing and quantification with 1D and 2D NMR logging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqin

    2007-05-01

    In situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fluid typing has recently gained momentum due to data acquisition and inversion algorithm enhancement of NMR logging tools. T(2) distributions derived from NMR logging contain information on bulk fluids and pore size distributions. However, the accuracy of fluid typing is greatly overshadowed by the overlap between T(2) peaks arising from different fluids with similar apparent T(2) relaxation times. Nevertheless, the shapes of T(2) distributions from different fluid components are often different and can be predetermined. Inversion with predetermined T(2) distributions allows us to perform fluid component decomposition to yield individual fluid volume ratios. Another effective method for in situ fluid typing is two-dimensional (2D) NMR logging, which results in proton population distribution as a function of T(2) relaxation time and fluid diffusion coefficient (or T(1) relaxation time). Since diffusion coefficients (or T(1) relaxation time) for different fluid components can be very different, it is relatively easy to separate oil (especially heavy oil) from water signal in a 2D NMR map and to perform accurate fluid typing. Combining NMR logging with resistivity and/or neutron/density logs provides a third method for in situ fluid typing. We shall describe these techniques with field examples. PMID:17466778

  12. GEL-STATE NMR OF BALL-MILLED WHOLE CELL WALLS IN DMSO-d6 USING 2D SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell walls were used for obtaining 2D solution-state NMR spectra without actual solubilization or structural modification. Ball-milled whole cell walls were swelled directly in the NMR tube with DMSO-d6 where they formed a gel. There are relatively few gel-state NMR studies. Most have involved...

  13. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  14. An NMR Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Don; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Outlines advantages of and provides background information, procedures, and typical student data for an experiment determining rate of hydration of p-methyoxyphenylacetylene (III), followed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Reaction rate can be adjusted to meet time framework of a particular laboratory by altering concentration of…

  15. Real-time reaction monitoring by ultrafast 2D NMR on a benchtop spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gouilleux, Boris; Charrier, Benoît; Danieli, Ernesto; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Akoka, Serge; Felpin, François-Xavier; Rodriguez-Zubiri, Mireia; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Reaction monitoring is widely used to follow chemical processes in a broad range of application fields. Recently, the development of robust benchtop NMR spectrometers has brought NMR under the fume hood, making it possible to monitor chemical reactions in a safe and accessible environment. However, these low-field NMR approaches suffer from limited resolution leading to strong peak overlaps, which can limit their application range. Here, we propose an approach capable of recording ultrafast 2D NMR spectra on a compact spectrometer and of following in real time reactions in the synthetic chemistry laboratory. This approach--whose potential is shown here on a Heck-Matsuda reaction--is highly versatile; the duration of the measurement can be optimized to follow reactions whose time scale ranges from between a few tens of seconds to a few hours. It makes it possible to monitor complex reactions in non-deuterated solvents, and to confirm in real time the molecular structure of the compounds involved in the reaction while giving access to relevant kinetic parameters. PMID:26501887

  16. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  17. 2D NMR Methods for Structural Delineation of Copper(II) Complexes of Penicillin and Pilocarpine

    PubMed Central

    Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed for delineating the structure of paramagnetic metal complexes. The selective disappearance of cross-peaks in proton-carbon shift correlated 2D NMR maps was shown to uniquely depend upon the scalar and/or dipolar interaction between ligand nuclei and the unpaired electron(s), thus providing a means of identifying binding sites. Copper(II) was shown to form metal complexes with both Penicillin (PNC) and Pilocarpine (PLC) and the structure of the two 1:2 complexes in water solution at physiological pH were determined. PMID:18476239

  18. A new approach to the optimisation of non-uniform sampling schedules for use in the rapid acquisition of 2D NMR spectra of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    Non-uniform sampling allows the routine, rapid acquisition of 2D NMR data. When the number of points in the NUS schedule is low, the quality of the data obtained is very dependent of the schedule used. A simple proceedure for finding optimium schedules has been developed and is demonstrated for the multiplicity edited HSQC experiment. PMID:27160788

  19. Adsorption mechanism at the molecular level between polymers and uremic octapeptide by the 2D 1H NMR Technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Li, Jihong; Wang, Wei; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Yuanwei; Sun, Pingchuan; Yuan, Zhi; He, Binglin; Yu, Yaoting

    2006-06-01

    To remove uremic octapeptide from the blood stream of uremic patients, various modified polyacylamide cross-linked absorbents were prepared. Adsorption experiments showed these absorbents have significant differences in adsorption capacity to the target peptide. In this paper, two-dimension proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D 1H NMR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the interaction mechanism between the peptide and the adsorbents. Because of the insolubility of the absorbent, some soluble linear polymers with the same functional groups as the absorbents were employed as the model adsorbents in 2D 1H NMR. The preferred binding site for the peptide and polymers was identified to be at the C-terminal carboxyl group of the octapeptide via chemical shift perturbation effects. In this study, we found that hydrogen bonding, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions all play a role in the interaction force but had different contributions. Especially, the great chemical shift changes of the aromatic amino acid residues (Trp) during the interaction between butyl-modified polyacrylamide and octapeptide suggested the hydrophobic interaction, incorporated with the electrostatic force, played an important role in the binding reaction in aqueous solutions. This information not only rationally explained the results of the adsorption experiments, but also identified the effective binding site and mechanism, and shall provide a structural basis for designing better affinity-type adsorbents for the target peptide. PMID:16768402

  20. Differential Analysis of 2D NMR Spectra: New Natural Products from a Pilot-Scale Fungal Extract Library

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a newly developed protocol for the differential analysis of arrays of 2D NMR spectra, we were able to rapidly identify two previously unreported indole alkaloids from a library of unfractionated fungal extracts. Differential analyses of NMR spectra thus constitute an effective tool for the non...

  1. HyperSPASM NMR: A new approach to single-shot 2D correlations on DNP-enhanced samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Frydman, Lucio

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution DNP experiments are limited to a single or at most a few scans, before the non-Boltzmann magnetization has been consumed. This makes it impractical to record 2D NMR data by conventional, t1-incremented schemes. Here a new approach termed HyperSPASM to establish 2D heteronuclear correlations in a single scan is reported, aimed at dealing with this kind of challenge. The HyperSPASM experiment relies on imposing an amplitude-modulation of the data by a single Δt1 indirect-domain evolution time, and subsequently monitoring the imparted encoding on separate echo and anti-echo pathway signals within a single continuous acquisition. This is implemented via the use of alternating, switching, coherence selection gradients. As a result of these manipulations the phase imparted by a heteronucleus over its indirect domain evolution can be accurately extracted, and 2D data unambiguously reconstructed with a single-shot excitation. The nature of this sequence makes the resulting experiment particularly well suited for collecting indirectly-detected HSQC data on hyperpolarized samples. The potential of the ensuing HyperSPASM method is exemplified with natural-abundance hyperpolarized correlations on model systems.

  2. 2D NMR Barcoding and Differential Analysis of Complex Mixtures for Chemical Identification: The Actaea Triterpenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of NMR spectroscopic information for structure elucidation involves decoding of complex resonance patterns that contain valuable molecular information (δ and J), which is not readily accessible otherwise. We introduce a new concept of 2D-NMR barcoding that uses clusters of fingerprint signals and their spatial relationships in the δ−δ coordinate space to facilitate the chemical identification of complex mixtures. Similar to widely used general barcoding technology, the structural information of individual compounds is encoded as a specifics pattern of their C,H correlation signals. Software-based recognition of these patterns enables the structural identification of the compounds and their discrimination in mixtures. Using the triterpenes from various Actaea (syn. Cimicifuga) species as a test case, heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) barcodes were generated on the basis of their structural subtypes from a statistical investigation of their δH and δC data in the literature. These reference barcodes allowed in silico identification of known triterpenes in enriched fractions obtained from an extract of A. racemosa (black cohosh). After dereplication, a differential analysis of heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectra even allowed for the discovery of a new triterpene. The 2D barcoding concept has potential application in a natural product discovery project, allowing for the rapid dereplication of known compounds and as a tool in the search for structural novelty within compound classes with established barcodes. PMID:24673652

  3. 2D NMR barcoding and differential analysis of complex mixtures for chemical identification: the Actaea triterpenes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Burton, Ian; Karakach, Tobias; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2014-04-15

    The interpretation of NMR spectroscopic information for structure elucidation involves decoding of complex resonance patterns that contain valuable molecular information (δ and J), which is not readily accessible otherwise. We introduce a new concept of 2D-NMR barcoding that uses clusters of fingerprint signals and their spatial relationships in the δ-δ coordinate space to facilitate the chemical identification of complex mixtures. Similar to widely used general barcoding technology, the structural information of individual compounds is encoded as a specifics pattern of their C,H correlation signals. Software-based recognition of these patterns enables the structural identification of the compounds and their discrimination in mixtures. Using the triterpenes from various Actaea (syn. Cimicifuga) species as a test case, heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) barcodes were generated on the basis of their structural subtypes from a statistical investigation of their δH and δC data in the literature. These reference barcodes allowed in silico identification of known triterpenes in enriched fractions obtained from an extract of A. racemosa (black cohosh). After dereplication, a differential analysis of heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectra even allowed for the discovery of a new triterpene. The 2D barcoding concept has potential application in a natural product discovery project, allowing for the rapid dereplication of known compounds and as a tool in the search for structural novelty within compound classes with established barcodes. PMID:24673652

  4. Dolphin: a tool for automatic targeted metabolite profiling using 1D and 2D (1)H-NMR data.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Josep; Brezmes, Jesús; Mallol, Roger; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Vinaixa, Maria; Salek, Reza M; Correig, Xavier; Cañellas, Nicolau

    2014-12-01

    One of the main challenges in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics is to obtain valuable metabolic information from large datasets of raw NMR spectra in a high throughput, automatic, and reproducible way. To date, established software packages used to match and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra remain mostly manually operated, leading to low resolution results and subject to inconsistencies not attributable to the NMR technique itself. Here, we introduce a new software package, called Dolphin, able to automatically quantify a set of target metabolites in multiple sample measurements using an approach based on 1D and 2D NMR techniques to overcome the inherent limitations of 1D (1)H-NMR spectra in metabolomics. Dolphin takes advantage of the 2D J-resolved NMR spectroscopy signal dispersion to avoid inconsistencies in signal position detection, enhancing the reliability and confidence in metabolite matching. Furthermore, in order to improve accuracy in quantification, Dolphin uses 2D NMR spectra to obtain additional information on all neighboring signals surrounding the target metabolite. We have compared the targeted profiling results of Dolphin, recorded from standard biological mixtures, with those of two well established approaches in NMR metabolomics. Overall, Dolphin produced more accurate results with the added advantage of being a fully automated and high throughput processing package. PMID:25370160

  5. Dihydrofolate reductase: Sequential resonance assignments using 2D and 3D NMR and secondary structure determination in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.D.; Birdsall, B.; Jimenez-Barbero, J.; Polshakov, V.I.; McCormick, J.E.; Feeney, J.; Frenkiel, T.A.; Bauer, C.J. ); Roberts, G.C.K. )

    1991-06-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR techniques have been used to make sequential {sup 1}H and {sup 15}H resonance assignments for most of the residues of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a monomeric protein of molecular mass 18,300 Da. A uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled sample of the protein was prepared and its complex with methotrexate (MTX) studied by 3D {sup 15}N/{sup 1}H nuclear Overhauserheteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (NOESY-HMQC), Harmann-Hahn-heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HOHAHA-HMQC), and HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiments. These experiments overcame most of the spectral overlap problems caused by chemical shift degeneracies in 2D spectra and allowed the {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H through-space and through-bond connectivities to be identified unambiguously, leading to the resonance assignments. The novel HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment allows NOE cross peaks to be detected between NH protons even when their {sup 1}H chemical shifts are degenerate as long as the amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts are nondegenerate. The 3D experiments, in combination with conventional 2D NOESY, COSY, and HOHAHA experiments on unlabelled and selectively deuterated DHFR, provide backbone assignments for 146 of the 162 residues and side-chain assignments for 104 residues of the protein. Data from the NOE-based experiments and identification of the slowly exchanging amide protons provide detailed information about the secondary structure of the binary complex of the protein with methotrexate.

  6. 1D and 2D NMR studies of isobornyl acrylate - Methyl methacrylate copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Deepika; Hooda, Sunita; Brar, A. S.; Shankar, Ravi

    2011-10-01

    Isobornyl acrylate - methyl methacrylate (B/M) copolymers of different compositions were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using methyl-2-bromopropionate as an initiator and PMDETA copper complex as catalyst under nitrogen atmosphere at 70 °C. 1H NMR spectrum was used to determine the compositions of copolymer. The copolymer compositions were then used to determine the reactivity ratios of monomers. Reactivity ratios of co-monomers in B/M copolymer, determined from linear Kelen-Tudos method (KT) and non linear Error-in-Variable Method (EVM), are rB = 0.41 ± 0.11, rM = 1.11 ± 0.33 and rB = 0.52, rM = 1.31 respectively. The complete resonance assignments of 1H and 13C{ 1H} NMR spectra were carried out with the help of Distortion less Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT), two-dimensional Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC). 2D HSQC assignments were further confirmed by 2D Total Correlation Spectroscopy (TOCSY). The carbonyl carbon of B and M units and methyl carbon of M unit were assigned up to triad compositional and configurational sequences whereas β-methylene carbons were assigned up to tetrad compositional and configurational sequences. Similarly the methine carbon of B unit was assigned up to pentad level. 1,3 and 1,4 bond order couplings of carbonyl carbon and quaternary carbon resonances with methine, methylene and methyl protons were studied in detail using 2D Hetero Nuclear Multiple Bond Correlation (HMBC) spectra.

  7. Differentiation of enantiomers by 2D NMR spectroscopy at 1 T using residual dipolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Koos, Martin R M; Danieli, Ernesto; Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-06-01

    Differentiating enantiomers using 2D bench-top NMR spectroscopy. Spectrometers working with permanent magnets at 1 T field strength allow the acquisition of 2D data sets. In conjunction with previously reported chiral alignment media, this setup allows the measurement of enantiomeric excess via residual dipolar couplings in stretched gelatine as a result of the reduced line width obtained by 2D J-resolved spectroscopy. PMID:25773020

  8. Stereochemistry of 16a-hydroxyfriedelin and 3-Oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene established by 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Silva de Miranda, Roqueline Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Salomão Bento Vasconcelos; de Fátima Silva, Grácia Divina; Vieira Filho, Sidney Augusto; Knupp, Vagner Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Friedelin (1), 3beta-friedelinol (2), 28-hydroxyfriedelin (3), 16alpha-hydroxyfriedelin (4), 30-hydroxyfriedelin (5) and 16alpha,28-dihydroxyfriedelin (6) were isolated through fractionation of the hexane extract obtained from branches of Salacia elliptica. After a week in CDCl(3) solution, 16alpha-hydroxyfriedelin (4) reacted turning into 3-oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene (7). This is the first report of a dehydration followed by a Nametkin rearrangement of a pentacyclic triterpene in CDCl(3) solution occurring in the NMR tube. These seven pentacyclic triterpenes was identified through NMR spectroscopy and the stereochemistry of compound 4 and 7 was established by 2D NMR (NOESY) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). It is also the first time that all the (13)C-NMR and 2D NMR spectral data are reported for compounds 4 and 7. PMID:19214150

  9. Structural description of acid-denatured cytochrome c by hydrogen exchange and 2D NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, Meifen; Englander, S.W.; Elove, G.A.; Wand, A.J.; Roder, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Hydrogen exchange and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) techniques were used to characterize the structure of oxidized horse cytochrome c at acid pH and high ionic strength. Under these conditions, cytochrome c is known to assume a globular conformation (A state) with properties resembling those of the molten globule state described for other proteins. In order to measure the rate of hydrogen-deuterium exchange for individual backbone amide protons in the A state, samples of oxidized cytochrome c were incubated at 20 {degree}C in D{sub 2}O buffer for time periods ranging from 2 min to 500 h. The exchange reaction was then quenched by transferring the protein to native conditions. The extent of exchange for 44 amide protons trapped in the refolded protein was measured by 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results show that this approach can provide detailed information on H-bonded secondary and tertiary structure in partially folded equilibrium forms of a protein. All of the slowly exchanging amide protons in the three major helices of native cytochrome c are strongly protected from exchange at acid pH, indicating that the A state contains native-like elements of helical secondary structure. By contrast, a number of amide protons involved in irregular tertiary H-bonds of the native structure are only marginally protected in the A state, indicating that these H-bonds are unstable or absent. The H-exchange results suggest that the major helices of cytochrome c and their common hydrophobic domain are largely preserved in the globular acidic form while the loop region of the native structure is flexible and partly disordered.

  10. High field and 2D-nmr studies with the aporphine alkaloid glaucine.

    PubMed

    Kerr, K M; Kook, A M; Davis, P J

    1986-01-01

    The aporphine alkaloid glaucine (1) was examined by comparison of the high field (600 MHz) 1H-nmr spectra of 1 vs. racemic 6a,7,7-trideutereoglaucine (4,5), by computer-simulated 1H-nmr spectra at 600 MHz, by using decoupled proton spectra, and two-dimensional COSY and HETCOR experiments with 1 at 500 and 360 MHz, respectively, and using high field (90 MHZ) 13C-nmr of S-(+)-glaucine (1). Emphasis was placed on the resolution of the chemical shifts and coupling constants for the H-4 alpha, H-4 beta, H-5 alpha, H-5 beta, H-6 alpha, H-7 alpha, and H-7 beta alicyclic protons of the molecule, which were previously unassigned. The complete assignment of the alicyclic protons of 1 by 1H-nmr was required for the structural elucidation of deuterated analogs of glaucine, which will be used in microbial transformation studies to determine the stereochemical course of aporphine dehydrogenation by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030). PMID:3783155

  11. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulkmore » IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.« less

  12. Ionic Liquid–Solute Interactions Studied by 2D NOE NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2014-11-26

    Intermolecular interactions between a Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute and the anions and cations of four different ionic liquids (ILs) are investigated by 2D NMR nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) techniques, including {¹H-¹⁹F} HOESY and {¹H-¹H} ROESY. Four ILs are studied, each having the same bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion in common. Two of the ILs have aliphatic 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cations, while the other two ILs have aromatic 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations. ILs with both shorter (butyl) and longer (octyl or decyl) cationic alkyl substituents are studied. NOE NMR results suggest that the local environment of IL anions and cations near the Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute is rather different from the bulk IL structure. The solute-anion and solute-cation interactions are significantly different both for ILs with short vs long alkyl tails and for ILs with aliphatic vs aromatic cation polar head groups. In particular, the solute-anion interactions are observed to be about 3 times stronger for the cations with shorter alkyl tails relative to the ILs with longer alkyl tails. The Ru²⁺(bpy)₃ solute interacts with both the polar head and the nonpolar tail groups of the 1- butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation but only with the nonpolar tail groups of the 1-decyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium cation.

  13. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments. PMID:26556218

  14. Simulation of 2D NMR Spectra of Carbohydrates Using GODESS Software.

    PubMed

    Kapaev, Roman R; Toukach, Philip V

    2016-06-27

    Glycan Optimized Dual Empirical Spectrum Simulation (GODESS) is a web service, which has been recently shown to be one of the most accurate tools for simulation of (1)H and (13)C 1D NMR spectra of natural carbohydrates and their derivatives. The new version of GODESS supports visualization of the simulated (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts in the form of most 2D spin correlation spectra commonly used in carbohydrate research, such as (1)H-(1)H TOCSY, COSY/COSY-DQF/COSY-RCT, and (1)H-(13)C edHSQC, HSQC-COSY, HSQC-TOCSY, and HMBC. Peaks in the simulated 2D spectra are color-coded and labeled according to the signal assignment and can be exported in JCAMP-DX format. Peak widths are estimated empirically from the structural features. GODESS is available free of charge via the Internet at the platform of the Carbohydrate Structure Database project ( http://csdb.glycoscience.ru ). PMID:27227420

  15. A Better 2-D Mechanical Energy Conservation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paesler, Michael

    2012-02-01

    A variety of simple classical mechanics energy conservation experiments are used in teaching laboratories. Typical one-dimensional (1-D) setups may involve falling balls or oscillating springs. Many of these can be quite satisfying in that students can confirm—within a few percent—that mechanical energy is conserved. Students generally have little trouble identifying discrepancies such as the loss of a few percent of the gravitational potential energy due to air friction encountered by a falling ball. Two-dimensional (2-D) systems can require more sophisticated analysis for higher level laboratories, but such systems often incorporate complicating components that can make the exercise academically incomplete and experimentally less accurate. The following describes a simple 2-D energy conservation experiment based on the popular "Newton's Cradle" toy that allows students to account for nearly all of the mechanical energy in the system in an academically complete analysis.

  16. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  17. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-01

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach. PMID:20681586

  18. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Eghbalnia, Hamid R

    2007-08-01

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, "High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings" (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector represents a realistic

  19. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  20. Interactions of sialic acid with phosphatidylcholine liposomes studied by 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Timoszyk, Anna; Latanowicz, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex systems which have attracted scientific interest for a long time and for various reasons. The sialic acid-liposome interactions at the molecular level depend on their hydro-lipophilic characteristics. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes of conformation of the phospholipid (1,2-Diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and sialic acid (2,8-(N-acetylneuraminic acid)) molecules and the type of interactions induced by the sialic acid molecules on membrane-like systems (liposomes) by 2D NMR (TOCSY, HETCOR, ROESY). The nature of the interaction of sialic acid with the model membrane depends on the structure of the phospholipid headgroups and the hydration of membrane. In ROESY spectra was observed the absence of dipole-dipole couplings within the choline head, between headgroups and glycerol, and between glycerol and fatty acid chains. It indicates an increase of the membrane dynamics in the presence of sialic acid. Moreover, the conformation of sialic acid molecule is changed in the presence of liposomes, which depends on stereochemistry of the chemical groups of the carbon atoms C7 and C8, and oxygen O8. The observed differences between the ROESY spectra of free and liposome bound sialic acid may be a consequence of a changed orientation of the pyranose ring from trans to gauche in the presence of liposomes. The sialic acid penetrate into the phospholipid bilayer to a sufficient depth to allow the dipole interaction. The present result that the correlation signal was found only between the methyl protons from the acetyl group of sialic acid and the methylene tail of phospholipid molecule in the ROESY spectrum indicates that the opposite end of the sialic acid molecule stays in the aqueous phase without interacting with membrane molecules. PMID:24364043

  1. Large structure rearrangement of colicin ia channel domain after membrane binding from 2D 13C spin diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenbin; Yao, Xiaolan; Hong, Mei

    2005-05-01

    One of the main mechanisms of membrane protein folding is by spontaneous insertion into the lipid bilayer from the aqueous environment. The bacterial toxin, colicin Ia, is one such protein. To shed light on the conformational changes involved in this dramatic transfer from the polar to the hydrophobic milieu, we carried out 2D magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR experiments on the water-soluble and membrane-bound states of the channel-forming domain of colicin Ia. Proton-driven (13)C spin diffusion spectra of selectively (13)C-labeled protein show unequivocal attenuation of cross-peaks after membrane binding. This attenuation can be assigned to distance increases but not reduction of the diffusion coefficient. Analysis of the statistics of the interhelical and intrahelical (13)C-(13)C distances in the soluble protein structure indicates that the observed cross-peak reduction is well correlated with a high percentage of short interhelical contacts in the soluble protein. This suggests that colicin Ia channel domain becomes open and extended upon membrane binding, thus lengthening interhelical distances. In comparison, cross-peaks with similar intensities between the two states are dominated by intrahelical contacts in the soluble state. This suggests that the membrane-bound structure of colicin Ia channel domain may be described as a "molten globule", in which the helical secondary structure is retained while the tertiary structure is unfolded. This study demonstrates that (13)C spin diffusion NMR is a valuable tool for obtaining qualitative long-range distance constraints on membrane protein folding. PMID:15853348

  2. Orphan spin operators enable the acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-05-01

    We propose a general method that enables the acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D solid-state NMR spectra for U-13C, 15N-labeled proteins. This method, called MEIOSIS (Multiple ExperIments via Orphan SpIn operatorS), makes it possible to detect four coherence transfer pathways simultaneously, utilizing orphan (i.e., neglected) spin operators of nuclear spin polarization generated during 15N-13C cross polarization (CP). In the MEIOSIS experiments, two phase-encoded free-induction decays are decoded into independent nuclear polarization pathways using Hadamard transformations. As a proof of principle, we show the acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra of U-13C, 15N-labeled microcrystalline ubiquitin. Hadamard decoding of CP coherences into multiple independent spin operators is a new concept in solid-state NMR and is extendable to many other multidimensional experiments. The MEIOSIS method will increase the throughput of solid-state NMR techniques for microcrystalline proteins, membrane proteins, and protein fibrils.

  3. Characterization of novel isobenzofuranones by DFT calculations and 2D NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Milena G; Alvarenga, Elson S

    2016-08-01

    Phthalides are frequently found in naturally occurring substances and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities. In the search for compounds with insecticidal activity, phthalides have been used as versatile building blocks for the syntheses of novel potential agrochemicals. In our work, the Diels-Alder reaction between furan-2(5H)-one and cyclopentadiene was used successfully to obtain (3aR,4S,7R,7aS)-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one and (3aS,4R,7S,7aR)-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (2) and (3aS,4S,7R,7aR)-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one and (3aR,4R,7S,7aS)-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (3). The endo adduct (2) was brominated to afford (3aR,4R,5R,7R,7aS,8R)-5,8-dibromohexahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one and (3aS,4S,5S,7S,7aR,8S)-5,8-dibromohexahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (4) and (3aS,4R,5R,6S,7S,7aR)-5,6-dibromohexahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one and (3aR,4S,5S,6R,7R,7aS)-5,6-dibromohexahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (5). Following the initial analysis of the NMR spectra and the proposed two novel unforeseen products, we have decided to fully analyze the classical and non-classical assay structures with the aid of computational calculations. Computation to predict the (13) C and (1) H chemical shifts for mean absolute error analyses have been carried out by gauge-including atomic orbital method at M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) levels of theory for all viable conformers. Characterization of the novel unforeseen compounds (4) and (5) were not possible by employing only the experimental NMR data; however, a more conclusive structural identification was performed by comparing the experimental and theoretical (1) H and (13) C chemical shifts by mean absolute error and DP4 probability analyses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26811211

  4. Off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation spectra of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei in static samples.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Deng, F; Ye, C

    1995-12-01

    The off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei are demonstrated with perturbation theory and numerical calculation in static samples. The off-resonant (delta omega) rf field (omega 1) enlarges a nutation frequency and consequently increases the measurement range of nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters. When omega e > omega Qmax, and arctg(omega 1/delta omega) = +/- 54.7 degrees (magic angle), the satellite lines (produced by coherence transfers) in a nutation spectrum are superimposed with the line of central transition, and hence the nutation spectrum is simplified and its sensitivity is enhanced. The nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters of 23Na nuclei in Na omega molecular sieve are obtained using 2D NMR nutation. PMID:9053113

  5. An omics approach to rational feed: Enhancing growth in CHO cultures with NMR metabolomics and 2D-DIGE proteomics.

    PubMed

    Blondeel, Eric J M; Ho, Raymond; Schulze, Steffen; Sokolenko, Stanislav; Guillemette, Simon R; Slivac, Igor; Durocher, Yves; Guillemette, J Guy; McConkey, Brendan J; Chang, David; Aucoin, Marc G

    2016-09-20

    Expression of recombinant proteins exerts stress on cell culture systems, affecting the expression of endogenous proteins, and contributing to the depletion of nutrients and accumulation of waste metabolites. In this work, 2D-DIGE proteomics was employed to analyze differential expression of proteins following stable transfection of a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line to constitutively express a heavy-chain monoclonal antibody. Thirty-four proteins of significant differential expression were identified and cross-referenced with cellular functions and metabolic pathways to identify points of cell stress. Subsequently, 1D-(1)H NMR metabolomics experiments analyzed cultures to observe nutrient depletion and waste metabolite accumulations to further examine these cell stresses and pathways. From among fifty metabolites tracked in time-course, eight were observed to be completely depleted from the production media, including: glucose, glutamine, proline, serine, cystine, asparagine, choline, and hypoxanthine, while twenty-three excreted metabolites were also observed to accumulate. The differentially expressed proteins, as well as the nutrient depletion and accumulation of these metabolites corresponded with upregulated pathways and cell systems related to anaplerotic TCA-replenishment, NADH/NADPH replenishment, tetrahydrofolate cycle C1 cofactor conversions, limitations to lipid synthesis, and redox modulation. A nutrient cocktail was assembled to improve the growth medium and alleviate these cell stresses to achieve a ∼75% improvement to peak cell densities. PMID:27496566

  6. NMR profiling of biomolecules at natural abundance using 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C multiplicity-separated (MS) HSQC spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Freedberg, Darón I.; Keire, David A.

    2015-02-01

    2D NMR 1H-X (X = 15N or 13C) HSQC spectra contain cross-peaks for all XHn moieties. Multiplicity-edited1H-13C HSQC pulse sequences generate opposite signs between peaks of CH2 and CH/CH3 at a cost of lower signal-to-noise due to the 13C T2 relaxation during an additional 1/1JCH period. Such CHn-editing experiments are useful in assignment of chemical shifts and have been successfully applied to small molecules and small proteins (e.g. ubiquitin) dissolved in deuterated solvents where, generally, peak overlap is minimal. By contrast, for larger biomolecules, peak overlap in 2D HSQC spectra is unavoidable and peaks with opposite phases cancel each other out in the edited spectra. However, there is an increasing need for using NMR to profile biomolecules at natural abundance dissolved in water (e.g., protein therapeutics) where NMR experiments beyond 2D are impractical. Therefore, the existing 2D multiplicity-edited HSQC methods must be improved to acquire data on nuclei other than 13C (i.e.15N), to resolve more peaks, to reduce T2 losses and to accommodate water suppression approaches. To meet these needs, a multiplicity-separated1H-X HSQC (MS-HSQC) experiment was developed and tested on 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with room temperature probes using RNase A (14 kDa) and retroviral capsid (26 kDa) proteins dissolved in 95% H2O/5% D2O. In this pulse sequence, the 1/1JXH editing-period is incorporated into the semi-constant time (semi-CT) X resonance chemical shift evolution period, which increases sensitivity, and importantly, the sum and the difference of the interleaved 1JXH-active and the 1JXH-inactive HSQC experiments yield two separate spectra for XH2 and XH/XH3. Furthermore we demonstrate improved water suppression using triple xyz-gradients instead of the more widely used z-gradient only water-suppression approach.

  7. An inversion method of 2D NMR relaxation spectra in low fields based on LSQR and L-curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guanqun; Zhou, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijia; Wang, Yuanjun; Nie, Shengdong

    2016-04-01

    The low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) inversion method based on traditional least-squares QR decomposition (LSQR) always produces some oscillating spectra. Moreover, the solution obtained by traditional LSQR algorithm often cannot reflect the true distribution of all the components. Hence, a good solution requires some manual intervention, for especially low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data. An approach based on the LSQR algorithm and L-curve is presented to solve this problem. The L-curve method is applied to obtain an improved initial optimal solution by balancing the residual and the complexity of the solutions instead of manually adjusting the smoothing parameters. First, the traditional LSQR algorithm is used on 2D NMR T1-T2 data to obtain its resultant spectra and corresponding residuals, whose norms are utilized to plot the L-curve. Second, the corner of the L-curve as the initial optimal solution for the non-negative constraint is located. Finally, a 2D map is corrected and calculated iteratively based on the initial optimal solution. The proposed approach is tested on both simulated and measured data. The results show that this algorithm is robust, accurate and promising for the NMR analysis.

  8. Homo- and heteronuclear 2D NMR approaches to analyse a mixture of deuterated unlike/like stereoisomers using weakly ordering chiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ali, Karim; Lafon, Olivier; Zimmermann, Herbert; Guittet, Eric; Lesot, Philippe

    2007-08-01

    We describe several homo- and heteronuclear 2D NMR strategies dedicated to the analysis of anisotropic 2H spectra of a mixture of dideuterated unlike/like stereoisomers with two remote stereogenic centers, using weakly orienting chiral liquid crystals. To this end, we propose various 2D correlation experiments, denoted "D(H) nD" or "D(H) nC" (with n = 1, 2), that involve two heteronuclear polarization transfers of INEPT-type with one or two proton relays. The analytical expressions of correlation signals for four pulse sequences reported here were calculated using the product-operators formalism for spin I = 1 and S = 1/2. The features and advantages of each scheme are presented and discussed. The efficiency of these 2D sequences is illustrated using various deuterated model molecules, dissolved in organic solutions of polypeptides made of poly- γ-benzyl- L-glutamate (PBLG) or poly- ɛ-carbobenzyloxy- L-lysine (PCBLL) and NMR numerical simulations.

  9. Resistivity inversion in 2-D anisotropic media: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, Timothy; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Zhou, Bing; Greenhalgh, Mark; Marescot, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Many rocks and layered/fractured sequences have a clearly expressed electrical anisotropy although it is rare in practice to incorporate anisotropy into resistivity inversion. In this contribution, we present a series of 2.5-D synthetic inversion experiments for various electrode configurations and 2-D anisotropic models. We examine and compare the image reconstructions obtained using the correct anisotropic inversion code with those obtained using the false but widely used isotropic assumption. Superior reconstruction in terms of reduced data misfit, true anomaly shape and position, and anisotropic background parameters were obtained when the correct anisotropic assumption was employed for medium to high coefficients of anisotropy. However, for low coefficient values the isotropic assumption produced better-quality results. When an erroneous isotropic inversion is performed on medium to high level anisotropic data, the images are dominated by patterns of banded artefacts and high data misfits. Various pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole data sets were investigated and evaluated for the accuracy of the inversion result. The eigenvalue spectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix and the formal resolution matrix were also computed to determine the information content and goodness of the results. We also present a data selection strategy based on high sensitivity measurements which drastically reduces the number of data to be inverted but still produces comparable results to that of the comprehensive data set. Inversion was carried out using transversely isotropic model parameters described in two different co-ordinate frames for the conductivity tensor, namely Cartesian versus natural or eigenframe. The Cartesian frame provided a more stable inversion product. This can be simply explained from inspection of the eigenspectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix for the two model descriptions.

  10. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  11. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  12. Accelerating multidimensional NMR and MRI experiments using iterated maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Sean; Frey, Merideth; Sethna, Zachary; Manley, Gregory; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Zilm, Kurt; Loria, J. Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Techniques that accelerate data acquisition without sacrificing the advantages of fast Fourier transform (FFT) reconstruction could benefit a wide variety of magnetic resonance experiments. Here we discuss an approach for reconstructing multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and MR images from sparsely-sampled time domain data, by way of iterated maps. This method exploits the computational speed of the FFT algorithm and is done in a deterministic way, by reformulating any a priori knowledge or constraints into projections, and then iterating. In this paper we explain the motivation behind this approach, the formulation of the specific projections, the benefits of using a `QUasi-Even Sampling, plus jiTter' (QUEST) sampling schedule, and various methods for handling noise. Applying the iterated maps method to real 2D NMR and 3D MRI of solids data, we show that it is flexible and robust enough to handle large data sets with significant noise and artifacts.

  13. Accelerating multidimensional NMR and MRI experiments using iterated maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Merideth A.; Sethna, Zachary M.; Manley, Gregory A.; Sengupta, Suvrajit; Zilm, Kurt W.; Loria, J. Patrick; Barrett, Sean E.

    2013-12-01

    Techniques that accelerate data acquisition without sacrificing the advantages of fast Fourier transform (FFT) reconstruction could benefit a wide variety of magnetic resonance experiments. Here we discuss an approach for reconstructing multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and MR images from sparsely-sampled time domain data, by way of iterated maps. This method exploits the computational speed of the FFT algorithm and is done in a deterministic way, by reformulating any a priori knowledge or constraints into projections, and then iterating. In this paper we explain the motivation behind this approach, the formulation of the specific projections, the benefits of using a ‘QUasi-Even Sampling, plus jiTter' (QUEST) sampling schedule, and various methods for handling noise. Applying the iterated maps method to real 2D NMR and 3D MRI of solids data, we show that it is flexible and robust enough to handle large data sets with significant noise and artifacts.

  14. Influence of anthraquinone scaffold on E/Z isomer distribution of two thiosemicarbazone derivatives. 2D NMR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Violeta; Joksović, Milan D.; Marković, Svetlana; Jakovljević, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    A distribution of possible isomeric and tautomeric forms of two tautomerizable anthraquinone-thiosemicarbazones with pronounced cytotoxic potential was investigated using 2D NMR and DFT studies. Conformational analysis of the E and Z isomers of both thiosemicarbazones was performed to find out the most stable conformation for each molecule. It was found that superior stability of E-isomers results from ten-membered intramolecular hydrogen bond between thiosemicarbazone N2H and anthraquinone carbonyl group. This hydrogen bond is stronger than that between thiosemicarbazone N2H and ester oxygen, owing to the large partial negative charge on the anthraquinone oxygen.

  15. Unraveling the heterogeneity in N butyl-N-methylpiperidinium trifluromethanesulfonimide ionic liquid by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Neha; Saha, Satyen

    2014-06-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids are one of the most exciting classes of materials in the last decade. In particular piperidinium (PIP) cation based ionic liquid (IL) (such as PIP14NTf2) have found application in electrochemistry/batteries. In this Letter, 2D NMR (NOESY and HOESY) is employed for studying the interactions present between cations and anions. HOESY spectrum shows that fluorine of NTf2 unusually interacts with all proton of the cation (PIP14). Combined HOESY and NOESY indicate that NTf2 anion is distributed heterogeneously in liquid. Existence of micro heterogeneity in this important class of IL is proposed.

  16. Computer-assisted assignment of 2D 1H NMR spectra of proteins: basic algorithms and application to phoratoxin B.

    PubMed

    Kleywegt, G J; Boelens, R; Cox, M; Llinás, M; Kaptein, R

    1991-05-01

    A suite of computer programs (CLAIRE) is described which can be of assistance in the process of assigning 2D 1H NMR spectra of proteins. The programs embody a software implementation of the sequential assignment approach first developed by Wüthrich and co-workers (K. Wüthrich, G. Wider, G. Wagner and W. Braun (1982) J. Mol. Biol. 155, 311). After data-abstraction (peakpicking), the software can be used to detect patterns (spin systems), to find cross peaks between patterns in 2D NOE data sets and to generate assignments that are consistent with all available data and which satisfy a number of constraints imposed by the user. An interactive graphics program called CONPAT is used to control the entire assignment process as well as to provide the essential feedback from the experimental NMR spectra. The algorithms are described in detail and the approach is demonstrated on a set of spectra from the mistletoe protein phoratoxin B, a homolog of crambin. The results obtained compare well with those reported earlier based entirely on a manual assignment process. PMID:1841687

  17. 2D exchange 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) exchange 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to study the slow overall motion of the rod-shaped viruses M13 and tobacco mosaic virus in concentrated gels. Even for short mixing times, observed diagonal spectra differ remarkably from projection spectra and one-dimensional spectra. Our model readily explains this to be a consequence of the T2e anisotropy caused by slow overall rotation of the viruses about their length axis. 2D exchange spectra recorded for 30% (w/w) tobacco mosaic virus with mixing times < 1 s do not show any off-diagonal broadening, indicating that its overall motion occurs in the sub-Hz frequency range. In contrast, the exchange spectra obtained for 30% M13 show significant off-diagonal intensity for mixing times of 0.01 s and higher. A log-gaussian distribution around 25 Hz of overall diffusion coefficients mainly spread between 1 and 10(3) Hz faithfully reproduces the 2D exchange spectra of 30% M13 recorded at various mixing times in a consistent way. A small but notable change in diagonal spectra at increasing mixing time is not well accounted for by our model and is probably caused by 31P spin diffusion. PMID:7756532

  18. Isolation, LC-MS/MS and 2D-NMR characterization of alkaline degradants of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate.

    PubMed

    Anandgaonkar, Vaibhav; Gupta, Abhishek; Kona, Srinivas; Talluri, M V N Kumar

    2015-03-25

    The present work describes the preparative isolation and characterization of two alkaline degradation products of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). Tenofovir disoproxil is a prodrug of tenofovir (antiviral agent) and co-crystal form of this prodrug with fumaric acid is tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. The drug is subjected to alkaline degradation with 0.1N sodium hydroxide for 2 min at room temperature. The two degradants were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at relative retention of 0.26 and 0.73 with respect to the drug. HPLC method involves gradient elution on Kromasil Eternity column (150 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.5 μm) using ammonium acetate (10mM) - acetonitrile as mobile phase at flow rate of 0.3 mL/min and UV detection at 260 nm. Two degradation products were isolated by preparative HPLC and further characterized by LC-MS, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and 2D-NMR. On the basis of this spectral data, the structure of two DPs are confirmed as methyl hydrogen ({[1-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)propan-2-yl]oxy}methyl)phosphonate for DP-I and dimethyl ({[1-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)propan-2-yl]oxy}methyl)phosphonate for DP-II. PMID:25594895

  19. ADAPT-NMR 3.0: utilization of BEST-type triple-resonance NMR experiments to accelerate the process of data collection and assignment

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Hesam; Tonelli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) is a software package whose Bayesian core uses on-the-fly chemical shift assignments to guide data acquisition by non-uniform sampling from a panel of through-bond NMR experiments. The new version of ADAPT-NMR (ADAPT-NMR v3.0) has the option of utilizing 2D tilted-plane versions of 3D fast spectral acquisition with BEST-type pulse sequences, while also retaining the capability of acquiring and processing data from tilted-plane versions of conventional sensitivity-enhanced experiments. The use of BEST experiments significantly reduces data collection times and leads to enhanced performance by ADAPT-NMR. PMID:26021595

  20. ADAPT-NMR 3.0: utilization of BEST-type triple-resonance NMR experiments to accelerate the process of data collection and assignment.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Hesam; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2015-07-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) is a software package whose Bayesian core uses on-the-fly chemical shift assignments to guide data acquisition by non-uniform sampling from a panel of through-bond NMR experiments. The new version of ADAPT-NMR (ADAPT-NMR v3.0) has the option of utilizing 2D tilted-plane versions of 3D fast spectral acquisition with BEST-type pulse sequences, while also retaining the capability of acquiring and processing data from tilted-plane versions of conventional sensitivity-enhanced experiments. The use of BEST experiments significantly reduces data collection times and leads to enhanced performance by ADAPT-NMR. PMID:26021595

  1. Cannibalism Affects Core Metabolic Processes in Helicoverpa armigera Larvae-A 2D NMR Metabolomics Study.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Fredd; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cannibalism is known in many insect species, yet its impact on insect metabolism has not been investigated in detail. This study assessed the effects of cannibalism on the metabolism of fourth-instar larvae of the non-predatory insect Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidotera: Noctuidea). Two groups of larvae were analyzed: one group fed with fourth-instar larvae of H. armigera (cannibal), the other group fed with an artificial plant diet. Water-soluble small organic compounds present in the larvae were analyzed using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and principal component analysis (PCA). Cannibalism negatively affected larval growth. PCA of NMR spectra showed that the metabolic profiles of cannibal and herbivore larvae were statistically different with monomeric sugars, fatty acid- and amino acid-related metabolites as the most variable compounds. Quantitation of ¹H-(13)C HSQC (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence) signals revealed that the concentrations of glucose, glucono-1,5-lactone, glycerol phosphate, glutamine, glycine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, ornithine, proline, threonine and valine were higher in the herbivore larvae. PMID:27598144

  2. Structure elucidation of organic compounds from natural sources using 1D and 2D NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Gulacti; Ulubelen, Ayhan

    2007-05-01

    In our continuing studies on Lamiaceae family plants including Salvia, Teucrium, Ajuga, Sideritis, Nepeta and Lavandula growing in Anatolia, many terpenoids, consisting of over 50 distinct triterpenoids and steroids, and over 200 diterpenoids, several sesterterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids along with many flavonoids and other phenolic compounds have been isolated. For Salvia species abietanes, for Teucrium and Ajuga species neo-clerodanes for Sideritis species ent-kaurane diterpenes are characteristic while nepetalactones are specific for Nepeta species. In this review article, only some interesting and different type of skeleton having constituents, namely rearranged, nor- or rare diterpenes, isolated from these species will be presented. For structure elucidation of these natural diterpenoids intensive one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ( 1H, 13C, APT, DEPT, NOE/NOESY, 1H- 1H COSY, HETCOR, COLOC, HMQC/HSQC, HMBC, SINEPT) were used besides mass and some other spectroscopic methods.

  3. Spin-coated and PECVD low dielectric constant porous organosilicate films studied by 1D and 2D solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Gerbaud, Guillaume; Hediger, Sabine; Bardet, Michel; Favennec, Laurent; Zenasni, Aziz; Beynet, Julien; Gourhant, Olivier; Jousseaume, Vincent

    2009-11-14

    In the research field of the sub-65 nm semiconductor industry, organosilicate SiOCH films with low dielectric constant (k < 2.4) need to be developed in order to improve the performance of integrated circuits [International Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), San Jose, CA, 2004]. One way to produce SiOCH films of low dielectric constant is to introduce pores into the film. This is usually obtained in two steps. Firstly, co-deposition of a matrix precursor, with a sacrificial organic porogen, either by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or spin-coating. Secondly, application of a specific thermal treatment to remove the porogen and create the porosity. This last step can be improved by adding to the thermal process a super-critical CO(2) treatment, an UV irradiation or an electronic bombardment (e-beam). In this study, the two deposition processes as well as the various treatments applied to eliminate the porogens were evaluated and compared using high-resolution solid-state NMR. For this purpose, hybrid (containing porogens) and porous films were extensively characterized on the basis of their (1)H, (13)C and (29)Si high-resolution NMR spectra. Information was obtained concerning the crosslinking of the Si skeleton. Spectral features could be correlated to the processes used. Isotropic chemical shift analyses and 2D correlation NMR experiments were used to show the existence and nature of the interactions between the matrix precursor and the organic porogen. PMID:19851550

  4. Data catalog of satellite experiments. Supplement no. 2D: Planetology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Spacecraft, experiment, and data sets are presented of lunar explorations. Apollo lunar surface experiments are listed and brief discriptions are included. Areas of data include: astronomy, meteorology, planetology, and solar physics.

  5. Characterization of the isomeric configuration and impurities of (Z)-endoxifen by 2D NMR, high resolution LC⬜MS, and quantitative HPLC analysis.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Phyllis; Coleman, Donna; Burgess, Jason; Gardner, Michael; Hines, John; Scott, Brendan; Kroenke, Michelle; Larson, Jami; Lightner, Melissa; Turner, Gregory; White, Jonathan; Liu, Paul

    2014-01-01

    (Z)-Endoxifen (4-hydroxy-N-desmethyltamoxifen), an active metabolite generated via actions of CYP3A4/5 and CYP2D6, is a more potent selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) than tamoxifen. In the MCF-7 human mammary tumor xenograft model with female athymic mice, (Z)-endoxifen, at an oral dose of 4⬜8 mg/kg, significantly inhibits tumor growth. (Z)-Endoxifen's potential as an alternative therapeutic agent independent of CYP2D6 activities, which can vary widely in ER+ breast cancer patients, is being actively evaluated. This paper describes confirmation of the configuration of the active (Z)-isomer through 2D NMR experiments, including NOE (ROESY) to establish spatial proton⬜proton correlations, and identification of the major impurity as the (E)-isomer in endoxifen drug substance by HPLC/HRMS (HPLC/MS-TOF). Stability of NMR solutions was confirmed by HPLC/UV analysis. For pre-clinical studies, a reverse-phase HPLC⬜UV method, with methanol/water mobile phases containing 10 mM ammonium formate at pH 4.3, was developed and validated for the accurate quantitation and impurity profiling of drug substance and drug product. Validation included demonstration of linearity, method precision, accuracy, and specificity in the presence of impurities, excipients (for the drug product), and degradation products. Ruggedness and reproducibility of the method were confirmed by collaborative studies between two independent laboratories. The method is being applied for quality control of the API and oral drug product. Kinetic parameters of Z- to E-isomerization were also delineated in drug substance and in aqueous formulation, showing conversion at temperatures above 25 °C. PMID:24055701

  6. Pulse methods in 1D and 2D liquid-phase NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Brey, W.S.

    1988-01-01

    State-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers are capable of performing an array of multiple-pulse one-dimensional and two-dimensional experiments. These experiments can provide detailed information about the structure, dynamics, and reactions of molecules. However, their successful application to chemical problems requires that the chemist have some knowledge of the various experiments and the information they can provide. This book, written by authorities in the field, provides such information for both the specialist and the nonspecialist.

  7. Conformational studies of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, K.; Stawikowski, M.; Ślusarz, R.; Sikorska, E.; Lesner, A.; Łęgowska, A.; Rolka, K.

    2015-11-01

    Trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 is the smallest and the most potent among BBI inhibitors. It is also an interesting object for SAR studies since it is cyclic 14 amino acid molecule which additionally contains disulfide bridge. We showed that elimination of head-to-tail cycliztion did not influence its activity. Moreover peptoid monomers of Nlys and Nphe introduced in the substrate specificity P1 position of monocyclic SFTI-1 preserved trypsin and chymotripsin inhibitory activity respectively and made P1-P1‧ bond proteolytically stable. These findings motivated us to perform conformational analysis of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations. Obtained structure occurred to be in a good agreement with published structures for wild-type SFTI-1, its monocyclic analog with disulfide bridge only as well as one containing Nlys peptoid monomer in P1 position.

  8. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-01

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond 13C/1H and 13C/13C chemical shift correlations, the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment also provides a COSY-type 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices (1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different 13C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D 1H/13C/1H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological

  9. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-21

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond (13)C/(1)H and (13)C/(13)C chemical shift correlations, the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment also provides a COSY-type (1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices ((1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different (13)C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of

  10. A Better 2-D Mechanical Energy Conservation Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paesler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A variety of simple classical mechanics energy conservation experiments are used in teaching laboratories. Typical one-dimensional (1-D) setups may involve falling balls or oscillating springs. Many of these can be quite satisfying in that students can confirm--within a few percent--that mechanical energy is conserved. Students generally have…

  11. Structural and conformational study of the aluminum-thymulin complex using 1-D and 2-D NMR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Laussac, J.P.; Lefrancier, P.; Dardenne, M.; Bach, J.F.; Marraud, M.; Cung, M.T.

    1988-11-16

    The interaction between aluminum and thymulin, a linear nonapeptide of thymic origin isolated from serum, was investigated by means of one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments. These experiments were performed in dimethyl-d/sub 6/ sulfoxide solution at different metal:peptide ratios. The results lead the following conclusions: (i) the Al(III) complexation corresponds to a fast exchange on the NMR time scale; (ii) the evolution of /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts indicates the existence of one type of complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry, associating two peptide molecules and one Al(III) ion; (iii) analysis of the spectra suggests that Al(III) has a specific binding site involving the Asn/sup 9/COO/sup /minus// terminal group and the hydroxyl group of the Ser/sup 4/ residue; (iv) from the NOESY data a conformation has been proposed and compared to the biologically active Zn(II)-thymulin complex. 23 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. 2-D Airbreathing Lightcraft Engine Experiments in Quiescent Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Israel I.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Minucci, Marco A. S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; Toro, Paulo G. P.; Chanes, José B.; Rego, Israel S.

    2011-11-01

    Ground-breaking laser propulsion (LP) experiments were performed under quiescent conditions with a 25 cm wide, two-dimensional Lightcraft model using a Lumonics TEA-622 CO2 laser emitting ˜ 1 μs pulses. In preparation for subsequent hypersonic experiments, this static test campaign was conducted at ambient pressures of 0.06, 0.15, 0.30 and 1 bar with laser pulse energies of 150 to 230 J. Time-variant pressure distributions, generated over engine "absorption chamber" walls, were integrated to obtain total impulse and momentum coupling coefficients (Cm) representative of a single propulsion cycle. Schlieren visualization of laser-induced air breakdown and expanding blast waves was also accomplished. Surprisingly, the Cm results of 600-3000 Ns/MJ were 2.5x to 5x greater than previous results from smaller Lightcraft models; this suggests that higher static Cm performance can likely be achieved in larger scale LP engines. This research collaboration, forged between the USAF and Brazilian Air Force, was carried out at the Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics in Brazil.

  13. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  14. Automated structure verification based on a combination of 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C HSQC spectra.

    PubMed

    Golotvin, Sergey S; Vodopianov, Eugene; Pol, Rostislav; Lefebvre, Brent A; Williams, Antony J; Rutkowske, Randy D; Spitzer, Timothy D

    2007-10-01

    A method for structure validation based on the simultaneous analysis of a 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C single-bond correlation spectrum such as HSQC or HMQC is presented here. When compared with the validation of a structure by a 1D (1)H NMR spectrum alone, the advantage of including a 2D HSQC spectrum in structure validation is that it adds not only the information of (13)C shifts, but also which proton shifts they are directly coupled to, and an indication of which methylene protons are diastereotopic. The lack of corresponding peaks in the 2D spectrum that appear in the 1D (1)H spectrum, also gives a clear picture of which protons are attached to heteroatoms. For all these benefits, combined NMR verification was expected and found by all metrics to be superior to validation by 1D (1)H NMR alone. Using multiple real-life data sets of chemical structures and the corresponding 1D and 2D data, it was possible to unambiguously identify at least 90% of the correct structures. As part of this test, challenging incorrect structures, mostly regioisomers, were also matched with each spectrum set. For these incorrect structures, the false positive rate was observed as low as 6%. PMID:17694570

  15. Proton-detected 2D radio frequency driven recoupling solid-state NMR studies on micelle-associated cytochrome-b5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross-peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles.

  16. Proton-Detected 2D Radio Frequency Driven Recoupling Solid-state NMR Studies on Micelle-associated Cytochrome-b5

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles. PMID:24657390

  17. Removal of t1 noise from metabolomic 2D 1H- 13C HSQC NMR spectra by Correlated Trace Denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulding, Simon; Charlton, Adrian J.; Donarski, James; Wilson, Julie C.

    2007-12-01

    The presence of t1 noise artefacts in 2D phase-cycled Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC) spectra constrains the use of this experiment despite its superior sensitivity. This paper proposes a new processing algorithm, working in the frequency-domain, for reducing t1 noise. The algorithm has been developed for use in contexts, such as metabolomic studies, where existing denoising techniques cannot always be applied. Two test cases are presented that show the algorithm to be effective in improving the SNR of peaks embedded within t1 noise by a factor of more than 2, while retaining the intensity and shape of genuine peaks.

  18. 2D 31P solid state NMR spectroscopy, electronic structure and thermochemistry of PbP7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benndorf, Christopher; Hohmann, Andrea; Schmidt, Peer; Eckert, Hellmut; Johrendt, Dirk; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Phase pure polycrystalline PbP7 was prepared from the elements via a lead flux. Crystalline pieces with edge-lengths up to 1 mm were obtained. The assignment of the previously published 31P solid state NMR spectrum to the seven distinct crystallographic sites was accomplished by radio-frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) experiments. As commonly found in other solid polyphosphides there is no obvious correlation between the 31P chemical shift and structural parameters. PbP7 decomposes incongruently under release of phosphorus forming liquid lead as remainder. The thermal decomposition starts at T>550 K with a vapor pressure almost similar to that of red phosphorus. Electronic structure calculations reveal PbP7 as a semiconductor according to the Zintl description and clearly shows the stereo-active Pb-6s2 lone pairs in the electron localization function ELF.

  19. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  20. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 2: 2D NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Ashish P.; Pacheco, Carlos; Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyl groups are abundant in natural organic molecules (NOM) and play a major role in their reactivity. The structural environments of carboxyl groups in IHSS soil and river humic samples were investigated using 2D NMR (heteronuclear and homonuclear correlation) spectroscopy. Based on the 1H- 13C heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy results, the carboxyl environments in NOM were categorized as Type I (unsubstituted and alkyl-substituted aliphatic/alicyclic), Type II (functionalized carbon substituted), Type IIIa, b (heteroatom and olefin substituted), and Type IVa, b (5-membered heterocyclic aromatic and 6-membered aromatic). The most intense signal in the HMBC spectra comes from the Type I carboxyl groups, including the 2JCH and 3JCH couplings of unsubstituted aliphatic and alicyclic acids, though this spectral region also includes the 3JCH couplings of Type II and III structures. Type II and III carboxyls have small but detectable 2JCH correlations in all NOM samples except for the Suwannee River humic acid. Signals from carboxyls bonded to 5-membered aromatic heterocyclic fragments (Type IVa) are observed in the soil HA and Suwannee River FA, while correlations to 6-membered aromatics (Type IVb) are only observed in Suwannee River HA. In general, aromatic carboxylic acids may be present at concentrations lower than previously imagined in these samples. Vibrational spectroscopy results for these NOM samples, described in an accompanying paper [Hay M. B. and Myneni S. C. B. (2007) Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (in press)], suggest that Type II and Type III carboxylic acids with α substituents (e.g., -OH, -OR, or -CO 2H) constitute the majority of carboxyl structures in all humic substances examined. Furoic and salicylic acid structures (Type IV) are also feasible fragments, albeit as minor constituents. The

  1. Elucidating structural characteristics of biomass using solution-state 2 D NMR with a mixture of deuterated dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    2016-04-26

    In recent developments of NMR methods for characterization of lignocellulosic biomass allow improved understanding of plant cell-wall structures with minimal deconstruction and modification of biomass. This study introduces a new NMR solvent system composed of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA-d18). HMPA as a co-solvent enhanced swelling and mobility of the biomass samples; thereby it allowed enhancing signals of NMR spectra. Moreover, the structural information of biomass was successfully analyzed by the proposed NMR solvent system (DMSO-d6/HMPA-d18; 4:1, v/v) with different biomass. The proposed bi-solvent system does not require derivatization or isolation of biomass, facilitating a facile sample preparation and involvingmore » with no signals overlapping with biomass peaks. Furthermore, it also allows analyzing biomass with a room-temperature NMR probe instead of cryo-probes, which are traditionally used for enhancing signal intensities.« less

  2. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  3. An F2D analysis of the Flow Instability Test (FIT) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-10-01

    The F2D code was used to analyze the Flow-Instability-Test (FIT) experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratories. A one-dimensional analysis of the experiment indicated that at the higher temperature levels the element should be unstable. The experimental data corroborated this theory. The two-dimensional simulation behaved in a manner that was very similar to the experimentally measured behavior. In conclusion, the FIT experimental analysis yields partial code validation of F2D, and it also validates the methodology that is used in analyzing thermal flow stability.

  4. 2D 1H and 3D 1H-15N NMR of zinc-rubredoxins: contributions of the beta-sheet to thermostability.

    PubMed Central

    Richie, K. A.; Teng, Q.; Elkin, C. J.; Kurtz, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    Based on 2D 1H-1H and 2D and 3D 1H-15N NMR spectroscopies, complete 1H NMR assignments are reported for zinc-containing Clostridium pasteurianum rubredoxin (Cp ZnRd). Complete 1H NMR assignments are also reported for a mutated Cp ZnRd, in which residues near the N-terminus, namely, Met 1, Lys 2, and Pro 15, have been changed to their counterparts, (-), Ala and Glu, respectively, in rubredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf Rd). The secondary structure of both wild-type and mutated Cp ZnRds, as determined by NMR methods, is essentially the same. However, the NMR data indicate an extension of the three-stranded beta-sheet in the mutated Cp ZnRd to include the N-terminal Ala residue and Glu 15, as occurs in Pf Rd. The mutated Cp Rd also shows more intense NOE cross peaks, indicating stronger interactions between the strands of the beta-sheet and, in fact, throughout the mutated Rd. However, these stronger interactions do not lead to any significant increase in thermostability, and both the mutated and wild-type Cp Rds are much less thermostable than Pf Rd. These correlations strongly suggest that, contrary to a previous proposal [Blake PR et al., 1992, Protein Sci 1:1508-1521], the thermostabilization mechanism of Pf Rd is not dominated by a unique set of hydrogen bonds or electrostatic interactions involving the N-terminal strand of the beta-sheet. The NMR results also suggest that an overall tighter protein structure does not necessarily lead to increased thermostability. PMID:8732760

  5. Benchmarking NMR experiments: A relational database of protein pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthamarai, Russell R. P.; Kuprov, Ilya; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2010-03-01

    Systematic benchmarking of multi-dimensional protein NMR experiments is a critical prerequisite for optimal allocation of NMR resources for structural analysis of challenging proteins, e.g. large proteins with limited solubility or proteins prone to aggregation. We propose a set of benchmarking parameters for essential protein NMR experiments organized into a lightweight (single XML file) relational database (RDB), which includes all the necessary auxiliaries (waveforms, decoupling sequences, calibration tables, setup algorithms and an RDB management system). The database is interfaced to the Spinach library ( http://spindynamics.org), which enables accurate simulation and benchmarking of NMR experiments on large spin systems. A key feature is the ability to use a single user-specified spin system to simulate the majority of deposited solution state NMR experiments, thus providing the (hitherto unavailable) unified framework for pulse sequence evaluation. This development enables predicting relative sensitivity of deposited implementations of NMR experiments, thus providing a basis for comparison, optimization and, eventually, automation of NMR analysis. The benchmarking is demonstrated with two proteins, of 170 amino acids I domain of αXβ2 Integrin and 440 amino acids NS3 helicase.

  6. NMR Investigations of Nitrophorin 2 Belt Side Chain Effects on Heme Orientation and Seating of Native N-terminus NP2 and NP2(D1A)

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Shokhireva, Tatiana K.; Garrett, Sarah A.; Goren, Allena M.; Zhang, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    Nitrophorin 2, one of the four NO–storing and –releasing proteins found in the saliva of the blood-sucking bug Rhodnius prolixus, has a more ruffled heme and a high preference for a particular heme orientation (B), compared to those of NP1 and NP4, which show no preference (A:B ~ 1:1), suggesting that it fits more tightly in the β-barrel protein. In this work we have prepared a series of “Belt” mutants of NP2(D1A) and (ΔM0)NP2 aimed at reducing the size of aromatic or other residues that surround the heme, and investigated them as the high-spin aqua and low-spin N-methylimidazole (NMeIm) complexes. The “Belt” mutants included Y38A, Y38F, F42A, F66A, Y85A, Y85F, Y104A, I120T and a triple mutant of NP2(D1A), the F42L,L106F,I120T mutant. Although I120 has been mainly considered to be a distal pocket residue, the CδH3 of I120 lies directly above the heme 3-methyl, at 2.67 Å, of heme orientation B, or 2-vinyl of A, and it thus plays a role as a “Belt” mutant, a role that turns out to be extremely important in creating the strong favoring of the B heme orientation (A:B = 1:14) for NP2(D1A) or 1:12 for (ΔM0)NP2. The results show that the 1D 1H NMR spectra of the high-spin forms are quite sensitive to changes in the shape of the heme binding cavity. The single mutation I120T eliminates the favorability of the B heme orientation by producing a heme A:B orientation of 1:1, while the single mutation F42A reverses the heme orientation from A:B = 1:14 seen for NP2(D1A) to 10:1 for NP2(D1A,F42A). The most extreme ratio was found for the triple mutant of NP2(D1A), NP2(D1A,F42L,L105F,I120T), in which A:B ~25:1, a ΔG change of about −3.5 kcal/mol or −14.1 kJ/mol with respect to NP2(D1A). The seating of the heme is modified as well in that mutant and several others, by rotations of the heme by up to 4° from the seating observed in NP2(D1A), in order to relieve steric interactions between a vinyl β-carbon and a protein side chain, or to fill a cavity

  7. Two dimensional exchange NMR experiments of natural porous media with portable Halbach-Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Agnes; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    The characterization of pore space and connectivity in soils of different textures is one topic within Cluster A, Partial Project A1. For this purpose low field mobile NMR became a powerful tool following the development of portable NMR sensors for well logging. By now there are numerous applications of mobile NMR in materials analysis and chemical engineering where, for example, unique information about the structure, morphology and dynamics of polymers is obtained, and new opportunities are provided for geophysical investigations [1]. In particular, dynamic information can be retrieved by two-dimensional Laplace exchange NMR, where the initial NMR relaxation environment is correlated with the final relaxation environment of molecules migrating from one environment to the other within a so-called NMR mixing time tm [2]. Relaxation-relaxation exchange experiments were performed with saturated and un-saturated soil samples at low and moderately inhomogeneous magnetic field with a simple, portable Halbach-Magnet. By conducting NMR transverse relaxation exchange experiments for several mixing times and inverting the results to 2D T2 distributions (similar to joint probability densities of transverse relaxation times T2) with the help of inverse 2D Laplace Transformation (ILT), we observed characteristic exchange processes: Soils consisting mainly of silt and clay components show predominantly exchange between the smaller pores at mixing times of some milliseconds. In addition, there exists also weaker exchange with the larger pores observable for longer mixing time. In contrast to that fine sand exhibits 2D T2 distributions with no exchange processes which can be interpreted that water molecules move within pores of the same size class. These results will be compared to the exchange behaviour under unsaturated conditions. References: 1. B. Blümich, J. Mauler, A. Haber, J. Perlo, E. Danieli, F. Casanova, Mobile NMR for geophysical analysis and material testing

  8. Comparison of unstable water infiltration in porous media in 2D and 3D experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, C.; Neuweiler, I.; Lehmann, P.; Papafotiou, A.; Vontobel, P.; Hartmann, S.

    2010-05-01

    Water infiltration into unsaturated soil is an important process for groundwater recharge and thus for water balance of natural hydrosystems. The characteristics of infiltration patterns depend on porous media properties and initial moisture content. Infiltration fronts into soil can be unstable in layered media with fine over dry coarse material. To predict arrival times of infiltration fronts and average water content in upscaled models, it is necessary to understand occurrence of instabilities. The unstable flow behavior is not captured by standard models and finger characteristics have mostly been investigated experimentally. Most experiments in the past were carried out in 2D setups and it is not clear how the results of such studies relate to real 3D systems. The aim of this study is to compare development and finger characteristics of unstable infiltration in 2D and 3D setups. We carried out laboratory experiments on fast infiltration in 2D and 3D setups and measured water content in porous media with neutron transmission technology at the NEUTRA beam line at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The 2D experiments were carried out in a glass sandbox (260 mm high, 75 mm wide and 11 mm deep). For the 3D experiments aluminum cylindrical column (150 mm in height and 100 mm in diameter) were used. Both columns were filled homogeneously with coarse quartz sand (grain size 0.7 - 1.2 mm) below fine sand layer (0.1 - 0.3 mm) of 20 - 30 mm thickness. Two dimensional projection images of water content with spatial resolution of 125 microns were deduced from neutron images every 2 second. For the 3D setup water content distribution was reconstructed in 3D to monitor water content inside the fingers over time. Water content and finger-width (15 - 23 mm) were similar for 2D and 3D setups. In both cases water content was maximum when the front passes and was decreasing afterwards (indicating "overshoot" behavior). Also the water content difference between values after

  9. Analytical contribution of NAD 2D-NMR spectroscopy in polypeptide mesophases to the investigation of triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Serhan, Zeinab; Aroulanda, Christie; Billault, Isabelle

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we report and discuss on the use and limitations of the natural abundance deuterium two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in polypeptide chiral and achiral aligning media in the studies of homogenous triglycerides at 14.1 T. As illustrative examples, two triglycerides with short and long alkyl chains were investigated: the 1,3-di(butanoyloxy)propan-2-yl butanoate or tributyrin (TB) and the 1,3-di(tetradecanoyloxy)propan-2-yl tetradecanoate or trimyristin (TM). If both flexible compounds are theoretically of C(s) symmetry on average, according to the Altmann's definition (Proc. Roy. Soc., 1967, A298, 184.), the analysis of spectral data in terms of enantiotopic and diastereotopic discriminations shows noticeable differences related to their orientational ordering behavior inside the mesophases. Although from NMR analysis viewpoint, TB behaves as a C(s) symmetry molecule as expected, the NMR results obtained for TM suggest a behavior that could be formally predicted for a C(3v) symmetry molecule on average. This conclusion was nicely supported by the comparison with the tri-n-propylorthoformate, a real C(3v) symmetry solute on average on the NMR timescale. This difference of effective orientational behavior could originate from the difference of size and shape between lateral and central alkyl chains of the solute molecule. PMID:23280656

  10. Study of the cyclodextrin and its complexation with 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid through photophysical properties and 2D NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalin, T.; Srinivasan, K.; Sivakumar, K.

    2014-02-01

    The host-guest inclusion complex formation of 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid (2,4-DNB) with nano-hydrophobic cavity of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in solution phase were studied by UV-visible spectrophotometer and electrochemical method (cyclic voltammetry, CV). The prototropic behaviors of 2,4-DNB with and without β-CD and the ground state acidity constant (pKa) of host-guest inclusion complex (2,4-DNB-β-CD) was studied. The binding constant of the inclusion complex at 303 K was calculated using Benesi-Hildebrand plot. The solid inclusion complex formation between β-CD and 2,4-DNB was confirmed by 1H NMR, 2D 1H NMR (ROESY), FT-IR, XRD and SEM analysis. A schematic representation of this inclusion process is proposed by molecular docking studies using the patch dock server.

  11. (4,2)D Projection--reconstruction experiments for protein backbone assignment: application to human carbonic anhydrase II and calbindin D(28K).

    PubMed

    Venters, Ronald A; Coggins, Brian E; Kojetin, Doug; Cavanagh, John; Zhou, Pei

    2005-06-22

    Projection-reconstruction NMR experiments have been shown to significantly reduce the acquisition time required to obtain protein backbone assignment data. To date, this concept has only been applied to smaller (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. Here, we show that projection-reconstruction NMR techniques can be extended to larger protonated and perdeuterated proteins. We present a suite of (4,2)D triple-resonance experiments for protein backbone assignment and a Hybrid Backprojection/Lower-Value algorithm for reconstructing data with relatively weak signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, we propose a sampling theorem and discuss its implication on the choice of projection angles. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach using the 29 kDa protein, human carbonic anhydrase II and the 30 kDa protein, calbindin D(28K). PMID:15954785

  12. Contribution of NAD 2D-NMR in liquid crystals to the determination of hydrogen isotope profile of methyl groups in miliacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdagué, Philippe; Lesot, Philippe; Jacob, Jérémy; Terwilliger, Valery J.; Le Milbeau, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δD or (D/H) value) of molecular biomarkers preserved in sedimentary archives is increasingly used to provide clues about the evolution of past climatic conditions. The rationale is that intact biomarkers retain isotopic information related to the climatic conditions that prevailed at the time of their synthesis. Some of these biomarkers may be degraded during diagenesis, however. The extent to which these degradations alter the original δD value of the source biomarker is presently debated and the capacity to resolve this question by determination of compound-specific δD values alone is limited. The "bulk" or "global" δD value of any molecule is in fact a composite of δD values at each site within this molecule (δDi or (D/H)i with i = number of hydrogen/deuterium atoms in the considered molecule). Determination of this site-specific δDi value in biomarkers could not only yield outstanding paleoenvironmental information but also help forecast the impacts of diagenesis and define essential steps in biosynthetic pathways. This task is analytically challenging. Here, we examined the capabilities of natural abundance deuterium 2D-NMR (NAD 2D-NMR) using homopolypeptide liquid crystals as an NMR solvent to: (i) analyze the NAD spectra of biomakers; (ii) determine the site-specific distribution of hydrogen in the nine methyl groups (δDMei with i = 23-31) of miliacin, a pentacyclic triterpene of the amyrin family and key biomarker for broomcorn millet in sedimentary archives. Relative (D/H)Mei values were established by anisotropic NAD 2D-NMR. Then absolute δDMei values were obtained by determining δDMei value of the methoxy group of miliacin using two independent approaches: isotropic NAD NMR (SNIF-NMR™) and GC-irMS. The resulting isotope profile for miliacin shows, for the first time, large variations in δDMei values that can directly be explained by biosynthetic processes. This approach has also the potential to permit

  13. Phase Transitions in Quasi-2D Plasma-Dust Systems: Simulations and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Oleg; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Statsenko, Konstantin; Koss, Xeniya; Vasilieva, Elena; Myasnikov, Maxim; Lisin, Evgeny

    2015-11-01

    A nature of phase transition in quasi-2D dusty plasma structures was studied and the influence of the quasi-2D cluster size (a number of particles in it) on the features of the phase transition was investigated. Experiments and numerical simulation was conducted for the systems consisting of small (~ 10) and large (~ 103) number of particles. To investigate the phase state of the system with 7, 18 and 100 particles observed in numerical and laboratory experiments, we used the method based on analysis of dynamic entropy. Numerical modeling of small systems was conducted by the Langevin molecular dynamic method with the Langevin force, responsible for the stochastic nature of the motion of particles with a given kinetic temperature. Phase state of systems with the number of elements in the order of 103, was studied using the methods of statistical thermodynamics. Here we present new results of an experimental study of the change of translational and orientational order and topological defects, and the pair interactions at 2D melting of dust cluster in rf discharge plasma. The experimental results have revealed the existence of hexatic phase as well as solid-to-hexatic phase and hexatic-to-liquid transitions. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (O.F. Petrov, M.M.Vasiliev, K.B. Stacenko, X.G. Koss, E.V. Vasilieva, M.I.Myasnikov and E.?.Lisin) through Grant No. 14-12-01440).

  14. Triple Resonance Solid State NMR Experiments with Reduced Dimensionality Evolution Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrof, Nathan S.; Lyon, Charles E.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2001-10-01

    Two solid state NMR triple resonance experiments which utilize the simultaneous incrementation of two chemical shift evolution periods to obtain a spectrum with reduced dimensionality are described. The CON CA experiment establishes the correlation of 13Ci-1 to 13Cαi and 15Ni by simultaneously encoding the 13COi-1 and 15Ni chemical shifts. The CAN COCA experiment establishes the correlation 13Cai and 15COi to 13Cαi-1 and 15Ni-1 within a single experiment by simultaneous encoding of the 13Cαi and 15Ni chemical shifts. This experiment establishes sequential amino acid correlations in close analogy to the solution state HNCA experiment. Reduced dimensionality 2D experiments are a practical alternative to recording multiple 3D data sets for the purpose of obtaining sequence-specific resonance assignments of peptides and proteins in the solid state.

  15. 2D NMR studies of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Use of relayed coherence transfer for /sub 1/H resonance assignment and in situ structure elucidation of amikacin derivatives in reaction mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, N.H.; Eaton, H.L.; Nguyen, K.T.; Hartzell, C.; Nelson, R.J.; Priest, J.H.

    1988-04-19

    Phase-sensitive 2D /sup 1/H//sup 1/H COSY spectra can be used to identify the structures of individual pure specimens of the aminoglycoside antibiotic amikacin and its N-hemisuccinyl derivatives. However, even at 500 MHz the 2D chemical shift dispersion does not allow for unambiguous assignment of all cross-peaks. By use of 2D relayed coherence transfer experiments (RELAY) optimized to detect two-step /sup 1/H//sup 1/H scalar interactions in which one of the J-values is small, sufficient additional correlations can be obtained from the frequency-isolated resonances to allow facile tracing of all scalar connectivities. Complete assignments of the /sup 1/H NMR spectra of amikacin, its 6'-N-hemisuccinamide, and a novel bis(acylate) (..gamma..-N-(p-vinylbenzoyl)amikacin 6'-N-hemisuccinamide) were obtained for aqueous media. The NMR spectrum of amikacin free base was also assigned in dimethyl sulfoxide solution. The RELAY experiment can be extended to the analysis of reaction mixtures, which allows for the identification and resonance assignment of regioisomeric amikacin haptens in the mixture state. All of the N-monohemisuccinyl isomers of amikacin have been identified in reaction mixtures through the RELAY experiment. The relative reactivities of the amino functions of amikacin toward acylating agents were found to be 6'-N > 3-N greater than or equal to 3''-N greater than or equal to ..gamma..-N. However, this reactivity order is altered after the initial acylation event.

  16. Instrument Control and Data Acquisition for NMR Experiments

    1999-03-29

    This is a software program which is intended to do some instrument control and data acquisition for NMR experiments. The basic purpose of the program is to allow a user of the NMR system to create a list of instructions which tells the program what steps should be done, the stat the data taking program and let the system run by itself (depending on the type of sample and the type of experiment being run,more » it can take from several minutes to many hours to do a data collection run).« less

  17. Solution-state 2D NMR of ball-milled plant cell wall gels in DMSO-d6/pyridine-d5†

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, John

    2014-01-01

    NMR fingerprinting of the components of finely divided plant cell walls swelled in DMSO has been recently described. Cell wall gels, produced directly in the NMR tube with perdeutero-dimethylsulfoxide, allowed the acquisition of well resolved/dispersed 2D 13C–1H correlated solution-state NMR spectra of the entire array of wall polymers, without the need for component fractionation. That is, without actual solubilization, and without apparent structural modification beyond that inflicted by the ball milling and ultrasonication steps, satisfactorily interpretable spectra can be acquired that reveal compositional and structural details regarding the polysaccharide and lignin components in the wall. Here, the profiling method has been improved by using a mixture of perdeuterated DMSO and pyridine (4:1, v/v). Adding pyridine provided not only easier sample handling because of the better mobility compared to the DMSO-d6-only system but also considerably elevated intensities and improved resolution of the NMR spectra due to the enhanced swelling of the cell walls. This modification therefore provides a more rapid method for comparative structural evaluation of plant cell walls than is currently available. We examined loblolly pine (Pinus taeda, a gymnosperm), aspen (Populus tremuloides, an angiosperm), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus, an herbaceous plant), and corn (Zea mays L., a grass, i.e., from the Poaceae family). In principle, lignin composition (notably, the syringyl : guaiacyl : p-hydroxyphenyl ratio) can be quantified without the need for lignin isolation. Correlations for p-coumarate units in the corn sample are readily seen, and a variety of the ferulate correlations are also well resolved; ferulates are important components responsible for cell wall cross-linking in grasses. Polysaccharide anomeric correlations were tentatively assigned for each plant sample based on standard samples and various literature data. With the new potential for chemometric analysis

  18. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, Ivan I.; Vinding, Mads S.; Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Shah, N. Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  19. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Ivan I; Vinding, Mads S; Tse, Desmond H Y; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Shah, N Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community. PMID:25863895

  20. Rapid Plateau border size variations expected in three simple experiments on 2D liquid foams.

    PubMed

    Gay, C; Rognon, P; Reinelt, D; Molino, F

    2011-01-01

    Up to a global scaling, the geometry of foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams) essentially depends on two independent parameters: the liquid volume fraction and the degree of squeezing (bubble thickness to diameter ratio). We describe it in two main asymptotic regimes: fully dry floor tiles, where the Plateau border radius is smaller than the distance between the solid plates, and dry pancakes, where it is larger. We predict a rapid variation of the Plateau border radius in one part of the pancake regime, namely when the Plateau border radius is larger than the inter-plate distance but smaller than the geometric mean of that distance and the bubble perimeter. This rapid variation is not related to any topological change in the foam: in all the regimes we consider, the bubbles remain in mutual lateral contact through films located at mid-height between both plates. We provide asymptotic predictions in different types of experiments on such 2D GG foams: when foam is being progressively dried or wetted, when it is being squeezed further or stretched, when it coarsens through film breakage or through inter-bubble gas diffusion. Our analysis is restricted to configurations close to equilibrium, as we do not include stresses resulting from bulk viscous flow or from non-homogeneous surfactant concentrations. We also assume that the inter-plate distance is sufficiently small for gravity to be negligible. The present work does not provide a method for measuring small Plateau border radii experimentally, but it indicates that large (and easily observable) Plateau borders should appear or disappear rather suddenly in some types of experiments with small inter-plate gaps. It also gives expected orders of magnitude that should be helpful for designing experiments on 2D GG foams. PMID:21253804

  1. Study of inclusion complex between 2,6-dinitrobenzoic acid and β-cyclodextrin by 1H NMR, 2D 1H NMR (ROESY), FT-IR, XRD, SEM and photophysical methods.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Krishnan; Stalin, Thambusamy

    2014-09-15

    The formation of host-guest inclusion complex of 2,6-dinitrobenzoic acid (2,6-DNB) with nano-hydrophobic cavity of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in solution phase has been studied by UV-visible spectroscopy and electrochemical analysis (cyclic voltammetry, CV). The effect of acid-base concentrations of 2,6-DNB has been studied in presence and absence of β-CD to determination for the ground state acidity constant (pKa). The binding constant of inclusion complex at 303 K was calculated using Benesi-Hildebrand plot and thermodynamic parameter (ΔG) was also calculated. The solid inclusion complex formation between β-CD and 2,6-DNB was confirmed by 1H NMR, 2D 1H NMR (ROESY), FT-IR, XRD and SEM analysis. A schematic representation of this inclusion process was proposed by molecular docking studies using patch dock server. PMID:24769381

  2. Study of inclusion complex between 2,6-dinitrobenzoic acid and β-cyclodextrin by 1H NMR, 2D 1H NMR (ROESY), FT-IR, XRD, SEM and photophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Krishnan; Stalin, Thambusamy

    2014-09-01

    The formation of host-guest inclusion complex of 2,6-dinitrobenzoic acid (2,6-DNB) with nano-hydrophobic cavity of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in solution phase has been studied by UV-visible spectroscopy and electrochemical analysis (cyclic voltammetry, CV). The effect of acid-base concentrations of 2,6-DNB has been studied in presence and absence of β-CD to determination for the ground state acidity constant (pKa). The binding constant of inclusion complex at 303 K was calculated using Benesi-Hildebrand plot and thermodynamic parameter (ΔG) was also calculated. The solid inclusion complex formation between β-CD and 2,6-DNB was confirmed by 1H NMR, 2D 1H NMR (ROESY), FT-IR, XRD and SEM analysis. A schematic representation of this inclusion process was proposed by molecular docking studies using patch dock server.

  3. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  4. 13C and 1H chemical shift assignments and conformation confirmation of trimedlure-Y via 2-D NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warthen, J. D.; Waters, R. M.; McGovern, T. P.

    The conformation of 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- cis-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-Y) was confirmed as 1,2,5 equatorial, axial, equatorial via 13C, 1H, APT, CSCM and COSY NMR analyses. The carbon and proton nuclei in trimedlure-Y and the previously unassigned eight cyclohexyl protons (1.50-2.60 ppm) in 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- trans-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-B 1; 1,2,5 equatorial, equatorial, equatorial) were also characterized by these methods. The effects of the 2-CH 3 in the axial or equatorial conformation upon the chemical shifts of the other nuclei in the molecule are discussed.

  5. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  6. Synthesis of new thiazolo-celecoxib analogues as dual cyclooxygenase-2/15-lipoxygenase inhibitors: Determination of regio-specific different pyrazole cyclization by 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Abdelall, Eman K A; Kamel, Gehan M

    2016-08-01

    Two new series of 1,5-diaryl pyrazoles (5a, 5b, 7a, 7b and 10) and 1,5-diaryl pyrazoline (12a and 12b) were prepared as both Cyclooxygenase-2 and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitors. Carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, ulcer index and anti-COX-1/COX-2 and 15-LOX inhibition assays were also included. Cyclization of different pyrazoles was discussed using 2D NMR such as HSQC, HMBC and NOSEY determinations. Compound 5a is more effective with ED50 = 0.98 and 3.98 μM against COX-2 and 15-lipoxygenase respectively, than the references celecoxib (1.54 μM) and meclofenamate sodium (5.64 μM). PMID:27131067

  7. Carbon-proton scalar couplings in RNA. 3D heteronuclear and 2D isotope-edited NMR of a [sup 13]C-labeled extra-stable hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; Varani, G.; Tinoco, I. Jr. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-29

    Long range carbon-proton scalar couplings were measured for an RNA hairpin of 12 nucleotides using 3D and [sup 13]C-edited 2D NMR. The large one-bond carbon-proton scalar couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) and small n-bond couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) produce ECOSY type cross-peaks, thus facilitating the determination of the sign and magnitude of the smaller [sup 2]J[sub CH] or [sup 3]J[sub CH]. The UUCGRNA hairpin (5[prime]-rGGACUUCGGUCC-3[prime]), whose structure has been determined by our laboratory, was uniformly [sup 13]C-labeled at 30% isotopic enrichment. The observed [sup 1]J[sub CH] couplings were then correlated to the known structure. The signs of [sup 2]J[sub C4[prime]H5[prime

  8. The novel acid degradation products of losartan: Isolation and characterization using Q-TOF, 2D-NMR and FTIR.

    PubMed

    Kumar Pandey, Avadhesh; Rapolu, Ravi; Raju, Ch Krishnam; Sasalamari, Gururaj; Kumar Goud, Sanath; Awasthi, Atul; Navalgund, Sameer G; Surendranath, Koduru V

    2016-02-20

    Forced degradation of losartan potassium in acidic condition resulted into three potential unknown impurities. These unknown degradation products marked as LD-I, LD-II and LD-III were analyzed using a new reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), eluting at 3.63, 3.73 and 3.91 relative retention times with respect to losartan potassium (LOS) peak. All three were isolated from reaction mass using preparative HPLC and their structures were elucidated using LC-MS/MS, multidimensional NMR and FTIR spectroscopic techniques, as 5(2),11(2)-dibutyl-5(4),11(4)-dichloro-1(1)H,5(1)H,7(1)H,11(1)H-1(5,1),7(1,5)-ditetrazola-5,11(1,5)-diimidazola-2,8(1,2),3,9(1,4)-tetrabenzenacyclododecaphane,(Z)-5(2),11(2)-dibutyl-5(4),11(4)-dichloro-1(1)H,5(1)H,7(2)H,11(1)H-1(5,1),7(2,5)-ditetrazola-5,11(1,5)-diimidazola-2,8(1,2),3,9(1,4)-tetrabenzenacyclododecaphane, and 5(2),11(2)-dibutyl-5(4),11(4)-dichloro-1(2)H,5(1)H,7(2)H,11(1)H-1(5,2),7(2,5)-ditetrazola-5,11(1,5)-diimidazola-2,8(1,2),3,9(1,4)-tetrabenzenacyclododecaphane, respectively. To best of our knowledge, all three degradation products are novel impurities which are not discussed at any form of publication yet. PMID:26704631

  9. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, J.; Bellama, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two dimensional NMR represents a significant achievement in the continuing effort to increase solution in NMR spectroscopy. This book explains the fundamentals of this new technique and its analytical applications. It presents the necessary information, in pictorial form, for reading the ''2D NMR,'' and enables the practicing chemist to solve problems and run experiments on a commercial spectrometer by using the software provided by the manufacturer.

  10. A 2D MOT design optimized for dual-species 6 Li-7 Li experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yanping; Evans, Jesse; Wright, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    We have built a 2D MOT optimized for simultaneous capture and cooling of 6 Li and 7 Li. The design includes a vapor source located very close to the capture region, which reduces depletion of the low-velocity part of the oven flux. The source is angled so that the most probable longitudinal velocity of captured atoms is near optimal for transferring to a 3D MOT, even without a push beam. Because 6 Li D2 repump light can impede capture and cooling of 7 Li, we have characterized the system performance with 6 Li repumped on both the D1 and D2 transitions. This design provides ample cold atom flux to load a dual-species 3D MOT for quantum degenerate gas experiments.

  11. Impact of Surface Roughness on Capillary Trapping Using 2D-Micromodel Visualization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Attaei-Dadavi, Iman; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    According to experimental observations, capillary trapping is strongly dependent on the roughness of the pore-solid interface. We performed imbibition experiments in the range of capillary numbers (Ca) from 10^-6 to 5x10^-5 using 2D-micromodels, which exhibit a rough surface. The microstructure comprises a double-porosity structure with pronounced macropores. The dynamics of precursor thin-film flow and its importance for capillary trapping is studied. For the first time Thin-Film Dynamics and the Complex Interplay of Thin Film- and Corner Flow for Snap-off Trapping is visualized using fluorescence microscopy. The experimental data for thin-film flow advancement show a square-root time dependence. Contrary to smooth surfaces, we prove by strict thermodynamical arguments that complete wetting is possible in a broad range of contact angles (0 - 90°). We develop a pore-scale model, which describes the front dynamics of thin-film flow on rough surfaces. Furthermore, contact angle hysteresis is considered for rough surfaces. We conduct a comprehensive cluster analysis, studying the influence of viscous forces (capillary number) and buoyancy forces (bond number) on cluster size distribution and comparing the results with predictions from percolation theory. We found that our experimental results agree with theoretical results of percolation theory for Ca = 10^-6: (i) a universal power-like cluster size distribution, (ii) the linear surface-volume relationship of trapped clusters, and (iii) the existence of the cut-off correlation length for the maximal cluster height. The good agreement is a strong argument that the experimental cluster size distribution is caused by a percolation-like trapping process (Ordinary Percolation). [1] H. Geistlinger, I. Ataei-Dadavi, S. Mohammadian, and H.-J. Vogel (2015) The Impact of Pore structure and Surface Roughness on Capillary Trapping for 2D- and 3D-porous media: Comparison with Percolation theory. Special issue: Applications of

  12. 2D experiments for characterizing solute dispersion in unsaturated heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Martinez, J.; De Anna, P.; Turuban, R.; Tabuteau, H.; Le Borgne, T.; Meheust, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The unsaturated zone plays a key role in the transfer of chemical elements from the surface to the subsurface. Yet, predicting the transport of chemical species through unsaturated porous media is still an open issue. The distribution of water and air clusters creates flow paths that are controlled by the water saturation, with the feature of a large velocity distribution. As saturation decreases, very low velocity zones in regions of trapped fluid coexist with connected fluid clusters with relatively high velocities. As a consequence the dispersion of solute elements strongly depends on the saturation degree. Numerical simulations of unsaturated flows at the pore scale are feasible, but to our knowledge no simulation of solute transport in the water phase during two-phase flow has been achieved yet. Due to technical difficulties, there also exists relatively few laboratory experiments that allow for visualization and quantification of unsaturated flow and transport at the pore scale. We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) horizontal set up, built by lithographic technique and in which a joint injection of the two phases (wetting and non-wetting) provides a controlled homogeneous saturation in the medium. The simultaneous precise measurement of the flow field, the spatial distribution of water and air, and the 2D tracer concentration field, as well as breakthrough curves at different locations, are used to investigate the relationship between the flow field complexity (velocity distribution and its correlation properties) and dispersion properties. Experimental results show non-Fickian transport behaviors, characterized by heavy tailed breakthrough curves, whose characteristics depend on the average saturation.

  13. 2-D Air-Breathing Lightcraft Engine Experiments in Hypersonic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Israel I.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Minucci, Marco A. S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; Toro, Paulo G. P.; Chanes, José B.; Rego, Israel S.

    2011-11-01

    Experiments were performed with a 2-D, repetitively-pulsed (RP) laser Lightcraft model in hypersonic flow conditions. The main objective was the feasibility analysis for impulse generation with repetitively-pulsed air-breathing laser Lightcraft engines at hypersonic speeds. The future application of interest for this basic research endeavor is the laser launch of pico-, nano-, and micro-satellites (i.e., 0.1-100 kg payloads) into Low-Earth-Orbit, at low-cost and on-demand. The laser propulsion experiments employed a Hypersonic Shock Tunnel integrated with twin gigawatt pulsed Lumonics 620-TEA CO2 lasers (˜ 1 μs pulses), to produce the required test conditions. This hypersonic campaign was carried out at nominal Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 10. Time-dependent surface pressure distributions were recorded together with Schlieren movies of the flow field structure resulting from laser energy deposition. Results indicated laser-induced pressure increases of 0.7-0.9 bar with laser pulse energies of ˜ 170 J, on off-shroud induced breakdown condition, and Mach number of 7.

  14. 2D fluid simulations of acoustic waves in pulsed ICP discharges: Comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neutral depletion, which is mostly caused by gas heating under typical material processing conditions, is an important phenomenon in high-density plasmas. In low pressure pulsed discharges, experiments show that additional depletion due to electron pressure (Pe) may have a non-negligible influence on radical transport [1]. To evaluate this effect, comparisons between 2D fluid simulations and measurements of gas convection in Ar/Cl2 pulsed ICP plasmas are reported. In the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly by electron cooling which generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls. This in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Time-resolved measurements of atoms drift velocity and gas temperature by LIF and LAS in the early afterglow are consistent with gas drifting at acoustic wave velocity followed by rapid gas cooling. Similar results are predicted by the model. The ion flux at the reactor walls is also shown to oscillate in phase with the acoustic wave due to ion-neutral friction forces. Finally, during plasma ignition, experiments show opposite phenomena when Pe rises.[4pt] [1] Cunge et al, APL 96, 131501 (2010)

  15. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  16. Rise characteristics of gas bubbles in a 2D rectangular column: VOF simulations vs experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, R.; Baten, J.M. van

    1999-10-01

    About five centuries ago, Leonardo da Vinci described the sinuous motion of gas bubbles rising in water. The authors have attempted to simulate the rise trajectories of bubbles of 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 20 mm in diameter rising in a 2D rectangular column filled with water. The simulations were carried out using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique developed by Hirt and Nichols (J. Computational Physics, 39, 201--225 (1981)). To solve the Navier-Stokes equations of motion the authors used a commercial solver, CFX 4.1c of AEA Technology, UK. They developed their own bubble-tracking algorithm to capture sinuous bubble motions. The 4 and 5 mm bubbles show large lateral motions observed by Da Vinci. The 7, 8 and 9 mm bubble behave like jellyfish. The 12 mm bubble flaps its wings like a bird. The extent of lateral motion of the bubbles decreases with increasing bubble size. Bubbles larger than 20 mm in size assume a spherical cap form and simulations of the rise characteristics match experiments exactly. VOF simulations are powerful tools for a priori determination of the morphology and rise characteristics of bubbles rising in a liquid. Bubble-bubble interactions are also properly modeled by the VOF technique.

  17. 2-D Circulation Control Airfoil Benchmark Experiments Intended for CFD Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Allan, Brian G.; Lin, Johb C.

    2009-01-01

    A current NASA Research Announcement (NRA) project being conducted by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) personnel and NASA collaborators includes the development of Circulation Control (CC) blown airfoils to improve subsonic aircraft high-lift and cruise performance. The emphasis of this program is the development of CC active flow control concepts for both high-lift augmentation, drag control, and cruise efficiency. A collaboration in this project includes work by NASA research engineers, whereas CFD validation and flow physics experimental research are part of NASA s systematic approach to developing design and optimization tools for CC applications to fixed-wing aircraft. The design space for CESTOL type aircraft is focusing on geometries that depend on advanced flow control technologies that include Circulation Control aerodynamics. The ability to consistently predict advanced aircraft performance requires improvements in design tools to include these advanced concepts. Validation of these tools will be based on experimental methods applied to complex flows that go beyond conventional aircraft modeling techniques. This paper focuses on recent/ongoing benchmark high-lift experiments and CFD efforts intended to provide 2-D CFD validation data sets related to NASA s Cruise Efficient Short Take Off and Landing (CESTOL) study. Both the experimental data and related CFD predictions are discussed.

  18. 2D Mesoscale Simulation of Shock Response of Dry Sand in Plate Impact Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L.; Teeter, R. D.; Dwivedi, S. K.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2007-06-01

    The one-dimensional approach with a homogenized continuum model used in the literature to derive the shock Hugoniot of sand from plate impact experimental data neglects heterogeneous deformation and cannot incorporate mesoscale phenomena. We present a 2D mesoscale simulation approach to probe the shock response of dry sand with the main objectives to identify important mesoscale phenomena and the role of inter granular friction. The in-house code ISP-SAND was used to generate sand with desired grain size distribution and porosity. The explicit finite element code ISP-TROTP was used to simulate plate impact experiments of assumed configurations. The deformation of individual sand grains was modeled by non-linear mean stress volume compression relation with an assumed mean stress dependent yield strength. The results show heterogeneous deformation with finite lateral velocity and regions of stress concentrations in the sand sample. The effects of grain size distribution, porosity and friction between grains are discussed by comparing the particle velocity profiles at the window interface. Work supported by DOE and AFOSR.

  19. High-Resolution NMR Probe for Experiments at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, L.; Reiner, C.; Jonas, J.

    A 300 MHz high-resolution, high-pressure NMR probe which operates in the pressure range of 1 bar to 9 kbar at temperatures of -30 to 100°C is described. Specialized novel design features of the probe are discussed and test spectra showing resolution better than 1 Hz (<3.0 × 10 -9) for 8 mm samples are presented. Potential biochemical applications of this probe are illustrated by experiments dealing with the pressure-induced unfolding of hen egg white lysozyme.

  20. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches. PMID:22427982

  1. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  2. 2-D magnetotelluric experiment to investigate the Nassugtoqidian orogeny in South-East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heincke, Björn; Chen, Jin; Riisager, Peter; Kolb, Jochen; Jørgensen, Asta F.

    2015-04-01

    The northwest-trending Palaeoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian orogen extends over 250 km along the east coast of Greenland in the area around the village Tasiilaq. The geological evolution of this area closely compares with the ones of the Lewisian complex of Scotland and the Nagssugtoqidian orogen in western Greenland and, hence, leads to the suggestion that they belong to the same continental-scale orogenic belt. However, an accurate correlation across the inland ice is challenging and still ambiguous and therefore more detailed knowledge about the individual orogens might help to understand their relationship. Details about the large-scale tectonic evolution during the Nagssugtoqidian orogeny in this remote Arctic region are not known due to complex geology, relatively coarse geological mapping and the lack of extensive geophysical investigations. E.g. the vergence of the orogen, subduction-related magmatism and accretion history are matters of ongoing discussion (Kalsbeek et al., 1993; Nutman et al., 2008 and Kolb, 2013). We performed a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the southern part of the orogen along the Sermilik Fjord in order to improve our understanding of the orogenic process in general and to better constrain the location and vergence of the suture zone. However, because of the rough climate and the lack of infrastructure, this study is considered as a first test to investigate how MT surveys can be most efficiently performed in this remote part of the world. The NE-SW trending profile consists of eight MT stations and has a total length of ~70 km using long period LEMI-420 systems. The quality of the data is severely affected by polar electrojets that do not satisfy the plane wave assumptions, which is typical for regions close to the magnetic poles. In order to reduce the distortion from these signals onto the impedance estimates, we tested different advanced processing schemes. In addition to the more conventional robust response function

  3. Quality assessment of fluoxetine and fluvoxamine pharmaceutical formulations purchased in different countries or via the Internet by 19F and 2D DOSY 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Trefi, Saleh; Gilard, Véronique; Balayssac, Stéphane; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Martino, Robert

    2008-03-13

    A simple and selective (19)F NMR method has been validated for the quantitation of fluoxetine (FLX) and fluvoxamine (FLV) in methanol solutions and in human plasma and urine. The regression equations for FLX and FLV showed a good linearity in the range of 1.4-620 microg mL(-1) (3.3 x 10(-6)-1.8 x 10(-3) mol L(-1)) with a limit of detection of approximately 0.5 microg mL(-1) (1.3 x 10(-6) mol L(-1)) and a limit of quantification of approximately 2 microg mL(-1) (4.6 x 10(-6) mol L(-1)). The precision of the assay depends on the concentrations and is comprised between 1.5 and 9.5% for a range of concentrations between 1.2 x 10(-3) and 3.2 x 10(-6) mol L(-1). The accuracy evaluated through recovery studies ranged from approximately 96 to 103% in methanol solutions and in urine, and from approximately 93 to 104% in plasma, with standard deviations <7.5%. The low sensitivity of the method precludes its use for the assay of these antidepressants in biofluids at least at therapeutic doses as the ranges of FLX and FLV plasma levels are 0.15-0.5 microg mL(-1) and 0.15-0.25 microg mL(-1), respectively. The method was applied successfully to the determination of FLX and FLV contents in pharmaceutical samples (brand-named and generic) purchased in several countries or via the Internet. All the commercial formulations contain the active ingredient in the range 94-103% of stated concentration. A "signature" of the formulations (solid and liquid) was obtained with 2D Diffusion-Ordered SpectroscopY (DOSY) (1)H NMR which allowed the characterisation of the active ingredient and excipients present in the formulations studied. Finally, the DOSY separation of FLX and FLV whose molecular weights are very close was obtained by using beta-cyclodextrin as host-guest complexing agent. PMID:18206329

  4. Jointly deriving NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions by NMR relaxation experiments on partially desaturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Hughes, B.

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a geophysical method widely used in borehole and laboratory applications to nondestructively infer transport and storage properties of rocks and soils as it is directly sensitive to the water/oil content and pore sizes. However, for inferring pore sizes, NMR relaxometry data need to be calibrated with respect to a surface interaction parameter, surface relaxivity, which depends on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock. This study introduces an inexpensive and quick alternative to the classical calibration methods, e.g., mercury injection, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR, or grain size analysis, which allows for jointly estimating NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions using NMR relaxometry data from partially desaturated rocks. Hereby, NMR relaxation experiments are performed on the fully saturated sample and on a sample partially drained at a known differential pressure. Based on these data, the (capillary) pore radius distribution and surface relaxivity are derived by joint optimization of the Brownstein-Tarr and the Young-Laplace equation assuming parallel capillaries. Moreover, the resulting pore size distributions can be used to predict water retention curves. This inverse modeling approach—tested and validated using NMR relaxometry data measured on synthetic porous borosilicate samples with known petrophysical properties (i.e., permeability, porosity, inner surfaces, pore size distributions)—yields consistent and reproducible estimates of surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions. Also, subsequently calculated water retention curves generally correlate well with measured water retention curves.

  5. Metabolic flux and metabolic network analysis of Penicillium chrysogenum using 2D [13C, 1H] COSY NMR measurements and cumulative bondomer simulation.

    PubMed

    van Winden, Wouter A; van Gulik, Walter M; Schipper, Dick; Verheijen, Peter J T; Krabben, Preben; Vinke, Jacobus L; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2003-07-01

    At present two alternative methods are available for analyzing the fluxes in a metabolic network: (1) combining measurements of net conversion rates with a set of metabolite balances including the cofactor balances, or (2) leaving out the cofactor balances and fitting the resulting free fluxes to measured (13)C-labeling data. In this study these two approaches are applied to the fluxes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway of Penicillium chrysogenum growing on either ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source, which is expected to give different pentose phosphate pathway fluxes. The presented flux analyses are based on extensive sets of 2D [(13)C, (1)H] COSY data. A new concept is applied for simulation of this type of (13)C-labeling data: cumulative bondomer modeling. The outcomes of the (13)C-labeling based flux analysis substantially differ from those of the pure metabolite balancing approach. The fluxes that are determined using (13)C-labeling data are shown to be highly dependent on the chosen metabolic network. Extending the traditional nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway with additional transketolase and transaldolase reactions, extending the glycolysis with a fructose 6-phosphate aldolase/dihydroxyacetone kinase reaction sequence or adding a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase reaction to the model considerably improves the fit of the measured and the simulated NMR data. The results obtained using the extended version of the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway model show that the transketolase and transaldolase reactions need not be assumed reversible to get a good fit of the (13)C-labeling data. Strict statistical testing of the outcomes of (13)C-labeling based flux analysis using realistic measurement errors is demonstrated to be of prime importance for verifying the assumed metabolic model. PMID:12740935

  6. Residual methyl protonation in perdeuterated proteins for multi-dimensional correlation experiments in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Vipin; Reif, Bernd

    2008-09-01

    NMR studies involving perdeuterated proteins focus in general on exchangeable amide protons. However, non-exchangeable sites contain as well a small amount of protons as the employed precursors for protein biosynthesis are not completely proton depleted. The degree of methyl group protonation is in the order of 9% for CD 2H using >97% deuterium enriched glucose. We show in this manuscript that this small amount of residual protonation is sufficient to perform 2D and 3D MAS solid-state NMR experiments. In particular, we suggest a HCCH-TOBSY type experiment which we successfully employ to assign the methyl resonances in aliphatic side chains in a perdeuterated sample of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin.

  7. Collaborative development for setup, execution, sharing and analytics of complex NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Alistair G.; Slynko, Vadim; Nikolaev, Yaroslav; Senthamarai, Russell R. P.; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2014-02-01

    Factory settings of NMR pulse sequences are rarely ideal for every scenario in which they are utilised. The optimisation of NMR experiments has for many years been performed locally, with implementations often specific to an individual spectrometer. Furthermore, these optimised experiments are normally retained solely for the use of an individual laboratory, spectrometer or even single user. Here we introduce a web-based service that provides a database for the deposition, annotation and optimisation of NMR experiments. The application uses a Wiki environment to enable the collaborative development of pulse sequences. It also provides a flexible mechanism to automatically generate NMR experiments from deposited sequences. Multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins and other macromolecules consume significant resources, in terms of both spectrometer time and effort required to analyse the results. Systematic analysis of simulated experiments can enable optimal allocation of NMR resources for structural analysis of proteins. Our web-based application (http://nmrplus.org) provides all the necessary information, includes the auxiliaries (waveforms, decoupling sequences etc.), for analysis of experiments by accurate numerical simulation of multidimensional NMR experiments. The online database of the NMR experiments, together with a systematic evaluation of their sensitivity, provides a framework for selection of the most efficient pulse sequences. The development of such a framework provides a basis for the collaborative optimisation of pulse sequences by the NMR community, with the benefits of this collective effort being available to the whole community.

  8. Enhancing signal detection and completely eliminating scattering using quasi-phase-cycling in 2D IR experiments.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Robbert; Garrett-Roe, Sean; Strzalka, Halina; Hamm, Peter; Donaldson, Paul

    2010-12-20

    We demonstrate how quasi-phase-cycling achieved by sub-cycle delay modulation can be used to replace optical chopping in a box-CARS 2D IR experiment in order to enhance the signal size, and, at the same time, completely eliminate any scattering contamination. Two optical devices are described that can be used for this purpose, a wobbling Brewster window and a photoelastic modulator. They are simple to construct, easy to incorporate into any existing 2D IR setup, and have attractive features such as a high optical throughput and a fast modulation frequency needed to phase cycle on a shot-to-shot basis. PMID:21196983

  9. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  10. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  11. Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns with a Photoinjected Pure Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, Daniel; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    The equations governing the evolution of a strongly magnetized pure electron plasma are analogous to those of an ideal 2D fluid; plasma density is analogous to fluid vorticity. Therefore, we can study vortex dynamics with pure electron plasmas. We generate our electron plasma with a photocathode electron source. The photocathode provides greater control over the initial profile than previous thermionic sources and allows us to create complicated initial density distributions, corresponding to complicated vorticity distributions in a fluid. Results on the stability of 2D vortex patterns will be presented: 1) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring; 2) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring with a central vortex; 3) The stability of more complicated vortex patterns.(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ )fajans/

  12. First experiences with 2D-mXRF analysis of gunshot residue on garment, tissue, and cartridge cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knijnenberg, Alwin; Stamouli, Amalia; Janssen, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The investigation of garment and human tissue originating from a victim of a shooting incident can provide crucial information for the reconstruction of such an incident. The use of 2D-mXRF for such investigations has several advantages over current methods as this new technique can be used to scan large areas, provides simultaneous information on multiple elements, can be applied under ambient conditions and is non-destructive. In this paper we report our experiences and challenges with the implementation of 2D-mXRF in GSR analysis. Currently we mainly focus on the use of 2D-mXRF as a tool for visualizing elemental distributions on various samples.

  13. Realization of an Er 2D MOT for a Na+Er mixture experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Neil; Banik, Swarnav; Gutierrez, Monica; Kumar, Avinash; Eckel, Stephen; Campbell, Gretchen

    2016-05-01

    We have realized a dual-species sodium and erbium 2D MOT. This compact source allows us to rapidly switch between loading either species into 3D MOTs in a main chamber. We have characterized the flux from this source and the resulting loading rates into the 3D MOTs. This new source opens possibilities of studying lanthanide-alkali collisions and Feshbach spectra, possibly opening new pathways to realizing interesting quantum many body systems.

  14. Multiple Acquisition of Magic Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Experiments Using One Receiver: Application to Microcrystalline and Membrane Protein Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    Solid-State NMR spectroscopy of proteins is a notoriously low-throughput technique. Relatively low-sensitivity and poor resolution of protein samples require long acquisition times for multidimensional NMR experiments. To speed up data acquisition, we developed a family of experiments called Polarization Optimized Experiments (POE), in which we utilized the orphan spin operators that are discarded in classical multidimensional NMR experiments, recovering them to allow simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D experiments, all while using conventional probes with spectrometers equipped with one receiver. POEs allow the concatenation of multiple 2D or 3D pulse sequences into a single experiment, thus potentially combining all of the aforementioned advances, boosting the capability of ssNMR spectrometers at least two-fold without the addition of any hardware. In this Perspective, we describe the first generation of POEs, such as dual acquisition MAS (or DUMAS) methods, and then illustrate the evolution of these experiments into MEIOSIS, a method that enables the simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra. Using these new pulse schemes for the solid-state NMR investigation of biopolymers makes it possible to obtain sequential resonance assignments, as well as distance restraints, in about half the experimental time. While designed for acquisition of heteronuclei, these new experiments can be easily implemented for proton detection and coupled with other recent advancements, such as dynamic polarization, to improve signal to noise. Finally, we illustrate the application of these methods to microcrystalline protein preparations as well as single and multi-span membrane proteins reconstituted in lipid membranes. PMID:25797011

  15. Multiple acquisition of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments using one receiver: Application to microcrystalline and membrane protein preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of proteins is a notoriously low-throughput technique. Relatively low-sensitivity and poor resolution of protein samples require long acquisition times for multidimensional NMR experiments. To speed up data acquisition, we developed a family of experiments called Polarization Optimized Experiments (POE), in which we utilized the orphan spin operators that are discarded in classical multidimensional NMR experiments, recovering them to allow simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D experiments, all while using conventional probes with spectrometers equipped with one receiver. POE allow the concatenation of multiple 2D or 3D pulse sequences into a single experiment, thus potentially combining all of the aforementioned advances, boosting the capability of ssNMR spectrometers at least two-fold without the addition of any hardware. In this perspective, we describe the first generation of POE, such as dual acquisition MAS (or DUMAS) methods, and then illustrate the evolution of these experiments into MEIOSIS, a method that enables the simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra. Using these new pulse schemes for the solid-state NMR investigation of biopolymers makes it possible to obtain sequential resonance assignments, as well as distance restraints, in about half the experimental time. While designed for acquisition of heteronuclei, these new experiments can be easily implemented for proton detection and coupled with other recent advancements, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), to improve signal to noise. Finally, we illustrate the application of these methods to microcrystalline protein preparations as well as single and multi-span membrane proteins reconstituted in lipid membranes.

  16. Using an NMR Spectrometer to Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Wayne E.; Maher, M. Cyrus

    2007-01-01

    A conventional Fourier-transform NMR spectrometer with a triple-axis gradient probe can function as a MRI imager. In this experiment students gain hands-on experience with MRI while they learn about important principles underlying the practice of NMR, such as gradients, multi-dimensional spectroscopy, and relaxation. Students image a biological…

  17. A Solid-State NMR Experiment: Analysis of Local Structural Environments in Phosphate Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stanley E.; Saiki, David; Eckert, Hellmut; Meise-Gresch, Karin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment that can be used to directly study the local chemical environments of phosphorus in solid amorphous materials is demonstrated. The experiment aims at familiarizing the students of chemistry with the principles of solid-state NMR, by having them synthesize a simple phosphate glass, and making them observe the (super 31)P NMR spectrum,…

  18. Magnetic structure and domain conversion of the quasi-2D frustrated antiferromagnet CuCrO{sub 2} probed by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sakhratov, Yu. A.; Svistov, L. E.; Kuhns, P. L.; Zhou, H. D.; Reyes, A. P.

    2014-11-15

    We have carried out {sup 63,65}Cu NMR spectra measurements in a magnetic field up to about 15.5 T on a single crystal of the multiferroic triangular-lattice antiferromagnet CuCrO{sub 2}. The measurements were performed for perpendicular and parallel orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the c axis of the crystal, and the detailed angle dependence of the spectra on the magnetic field direction in the ab plane was studied. The shape of the spectra can be well described in the model of spiral spin structure proposed by recent neutron diffraction experiments. When the field is rotated perpendicular to the crystal c axis, we observed, directly for the first time, a remarkable reorientation of the spin plane simultaneous with rotation of the incommensurate wavevector, by quantitatively deducing the conversion of the energetically less favorable domain to a more favorable one. At high enough fields parallel to the c axis, the data are consistent with either a field-induced commensurate spiral magnetic structure or an incommensurate spiral magnetic structure with a disorder in the c direction, suggesting that high fields may have influence on interplanar ordering.

  19. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  20. 2D divertor heat flux distribution using a 3D heat conduction solver in National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gan, K F; Ahn, J-W; Park, J-W; Maingi, R; McLean, A G; Gray, T K; Gong, X; Zhang, X D

    2013-02-01

    The divertor heat flux footprint in tokamaks is often observed to be non-axisymmetric due to intrinsic error fields, applied 3D magnetic fields or during transients such as edge localized modes. Typically, only 1D radial heat flux profiles are analyzed; however, analysis of the full 2D divertor measurements provides opportunities to study the asymmetric nature of the deposited heat flux. To accomplish this an improved 3D Fourier analysis method has been successfully applied in a heat conduction solver (TACO) to determine the 2D heat flux distribution at the lower divertor surface in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) tokamak. This advance enables study of helical heat deposition onto the divertor. In order to account for heat transmission through poorly adhered surface layers on the divertor plate, a heat transmission coefficient, defined as the surface layer thermal conductivity divided by the thickness of the layer, was introduced to the solution of heat conduction equation. This coefficient is denoted as α and a range of values were tested in the model to ensure a reliable heat flux calculation until a specific value of α led to the constant total deposited energy in the numerical solution after the end of discharge. A comparison between 1D heat flux profiles from TACO and from a 2D heat flux calculation code, THEODOR, shows good agreement. Advantages of 2D heat flux distribution over the conventional 1D heat flux profile are also discussed, and examples of 2D data analysis in the study of striated heat deposition pattern as well as the toroidal degree of asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width are demonstrated. PMID:23464209

  1. 2D divertor heat flux distribution using a 3D heat conduction solver in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, K. F.; Ahn, J.-W.; Park, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G.; Gray, T. K.; Gong, X.; Zhang, X. D.

    2013-02-01

    The divertor heat flux footprint in tokamaks is often observed to be non-axisymmetric due to intrinsic error fields, applied 3D magnetic fields or during transients such as edge localized modes. Typically, only 1D radial heat flux profiles are analyzed; however, analysis of the full 2D divertor measurements provides opportunities to study the asymmetric nature of the deposited heat flux. To accomplish this an improved 3D Fourier analysis method has been successfully applied in a heat conduction solver (TACO) to determine the 2D heat flux distribution at the lower divertor surface in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) tokamak. This advance enables study of helical heat deposition onto the divertor. In order to account for heat transmission through poorly adhered surface layers on the divertor plate, a heat transmission coefficient, defined as the surface layer thermal conductivity divided by the thickness of the layer, was introduced to the solution of heat conduction equation. This coefficient is denoted as α and a range of values were tested in the model to ensure a reliable heat flux calculation until a specific value of α led to the constant total deposited energy in the numerical solution after the end of discharge. A comparison between 1D heat flux profiles from TACO and from a 2D heat flux calculation code, THEODOR, shows good agreement. Advantages of 2D heat flux distribution over the conventional 1D heat flux profile are also discussed, and examples of 2D data analysis in the study of striated heat deposition pattern as well as the toroidal degree of asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width are demonstrated.

  2. Comparing a 2D fluid model of the DC planar magnetron cathode to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1996-05-01

    Planar magnetron cathodes have arching magnetic field lines which concentrate plasma density near the electrode surface. This enhances the ion bombardment of the surface and the yield of sputtered atoms. Magnetron cathodes are used in the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) devices of the Laser Program because they provide for significantly higher conduction than do glow discharges. An essential feature of magnetron cathodes is that the vector product of the perpendicular electric field, E[sub y], with the parallel component of the magnetic field, B[sub x], forms a closed track with a circulating current along the cathode surface. An analytical, 2D, two component, quasi-neutral, continuum model yields formulas for the plasma density, the total and component current densities, the electric field, and the positive electrical potential, between the cathode surface and a distant, uniform plasma. For a specific gas, the free parameters are electron temperature, gas number density, and total current. The model is applied to the interpretation of experimental data from the PEPC device, as well as a small vacuum facility for testing magnetron cathodes. Finally, the model has been applied to generate cross sectional views of a PEPC magnetron cathode track.

  3. Quantum information experiments with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2016-05-01

    We summarize recent experimental work with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped 9 Be+ ions stored in a Penning trap. Penning traps utilize static magnetic and electric fields to confine ions, and enable the trapping and laser cooling of ion crystals larger than typically possible in RF ion traps. We work with single-plane ion crystals where the ions form a triangular lattice through minimization of their Coulomb potential energy. The crystals rotate, and we present numerical studies that determine optimal operating parameters for producing low temperature, stable 2-dimensional crystals with Doppler laser cooling and a rotating wall potential. Our qubit is the electron spin-flip transition in the ground state of 9 Be+ and is sensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. Through mitigation of part-per-billion, vibration-induced magnetic field fluctuations we demonstrate T2 coherence times longer than 50 ms. We engineer long-range Ising interactions with spin-dependent optical dipole forces, and summarize recent measurements that characterize the entanglement generated through single-axis twisting. Supported by: JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PHY-1521080, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  4. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of a 2D Circulation Control Wind Tunnel Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Jones, Greg; Lin, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver for a circulation control airfoil. 2D and 3D simulation results are compared to a circulation control wind tunnel test conducted at the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART). The RANS simulations are compared to a low blowing case with a jet momentum coefficient, C(sub u), of 0:047 and a higher blowing case of 0.115. Three dimensional simulations of the model and tunnel walls show wall effects on the lift and airfoil surface pressures. These wall effects include a 4% decrease of the midspan sectional lift for the C(sub u) 0.115 blowing condition. Simulations comparing the performance of the Spalart Allmaras (SA) and Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence models are also made, showing the SST model compares best to the experimental data. A Rotational/Curvature Correction (RCC) to the turbulence model is also evaluated demonstrating an improvement in the CFD predictions.

  5. Simplification of the 1H NMR spectra of enantiomers dissolved in chiral liquid crystals, combining variable angle sample spinning and selective refocusing experiments.

    PubMed

    Beguin, Laetitia; Courtieu, Jacques; Ziani, Latifa; Merlet, Denis

    2006-12-01

    This work presents a technique to simplify overcrowded proton spectra in chiral liquid crystal solvents using rotation of the sample near the magic angle, VASS, combined with homonuclear selective refocusing 2D NMR experiments, SERF. This methodology provides a powerful tool to visualise enantiomers out of unresolved proton spectra. A modified SERF sequence is presented where the resulting 2D spectrum can be phased to increase the resolution. Accurate enantiomeric excesses are determined that are not possible to measure on static samples. Two examples are presented. PMID:16991108

  6. An Analysis of a Commercial Furniture Refinisher: A Comprehensive Introductory NMR Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markow, Peter G.; Cramer, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment designed to introduce undergraduate organic chemistry students to measurement/interpretation of NMR parameters. Students investigate chemical shift analysis, spin-spin coupling, peak integrations, effect of deuterium oxide extraction, and comparisons with literature spectra;…

  7. 2D Radiation MHD K-shell Modeling of Single Wire Array Stainless Steel Experiments on the Z Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Chong, Y. K.; Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, K. G.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Many physical effects can produce unstable plasma behavior that affect K-shell emission from arrays. Such effects include: asymmetry in the initial density profile, asymmetry in power flow, thermal conduction at the boundaries, and non-uniform wire ablation. Here we consider how asymmetry in the radiation field also contributes to the generation of multidimensional plasma behavior that affects K-shell power and yield. To model this radiation asymmetry, we have incorporated into the MACH2 r-z MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE population kinetics based on radiation transport using multi-dimensional ray tracing. Such methodology is necessary for modeling the enhanced radiative cooling that occurs at the anode and cathode ends of the pinch during the run-in phase of the implosion. This enhanced radiative cooling is due to reduced optical depth at these locations producing an asymmetric flow of radiative energy that leads to substantial disruption of large initial diameter (>5 cm) pinches and drives 1D into 2D fluid (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor like) flows. The impact of this 2D behavior on K-shell power and yield is investigated by comparing 1D and 2D model results with data obtained from a series of single wire array stainless steel experiments performed on the Z generator.

  8. SIMULATION REAL SCALE EXPERIMENT ON LEVEE BREACH USING 2D SHALLOW FLOW MODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenno, Hiroki; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Ichiro

    Flood in rivers is a common disaster all over the world. If a levee breach happens, it sometimes causes a fatal disaster. In addition, many buildings, urban facilities, lifelines, etc. are seriously damaged. Detailed mechanism of a levee breach has not been clarified yet. Therefore, it is important to predict the collapsing process of riverbank and behavior of overtop flow for reducing damage. We applied a two-dimensional shallow flow computational model to levee breach phenomena caused by overflow and the performance of the model was elucidated. A calibration of the numerical model is made through the comparison with field experimental data. Recently, a real-scale experiment on a levee breach was carried out at the Chiyoda Experimental Channel in Hokkaido, Japan. We performed the computation under the same conditions in the experiment. The computational results showed the excellent performance for simulating levee breach phenomena.

  9. Sensitive and robust electrophoretic NMR: Instrumentation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Furó, István; Yushmanov, Pavel V.; Stilbs, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although simple as a concept, electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) has so far failed to find wider application. Problems encountered are mainly due to disturbing and partly irreproducible convection-like bulk flow effects from both electro-osmosis and thermal convection. Additionally, bubble formation at the electrodes and rf noise pickup has constrained the typical sample geometry to U-tube-like arrangements with a small filling factor and a low resulting NMR sensitivity. Furthermore, the sign of the electrophoretic mobility cancels out in U-tube geometries. We present here a new electrophoretic sample cell based on a vertically placed conventional NMR sample tube with bubble-suppressing palladium metal as electrode material. A suitable radiofrequency filter design prevents noise pickup by the NMR sample coil from the high-voltage leads which extend into the sensitive sample volume. Hence, the obtained signal-to-noise ratio of this cell is one order of magnitude higher than that of our previous U-tube cells. Permitted by the retention of the sign of the displacement-related signal phase in the new cell design, an experimental approach is described where bulk flow effects by electro-osmosis and/or thermal convection are compensated through parallel monitoring of a reference signal from a non-charged species in the sample. This approach, together with a CPMG-like pulse train scheme provides a superior first-order cancellation of non-electrophoretic bulk flow effects.

  10. Emergent Power-Law Phase in the 2D Heisenberg Windmill Antiferromagnet: A Computational Experiment.

    PubMed

    Jeevanesan, Bhilahari; Chandra, Premala; Coleman, Piers; Orth, Peter P

    2015-10-23

    In an extensive computational experiment, we test Polyakov's conjecture that under certain circumstances an isotropic Heisenberg model can develop algebraic spin correlations. We demonstrate the emergence of a multispin U(1) order parameter in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The correlations of this relative phase angle are observed to decay algebraically at intermediate temperatures in an extended critical phase. Using finite-size scaling we show that both phase transitions are of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type, and at lower temperatures we find long-range Z(6) order. PMID:26551137

  11. Dipeptide Structural Analysis Using Two-Dimensional NMR for the Undergraduate Advanced Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Elizabeth; Dolino, Drew; Schwartzenburg, Danielle; Steiger, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to introduce students in either an organic chemistry or biochemistry lab course to two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy using simple biomolecules. The goal of this experiment is for students to understand and interpret the information provided by a 2D NMR spectrum. Students are…

  12. The Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectrum of Methyl 7-Cycloheptatrienylacetate: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurch, G. R., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment designed to give the senior chemistry student an opportunity to apply several synthetic and purification techniques as well as possibilities for the application of NMR spectroscopy. (CS)

  13. Imidazole as a pH Probe: An NMR Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, William J., Jr.; Edie, Dennis L.; Cooley, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis describes an NMR experiment for the general chemistry laboratory, which employs an unknown imidazole solution to measure the pH values. The described mechanism can also be used for measuring the acidity within the isolated cells.

  14. The 2-D simulations of the NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. G.

    1985-05-01

    Two-dimensional gas-dynamic simulations of the NRL laser experiment have been performed to study the formation of aneurysms in the blast wave and to study the formation of structure internal to the blast front itself. In one set of simulations the debris shell was perturbed sinusoidally in mass and position and also perturbed to mimic the action of a slow jet of material leaving the target at slower speeds than the bulk of the debris. In all cases the blast wave remained stable to any aneurysm-like instability. Internal structure, however, was quite easily produced and grew as a function of time. In the other set of simulations the effect of a pre-heated channel upon the propagation of the blast wave was examined. Bulges in the blast wave shock front were produced in these simulations that could be the beginning of the aneurysm phenomenon, but the preheated channel by itself appears to be insufficient to produce the observed aneurysm.

  15. Critical Heat Flux Experiments on the Reactor Vessel Wall Using 2-D Slice Test Section

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung; Baek, Won-Pil

    2005-11-15

    The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel outer wall was measured using the two-dimensional slice test section. The radius and the channel area of the test section were 2.5 m and 10 cm x 15 cm, respectively. The flow channel area and the heater width were smaller than those of the ULPU experiments, but the radius was greater than that of the ULPU. The CHF data under the inlet subcooling of 2 to 25 deg. C and the mass flux 0 to 300 kg/m{sup 2}.s had been acquired. The measured CHF value was generally slightly lower than that of the ULPU. The difference possibly comes from the difference of the test section material and the thickness. However, the general trend of CHF according to the mass flux was similar with that of the ULPU. The experimental CHF data were compared with the predicted values by SULTAN correlation. The SULTAN correlation predicted well this study's data only for the mass flux higher than 200 kg/m{sup 2}.s, and for the exit quality lower than 0.05. The local condition-based correlation was developed, and it showed good prediction capability for broad quality (-0.01 to 0.5) and mass flux (<300 kg/m{sup 2}.s) conditions with a root-mean-square error of 2.4%. There were increases in the CHF with trisodium phosphate-added water.

  16. Solution NMR Experiment for Measurement of (15)N-(1)H Residual Dipolar Couplings in Large Proteins and Supramolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Pulavarti, Surya V S R K; Beaumont, Victor; Gollnick, Paul; Szyperski, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are exquisite probes of protein structure and dynamics. A new solution NMR experiment named 2D SE2 J-TROSY is presented to measure N-H RDCs for proteins and supramolecular complexes in excess of 200 kDa. This enables validation and refinement of their X-ray crystal and solution NMR structures and the characterization of structural and dynamic changes occurring upon complex formation. Accurate N-H RDCs were measured at 750 MHz (1)H resonance frequency for 11-mer 93 kDa (2)H,(15)N-labeled Trp RNA-binding attenuator protein tumbling with a correlation time τc of 120 ns. This is about twice as long as that for the most slowly tumbling system, for which N-H RDCs could be measured, so far, and corresponds to molecular weights of ∼200 kDa at 25 °C. Furthermore, due to the robustness of SE2 J-TROSY with respect to residual (1)H density from exchangeable protons, increased sensitivity at (1)H resonance frequencies around 1 GHz promises to enable N-H RDC measurement for even larger systems. PMID:26293598

  17. Structure and Metabolic-Flow Analysis of Molecular Complexity in a (13) C-Labeled Tree by 2D and 3D NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Ohishi, Risa; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-05-10

    Improved signal identification for biological small molecules (BSMs) in a mixture was demonstrated by using multidimensional NMR on samples from (13) C-enriched Rhododendron japonicum (59.5 atom%) cultivated in air containing (13) C-labeled carbon dioxide for 14 weeks. The resonance assignment of 386 carbon atoms and 380 hydrogen atoms in the mixture was achieved. 42 BSMs, including eight that were unlisted in the spectral databases, were identified. Comparisons between the experimental values and the (13) C chemical shift values calculated by density functional theory supported the identifications of unlisted BSMs. Tracing the (13) C/(12) C ratio by multidimensional NMR spectra revealed faster and slower turnover ratios of BSMs involved in central metabolism and those categorized as secondary metabolites, respectively. The identification of BSMs and subsequent flow analysis provided insight into the metabolic systems of the plant. PMID:27060701

  18. Distinctive features of complexation of anthracycline antibiotic daunomycin with deoxyhexanucleotide d(GCATGC) in aqueous solution: 1D- and 2D-NMR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahomov, Valery I.; Rogova, Olga V.; Volynkin, Vladimir S.; Veselkov, Kyrill A.; Hernandez Santiago, Adrian A.; Semanin, Alexander V.; Djimant, Leonid N.; Veselkov, Alexei N.

    2004-07-01

    Complexation of anthracycline antibiotic daunomycin (DAU) with self-complementary deoxyhexanucleotide d(GCATGC) in aqueous solution has been investigated by one-dimensional and two-dimensional homonuclear 'H NMR spectroscopy (TOCSY and NOESY) and heteronuclear 'H-31P NMR spectroscopy (HMBC). Quantitative determination of parameters of oligonucleotide self-association and its complexation with DAU was based on the analysis of the dependences of proton chemical shifts on concentration and temperature. Experimental results were analysed in terms of the equilibrium reaction constants, limiting proton chemical shifts and thermodynamical parameters (enthalpies AN, entropies AS) of the formation of hexamer duplex and different drug-DNA complexes. The most favourable structures of the single-stranded form of d(GCATGC) and the intercalated DAU-hexamer complex have been determined using X-PLOR software taking into consideration both intra- and intermolecular NOE contacts.

  19. Isolation and characterization of a potential process related impurity of phenazopyridine HCl by preparative HPLC followed by MS-MS and 2D-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Maurya, Pawan K; Raju, A Narasa

    2009-07-12

    During the process development of phenazopyridine HCl bulk drug, a potential impurity was detected in the routine impurity profiles by HPLC. Using MS-MS and multidimensional NMR techniques, the trace level impurity was unambiguously identified to be 3-phenyl-5-phenylazo-pyridine-2,6-diamine after its isolation from phenazopyridine HCl by semi-preparative HPLC. The formation of the impurity was discussed. To our knowledge, it is a novel impurity not reported elsewhere. PMID:19376664

  20. Hydrogen bonding induced distortion of CO3 units and kinetic stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate: results from 2D (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Kaseman, Derrick C; Colas, Bruno; Jacob, Dorrit E; Clark, Simon M

    2016-07-27

    Systematic correlation in alkaline-earth carbonate compounds between the deviation of the CO3 units from the perfect D3h symmetry and their (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters is established. The (13)C NMR CSA parameters of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) are measured using two-dimensional (13)C phase adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) NMR spectroscopy and are analyzed on the basis of this correlation. The results indicate a distortion of the CO3 units in ACC in the form of an in-plane displacement of the C atom away from the centroid of the O3 triangle, resulting from hydrogen bonding with the surrounding H2O molecules, without significant out-of-plane displacement. Similar distortion for all C atoms in the structure of ACC suggests a uniform spatial disposition of H2O molecules around the CO3 units forming a hydrogen-bonded amorphous network. This amorphous network is stabilized against crystallization by steric frustration, while additives such as Mg presumably provide further stabilization by increasing the energy of dehydration. PMID:27276013

  1. Structural studies of an arabinan from the stems of Ephedra sinica by methylation analysis and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong-Gang; Liang, Jun; Yang, Bing-You; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2015-05-01

    Plant arabinan has important biological activity. In this study, a water-soluble arabinan (Mw∼6.15kDa) isolated from the stems of Ephedra sinica was found to consist of (1→5)-Araƒ, (1→3,5)-Araƒ, T-Araƒ, (1→3)-Araƒ and (1→2,5)-Araƒ residues at proportions of 10:2:3:2:1. A tentative structure was proposed by methylation analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT-135, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and ROESY) and literature. The structure proposed includes a branched (1→5)-α-Araf backbone where branching occurs at the O-2 and O-3 positions of the residues with 7.7% and 15.4% of the 1,5-linked α-Araf substituted at the O-2 and O-3 positions. The presence of a branched structure was further observed by atomic force microscopy. This polymer was characterized as having a much longer linear (1→5)-α-Araf backbone as a repeating unit. In particular, the presence of α-Araf→3)-α-Araf-(1→3)-α-Araf-(1→ attached at the O-2 is a new finding. This study may facilitate a deeper understanding of structure-activity relationships of biological polysaccharides from the stems of E. sinica. PMID:25659720

  2. Determination of Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Time Using (Super 13)C NMR: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasyna, Zbigniew L.; Jurkiewicz, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    An experiment designed for the physical chemistry laboratory where (super 13)C NMR is applied to determine the spin-lattice relaxation time for carbon atoms in n-hexanol is proposed. It is concluded that students learn the principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy as well as dynamic NMR experiments.

  3. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Pober, J. C.; Ali, Z. S.; Bradley, R. F.; Carilli, C. L.; DeBoer, D. R.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Jacobs, D. C.; Klima, P.; MacMahon, D. H. E.; Manley, J. R.; Moore, D. F.; Parsons, A. R.; Stefan, I. I.; Walbrugh, W. P.

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  4. Novel stilbene-based Fischer base analog of leuco-TAM - (2E,2'Z)-{2-(4-(E)-styrylphenyl)propane-1,3-diylidene}bis(1,3,3-trimethylindoline) - derivatives: synthesis and structural consideration by 1D NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keum, Sam-Rok; Lim, Hyun-Woo

    2016-02-01

    We report the synthesis of a series of novel stilbene-based (St) Fischer base analogs of leuco-triarylmethane (LTAM) dyes by treating Fischer base with (E)-4-styrylbenzaldehyde derivatives. All St-LTAM molecules examined herein are characterized by 1D and 2D NMR. They were found to exhibit ZE configuration and isomerize to their diastereomers EE and ZZ in 2-3 h. They exhibit type I behavior of diastereomeric isomerization. PMID:26448377

  5. Momentum density and 2D-ACAR experiments in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics); Smedskjaer, L.C. )

    1991-12-01

    We compare measured c-projected 2D-ACAR spectrum from an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} with the corresponding band theory predictions. Many different one-dimensional sections through the spectrum are considered, together with the characteristic amplitudes and shapes of the spectral anisotropies, with a focus on identifying and delineating Fermi surface signatures in the spectra. The positron data clearly show several distinct features of the ridge Fermi surface predicted by the band theory, and give an indication of the pillbox Fermi sheet. The good agreement between theory and experiment suggests that the band theory framework based on the local density approximation (LDA) is capable of providing a substantially correct description of the momentum density and Fermiology of the normal ground state electronic structure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  6. Intercalation complex of imidazoacridinone C-1311, a potential anticancer drug, with DNA helix d(CGATCG)2: stereostructural studies by 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Tomasz; Czub, Jacek; Sowiński, Paweł; Mazerski, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Imidazoacridinone C-1311 (Symadex®) is a powerful antitumor agent, which successfully made its way through the Phase I clinical trials and has been recommended for Phase II few a years ago. It has been shown experimentally that during the initial stage of its action C-1311 forms a relatively stable intercalation complex with DNA, yet it has shown no base-sequence specificity while binding to DNA. In this paper, the d(CGATCG)2:C-1311 intercalation complex has been studied by means of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, yielding a full assignment of the resonance lines observed in (1)H NMR spectra. The observation of the intermolecular NOE contacts between C-1311 and DNA allowed locating the ligand between the guanine and adenine moieties. Formation of a symmetric complex was pointed out on the basis of the lack of a second set of the (1)H resonances. The resulting stereostructure of the complex was then improved by means of molecular dynamics, using the CHARMM force field and GROMACS software. To this end, distance restraints derived from the NOESY cross-peak volumes were applied to the atomistic model of the d(CGATCG)2:C-1311 complex. Obtained results are in full agreement with biochemical data on the mechanism of action of C-1311, in particular with the previously postulated post-intercalation enzymatic activation of the studied drug. PMID:26211888

  7. Citrus Quality Control: An NMR/MRI Problem-Based Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erhart, Sarah E.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.; Yezierski, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    An experiment seated in an industrial context can provide an engaging framework and unique learning opportunity for an upper-division physical chemistry laboratory. An experiment that teaches NMR/MRI through a problem-based quality control of citrus products was developed. In this experiment, using a problem-based learning (PBL) approach, students…

  8. Wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layer flow over a wall-mounted 2-D block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent boundary-layer flows over complex topography have been extensively studied in the atmospheric sciences and wind engineering communities. The upwind turbulence level, the atmospheric thermal stability and the shape of the topography as well as surface characteristics play important roles in turbulent transport of momentum and scalar fluxes. However, to the best of our knowledge, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been taken into account in laboratory simulations, particularly in wind-tunnel experiments. Extension of such studies in thermally-stratified wind tunnels will substantially advance our understanding of thermal stability effects on the physics of flow over complex topography. Additionally, high-resolution experimental data can be used for development of new parameterization of surface fluxes and validation of numerical models such as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). A series of experiments of neutral and thermally-stratified boundary-layer flows over a wall-mounted 2-D block were conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory boundary-layer wind tunnel. The 2-D block, with a width to height ratio of 2:1, occupied the lowest 25% of the turbulent boundary layer. Stable and convective boundary layers were simulated by independently controlling the temperature of air flow, the test section floor, and the wall-mounted block surfaces. Measurements using high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), x-wire/cold-wire anemometry, thermal-couples and surface heat flux sensors were made to quantify the turbulent properties and surface fluxes in distinct macroscopic flow regions, including the separation/recirculation zones, evolving shear layer and the asymptotic far wake. Emphasis will be put on addressing thermal stability effects on the spatial distribution of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and turbulent fluxes of momentum and scalar from the near to far wake region. Terms of the TKE budget equation are also inferred from measurements and

  9. Experimental and Theoretical Limits on Pulse Quality in Silicon NMR Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Rona

    2005-03-01

    Previous NMR experiments on Silicon involving multiple pulses showed long lived spin echoes [A.E. Dementyev, D. Li, K. MacLean, S.E. Barrett, Phys. Rev. B, 68, 153302 (2003)], an anomalous behavior that disagrees with conventional NMR theory. The application of several pulses to a many spin system warrants the understanding of pulse quality in fine detail. A series of experiments to improve the pulse characteristics and to approach the limit of delta function, spatially homogeneous pulses were performed. These experiments and detailed calculations of the pulse fields involved will be discussed, as well as the implications in understanding the anomalous long lived behavior of previous experiments.

  10. NMR experiments on a three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Chao; Yang, Xiaoyu; Candela, D.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2004-04-01

    A three-dimensional granular system fluidized by vertical container vibrations was studied using pulsed field gradient NMR coupled with one-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. The system consisted of mustard seeds vibrated vertically at 50 Hz, and the number of layers Nl⩽4 was sufficiently low to achieve a nearly time-independent granular fluid. Using NMR, the vertical profiles of density and granular temperature were directly measured, along with the distributions of vertical and horizontal grain velocities. The velocity distributions showed modest deviations from Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, except for the vertical velocity distribution near the sample bottom, which was highly skewed and non-Gaussian. Data taken for three values of Nl and two dimensionless accelerations Γ=15,18 were fitted to a hydrodynamic theory, which successfully models the density and temperature profiles away from the vibrating container bottom. A temperature inversion near the free upper surface is observed, in agreement with predictions based on the hydrodynamic parameter μ which is nonzero only in inelastic systems.

  11. Rapid-Pulsing Artifact-Free Double-Quantum-Filtered Homonuclear Spectroscopy. The 2D-INADEQUATE Experiment Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdonneau, Maryse; Ancian, Bernard

    1998-06-01

    Rapid pulsing artifacts are observed in the conventional phase-cycled carbon-13 2D INADEQUATE experiment. By using the product operator formalism, it is shown that they result from the effects of imperfect 90° and 180° excitation pulses on the most abundant molecules containing only one isolated carbon-13 nucleus. The labeled longitudinal magnetization remaining at the end of one scan is recycled by the subsequent acquisition, giving rise to multiple-quantum (p= 0, ±1, ±2, …) artifacts in theF1dimension. By considering pairs of scans instead of single scans, a new phase cycle is proposed. It is based on a scheme for compensating for imperfections in the excitation cluster by a proper combination of the pulse phases in two consecutive scans. Because the artifacts are 90° out of phase compared to the desired signal, a concomitant rearrangement of the receiver phase achieves suppression of all unwanted signals. Experiments are presented on menthol dissolved in CDCl3as a test compound. Improvements in spectrum quality as well as increased sensitivity are discussed.

  12. 31P NMR 2D Mapping of Creatine Kinase Forward Flux Rate in Hearts with Postinfarction Left Ventricular Remodeling in Response to Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling; Cui, Weina; Zhang, Pengyuan; Jang, Albert; Zhu, Wuqiang; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing a fast 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI) method, this study examined the heterogeneity of creatine kinase (CK) forward flux rate of hearts with postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Immunosuppressed Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 4 groups: 1) A sham-operated normal group (SHAM, n = 6); 2) A 60 minutes distal left anterior descending coronary artery ligation and reperfusion (MI, n = 6); 3) Open patch group; ligation injury plus open fibrin patch over the site of injury (Patch, n = 6); and 4) Cell group, hiPSCs-cardiomyocytes, -endothelial cells, and -smooth muscle cells (2 million, each) were injected into the injured myocardium pass through a fibrin patch (Cell+Patch, n = 5). At 4 weeks, the creatine phosphate (PCr)/ATP ratio, CK forward flux rate (Flux PCr→ATP), and k constant of CK forward flux rate (kPCr→ATP) were severely decreased at border zone myocardium (BZ) adjacent to MI. Cell treatment results in significantly increase of PCr/ATP ratio and improve the value of kPCr→ATP and Flux PCr→ATP in BZ myocardium. Moreover, the BZ myocardial CK total activity and protein expression of CK mitochondria isozyme and CK myocardial isozyme were significantly reduced, but recovered in response to cell treatment. Thus, cell therapy results in improvement of BZ bioenergetic abnormality in hearts with postinfarction LV remodeling, which is accompanied by significantly improvements in BZ CK activity and CK isozyme expression. The fast 2D 31P MR CSI mapping can reliably measure the heterogeneity of bioenergetics in hearts with post infarction LV remodeling. PMID:27606901

  13. NMR Experiments on a Three-Dimensional Vibrofluidized Granular Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Chao; Yang, Xiaoyu; Candela, D.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2003-03-01

    We have used MRI/PFG NMR methods to measure the density and granular temperature profiles for three-dimensional samples of mustard seeds fluidized by 50 Hz vertical vibration. Data were taken for several values of the bed depth and the vibration acceleration, and jointly fit to a hydrodynamic theory for granular fluids. The fit is qualitatively accurate, apart from a region immediately adjacent to the vibrating cell bottom where the grain velocity distribution is markedly non-Gaussian. In the upper portion of the sample the granular temperature increases with height despite the fact that energy input comes only from below. This corresponds to a heat current flowing opposite the temperature gradient, an effect which is predicted by the hydrodynamic theory.

  14. NMR Hole-Burning Experiments on Superionic Conductor Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, J.; Kuwata, N.; Hattori, T.

    2004-04-01

    Inhomogeneity is an inherent nature of glass, which is the density and concentration fluctuation frozen at glass transition temperature. The inhomogeneity of the glass plays significant role in so called superionic conductor glasses (SIG), since the mobile ions seek to move through energetically favorable paths. The localization of mobile ions in SIG near the 2nd glass transition is a remaining issue, where the trapping, percolation and many-body interactions are playing the roles. In order to investigate the trapping process in SIG, the authors have applied 109Ag NMR Hole-Burning technique to AgI containing SIG glasses. By using this technique, the slowing down process of the site-exchange rates between different sites were evaluated.

  15. Structural Isomer Identification via NMR: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment for Organic, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Zvi

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment that examines the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to distinguish between structural isomers via resonance multiplicities and chemical shifts. Reasons for incorporating the experiment into organic, analytical, or physical chemistry…

  16. Identification of histidine tautomers in proteins by 2D 1H/13C(delta2) one-bond correlated NMR.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, James L; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Haddad, Kristin E Coffman; Day, Regina M; Thalhauser, Craig J; Bullock, Peter A; Bachovchin, William W

    2003-07-16

    If the 13Cdelta2 chemical shift of neutral ("high pH") histidine is >122 ppm, primarily Ndelta1-H tautomer (2) is indicated; if it is <122 ppm, primarily Nepsilon2-H tautomer (1) is indicated. His resonances from the catalytic triad of active serine proteases, for example, are readily distinguished from those of denatured enzyme. The 13Cdelta2 chemical shifts increased by 6.2 ppm for the catalytic histidines in both alpha-lytic protease and subtilisin BPN' in raising the pH from that of imidazolium cation to that of tautomer 2. This tautomer identification method is easy to implement, requiring only bioincorporation of [U-13C] (or the more readily available [U-13C,15N])-histidine. Standard 1H/13C correlation HMQC or HSQC NMR pulse programs then yield the 13Cdelta2 chemical shifts with the benefit of high 1H sensitivity. Because of large one-bond spin-couplings (1JCH approximately 200 Hz), the method should extend to proteins having large 1H and 13C line widths, including very high molecular weights. PMID:12848537

  17. A High-Pressure, High-Resolution NMR Probe for Experiments at 500 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Lance; Yu, Aimee; Reiner, Carl; Jonas, Jiri

    1998-07-01

    A novel high-pressure, high-resolution NMR probe is described which operates at a frequency of 500 MHz. The design features an alternative RF coil (8 mm sample tube) for high frequency, sensitivity, probe power, and resolution (< 3.0 × 10-9). The probe is capable of pressures to at least 5 kbar over a temperature range of -30 to 80°C, and has a double-tuned1H/2H circuit which can tune at1H frequencies of either 300 or 500 MHz. The sensitivity of the 300-MHz circuit is over twice that of previous 10-mm high-pressure NMR probe designs, while at 500 MHz the sensitivity is nearly five times that of previous 300-MHz pressure probes. Potential biochemical applications are demonstrated by 2D NOESY spectra of a Troponin C mutant.

  18. 2D-NMR, X-ray crystallography and theoretical studies of the reaction mechanism for the synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepines from dehydroacetic acid derivatives and o-phenylenediamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabahi, Amal; Hamdi, Safouane M.; Rachedi, Yahia; Hamdi, Maamar; Talhi, Oualid; Almeida Paz, Filipe A.; Silva, Artur S. M.; Fadila, Balegroune; Malika, Hamadène; Kamel, Taïbi

    2014-03-01

    The synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepines by the reaction of o-phenylenediamines (o-PDAs) with dehydroacetic acid DHAA [3-acetyl-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one] or conjugate analogues is largely reported in the literature, but still with uncontrolled stereochemistry. In this work, a comprehensive mechanistic study on the formation of some synthesized 1,5-benzodiazepine models following different organic routes is established based on liquid-state 2D NMR, single-crystal X-ray diffraction and theoretical calculations allowing the classification of two prototropic forms A (enaminopyran-2,4-dione) and B (imino-4-hydroxypyran-2-one). Evidences are presented to show that most of the reported 1,5-benzodiazepine structures arising from DHAA and derivatives preferentially adopt the (E)-enaminopyran-2,4-diones A.

  19. Ionic Pathways in Li13Si4 investigated by (6)Li and (7)Li solid state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Dupke, Sven; Langer, Thorsten; Winter, Florian; Pöttgen, Rainer; Winter, Martin; Eckert, Hellmut

    2015-02-01

    Local environments and dynamics of lithium ions in the binary lithium silicide Li13Si4 have been studied by (6)Li MAS-NMR, (7)Li spin-lattice relaxation time and site-resolved (7)Li 2D exchange NMR measurements as a function of mixing time. Variable temperature experiments result in distinct differences in activation energies characterizing the transfer rates between the different lithium sites. Based on this information, a comprehensive picture of the preferred ionic transfer pathways in this silicide has been developed. With respect to local mobility, the results of the present study suggests the ordering Li6/Li7>Li5>Li1>Li4 >Li2/Li3. Mobility within the z=0.5 plane is distinctly higher than within the z=0 plane, and the ionic transfer between the planes is most facile via Li1/Li5 exchange. The lithium ionic mobility can be rationalized on the basis of the type of the coordinating silicide anions and the lithium-lithium distances within the structure. Lithium ions strongly interacting with the isolated Si(4-) anions have distinctly lower mobility than those the coordination of which is dominated by Si2(6-) dumbbells. PMID:25524128

  20. Effects of radiation damping for biomolecular NMR experiments in solution: a hemisphere concept for water suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    Abundant solvent nuclear spins, such as water protons in aqueous solution, cause radiation damping in NMR experiments. It is important to know how the effect of radiation damping appears in high-resolution protein NMR because macromolecular studies always require very high magnetic field strengths with a highly sensitive NMR probe that can easily cause radiation damping. Here, we show the behavior of water magnetization after a pulsed-field gradient (PFG) using nutation experiments at 900 MHz with a cryogenic probe: when water magnetization is located in the upper hemisphere (having +Z component, parallel to the external magnetic field), dephasing of the magnetization by a PFG effectively suppresses residual water magnetization in the transverse plane. In contrast, when magnetization is located in the lower hemisphere (having −Z component), the small residual transverse component remaining after a PFG is still sufficient to induce radiation damping. Based on this observation, we designed 1H-15N HSQC experiments in which water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere, but not necessarily along Z, and compared them with the conventional experiments, in which water magnetization is inverted during the t1 period. The result demonstrates moderate gain of signal-to-noise ratio, 0–28%. Designing the experiments such that water magnetization is maintained in the upper hemisphere allows shorter pulses to be used compared to the complete water flip-back and, thereby, is useful as a building block of protein NMR pulse programs in solution. PMID:27524944

  1. Digit ratio (2D:4D) predicts sporting success among female fencers independent from physical, experience, and personality factors.

    PubMed

    Voracek, M; Reimer, B; Dressler, S G

    2010-12-01

    Research particularly focusing on male athletes and popular sports (running and soccer) suggests associations of lower (masculinized) second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action, with better sports performance. Studies focusing on women, non-mainstream sports, or controlling for covariates relevant for sporting success are still sparse. This study examined associations between 2D:4D and performance of both male and female athletes active in fencing (a non-mainstream sport dominated by male participants), while controlling for covariates. National fencing rankings and 2D:4D of 58 male and 41 female Austrian tournament fencers (mean age 24 years) were correlated. Among female, but not male, fencers, lower 2D:4D was related to better national fencing rankings. 2D:4D still accounted for incremental variance (12%) in fencing success, when the effects of salient performance factors (age, body mass index, years of fencing, training intensity, and the personality variables achievement, control, harm avoidance, and social potency) were controlled for (totaling 35% attributable variance). Athletes active in the most aggressive form (the sabre) had lower 2D:4D than those active in the other forms (épée and foil fencing). Sporting success in adult life might be partly prenatally programmed via long-lasting extragenital effects of testosterone. PMID:19843265

  2. Shimming of a Magnet for Calibration of NMR Probes for the Muon g-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielajew, Rachel

    2013-10-01

    The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the anomalous magnetic moment aμ ≡ (g-2)/2 of the muon to the precision of 0.14 parts per million. This experimental value of aμ can then be compared to the similarly precise theoretical predictions of the Standard Model in order to test the completeness of the model. The value of aμ is extracted from muons precessing in a magnetic field. The magnetic field will be measured with a set of 400 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes, which have the ability to measure the field to a precision of tens of parts per billion. Before the Muon g-2 Experiment can take place, new NMR probes must be designed, built, and tested using a 1.45 Tesla test magnet at the University of Washington Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics (CENPA). In order to achieve a significant signal from NMR probes, the magnetic field in which the probes are immersed must be extremely uniform. The existing magnet at CENPA has an approximately linear gradient in magnetic field of about 1 Gauss per centimeter in the smoothest direction. A pair of adjacent square Helmholtz coils was designed and built to create a linear gradient in order to cancel the existing gradient. The length of the NMR signals improved with the implementation of the coils. The results of the addition of the coils to the magnet on the signals from the NMR probes will be presented.

  3. Comparison of 2D and 3D Numerical Models with Experiments of Tsunami Flow through a Built Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVeque, R. J.; Motley, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    A series of tsunami wave basin experiments of flow through a scale model of Seaside, Oregon have been used as validation data for a 2015 benchmarking workshop hosted by the National Tsunami Mitigation Program, which focused on better understanding the ability of tsunami models to predict flow velocities and inundation depths following a coastal inundation event. As researchers begin to assess the safety of coastal infrastructures, proper assessment of tsunami-induced forces on coastal structures is critical. Hydrodynamic forces on these structures are fundamentally proportional to the local momentum flux of the fluid, and experimental data included momentum flux measurements at many instrumented gauge locations. The GeoClaw tsunami model, which solves the two-dimensional shallow water equations, was compared against other codes during the benchmarking workshop, and more recently a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model using the open-source OpenFOAM software has been developed and results from this model are being compared with both the experimental data and the 2D GeoClaw results. In addition, the 3D model allows for computation of fluid forces on the faces of structures, permitting an investigation of the common use of momentum flux as a proxy for these forces. This work aims to assess the potential to apply these momentum flux predictions locally within the model to determine tsunami-induced forces on critical structures. Difficulties in working with these data sets and cross-model comparisons will be discussed. Ultimately, application of the more computationally efficient GeoClaw model, informed by the 3D OpenFOAM models, to predict forces on structures at the community scale can be expected to improve the safety and resilience of coastal communities.

  4. An NMR Study of Isotope Effect on Keto-Enol Tautomerization: A Physical Organic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, D.; Chechik, V.

    2004-01-01

    Isotope substitution often affects the rate of an organic reaction and can be used to reveal the underlying mechanism. A series of experiments that use (super 1)H NMR to determine primary and secondary isotope effects, activation parameters, and the regioselectivity of butanone enolization are described.

  5. NMR Determination of Hydrogen Bond Thermodynamics in a Simple Diamide: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Janine G.; Joe, Candice L.; Stolla, Massiel C.; Koshland, Sophia R.; Londergan, Casey H.; Schofield, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Variable temperature NMR spectroscopy is used to determine the ?H° and ?S° of hydrogen bond formation in a simple diamide. In this two- or three-day experiment, students synthesize N,N'-dimethylmalonamide, dimethylsuccinamide, dimethylglutaramide, or dimethyladipamide from methylamine and the corresponding diester (typically in 50% recrystallized…

  6. Direct (13)C-detected NMR experiments for mapping and characterization of hydrogen bonds in RNA.

    PubMed

    Fürtig, Boris; Schnieders, Robbin; Richter, Christian; Zetzsche, Heidi; Keyhani, Sara; Helmling, Christina; Kovacs, Helena; Schwalbe, Harald

    2016-03-01

    In RNA secondary structure determination, it is essential to determine whether a nucleotide is base-paired and not. Base-pairing of nucleotides is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The NMR characterization of hydrogen bonds relies on experiments correlating the NMR resonances of exchangeable protons and can be best performed for structured parts of the RNA, where labile hydrogen atoms are protected from solvent exchange. Functionally important regions in RNA, however, frequently reveal increased dynamic disorder which often leads to NMR signals of exchangeable protons that are broadened beyond (1)H detection. Here, we develop (13)C direct detected experiments to observe all nucleotides in RNA irrespective of whether they are involved in hydrogen bonds or not. Exploiting the self-decoupling of scalar couplings due to the exchange process, the hydrogen bonding behavior of the hydrogen bond donor of each individual nucleotide can be determined. Furthermore, the adaption of HNN-COSY experiments for (13)C direct detection allows correlations of donor-acceptor pairs and the localization of hydrogen-bond acceptor nucleotides. The proposed (13)C direct detected experiments therefore provide information about molecular sites not amenable by conventional proton-detected methods. Such information makes the RNA secondary structure determination by NMR more accurate and helps to validate secondary structure predictions based on bioinformatics. PMID:26852414

  7. Dynamic nuclear polarization experiments at 14.1 T for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Takahashi, Hiroki; Ueda, Keisuke; Idehara, Toshitaka; Ogawa, Isamu; Toda, Mitsuru; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2010-06-14

    Instrumentation for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 14.1 T was developed to enhance the nuclear polarization for NMR of solids. The gyrotron generated 394.5 GHz submillimeter (sub-mm) wave with a power of 40 W in the second harmonic TE(0,6) mode. The sub-mm wave with a power of 0.5-3 W was transmitted to the sample in a low-temperature DNP-NMR probe with a smooth-wall circular waveguide system. The (1)H polarization enhancement factor of up to about 10 was observed for a (13)C-labeled compound with nitroxyl biradical TOTAPOL. The DNP enhancement was confirmed by the static magnetic field dependence of the NMR signal amplitude at 90 K. Improvements of the high-field DNP experiments are discussed. PMID:20518128

  8. Experiment evaluation of speckle suppression efficiency of 2D quasi-spiral M-sequence-based diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Lapchuk, A; Pashkevich, G A; Prygun, O V; Yurlov, V; Borodin, Y; Kryuchyn, A; Korchovyi, A A; Shylo, S

    2015-10-01

    The quasi-spiral 2D diffractive optical element (DOE) based on M-sequence of length N=15 is designed and manufactured. The speckle suppression efficiency by the DOE rotation is measured. The speckle suppression coefficients of 10.5, 6, and 4 are obtained for green, violet, and red laser beams, respectively. The results of numerical simulation and experimental data show that the quasi-spiral binary DOE structure can be as effective in speckle reduction as a periodic 2D DOE structure. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the speckle suppression efficiency of the 2D DOE structure decreases approximately twice at the boundaries of the visible range. It is shown that a replacement of this structure with the bilateral 1D DOE allows obtaining the maximum speckle suppression efficiency in the entire visible range of light. PMID:26479664

  9. Superstatistics model for T₂ distribution in NMR experiments on porous media.

    PubMed

    Correia, M D; Souza, A M; Sinnecker, J P; Sarthour, R S; Santos, B C C; Trevizan, W; Oliveira, I S

    2014-07-01

    We propose analytical functions for T2 distribution to describe transverse relaxation in high- and low-fields NMR experiments on porous media. The method is based on a superstatistics theory, and allows to find the mean and standard deviation of T2, directly from measurements. It is an alternative to multiexponential models for data decay inversion in NMR experiments. We exemplify the method with q-exponential functions and χ(2)-distributions to describe, respectively, data decay and T2 distribution on high-field experiments of fully water saturated glass microspheres bed packs, sedimentary rocks from outcrop and noisy low-field experiment on rocks. The method is general and can also be applied to biological systems. PMID:24819425

  10. Parameterized signal calibration for NMR cryoporometry experiment without external standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoch, Grzegorz; Krzyżak, Artur T.

    2016-08-01

    In cryoporometric experiments non-linear effects associated with the sample and the probehead bring unwanted contributions to the total signal along with the change of temperature. The elimination of these influences often occurs with the help of an intermediate measurement of a separate liquid sample. In this paper we suggest an alternative approach under certain assumptions, solely based on data from the target experiment. In order to obtain calibration parameters the method uses all of these raw data points. Its reliability is therefore enhanced as compared to other methods based on lesser number of data points. Presented approach is automatically valid for desired temperature range. The need for intermediate measurement is removed and parameters for such a calibration are naturally adapted to the individual sample-probehead combination.

  11. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested. PMID:24697421

  12. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-01

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  13. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  14. Results of an attempt to measure increased rates of the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n in a nonelectrochemical cold fusion experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Decker, Arthur J.; Blue, James W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to look for evidence of deuterium fusion in palladium. The experiment, which involved introducing deuterium into the palladium filter of a hydrogen purifier, was designed to detect neutrons produced in the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n as well as heat production. The neutron counts for deuterium did not differ significantly from background or from the counts for a hydrogen control. Heat production was detected when deuterium, but not hydrogen, was pumped from the purifier.

  15. Changes in Lignin and Polysaccharide Components in 13 Cultivars of Rice Straw following Dilute Acid Pretreatment as Studied by Solution-State 2D 1H-13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Teramura, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Kengo; Oshima, Tomoko; Aikawa, Shimpei; Matsuda, Fumio; Okamoto, Mami; Shirai, Tomokazu; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Ogino, Chiaki; Yamasaki, Masanori; Kikuchi, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    A renewable raw material, rice straw is pretreated for biorefinery usage. Solution-state two-dimensional (2D) 1H-13 C hetero-nuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to analyze 13 cultivars of rice straw before and after dilute acid pretreatment, to characterize general changes in the lignin and polysaccharide components. Intensities of most (15 of 16) peaks related to lignin aromatic regions, such as p-coumarate, guaiacyl, syringyl, p-hydroxyphenyl, and cinnamyl alcohol, and methoxyl, increased or remained unchanged after pretreatment. In contrast, intensities of most (11 of 13) peaks related to lignin aliphatic linkages or ferulate decreased. Decreased heterogeneity in the intensities of three peaks related to cellulose components in acid-insoluble residues resulted in similar glucose yield (0.45–0.59 g/g-dry biomass). Starch-derived components showed positive correlations (r = 0.71 to 0.96) with glucose, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), and formate concentrations in the liquid hydrolysates, and negative correlations (r = –0.95 to –0.97) with xylose concentration and acid-insoluble residue yield. These results showed the fate of lignin and polysaccharide components by pretreatment, suggesting that lignin aromatic regions and cellulose components were retained in the acid insoluble residues and starch-derived components were transformed into glucose, 5-HMF, and formate in the liquid hydrolysate. PMID:26083431

  16. Hydrolysis Studies and Quantitative Determination of Aluminum Ions Using [superscript 27]Al NMR: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Maria A.; Ingalls, Laura R.; Campbell, Andrew; James-Pederson, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a novel experiment focused on metal ion hydrolysis and the equilibria related to metal ions in aqueous systems. Using [superscript 27]Al NMR, the students become familiar with NMR spectroscopy as a quantitative analytical tool for the determination of aluminum by preparing a standard calibration curve using standard aluminum…

  17. NMR analysis of weak molecular interactions using slice-selective experiments via study of concentration gradients in agar gels.

    PubMed

    Mitrev, Y; Simova, S; Jeannerat, D

    2016-04-01

    Weak molecular interactions can be localized and quantified using a single NMR experiment analysing concentration gradients generated in agar gels. The spectra from various cross-sections along the gradient were obtained using a slice-selective pulse sequence realisable with standard NMR equipment. PMID:27009847

  18. Effective one-body dynamics in multiple-quantum NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufeil-Fiori, E.; Sánchez, C. M.; Oliva, F. Y.; Pastawski, H. M.; Levstein, P. R.

    2009-03-01

    A suitable NMR experiment in a one-dimensional dipolar coupled spin system allows one to reduce the natural many-body dynamics into effective one-body dynamics. We verify this in a polycrystalline sample of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by monitoring the excitation of NMR many-body superposition states: the multiple-quantum coherences. The observed effective one-dimensionality of HAp relies on the quasi-one-dimensional structure of the dipolar coupled network that, as we show here, is dynamically enhanced by the quantum Zeno effect. Decoherence is also probed through a Loschmidt echo experiment, where the time reversal is implemented on the double-quantum Hamiltonian, HDQ∝Ii+Ij++Ii-Ij- . We contrast the decoherence of adamantane, a standard three-dimensional system, with that of HAp. While the first shows an abrupt Fermi-type decay, HAp presents a smooth exponential law.

  19. Determination of Kinetic Parameters within a Single Nonisothermal On-Flow Experiment by Nanoliter NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gomez, M Victoria; Rodriguez, Antonio M; de la Hoz, Antonio; Jimenez-Marquez, Francisco; Fratila, Raluca M; Barneveld, Peter A; Velders, Aldrik H

    2015-10-20

    Conventional methods to determine the kinetic parameters for a certain reaction require multiple, separate isothermal experiments, resulting in time- and material-consuming processes. Here, an approach to determine the kinetic information within a single nonisothermal on-flow experiment is presented, consuming less than 10 μmol of reagents and having a total measuring time of typically 10 min. This approach makes use of a microfluidic NMR chip hyphenated to a continuous-flow microreactor and is based on the capabilities of the NMR chip to analyze subnanomole quantities of material in the 25 nL detection volume. Importantly, useful data are acquired from the microreactor platform in specific isothermal and nonisothermal frames. A model fitting the experimental data enables rapid determination of kinetic parameters, as demonstrated for a library of isoxazole and pyrazole derivatives. PMID:26383715

  20. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear.

  1. Cooling overall spin temperature: Protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D.

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the 1H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal 1H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated 15N enriched proteins (with or without 13C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between 1H N and 1H α spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed.

  2. Cooling overall spin temperature: protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the (1)H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal (1)H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated (15)N enriched proteins (with or without (13)C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between (1)H(N) and (1)H(alpha) spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed. PMID:16249110

  3. Computer-intensive simulation of solid-state NMR experiments using SIMPSON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošner, Zdeněk; Andersen, Rasmus; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Conducting large-scale solid-state NMR simulations requires fast computer software potentially in combination with efficient computational resources to complete within a reasonable time frame. Such simulations may involve large spin systems, multiple-parameter fitting of experimental spectra, or multiple-pulse experiment design using parameter scan, non-linear optimization, or optimal control procedures. To efficiently accommodate such simulations, we here present an improved version of the widely distributed open-source SIMPSON NMR simulation software package adapted to contemporary high performance hardware setups. The software is optimized for fast performance on standard stand-alone computers, multi-core processors, and large clusters of identical nodes. We describe the novel features for fast computation including internal matrix manipulations, propagator setups and acquisition strategies. For efficient calculation of powder averages, we implemented interpolation method of Alderman, Solum, and Grant, as well as recently introduced fast Wigner transform interpolation technique. The potential of the optimal control toolbox is greatly enhanced by higher precision gradients in combination with the efficient optimization algorithm known as limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno. In addition, advanced parallelization can be used in all types of calculations, providing significant time reductions. SIMPSON is thus reflecting current knowledge in the field of numerical simulations of solid-state NMR experiments. The efficiency and novel features are demonstrated on the representative simulations.

  4. Mathematical Modeling and Data Analysis of NMR Experiments using Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Guilhem; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid-dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has made significant impact in the characterization and understanding of metabolism that occurs on the sub-minute timescale in several diseases. While significant efforts have been made in developing applications, and in designing rapid-imaging radiofrequency (RF) and magnetic field gradient pulse sequences, very few groups have worked on implementing realistic mathematical/kinetic/relaxation models to fit the emergent data. The critical aspects to consider when modeling DNP experiments depend on both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and (bio)chemical kinetics. The former constraints are due to the relaxation of the NMR signal and the application of ‘read’ RF pulses, while the kinetic constraints include the total amount of each molecular species present. We describe the model-design strategy we have used to fit and interpret our DNP results. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a systematic analysis of DNP data. PMID:25114541

  5. Combined (Super 31)P and (Super 1)H NMR Experiments in the Structural Elucidation of Polynuclear Thiolate Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerrada, Elena; Laguna, Mariano

    2005-01-01

    A facile synthesis of two gold(I) complexes with 1,2-benzenedithiolate ligand and two different bidentate phosphines are described. A detailed sequence of NMR experiments is suggested to determine the structure of the compounds.

  6. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy. PMID:26081313

  7. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy. PMID:26081313

  8. Comparing hepatic 2D and 3D magnetic resonance elastography methods in a clinical setting – Initial experiences

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, Mikael F.; Norén, Bengt; Kihlberg, Johan; Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof; Kechagias, Stergios; Lundberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Continuous monitoring of liver fibrosis progression in patients is not feasible with the current diagnostic golden standard (needle biopsy). Recently, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a promising method for such continuous monitoring. Since there are different MRE methods that could be used in a clinical setting there is a need to investigate whether measurements produced by these MRE methods are comparable. Hence, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the measurements of the viscoelastic properties produced by 2D (stiffness) and 3D (elasticity and ‘Gabs,Elastic’) MRE are comparable. Materials and methods Seven patients with diffuse or suspect diffuse liver disease were examined in the same day with the two MRE methods. 2D MRE was performed using an acoustic passive transducer, with a 1.5 T GE 450 W MR system. 3D MRE was performed using an electromagnetic active transducer, with a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR system. Finally, mean viscoelastic values were extracted from the same anatomical region for both methods by an experienced radiologist. Results Stiffness correlated well with the elasticity, R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 1.08, intercept = 0.61 kPa), as well as with ‘Gabs,Elastic’ R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 0.95, intercept = 0.28 kPa). Conclusion This pilot study shows that different MRE methods can produce comparable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the liver. The existence of such comparable measurements is important, both from a clinical as well as a research perspective, since it allows for equipment-independent monitoring of disease progression. PMID:26937438

  9. A fast field-cycling device for high-resolution NMR: Design and application to spin relaxation and hyperpolarization experiments.

    PubMed

    Kiryutin, Alexey S; Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Grishin, Yuri A; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V

    2016-02-01

    A device for performing fast magnetic field-cycling NMR experiments is described. A key feature of this setup is that it combines fast switching of the external magnetic field and high-resolution NMR detection. The field-cycling method is based on precise mechanical positioning of the NMR probe with the mounted sample in the inhomogeneous fringe field of the spectrometer magnet. The device enables field variation over several decades (from 100μT up to 7T) within less than 0.3s; progress in NMR probe design provides NMR linewidths of about 10(-3)ppm. The experimental method is very versatile and enables site-specific studies of spin relaxation (NMRD, LLSs) and spin hyperpolarization (DNP, CIDNP, and SABRE) at variable magnetic field and at variable temperature. Experimental examples of such studies are demonstrated; advantages of the experimental method are described and existing challenges in the field are outlined. PMID:26773525

  10. A fast field-cycling device for high-resolution NMR: Design and application to spin relaxation and hyperpolarization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryutin, Alexey S.; Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Grishin, Yuri A.; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.

    2016-02-01

    A device for performing fast magnetic field-cycling NMR experiments is described. A key feature of this setup is that it combines fast switching of the external magnetic field and high-resolution NMR detection. The field-cycling method is based on precise mechanical positioning of the NMR probe with the mounted sample in the inhomogeneous fringe field of the spectrometer magnet. The device enables field variation over several decades (from 100 μT up to 7 T) within less than 0.3 s; progress in NMR probe design provides NMR linewidths of about 10-3 ppm. The experimental method is very versatile and enables site-specific studies of spin relaxation (NMRD, LLSs) and spin hyperpolarization (DNP, CIDNP, and SABRE) at variable magnetic field and at variable temperature. Experimental examples of such studies are demonstrated; advantages of the experimental method are described and existing challenges in the field are outlined.

  11. Conceptual-level workflow modeling of scientific experiments using NMR as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Verdi, Kacy K; Ellis, Heidi JC; Gryk, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Background Scientific workflows improve the process of scientific experiments by making computations explicit, underscoring data flow, and emphasizing the participation of humans in the process when intuition and human reasoning are required. Workflows for experiments also highlight transitions among experimental phases, allowing intermediate results to be verified and supporting the proper handling of semantic mismatches and different file formats among the various tools used in the scientific process. Thus, scientific workflows are important for the modeling and subsequent capture of bioinformatics-related data. While much research has been conducted on the implementation of scientific workflows, the initial process of actually designing and generating the workflow at the conceptual level has received little consideration. Results We propose a structured process to capture scientific workflows at the conceptual level that allows workflows to be documented efficiently, results in concise models of the workflow and more-correct workflow implementations, and provides insight into the scientific process itself. The approach uses three modeling techniques to model the structural, data flow, and control flow aspects of the workflow. The domain of biomolecular structure determination using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the process. Specifically, we show the application of the approach to capture the workflow for the process of conducting biomolecular analysis using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Conclusion Using the approach, we were able to accurately document, in a short amount of time, numerous steps in the process of conducting an experiment using NMR spectroscopy. The resulting models are correct and precise, as outside validation of the models identified only minor omissions in the models. In addition, the models provide an accurate visual description of the control flow for conducting biomolecular analysis using

  12. Molecular Mechanics and Variable-Temperature 1H NMR Studies on N,N-Diethyl-m-toluamide. An Undergraduate NMR and Molecular Modeling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Bruce L.; Fort, Raymond C., Jr.

    2001-04-01

    A combination of molecular modeling and variable-temperature NMR experiments is used to analyze the barrier to rotation about the amide bond of N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET). This approach utilizes the ability of computers to calculate the potential energy of a set of conformations obtained from a dihedral drive around the N-CO bond. The results of this experiment demonstrate a substantial barrier of 15.9 kcal/mol. These data are applied to a set of 1H NMR spectra taken over a range of temperatures from 9 to 85 °C. At very low temperatures the conformation is "locked" and the spectrum displays two sets of triplets and two sets of quartets for the two nonequivalent ethyl groups. However, at high temperature the rapid rotation about the amide linkage produces only one quartet and one triplet, characteristic of two indistinguishable ethyl groups. The experiment offers students hands-on experience with two important laboratory instruments and allows for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of the data. This experiment is scheduled to coincide with lecture discussion of NMR spectroscopy, after the fundamentals of bond rotation have been presented.

  13. Quantitative two-dimensional HSQC experiment for high magnetic field NMR spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Harri; Heikkilä, Outi; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Heikkinen, Sami

    2010-01-01

    The finite RF power available on carbon channel in proton-carbon correlation experiments leads to non-uniform cross peak intensity response across carbon chemical shift range. Several classes of broadband pulses are available that alleviate this problem. Adiabatic pulses provide an excellent magnetization inversion over a large bandwidth, and very recently, novel phase-modulated pulses have been proposed that perform 90° and 180° magnetization rotations with good offset tolerance. Here, we present a study how these broadband pulses (adiabatic and phase-modulated) can improve quantitative application of the heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) experiment on high magnetic field strength NMR spectrometers. Theoretical and experimental examinations of the quantitative, offset-compensated, CPMG-adjusted HSQC (Q-OCCAHSQC) experiment are presented. The proposed experiment offers a formidable improvement to the offset performance; 13C offset-dependent standard deviation of the peak intensity was below 6% in range of ±20 kHz. This covers the carbon chemical shift range of 150 ppm, which contains the protonated carbons excluding the aldehydes, for 22.3 T NMR magnets. A demonstration of the quantitative analysis of a fasting blood plasma sample obtained from a healthy volunteer is given.

  14. Application of high-performance liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance coupling to the identification of limonoids from mahogany tree (Switenia macrophylla, Meliaceae) by stopped-flow 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schefer, Alexandre B; Braumann, Ulrich; Tseng, Li-Hong; Spraul, Manfred; Soares, Marisi G; Fernandes, João B; da Silva, Maria F G F; Vieira, Paulo C; Ferreira, Antonio G

    2006-09-22

    Separation and characterization of limonoids from Switenia macrophylla (Meliaceae) by HPLC-NMR technique has been described. Analyses were carried out using reversed-phase gradient HPLC elution coupled to NMR (600 MHz) spectrometer in stopped-flow mode. Separated peaks were collected into an interface unit prior to NMR measurements, which were performed with suppression of solvent signals by shaped pulses sequences. Structure elucidation of the limonoids was attained by data obtained from 1H NMR, TOCSY, gHSQC and gHMBC spectra without conventional isolation that is usually applied in natural products studies. PMID:16904679

  15. Spectroscopic separation of (13) C NMR spectra of complex isomeric mixtures by the CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT experiment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Moreno, Aitor; Fieber, Wolfgang; Brauchli, Robert; Sommer, Horst

    2015-04-01

    Isomeric mixtures from synthetic or natural origins can pose fundamental challenges for their chromatographic separation and spectroscopic identification. A novel 1D selective NMR experiment, chemical shift selective filter (CSSF)-TOCSY-INEPT, is presented that allows the extraction of (13) C NMR subspectra of discrete isomers in complex mixtures without physical separation. This is achieved via CSS excitation of proton signals in the (1) H NMR mixture spectrum, propagation of the selectivity by polarization transfer within coupled (1) H spins, and subsequent relaying of the magnetization from (1) H to (13) C by direct INEPT transfer to generate (13) C NMR subspectra. Simple consolidation of the subspectra yields (13) C NMR spectra for individual isomers. Alternatively, CSSF-INEPT with heteronuclear long-range transfer can correlate the isolated networks of coupled spins and therefore facilitate the reconstruction of the (13) C NMR spectra for isomers containing multiple spin systems. A proof-of-principle validation of the CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT experiment is demonstrated on three mixtures with different spectral and structural complexities. The results show that CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT is a versatile, powerful tool for deconvoluting isomeric mixtures within the NMR tube with unprecedented resolution and offers unique, unambiguous spectral information for structure elucidation. PMID:25616134

  16. Geometric Approximation: A New Computational Approach To Characterize Protein Dynamics from NMR Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion Experiments.

    PubMed

    Chao, Fa-An; Byrd, R Andrew

    2016-06-15

    A new computational strategy is reported that provides a fast approximation of numerical solutions of differential equations in general. The method is demonstrated with the analysis of NMR adiabatic relaxation dispersion experiments to reveal biomolecular dynamics. When an analytical solution to the theoretical equations describing a physical process is not available, the new approach can significantly accelerate the computational speed of the conventional numerical integration up to 10(5) times. NMR adiabatic relaxation dispersion experiments enhanced with optimized proton-decoupled pulse sequences, although extremely powerful, have previously been refractory to quantitative analysis. Both simulations and experimental validation demonstrate detectable "slow" (microsecond to millisecond) conformational exchange rates from 10(2) to 10(5) s(-1). This greatly expanded time-scale range enables the characterization of a wide array of conformational fluctuations for individual residues, which correlate with biomolecular function and were previously inaccessible. Moreover, the new computational method can be potentially generalized for analysis of new types of relaxation dispersion experiments to characterize the various dynamics of biomolecular systems. PMID:27225523

  17. Using magnetic coupling to implement 1H, 19F, 13C experiments in routine high resolution NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Paul; Finnigan, Jim; Marsden, Brian; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the design of 1H, 19F, 13C circuitry using magnetic coupling which can do on demand experiments where one of the three nuclei is observed and the other two are decoupled. The implementation of this circuitry in routine NMR probes is compared with capacitive coupling methods where it was found that by using magnetic coupling the performance of the routine NMR probe was not impacted by the addition of this circuitry. It is surmised that using this type of circuitry would be highly desirable for those chemists doing routine 19F NMR.

  18. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  19. Ionic Liquid Dynamics Measured with 2D IR and IR Pump-Probe Experiments on a Linear Anion and the Influence of Potassium Cations.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    The room-temperature ionic liquid EmimNTf2 (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) was studied with two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) experiments using low-concentration selenocyanate (SeCN(-)) as the vibrational probe. SeCN(-) was added as EmimSeCN, which keeps the cation the same. KSeCN was also used, so K(+) was added. Two 2D IR polarization configurations were employed: ⟨XXXX⟩ (all pulses have the same polarization) and ⟨XXYY⟩ (the first two pulse polarizations are perpendicular to that of the third pulse and the echo). The spectral diffusion differs for the two configurations, demonstrating that reorientation-induced spectral diffusion, in addition to structural spectral diffusion (SSD), plays a role in the observed dynamics. The SSD was extracted from the 2D IR time-dependent data. The samples with EmimSeCN have dynamics on several fast time scales; however, when KSeCN is used, both the PPSP anisotropy decay and the 2D IR decays have low amplitude offsets (nondecaying values at long times). The size of the offsets increased with increased K(+) concentration. These results are explained in terms of a two-ensemble model. A small fraction of the SeCN(-) is located in the regions modified by the presence of K(+), causing a substantial slowing of the SeCN(-) orientational relaxation and spectral diffusion. Having a small ensemble of SeCN(-) that undergoes very slow dynamics is sufficient to explain the offsets. For the major ensemble, the dynamics with and without K(+) are the same. PMID:26872207

  20. Comparison and analysis of 2-D simulation results with two implosion radiation experiments on the Los Alamos Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Lebeda, C.F.; Matuska, W.; Benage, J.; Idzorek, G.; Oona, H.; Stokes, J.; Roderick, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    Two experiments, PegI-41, conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus I capacitor bank, and PegII-25, on the Pegasus II bank, consisted of the implosions of 13 mg (nominal), 5 cm radius, 2 cm high thin cylindrical aluminum foils resulting in soft x-ray radiation pulses from the plasma thermalization on axis. The implosions were conducted in direct-drive (no intermediate switching) mode with peak currents of about 4 MA and 5 MA respectively, and implosion times of about 2.5 {micro}s and 2.0 {micro}s. A radiation yield of about 250 kJ was measured for PegII-25. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the physics of the implosion and relate this physics to the production of the radiation pulse and to provide detailed experimental data which could be compared with 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. Included in the experimental diagnostic suites were faraday rotation and dB/dt current measurements, a visible framing camera, an x-ray stripline camera, time-dependent spectroscopy, bolometers and XRD`S. A comparison of the results from these experiments shows agreement with 2-D simulation results in the instability development, current, and radiation pulse data, including the pulsewidth, shape, peak power and total radiation yield as measured by bolometry. Instabilities dominate the behavior of the implosion and largely determine the properties of the resulting radiation pulse. The 2-D simulations can be seen to be an important tool in understanding the implosion physics.

  1. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  2. Synthesis and structural analysis using 2-D NMR of Sialyl Lewis X (SLe{sup x}) and Lewis X (Le{sup x}) oligosaccharides: Ligands related to E-selectin [ELAM-1] binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, G.E.; Nagy, J.O.; Brown, E.G.

    1992-06-17

    The sialyl Lewis X (SLe{sup x}) determinant (NeuAc-{alpha}-2,3-Gal-{beta}-1,4-[Fuc-{alpha}-1,3]-GlcNAc), compound 1, is a ligand for E-selectin (endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule 1, or ELAM-1), a member of the selectin family of cell adhesion molecules. Interactions between E-selectin and leucocyte-bound SLe{sup x} or closely related oligosaccharides are thought to be important early events in the inflammation process. Binding analysis has shown that the sialic acid (NeuAc) and the fucose (Fuc) moieties are essential for high affinity. The related desialylated trisaccharide Le{sup x} (Gas-{beta}-1,4-[Fuc-{alpha}-1,3]-GlcNAc), for example, is not a high-affinity ligand for E-selectin. In this communication, the authors describe the syntheses of SLe{sup x} 1 and the {beta}-O-allyl glycoside of Le{sup x} 2 using a cloned fucosyltransferase and their complete NMR spectral assignments including ROESY and NOESY experiments in order to investigate the conformation of these compounds in solution. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Spatial reorientation experiments for NMR of solids and partially oriented liquids.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachel W; Kelly, John E; Collier, Kelsey A

    2015-11-01

    on how motional reorientation experiments can be applied to current problems in chemistry, molecular biology, and materials science, given the many advances in high-field NMR magnets, fast spinning, and sample preparation realized in recent years. PMID:26592947

  4. A direct sensitivity comparison between flow-modulated comprehensive 2D and 1D GC in untargeted and targeted MS-based experiments.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Franchina, Flavio A; Zoccali, Mariosimone; Bonaccorsi, Ivana; Cacciola, Francesco; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-09-01

    The present contribution is focused on the measurement of the analytical sensitivity attained in untargeted/targeted MS/MS experiments, performed using flow-modulator comprehensive 2D and 1D GC. The comprehensive 2D experiment was performed by diverting part of the high flow (circa 80%) to flush the accumulation loop (about 28 mL/min) to waste, to reduce the gas flow entering the ion source. 1D analyses were performed through: (i) unmodulated and (ii) single column applications. An equivalent temperature program was applied in the modulated and unmodulated analyses, while a faster one was employed in the single column one. In all application types, the (same) triple quadrupole instrument was operated in the full-scan and multiple reaction monitoring modes. A genuine sweet orange oil and the same sample spiked with 20 phytosanitary compounds were employed to reach the research objective. The results highlight the problems related to the flow modulation-MS combination. Specifically, it was found that sensitivity was on average three to four times higher in unmodulated and optimized single-column applications. PMID:23868497

  5. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: Quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  6. Investigation of capillary nanosecond discharges in air at moderate pressure: comparison of experiments and 2D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, Andrei V.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-01

    Nanosecond electrical discharges in the form of ionization waves are of interest for rapidly ionizing and exciting complex gas mixtures to initiate chemical reactions. Operating with a small discharge tube diameter can significantly increase the specific energy deposition and so enable optimization of the initiation process. Analysis of the uniformity of energy release in small diameter capillary tubes will aid in this optimization. In this paper, results for the experimentally derived characteristics of nanosecond capillary discharges in air at moderate pressure are presented and compared with results from a two-dimensional model. The quartz capillary tube, having inner and outer diameters of 1.5 and 3.4 mm, is about 80 mm long and filled with synthetic dry air at 27 mbar. The capillary tube with two electrodes at the ends is inserted into a break of the central wire of a long coaxial cable. A metal screen around the tube is connected to the cable ground shield. The discharge is driven by a 19 kV 35 ns voltage pulse applied to the powered electrode. The experimental measurements are conducted primarily by using a calibrated capacitive probe and back current shunts. The numerical modelling focuses on the fast ionization wave (FIW) and the plasma properties in the immediate afterglow after the conductive plasma channel has been established between the two electrodes. The FIW produces a highly focused region of electric field on the tube axis that sustains the ionization wave that eventually bridges the electrode gap. Results from the model predict FIW propagation speed and current rise time that agree with the experiment.

  7. NMR Backbone Assignment of Large Proteins by Using (13) Cα -Only Triple-Resonance Experiments.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingtao; Chen, Jiajing; Mi, Juan; Zhang, Jiahai; Ruan, Ke; Wu, Jihui

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to interrogate protein structure and dynamics residue by residue. However, the prerequisite chemical-shift assignment remains a bottleneck for large proteins due to the fast relaxation and the frequency degeneracy of the (13) Cα nuclei. Herein, we present a covariance NMR strategy to assign the backbone chemical shifts by using only HN(CO)CA and HNCA spectra that has a high sensitivity even for large proteins. By using the peak linear correlation coefficient (LCC), which is a sensitive probe even for tiny chemical-shift displacements, we correctly identify the fidelity of approximately 92 % cross-peaks in the covariance spectrum, which is thus a significant improvement on the approach developed by Snyder and Brüschweiler (66 %) and the use of spectral derivatives (50 %). Thus, we calculate the 4D covariance spectrum from HN(CO)CA and HNCA experiments, in which cross-peaks with LCCs above a universal threshold are considered as true correlations. This 4D covariance spectrum enables the sequential assignment of a 42 kDa maltose binding protein (MBP), in which about 95 % residues are successfully assigned with a high accuracy of 98 %. Our LCC approach, therefore, paves the way for a residue-by-residue study of the backbone structure and dynamics of large proteins. PMID:27276173

  8. Extending long-range heteronuclear NMR connectivities by HSQMBC-COSY and HSQMBC-TOCSY experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurí, Josep; Marcó, Núria; Williamson, R. Thomas; Martin, Gary E.; Parella, Teodor

    2015-09-01

    The detection of long-range heteronuclear correlations presenting J(CH) coupling values smaller than 1-2 Hz is a challenge in the structural analysis of small molecules and natural products. HSQMBC-COSY and HSQMBC-TOCSY pulse schemes are evaluated as complementary NMR methods to standard HMBC/HSQMBC experiments. Incorporation of an additional J(HH) transfer step in the basic HSQMBC pulse scheme can favor the sensitive observation of traditionally missing or very weak correlations and, in addition, facilitates the detection of a significant number of still longer-range connectivities to both protonated and non-protonated carbons under optimum sensitivity conditions. A comparative 1H-13C study is performed using strychnine as a model compound and several examples are also provided including 1H-15N applications.

  9. Momentum density and 2D-ACAR experiments in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A.; Smedskjaer, L.C.

    1991-12-01

    We compare measured c-projected 2D-ACAR spectrum from an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} with the corresponding band theory predictions. Many different one-dimensional sections through the spectrum are considered, together with the characteristic amplitudes and shapes of the spectral anisotropies, with a focus on identifying and delineating Fermi surface signatures in the spectra. The positron data clearly show several distinct features of the ridge Fermi surface predicted by the band theory, and give an indication of the pillbox Fermi sheet. The good agreement between theory and experiment suggests that the band theory framework based on the local density approximation (LDA) is capable of providing a substantially correct description of the momentum density and Fermiology of the normal ground state electronic structure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  10. Nonuniform sampling of hypercomplex multidimensional NMR experiments: Dimensionality, quadrature phase and randomization

    PubMed Central

    Schuyler, Adam D; Maciejewski, Mark W; Stern, Alan S; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    Nonuniform sampling (NUS) in multidimensional NMR permits the exploration of higher dimensional experiments and longer evolution times than the Nyquist Theorem practically allows for uniformly sampled experiments. However, the spectra of NUS data include sampling-induced artifacts and may be subject to distortions imposed by sparse data reconstruction techniques, issues not encountered with the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) applied to uniformly sampled data. The characterization of these NUS-induced artifacts allows for more informed sample schedule design and improved spectral quality. The DFT–Convolution Theorem, via the point-spread function (PSF) for a given sampling scheme, provides a useful framework for exploring the nature of NUS sampling artifacts. In this work, we analyze the PSFs for a set of specially constructed NUS schemes to quantify the interplay between randomization and dimensionality for reducing artifacts relative to uniformly undersampled controls. In particular, we find a synergistic relationship between the indirect time dimensions and the “quadrature phase dimension” (i.e. the hypercomplex components collected for quadrature detection). The quadrature phase dimension provides additional degrees of freedom that enable partial-component NUS (collecting a subset of quadrature components) to further reduce sampling-induced aliases relative to traditional full-component NUS (collecting all quadrature components). The efficacy of artifact reduction is exponentially related to the dimensionality of the sample space. Our results quantify the utility of partial-component NUS as an additional means for introducing decoherence into sampling schemes and reducing sampling artifacts in high dimensional experiments. PMID:25899289

  11. Wind-tunnel experiments of turbulent flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block in a thermally-stratified boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent flows over complex surface topography have been of great interest in the atmospheric science and wind engineering communities. The geometry of the topography, surface roughness and temperature characteristics as well as the atmospheric thermal stability play important roles in determining momentum and scalar flux distribution. Studies of turbulent flow over simplified topography models, under neutrally stratified boundary-layer conditions, have provided insights into fluid dynamics. However, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been considered in laboratory experiments, e.g., wind-tunnel experiments. Series of wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified boundary-layer flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block, in a well-controlled boundary-layer wind tunnel, will be presented. Measurements using high-resolution PIV, x-wire/cold-wire anemometry and surface heat flux sensors were conducted to quantify the turbulent flow properties, including the size of the recirculation zone, coherent vortex structures and the subsequent boundary layer recovery. Results will be shown to address thermal stability effects on momentum and scalar flux distribution in the wake, as well as dominant mechanism of turbulent kinetic energy generation and consumption. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from the Swiss National Foundation (Grant 200021-132122), the National Science Foundation (Grant ATM-0854766) and NASA (Grant NNG06GE256).

  12. Analysis of Bromination of Ethylbenzene Using a 45 MHz NMR Spectrometer: An Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac-Lam, Meden F.

    2014-01-01

    A 45 MHz benchtop NMR spectrometer is used to identify the structures and determine the amount of 1-bromoethylbenzene and 1,1-dibromoethylbenzene produced from free-radical bromination of ethylbenzene. The experiment is designed for nonchemistry majors, specifically B.S. Biology students, in a predominantly undergraduate institution with…

  13. Extraction and [superscript 1]H NMR Analysis of Fats from Convenience Foods: A Laboratory Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartel, Aaron M.; Moore, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The extraction and analysis of fats from convenience foods (crackers, cookies, chips, candies) has been developed as an experiment for a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course. Students gravimetrically determine the fat content per serving and then perform a [superscript 1]H NMR analysis of the recovered fat to determine the…

  14. Interpreting the Paramagnetic NMR Spectra of Potential Ru(III) Metallodrugs: Synergy between Experiment and Relativistic DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Jan; Sojka, Martin; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Nečas, Marek; Marek, Radek

    2016-07-13

    Ruthenium-based compounds are potential candidates for use as anticancer metallodrugs. The central ruthenium atom can be in the oxidation state +2 (e.g., RAPTA, RAED) or +3 (e.g., NAMI, KP). In this study we focus on paramagnetic NAMI analogs of a general structure [4-R-pyH](+)trans-[Ru(III)Cl4(DMSO)(4-R-py)](-), where 4-R-py stands for a 4-substituted pyridine. As paramagnetic systems are generally considered difficult to characterize in detail by NMR spectroscopy, we performed a systematic structural and methodological NMR study of complexes containing variously substituted pyridines. The effect of the paramagnetic nature of these complexes on the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts was systematically investigated by temperature-dependent NMR experiments and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. To understand the electronic factors influencing the orbital (δ(orb), temperature-independent) and paramagnetic (δ(para), temperature-dependent) contributions to the total NMR chemical shifts, a relativistic two-component DFT approach was used. The paramagnetic contributions to the (13)C NMR chemical shifts are correlated with the distribution of spin density in the ligand moiety and the (13)C isotropic hyperfine coupling constants, Aiso((13)C), for the individual carbon atoms. To analyze the mechanism of spin distribution in the ligand, the contributions of molecular spin-orbitals (MSOs) to the hyperfine coupling constants and the spatial distribution of the z-component of the spin density in the MSOs calculated at the relativistic four-component DFT level are discussed and rationalized. The significant effects of the substituent and the solvent on δ(para), particularly the contact contribution, are demonstrated. This work should contribute to further understanding of the link between the electronic structure and the NMR chemical shifts in open-shell systems, including the ruthenium-based metallodrugs investigated in this account. PMID:27312929

  15. NMR imaging of the chest at 0.12 T: initial clinical experience with a resistive magnet.

    PubMed

    Axel, L; Kressel, H Y; Thickman, D; Epstein, D M; Edelstein, W; Bottomley, P; Redington, R; Baum, S

    1983-12-01

    The chests of 40 subjects were imaged with an experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imager operating at a magnetic field of 0.12 T. There were six normal volunteers and 34 patients with abnormalities affecting different areas, including the chest wall, pleura, hila, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma, and including benign and malignant processes. In this initial clinical experience, NMR imaging provided useful information on the presence and extent of disease by its ability to distinguish different tissues and by the excellent demonstration of vascular structures. PMID:6606311

  16. Use of 2d-video Disdrometer to Derive Mean Density-size and Ze-SR Relations: Four Snow Cases from the Light Precipitation Validation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Gwo-Jong; Bringi, V. N.; Moisseev, Dmitri; Petersen, Walter A.; Bliven, Francis L.; Hudak, David

    2014-01-01

    The application of the 2D-video disdrometer to measure fall speed and snow size distribution and to derive liquid equivalent snow rate, mean density-size and reflectivity-snow rate power law is described. Inversion of the methodology proposed by Böhm provides the pathway to use measured fall speed, area ratio and '3D' size measurement to estimate the mass of each particle. Four snow cases from the Light Precipitation Validation Experiment are analyzed with supporting data from other instruments such as Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS), Snow Video Imager (SVI), a network of seven snow gauges and three scanning C9 band radars. The radar-based snow accumulations using the 2DVD-derived Ze-SR relation are in good agreement with a network of seven snow gauges and outperform the accumulations derived from a climatological Ze-SR relation used by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The normalized bias between radar-derived and gauge accumulation is reduced from 96% when using the fixed FMI relation to 28% when using the Ze-SR relations based on 2DVD data. The normalized standard error is also reduced significantly from 66% to 31%. For two of the days with widely different coefficients of the Ze-SR power law, the reflectivity structure showed significant differences in spatial variability. Liquid water path estimates from radiometric data also showed significant differences between the two cases. Examination of SVI particle images at the measurement site corroborated these differences in terms of unrimed versus rimed snow particles. The findings reported herein support the application of Böhm's methodology for deriving the mean density-size and Ze-SR power laws using data from 2D-video disdrometer.

  17. Use of 2D-video disdrometer to derive mean density-size and Ze-SR relations: Four snow cases from the light precipitation validation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Gwo-Jong; Bringi, V. N.; Moisseev, Dmitri; Petersen, W. A.; Bliven, L.; Hudak, David

    2015-02-01

    The application of the 2D-video disdrometer to measure fall speed and snow size distribution and to derive liquid equivalent snow rate, mean density-size and reflectivity-snow rate power law is described. Inversion of the methodology proposed by Böhm provides the pathway to use measured fall speed, area ratio and '3D' size measurement to estimate the mass of each particle. Four snow cases from the Light Precipitation Validation Experiment are analyzed with supporting data from other instruments such as the Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS), Snow Video Imager (SVI), a network of seven snow gauges and three scanning C-band radars. The radar-based snow accumulations using the 2DVD-derived Ze-SR relation are in good agreement with a network of seven snow gauges and outperform the accumulations derived from a climatological Ze-SR relation used by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The normalized bias between radar-derived and gauge accumulation is reduced from 96% when using the fixed FMI relation to 28% when using the Ze-SR relations based on 2DVD data. The normalized standard error is also reduced significantly from 66% to 31%. For two of the days with widely different coefficients of the Ze-SR power law, the reflectivity structure showed significant differences in spatial variability. Liquid water path estimates from radiometric data also showed significant differences between the two cases. Examination of SVI particle images at the measurement site corroborated these differences in terms of unrimed versus rimed snow particles. The findings reported herein support the application of Böhm's methodology for deriving the mean density-size and Ze-SR power laws using data from 2D-video disdrometer.

  18. The complexity of protein energy landscapes studied by solution NMR relaxation dispersion experiments

    PubMed Central

    Khirich, Gennady; Loria, J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The millisecond timescale motions in ribonuclease A (RNase A) were studied by solution NMR CPMG and off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion experiments over a wide pH and temperature range. These experiments identify three separate protein regions termed Cluster 1, Cluster 2, and R33 whose motions are governed by distinct thermodynamic parameters. Moreover each of these regions has motions with different pH dependencies. Cluster 1 shows an increase in activation enthalpy and activation entropy as the pH is lowered, whereas Cluster two exhibits the opposite behavior. In contrast the activation enthalpy and entropy of R33 show no pH dependence. Compounding the differences, Δω values for Cluster 2 are characteristic of two-site conformational exchange yet similar analysis for Cluster 1 indicates that this region of the enzyme exhibits conformational fluctuations between a major conformer and a pH-dependent average of protonated and de-protonated minor conformers. PMID:25680027

  19. An NMR Experiment Based on Off-the-Shelf Digital Data-Acquisition Equipment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilty, Christian; Bowen, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) poses significant challenges for teaching in the context of an undergraduate laboratory, foremost because of high equipment cost. Current off-the-shelf data-acquisition hardware, however, is sufficiently powerful to constitute the core of a fully digital NMR spectrometer operating at the earth's field. We present…

  20. Determination of DNA conformational features from selective two-dimensional NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Emsley, L.; Dwyer, T.J.; Spielmann, H.P.; Wemmer, D.E. |

    1993-08-25

    Selective two-dimensional NMR correlation experiments are demonstrated to be particularly well suited to the problem of obtaining quantitative three-bond coupling constants in samples of DNA. The techniques were demonstrated by obtaining high-resolution spectra of cross peaks between sugar protons, which were then iteratively fitted to simulations derived from trial coupling topologies to determine the coupling constants which contribute to the cross-peak patterns. These coupling constants were then used to determine structural parameters such as the phase angle of the deoxyribose pseudorotation and the backbone torsion angles {delta} and {epsilon}. Examples are given for both single-stranded and duplex DNA. We have studied both the unmodified 8-mer duplex d(GCGTACGC){sub 2} and the furan-side monoadduct formed between the thymidine of one of the strands and 4{prime}-(hydroxymethyl)-4,5{prime},8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) of the same DNA sequence. We comment on the structural differences between the two. 44 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Structural constraints for the Crh protein from solid-state NMR experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gardiennet, Carole; Loquet, Antoine; Etzkorn, Manuel; Heise, Henrike; Baldus, Marc

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that short, medium and long-range constraints can be extracted from proton mediated, rare-spin detected correlation solid-state NMR experiments for the microcrystalline 10.4 × 2 kDa dimeric model protein Crh. Magnetization build-up curves from cross signals in NHHC and CHHC spectra deliver detailed information on side chain conformers and secondary structure for interactions between spin pairs. A large number of medium and long-range correlations can be observed in the spectra, and an analysis of the resolved signals reveals that the constraints cover the entire sequence, also including inter-monomer contacts between the two molecules forming the domain-swapped Crh dimer. Dynamic behavior is shown to have an impact on cross signals intensities, as indicated for mobile residues or regions by contacts predicted from the crystal structure, but absent in the spectra. Our work validates strategies involving proton distance measurements for large and complex proteins as the Crh dimer, and confirms the magnetization transfer properties previously described for small molecules in solid protein samples. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10858-008-9229-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18320329

  2. In situ temperature jump high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization experiments: enhanced sensitivity in liquid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Joo, Chan-Gyu; Hu, Kan-Nian; Bryant, Jeffrey A; Griffin, Robert G

    2006-07-26

    We describe an experiment, in situ temperature jump dynamic nuclear polarization (TJ-DNP), that is demonstrated to enhance sensitivity in liquid-state NMR experiments of low-gamma spins--13C, 15N, etc. The approach consists of polarizing a sample at low temperature using high-frequency (140 GHz) microwaves and a biradical polarizing agent and then melting it rapidly with a pulse of 10.6 microm infrared radiation, followed by observation of the NMR signal in the presence of decoupling. In the absence of polarization losses due to relaxation, the enhancement should be epsilon+ = epsilon(T(obs)/T(mu)(wave)), where epsilon+ is the observed enhancement, epsilon is the enhancement obtained at the temperature where the polarization process occurs, and T(mu)(wave) and T(obs) are the polarization and observation temperatures, respectively. In a single experimental cycle, we observe room-temperature enhancements, epsilon(dagger), of 13C signals in the range 120-400 when using a 140 GHz gyrotron microwave source, T(mu)(wave) = 90 K, and T(obs) = 300 K. In addition, we demonstrate that the experiment can be recycled to perform signal averaging that is customary in contemporary NMR spectroscopy. Presently, the experiment is applicable to samples that can be repeatedly frozen and thawed. TJ-DNP could also serve as the initial polarization step in experiments designed for rapid acquisition of multidimensional spectra. PMID:16848479

  3. Ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR for a rapid and sensitive chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahola, Susanna; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V.; Mankinen, Otto; Zhang, Guannan; Kantola, Anu M.; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Hilty, Christian; Koptyug, Igor V.; Telkki, Ville-Veikko

    2015-09-01

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy relies on the versatile chemical information conveyed by spectra. To complement conventional NMR, Laplace NMR explores diffusion and relaxation phenomena to reveal details on molecular motions. Under a broad concept of ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR, here we introduce an ultrafast diffusion-relaxation correlation experiment enhancing the resolution and information content of corresponding 1D experiments as well as reducing the experiment time by one to two orders of magnitude or more as compared with its conventional 2D counterpart. We demonstrate that the method allows one to distinguish identical molecules in different physical environments and provides chemical resolution missing in NMR spectra. Although the sensitivity of the new method is reduced due to spatial encoding, the single-scan approach enables one to use hyperpolarized substances to boost the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, significantly enhancing the overall sensitivity of multidimensional Laplace NMR.

  4. Ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR for a rapid and sensitive chemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahola, Susanna; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Mankinen, Otto; Zhang, Guannan; Kantola, Anu M.; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Hilty, Christian; Koptyug, Igor V.; Telkki, Ville-Veikko

    2015-01-01

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy relies on the versatile chemical information conveyed by spectra. To complement conventional NMR, Laplace NMR explores diffusion and relaxation phenomena to reveal details on molecular motions. Under a broad concept of ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR, here we introduce an ultrafast diffusion-relaxation correlation experiment enhancing the resolution and information content of corresponding 1D experiments as well as reducing the experiment time by one to two orders of magnitude or more as compared with its conventional 2D counterpart. We demonstrate that the method allows one to distinguish identical molecules in different physical environments and provides chemical resolution missing in NMR spectra. Although the sensitivity of the new method is reduced due to spatial encoding, the single-scan approach enables one to use hyperpolarized substances to boost the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, significantly enhancing the overall sensitivity of multidimensional Laplace NMR. PMID:26381101

  5. Effects of microgeometry and surface relaxation on NMR pulsed-field-gradient experiments: Simple pore geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Partha P.; Sen, Pabitra N.

    1992-01-01

    We derive an expression for the magnetization M(k,Δ) in a pulsed-field-gradient experiment for spins diffusing in a confined space with relaxation at the pore walls. Here k=γδg, δ= pulse width, g= gradient strength, γ= the gyromagnetic ratio, and Δ is the time between gradient pulses. We show that the deviation of -ln[M(k,Δ)/M(0,Δ)] from quadratic behavior in k in experiments in porous media can be a more sensitive probe of the microgeometry (size, connectivity, size distribution, shape, etc.), than either the enhancement of 1/T1 over the bulk water value, or the macroscopic diffusion coefficient, which is derived from the slope of -ln[M(k,Δ)/M(0,Δ)] at small k2, in the limit of large Δ. We propose some simple models of randomly oriented tubes and sheets to interpret the k dependence of the amplitude beyond the leading small-k quadratic behavior. When the macroscopic diffusion coefficient is unobtainable, due to the decay, the present considerations should be useful in extracting geometrical information. The effective diffusion constant derived from NMR exactly equals that derived from electrical conductivity only when the surface relaxivity is zero, but can be close to each other in favorable circumstances even for finite surface relaxivity. Exact solutions with partially absorbing boundary conditions are obtained for a slab and a sphere to infer that the normalized amplitude M(k,Δ,ρ)/M(0,Δ,ρ) depends only weakly on the surface relaxivity ρ for monodisperse convex-shaped pores in the parameter ranges of interest. We also obtain expressions for the mean lifetime of the amplitude in the geometries considered.

  6. Manifestations of the absence of spin diffusion in multipulse NMR experiments on diluted dipolar solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzoni, María Belén; Levstein, Patricia R.

    2005-12-01

    Puzzling anomalies previously observed in multipulse NMR experiments in natural abundance Si29 [A. E. Dementyev, D. Li, K. MacLean, and S. E. Barrett, Phys. Rev. B 68, 153302 (2003)], such as long-lived spin echoes and even-odd asymmetries, are also found in polycrystalline C60 . Further experiments controlling the phases and tilting angles of the pulse trains, as well as analytical and numerical calculations, allowed us to explain the origin of these anomalies. We prove that the observation of long magnetization tails requires two conditions: (i) an rf field inhomogeneity or a highly inhomogeneous line able to produce different tilting angles in different sites of the sample and (ii) the absence of spin diffusion (noneffective flip-flop interactions). The last requirement is easily satisfied in diluted dipolar solids, where the frequency differences between sites, caused by disorder or other sources, are usually at least one order of magnitude larger than the dipolar couplings. Both conditions lead to the generation of stimulated echoes in Carr-Purcell (CP) and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse trains. We show, both experimentally and theoretically, that the stimulated echoes interfere constructively or destructively with the normal (Hahn) echoes depending on the alternation or not of the π pulse phases in the CP and CPMG sequences. Constructive interferences occur for the CP and CPMG sequences with and without phase alternation, respectively, which are the cases where long magnetization tails are observed. Sequences with two, three, and four π pulses after the π/2 pulse allow us to disentangle the contributions of the different echoes and show how the stimulated echoes originate the even-odd asymmetry observed in both Si29 and C60 polycrystalline samples.

  7. Phase Cycling Schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS Solid State NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY414, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D 1H/1H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY412, XY413, XY414, and XY814 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T10T2,±2, T1,±1T2,±1, etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field in homogeneity effects revealed that XY414 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp-RFDR are also analyzed

  8. Collection of NMR Scalar and Residual Dipolar Couplings Using a Single Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gil-Silva, Leandro F; Santamaría-Fernández, Raquel; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Gil, Roberto R

    2016-01-11

    A new DMSO-compatible aligning gel based on cross-linked poly(2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (poly-HEMA) has been developed. Due to a significant difference in bulk magnetic susceptibility between the DMSO inside and outside the gel, it is possible to simultaneously collect isotropic and anisotropic NMR data, such as residual dipolar couplings (RDC), in the same NMR tube. RDC-assisted structural analysis of menthol and the alkaloid retrorsine is reported as proof of concept. PMID:26515991

  9. 2D NMR analysis of highly restricted internal rotation in 2-methylthio-3H-4- p-bromophenyl)-7-[( ortho- and para-substituted)-phenylthio]-1,5-benzodiazepines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes C., E.; Becerra L., M. I.; Osornio P., Y. M.; Díaz T., E.; Jankowski, K.

    2000-08-01

    The complete assignments of twelve 4-ary1-7-thioary1-1,5-benzodiazepines 1H and 13C spectra, performed with the use of high resolution variable solvent and temperature 1D and 2D techniques (e.g. HOMOCOSY, NOESY, HMQC and HMBC), lead to the determination of conformational equilibria between two rotamers having the aromatic ring of the thioaryl oriented in a perpendicular or helical orientation toward the benzodiazepine ring. The restricted rotation was evaluated from the population of these conformers.

  10. A guide to the identification of metabolites in NMR-based metabonomics/metabolomics experiments

    PubMed Central

    Dona, Anthony C.; Kyriakides, Michael; Scott, Flora; Shephard, Elizabeth A.; Varshavi, Dorsa; Veselkov, Kirill; Everett, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Metabonomics/metabolomics is an important science for the understanding of biological systems and the prediction of their behaviour, through the profiling of metabolites. Two technologies are routinely used in order to analyse metabolite profiles in biological fluids: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS), the latter typically with hyphenation to a chromatography system such as liquid chromatography (LC), in a configuration known as LC–MS. With both NMR and MS-based detection technologies, the identification of the metabolites in the biological sample remains a significant obstacle and bottleneck. This article provides guidance on methods for metabolite identification in biological fluids using NMR spectroscopy, and is illustrated with examples from recent studies on mice. PMID:27087910

  11. Deriving NMR surface relaxivities, pore size distributions and water retention curves by NMR relaxation experiments on partially de-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C. L.; Klitzsch, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a method used over a wide field of geophysical applications to non-destructively determine transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. In NMR relaxometry signal amplitudes correspond directly to the rock's fluid (water, oil) content. On the other hand the NMR relaxation behavior, i.e. the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) NMR relaxation times, can be used to derive pore sizes and permeability as it is linearly linked to the pore's surface-to-volume-ratio and physiochemical properties of the rock-fluid interface by the surface relaxivity ρ_s This parameter, however, is dependent on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock sample and thus has to be determined and calibrated prior to estimating pore sizes from NMR relaxometry measurements. Frequently used methods to derive surface relaxivity to calibrate NMR pore sizes comprise mercury injection, pulsed field gradients (PFG-NMR) or grain size analysis. This study introduces an alternative approach to jointly estimate NMR surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions using NMR relaxation data obtained from partially de-saturated rocks. In this, inverse modeling is carried on a linked Young Laplace equation for capillary bundles and the Brownstein and Tarr equations. Subsequently, this approach is used to predict water retention curves of the investigated rocks. The method was tested and validated on simulated and laboratory transverse NMR data. Calculated inverse models are generally in a good agreement with results obtained from mercury injection and drainage measurements. Left: Measured and predicted water retention (pF) curves. Center: NMR relaxometry data, fit and error. Right: Mercury injection data (HgPor, dashed line) and jointly derived pore radii distributions and surface relaxivity by joint inverse modelling

  12. Experiments on two-phase flow in a quasi-2D porous medium: investigation of boundary effects in the measurement of pressure-saturation relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Marcel; Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Toussaint, Renaud; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    We have performed two-phase flow experiments to analyze the drainage from a quasi-2D random porous medium. The medium is transparent, which allows for the visualization of the invasion pattern during the flow and is initially fully saturated with a viscous fluid (a dyed glycerol-water mix). As the pressure in the fluid is gradually reduced, air penetrates from an open inlet, thus displacing the fluid which leaves the system from the outlet in the opposite side. A feedback mechanism was devised to control the experiment: the capillary pressure (difference in pressure between the non-wetting and wetting phases) is continuously increased to be just above the threshold value necessary to drive the invasion process. This mechanism is intended to keep the invasion process slow, in the so-called capillary regime, where capillary forces dominate the dynamics. Pressure measurements and pictures of the flow are recorded and the pressure-saturation relationship is computed. The effects of the boundary conditions to this quantity are verified experimentally by repeatedly performing the analysis using porous media of different sizes. We show that some features of the pressure-saturation curve are strongly affected by boundary effects. The invasion close to the inlet and outlet of the model are particularly influenced by the boundaries and this is reflected in the phases of pressure building up in the pressure-saturation curves, in the beginning and end of the invasion process. Conversely, at the central part of the model (away from the boundaries), the invasion process happens at an essentially constant capillary pressure, which is reflected as a plateau in the pressure-saturation curve. Additionally, the use of a high-resolution camera allows us to analyze the images down to the pore scale. We can directly obtain a distribution of pore-throat sizes in the model (and their associated capillary pressure thresholds) and divide it into distributions of invaded / non-invaded pores

  13. Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-08-19

    To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.

  14. 13C-NMR spectra and contact time experiment for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The T(CP) and T(1p) time constants for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids were determined to be short with T(CP) values ranging from 0.14 ms to 0.53 ms and T(1p) values ranging from 3.3 ms to 5.9 ms. T(CP) or T(1p) time constants at a contact time of 1 ms are favorable for quantification of 13C-NMR spectra. Because of the short T(CP) values, correction factors for signal intensity for various regions of the 13C-NMR spectra would be necessary at contact times greater than 1.1 ms or less than 0.9 ms. T(CP) and T(1p) values have a limited non-homogeneity within Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids. A pulse delay or repeat time of 700 ms is more than adequate for quantification of these 13C-NMR spectra. Paramagnetic effects in these humic substances are precluded due to low inorganic ash contents, low contents of Fe, Mn, and Co, and low organic free-radical contents. The observed T(CP) values suggest that all the carbon types in Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids are fully cross-polarized before significant proton relaxation occurs. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern fulvic acid is similar to most aquatic fulvic acids as it is predominantly aliphatic, low in aromaticity (fa1 = 24), low in phenolic content, high in carboxyl content, and has no resolution of a methoxyl peak. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern humic acid is also similar to most other aquatic humic acids in that it is also predominantly aliphatic, high in aromaticity (fa1 = 38), moderate in phenolic content, moderate in carboxyl content, and has a clear resolution of a methoxyl carbon region. After the consideration of the necessary 13C-NMR experimental conditions, these spectra are considered to be quantitative. With careful consideration of the previously determined 13C-NMR experimental conditions, quantitative spectra can be obtained for humic substances in the future from the HUMEX site. Possible changes in humic substances due to acidification should be determined from 13C-NMR data.

  15. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G.; Bansil, A.

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a ``background corrected`` experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  16. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G. ); Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a background corrected'' experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  17. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Jair C. C.; Scopel, Wanderlã L.; Paz, Wendel S.; Bernardes, Leandro V.; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E.; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitanić, Tonči; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at 13C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18–21 T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials. PMID:26434597

  18. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Jair C. C.; Scopel, Wanderlã L.; Paz, Wendel S.; Bernardes, Leandro V.; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E.; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitanić, Tonči; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-10-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at 13C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18-21 T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials.

  19. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Jair C C; Scopel, Wanderlã L; Paz, Wendel S; Bernardes, Leandro V; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitanić, Tonči; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at (13)C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18-21 T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials. PMID:26434597

  20. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  1. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  2. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  3. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  4. Propagator-resolved 2D exchange in porous media in the inhomogeneous magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Burcaw, Lauren M; Hunter, Mark W; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-08-01

    We present a propagator-resolved 2D exchange spectroscopy technique for observing fluid motion in a porous medium. The susceptibility difference between the matrix and the fluid is exploited to produce an inhomogeneous internal magnetic field, causing the Larmor frequency to change as molecules migrate. We test our method using a randomly packed monodisperse 100 microm diameter glass bead matrix saturated with distilled water. Building upon previous 2D exchange spectroscopy work we add a displacement dimension which allows us to obtain 2D exchange spectra that are defined by both mixing time and spatial displacement rather than by mixing time alone. We also simulate our system using a Monte Carlo process in a random nonpenetrating monodisperse bead pack, finding good agreement with experiment. A simple analytic model is used to interpret the NMR data in terms of a characteristic length scale over which molecules must diffuse to sample the inhomogeneous field distribution. PMID:20554230

  5. Using 31P-NMR to investigate dynamics of soil phosphorus compounds in the Rothamsted Long Term Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Martin; Turner, Ben; Granger, Steve; Hooper, Tony; Darch, Tegan; Hawkins, Jane; Yuan, Huimin; McGrath, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The technique of 31P-NMR spectroscopy has done more to advance the knowledge of phosphorus forms (especially organic phosphorus) in environmental samples than any other method. The technique has advanced such that specific compounds can be identified where previously only broad categories such as orthophosphate monoesters and diesters were distinguishable. The Soil Archive and Long Term Experiments at Rothamsted Research, UK, potentially provides an unequalled opportunity to use this technique to observe changes in soil phosphorus compounds with time and under different treatments, thereby enhancing our understanding of phosphorus cycling and use by plants. Some of the earliest work using this technique on soils was carried out by Hawkes et al. in 1984 and this used soils from two of the oldest Rothamsted Long Term Experiments, namely Highfield and Park Grass. Here we revisit the samples studied in this early work and reanalyse them using current methodology to demonstrate how the 31P-NMR technique has advanced. We also present results from a study on the phosphorus chemistry in soils along the Hoosfield acid strip (Rothamsted, UK), where a pH gradient from 3.7 to 7.8 occurs in a single soil with little variation in total phosphorus (mean ± standard deviation 399 ± 27 mg P kg-1). Soil pH was found to be an important factor in determining the proportion of phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in the soil organic phosphorus, although total organic phosphorus concentrations were a relatively consistent proportion of the total soil phosphorus (36 ± 2%) irrespective of soil pH. Key words. 31P-NMR, soil organic phosphorus, long term experiments, Hoosfield acid strip

  6. Optimization of an absolute sensitivity in a glassy matrix during DNP-enhanced multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Fernández-de-Alba, Carlos; Lee, Daniel; Maurel, Vincent; Gambarelli, Serge; Bardet, Michel; Hediger, Sabine; Barra, Anne-Laure; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2014-02-01

    Thanks to instrumental and theoretical development, notably the access to high-power and high-frequency microwave sources, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) on solid-state NMR currently appears as a promising solution to enhance nuclear magnetization in many different types of systems. In magic-angle-spinning DNP experiments, systems of interest are usually dissolved or suspended in glass-forming matrices doped with polarizing agents and measured at low temperature (down to ∼100K). In this work, we discuss the influence of sample conditions (radical concentration, sample temperature, etc.) on DNP enhancements and various nuclear relaxation times which affect the absolute sensitivity of DNP spectra, especially in multidimensional experiments. Furthermore, DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR experiments performed at 9.4 T are complemented by high-field CW EPR measurements performed at the same magnetic field. Microwave absorption by the DNP glassy matrix is observed even below the glass transition temperature caused by softening of the glass. Shortening of electron relaxation times due to glass softening and its impact in terms of DNP sensitivity is discussed. PMID:24480716

  7. Optimization of an absolute sensitivity in a glassy matrix during DNP-enhanced multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Fernández-de-Alba, Carlos; Lee, Daniel; Maurel, Vincent; Gambarelli, Serge; Bardet, Michel; Hediger, Sabine; Barra, Anne-Laure; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2014-02-01

    Thanks to instrumental and theoretical development, notably the access to high-power and high-frequency microwave sources, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) on solid-state NMR currently appears as a promising solution to enhance nuclear magnetization in many different types of systems. In magic-angle-spinning DNP experiments, systems of interest are usually dissolved or suspended in glass-forming matrices doped with polarizing agents and measured at low temperature (down to ∼100 K). In this work, we discuss the influence of sample conditions (radical concentration, sample temperature, etc.) on DNP enhancements and various nuclear relaxation times which affect the absolute sensitivity of DNP spectra, especially in multidimensional experiments. Furthermore, DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR experiments performed at 9.4 T are complemented by high-field CW EPR measurements performed at the same magnetic field. Microwave absorption by the DNP glassy matrix is observed even below the glass transition temperature caused by softening of the glass. Shortening of electron relaxation times due to glass softening and its impact in terms of DNP sensitivity is discussed.

  8. ¹¹³Cd NMR experiments reveal an unusual metal cluster in the solution structure of the yeast splicing protein Bud31p.

    PubMed

    van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Yang, Ji-Chun; Mathieu, Daniel; Bermel, Wolfgang; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Neuhaus, David

    2015-04-13

    Establishing the binding topology of structural zinc ions in proteins is an essential part of their structure determination by NMR spectroscopy. Using (113)Cd NMR experiments with (113)Cd-substituted samples is a useful approach but has previously been limited mainly to very small protein domains. Here we used (113)Cd NMR spectroscopy during structure determination of Bud31p, a 157-residue yeast protein containing an unusual Zn3Cys9 cluster, demonstrating that recent hardware developments make this approach feasible for significantly larger systems. PMID:25703931

  9. 113Cd NMR Experiments Reveal an Unusual Metal Cluster in the Solution Structure of the Yeast Splicing Protein Bud31p**

    PubMed Central

    van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Yang, Ji-Chun; Mathieu, Daniel; Bermel, Wolfgang; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Neuhaus, David

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the binding topology of structural zinc ions in proteins is an essential part of their structure determination by NMR spectroscopy. Using 113Cd NMR experiments with 113Cd-substituted samples is a useful approach but has previously been limited mainly to very small protein domains. Here we used 113Cd NMR spectroscopy during structure determination of Bud31p, a 157-residue yeast protein containing an unusual Zn3Cys9 cluster, demonstrating that recent hardware developments make this approach feasible for significantly larger systems. PMID:25703931

  10. Identification of an Unknown Compound by Combined Use of IR, [to the first power]H NMR, [to the thirteenth power]C NMR, and Mass Spectrometry: A Real-Life Experience in Structure Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liotta, Louis J.; James-Pederson, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    In this introductory organic chemistry experiment, the students get an opportunity to analyze and identify an unknown compound as it is done in a real-laboratory setting. First, students are instructed on the proper operation of three major instruments, NMR, IR, and GC-MS, and are given a sample of an unknown compound. The students are expected to…

  11. 13C direct detected COCO-TOCSY: A tool for sequence specific assignment and structure determination in protonless NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Jiménez, Beatriz; Piccioli, Mario

    2006-10-01

    A novel experiment is proposed to provide inter-residue sequential correlations among carbonyl spins in 13C detected, protonless NMR experiments. The COCO-TOCSY experiment connects, in proteins, two carbonyls separated from each other by three, four or even five bonds. The quantitative analysis provides structural information on backbone dihedral angles ϕ as well as on the side chain dihedral angles of Asx and Glx residues. This is the first dihedral angle constraint that can be obtained via a protonless approach. About 75% of backbone carbonyls in Calbindin D 9K, a 75 aminoacid dicalcium protein, could be sequentially connected via a COCO-TOCSY spectrum. 49 3J values were measured and related to backbone ϕ angles. Structural information can be extended to the side chain orientation of aminoacids containing carbonyl groups. Additionally, long range homonuclear coupling constants, 4JCC and 5JCC, could be measured. This constitutes an unprecedented case for proteins of medium and small size.

  12. Comparison of Changes in Immunological Parameters in Human Lymphocytes in 2D Versus 3D Clinostats-Goal Towards Microgravity Analog Calibration for Future Space Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Russomano, Thais; Pellis, Neal R.

    2008-06-01

    Exposure to microgravity may produce changes in the performance of the immunological system at the cellular level as well as in the major physiological systems of the body. Studies in true spaceflight and similar studies in 2D clinostats (Rotating wall vessels) related to decreased immune function in astronaut blood and normal human lymphocytes indicate a decrease in cell proliferation, T cell activation, locomotion and altered lymphocyte signal transduction (Sundaresan and Pellis, 2008, Sundaresan et al., 2004). The present study was designed to investigate whether the proliferation and viability of lymphocytes are reduced by exposure to rotation in a 3D-Clinostat, which is used to simulate microgravity for cells.

  13. Study of Positronium in Low-k Dielectric Films by means of 2D-Angular Correlation Experiments at a High-Intensity Slow-Positron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gessmann, T; Petkov, M P; Weber, M H; Lynn, K G; Rodbell, K P; Asoka-Kumar, P; Stoeffl, W; Howell, R H

    2001-06-20

    Depth-resolved measurements of the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) were performed at the high-intensity slow-positron beam of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We studied the formation of positronium in thin films of methyl-silsesquioxane (MSSQ) spin-on glass containing open-volume defects in the size of voids. Samples with different average void sizes were investigated and positronium formation could be found in all cases. The width of the angular correlation related to the annihilation of parapositronium increased with the void size indicating the annihilation of non-thermalized parapositronium.

  14. Site-resolved 2H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, E. L.; Stilbs, P.; Furó, I.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in 2H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the 2H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two 2H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In 2H-exchanged cellulose containing two 2H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics.

  15. Site-resolved (2)H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Lindh, E L; Stilbs, P; Furó, I

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in (2)H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the (2)H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two (2)H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In (2)H-exchanged cellulose containing two (2)H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics. PMID:27152833

  16. Theoretical NMR correlations based Structure Discussion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The actual difficulty of the structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. The moment HMBC data is involved in the process or a large number of heteroatoms is present, a possibility of multiple solutions fitting the same data set exists. A structure elucidation software can be used to find such alternative constitutional assignments and help in the discussion in order to find the correct solution. But this is rarely done. This article describes the use of theoretical NMR correlation data in the structure elucidation process with WEBCOCON, not for the initial constitutional assignments, but to define how well a suggested molecule could have been described by NMR correlation data. The results of this analysis can be used to decide on further steps needed to assure the correctness of the structural assignment. As first step the analysis of the deviation of carbon chemical shifts is performed, comparing chemical shifts predicted for each possible solution with the experimental data. The application of this technique to three well known compounds is shown. Using NMR correlation data alone for the description of the constitutions is not always enough, even when including 13C chemical shift prediction. PMID:21797997

  17. Combination of transient 2D-IR experiments and ab initio computations sheds light on the formation of the charge-transfer state in photoexcited carbonyl carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Segado Centellas, Mireia; Lapini, Andrea; Lima, Manuela; Avila, Francisco; Santoro, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Chiara; Righini, Roberto

    2014-08-14

    The excited state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids is very complex because of the coupling of single- and doubly excited states and the possible involvement of intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) states. In this contribution we employ ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and theoretical computations to investigate the relaxation dynamics of trans-8'-apo-β-carotenal occurring on the picosecond time scale, after excitation in the S2 state. In a (slightly) polar solvent like chloroform, one-dimensional (T1D-IR) and two-dimensional (T2D-IR) transient infrared spectroscopy reveal spectral components with characteristic frequencies and lifetimes that are not observed in nonpolar solvents (cyclohexane). Combining experimental evidence with an analysis of CASPT2//CASSCF ground and excited state minima and energy profiles, complemented with TDDFT calculations in gas phase and in solvent, we propose a photochemical decay mechanism for this system where only the bright single-excited 1Bu(+) and the dark double-excited 2Ag(-) states are involved. Specifically, the initially populated 1Bu(+) relaxes toward 2Ag(-) in 200 fs. In a nonpolar solvent 2Ag(-) decays to the ground state (GS) in 25 ps. In polar solvents, distortions along twisting modes of the chain promote a repopulation of the 1Bu(+) state which then quickly relaxes to the GS (18 ps in chloroform). The 1Bu(+) state has a high electric dipole and is the main contributor to the charge-transfer state involved in the dynamics in polar solvents. The 2Ag(-) → 1Bu(+) population transfer is evidenced by a cross peak on the T2D-IR map revealing that the motions along the same stretching of the conjugated chain on the 2Ag(-) and 1Bu(+) states are coupled. PMID:25050938

  18. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  19. Diels-Alder Cycloadditions: A MORE Experiment in the Organic Laboratory Including a Diene Identification Exercise Involving NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Roosevelt; Severin, Ashika; Balfour, Miguel; Nettles, Columbus

    2005-01-01

    Two Diels-Alder reactions are described that are suitable for a MORE (microwave-induced organic reaction enhanced) experiment in the organic chemistry laboratory course. A second experiment in which the splitting patterns of the vinyl protons in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two MORE adducts are used in conjunction with molecular…

  20. Determination of Solvent Effects on Keto-Enol Equilibria of 1,3-Dicarbonyl Compounds Using NMR: Revisiting a Classic Physical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, A. Gilbert; Feltman, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    The use of proton NMR to determine the equilibrium position of tautomeric 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds in various solvents has been a classic physical chemistry experiment. We are presenting an expansion of the excellent description of this experiment by Garland, Shoemaker, and Nibler. Often the assumption is made that the keto tautomer is always the…

  1. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  2. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopic approaches for exploring plant metabolome: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mahrous, Engy A.; Farag, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Today, most investigations of the plant metabolome tend to be based on either nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or mass spectrometry (MS), with or without hyphenation with chromatography. Although less sensitive than MS, NMR provides a powerful complementary technique for the identification and quantification of metabolites in plant extracts. NMR spectroscopy, well appreciated by phytochemists as a particularly information-rich method, showed recent paradigm shift for the improving of metabolome(s) structural and functional characterization and for advancing the understanding of many biological processes. Furthermore, two dimensional NMR (2D NMR) experiments and the use of chemometric data analysis of NMR spectra have proven highly effective at identifying novel and known metabolites that correlate with changes in genotype or phenotype. In this review, we provide an overview of the development of NMR in the field of metabolomics with special focus on 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques and their applications in phytomedicines quality control analysis and drug discovery from natural sources, raising more attention at its potential to reduce the gap between the pace of natural products research and modern drug discovery demand. PMID:25685540

  3. Access to experimentally infeasible spectra by pure-shift NMR covariance.

    PubMed

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Parella, Teodor

    2016-09-01

    Covariance processing is a versatile processing tool to generate synthetic NMR spectral representations without the need to acquire time-consuming experimental datasets. Here we show that even experimentally prohibited NMR spectra can be reconstructed by introducing key features of a reference 1D CHn-edited spectrum into standard 2D spectra. This general procedure is illustrated with the calculation of experimentally infeasible multiplicity-edited pure-shift NMR spectra of some very popular homonuclear (ME-psCOSY and ME-psTOCSY) and heteronuclear (ME-psHSQC-TOCSY and ME-psHMBC) experiments. PMID:27494746

  4. Access to experimentally infeasible spectra by pure-shift NMR covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Parella, Teodor

    2016-09-01

    Covariance processing is a versatile processing tool to generate synthetic NMR spectral representations without the need to acquire time-consuming experimental datasets. Here we show that even experimentally prohibited NMR spectra can be reconstructed by introducing key features of a reference 1D CHn-edited spectrum into standard 2D spectra. This general procedure is illustrated with the calculation of experimentally infeasible multiplicity-edited pure-shift NMR spectra of some very popular homonuclear (ME-psCOSY and ME-psTOCSY) and heteronuclear (ME-psHSQC-TOCSY and ME-psHMBC) experiments.

  5. Analysis of one-dimensional pure-exchange NMR experiments for studying dynamics with broad distributions of correlation times.

    PubMed

    deAzevedo, E R; Tozoni, J R; Schmidt-Rohr, K; Bonagamba, T J

    2005-04-15

    One-dimensional (1D) exchange NMR experiments can elucidate the geometry, time scale, memory, and heterogeneity of slow molecular motions (1 ms-1 s) in solids. The one-dimensional version of pure-exchange (PUREX) solid-state exchange NMR, which is applied to static samples and uses the chemical shift anisotropy as a probe for molecular motion, is particularly promising and convenient in applications where site resolution is not a problem, i.e., in systems with few chemical sites. In this work, some important aspects of the 1D PUREX experiment applied to systems with complex molecular motions are analyzed. The influence of intermediate-regime (10 micros-1 ms) motions and of the distribution of reorientation angles on the pure-exchange intensity are discussed, together with a simple method for estimating the activation energy of motions occurring with a single correlation time. In addition, it is demonstrated that detailed information on the motional geometry can be obtained from 1D PUREX spectral line shapes. Experiments on a molecular crystal, dimethyl sulfone, confirm the analysis quantitatively. In two amorphous polymers, atactic polypropylene (aPP) and polyisobutylene (PIB), which differ only by one methyl group in the repeat unit, the height of the normalized exchange intensity clearly reveals a striking difference in the width of the distribution of correlation times slightly above the glass transition. The aPP shows the broad distribution and Williams-Landel-Ferry temperature dependence of correlation times typical of polymers and other "fragile" glass formers. In contrast, the dynamics in PIB occur essentially with a single correlation time and exhibits Arrhenius behavior, which is more typical of "strong" glass formers; this is somewhat surprising given the weak intermolecular forces in PIB. PMID:15945644

  6. Determinants of the substrate specificity of human cytochrome P-450 CYP2D6: design and construction of a mutant with testosterone hydroxylase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G; Modi, S; Pillai, I; Lian, L Y; Sutcliffe, M J; Pritchard, M P; Friedberg, T; Roberts, G C; Wolf, C R

    1998-01-01

    , the CYP2D6F483I mutant acquired the ability to metabolize testosterone to a novel product, which was identified by MS and proton NMR spectroscopy as 15alpha-hydroxytestosterone. NMR spin relaxation experiments were used to measure distances between the haem iron and protons of testosterone bound to the CYP2D6F483I mutant. These experiments demonstrate that very minor modifications to the active site structure of CYP2D6 can have a profound influence on the substrate specificity of the enzyme. PMID:9560305

  7. NMR studies of bond arrangements in alkali phosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Brow, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    Solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the investigation of local structure and medium range order in glasses. Previous {sup 31}P MAS NMR studies have detailed the local structure for a series of phosphate glasses. Phosphate tetrahedra within the glass network are commonly described using the Q{sup n} notation, where n = 0, 1, 2, 3 and represents the number of bridging oxygens attached to the phosphate. Using {sup 31}P MAS NMR different phosphate environments are readily identified and quantified. In this paper, the authors present a brief description of recent one dimensional (1D) {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li and {sup 31}P MAS experiments along with two-dimensional (2D) {sup 31}P exchange NMR experiments for a series of lithium ultraphosphate glasses. From the 2D exchange experiments the connectivities between different Q{sup n} phosphate tetrahedra were directly measured, while the 1D experiments provided a measure of the P-O-P bond angle distribution and lithium coordination number as a function of Li{sub 2}O concentration.

  8. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR. PMID:25924947

  9. Solubilization of amphiphilic carboxylic acids in nonionic micelles: determination of partition coefficients from pKa measurements and NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Dupont-Leclercq, Laurence; Giroux, Sébastien; Henry, Bernard; Rubini, Patrice

    2007-10-01

    The solubilization of octylamidotartaric acid (C8T) and octanoic acid (C8C) in Triton X-100 and Brij 58 nonionic micelles has been studied by pHmetric and 1H NMR self-diffusion experiments. As both C8C and C8T exhibit acid-base properties, a distinction between the partition of the neutral acidic form, in terms of the partition coefficient KPH, and the partition of the charged basic form, in terms of the partition coefficient KP-, has been made. The acidity constants, Ka, of C8T and C8C in the presence of micelles have been evaluated from pHmetric experiments. For both solutes, an increase in the pKa is observed in micellar media due to the difference in the partition of acidic and basic forms of the solutes. A model has been developed to determine KPH and KP- from the pKa shifts observed. The values obtained by this pKa shift modeling method and those from self-diffusion coefficient measurements are in good agreement. The acidic form of C8C is incorporated to a larger extent into the Brij 58 micelles than the acidic form of C8T, whereas the opposite trend is observed for the basic forms. Both the acidic and basic forms of C8T are more easily incorporated into Brij 58 micelles than into Triton X-100 micelles. The influence of the structure of the polar head on the solubilization properties is demonstrated. Moreover, evidence for the localization of the solutes in the micelles is obtained from the comparison of the partition coefficients and from 1H NMR data. PMID:17850105

  10. Reduced dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH experiment: an efficient backbone assignment tool for NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-09-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment of proteins forms the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone ((1)H, (15)N, (13)C(α) and (13)C') resonances of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality experiment--(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone ((13)C(α) and (13)C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text). The resulted increased dispersion of peaks--which is different in sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) frequency regions--greatly facilitates the analysis of the spectrum by resolving the problems (associated with routine assignment strategies) arising because of degenerate amide (15)N and backbone (13)C chemical shifts. Further, the spectrum provides direct distinction between intra- and inter-residue correlations because of their opposite peak signs. The other beneficial feature of the spectrum is that it provides: (a) multiple unidirectional sequential (i→i + 1) (15)N and (13)C correlations and (b) facile identification of certain specific triplet sequences which serve as check points for mapping the stretches of sequentially connected HSQC cross peaks on to the primary sequence for assigning the resonances sequence specifically. On top of all this, the F₂-F₃ planes of the spectrum corresponding to sum (CA + CO) and difference (CA - CO) chemical shifts enable rapid and unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks through matching their coordinates in these two planes (see the text). Overall, the experiment presented here will serve as an important backbone assignment tool for variety of structural and functional proteomics and drug discovery research programs by NMR involving well behaved small folded proteins (MW

  11. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  12. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  13. Exploring the use of Generalized Indirect Covariance to reconstruct pure shift NMR spectra: Current Pros and Cons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Martin, Gary E.; Parella, Teodor

    2016-05-01

    The current Pros and Cons of a processing protocol to generate pure chemical shift NMR spectra using Generalized Indirect Covariance are presented and discussed. The transformation of any standard 2D homonuclear and heteronuclear spectrum to its pure shift counterpart by using a reference DIAG spectrum is described. Reconstructed pure shift NMR spectra of NOESY, HSQC, HSQC-TOCSY and HSQMBC experiments are reported for the target molecule strychnine.

  14. A Qualitative-Quantitative H-NMR Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, John S.; Leary, James J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiment combining qualitative and quantitative information from hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Reviews theory, discusses the experimental approach, and provides sample results. (JM)

  15. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  16. Preparation of RNA samples with narrow line widths for solid state NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Bardaro, Michael F.; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P.

    2012-10-01

    Solid state NMR can provide detailed structural and dynamic information on biological systems that cannot be studied under solution conditions, and can investigate motions which occur with rates that cannot be fully studied by solution NMR. This approach has successfully been used to study proteins, but the application of multidimensional solid state NMR to RNA has been limited because reported line widths have been too broad to execute most multidimensional experiments successfully. A reliable method to generate spectra with narrow line widths is necessary to apply the full range of solid state NMR spectroscopic approaches to RNA. Using the HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA as a model, we present an approach based on precipitation with polyethylene glycol that improves the line width of 13C signals in TAR from >6 ppm to about 1 ppm, making solid state 2D NMR studies of selectively enriched RNAs feasible at ambient temperature.

  17. Delineating the conformational flexibility of trisaccharides from NMR spectroscopy experiments and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingjun; Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault; Säwén, Elin; Jana, Madhurima; Widmalm, Göran; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2016-07-28

    The conformation of saccharides in solution is challenging to characterize in the context of a single well-defined three-dimensional structure. Instead, they are better represented by an ensemble of conformations associated with their structural diversity and flexibility. In this study, we delineate the conformational heterogeneity of five trisaccharides via a combination of experimental and computational techniques. Experimental NMR measurements target conformationally sensitive parameters, including J couplings and effective distances around the glycosidic linkages, while the computational simulations apply the well-calibrated additive CHARMM carbohydrate force field in combination with efficient enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulation methods. Analysis of conformational heterogeneity is performed based on sampling of discreet states as defined by dihedral angles, on root-mean-square differences of Cartesian coordinates and on the extent of volume sampled. Conformational clustering, based on the glycosidic linkage dihedral angles, shows that accounting for the full range of sampled conformations is required to reproduce the experimental data, emphasizing the utility of the molecular simulations in obtaining an atomic detailed description of the conformational properties of the saccharides. Results show the presence of differential conformational preferences as a function of primary sequence and glycosidic linkage types. Significant differences in conformational ensembles associated with the anomeric configuration of a single glycosidic linkage reinforce the impact of such changes on the conformational properties of carbohydrates. The present structural insights of the studied trisaccharides represent a foundation for understanding the range of conformations adopted in larger oligosaccharides and how these molecules encode their conformational heterogeneity into the monosaccharide sequence. PMID:27346493

  18. Membrane binding of an acyl-lactoferricin B antimicrobial peptide from solid-state NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Romo, Tod D.; Bradney, Laura A.; Greathouse, Denise V.; Grossfield, Alan

    2011-01-01

    One approach to the growing health problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria is the development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as alternative treatments. The mechanism by which these AMPs selectively attack the bacterial membrane is not well understood, but is believed to depend on differences in membrane lipid composition. N-acylation of the small amidated hexapeptide, RRWQWR-NH2 (LfB6) derived from the 25 amino acid bovine lactoferricin (LfB25) can be an effective means to improve its antimicrobial properties. Here, we investigate the interactions of C6-LfB6, N-acylated with a 6 carbon fatty acid, with model lipid bilayers with two distinct compositions: 3:1 POPE:POPG (negatively charged) and POPC (zwitterionic). Results from solid-state 2H and 31P NMR experiments are compared with those from an ensemble of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations running in aggregate more than 8.6 microseconds. 2H NMR spectra reveal no change in the lipid acyl chain order when C6-LfB6 is bound to the negatively charged membrane and only a slight decrease in order when it is bound to the zwitterionic membrane. 31P NMR spectra show no significant perturbation of the phosphate headgroups of either lipid system in the presence of C6-LfB6. Molecular dynamics simulations show that for the negatively charged membrane, the peptide’s arginines drive the initial association with the membrane, followed by attachment of the tryptophans at the membrane-water interface, and finally by the insertion of the C6 tails deep into the bilayer. In contrast, the C6 tail leads the association with the zwitterionic membrane, with the tryptophans and arginines associating with the membrane-water interface in roughly the same amount of time. We find similar patterns in the order parameters from our simulations. Moreover, we find in the simulations that the C6 tail can insert 1–2 Å more deeply into the zwitterionic membrane and can exist in a wider range of angles than in the negatively charged

  19. What Is the True Color of Fresh Meat? A Biophysical Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Investigating the Effects of Ligand Binding on Myoglobin Using Optical, EPR, and NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linenberger, Kimberly; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Crowder, Michael W.; McCarrick, Robert; Lorigan, Gary A.; Tierney, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With an increased focus on integrated upper-level laboratories, we present an experiment integrating concepts from inorganic, biological, and physical chemistry content areas. Students investigate the effects of ligand strength on the spectroscopic properties of the heme center in myoglobin using UV-vis, [superscript 1]H NMR, and EPR…

  20. Enzymatic Resolution of 1-Phenylethanol and Formation of a Diastereomer: An Undergraduate [superscript 1]H NMR Experiment to Introduce Chiral Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraldos, Juan A.; Giner, Jos-Luis; Smith, David H.; Wilson, Mark; Ronhovde, Kyla; Wilson, Erin; Clevette, David; Holmes, Andrea E.; Rouhier, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    This organic laboratory experiment introduces students to stereoselective enzyme reactions, resolution of enantiomers, and NMR analysis of diastereomers. The reaction between racemic 1-phenylethanol and vinyl acetate in hexane to form an ester is catalyzed by acylase I. The unreacted alcohol is then treated with a chiral acid and the resulting…

  1. Model based evaluation of a contaminant plume development under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in 2D bench-scale tank experiments.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Beyer, C; Bauer, R D; Griebler, C; Bauer, S

    2014-06-01

    The influence of transverse mixing on competitive aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume was investigated using a two-dimensional, bench-scale flow-through laboratory tank experiment. In the first part of the experiment aerobic degradation of increasing toluene concentrations was carried out by the aerobic strain Pseudomonas putida F1. Successively, ethylbenzene (injected as a mixture of unlabeled and fully deuterium-labeled isotopologues) substituted toluene; nitrate was added as additional electron acceptor and the anaerobic denitrifying strain Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1 was inoculated to study competitive degradation under aerobic /anaerobic conditions. The spatial distribution of anaerobic degradation was resolved by measurements of compound-specific stable isotope fractionation induced by the anaerobic strain as well as compound concentrations. A fully transient numerical reactive transport model was employed and calibrated using measurements of electron donors, acceptors and isotope fractionation. The aerobic phases of the experiment were successfully reproduced using a double Monod kinetic growth model and assuming an initial homogeneous distribution of P. putida F1. Investigation of the competitive degradation phase shows that the observed isotopic pattern cannot be explained by transverse mixing driven biodegradation only, but also depends on the inoculation process of the anaerobic strain. Transient concentrations of electron acceptors and donors are well reproduced by the model, showing its ability to simulate transient competitive biodegradation. PMID:24122285

  2. A Cross-Polarization Based Rotating-Frame Separated-Local-Field NMR Experiment Under Ultrafast MAS Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Damron, Joshua; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Rotating-frame separated-local-field solid-state NMR experiments measure highly resolved heteronuclear dipolar couplings which, in turn, provide valuable interatomic distances for structural and dynamic studies of molecules in the solid-state. Though many different rotating-frame SLF sequences have been put forth, recent gains in ultrafast MAS technology have considerably simplified pulse sequence requirements due to the suppression of proton-proton dipolar interactions. In this study we revisit a simple two-dimensional 1H-13C dipolar coupling/chemical shift correlation experiment using 13C detected Cross-Polarization with a Variable Contact time (CPVC) and systematically study the conditions for its optimal performance at 60 kHz MAS. In addition, we demonstrate the feasibility of a proton-detected version of the CPVC experiment. The theoretical analysis of the CPVC pulse sequence under different Hartmann-Hahn matching conditions confirms that it performs optimally under the ZQ (w1H-w1C=±wr) condition for polarization transfer. The limits of the cross polarization process are explored and precisely defined as a function of offset and Hartmann-Hahn mismatch via spin dynamics simulation and experiments on a powder sample of uniformly 13C-labeled L-isoleucine. Our results show that the performance of the CPVC sequence and subsequent determination of 1H-13C dipolar couplings are insensitive to 1H/13C frequency offset frequency when high RF fields are used on both RF channels. Conversely, the CPVC sequence is quite sensitive to the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch, particularly for systems with weak heteronuclear dipolar couplings. We demonstrate the use of the CPVC based SLF experiment as a tool to identify different carbon groups, and hope to motivate the exploration of more sophisticated 1H detected avenues for ultrafast MAS. PMID:25486635

  3. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  4. Magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments for structural characterization of proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lichi; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) has become a prominent method in biology and is suitable for the characterization of insoluble proteins and protein aggregates such as amyloid fibrils, membrane-lipid complexes, and precipitated proteins. Often, the initial and the most critical step is to obtain spectroscopic assignments, that is, to determine chemical shifts of individual atoms. The procedures for SSNMR spectroscopic assignments are now well established for small microcrystalline proteins, where high signal-to-noise can be obtained. The sensitivity of the experiments and spectral resolution decrease with the increasing molecular weight, which makes setting SSNMR experiments in large proteins a much more challenging and demanding procedure. Here, we describe the protocol for the most common set of 3D magic angle spinning (MAS) SSNMR experiments. While the procedures described in the text are well known to SSNMR practitioners, we hope they will be of interest to scientists interested in extending their repertoire of biophysical techniques. PMID:22760319

  5. Computational Chemistry Meets Experiments for Explaining the Behavior of Bibenzyl: A Thermochemical and Spectroscopic (Infrared, Raman, and NMR) Investigation.

    PubMed

    Latouche, Camille; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    The structure, conformational behavior, and spectroscopic parameters of bibenzyl have been investigated by a computational protocol including proper treatment of anharmonic and hindered rotor contributions. Conventional hybrid functionals overstabilize the anti conformer while low-order post-Hartree-Fock (MP2) approaches strongly favor the gauche conformer. However, inclusion of semiempirical dispersion effects in density functionals or coupled cluster post-Hartree-Fock models agree in forecasting the simultaneous presence of both conformers in the gas phase with a slightly larger stability (0.7 kcal·mol(-1)) of the gauche conformer. Addition of thermal and entropic effects finally leads to very close Gibbs free energies for both conformers and, thus, to a slight preference for the gauche form due to statistical factors (2 vs 1). The situation remains essentially the same in solution. On these grounds, perturbative vibrational computations including both electrical and mechanical anharmonicities lead to IR and Raman spectra in remarkable agreement with experiment. Full assignment of the IR spectra explains the presence of peaks from gauche or anti conformers. Comparison between computed and experimental Raman spectra confirms that both conformers are present in liquid phase, whereas the anti conformer seems to be preponderant in the solid state. Also computed NMR parameters are in good agreement with experiment. PMID:26583241

  6. Design, realization and test of a rad-hard 2D-compressor and packing chip for high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Samuele; Falchieri, Davide; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Enzo

    2004-09-01

    CARLOSv3 is a third version of a chip that plays a significant role in the data acquisition chain of the A Large Ion Collider Experiment Inner Tracking System experiment. It has been designed and realized with a 0.25 μm CMOS 3-metal rad-hard digital library. The chip elaborates and compresses, by means of a bi-dimensional compressor, data belonging to a so-called event. The compressor looks for cross-shaped clusters within the whole data set coming from the silicon detector. To test the chip a specific PCB has been designed; it contains the connectors for probing the ASIC with a pattern generator and a logic state analyzer. The chip is inserted on the PCB using a ZIF socket. This allows to test the 35 packaged samples out of the total amount of bare chips we have from the foundry. The test phase has shown that 32 out of 35 chips under test work well. It is planned to redesign a new version of the chip by adding extra features and to submit the final version of CARLOS upon the final DAQ chain will be totally tested both in Bologna and at CERN.

  7. Sideband separation experiments in NMR with phase incremented echo train acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Brennan J.; Dey, Krishna K.; Kaseman, Derrick C.; Baltisberger, Jay H.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2013-05-01

    A general approach for enhancing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance sideband separation experiments, such as Two-Dimensional One Pulse (TOP), Magic-Angle Turning (MAT), and Phase Adjust Spinning Sidebands (PASS) experiments, with phase incremented echo-train acquisition (PIETA) is described. This approach is applicable whenever strong inhomogeneous broadenings dominate the unmodulated frequency resonances, such as in non-crystalline solids or in samples with large residual frequency anisotropy. PIETA provides significant sensitivity enhancements while also eliminating spectral artifacts would normally be present with Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill acquisition. Additionally, an intuitive approach is presented for designing and processing echo train acquisition magnetic resonance experiments on rotating samples. Affine transformations are used to relate the two-dimensional signals acquired in TOP, MAT, and PASS experiments to a common coordinate system. Depending on sequence design and acquisition conditions two significant artifacts can arise from truncated acquisition time and discontinuous damping in the T2 decay. Here we show that the former artifact can always be eliminated through selection of a suitable affine transformation, and give the conditions in which the latter can be minimized or removed entirely.

  8. Determination of Molecular Self-Diffusion Coefficients Using Pulsed-Field-Gradient NMR: An Experiment for Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Jennifer; Coffman, Cierra; Villarrial, Spring; Chabolla, Steven; Heisel, Kurt A.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V.

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become one of the primary tools that chemists utilize to characterize a range of chemical species in the solution phase, from small organic molecules to medium-sized proteins. A discussion of NMR spectroscopy is an essential component of physical and biophysical chemistry lecture courses, and a number of instructional…

  9. Bridging experiment and theory: A template for unifying NMR data and electronic structure calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, David M. L.; Cho, Herman; de Jong, Wibe A.

    2016-02-09

    Here, the testing of theoretical models with experimental data is an integral part of the scientific method, and a logical place to search for new ways of stimulating scientific productivity. Often experiment/theory comparisons may be viewed as a workflow comprised of well-defined, rote operations distributed over several distinct computers, as exemplified by the way in which predictions from electronic structure theories are evaluated with results from spectroscopic experiments. For workflows such as this, which may be laborious and time consuming to perform manually, software that could orchestrate the operations and transfer results between computers in a seamless and automated fashionmore » would offer major efficiency gains. Such tools also promise to alter how researchers interact with data outside their field of specialization by, e.g., making raw experimental results more accessible to theorists, and the outputs of theoretical calculations more readily comprehended by experimentalists.« less

  10. Residue-specific NH exchange rates studied by NMR diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Torsten; Cabrita, Eurico J.; Morris, Gareth A.; Günther, Robert; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg; Berger, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    We present a novel approach to the investigation of rapid (>2 s -1) NH exchange rates in proteins, based on residue-specific diffusion measurements. 1H, 15N-DOSY-HSQC spectra are recorded in order to observe resolved amide proton signals for most residues of the protein. Human ubiquitin was used to demonstrate the proposed method. Exchange rates are derived directly from the decay data of the diffusion experiment by applying a model deduced from the assumption of a two-site exchange with water and the "pure" diffusion coefficients of water and protein. The "pure" diffusion coefficient of the protein is determined in an experiment with selective excitation of the amide protons in order to suppress the influence of magnetization transfer from water to amide protons on the decay data. For rapidly exchanging residues a comparison of our results with the exchange rates obtained in a MEXICO experiment showed good agreement. Molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical calculations were performed to find molecular parameters correlating with the exchangeability of the NH protons. The RMS fluctuations of the amide protons, obtained from the MD simulations, together with the NH coupling constants provide a bilinear model which shows a good correlation with the experimental NH exchange rates.

  11. Strategy for complete NMR assignment of disordered proteins with highly repetitive sequences based on resolution-enhanced 5D experiments

    PubMed Central

    Motáčková, Veronika; Nováček, Jiří; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Šanderová, Hana; Krásný, Libor; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Sklenář, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    A strategy for complete backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of disordered proteins with highly repetitive sequence is presented. The protocol is based on three resolution-enhanced NMR experiments: 5D HN(CA)CONH provides sequential connectivity, 5D HabCabCONH is utilized to identify amino acid types, and 5D HC(CC-TOCSY)CONH is used to assign the side-chain resonances. The improved resolution was achieved by a combination of high dimensionality and long evolution times, allowed by non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions. Random distribution of the data points and Sparse Multidimensional Fourier Transform processing were used. Successful application of the assignment procedure to a particularly difficult protein, δ subunit of RNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis, is shown to prove the efficiency of the strategy. The studied protein contains a disordered C-terminal region of 81 amino acids with a highly repetitive sequence. While the conventional assignment methods completely failed due to a very small differences in chemical shifts, the presented strategy provided a complete backbone and side-chain assignment. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10858-010-9447-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20890634

  12. High-resolution iterative frequency identification for NMR as a general strategy for multidimensional data collection.

    PubMed

    Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Hallenga, Klaas; Markley, John L

    2005-09-14

    We describe a novel approach to the rapid collection and processing of multidimensional NMR data: "high-resolution iterative frequency identification for NMR" (HIFI-NMR). As with other reduced dimensionality approaches, HIFI-NMR collects n-dimensional data as a set of two-dimensional (2D) planes. The HIFI-NMR algorithm incorporates several innovative features. (1) Following the initial collection of two orthogonal 2D planes, tilted planes are selected adaptively, one-by-one. (2) Spectral space is analyzed in a rigorous statistical manner. (3) An online algorithm maintains a model that provides a probabilistic representation of the three-dimensional (3D) peak positions, derives the optimal angle for the next plane to be collected, and stops data collection when the addition of another plane would not improve the data model. (4) A robust statistical algorithm extracts information from the plane projections and is used to drive data collection. (5) Peak lists with associated probabilities are generated directly, without total reconstruction of the 3D spectrum; these are ready for use in subsequent assignment or structure determination steps. As a proof of principle, we have tested the approach with 3D triple-resonance experiments of the kind used to assign protein backbone and side-chain resonances. Peaks extracted automatically by HIFI-NMR, for both small and larger proteins, included approximately 98% of real peaks obtained from control experiments in which data were collected by conventional 3D methods. HIFI-NMR required about one-tenth the time for data collection and avoided subsequent data processing and peak-picking. The approach can be implemented on commercial NMR spectrometers and is extensible to higher-dimensional NMR. PMID:16144400

  13. GFT projection NMR spectroscopy for proteins in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Franks, W. Trent; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Recording of four-dimensional (4D) spectra for proteins in the solid state has opened new avenues to obtain virtually complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins. As in solution state NMR, the sampling of three indirect dimensions leads per se to long minimal measurement time. Furthermore, artifact suppression in solid state NMR relies primarily on radio-frequency pulse phase cycling. For an n-step phase cycle, the minimal measurement times of both 3D and 4D spectra are increased n times. To tackle the associated ‘sampling problem’ and to avoid sampling limited data acquisition, solid state G-Matrix Fourier Transform (SS GFT) projection NMR is introduced to rapidly acquire 3D and 4D spectral information. Specifically, (4,3)D (HA)CANCOCX and (3,2)D (HACA)NCOCX were implemented and recorded for the 6 kDa protein GB1 within about 10% of the time required for acquiring the conventional congeners with the same maximal evolution times and spectral widths in the indirect dimensions. Spectral analysis was complemented by comparative analysis of expected spectral congestion in conventional and GFT NMR experiments, demonstrating that high spectral resolution of the GFT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain nearly complete resonance assignments even for large proteins. PMID:21052779

  14. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  15. Understanding the NMR properties and conformational behavior of indole vs. azaindole group in protoberberines: NICS and NCS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Shivaji S.; Toušek, Jaromír; Maier, Lukáš; Pipíška, Matej; Sklenář, Vladimír; Marek, Radek

    2012-11-01

    We report here the preparation and the structural investigation into a series of 8-(indol-1-yl)-7,8-dihydroprotoberberine derivatives derived from berberine, palmatine, and coptisine. Structures of these new compounds were characterized mainly by 2D NMR spectroscopy and the conformational behavior was investigated by using methods of density-functional theory (DFT). PBE0/6-311+G** calculated NMR chemical shifts for selected derivatives correlate excellently with the experimental NMR data and support the structural conclusions drawn from the NMR experiments. An interesting role of the nitrogen atom in position N7' of the indole moiety in 8-(7-azaindol-1-yl)-7,8-dihydroprotoberberines as compared to other 8-indolyl derivatives is investigated in detail. The experimentally observed trends in NMR chemical shifts are rationalized by DFT calculations and analysis based on the nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) and natural localized molecular orbitals (NLMOs).

  16. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E S; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets. PMID:26723664

  17. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn; Smith, Pieter E. S.

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials’ structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences’ phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, “ultrafast” NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  18. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  19. Interactions between Nafion resin and protonated dodecylamine modified montmorillonite: a solid state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Xu, Jun; Hou, Guangjin; Tang, Huiru; Deng, Feng

    2007-07-01

    A series of nanocomposites have been prepared from perfluorosulfonylfluoride copolymer resin (Nafion) and layered montmorillonite (MMT) modified with protonated dodecylamine by conventional sol-gel intercalation. The structure of these nanocomposite materials have been characterized using FT-IR, elemental analysis, XRD and solid state NMR techniques, including 19F magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, 19F NMR relaxation time measurements, 29Si MAS, 1H MAS, 1H-13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS), and 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) 2D NMR. The results showed that thermal stability of Nafion was improved moderately by the addition of dodecylamine modified MMT without intercalation. FT-IR and 29Si MAS NMR results indicated that dodecylamine modification did not result in obvious changes in the MMT lattice structure. The XRD results showed that the protonated dodecylamine has been embedded and intercalated into the MMT interlayers, whereas Nafion was not. Elemental analysis results also suggested that some dodecylamine was adsorbed on the surface of MMT. 1H-13C HETCOR 2D NMR experiment clearly indicated that strong electrostatic interactions were present between the NH+3 group of dodecylamine and the fluorine-containing groups (CF3, OCF2, and SCF2) of Nafion resin. Such electrostatic interactions are probably the major contributors for the improved thermal stability of the resultant composite materials. PMID:17382953

  20. Reducing acquisition times in multidimensional NMR with a time-optimized Fourier encoding algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E S; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-11-21

    Speeding up the acquisition of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra is an important topic in contemporary NMR, with central roles in high-throughput investigations and analyses of marginally stable samples. A variety of fast NMR techniques have been developed, including methods based on non-uniform sampling and Hadamard encoding, that overcome the long sampling times inherent to schemes based on fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) methods. Here, we explore the potential of an alternative fast acquisition method that leverages a priori knowledge, to tailor polychromatic pulses and customized time delays for an efficient Fourier encoding of the indirect domain of an NMR experiment. By porting the encoding of the indirect-domain to the excitation process, this strategy avoids potential artifacts associated with non-uniform sampling schemes and uses a minimum number of scans equal to the number of resonances present in the indirect dimension. An added convenience is afforded by the fact that a usual 2D FFT can be used to process the generated data. Acquisitions of 2D heteronuclear correlation NMR spectra on quinine and on the anti-inflammatory drug isobutyl propionic phenolic acid illustrate the new method's performance. This method can be readily automated to deal with complex samples such as those occurring in metabolomics, in in-cell as well as in in vivo NMR applications, where speed and temporal stability are often primary concerns. PMID:25416883

  1. Reducing acquisition times in multidimensional NMR with a time-optimized Fourier encoding algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Speeding up the acquisition of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra is an important topic in contemporary NMR, with central roles in high-throughput investigations and analyses of marginally stable samples. A variety of fast NMR techniques have been developed, including methods based on non-uniform sampling and Hadamard encoding, that overcome the long sampling times inherent to schemes based on fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) methods. Here, we explore the potential of an alternative fast acquisition method that leverages a priori knowledge, to tailor polychromatic pulses and customized time delays for an efficient Fourier encoding of the indirect domain of an NMR experiment. By porting the encoding of the indirect-domain to the excitation process, this strategy avoids potential artifacts associated with non-uniform sampling schemes and uses a minimum number of scans equal to the number of resonances present in the indirect dimension. An added convenience is afforded by the fact that a usual 2D FFT can be used to process the generated data. Acquisitions of 2D heteronuclear correlation NMR spectra on quinine and on the anti-inflammatory drug isobutyl propionic phenolic acid illustrate the new method's performance. This method can be readily automated to deal with complex samples such as those occurring in metabolomics, in in-cell as well as in in vivo NMR applications, where speed and temporal stability are often primary concerns. PMID:25416883

  2. Reducing acquisition times in multidimensional NMR with a time-optimized Fourier encoding algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-11-21

    Speeding up the acquisition of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra is an important topic in contemporary NMR, with central roles in high-throughput investigations and analyses of marginally stable samples. A variety of fast NMR techniques have been developed, including methods based on non-uniform sampling and Hadamard encoding, that overcome the long sampling times inherent to schemes based on fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) methods. Here, we explore the potential of an alternative fast acquisition method that leverages a priori knowledge, to tailor polychromatic pulses and customized time delays for an efficient Fourier encoding of the indirect domain of an NMR experiment. By porting the encoding of the indirect-domain to the excitation process, this strategy avoids potential artifacts associated with non-uniform sampling schemes and uses a minimum number of scans equal to the number of resonances present in the indirect dimension. An added convenience is afforded by the fact that a usual 2D FFT can be used to process the generated data. Acquisitions of 2D heteronuclear correlation NMR spectra on quinine and on the anti-inflammatory drug isobutyl propionic phenolic acid illustrate the new method's performance. This method can be readily automated to deal with complex samples such as those occurring in metabolomics, in in-cell as well as in in vivo NMR applications, where speed and temporal stability are often primary concerns.

  3. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  4. High-Resolution Iterative Frequency Identification for NMR as a General Strategy for Multidimensional Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Hallenga, Klaas; Markley, John L.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to the rapid collection and processing of multidimensional NMR data: “high-resolution iterative frequency identification for NMR” (HIFI–NMR). As with other reduced dimensionality approaches, HIFI–NMR collects n-dimensional data as a set of two-dimensional (2D) planes. The HIFI–NMR algorithm incorporates several innovative features. (1) Following the initial collection of two orthogonal 2D planes, tilted planes are selected adaptively, one-by-one. (2) Spectral space is analyzed in a rigorous statistical manner. (3) An online algorithm maintains a model that provides a probabilistic representation of the three-dimensional (3D) peak positions, derives the optimal angle for the next plane to be collected, and stops data collection when the addition of another plane would not improve the data model. (4) A robust statistical algorithm extracts information from the plane projections and is used to drive data collection. (5) Peak lists with associated probabilities are generated directly, without total reconstruction of the 3D spectrum; these are ready for use in subsequent assignment or structure determination steps. As a proof of principle, we have tested the approach with 3D triple-resonance experiments of the kind used to assign protein backbone and side-chain resonances. Peaks extracted automatically by HIFI–NMR, for both small and larger proteins, included ~98% of real peaks obtained from control experiments in which data were collected by conventional 3D methods. HIFI–NMR required about one-tenth the time for data collection and avoided subsequent data processing and peak-picking. The approach can be implemented on commercial NMR spectrometers and is extensible to higher-dimensional NMR. PMID:16144400

  5. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  6. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  7. Statistical filtering for NMR based structure generation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The constitutional assignment of natural products by NMR spectroscopy is usually based on 2D NMR experiments like COSY, HSQC, and HMBC. The difficulty of a structure elucidation problem depends more on the type of the investigated molecule than on its size. Saturated compounds can usually be assigned unambiguously by hand using only COSY and 13C-HMBC data, whereas condensed heterocycles are problematic due to their lack of protons that could show interatomic connectivities. Different computer programs were developed to aid in the structural assignment process, one of them COCON. In the case of unsaturated and substituted molecules structure generators frequently will generate a very large number of possible solutions. This article presents a "statistical filter" for the reduction of the number of results. The filter works by generating 3D conformations using smi23d, a simple MD approach. All molecules for which the generation of constitutional restraints failed were eliminated from the result set. Some structural elements removed by the statistical filter were analyzed and checked against Beilstein. The automatic removal of molecules for which no MD parameter set could be created was included into WEBCOCON. The effect of this filter varies in dependence of the NMR data set used, but in no case the correct constitution was removed from the resulting set. PMID:21835037

  8. DFT and NMR parameterized conformation of valeranone.

    PubMed

    Torres-Valencia, J Martín; Meléndez-Rodríguez, Myriam; Alvarez-García, Rocío; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2004-10-01

    A Monte Carlo random search using molecular mechanics, followed by geometry optimization of each minimum energy structure employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level and a Boltzmann analysis of the total energies, generated accurate molecular models which describe the conformational behavior of the antispasmodic bicyclic sesquiterpene valeranone (1). The theoretical H-C-C-H dihedral angles gave the corresponding 1H, 1H vicinal coupling constants using a generalized Karplus-type equation. In turn, the 3J(H,H) values were used as initial input data for the spectral simulation of 1, which after iteration provided an excellent correlation with the experimental 1H NMR spectrum. The calculated 3J(H,H) values closely predicted the experimental values, excepting the coupling constant between the axial hydrogen alpha to the carbonyl group and the equatorial hydrogen beta to the carbonyl group (J(2beta, 3beta)). The difference is explained in terms of the electron density distribution found in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 1. The simulated spectrum, together with 2D NMR experiments, allowed the total assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 1. PMID:15366065

  9. Stacking up 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Graphene might be the most famous example, but there are other 2D materials and compounds too. Louise Mayor explains how these atomically thin sheets can be layered together to create flexible “van der Waals heterostructures”, which could lead to a range of novel applications.

  10. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  11. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon Swisher, Christine; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate-lactate, pyruvate-alanine, and pyruvate-hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines.

  12. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Christine Leon; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate–lactate, pyruvate–alanine, and pyruvate–hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines. PMID:26117655

  13. Structural studies of pravastatin and simvastatin and their complexes with SDS micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullin, I. Z.; Galiullina, L. F.; Klochkova, E. A.; Latfullin, I. A.; Aganov, A. V.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational features of pravastatin and simvastatin molecules in solution and in their complexes with sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles (SDS) were studied by 2D NOESY NMR spectroscopy. On the basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance experiments it was established that pravastatin and simvastatin can form molecular complex with SDS micelles which were considered as the model of cell membrane. In addition, interatomic distances for studied compounds were calculated based on 2D NOESY NMR experiments. It was shown that pravastatin interacts only with a surface of model membrane. However, in contrast to pravastatin, simvastatin penetrates into the inner part of SDS micelles. Observed distinctions in the mechanisms of interaction of pravastatin and simvastatin with models of cell membranes could explain the differences in their pharmacological properties.

  14. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  15. Design and Construction of a Versatile Dual Volume Heteronuclear Double Resonance Microcoil NMR Probe

    PubMed Central

    Kc, Ravi; Henry, Ian D.; Park, Gregory H. J.; Raftery, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Improved NMR detection of mass limited samples can be obtained by taking advantage of the mass sensitivity of microcoil NMR, while throughput issues can be addressed using multiple, parallel sample detection coils. We present the design and construction of a double resonance 300-MHz dual volume microcoil NMR probe with thermally-etched 440-nL detection volumes and fused silica transfer lines for high-throughput stopped-flow or flow-through sample analysis. Two orthogonal solenoidal detection coils and the novel use of shielded inductors allowed the construction of a probe with negligible radio-frequency cross talk. The probe was resonated at 1H–2D (upper coil) and 1H–13C (lower coil) frequencies such that it could perform 1D and 2D experiments with active locking frequency. The coils exhibited line widths of 0.8 to 1.1 Hz with good mass sensitivity for both 1H and 13C NMR detection. 13C directly detected 2D HETCOR spectra of 5% v/v 13C labeled acetic acid were obtained in less than 5 min. Demonstration of the probe characteristics as well as applications of the versatile two-coil double resonance probe are discussed. PMID:19138541

  16. Differential CYP 2D6 Metabolism Alters Primaquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Brittney M. J.; Xie, Lisa H.; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T.; Bandara Herath, H. M. T.; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N. P.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity. PMID:25645856

  17. Detection of methylquinoline transformation products in microcosm experiments and in tar oil contaminated groundwater using LC-NMR.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Anne-Kirsten; Preiss, Alfred; Elend, Manfred; Hollender, Juliane

    2008-02-01

    N-heterocyclic compounds are known pollutants at tar oil contaminated sites. Here we report the degradation of methyl-, and hydroxy-methyl-substituted quinolines under nitrate-, sulfate- and iron-reducing conditions in microcosms with aquifer material of a former coke manufacturing site. Comparison of degradation potential and rate under different redox conditions revealed highest degradation activities under sulfate-reducing conditions, the prevailing conditions in the field. Metabolites of methylquinolines, with the exception of 2-methylquinolines, were formed in high amounts in the microcosms and could be identified by (1)H NMR spectroscopy as 2(1H)-quinolinone analogues. 4-Methyl-, 6-methyl-, and 7-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone, the hydrogenated metabolites in the degradation of quinoline compounds, were identified by high resolution LC-MS. Metabolites of methylquinolines showed persistence, although for the first time a transformation of 4-methylquinoline and its metabolite 4-methyl-2(1H)-quinolinone is described. The relevance of the identified metabolites is supported by the detection of a broad spectrum of them in groundwater of the field site using LC-NMR technique. LC-NMR allowed the differentiation of isomers and identification without reference compounds. A variety of methylated 2(1H)-quinolinones, as well as methyl-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone isomers were not identified before in groundwater. PMID:17936873

  18. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  19. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  20. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  1. Nanoimprint lithography: 2D or not 2D? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is more than a planar high-end technology for the patterning of wafer-like substrates. It is essentially a 3D process, because it replicates various stamp topographies by 3D displacement of material and takes advantage of the bending of stamps while the mold cavities are filled. But at the same time, it keeps all assets of a 2D technique being able to pattern thin masking layers like in photon- and electron-based traditional lithography. This review reports about 20 years of development of replication techniques at Paul Scherrer Institut, with a focus on 3D aspects of molding, which enable NIL to stay 2D, but at the same time enable 3D applications which are "more than Moore." As an example, the manufacturing of a demonstrator for backlighting applications based on thermally activated selective topography equilibration will be presented. This technique allows generating almost arbitrary sloped, convex and concave profiles in the same polymer film with dimensions in micro- and nanometer scale.

  2. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion relaxation data—2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T.; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T2- D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T2- D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T2- D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D = 3 × 10 -12 m 2 s -1 and T2 = 180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D = 10 -9 m 2 s -1, T2 = 10 ms and D = 3 × 10 -13 m 2 s -1, T2 = 13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  3. NMR assignments of mitochondrial cyclophilin Cpr3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Singh, Jai Shankar; Trivedi, Dipesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Cyclophilins regulate protein folding, transport and signalling through catalysis of proline isomerization, and are ubiquitously expressed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Cpr3 is the yeast mitochondrial cyclophilin and it is structurally and biophysically uncharacterized so far. Yeast cyclophilin gene cpr3 is essential for the lactate metabolism. Here, we report (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments of Cpr3 protein determined by various 2D and 3D heteronuclear NMR experiments at pH 6.5, and temperature 298 K. PMID:26897529

  4. An improved method for suppressing protein background in PFG NMR experiments to determine ligand diffusion coefficients in the presence of receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Bridget A.; Morris, Kevin F.; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2006-08-01

    In NMR diffusion experiments to study ligand-protein binding equilibria, the spectral background due to broad protein resonances can contribute significantly to the measured ligand signal intensity resulting in erroneous binding affinities. One method to suppress the protein spectral background involves coupling a CPMG pulse train before or after the BPPSTE pulse sequence to allow for differential T2 relaxation of the broad protein resonances. Here, we present an improved method, the Gradient Phase Encoded Spin-lock (GraPES) experiment that integrates the relaxation filter into the diffusion period. Compared with sequential CPMG-BPPSTE pulse sequences, GraPES offers effective suppression of the protein background with improved signal-to-noise ratios and shorter experiment times.

  5. Theoretical and experimental NMR chemical shifts of norsanguinarine and norchelerythrine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toušek, Jaromír.; Dostál, Jiří; Marek, Radek

    2004-02-01

    Norchelerythrine and norsanguinarine, tertiary benzo[ c]phenanthridine alkaloids, were examined by gradient-selected 2D NMR spectroscopy and the later also by extensive theoretical calculations. 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts assignments of the title isoquinoline alkaloids based on NOE and multiple-bond chemical-shift correlation experiments (GSQMBC) are reported. Various methods were used for the NMR chemical shifts calculations. Molecular mechanics (MM3 forcefield), AM1 method and Ab initio methods were used for optimizing the geometry. Chemical shielding constants were computed by density functional theory, GIAO and IGLO approaches were used. Chemical shifts calculated by all methods display good qualitative agreement with experimentally determined values. The best overall agreement was achieved when geometry was optimized by RHF/6-31G** method and chemical shielding constants were calculated by B3LYP/6-311G** method, GIAO approach.

  6. Differential Cytochrome P450 2D Metabolism Alters Tafenoquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Chau; Xie, Lisa H.; Potter, Brittney M. J.; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Nanayakkara, N. P. Dhammika; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.; Smith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D metabolism is required for the liver-stage antimalarial efficacy of the 8-aminoquinoline molecule tafenoquine in mice. This could be problematic for Plasmodium vivax radical cure, as the human CYP 2D ortholog (2D6) is highly polymorphic. Diminished CYP 2D6 enzyme activity, as in the poor-metabolizer phenotype, could compromise radical curative efficacy in humans. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism for tafenoquine liver-stage efficacy, the exact role that CYP 2D metabolism plays in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of tafenoquine and other 8-aminoquinoline molecules has not been extensively studied. In this study, a series of tafenoquine pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with different CYP 2D metabolism statuses, including wild-type (WT) (reflecting extensive metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) and CYPmouse 2D knockout (KO) (reflecting poor metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single 20-mg/kg of body weight dose of tafenoquine differed between the strains; however, the differences were less striking than previous results obtained for primaquine in the same model. Additionally, the presence of a 5,6-ortho-quinone tafenoquine metabolite was examined in both mouse strains. The 5,6-ortho-quinone species of tafenoquine was observed, and concentrations of the metabolite were highest in the WT extensive-metabolizer phenotype. Altogether, this study indicates that CYP 2D metabolism in mice affects tafenoquine pharmacokinetics and could have implications for human tafenoquine pharmacokinetics in polymorphic CYP 2D6 human populations. PMID:25870069

  7. Interaction study of bioactive molecules with fibrinogen and human platelets determined by 1H NMR relaxation experiments.

    PubMed

    Bonechi, Claudia; Martini, Silvia; Rossi, Claudio

    2009-02-15

    In order to investigate the interaction processes between bioactive molecules and macromolecular receptors NMR methodology based on the analysis of selective and non-selective spin-lattice relaxation rate enhancements of ligand protons was used. The contribution from the bound ligand fraction to the observed relaxation rate in relation to macromolecular target concentration allowed the calculation of the normalized affinity index[A(I)(N)](L)(T) in which the effects of motional anisotropies and different proton densities have been removed. In this paper, we applied this methodology to investigate the affinity of epinephrine and isoproterenol towards two different systems: fibrinogen and platelets. PMID:19157885

  8. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  9. Protein Dynamics Studied with Ultrafast 2D IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    THIELGES, MEGAN C.; FAYER, MICHAEL D.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Proteins, enzymes, and other biological molecules undergo structural dynamics as an intrinsic part of their biological functions. While many biological processes occur on the millisecond, second, and even longer time scales, the fundamental structural dynamics that eventually give rise to such processes occur on much faster time scales. Many decades ago, chemical kineticists focused on the inverse of the reaction rate constant as the important time scale for a chemical reaction. However, through transition state theory and a vast amount of experimental evidence, we now know that the key events in a chemical reaction can involve structural fluctuations that take a system of reactants to its transitions state, the crossing of a barrier, and the eventual relaxation to product states. Such dynamics occur on very fast time scales. Today researchers would like to investigate the fast structural fluctuations of biological molecules to gain an understanding of how biological processes proceed from simple structural changes in biomolecules to the final, complex biological function. The study of the fast structural dynamics of biological molecules requires experiments that operate on the appropriate time scales, and in this Account, we discuss the application of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy to the study of dynamics. The 2D IR vibrational echo experiment is akin to 2D NMR, but it operates on time scales many orders of magnitude faster. In the experiments, a particular vibrational oscillator serves as a vibrational dynamics probe. As the structure of the protein evolves in time, the structural changes are manifested as time dependent changes in the frequency of the vibrational dynamics probe. The 2D IR vibrational echo experiments can track the vibrational frequency evolution, which we then relate to the time evolution of the protein structure. In particular, we measured protein substate interconversion for mutants of

  10. Thermal stability of Ag, Al, Sn, Pb, and Hg films reinforced by 2D (C, Si) crystals and the formation of interfacial fluid states in them upon heating. MD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polukhin, V. A.; Kurbanova, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the thermal stability of the interfacial states of metallic Al, Ag, Sn, Pb, and Hg films (i.e., the structural elements of superconductor composites and conducting electrodes) reinforced by 2D graphene and silicene crystals upon heating up to disordering and to analyze the formation of nonautonomous fluid pseudophases in interfaces. The effect of perforation defects in reinforcing 2D-C and 2D-Si planes with passivated edge covalent bonds on the atomic dynamics is investigated. As compared to Al and Ag, the diffusion coefficients in Pd and Hg films increase monotonically with temperature during thermally activated disordering processes, the interatomic distances decrease, the sizes decrease, drops form, and their density profile grows along the normal. The coagulation of Pb and Hg drops is accompanied by a decrease in the contact angle, the reduction of the interface contact with graphene, and the enhancement of its corrugation (waviness).

  11. Measuring diffusion-relaxation correlation maps using non-uniform field gradients of single-sided NMR devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-11-01

    Single-sided NMR systems are becoming a relevant tool in industry and laboratory environments due to their low cost, low maintenance and capacity to evaluate quantity and quality of hydrogen based materials. The performance of such devices has improved significantly over the last decade, providing increased field homogeneity, field strength and even controlled static field gradients. For a class of these devices, the configuration of the permanent magnets provides a linear variation of the magnetic field and can be used in diffusion measurements. However, magnet design depends directly on its application and, according to the purpose, the field homogeneity may significantly be compromised. This may prevent the determination of diffusion properties of fluids based on the natural inhomogeneity of the field using known techniques. This work introduces a new approach that extends the applicability of diffusion-editing CPMG experiments to NMR devices with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields, which do not vary linearly in space. Herein, we propose a method to determine a custom diffusion kernel based on the gradient distribution, which can be seen as a signature of each NMR device. This new diffusion kernel is then utilised in the 2D inverse Laplace transform (2D ILT) in order to determine diffusion-relaxation correlation maps of homogeneous multi-phasic fluids. The experiments were performed using NMR MObile Lateral Explore (MOLE), which is a single-sided NMR device designed to maximise the volume at the sweet spot with enhanced depth penetration.

  12. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-09-30

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40/sup 0/C for a tightly bound /sup 15/N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads.

  13. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  14. UV-vis, IR and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies and characterization of ionic-pair crystal violet-oxytetracycline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Sandra; Soto, César; Toral, M. Inés

    2010-01-01

    The present study shows the formation and characterization of the ionic-pair between the antibiotic oxytetracycline and the dye crystal violet in ammonia solution pH 9.0 ± 0.2 extracted into chloroform. The characterization was demonstrated using UV-vis spectrophotometry, 1H NMR, measurement of relaxation times T1 and IR spectroscopy, using a comparison between the signals of individual pure compounds with the signals with the mixture CV-OTC in different alkaline media. The formation of ionic-pair was also corroborated by new signals and chemical shifts. (2D) NMR spectroscopy experiments show that the interaction is electrostatic.

  15. Conformational properties of α- or β-(1→6)-linked oligosaccharides: Hamiltonian replica exchange MD simulations and NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhilon S; Pendrill, Robert; Mallajosyula, Sairam S; Widmalm, Göran; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-03-20

    Conformational sampling for a set of 10 α- or β-(1→6)-linked oligosaccharides has been studied using explicit solvent Hamiltonian replica exchange (HREX) simulations and NMR spectroscopy techniques. Validation of the force field and simulation methodology is done by comparing calculated transglycosidic J coupling constants and proton-proton distances with the corresponding NMR data. Initial calculations showed poor agreement, for example, with >3 Hz deviation of the calculated (3)J(H5,H6R) values from the experimental data, prompting optimization of the ω torsion angle parameters associated with (1→6)-linkages. The resulting force field is in overall good agreement (i.e., within ∼0.5 Hz deviation) from experimental (3)J(H5,H6R) values, although some small limitations are evident. Detailed hydrogen bonding analysis indicates that most of the compounds lack direct intramolecular H-bonds between the two monosaccharides; however, minor sampling of the O6···HO2' hydrogen bond is present in three compounds. The results verify the role of the gauche effect between O5 and O6 atoms in gluco- and manno-configured pyranosides causing the ω torsion angle to sample an equilibrium between the gt and gg rotamers. Conversely, galacto-configured pyranosides sample a population distribution in equilibrium between gt and tg rotamers, while the gg rotamer populations are minor. Water radial distribution functions suggest decreased accessibility to the O6 atom in the (1→6)-linkage as compared to the O6' atom in the nonreducing sugar. The role of bridging water molecules between two sugar moieties on the distributions of ω torsion angles in oligosaccharides is also explored. PMID:24552401

  16. Conformational Properties of α- or β-(1→6)-Linked Oligosaccharides: Hamiltonian Replica Exchange MD Simulations and NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformational sampling for a set of 10 α- or β-(1→6)-linked oligosaccharides has been studied using explicit solvent Hamiltonian replica exchange (HREX) simulations and NMR spectroscopy techniques. Validation of the force field and simulation methodology is done by comparing calculated transglycosidic J coupling constants and proton–proton distances with the corresponding NMR data. Initial calculations showed poor agreement, for example, with >3 Hz deviation of the calculated 3J(H5,H6R) values from the experimental data, prompting optimization of the ω torsion angle parameters associated with (1→6)-linkages. The resulting force field is in overall good agreement (i.e., within ∼0.5 Hz deviation) from experimental 3J(H5,H6R) values, although some small limitations are evident. Detailed hydrogen bonding analysis indicates that most of the compounds lack direct intramolecular H-bonds between the two monosaccharides; however, minor sampling of the O6···HO2′ hydrogen bond is present in three compounds. The results verify the role of the gauche effect between O5 and O6 atoms in gluco- and manno-configured pyranosides causing the ω torsion angle to sample an equilibrium between the gt and gg rotamers. Conversely, galacto-configured pyranosides sample a population distribution in equilibrium between gt and tg rotamers, while the gg rotamer populations are minor. Water radial distribution functions suggest decreased accessibility to the O6 atom in the (1→6)-linkage as compared to the O6′ atom in the nonreducing sugar. The role of bridging water molecules between two sugar moieties on the distributions of ω torsion angles in oligosaccharides is also explored. PMID:24552401

  17. Untargeted NMR-based methodology in the study of fruit metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Anatoly Petrovich; Mannina, Luisa; Proietti, Noemi; Carradori, Simone; Daglia, Maria; Giusti, Anna Maria; Antiochia, Riccarda; Capitani, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    In this review, fundamental aspects of the untargeted NMR-based methodology applied to fruit characterization are described. The strategy to perform the structure elucidation of fruit metabolites is discussed with some examples of spectral assignments by 2D experiments. Primary ubiquitous metabolites as well as secondary species-specific metabolites, identified in different fruits using an untargeted 1H-NMR approach, are summarized in a comprehensive way. Crucial aspects regarding the quantitative elaboration of spectral data are also discussed. The usefulness of the NMR-based metabolic profiling was highlighted using some results regarding quality, adulteration, varieties and geographical origin of fruits and fruit-derived products such as juices. PMID:25749679

  18. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Gupta, Shalabh; Caporini, Marc A; Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Pruski, Marek

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  19. Accelerated 2D magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single spins using matrix completion

    PubMed Central

    Scheuer, Jochen; Stark, Alexander; Kost, Matthias; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2015-01-01

    Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the major tools for analysing the chemical structure of organic molecules and proteins. Despite its power, this technique requires long measurement times, which, particularly in the recently emerging diamond based single molecule NMR, limits its application to stable samples. Here we demonstrate a method which allows to obtain the spectrum by collecting only a small fraction of the experimental data. Our method is based on matrix completion which can recover the full spectral information from randomly sampled data points. We confirm experimentally the applicability of this technique by performing two dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments on a two spin system consisting of a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre in diamond coupled to a single 13C nuclear spin. The signal to noise ratio of the recovered 2D spectrum is compared to the Fourier transform of randomly subsampled data, where we observe a strong suppression of the noise when the matrix completion algorithm is applied. We show that the peaks in the spectrum can be obtained with only 10% of the total number of the data points. We believe that our results reported here can find an application in all types of two dimensional spectroscopy, as long as the measured matrices have a low rank. PMID:26631593

  20. Accelerated 2D magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single spins using matrix completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Stark, Alexander; Kost, Matthias; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2015-12-01

    Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the major tools for analysing the chemical structure of organic molecules and proteins. Despite its power, this technique requires long measurement times, which, particularly in the recently emerging diamond based single molecule NMR, limits its application to stable samples. Here we demonstrate a method which allows to obtain the spectrum by collecting only a small fraction of the experimental data. Our method is based on matrix completion which can recover the full spectral information from randomly sampled data points. We confirm experimentally the applicability of this technique by performing two dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments on a two spin system consisting of a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre in diamond coupled to a single 13C nuclear spin. The signal to noise ratio of the recovered 2D spectrum is compared to the Fourier transform of randomly subsampled data, where we observe a strong suppression of the noise when the matrix completion algorithm is applied. We show that the peaks in the spectrum can be obtained with only 10% of the total number of the data points. We believe that our results reported here can find an application in all types of two dimensional spectroscopy, as long as the measured matrices have a low rank.

  1. Measurement and Quantification of Heterogeneity, Flow, and Mass Transfer in Porous Media Using NMR Low-Field Techiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciok, E.; Olaru, A. M.; Haber, A.; van Landeghem, M.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Sucre, O. E.; Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.; RWTH Aachen Mobile Low-Field NMR

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is renowned for its unique potential to both reveal and correlate spectroscopic, relaxometric, spatial and dynamic properties in a large variety of organic and inorganic systems. NMR has no restrictions regarding sample opacity and is an entirely non-invasive method, which makes it the ideal tool for the investigation of porous media. However, for years NMR research of soils was limited by the use of high-field NMR devices, which necessitated elaborate NMR experiments and were not applicable to bulky samples or on-site field measurements. The evolution of low-field NMR devices during the past 20 years has brought forth portable, small-scale NMR systems with open and closed magnet arrangements specialized to specific NMR applications. In combination with recent advances in 2D-NMR Laplace methodology [1], low-field NMR has opened up the possibility to study real-life microporous systems ranging from granular media to natural soils and oil well boreholes. Thus, information becomes available, which before has not been accessible with high-field NMR. In this work, we present our recent progress in mobile low-field NMR probe design for field measurements of natural soils: a slim-line logging tool, which can be rammed into the soil of interest on-site. The performance of the device is demonstrated in measurements of moisture profiles of model soils [2] and field measurements of relaxometric properties and moisture profiles of natural soils [3]. Moreover, an improved concept of the slim-line logging tool is shown, with a higher excitation volume and a better signal-to-noise due to an improved coil design. Furthermore, we present our recent results in 2D exchange relaxometry and simulation. These include relaxation-relaxation experiments on natural soils with varying degree of moisture saturation, where we could draw a connection between the relaxometric properties of the soil to its pore size-related diffusivity and to its clay content

  2. Rapid characterization of molecular diffusion by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pudakalakatti, Shivanand M; Chandra, Kousik; Thirupathi, Ravula; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2014-11-24

    An NMR-based approach for rapid characterization of translational diffusion of molecules has been developed. Unlike the conventional method of acquiring a series of 2D (13)C and (1)H spectra, the proposed approach involves a single 2D NMR spectrum, which can be acquired in minutes. Using this method, it was possible to detect the presence of intermediate oligomeric species of diphenylalanine in solution during the process of its self-assembly to form nanotubular structures. PMID:25331210

  3. Protein Motions and Folding Investigated by NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2002-03-01

    NMR spin relaxation spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for globally characterizing conformational dynamics of proteins in solution. Laboratory frame relaxation measurements are sensitive to overall rotational diffusion and internal motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, while rotating frame relaxation measurements are sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales. The former approach is illustrated by ^15N laboratory-frame relaxation experiments as a function of temperature for the helical subdomain HP36 of the F-actin-binding headpiece domain of chicken villin. The data are analyzed using the model-free formalism to characterize order parameters and effective correlation times for intramolecular motions of individual ^15N sites. The latter approach is illustrated by ^13C Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation measurements for the de novo designed α_2D protein and by ^15N rotating-frame relaxation measurements for the peripheral subunit-binding domain (PSBD) from the dihydrolopoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus. These experiments are used to determine the folding and unfolding kinetic rate constants for the two proteins. The results for HP36, α_2D, and PSBD illustrate the capability of current NMR methods for characterizing dynamic processes on multiple time scales in proteins.

  4. Benzenium ion chemistry on solid metal halide superacids: in situ {sup 13}C NMR experiments and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Barich, D.H.; Torres, P.D.; Haw, J.F.

    1997-01-15

    The benzenium, toluenium, and ethylbenzenium ions were synthesized on aluminium bromide by coadsorption of the precursors with either HBr or alkyl bromide. Principal components of the {sup 13}C chemical shift tensors for the ring carbons of these species were measured from magic angle spinning spectra. The benzenium ion was static at 77 K but underwent both proton scrambling and anisotropic rotation at 298 K as well as oligomerization at higher loadings. The para form of the toluenium ion was the dominant isomer at 77 K, but a temperature-dependent equilibrium between the para and ortho isomers was observed at 273 K. The energy calculations at MP4(fc,sdq)/ 6-311+G{sup *}//MP2/6-311+G{sup *} with thermal corrections resulted in good agreement between calculated and measured proton affinities for benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene. For toluenium ion, the energies of the ortho and meta isomers were 1.2 and 5.4 kcal/mol, respectively, above the para isomer, consistent with the temperature-dependent {sup 13}C NMR spectra in the solid state. {sup 13}C chemical shift tensors calculated at the GIAO-MP2/tzp/dz//MP2/ 6-311+G{sup *} and GIAO-MP2/tzp/dz//B3LYP/6-311+G{sup *} levels of theory were in very close agreement with each other and generally in satisfactory agreement with experimental principal components. 64 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  6. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  7. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  8. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  9. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  10. Artifacts in time-resolved NUS: A case study of NOE build-up curves from 2D NOESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dass, Rupashree; Kasprzak, Paweł; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy requires time-consuming sampling of indirect dimensions and so is usually used to study stable samples. However, dynamically changing compounds or their mixtures commonly occur in problems of natural science. Monitoring them requires the use multidimensional NMR in a time-resolved manner - in other words, a series of quick spectra must be acquired at different points in time. Among the many solutions that have been proposed to achieve this goal, time-resolved non-uniform sampling (TR-NUS) is one of the simplest. In a TR-NUS experiment, the signal is sampled using a shuffled random schedule and then divided into overlapping subsets. These subsets are then processed using one of the NUS reconstruction methods, for example compressed sensing (CS). The resulting stack of spectra forms a temporal "pseudo-dimension" that shows the changes caused by the process occurring in the sample. CS enables the use of small subsets of data, which minimizes the averaging of the effects studied. Yet, even within these limited timeframes, the sample undergoes certain changes. In this paper we discuss the effect of varying signal amplitude in a TR-NUS experiment. Our theoretical calculations show that the variations within the subsets lead to t1 -noise, which is dependent on the rate of change of the signal amplitude. We verify these predictions experimentally. As a model case we choose a novel 2D TR-NOESY experiment in which mixing time is varied in parallel with shuffled NUS in the indirect dimension. The experiment, performed on a sample of strychnine, provides a near-continuous NOE build-up curve, whose shape closely reflects the t1 -noise level. 2D TR-NOESY reduces the measurement time compared to the conventional approach and makes it possible to verify the theoretical predictions about signal variations during TR-NUS.

  11. Artifacts in time-resolved NUS: A case study of NOE build-up curves from 2D NOESY.

    PubMed

    Dass, Rupashree; Kasprzak, Paweł; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy requires time-consuming sampling of indirect dimensions and so is usually used to study stable samples. However, dynamically changing compounds or their mixtures commonly occur in problems of natural science. Monitoring them requires the use multidimensional NMR in a time-resolved manner - in other words, a series of quick spectra must be acquired at different points in time. Among the many solutions that have been proposed to achieve this goal, time-resolved non-uniform sampling (TR-NUS) is one of the simplest. In a TR-NUS experiment, the signal is sampled using a shuffled random schedule and then divided into overlapping subsets. These subsets are then processed using one of the NUS reconstruction methods, for example compressed sensing (CS). The resulting stack of spectra forms a temporal "pseudo-dimension" that shows the changes caused by the process occurring in the sample. CS enables the use of small subsets of data, which minimizes the averaging of the effects studied. Yet, even within these limited timeframes, the sample undergoes certain changes. In this paper we discuss the effect of varying signal amplitude in a TR-NUS experiment. Our theoretical calculations show that the variations within the subsets lead to t1-noise, which is dependent on the rate of change of the signal amplitude. We verify these predictions experimentally. As a model case we choose a novel 2D TR-NOESY experiment in which mixing time is varied in parallel with shuffled NUS in the indirect dimension. The experiment, performed on a sample of strychnine, provides a near-continuous NOE build-up curve, whose shape closely reflects the t1-noise level. 2D TR-NOESY reduces the measurement time compared to the conventional approach and makes it possible to verify the theoretical predictions about signal variations during TR-NUS. PMID:26896866

  12. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a protein by two-dimensional NMR: The case of mouse epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kohda, Daisuke; Sawada, Toshie; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko )

    1991-05-21

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p{sup 2}H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) {sup 1}H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable group which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups ({alpha}-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and {alpha}-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal {alpha}-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the {beta}-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. The authors found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins.

  13. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances a protein by two-dimensional NMR: the case of mouse epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kohda, D; Sawada, T; Inagaki, F

    1991-05-21

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p2H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) 1H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable groups which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups (alpha-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and alpha-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal alpha-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the beta-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. We found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins. PMID:2036358

  14. From weakly to strongly interacting 2D Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Paul; Fenech, Kristian; Lingham, Marcus; Peppler, Tyson; Hoinka, Sascha; Vale, Chris

    2014-05-01

    We study ultracold 2D Fermi gases of 6Li formed in a highly oblate trapping potential. The potential is generated by a cylindrically focused, blue detuned TEM01 mode laser beam. Weak magnetic field curvature provides highly harmonic confinement in the radial direction and we can readily produce single clouds with an aspect ratio of 230. Our experiments investigate the dimensional crossover from 3D to 2D for a two component Fermi gas in the Bose-Einstein Condensate to Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer crossover. Observation of an elbow in measurements of the cloud width vs. atom number is consistent with populating only the lowest transverse harmonic oscillator state for weak attractive interactions. This measurement is extended to the strongly interacting region using the broad Feshbach resonance at 832 G. We also report our progress towards measurement of the 2D equation of state for an interacting 2D Fermi gas via in-situ absorption imaging.

  15. Molecular environment of stable iodine and radioiodine (129I) in natural organic matter: Evidence inferred from NMR and binding experiments at environmentally relevant concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Zhong, Junyan; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Zhang, Saijin; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Ho, Yi-Fang; Schwehr, Kathleen A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Roberts, Kimberly A.; Brinkmeyer, Robin; Yeager, Chris M.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2012-11-01

    129I is a major by-product of nuclear fission and had become one of the major radiation risk drivers at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 129I is present at elevated levels in the surface soils of the Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area and was found to be bound predominantly to soil organic matter (SOM). Naturally bound 127I and 129I to sequentially extracted humic acids (HAs), fulvic acids (FAs) and a water extractable colloid (WEC) were measured in a 129I-contaminated wetland surface soil located on the SRS. WEC is a predominantly colloidal organic fraction obtained from soil re-suspension experiments to mimic the fraction that may be released during groundwater exfiltration, storm water or surface runoff events. For the first time, NMR techniques were applied to infer the molecular environment of naturally occurring stable iodine and radioiodine binding to SOM. Iodine uptake partitioning coefficients (Kd) by these SOM samples at ambient iodine concentrations were also measured and related to quantitative structural analyses by 13C DPMAS NMR and solution state 1H NMR on the eight humic acid fractions. By assessing the molecular environment of iodine, it was found that it was closely associated with the aromatic regions containing esterified products of phenolic and formic acids or other aliphatic carboxylic acids, amide functionalities, quinone-like structures activated by electron-donating groups (e.g., NH2), or a hemicellulose-lignin-like complex with phenyl-glycosidic linkages. However, FAs and WEC contained much greater concentrations of 127I or 129I than HAs. The contrasting radioiodine contents among the three different types of SOM (HAs, FAs and WEC) suggest that the iodine binding environment cannot be explained solely by the difference in the amount of their reactive binding sites. Instead, indirect evidence indicates that the macro-molecular conformation, such as the hydrophobic aliphatic periphery hindering the active aromatic cores and the hydrophilic

  16. Determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear coupling constants from 2D 19F-13C correlation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Dvortsak, Peter; van der Werf, Ramon M.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Jaeger, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorinated organic compounds have become increasingly important within the polymer and the pharmaceutical industry as well as for clinical applications. For the structural elucidation of such compounds, NMR experiments with fluorine detection are of great value due to the favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus. For the investigation of three fluorinated compounds, triple resonance 2D HSQC and HMBC experiments were adopted to fluorine detection with carbon and/or proton decoupling to yield F-C, F-C{H}, F-C{Cacq} and F-C{H,Cacq} variants. Analysis of E.COSY type cross-peak patterns in the F-C correlation spectra led, apart from the chemical shift assignments, to determination of size and signs of the JCH, JCF, and JHF coupling constants. In addition, the fully coupled F-C HMQC spectrum of steroid 1 was interpreted in terms of E.COSY type patterns. This example shows how coupling constants due to different nuclei can be determined together with their relative signs from a single spectrum. The analysis of cross-peak patterns, as presented here, not only provides relatively straightforward routes to the determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear J-couplings in fluorinated compounds, it also provides new and easy ways for the determination of residual dipolar couplings and thus for structure elucidation. The examples and results presented in this study may contribute to a better interpretation and understanding of various F-C correlation experiments and thereby stimulate their utilization.

  17. Drug solubilization mechanism of α-glucosyl stevia by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junying; Higashi, Kenjirou; Ueda, Keisuke; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi; Limwikrant, Waree; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2014-04-25

    We investigated the drug solubilization mechanism of α-glucosyl stevia (Stevia-G) which was synthesized from stevia (rebaudioside-A) by transglycosylation. (1)H and (13)C NMR peaks of Stevia-G in water were assigned by two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments including (1)H-(1)H correlation, (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple bond correlation, and (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence spectroscopies. The (1)H and (13)C peaks clearly showed the incorporation of two glucose units into rebaudioside-A to produce Stevia-G, supported by steviol glycoside and glucosyl residue assays. The concentration-dependent chemical shifts of Stevia-G protons correlated well with a mass-action law model, indicating the self-association of Stevia-G molecules in water. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was 12.0 mg/mL at 37°C. The aggregation number was 2 below the CMC and 12 above the CMC. Dynamic light scattering and 2D (1)H-(1)H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) NMR experiments demonstrated that Stevia-G self-associated into micelles of a few nanometers in size with a core-shell structure, containing a kaurane diterpenoid-based hydrophobic core and a glucose-based shell. 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY NMR measurements also revealed that a poorly water-soluble drug, naringenin, was incorporated into the hydrophobic core of the Stevia-G micelle. The Stevia-G self-assembly behavior and micellar drug inclusion capacity can achieve significant enhancement in drug solubility. PMID:24508331

  18. Amino-acid selective experiments on uniformly 13C and 15N labeled proteins by MAS NMR: Filtering of lysines and arginines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Stefan; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2006-12-01

    Amino-acid selective magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments can aid the assignment of ambiguous cross-peaks in crowded spectra of solid proteins. In particular for larger proteins, data analysis can be hindered by severe resonance overlap. In such cases, filtering techniques may provide a good alternative to site-specific spin-labeling to obtain unambiguous assignments that can serve as starting points in the assignment procedure. In this paper we present a simple pulse sequence that allows selective excitation of arginine and lysine residues. To achieve this, we make use of a combination of specific cross-polarization for selective excitation [M. Baldus, A.T. Petkova, J. Herzfeld, R.G. Griffin, Cross polarization in the tilted frame: assignment and spectral simplification in heteronuclear spin systems, Mol. Phys. 95 (1998) 1197-1207.] and spin diffusion for transfer along the amino-acid side-chain. The selectivity of the filter is demonstrated with the excitation of lysine and arginine side-chain resonances in a uniformly 13C and 15N labeled protein preparation of the α-spectrin SH3 domain. It is shown that the filter can be applied as a building block in a 13C- 13C lysine-only correlation experiment.

  19. A 3D Time-Shared NOESY Experiment Designed to Provide Optimal Resolution for Accurate Assignment of NMR Distance Restraints in Large Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subrata H; Harden, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by solution NMR has become an established method, but challenges increase steeply with the size of proteins. Notably spectral crowding and signal overlap impair the analysis of cross-peaks in NOESY spectra that provide distance restraints for structural models. An optimal spectral resolution can alleviate overlap but requires prohibitively long experimental time with existing methods. Here we present a time-shared 3D experiment optimized for large proteins that provides 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra in a single measurement. NOESY correlations appear in the detected dimension and hence benefit from the highest resolution achievable of all dimensions without increase in experimental time. By design, this experiment is inherently optimal for non-uniform sampling acquisition when compared to current alternatives. Thus, 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra with ultra-high resolution in all dimensions were acquired in parallel within about 4 days instead of 80 days for a 52 kDa monomeric protein at a concentration of 350 μM. PMID:25381567

  20. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  1. Signal enhancement of J-HMQC experiments in solid-state NMR involving half-integer quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Trébosc, Julien; Li, Yixuan; Xu, Jun; Hu, Bingwen; Feng, Ningdong; Chen, Qun; Lafon, Oliver; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2013-07-28

    We show that for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei, the manipulation of the satellite transitions can accelerate and enhance coherence transfer to other isotopes. This novel strategy is demonstrated to improve the sensitivity of (31)P-{(27)Al} J-HMQC experiments for a layered aluminophosphate Mu-4. PMID:23770976

  2. 13-C NMR Spectra of Styrene Derivatives: An Undergraduate Experiment Involving the Application of the Hammett Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blunt, J. W.; Happer, D. A. R.

    1979-01-01

    In this experiment, the observation that, for meta- and para-substituted styrene derivatives, the magnitude of the C-13 shielding value for the beta-carbon is linearly related to sigma for the ring substituent is used to determine sigma. (BB)

  3. Structural and dynamic characterization of Li(12)Si(7) and Li(12)Ge(7) using solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Dupke, Sven; Langer, Thorsten; Pöttgen, Rainer; Winter, Martin; Eckert, Hellmut

    2012-04-01

    Local environments and lithium ion dynamics in the binary lithium silicide Li(12)Si(7), and the analogous germanium compound have been characterized by detailed (6)Li, (7)Li, and (29)Si variable temperature static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments. In the MAS-NMR spectra, individual lithium sites are generally well-resolved at temperatures below 200K, whereas at higher temperatures partial site averaging is observed on the kHz timescale. The observed lithium chemical shift ranges of up to 60 ppm indicate a significant amount of electronic charge stored on the lithium species, consistent with the expectation of the extended Zintl-Klemm-Bussmann concept used for the theoretical description of lithium silicides. Furthermore the strongly diamagnetic chemical shifts observed for the lithium ions situated directly above the five-membered Si(5) rings suggest the possibility of aromatic ring currents in these structural elements. This assignment is confirmed further by (29)Si{(7)Li} CPMAS-heteronuclear correlation experiments. The (29)Si MAS-NMR spectra of Li(12)Si(7), aided by 2-D J-resolved spectroscopy, are well suited for differentiating between the individual sites within the silicon framework, while further detailed connectivity information is available on the basis of 2-D INADEQUATE and radio frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) spectra. Variable temperature static (7)Li NMR spectra reveal the onset of strong motional narrowing effects, illustrating high lithium ionic mobilities in both of these compounds. PMID:21996453

  4. A Discovery-Based Experiment Involving Rearrangement in the Conversion of Alcohols to Alkyl Halides: Permanent Magnet [to the thirteenth power]C NMR in the First-Semester Organic Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Tucker, Ryand J. F.

    2008-01-01

    The use of permanent magnet [to the thirteenth power]C NMR in large-section first-semester organic chemistry lab courses is limited by the availability of experiments that not only hinge on first-semester lecture topics, but which also produce at least 0.5 mL of neat liquid sample. This article reports a discovery-based experiment that meets both…

  5. Langerin-heparin interaction: two binding sites for small and large ligands as revealed by a combination of NMR spectroscopy and cross-linking mapping experiments.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Juan C; Chabrol, Eric; Vivès, Romain R; Thomas, Aline; de Paz, José L; Rojo, Javier; Imberty, Anne; Fieschi, Franck; Nieto, Pedro M; Angulo, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Langerin is a C-type lectin present on Langerhans cells that mediates capture of pathogens in a carbohydrate-dependent manner, leading to subsequent internalization and elimination in the cellular organelles called Birbeck granules. This mechanism mediated by langerin was shown to constitute a natural barrier for HIV-1 particle transmission. Besides interacting specifically with high mannose and fucosylated neutral carbohydrate structures, langerin has the ability to bind sulfated carbohydrate ligands as 6-sulfated galactosides in the Ca(2+)-dependent binding site. Very recently langerin was demonstrated to interact with sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), in a Ca(2+)-independent way, resulting in the proposal of a new binding site for GAGs. On the basis of those results, we have conducted a structural study of the interactions of small heparin (HEP)-like oligosaccharides with langerin in solution. Heparin bead cross-linking experiments, an approach specifically designed to identify HEP/heparan sulfate binding sites in proteins were first carried out and experimentally validated the previously proposed model for the interaction of langerin extracellular domain with 6 kDa HEP. High-resolution NMR studies of a set of eight synthetic HEP-like trisaccharides harboring different sulfation patterns demonstrated that all of them bound to langerin in a Ca(2+)-dependent way. The binding epitopes were determined by saturation transfer difference NMR and the bound conformations by transferred NOESY experiments. These experimental data were combined with docking and molecular dynamics and resulted in the proposal of a binding mode characterized by the coordination of calcium by the two equatorial hydroxyl groups, OH3 and OH4, at the non-reducing end. The binding also includes the carboxylate group at the adjacent iduronate residue. This epitope is shared by all eight ligands, explaining the absence of any impact on binding from differences in their substitution patterns

  6. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification

    PubMed Central

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Marsh, E. Neil. G.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling 1H-1H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using 1H-1H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time 1H-1H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5–15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils. PMID:26138908

  7. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Marsh, E. Neil. G.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling 1H-1H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using 1H-1H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time 1H-1H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5-15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils.

  8. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification.

    PubMed

    Kotler, Samuel A; Brender, Jeffrey R; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Marsh, E Neil G; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5-15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils. PMID:26138908

  9. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  10. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  11. Solution State Structure Determination of Silicate Oligomers by 29Si NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, Johnathan P.; Shah, Neil K.; Dixon, David A.

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by 29Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of 29Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the 29Si–29Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated crosspeaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stability of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations.

  12. Solution state structure determination of silicate oligomers by 29SI NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Herman; Felmy, Andrew R; Craciun, Raluca; Keenum, J Patrick; Shah, Neil; Dixon, David A

    2006-02-22

    Evidence for nine new solution state silicate oligomers has been discovered by (29)Si NMR homonuclear correlation experiments of (29)Si-enriched samples. In addition to enhancing signal sensitivity, the isotopic enrichment increases the probability of the (29)Si-(29)Si two-bond scalar couplings that are necessary for the observation of internuclear correlations in 2-D experiments. The proposed assignments are validated by comparisons of experimental and simulated cross-peaks obtained with high digital resolution. The internuclear connectivity indicated by the NMR data suggests that several of these oligomers can have multiple stereoisomers, including conformers and/or diastereomers. The stabilities of these oligomers and their possible stereoisomers have been investigated by electronic structure calculations. PMID:16478188

  13. Uncertainty minimization in NMR measurements of dynamic nuclear polarization of a proton target for nuclear physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Dustin M.

    2013-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation into the measurement uncertainty in polarization produced by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization is outlined. The polarization data taken during Jefferson Lab experiment E08-007 is used to obtain error estimates and to develop an algorithm to minimize uncertainty of the measurement of polarization in irradiated View the ^14NH_3 targets, which is readily applied to other materials. The target polarization and corresponding uncertainties for E08-007 are reported. The resulting relative uncertainty found in the target polarization is determined to be less than or equal to 3.9%.

  14. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  15. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  16. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

  17. Observation of 1H-13C and 1H-1H proximities in a paramagnetic solid by NMR at high magnetic field under ultra-fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenhui; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Zhou, Lei; Shen, Ming; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The assignment of NMR signals in paramagnetic solids is often challenging since: (i) the large paramagnetic shifts often mask the diamagnetic shifts specific to the local chemical environment, and (ii) the hyperfine interactions with unpaired electrons broaden the NMR spectra and decrease the coherence lifetime, thus reducing the efficiency of usual homo- and hetero-nuclear NMR correlation experiments. Here we show that the assignment of (1)H and (13)C signals in isotopically unmodified paramagnetic compounds with moderate hyperfine interactions can be facilitated by the use of two two-dimensional (2D) experiments: (i) (1)H-(13)C correlations with (1)H detection and (ii) (1)H-(1)H double-quantum↔single-quantum correlations. These methods are experimentally demonstrated on isotopically unmodified copper (II) complex of l-alanine at high magnetic field (18.8 T) and ultra-fast Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) frequency of 62.5 kHz. Compared to (13)C detection, we show that (1)H detection leads to a 3-fold enhancement in sensitivity for (1)H-(13)C 2D correlation experiments. By combining (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H 2D correlation experiments with the analysis of (13)C longitudinal relaxation times, we have been able to assign the (1)H and (13)C signals of each l-alanine ligand. PMID:25557861

  18. H(C)Ag: a triple resonance NMR experiment for (109) Ag detection in labile silver-carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Weske, Sebastian; Li, Yingjia; Wiegmann, Sara; John, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In silver complexes, indirect detection of (109) Ag resonances via (1) H,(109) Ag-HMQC frequently suffers from small or absent JHAg couplings or rapid ligand dissociation. In these cases, it would be favourable to employ H(X)Ag triple resonance spectroscopy that uses the large one-bond JXAg coupling (where the donor atom of the ligand X is the relay nucleus). We have applied an HMQC-based version of the H(C)Ag experiment to a labile silver-NHC complex (NHC=N-heterocyclic carbene) at natural (13) C isotopic abundance and variable temperature. In agreement with simulations, H(C)Ag detection became superior to (1) H,(109) Ag-HMQC detection above -20 °C. PMID:25641122

  19. Sequential backbone assignment of uniformly 13C-labeled RNAs by a two-dimensional P(CC)H-TOCSY triple resonance NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Wijmenga, S S; Heus, H A; Leeuw, H A; Hoppe, H; van der Graaf, M; Hilbers, C W

    1995-01-01

    A new 1H-13C-31P triple resonance experiment is described which allows unambiguous sequential backbone assignment in 13C-labeled oligonucleotides via through-bond coherence transfer from 31P via 13C to 1H. The approach employs INEPT to transfer coherence from 31P to 13C and homonuclear TOCSY to transfer the 13C coherence through the ribose ring, followed by 13C to 1H J-cross-polarisation. The efficiencies of the various possible transfer pathways are discussed. The most efficient route involves transfer of 31Pi coherence via C4'i and C4'i-1, because of the relatively large JPC4' couplings involved. Via the homonuclear and heteronuclear mixing periods, the C4'i and C4'i-1 coherences are subsequently transferred to, amongst others, H1'i and H1'i-1, respectively, leading to a 2D 1H-31P spectrum which allows a sequential assignment in the 31P-1H1' region of the spectrum, i.e. in the region where the proton resonances overlap least. The experiment is demonstrated on a 13C-labeled RNA hairpin with the sequence 5'(GGGC-CAAA-GCCU)3'. PMID:7533569

  20. Effects of a type I antifreeze protein (AFP) on the melting of frozen AFP and AFP+solute aqueous solutions studied by NMR microimaging experiment.

    PubMed

    Ba, Yong; Mao, Yougang; Galdino, Luiz; Günsen, Zorigoo

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a type I AFP on the bulk melting of frozen AFP solutions and frozen AFP+solute solutions were studied through an NMR microimaging experiment. The solutes studied include sodium chloride and glucose and the amino acids alanine, threonine, arginine, and aspartic acid. We found that the AFP is able to induce the bulk melting of the frozen AFP solutions at temperatures lower than 0 °C and can also keep the ice melted at higher temperatures in the AFP+solute solutions than those in the corresponding solute solutions. The latter shows that the ice phases were in super-heated states in the frozen AFP+solute solutions. We have tried to understand the first experimental phenomenon via the recent theoretical prediction that type I AFP can induce the local melting of ice upon adsorption to ice surfaces. The latter experimental phenomenon was explained with the hypothesis that the adsorption of AFP to ice surfaces introduces a less hydrophilic water-AFP-ice interfacial region, which repels the ionic/hydrophilic solutes. Thus, this interfacial region formed an intermediate chemical potential layer between the water phase and the ice phase, which prevented the transfer of water from the ice phase to the water phase. We have also attempted to understand the significance of the observed melting phenomena to the survival of organisms that express AFPs over cold winters. PMID:23860838

  1. The HN(COCA)HAHB NMR experiment for the stereospecific assignment of Hbeta-protons in non-native states of proteins.

    PubMed

    Hähnke, Martin J; Richter, Christian; Heinicke, Friederike; Schwalbe, Harald

    2010-01-27

    (3)J(H(alpha),H(beta))-coupling constants deliver precious information on the population of the three favored chi(1)-rotamers in unfolded states of proteins. Here, a novel pulse sequence, tailored toward the NMR analysis of non-native states of proteins, the HN(COCA)HAHB experiment, is developed to measure (3)J(H(alpha),H(beta)). In four subsequent INEPT steps, magnetization is transferred from H(N) to H(alpha). In a COSY-like magnetization transfer step, dephasing of magnetization on H(alpha) is quantified to determine the (3)J(H(alpha),H(beta))-coupling constants. Analysis of the measured homonuclear coupling constants, together with measurement of heteronuclear (3)J(N,C(gamma))- and (3)J(C',C(gamma))-coupling constants, allows stereospecific assignment of the two diastereotopic H(beta)-protons even in unfolded states of proteins, and the derivation of populations according to a Pachler-type analysis. PMID:20039672

  2. The Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC) Experiment: Vectors versus Product Operators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Vega-Herna´ndez, Karen; Antuch, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A vectorial representation of the full sequence of events occurring during the 2D-NMR heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) experiment is presented. The proposed vectorial representation conveys an understanding of the magnetization evolution during the HSQC pulse sequence for those who have little or no quantum mechanical background.…

  3. Parallel map analysis on 2-D grids

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.; Comiskey, J.; Minser, K.

    1993-12-31

    In landscape ecology, computer modeling is used to assess habitat fragmentation and its ecological iMPLications. Specifically, maps (2-D grids) of habitat clusters must be analyzed to determine number, sizes and geometry of clusters. Models prior to this study relied upon sequential Fortran-77 programs which limited the sizes of maps and densities of clusters which could be analyzed. In this paper, we present more efficient computer models which can exploit recursion or parallelism. Significant improvements over the original Fortran-77 programs have been achieved using both recursive and nonrecursive C implementations on a variety of workstations such as the Sun Sparc 2, IBM RS/6000-350, and HP 9000-750. Parallel implementations on a 4096-processor MasPar MP-1 and a 32-processor CM-5 are also studied. Preliminary experiments suggest that speed improvements for the parallel model on the MasPar MP-1 (written in MPL) and on the CM-5 (written in C using CMMD) can be as much as 39 and 34 times faster, respectively, than the most efficient sequential C program on a Sun Sparc 2 for a 512 map. An important goal in this research effort is to produce a scalable map analysis algorithm for the identification and characterization of clusters for relatively large maps on massively-parallel computers.

  4. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of the methyl radical isotopomers, CH3, CH2D, CHD2 and CD3: synergy between VUV synchrotron radiation experiments and explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Cunha de Miranda, Bárbara K; Alcaraz, Christian; Elhanine, Mohamed; Noller, Bastian; Hemberger, Patrick; Fischer, Ingo; Garcia, Gustavo A; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Gans, Bérenger; Mendes, Luiz A Vieira; Boyé-Péronne, Séverine; Douin, Stéphane; Zabka, Jan; Botschwina, Peter

    2010-04-15

    Threshold photoelectron spectra (TPES) of the isotopomers of the methyl radical (CH(3), CH(2)D, CHD(2), and CD(3)) have been recorded in the 9.5-10.5 eV VUV photon energy range using third generation synchrotron radiation to investigate the vibrational spectroscopy of the corresponding cations at a 7-11 meV resolution. A threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) spectrometer based on velocity map imaging and Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight has been used to simultaneously record the TPES of several radical species produced in a Ar-seeded beam by dc flash-pyrolysis of nitromethane (CH(x)D(y)NO(2), x + y = 3). Vibrational bands belonging to the symmetric stretching and out-of-plane bending modes have been observed and P, Q, and R branches have been identified in the analysis of the rotational profiles. Vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), in conjunction with near-equilibrium potential energy surfaces calculated by the explicitly correlated coupled cluster method CCSD(T*)-F12a, is used to calculate vibrational frequencies for the four radical isotopomers and the corresponding cations. Agreement with data from high-resolution IR spectroscopy is very good and a large number of predictions is made. In particular, the calculated wavenumbers for the out-of-plane bending vibrations, nu(2)(CH(3)(+)) = 1404 cm(-1), nu(4)(CH(2)D(+)) = 1308 cm(-1), nu(4)(CHD(2)(+)) = 1205 cm(-1), and nu(2)(CD(3)(+)) = 1090 cm(-1), should be accurate to ca. 2 cm(-1). Additionally, computed Franck-Condon factors are used to estimate the importance of autoionization relative to direct ionization. The chosen models globally account for the observed transitions, but in contrast to PES spectroscopy, evidence for rotational and vibrational autoionization is found. It is shown that state-selected methyl cations can be produced by TPEPICO spectroscopy for ion-molecule reaction studies, which are very important for the understanding of the planetary ionosphere chemistry. PMID:20218643

  5. Noninvasive deep Raman detection with 2D correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Min; Park, Hyo Sun; Cho, Youngho; Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Kang Taek; Jung, Young Mee; Suh, Yung Doug

    2014-07-01

    The detection of poisonous chemicals enclosed in daily necessaries is prerequisite essential for homeland security with the increasing threat of terrorism. For the detection of toxic chemicals, we combined a sensitive deep Raman spectroscopic method with 2D correlation analysis. We obtained the Raman spectra from concealed chemicals employing spatially offset Raman spectroscopy in which incident line-shaped light experiences multiple scatterings before being delivered to inner component and yielding deep Raman signal. Furthermore, we restored the pure Raman spectrum of each component using 2D correlation spectroscopic analysis with chemical inspection. Using this method, we could elucidate subsurface component under thick powder and packed contents in a bottle.

  6. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  7. Light field morphing using 2D features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Lin, Stephen; Lee, Seungyong; Guo, Baining; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2005-01-01

    We present a 2D feature-based technique for morphing 3D objects represented by light fields. Existing light field morphing methods require the user to specify corresponding 3D feature elements to guide morph computation. Since slight errors in 3D specification can lead to significant morphing artifacts, we propose a scheme based on 2D feature elements that is less sensitive to imprecise marking of features. First, 2D features are specified by the user in a number of key views in the source and target light fields. Then the two light fields are warped view by view as guided by the corresponding 2D features. Finally, the two warped light fields are blended together to yield the desired light field morph. Two key issues in light field morphing are feature specification and warping of light field rays. For feature specification, we introduce a user interface for delineating 2D features in key views of a light field, which are automatically interpolated to other views. For ray warping, we describe a 2D technique that accounts for visibility changes and present a comparison to the ideal morphing of light fields. Light field morphing based on 2D features makes it simple to incorporate previous image morphing techniques such as nonuniform blending, as well as to morph between an image and a light field. PMID:15631126

  8. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  9. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  10. 2D to 3D to 2D Dimensionality Crossovers in Thin BSCCO Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    With increasing temperature the superfluid fraction in very thin BSCCO films undergoes a series of dimensionality crossovers. At low temperatures the strong anisotropy causes the thermal excitations to be 2D pancake-antipancake pairs in uncoupled layers. At higher temperatures where the c-axis correlation length becomes larger than a layer there is a crossover to 3D vortex loops. These are initially elliptical, but as the 3D Tc is approached they become more circular as the anisotropy scales away, as modeled by Shenoy and Chattopadhyay [1]. Close to Tc when the correlation length becomes comparable to the film thickness there is a further crossover to a 2D Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, with a drop of the superfluid fraction to zero at T_KT which can be of the order of 1 K below T_c. Good agreement with this model is found for experiments on thin BSCCO 2212 films [2]. 1. S. R. Shenoy and B. Chattopadhyay, Phys. Rev. B 51, 9129 (1995). 2. K. Osborn et al., cond-mat/0204417.

  11. 2D imaging of functional structures in perfused pig heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Manfred D.; Cristea, Paul D.; Hiller, Michael; Trinks, Tobias

    2002-06-01

    In 2000 by 2D-imaging we were able for the first time to visualize in subcellular space functional structures of myocardium. For these experiments we used hemoglobin-free perfused pig hearts in our lab. Step by step we learned to understand the meaning of subcellular structures. Principally, the experiment revealed that in subcellular space very fast changes of light scattering can occur. Furthermore, coefficients of different parameters were determined on the basis of multicomponent system theory.

  12. Application of antiferromagnetic-Fermi-liquid theory to NMR experiments in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monien, H.; Monthoux, P.; Pines, D.

    1991-01-01

    NMR experiments on La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 by Kitaoka et al. and Imai et al. are analyzed using the phenomenological antiferromagnetic (AF) Fermi liquid theory of Millis, Monien, and Pines, and the results are compared with those previously obtained for YBa2Cu3O7 and YBa2Cu3O6.63. A one-component model, with hyperfine couplings that are unchanged from those found previously for YBa2Cu3O7 and YBa2Cu3O6.63, and parameters obtained from experiment, provide a quantitative fit to the data. At all temperatures the antiferromagnetic correlations found in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 are stronger than those found for the Y-Ba-Cu-O samples with the result that the characteristic energy for the antiferromagnetic paramagnons that describe the AF spin dynamics is quite low (

  13. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  14. Focusing surface wave imaging with flexible 2D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyuan; Fu, Junqiang; Li, Zhe; Xu, Chunguang; Xiao, Dingguo; Wang, Shaohan

    2016-04-01

    Curved surface is widely exist in key parts of energy and power equipment, such as, turbine blade cylinder block and so on. Cycling loading and harsh working condition of enable fatigue cracks appear on the surface. The crack should be found in time to avoid catastrophic damage to the equipment. A flexible 2D array transducer was developed. 2D Phased Array focusing method (2DPA), Mode-Spatial Double Phased focusing method (MSDPF) and the imaging method using the flexible 2D array probe are studied. Experiments using these focusing and imaging method are carried out. Surface crack image is obtained with both 2DPA and MSDPF focusing method. It have been proved that MSDPF can be more adaptable for curved surface and more calculate efficient than 2DPA.

  15. Improvements in Technique of NMR Imaging and NMR Diffusion Measurements in the Presence of Background Gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianyu

    In this work, modification of the cosine current distribution rf coil, PCOS, has been introduced and tested. The coil produces a very homogeneous rf magnetic field, and it is inexpensive to build and easy to tune for multiple resonance frequency. The geometrical parameters of the coil are optimized to produce the most homogeneous rf field over a large volume. To avoid rf field distortion when the coil length is comparable to a quarter wavelength, a parallel PCOS coil is proposed and discussed. For testing rf coils and correcting B _1 in NMR experiments, a simple, rugged and accurate NMR rf field mapping technique has been developed. The method has been tested and used in 1D, 2D, 3D and in vivo rf mapping experiments. The method has been proven to be very useful in the design of rf coils. To preserve the linear relation between rf output applied on an rf coil and modulating input for an rf modulating -amplifying system of NMR imaging spectrometer, a quadrature feedback loop is employed in an rf modulator with two orthogonal rf channels to correct the amplitude and phase non-linearities caused by the rf components in the rf system. The modulator is very linear over a large range and it can generate an arbitrary rf shape. A diffusion imaging sequence has been developed for measuring and imaging diffusion in the presence of background gradients. Cross terms between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and background gradients or imaging gradients can complicate diffusion measurement and make the interpretation of NMR diffusion data ambiguous, but these have been eliminated in this method. Further, the background gradients has been measured and imaged. A dipole random distribution model has been established to study background magnetic fields Delta B and background magnetic gradients G_0 produced by small particles in a sample when it is in a B_0 field. From this model, the minimum distance that a spin can approach a particle can be determined by measuring

  16. Two-dimensional NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series. In part one (ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, May 15) the authors discussed one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and some relatively advanced nuclear spin gymnastics experiments that provide a capability for selective sensitivity enhancements. In this article and overview and some applications of two-dimensional NMR experiments are presented. These powerful experiments are important complements to the one-dimensional experiments. As in the more sophisticated one-dimensional experiments, the two-dimensional experiments involve three distinct time periods: a preparation period, t/sub 0/; an evolution period, t/sub 1/; and a detection period, t/sub 2/.

  17. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  18. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  19. NMR Imaging: Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, Jeremy Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents three original contributions to the field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR): the experimental framework and analysis for the measurement of a new imaging parameter to describe perfusion; the measurement and analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity and a practical correction system for their reduction; a novel system for the synchronous control of NMR experiments based on the microprogrammed concept. The thesis begins with an introduction to the theory of NMR. The application of NMR to imaging is also introduced with emphasis on the techniques which developed into those in common use today. Inaccurate determination of the traditional NMR parameters (T_1 and T_2 and the molecular diffusion coefficient) can be caused by non-diffusive fluid movement within the sample. The experimental basis for determining a new imaging parameter --the Perfusion coefficient--is presented. This provides a measure of forced isotropic fluid motion through an organ or tissue. The instrumentation required for conducting NMR experiments is described in order to introduce the contribution made in this area during this research: A sequence controller. The controller is based on the concept of microprogramming and enables completely synchronous output of 128 bits of data. The software for the generation and storage of control data and the regulation of the data to provide experimental control is microcomputer based. It affords precise and accurate regulation of the magnetic field gradients, the rf synthesizer and the spectrometer for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Fundamental to the science of NMR is the presence of a magnetic field. A detailed study of the analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity in terms of spherical harmonics is presented. The field of a whole body imaging system with poor inhomogeneity was measured and analyzed to determine and describe the components of the inhomogeneity. Finally a

  20. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  1. Large NMR signals and polarization asymmetries.

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S. I.

    1998-11-25

    A large modulation in the series Q-meter can lead to nonlinear NMR signals and asymmetric polarization values. With a careful circuit analysis the nonlinearity can be estimated and corrections to polarization can be determined as a function of the strength of the modulation. We describe the recent LAMPF polarized proton target experiment, its NMR measurement and corrections to the measured polarizations.

  2. The Use of Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles in Solution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallick, D. A.; Tessmer, M. R.; Watts, C. R.; Li, C. Y.

    Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles are useful as a model membrane system for solution NMR. Several new observations on dodecylphosphocholine micelles and their interactions with opioid peptides are described. The optimal lipid concentration has been investigated for small peptide NMR studies in DPC micelles for two opioid peptides, a 5-mer and a 17-mer. In contrast to reports in the literature, identical 2D spectra have been observed at low and high lipid concentrations. The chemical shift of resolved peptide proton resonances has been followed as a function of added lipid and indicates that there are changes in the chemical shifts above the critical micelle concentration and up to a ratio of 7:1 (lipid:peptide) for the 17-mer, and 9.6:1 for the 5-mer. These results suggest that conformational changes occur in the peptide significantly above the critical micelle concentration, up to a lipid:peptide ratio which is dependent upon the peptide, here ranging from 7:1 to 9.6:1. To address the stoichiometry more directly, the diffusion coefficients of the lipid alone and the lipid with peptide have been measured using pulsed-field gradient spin-echo NMR experiments. These data have been used to calculate the hydrodynamic radius and the aggregation number of the micelle with and without peptide and show that the aggregation number of the peptide-lipid complex increases at high lipid concentrations without a concomitant change in the peptide conformation. Last, several protonated impurities have been observed in the commercial preparation of DPC which resonate in the amide proton region of the NMR spectrum. These results are significant for researchers using DPC micelles and illustrate that both care in sample preparation and the stoichiometry are important issues with the use of DPC as a model membrane.

  3. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  4. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  5. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  6. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  7. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  8. Ultrafast double-quantum NMR spectroscopy with optimized sensitivity for the analysis of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rouger, Laetitia; Gouilleux, Boris; Pourchet-Gellez, Mariane; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast (UF) 2D NMR enables the acquisition of 2D spectra within a single-scan. This methodology has become a powerful analytical tool, used in a large array of applications. However, UF NMR spectroscopy still suffers from the need to compromise between sensitivity, spectral width and resolution. With the commonly used UF-COSY pulse sequence, resolution issues are compounded by the presence of strong auto-correlation signals, particularly in the case of samples with high dynamic ranges. The recently proposed concept of UF Double Quantum Spectroscopy (DQS) allows a better peak separation as it provides a lower spectral peak density. This paper presents the detailed investigation of this new NMR tool in an analytical chemistry context. Theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are used to characterize the modulation of peak intensities as a function of pulse-sequence parameters, and thus enable a significant enhancement of the sensitivity. The analytical comparison of UF-COSY and UF-DQS shows similar performances, however the ultrafast implementation of the DQS approach is found to have some sensitivity advantages over its conventional counterpart. The analytical performance of the pulse sequence is illustrated by the quantification of taurine in complex mixtures (homemade and commercial energy drinks). The results demonstrate the high potential of this experiment, which forms a valuable alternative to UF-COSY spectra when the latter are characterized by strong overlaps and high dynamic ranges. PMID:26865359

  9. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  10. Knight shift and spin relaxation in the single band 2D Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, James; Chen, Xi; Gull, Emanuel

    We study in detail the roles of spin and charge fluctuations in the single band 2D Hubbard model. Using dynamical mean field theory and cluster extensions such as the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA), we compute the full two particle susceptibilities in the spin and charge representations. By performing analytic continuations we obtain the temperature and doping dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation (T1- 1) and knight shift in the 2D Hubbard model relevant to NMR results on doped cuprates and connect these to RPA results in weak coupling limits.

  11. Extended 2D generalized dilaton gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, R. O.

    2008-09-01

    We show that an anomaly-free description of matter in (1+1) dimensions requires a deformation of the 2D relativity principle, which introduces a non-trivial centre in the 2D Poincaré algebra. Then we work out the reduced phase space of the anomaly-free 2D relativistic particle, in order to show that it lives in a noncommutative 2D Minkowski space. Moreover, we build a Gaussian wave packet to show that a Planck length is well defined in two dimensions. In order to provide a gravitational interpretation for this noncommutativity, we propose to extend the usual 2D generalized dilaton gravity models by a specific Maxwell component, which guages the extra symmetry associated with the centre of the 2D Poincaré algebra. In addition, we show that this extension is a high energy correction to the unextended dilaton theories that can affect the topology of spacetime. Further, we couple a test particle to the general extended dilaton models with the purpose of showing that they predict a noncommutativity in curved spacetime, which is locally described by a Moyal star product in the low energy limit. We also conjecture a probable generalization of this result, which provides strong evidence that the noncommutativity is described by a certain star product which is not of the Moyal type at high energies. Finally, we prove that the extended dilaton theories can be formulated as Poisson Sigma models based on a nonlinear deformation of the extended Poincaré algebra.

  12. Recoupling in solid state NMR using γ prepared states and phase matching

    PubMed Central

    Lin, James; Griffin, R.G.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes two-dimensional solid state NMR experiments that use powdered dephased anti-phase coherence (γ preparation) to encode chemical shifts in the indirect dimension. Both components of this chemical shift encoded gamma-prepared states can be refocused into inphase coherence by a recoupling element. This helps to achieve sensitivity enhancement in 2D NMR experiments by quadrature detection. The powder dependence of the gamma-prepared states allows for manipulating them by suitable insertion of delays in the recoupling periods. This helps to design experiments that suppress diagonal peaks in 2D spectra, leading to improved resolution. We describe some new phase modulated heteronuclear and homonuclear recoupling pulse sequences that simplify the implementation of the described experiments based on γ prepared states. Recoupling in the heteronuclear spin system is achieved by matching the difference in the amplitude of the sine/cosine modulated phase on the two rf-channels to the spinning frequency while maintaining the same power on the two rf-channels. PMID:21889380

  13. Practical model fitting approaches to the direct extraction of NMR parameters simultaneously from all dimensions of multidimensional NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Chylla, R A; Volkman, B F; Markley, J L

    1998-08-01

    A maximum likelihood (ML)-based approach has been established for the direct extraction of NMR parameters (e.g., frequency, amplitude, phase, and decay rate) simultaneously from all dimensions of a D-dimensional NMR spectrum. The approach, referred to here as HTFD-ML (hybrid time frequency domain maximum likelihood), constructs a time-domain model composed of a sum of exponentially-decaying sinusoidal signals. The apodized Fourier transform of this time-domain signal is a model spectrum that represents the 'best-fit' to the equivalent frequency-domain data spectrum. The desired amplitude and frequency parameters can be extracted directly from the signal model constructed by the HTFD-ML algorithm. The HTFD-ML approach presented here, as embodied in the software package CHIFIT, is designed to meet the challenges posed by model fitting of D-dimensional NMR data sets, where each consists of many data points (10(8) is not uncommon) encoding information about numerous signals (up to 10(5) for a protein of moderate size) that exhibit spectral overlap. The suitability of the approach is demonstrated by its application to the concerted analysis of a series of ten 2D 1H-15N HSQC experiments measuring 15N T1 relaxation. In addition to demonstrating the practicality of performing maximum likelihood analysis on large, multidimensional NMR spectra, the results demonstrate that this parametric model-fitting approach provides more accurate amplitude and frequency estimates than those obtained from conventional peak-based analysis of the FT spectrum. The improved performance of the model fitting approach derives from its ability to take into account the simultaneous contributions of all signals in a crowded spectral region (deconvolution) as well as to incorporate prior knowledge in constructing models to fit the data. PMID:9751999

  14. Rheological Properties of Quasi-2D Fluids in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Trittel, Torsten; Eremin, Alexey; Harth, Kirsten; Clark, Noel; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Park, Cheol; Hall, Nancy; Tin, Padetha

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research on complex fluids and fluids in restricted geometries has attracted much attention in the scientific community. This can be attributed not only to the development of novel materials based on complex fluids but also to a variety of important physical phenomena which have barely been explored. One example is the behavior of membranes and thin fluid films, which can be described by two-dimensional (2D) rheology behavior that is quite different from 3D fluids. In this study, we have investigated the rheological properties of freely suspended films of a thermotropic liquid crystal in microgravity experiments. This model system mimics isotropic and anisotropic quasi 2D fluids [46]. We use inkjet printing technology to dispense small droplets (inclusions) onto the film surface. The motion of these inclusions provides information on the rheological properties of the films and allows the study of a variety of flow instabilities. Flat films have been investigated on a sub-orbital rocket flight and curved films (bubbles) have been studied in the ISS project OASIS. Microgravity is essential when the films are curved in order to avoid sedimentation. The experiments yield the mobility of the droplets in the films as well as the mutual mobility of pairs of particles. Experimental results will be presented for 2D-isotropic (smectic-A) and 2D-nematic (smectic-C) phases.

  15. Kinematics of segregating granular mixtures in quasi-2D heaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yi; Umbanhowar, Paul; Ottino, Julio; Lueptow, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Segregation of granular mixtures of different sized particles in heap flow appears in a variety of contexts. Our recent experiments showed that when bi-disperse mixtures of different sized spherical particles fill a quasi-two dimensional (2D) silo, three different final heap configurations - stratified, segregated, and mixed - occur, depending on either 2D flow rate or heap rise velocity. However, since it is difficult to measure the kinematic details of the segregating granular mixtures in heap flow experimentally, the underlying mechanisms for how 2D flow rate or heap rise velocity influences final particle configurations have not been well understood. In this work, we use the discrete element method (DEM) to simulate heap flow of bi-disperse mixtures in experimental scale quasi-2D heaps. The final particle distributions in the simulations agree quantitatively with experiments. We measure several key kinematic properties of the segregating granular mixtures including the local flow rate, velocity, and flowing layer thickness. We correlate the characteristics of these kinematic properties with the local particle distributions of the mixtures. This provides new insights for understanding the mechanisms of segregation and stratification in heap flow including the linear decrease in flow rate and maximum velocity down the heap as well as the relatively constant flowing layer thickness along the length of the heap. Funded by Dow Chemical Co.

  16. Uncovering Intramolecular π-Type Hydrogen Bonds in Solution by NMR Spectroscopy and DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mastrorilli, Piero; Gallo, Vito; Todisco, Stefano; Latronico, Mario; Saielli, Giacomo

    2016-06-01

    Reaction between the phosphinito bridged diplatinum species [(PHCy2 )Pt(μ-PCy2 ){κ(2) P,O-μ-P(O)Cy2 }Pt(PHCy2 )](Pt-Pt) (1), and (trimethylsilyl)acetylene at 273 K affords the σ-acetylide complex [(PHCy2 )(η(1) -Me3 SiC≡C)Pt(μ-PCy2 )Pt(PHCy2 ){κP-P(OH)Cy2 }](Pt-Pt) (2) featuring an intramolecular π-type hydrogen bond. Scalar and dipolar couplings involving the POH proton were detected by 2D NMR experiments. Relativistic DFT calculations of the geometry, relative energy, and NMR properties of model systems of 2 confirmed the structural assignment and allowed the energy of the π-type hydrogen bond to be estimated (ca. 22 kJ mol(-1) ). PMID:27097847

  17. Quantum mechanical NMR simulation algorithm for protein-size spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Luke J.; Savostyanov, D. V.; Welderufael, Z. T.; Lee, Donghan; Kuprov, Ilya

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is one of the few remaining areas of physical chemistry for which polynomially scaling quantum mechanical simulation methods have not so far been available. In this communication we adapt the restricted state space approximation to protein NMR spectroscopy and illustrate its performance by simulating common 2D and 3D liquid state NMR experiments (including accurate description of relaxation processes using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory) on isotopically enriched human ubiquitin - a protein containing over a thousand nuclear spins forming an irregular polycyclic three-dimensional coupling lattice. The algorithm uses careful tailoring of the density operator space to only include nuclear spin states that are populated to a significant extent. The reduced state space is generated by analysing spin connectivity and decoherence properties: rapidly relaxing states as well as correlations between topologically remote spins are dropped from the basis set.

  18. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  19. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Fearn, Jamie M; Brownson, Dale A C; Smith, Graham C; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E

    2016-08-21

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm(-2) modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR. PMID:27448174

  20. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  1. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  2. Critical Dynamics in Quenched 2D Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larcher, F.; Dalfovo, F.; Proukakis, N. P.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium dynamics across phase transitions is a subject of intense investigations in diverse physical systems. One of the key issues concerns the validity of the Kibble-Zurek (KZ) scaling law for spontaneous defect creation. The KZ mechanism has been recently studied in cold atoms experiments. Interesting open questions arise in the case of 2D systems, due to the distinct nature of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition. Our studies rely on the stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We perform systematic numerical simulations of the spontaneous emergence and subsequent dynamics of vortices in a uniform 2D Bose gas, which is quenched across the BKT phase transition in a controlled manner, focusing on dynamical scaling and KZ-type effects. By varying the transverse confinement, we also look at the extent to which such features can be seen in current experiments. Financial support from EPSRC and Provincia Autonoma di Trento.

  3. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  4. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Y. C.; Yochelis, S.; Dahmen, K. A.; Jung, G.; Paltiel, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments.

  5. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  6. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  7. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  8. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  9. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  10. 2D-Crystal-Based Functional Inks.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bartolotta, Antonino; Coleman, Jonathan N; Backes, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to produce and process graphene, related 2D crystals, and heterostructures in the liquid phase makes them promising materials for an ever-growing class of applications as composite materials, sensors, in flexible optoelectronics, and energy storage and conversion. In particular, the ability to formulate functional inks with on-demand rheological and morphological properties, i.e., lateral size and thickness of the dispersed 2D crystals, is a step forward toward the development of industrial-scale, reliable, inexpensive printing/coating processes, a boost for the full exploitation of such nanomaterials. Here, the exfoliation strategies of graphite and other layered crystals are reviewed, along with the advances in the sorting of lateral size and thickness of the exfoliated sheets together with the formulation of functional inks and the current development of printing/coating processes of interest for the realization of 2D-crystal-based devices. PMID:27273554

  11. Examination of the structures of several glycerolipids from marine macroalgae by NMR and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Logvinov, Stepan; Gerasimenko, Natalia; Esipov, Andrey; Denisenko, Vladimir A

    2015-12-01

    Several classes of glycerolipids were isolated from the total lipids of the algae Saccharina cichorioides, Eualaria fistulosa, Fucus evanescens, Sargassum pallidum, Silvetia babingtonii (Ochrophyta, Phaeophyceae), Tichocarpus crinitus, and Neorhodomela larix (Rhodophyta, Florideophyceae). The structures of these lipids were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, including 1D ((1) H and (13) C) and 2D (COSY, HSQC and HMBC) experiments. All of the investigated algae included common galactolipids and sulfonoglycolipids as the major glycolipids. Minor glycolipids isolated from S. cichorioides, T. crinitus, and N. laris were identified as lyso-galactolipids with a polar group consisted of the galactose. Comparison of the (1) H NMR data of minor nonpolar lipids isolated from the extracts of the brown algae S. pallidum and F. evanescens with the (1) H NMR data of other lipids allowed them to be identified as diacylglycerols. The structures of betaine lipids isolated from brown algae were confirmed by NMR for the first time. The fatty acid compositions of the isolated lipids were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:26987002

  12. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  13. Monoterpene Unknowns Identified Using IR, [to the first power]H-NMR, [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR, DEPT, COSY, and HETCOR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.

    2005-01-01

    A study identifies a compound from a set of monoterpenes using infrared (IR) and one-dimensional (1D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. After identifying the unknown, each carbon and proton signal can be interpreted and assigned to the structure using the information in the two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, correlation spectroscopy…

  14. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  15. The 2D lingual appliance system.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio

    2013-09-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) lingual bracket system represents a valuable treatment option for adult patients seeking a completely invisible orthodontic appliance. The ease of direct or simplified indirect bonding of 2D lingual brackets in combination with low friction mechanics makes it possible to achieve a good functional and aesthetic occlusion, even in the presence of a severe malocclusion. The use of a self-ligating bracket significantly reduces chair-side time for the orthodontist, and the low-profile bracket design greatly improves patient comfort. PMID:24005953

  16. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  17. Measurement of 2D birefringence distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Masato; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Masahiro; Tachihara, Satoru

    1992-10-01

    A new measuring method of 2-D birefringence distribution has been developed. It has not been an easy job to get a birefringence distribution in an optical element with conventional ellipsometry because of its lack of scanning means. Finding an analogy between the rotating analyzer method in ellipsometry and the phase-shifting method in recently developed digital interferometry, we have applied the phase-shifting algorithm to ellipsometry, and have developed a new method that makes the measurement of 2-D birefringence distribution easy and possible. The system contains few moving parts, assuring reliability, and measures a large area of a sample at one time, making the measuring time very short.

  18. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  19. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J.; Fearn, Jamie M.; Brownson, Dale A. C.; Smith, Graham C.; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E.

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm-2 modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR.Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets

  20. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  1. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits. PMID:26813882

  2. Baby universes in 2d quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, Jan; Jain, Sanjay; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1993-06-01

    We investigate the fractal structure of 2d quantum gravity, both for pure gravity and for gravity coupled to multiple gaussian fields and for gravity coupled to Ising spins. The roughness of the surfaces is described in terms of baby universes and using numerical simulations we measure their distribution which is related to the string susceptibility exponent γstring.

  3. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  4. An in-cell NMR study of monitoring stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hembram, Dambarudhar Shiba Sankar; Haremaki, Takahiro; Hamatsu, Jumpei; Inoue, Jin; Kamoshida, Hajime; Ikeya, Teppei; Mishima, Masaki; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Ito, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    Recent developments in in-cell NMR techniques have allowed us to study proteins in detail inside living eukaryotic cells. The lifetime of in-cell NMR samples is however much shorter than that in culture media, presumably because of various stresses as well as the nutrient depletion in the anaerobic environment within the NMR tube. It is well known that Ca(2+)-bursts occur in HeLa cells under various stresses, hence the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration can be regarded as a good indicator of the healthiness of cells in NMR tubes. In this study, aiming at monitoring the states of proteins resulting from the change of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration during experiments, human calbindin D9k (P47M+C80) was used as the model protein and cultured HeLa cells as host cells. Time-resolved measurements of 2D (1)H-(15)N SOFAST-HMQC experiments of calbindin D9k (P47M+C80) in HeLa cells showed time-dependent changes in the cross-peak patterns in the spectra. Comparison with in vitro assignments revealed that calbindin D9k (P47M+C80) is initially in the Mg(2+)-bound state, and then gradually converted to the Ca(2+)-bound state. This conversion process initiates after NMR sample preparation. These results showed, for the first time, that cells inside the NMR tube were stressed, presumably because of cell precipitation, the lack of oxygen and nutrients, etc., thereby releasing Ca(2+) into cytosol during the measurements. The results demonstrated that in-cell NMR can monitor the state transitions of stimulated cells through the observation of proteins involved in the intracellular signalling systems. Our method provides a very useful tool for in situ monitoring of the "healthiness" of the cells in various in-cell NMR studies. PMID:23933251

  5. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:27541575

  6. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  7. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  8. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Semiregular solid texturing from 2D image exemplars.

    PubMed

    Du, Song-Pei; Hu, Shi-Min; Martin, Ralph R

    2013-03-01

    Solid textures, comprising 3D particles embedded in a matrix in a regular or semiregular pattern, are common in natural and man-made materials, such as brickwork, stone walls, plant cells in a leaf, etc. We present a novel technique for synthesizing such textures, starting from 2D image exemplars which provide cross-sections of the desired volume texture. The shapes and colors of typical particles embedded in the structure are estimated from their 2D cross-sections. Particle positions in the texture images are also used to guide spatial placement of the 3D particles during synthesis of the 3D texture. Our experiments demonstrate that our algorithm can produce higher quality structures than previous approaches; they are both compatible with the input images, and have a plausible 3D nature. PMID:22614330

  10. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  11. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  12. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  13. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  14. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  15. Effect of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) metabolism in vitamin D-deficient rats infused with 1,25-(OH)2D3

    SciTech Connect

    Yamato, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Fukumoto, S.; Ikeda, K.; Ishizuka, S.; Ogata, E.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that administration of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24,25-(OH)2D3) to calcium (Ca)-deficient rats causes a dose-dependent reduction in markedly elevated serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 level. Although the results suggested that the metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 was accelerated by 24,25-(OH)2D3, those experiments could not define whether the enhanced metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 played a role in the reduction in the serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 level. In the present study, in order to address this issue more specifically, serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 was maintained solely by exogenous administration through miniosmotic pumps of 1,25-(OH)2D3 into vitamin D-deficient rats. Thus, by measuring the serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 concentration, the effect of 24,25-(OH)2D3 on the MCR of 1,25-(OH)2D3 could be examined. Administration of 24,25-(OH)2D3 caused a dose-dependent enhancement in the MCR of 1,25-(OH)2D3, and 1 microgram/100 g rat.day 24,25-(OH)2D3, which elevated serum 24,25-(OH)2D3 to 8.6 +/- 1.3 ng/ml, significantly increased MCR and suppressed serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3. The effect of 24,25-(OH)2D3 on 1,25-(OH)2D3 metabolism developed with a rapid time course, and the recovery of iv injected (1 beta-3H)1,25-(OH)2D3 in blood was significantly reduced within 1 h. In addition, there was an increase in radioactivity in the water-soluble fraction of serum as well as in urine, suggesting that 1,25-(OH)2D3 is rapidly degraded to a water-soluble metabolite(s). Furthermore, the reduction in serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 was associated with a reduction in both serum and urinary Ca levels. Because the conversion of (3H)24,25-(OH)2D3 to (3H)1,24,25-(OH)2D3 or other metabolites was minimal in these rats, 24,25-(OH)2D3 appears to act without being converted into other metabolites. These results demonstrate that 24,25-(OH)2D3 rapidly stimulates the metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and reduces its serum level.

  16. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  17. 2dF mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg; Lankshear, Allan

    1998-07-01

    2dF is a multi-object instrument mounted at prime focus at the AAT capable of spectroscopic analysis of 400 objects in a single 2 degree field. It also prepares a second 2 degree 400 object field while the first field is being observed. At its heart is a high precision robotic positioner that places individual fiber end magnetic buttons on one of two field plates. The button gripper is carried on orthogonal gantries powered by linear synchronous motors and contains a TV camera which precisely locates backlit buttons to allow placement in user defined locations to 10 (mu) accuracy. Fiducial points on both plates can also be observed by the camera to allow repeated checks on positioning accuracy. Field plates rotate to follow apparent sky rotation. The spectrographs both analyze light from the 200 observing fibers each and back- illuminate the 400 fibers being re-positioned during the observing run. The 2dF fiber position and spectrograph system is a large and complex instrument located at the prime focus of the Anglo Australian Telescope. The mechanical design has departed somewhat from the earlier concepts of Gray et al, but still reflects the audacity of those first ideas. The positioner is capable of positioning 400 fibers on a field plate while another 400 fibers on another plate are observing at the focus of the telescope and feeding the twin spectrographs. When first proposed it must have seemed like ingenuity unfettered by caution. Yet now it works, and works wonderfully well. 2dF is a system which functions as the result of the combined and coordinated efforts of the astronomers, the mechanical designers and tradespeople, the electronic designers, the programmers, the support staff at the telescope, and the manufacturing subcontractors. The mechanical design of the 2dF positioner and spectrographs was carried out by the mechanical engineering staff of the AAO and the majority of the manufacture was carried out in the AAO workshops.

  18. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  19. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  20. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.