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Sample records for 2d optical lattice

  1. Bound states and Cooper pairs of molecules in 2D optical lattices bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho-Guardian, A.; Domínguez-Castro, G. A.; Paredes, R.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the formation of Cooper pairs, bound dimers and the dimer-dimer elastic scattering of ultra- cold dipolar Fermi molecules confined in a 2D optical lattice bilayer configuration. While the energy and their associated bound states are determined in a variational way, the correlated two-molecule pair is addressed as in the original Cooper formulation. We demonstrate that the 2D lattice confinement favors the formation of zero center mass momentum bound states. Regarding the Cooper pairs binding energy, this depends on the molecule populations in each layer. Maximum binding energies occur for non-zero (zero) pair momentum when the Fermi system is polarized (unpolarized). We find an analytic expression for the dimer-dimer effective interaction in the deep BEC regime. The present analysis represents a route for addressing the BCS-BEC crossover superfluidity in dipolar Fermi gases confined in 2D optical lattices within the current experimental panorama.

  2. Identifying topological edge states in 2D optical lattices using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Nathan; Beugnon, Jérôme; Gerbier, Fabrice

    2013-02-01

    We recently proposed in a Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255303] a novel scheme to detect topological edge states in an optical lattice, based on a generalization of Bragg spectroscopy. The scope of the present article is to provide a more detailed and pedagogical description of the system - the Hofstadter optical lattice - and probing method. We first show the existence of topological edge states, in an ultra-cold gas trapped in a 2D optical lattice and subjected to a synthetic magnetic field. The remarkable robustness of the edge states is verified for a variety of external confining potentials. Then, we describe a specific laser probe, made from two lasers in Laguerre-Gaussian modes, which captures unambiguous signatures of these edge states. In particular, the resulting Bragg spectra provide the dispersion relation of the edge states, establishing their chiral nature. In order to make the Bragg signal experimentally detectable, we introduce a "shelving method", which simultaneously transfers angular momentum and changes the internal atomic state. This scheme allows to directly visualize the selected edge states on a dark background, offering an instructive view on topological insulating phases, not accessible in solid-state experiments.

  3. All optical active high decoder using integrated 2D square lattice photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper introduces a novel all optical active high 2 × 4 decoder based on 2D photonic crystals (PhC) of silicon rods with permittivity of ε = 10.1 × 10-11 farad/m. The main structure of optical decoder is designed using a combination of five nonlinear photonic crystal ring resonator, set of T-type waveguide, and line defect of Y and T branch splitters. The proposed structure has two logic input ports, four output ports, and one bias input port. The total size of the proposed 2 × 4 decoder is equal to 40 μm × 38 μm. The PhC structure has a square lattice of silicon rod with refractive index of 3.39 in air. The overall design and the results are discussed through the realization and the numerically simulation to confirm its operation and feasibility.

  4. Metastable States of a Gas of Dipolar Bosons in a 2D Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Menotti, C.; Trefzger, C.; Lewenstein, M.

    2007-06-08

    We investigate the physics of dipolar bosons in a two-dimensional optical lattice. It is known that due to the long-range character of dipole-dipole interaction, the ground state phase diagram of a gas of dipolar bosons in an optical lattice presents novel quantum phases, like checkerboard and supersolid phases. In this Letter, we consider the properties of the system beyond its ground state, finding that it is characterized by a multitude of almost degenerate metastable states, often competing with the ground state. This makes dipolar bosons in a lattice similar to a disordered system and opens possibilities of using them as quantum memories.

  5. Quantum fluctuations and Collective Oscillations of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a 2D Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Orso, G.; Stringari, S.; Menotti, C.

    2006-11-10

    We use Bogoliubov theory to calculate the beyond mean field correction to the equation of state of a weakly interacting Bose gas in the presence of a tight 2D optical lattice. We show that the lattice induces a characteristic 3D to 1D crossover in the behavior of quantum fluctuations. Using the hydrodynamic theory of superfluids, we calculate the corresponding shift of the collective frequencies of a harmonically trapped gas. We find that this correction can be of the order of a few percent and hence easily measurable in current experiments. The behavior of the quantum depletion of the condensate is also discussed.

  6. Interferometric approach to measuring band topology in 2D optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Abanin, Dmitry A; Kitagawa, Takuya; Bloch, Immanuel; Demler, Eugene

    2013-04-19

    Recently, optical lattices with nonzero Berry's phases of Bloch bands have been realized. New approaches for measuring Berry's phases and topological properties of bands with experimental tools appropriate for ultracold atoms need to be developed. In this Letter, we propose an interferometric method for measuring Berry's phases of two-dimensional Bloch bands. The key idea is to use a combination of Ramsey interference and Bloch oscillations to measure Zak phases, i.e., Berry's phases for closed trajectories corresponding to reciprocal lattice vectors. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to measure the Berry curvature of Bloch bands, the π Berry's phase of Dirac points, and the first Chern number of topological bands. We discuss several experimentally feasible realizations of this technique, which make it robust against low-frequency magnetic noise.

  7. Optical filter based on contra-directional waveguide coupling in a 2D photonic crystal with square lattice of dielectric rods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenfeng; Wang, Jiangang; He, Qingsheng; Cao, Liangcai; Su, Ping; Jin, Guofan

    2005-07-25

    A coupler-type optical filter in 2D photonic crystal (PhC) with square lattice of dielectric rods in air is presented. The reduced-index and increased-index waveguides of filter have dispersion curves with opposite slopes to realize contra-directional coupling, and the point of anti-crossing is designed below the light line to avoid vertical radiation. The filter has a broad operable bandwidth due to the absence of mini stop bands. The transmission properties are analyzed using coupled modes theory (CMT) and simulated using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results show that a filtering bandwidth of 4 nm can be achieved in the range of 1500~1600 nm, and over 83% drop coefficient is obtained.

  8. Fibonacci Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kevin; Geiger, Zachary; Senaratne, Ruwan; Rajagopal, Shankari; Fujiwara, Kurt; Weld, David; Weld Group Team

    2015-05-01

    Quasiperiodicity is intimately involved in quantum phenomena from localization to the quantum Hall effect. Recent experimental investigation of quasiperiodic quantum effects in photonic and electronic systems have revealed intriguing connections to topological phenomena. However, such experiments have been limited by the absence of techniques for creating tunable quasiperiodic structures. We propose a new type of quasiperiodic optical lattice, constructed by intersecting a Gaussian beam with a 2D square lattice at an angle with an irrational tangent. The resulting potential, a generalization of the Fibonacci lattice, is a physical realization of the mathematical ``cut-and-project'' construction which underlies all quasiperiodic structures. Calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of atoms loaded into the proposed quasiperiodic lattice demonstrate a fractal energy spectrum and the existence of edge states. We acknowledge support from the ONR (award N00014-14-1-0805), the ARO and the PECASE program (award W911NF-14-1-0154), the AFOSR (award FA9550-12-1-0305), and the Alfred P. Sloan foundation (grant BR2013-110).

  9. Nano-spatial parameters from 3D to 2D lattice dimensionality by organic variant in [ZnCl4]- [R]+ hybrid materials: Structure, architecture-lattice dimensionality, microscopy, optical Eg and PL correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajit; Verma, Sanjay K.; Alvi, P. A.; Jasrotia, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    The nanospatial morphological features of [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ hybrid derivative depicts 28 nm granular size and 3D spreader shape packing pattern as analyzed by FESEM and single crystal XRD structural studies. The organic moiety connect the inorganic components through N-H+…Cl- hydrogen bond to form a hybrid composite, the replacement of organic derivatives from 2-methylpyridine to 2-Amino-5-choloropyridine results the increase in granular size from 28nm to 60nm and unit cell packing pattern from 3D-2D lattice dimensionality along ac plane. The change in optical energy direct band gap value from 3.01eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ (HM1) to 3.42eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H5ClN2]+ (HM2) indicates the role of organic moiety in optical properties of hybrid materials. The photoluminescence emission spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 370 to 600 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.66a.u. at 438 nm for (HM1) and 370 to 600 nm with max peak intensity of 9.91 a.u. at 442 nm for (HM2), indicating that the emission spectra lies in visible range. PL excitation spectra depicts the maximum excitation intensity [9.8] at 245.5 nm for (HM1) and its value of 9.9 a.u. at 294 nm, specify the excitation spectra lies in UV range. Photoluminescence excitation spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 280 to 350 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.4 a.u. at 285.5 nm and 9.9 a.u. at 294 and 297 nm, indicating excitation in the UV spectrum. Single crystal growth process and detailed physiochemical characterization such as XRD, FESEM image analysis photoluminescence property reveals the structure stability with non-covalent interactions, lattice dimensionality (3D-2D) correlations interweaving into the design of inorganic-organic hybrid materials.

  10. Beam-Plasma Instabilities in a 2D Yukawa Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrkos, S.; Kalman, G. J.; Rosenberg, M.

    2009-06-05

    We consider a 2D Yukawa lattice of grains, with a beam of other charged grains moving in the lattice plane. In contrast to Vlasov plasmas, where the electrostatic instability excited by the beam is only longitudinal, here both longitudinal and transverse instabilities of the lattice phonons can develop. We determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. The growth rate spectrum in wave number space exhibits remarkable gaps where no instability can develop. Depending on the system parameters, the transverse instability can be selectively excited.

  11. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, S.; Ertüzün, A.

    2006-12-01

    A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  12. Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Williams, R A; Pillet, J D; Al-Assam, S; Fletcher, B; Shotter, M; Foot, C J

    2008-10-13

    We demonstrate a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a 2D optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Ultracold atoms in such a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, allowing investigation of phenomena such as the fractional quantum Hall effect. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of a 2D optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D accordion lattice.

  13. Engineering novel optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    Optical lattices have developed into a widely used and highly recognized tool to study many-body quantum physics with special relevance for solid state type systems. One of the most prominent reasons for this success is the high degree of tunability in the experimental setups. While at the beginning quasi-static, cubic geometries were mainly explored, the focus of the field has now shifted toward new lattice topologies and the dynamical control of lattice structures. In this review we intend to give an overview of the progress recently achieved in this field on the experimental side. In addition, we discuss theoretical proposals exploiting specifically these novel lattice geometries. PMID:23828639

  14. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  15. Geometric phases generated by the non-trivial spatial topology of static vector fields linearly coupled to a neutral spin-endowed particle: application to 171Yb atoms trapped in a 2D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, Marie-Anne; Bouchiat, Claude

    2012-10-01

    We have constructed the geometric phases emerging from the non-trivial topology of a space-dependent magnetic field B(r), interacting with the spin magnetic moment of a neutral particle. Our basic tool, adapted from a previous work on Berry’s phases, is the space-dependent unitary transformation {U}({\\mathbf {r}}), which leads to the identity, {U}({\\mathbf {r}})^{\\dag }\\, {\\mathbf {S}}\\,{\\bm \\cdot}\\, {\\mathbf {B}}({\\mathbf {r}}) \\, {U}({\\mathbf {r}}) = \\vert {\\mathbf {B}}({\\mathbf {r}}) \\vert \\, S_z, at each point r. In the ‘rotated’ Hamiltonian \\widehat{ H}, \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}} is replaced by the non-Abelian covariant derivative \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}}- \\frac{i}{\\hbar } {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) where {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) = i \\hbar \\, {U}^{\\dag }\\,{\\bm\\cdot}\\, \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}} {U} can be written as A1(r)Sx + A2(r)Sy + A3(r)Sz. The Abelian differentials Ak(r)·dr are given in terms of the Euler angles defining the orientation of B(r). The non-Abelian field {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) transforms as a Yang-Mills field; however, its vanishing ‘curvature’ reveals its purely geometric character. We have defined a perturbation scheme based upon the assumption that in \\widehat{ H} the longitudinal field A3(r) dominates the transverse field A1, 2(r) contributions, evaluated to second order. The geometry embedded in both the vector field A3(r) and the geometric magnetic field \\mathbf { B}_3 ({\\mathbf {r}}) = \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}}\\wedge {{\\mathbf {A}}}_3({\\mathbf {r}}) is described by their associated Aharonov-Bohm phase. As an illustration we study the physics of cold 171Yb atoms dressed by overlaying two circularly polarized stationary waves with orthogonal directions, which form a 2D square optical lattice. The frequency is tuned midway between the two hyperfine levels of the (6s6p)3P1 states to protect the optical B(r) field generated by the

  16. Subwavelength Lattice Optics by Evolutionary Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials—lattice opto-materials—that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens. PMID:25380062

  17. Cold atoms in a rotating optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Christopher J.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a two-dimensional optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of the optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D ``accordion lattice'' [1]. The angles of the laser beams are controlled by acousto-optic deflectors and this allows smooth changes with little heating of the trapped cold (rubidium) atoms. We have loaded a BEC into lattices with periodicities ranging from 1.8μm to 18μm, observing the collapse and revival of the diffraction orders of the condensate over a large range of lattice parameters as recently reported by a group in NIST [2]. We have also imaged atoms in situ in a 2D lattice over a range of lattice periodicities. Ultracold atoms in a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, i.e. the Hamiltonian of the atoms in the rotating frame resembles that of a charged particle in a strong magnetic field. In the future, we plan to use this to investigate a range of phenomena such as the analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect. [4pt] [1] R. A. Williams, J. D. Pillet, S. Al-Assam, B. Fletcher, M. Shotter, and C. J. Foot, ``Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms,'' Opt. Express 16, 16977-16983 (2008) [0pt] [2] J. H. Huckans, I. B. Spielman, B. Laburthe Tolra, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto, Quantum and Classical Dynamics of a BEC in a Large-Period Optical Lattice, arXiv:0901.1386v1

  18. Lattice Boltzmann Equation On a 2D Rectangular Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouzidi, MHamed; DHumieres, Dominique; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We construct a multi-relaxation lattice Boltzmann model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The model is partly inspired by a previous work of Koelman to construct a lattice BGK model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The linearized dispersion equation is analyzed to obtain the constraints on the isotropy of the transport coefficients and Galilean invariance for various wave propagations in the model. The linear stability of the model is also studied. The model is numerically tested for three cases: (a) a vortex moving with a constant velocity on a mesh periodic boundary conditions; (b) Poiseuille flow with an arbitrasy inclined angle with respect to the lattice orientation: and (c) a cylinder &symmetrically placed in a channel. The numerical results of these tests are compared with either analytic solutions or the results obtained by other methods. Satisfactory results are obtained for the numerical simulations.

  19. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  20. Simulations of Quantum Spin Models on 2D Frustrated Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melko, Roger

    2006-03-01

    Algorithmic advances in quantum Monte Carlo techniques have opened up the possibility of studying models in the general class of the S=1/2 XXZ model (equivalent to hard-core bosons) on frustrated lattices. With an antiferromagnetic diagonal interaction (Jz), these models can be solved exactly with QMC, albeit with some effort required to retain ergodicity in the near-degenerate manifold of states that exists for large Jz. The application of the quantum (ferromagnetic off-diagonal) interaction to this classically degenerate manifold produces a variety of intriguing physics, including an order-by-disorder supersolid phase, novel insulating states, and possible exotic quantum critical phenomena. We discuss numerical results for the triangular and kagome lattices with nearest and next-nearest neighbor exchange interactions, and focus on the relevance of the simulations to related areas of physics, such as experiments of cold trapped atomic gasses and the recent theory of deconfined quantum criticality.

  1. Lattice Formulation of 2D SQCD with exact supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sugino, Fumihiko

    2008-11-23

    We construct a lattice model for two-dimensional N = (2,2) supersymmetric QCD (SQCD), with the matter multiplets belonging to the fundamental or anti-fundamental representation of the gauge group U(N) or SU(N). The construction is based on the topological field theory (twisted supercharge) formulation and exactly preserves one supercharge. In order to avoid the species doublers of the matter multiplets, we introduce the Wilson terms and the model is defined for the case of the number of the fundamental matters (n{sub +}) equal to that of the anti-fundamental matters (n{sub -}). If some of the matter multiplets decouple from the theory by sending the corresponding anti-holomorphic twisted masses to the infinity, we can analyze the general n{sub +}{ne}n{sub -} case, although the lattice model is defined for n{sub +} = n{sub -}. By computing the anomaly of the U(1){sub A} R-symmetry in the lattice perturbation, we see that the decoupling is achieved and the anomaly for n{sub +}{ne}n{sub -} is correctly obtained.

  2. Dynamical polarizability of the 2D pseudospin-1 dice lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, John; Nicol, Elisabeth

    The two-dimensional dice lattice is composed of three triangular sublattices whose low-energy excitation spectrum consists of Dirac-Weyl fermions with pseudospin-1. The energy dispersion has two Dirac cones, like the pseudospin-1/2 two-triangular-sublattice graphene, with an additional third band exactly at zero energy. We present theoretical results for the electronic dynamical polarization function in the material. This is a fundamental entity in many-body physics, renormalizing the Coulomb interaction through the dielectric function. From the polarization function we also obtain the Lindhard function, the plasmon branch, and can discuss other screening effects. These are constrasted with those of graphene.

  3. Mirror effects and optical meta-surfaces in 2d atomic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Wild, Dominik; Lukin, Mikhail; Yelin, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Strong optical response of natural and artificial (meta-) materials typically relies on the fact that the lattice constant that separates their constituent particles (atoms or electromagnetic resonators, respectively) is much smaller than the optical wavelength. Here we consider a single layer of a 2d atom array with a lattice constant on the order of an optical wavelength, which can be thought of as a highly dilute 2d metamaterial (meta-surface). Our theoretical analysis shows how strong scattering of resonant incoming light off the array can be controlled by choosing its lattice constant, e.g. allowing the array to operate as a perfect mirror or a retro-reflector for most incident angles of the incoming light. We discuss the prospects for quantum metasurfaces, i.e. the ability to shape the output quantum state of light by controlling the atomic states, and the possible generality of our results as a universal wave phenomena.

  4. Quantum spin Hall phase in 2D trigonal lattice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z F; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Liu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase is an exotic phenomena in condensed-matter physics. Here we show that a minimal basis of three orbitals (s, px, py) is required to produce a QSH phase via nearest-neighbour hopping in a two-dimensional trigonal lattice. Tight-binding model analyses and calculations show that the QSH phase arises from a spin-orbit coupling (SOC)-induced s-p band inversion or p-p bandgap opening at Brillouin zone centre (Γ point), whose topological phase diagram is mapped out in the parameter space of orbital energy and SOC. Remarkably, based on first-principles calculations, this exact model of QSH phase is shown to be realizable in an experimental system of Au/GaAs(111) surface with an SOC gap of ∼73 meV, facilitating the possible room-temperature measurement. Our results will extend the search for substrate supported QSH materials to new lattice and orbital types. PMID:27599580

  5. Quantum spin Hall phase in 2D trigonal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. F.; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Liu, Feng

    2016-09-01

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase is an exotic phenomena in condensed-matter physics. Here we show that a minimal basis of three orbitals (s, px, py) is required to produce a QSH phase via nearest-neighbour hopping in a two-dimensional trigonal lattice. Tight-binding model analyses and calculations show that the QSH phase arises from a spin-orbit coupling (SOC)-induced s-p band inversion or p-p bandgap opening at Brillouin zone centre (Γ point), whose topological phase diagram is mapped out in the parameter space of orbital energy and SOC. Remarkably, based on first-principles calculations, this exact model of QSH phase is shown to be realizable in an experimental system of Au/GaAs(111) surface with an SOC gap of ~73 meV, facilitating the possible room-temperature measurement. Our results will extend the search for substrate supported QSH materials to new lattice and orbital types.

  6. Quantum spin Hall phase in 2D trigonal lattice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. F.; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Liu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase is an exotic phenomena in condensed-matter physics. Here we show that a minimal basis of three orbitals (s, px, py) is required to produce a QSH phase via nearest-neighbour hopping in a two-dimensional trigonal lattice. Tight-binding model analyses and calculations show that the QSH phase arises from a spin–orbit coupling (SOC)-induced s–p band inversion or p–p bandgap opening at Brillouin zone centre (Γ point), whose topological phase diagram is mapped out in the parameter space of orbital energy and SOC. Remarkably, based on first-principles calculations, this exact model of QSH phase is shown to be realizable in an experimental system of Au/GaAs(111) surface with an SOC gap of ∼73 meV, facilitating the possible room-temperature measurement. Our results will extend the search for substrate supported QSH materials to new lattice and orbital types. PMID:27599580

  7. Optical Stark effect in 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sie, Edbert J.; McIver, James W.; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Fu, Liang; Kong, Jing; Gedik, Nuh

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductors that are atomically thin can exhibit novel optical properties beyond those encountered in the bulk compounds. Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are leading examples of such semiconductors that possess remarkable optical properties. They obey unique selection rules where light with different circular polarization can be used for selective photoexcitation at two different valleys in the momentum space. These valleys constitute bandgaps that are normally locked in the same energy. Selectively varying their energies is of great interest for applications because it unlocks the potential to control valley degree of freedom, and offers a new promising way to carry information in next-generation valleytronics. In this proceeding paper, we show that the energy gaps at the two valleys can be shifted relative to each other by means of the optical Stark effect in a controllable valley-selective manner. We discuss the physics of the optical Stark effect, and we describe the mechanism that leads to its valleyselectivity in monolayer TMD tungsten disulfide (WS2).

  8. Enhanced detectability of small objects in correlated clutter using an improved 2-D adaptive lattice algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ffrench, P A; Zeidler, J H; Ku, W H

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) adaptive filtering is a technique that can be applied to many image processing applications. This paper will focus on the development of an improved 2-D adaptive lattice algorithm (2-D AL) and its application to the removal of correlated clutter to enhance the detectability of small objects in images. The two improvements proposed here are increased flexibility in the calculation of the reflection coefficients and a 2-D method to update the correlations used in the 2-D AL algorithm. The 2-D AL algorithm is shown to predict correlated clutter in image data and the resulting filter is compared with an ideal Wiener-Hopf filter. The results of the clutter removal will be compared to previously published ones for a 2-D least mean square (LMS) algorithm. 2-D AL is better able to predict spatially varying clutter than the 2-D LMS algorithm, since it converges faster to new image properties. Examples of these improvements are shown for a spatially varying 2-D sinusoid in white noise and simulated clouds. The 2-D LMS and 2-D AL algorithms are also shown to enhance a mammogram image for the detection of small microcalcifications and stellate lesions.

  9. Grid Cell Responses in 1D Environments Assessed as Slices through a 2D Lattice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, KiJung; Lewallen, Sam; Kinkhabwala, Amina A; Tank, David W; Fiete, Ila R

    2016-03-01

    Grid cells, defined by their striking periodic spatial responses in open 2D arenas, appear to respond differently on 1D tracks: the multiple response fields are not periodically arranged, peak amplitudes vary across fields, and the mean spacing between fields is larger than in 2D environments. We ask whether such 1D responses are consistent with the system's 2D dynamics. Combining analytical and numerical methods, we show that the 1D responses of grid cells with stable 1D fields are consistent with a linear slice through a 2D triangular lattice. Further, the 1D responses of comodular cells are well described by parallel slices, and the offsets in the starting points of the 1D slices can predict the measured 2D relative spatial phase between the cells. From these results, we conclude that the 2D dynamics of these cells is preserved in 1D, suggesting a common computation during both types of navigation behavior. PMID:26898777

  10. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  11. Species-specific optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, L. J.; Thywissen, J. H.

    2007-05-15

    We examine single-frequency optical schemes for species-selective trapping of ultracold alkali-metal atoms. Independently addressing the elements of a binary mixture enables the creation of an optical lattice for one atomic species with little or no effect on the other. We analyze a 'tune-in' scheme, using near-resonant detuning to create a strong potential for one specific element. A 'tune-out' scheme is also developed, in which the trapping wavelength is chosen to lie between two strong transitions of an alkali-metal atom such that the induced dipole moment is zero for that species but is nonzero for any other. We compare these schemes by examining the trap depths and heating rates associated with both. We find that the tune-in scheme is preferable for Li-Na, Li-K, and K-Na mixtures, while the tune-out scheme is preferable for Li-Cs, K-Rb, Rb-Cs, K-Cs, and {sup 39}K-{sup 40}K mixtures. Several applications of species-selective optical lattices are explored, including the creation of a lattice for a single species in the presence of a phononlike background, the tuning of relative effective mass, and the isothermal increase of phase-space density.

  12. Orbital optical lattices with bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, T.; Hippler, C.; Ewerbeck, A.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-02-01

    This article provides a synopsis of our recent experimental work exploring Bose-Einstein condensation in metastable higher Bloch bands of optical lattices. Bipartite lattice geometries have allowed us to implement appropriate band structures, which meet three basic requirements: the existence of metastable excited states sufficiently protected from collisional band relaxation, a mechanism to excite the atoms initially prepared in the lowest band with moderate entropy increase, and the possibility of cross-dimensional tunneling dynamics, necessary to establish coherence along all lattice axes. A variety of bands can be selectively populated and a subsequent thermalization process leads to the formation of a condensate in the lowest energy state of the chosen band. As examples the 2nd, 4th and 7th bands in a bipartite square lattice are discussed. The geometry of the 2nd and 7th bands can be tuned such that two inequivalent energetically degenerate energy minima arise at the X ±-points at the edge of the 1st Brillouin zone. In this case even a small interaction energy is sufficient to lock the phase between the two condensation points such that a complex-valued chiral superfluid order parameter can emerge, which breaks time reversal symmetry. In the 4th band a condensate can be formed at the Γ-point in the center of the 1st Brillouin zone, which can be used to explore topologically protected band touching points. The new techniques to access orbital degrees of freedom in higher bands greatly extend the class of many-body scenarios that can be explored with bosons in optical lattices.

  13. 2D Magneto-Optical Trapping of Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummon, Matthew T.; Yeo, Mark; Stuhl, Benjamin K.; Collopy, Alejandra L.; Xia, Yong; Ye, Jun

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate one- and two-dimensional transverse laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the polar molecule yttrium (II) oxide (YO). In a 1D magneto-optical trap (MOT), we characterize the magneto-optical trapping force and decrease the transverse temperature by an order of magnitude, from 25 to 2 mK, limited by interaction time. In a 2D MOT, we enhance the intensity of the YO beam and reduce the transverse temperature in both transverse directions. The approach demonstrated here can be applied to many molecular species and can also be extended to 3D.

  14. Nonlinear propagating localized modes in a 2D hexagonal crystal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajars, Janis; Eilbeck, J. Chris; Leimkuhler, Benedict

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we consider a 2D hexagonal crystal lattice model first proposed by Marín, Eilbeck and Russell in 1998. We perform a detailed numerical study of nonlinear propagating localized modes, that is, propagating discrete breathers and kinks. The original model is extended to allow for arbitrary atomic interactions, and to allow atoms to travel out of the unit cell. A new on-site potential is considered with a periodic smooth function with hexagonal symmetry. We are able to confirm the existence of long-lived propagating discrete breathers. Our simulations show that, as they evolve, breathers appear to localize in frequency space, i.e. the energy moves from sidebands to a main frequency band. Our numerical findings shed light on the open question of whether exact moving breather solutions exist in 2D hexagonal layers in physical crystal lattices.

  15. A 2D DNA lattice as an ultrasensitive detector for beta radiations.

    PubMed

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Kim, Jang Ah; Kim, Byeonghoon; Joshirao, Pranav; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Vyas, Chirag; Kim, Taesung; Park, Sung Ha; Manchanda, Vijay

    2014-02-26

    There is growing demand for the development of efficient ultrasensitive radiation detectors to monitor the doses administered to individuals during therapeutic nuclear medicine which is often based on radiopharmaceuticals, especially those involving beta emitters. Recently biological materials are used in sensors in the nanobio disciplines due to their abilities to detect specific target materials or sites. Artificially designed two-dimensional (2D) DNA lattices grown on a substrate were analyzed after exposure to pure beta emitters, (90)Sr-(90)Y. We studied the Raman spectra and reflected intensities of DNA lattices at various distances from the source with different exposure times. Although beta particles have very low linear energy transfer values, the significant physical and chemical changes observed throughout the extremely thin, ∼0.6 nm, DNA lattices suggested the feasibility of using them to develop ultrasensitive detectors of beta radiations.

  16. Influence of lattice defects on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour of 2D magnonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Manzin, Alessandra; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Coïsson, Marco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies, from a modelling point of view, the influence of randomly distributed lattice defects (non-patterned areas and variable hole size) on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour and spin wave mode profiles of 2D magnonic crystals based on Ni80Fe20 antidot arrays with hexagonal lattice. A reference sample is first defined via the comparison of experimental and simulated hysteresis loops and magnetoresistive curves of patterned films, prepared by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Second, a parametric analysis of the dynamic response is performed, investigating how edge, quasi-uniform and localized modes are affected by alterations of the lattice geometry and bias field amplitude. Finally, some results about the possible use of magnetic antidot arrays in frequency-based sensors for magnetic bead detection are presented, highlighting the need for an accurate control of microstructural features. PMID:26911336

  17. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yahong; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Cai, Yangjian

    2016-08-01

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  18. Fractionalized topological defects in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Fan, Wen-Jun; Shi, Jin-Wei; Kou, Su-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Topological objects are interesting topics in various fields of physics ranging from condensed matter physics to the grand unified and superstring theories. Among those, ultracold atoms provide a playground to study the complex topological objects. In this paper we present a proposal to realize an optical lattice with stable fractionalized topological objects. In particular, we generate the fractionalized topological fluxes and fractionalized skyrmions on two-dimensional optical lattices and fractionalized monopoles on three-dimensional optical lattices. These results offer a new approach to study the quantum many-body systems on optical lattices of ultracold quantum gases with controllable topological defects, including dislocations, topological fluxes and monopoles.

  19. 2-D scalable optical controlled phased-array antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maggie Yihong; Howley, Brie; Wang, Xiaolong; Basile, Panoutsopoulos; Chen, Ray T.

    2006-02-01

    A novel optoelectronically-controlled wideband 2-D phased-array antenna system is demonstrated. The inclusion of WDM devices makes a highly scalable system structure. Only (M+N) delay lines are required to control a M×N array. The optical true-time delay lines are combination of polymer waveguides and optical switches, using a single polymeric platform and are monolithically integrated on a single substrate. The 16 time delays generated by the device are measured to range from 0 to 175 ps in 11.6 ps. Far-field patterns at different steering angles in X-band are measured.

  20. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  1. All-optical digital 4 × 2 encoder based on 2D photonic crystal ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2016-04-01

    The photonic crystals draw significant attention to build all-optical logic devices and are considered one of the solutions for the opto-electronic bottleneck via speed and size. The paper presents a novel optical 4 × 2 encoder based on 2D square lattice photonic crystals of silicon rods. The main realization of optical encoder is based on the photonic crystal ring resonator NOR gates. The proposed structure has four logic input ports, two output ports, and two bias input port. The photonic crystal structure has a square lattice of silicon rods with a refractive index of 3.39 in air. The structure has lattice constant 'a' equal to 630 nm and bandgap range from 0.32 to 044. The total size of the proposed 4 × 2 encoder is equal to 35 μm × 35 μm. The simulation results using the dimensional finite difference time domain and Plane Wave Expansion methods confirm the operation and the feasibility of the proposed optical encoder for ultrafast optical digital circuits.

  2. Realizing Parafermions in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangli; Gorshkov, Alexey

    2016-05-01

    Parafermions, which are the fractional versions of Majorana fermions, possess more exotic braiding statistics than Majorana fermions and are therefore more powerful from the point of view of topological quantum computing. We propose a scheme to realize parafermionic zero modes in optical lattices, without the use of superconductive paring. With the help of laser assisted tunneling and on-site interactions, two layers of ultracold atoms in distinct hyperfine states can be engineered to host +/- 1 / m fractional quantum Hall states. We then introduce a finite-extent potential barrier that pierces both layers - this gives rise to two counter-propagating edge states that sit on top of each other. Finally, laser induced coupling is used to introduce backscattering between the two edge states and to gap them out. We show that the resulting defects give rise to the topological degeneracy associated with parafermions. We also discuss methods for preparation and detection.

  3. Optical lattices with micromechanical mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerer, K.; Stannigel, K.; Genes, C.; Zoller, P.; Treutlein, P.; Camerer, S.; Hunger, D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate a setup where a cloud of atoms is trapped in an optical lattice potential of a standing-wave laser field which is created by retroreflection on a micromembrane. The membrane vibrations itself realize a quantum mechanical degree of freedom. We show that the center-of-mass mode of atoms can be coupled to the vibrational mode of the membrane in free space. Via laser cooling of atoms a significant sympathetic cooling effect on the membrane vibrations can be achieved. Switching off laser cooling brings the system close to a regime of strong coherent coupling. This setup provides a controllable segregation between the cooling and coherent dynamics regimes, and allows one to keep the membrane in a cryogenic environment and atoms at a distance in a vacuum chamber.

  4. Self-Assembly of Cubes into 2D Hexagonal and Honeycomb Lattices by Hexapolar Capillary Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soligno, Giuseppe; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-06-01

    Particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface induce capillary deformations that determine their orientations and generate mutual capillary interactions which drive them to assemble into 2D ordered structures. We numerically calculate, by energy minimization, the capillary deformations induced by adsorbed cubes for various Young's contact angles. First, we show that capillarity is crucial not only for quantitative, but also for qualitative predictions of equilibrium configurations of a single cube. For a Young's contact angle close to 90°, we show that a single-adsorbed cube generates a hexapolar interface deformation with three rises and three depressions. Thanks to the threefold symmetry of this hexapole, strongly directional capillary interactions drive the cubes to self-assemble into hexagonal or graphenelike honeycomb lattices. By a simple free-energy model, we predict a density-temperature phase diagram in which both the honeycomb and hexagonal lattice phases are present as stable states.

  5. 2D photonic crystals on the Archimedean lattices (tribute to Johannes Kepler (1571 1630))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajić, R.; class="cross-out">D. Jovanović,

    2008-03-01

    Results of our research on 2D Archemedean lattice photonic crystals are presented. This involves the calculations of the band structures, band-gap maps, equifrequency contours and FDTD simulations of electromagnetic propagation through the structures as well as an experimental verification of negative refraction at microwaves. The band-gap dependence on dielectric contrast is established both for dielectric rods in air and air-holes in dielectric materials. A special emphasis is placed on possibilities of negative refraction and left-handedness in these structures. Together with the familiar Archimedean lattices like square, triangular, honeycomb and Kagome' ones, we consider also, the less known, (3 2, 4, 3, 4) (ladybug) and (3, 4, 6, 4) (honeycomb-ring) structures.

  6. Self-Assembly of Cubes into 2D Hexagonal and Honeycomb Lattices by Hexapolar Capillary Interactions.

    PubMed

    Soligno, Giuseppe; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-06-24

    Particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface induce capillary deformations that determine their orientations and generate mutual capillary interactions which drive them to assemble into 2D ordered structures. We numerically calculate, by energy minimization, the capillary deformations induced by adsorbed cubes for various Young's contact angles. First, we show that capillarity is crucial not only for quantitative, but also for qualitative predictions of equilibrium configurations of a single cube. For a Young's contact angle close to 90°, we show that a single-adsorbed cube generates a hexapolar interface deformation with three rises and three depressions. Thanks to the threefold symmetry of this hexapole, strongly directional capillary interactions drive the cubes to self-assemble into hexagonal or graphenelike honeycomb lattices. By a simple free-energy model, we predict a density-temperature phase diagram in which both the honeycomb and hexagonal lattice phases are present as stable states. PMID:27391753

  7. Metal-dielectric photonic crystal superlattice: 1D and 2D models and empty lattice approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichin, G.; Weiss, T.; Gao, H.; Henzie, J.; Odom, T. W.; Tikhodeev, S. G.; Giessen, H.

    2012-10-01

    Periodic nanostructures are one of the main building blocks in modern nanooptics. They are used for constructing photonic crystals and metamaterials and provide optical properties that can be changed by adjusting the geometrical parameters of the structures. In this paper the optical properties of a photonic crystal slab with a 2D superlattice are discussed. The structure consists of a gold layer with a finite periodic pattern of air holes that is itself repeated periodically with a larger superperiod. We propose simplified 1D and 2D models to understand the physical nature of Wood's anomalies in the optical spectra of the investigated structure. The latter are attributed to the Rayleigh anomalies, surface plasmon Bragg resonances and the hole-localized plasmons.

  8. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50<=n<=65) in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a transverse DC electric field. The trapping behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  9. Optical vortex array in spatially varying lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Amit; Kumar, Manish; Senthilkumaran, P.; Joseph, Joby

    2016-04-01

    We present an experimental method based on a modified multiple beam interference approach to generate an optical vortex array arranged in a spatially varying lattice. This method involves two steps which are: numerical synthesis of a consistent phase mask by using two-dimensional integrated phase gradient calculations and experimental implementation of produced phase mask by utilizing a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. This method enables an independent variation of the orientation and period of the vortex lattice. As working examples, we provide the experimental demonstration of various spatially variant optical vortex lattices. We further confirm the existence of optical vortices by formation of fork fringes. Such lattices may find applications in size dependent trapping, sorting, manipulation and photonic crystals.

  10. Bloch oscillations in optical dissipative lattices.

    PubMed

    Efremidis, Nikolaos K; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2004-11-01

    We show that Bloch oscillations are possible in dissipative optical waveguide lattices with a linearly varying propagation constant. These oscillations occur in spite of the fact that the Bloch wave packet experiences coupling gain and (or) loss. Experimentally, this process can be observed in different settings, such as in laser arrays and lattices of semiconductor optical amplifiers. In addition, we demonstrate that these systems can suppress instabilities arising from preferential mode noise growth.

  11. Atomic Fermi gases in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Modugno, G.; De Mirandes, E.; Ferlando, F.; Ott, H.; Roati, G.; Inguscio, M.

    2005-05-05

    We report on the first experiments with atomic Fermi gases in optical lattices. We have studied the properties of non interacting fermions and of an interacting boson-fermion mixture in a 1D lattice in presence of additional linear or harmonic potentials. These systems have allowed to study for the first time the fundamental quantum transport properties of a perfect crystal and to confirm the role of interactions in real crystals. We have found that the combination of Fermi gases and optical lattices can also have important applications, such as high-resolution force sensing.

  12. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S. E.; Younge, K. C.; Raithel, G.

    2011-12-23

    Rubidium Rydberg atoms are laser excited and subsequently trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). Efficient trapping is achieved by a lattice inversion immediately after laser excitation using an electro-optic technique. The trapping efficiency is probed via analysis of the trap-induced shift of the two-photon microwave transition 50S{yields}51S. The inversion technique allows us to reach a trapping efficiency of 90%. The dependence of the efficiency on the timing of the lattice inversion and on the trap laser power is studied. The dwell time of 50D{sub 5/2} Rydberg atoms in the lattice is analyzed using lattice-induced photoionization.

  13. Electronic and geometrical properties of monoatomic and diatomic 2D honeycomb lattices. A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Ángela; Rey, Rafael; Fonseca, Karen; Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica Team

    Since the discovery of graphene by Geim and Novoselov at 2004, several analogous systems have been theoretically and experimentally studied, due to their technological interest. Both monoatomic lattices, such as silicine and germanene, and diatomic lattices (h-GaAs and h-GaN) have been studied. Using Density Functional Theory we obtain and confirm the chemical stability of these hexagonal 2D systems through the total energy curves as a function of interatomic distance. Unlike graphene, silicine and germanene, gapless materials, h-GaAs and h-GaN exhibit electronic gaps, different from that of the bulk, which could be interesting for the industry. On the other hand, the ab initio band structure calculations for graphene, silicene and germanene show a non-circular cross section around K points, at variance with the prediction of usual Tight-binding models. In fact, we have found that Dirac cones display a dihedral group symmetry. This implies that Fermi speed can change up to 30 % due to the orientation of the wave vector, for both electrons and holes. Traditional analytic studies use the Dirac equation for the electron dynamics at low energies. However, this equation assumes an isotropic, homogeneous and uniform space. Authors would like to thank the División de Investigación Sede Bogotá for their financial support at Universidad Nacional de Colombia. A. M. Rojas-Cuervo would also like to thank the Colciencias, Colombia.

  14. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-04-01

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  15. DESIGN OF THE RCMS LATTICE OPTICS.

    SciTech Connect

    CARDONA,J.; KEWISCH,J.; PEGGS,S.

    2002-06-02

    THE RAPID CYCLING MEDICAL SYNCHROTRON (RCMS) IS DESIGNED TO BE A VERY LIGHT AND INEXPENSIVE ACCELERATOR. THIS IS POSSIBLE DUE TO THE SMALL BEAM SIZE THAT HAS BEEN CHOSEN EARLY DURING THE DESIGN STAGE. THIS CHOICE HAS IMPLICATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF THE LATTICE OPTICS. IN THIS PAPER, WE PRESENT AN OVERVIEW OF THE RCMS OPTICS LATTICE, THE KIND OF MAGNETS TO BE USED AND ALSO A DESCRIPTION OF A SPECIAL OPTIC MODULE THAT MATCHES THE ROTATING GANTRY WITH THE REST OF THE FIXED ACCELERATOR. TECHNIQUESDEVELOPED TO WIN ADDITIONAL SPACE BETWEEN QUADRUPOLES WITHOUT DISTRUBING BETA FUNCTIONS ARE ALSO PRESENTED.

  16. Minimizing nonadiabaticities in optical-lattice loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolfi, Michele; Kantian, Adrian; Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    In the quest to reach lower temperatures of ultracold gases in optical-lattice experiments, nonadiabaticities during lattice loading represent one of the limiting factors that prevent the same low temperatures being reached as in experiments without lattices. Simulating the loading of a bosonic quantum gas into a one-dimensional optical lattice with and without a trap, we find that the redistribution of atomic density inside a global confining potential is by far the dominant source of heating. Based on these results we propose adjusting the trapping potential during loading to minimize changes to the density distribution. Our simulations confirm that a very simple linear interpolation of the trapping potential during loading already significantly decreases the heating of a quantum gas, and we discuss how loading protocols minimizing density redistributions can be designed.

  17. The optical potential on the lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Agadjanov, Dimitri; Doring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; MeiBner, Ulf -G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-06-08

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the Luscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel Luscher formalism. Furthermore, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles.

  18. Creation of quantum-degenerate gases of ytterbium in a compact 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap setup

    SciTech Connect

    Doerscher, Soeren; Thobe, Alexander; Hundt, Bastian; Kochanke, Andre; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Windpassinger, Patrick; Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-04-15

    We report on the first experimental setup based on a 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap (MOT) scheme to create both Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases of several ytterbium isotopes. Our setup does not require a Zeeman slower and offers the flexibility to simultaneously produce ultracold samples of other atomic species. Furthermore, the extraordinary optical access favors future experiments in optical lattices. A 2D-MOT on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition captures ytterbium directly from a dispenser of atoms and loads a 3D-MOT on the narrow {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination transition. Subsequently, atoms are transferred to a crossed optical dipole trap and cooled evaporatively to quantum degeneracy.

  19. Quantum memory in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, J.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; Lee, K. C.; Langford, N. K.; Walmsley, I. A.; Dorner, U.; Jaksch, D.

    2010-08-15

    Arrays of atoms trapped in optical lattices are appealing as storage media for photons, since motional dephasing of the atoms is eliminated. The regular lattice is also associated with band structure in the dispersion experienced by incident photons. Here we study the influence of this band structure on the efficiency of quantum memories based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and on Raman absorption. We observe a number of interesting effects, such as both reduced and superluminal group velocities, enhanced atom-photon coupling, and anomalous transmission. These effects are ultimately deleterious to the memory efficiency, but they are easily avoided by tuning the optical fields away from the band edges.

  20. Enhancement of long-range correlations in a 2D vortex lattice by an incommensurate 1D disorder potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillamon, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Cordoba, R.; Sese, J.; de Teresa, J. M.; Ibarra, R.

    In two dimensional (2D) systems, theory has proposed that random disorder destroys long range correlations driving a transition to a glassy state. Here, I will discuss new insights into this issue obtained through the direct visualization of the critical behaviour of a 2D superconducting vortex lattice formed in a thin film with a smooth 1D thickness modulation. Using scanning tunneling microscopy at 0.1K, we have tracked the modification in the 2D vortex arrangements induced by the 1D thickness modulation while increasing the vortex density by three orders of magnitude. Upon increasing the field, we observed a two-step order-disorder transition in the 2D vortex lattice mediated by the appearance of dislocations and disclinations and accompanied by an increase in the local vortex density fluctuations. Through a detailed analysis of correlation functions, we find that the transition is driven by the incommensurate 1D thickness modulation. We calculate the critical points and exponents and find that they are well above theoretical expectation for random disorder. Our results show that long range 1D correlations in random potentials enhance the stability range of the ordered phase in a 2D vortex lattice. Work supported by Spanish MINECO, CIG Marie Curie Grant, Axa Research Fund and FBBVA.

  1. Ultra-Cold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Parag

    2009-01-01

    The field of ultra-cold atoms, since the achievement of Bose-Einstein Condensation (Anderson et al., 1995; Davis et al., 1995; Bradley et al., 1995), have seen an immensely growing interest over the past decade. With the creation of optical lattices, new possibilities of studying some of the widely used models in condensed matter have opened up.…

  2. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  3. Fibonacci optical lattices for tunable quantum quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K.; Saha, K.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Weld, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a quasiperiodic optical lattice, created by a physical realization of the abstract cut-and-project construction underlying all quasicrystals. The resulting potential is a generalization of the Fibonacci tiling. Calculation of the energies and wave functions of ultracold atoms loaded into such a lattice demonstrate a multifractal energy spectrum, a singular continuous momentum-space structure, and the existence of controllable edge states. These results open the door to cold atom quantum simulation experiments in tunable or dynamic quasicrystalline potentials, including topological pumping of edge states and phasonic spectroscopy.

  4. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-09-08

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid.

  5. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose—Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  6. Honeycomb optical lattices with harmonic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J. Kusk; Nygaard, N.

    2010-05-15

    We consider the fate of the Dirac points in the spectrum of a honeycomb optical lattice in the presence of a harmonic confining potential. By numerically solving the tight binding model, we calculate the density of states and find that the energy dependence can be understood from analytical arguments. In addition, we show that the density of states of the harmonically trapped lattice system can be understood by application of a local density approximation based on the density of states in the homogeneous lattice. The Dirac points are found to survive locally in the trap as evidenced by the local density of states. Furthermore, they give rise to a distinct spatial profile of a noninteracting Fermi gas.

  7. Twisted complex superfluids in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Sengstock, Klaus; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2015-01-01

    We show that correlated pair tunneling drives a phase transition to a twisted superfluid with a complex order parameter. This unconventional superfluid phase spontaneously breaks the time-reversal symmetry and is characterized by a twisting of the complex phase angle between adjacent lattice sites. We discuss the entire phase diagram of the extended Bose-Hubbard model for a honeycomb optical lattice showing a multitude of quantum phases including twisted superfluids, pair superfluids, supersolids and twisted supersolids. Furthermore, we show that the nearest-neighbor interactions lead to a spontaneous breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice and give rise to dimerized density-wave insulators, where particles are delocalized on dimers. For two components, we find twisted superfluid phases with strong correlations between the species already for surprisingly small pair-tunneling amplitudes. Interestingly, this ground state shows an infinite degeneracy ranging continuously from a supersolid to a twisted superfluid. PMID:26345721

  8. The Abelian Higgs model on Optical Lattice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Bazavov, Alexei; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    We study the Lattice Gauge Theory of the U(1)-Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions in the strongly coupled regime. We discuss the plaquette corrections to the effective theory where link variables are integrated out. We discuss matching with the second-order perturbation theory effective Hamiltonian for various Bose-Hubbard models. This correspondence can be exploited for building a lattice gauge theory simulator on optical lattices. We propose to implement the quantum rotors which appear in the Hamiltonian formulation using Bose mixtures or p-orbitals. Recent progress on magnetic effects in 2+1 dimensions will be discussed. Supported by the Army Research Office of the Department of Defense under Award Number W911NF-13-1-0119.

  9. Coherent matter waves of a dipolar condensate in two-dimensional optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Aixia; Xue Jukui

    2010-07-15

    The coherent matter waves of a dipolar condensate in deep two-dimensional (2D) tilted and nontilted optical lattices are studied both analytically and numerically. It is shown that, in tilted lattices, by properly designing the sign and the magnitude of the contact interaction and the dipolar interaction, it is possible to control the decoherence of Bloch oscillations. Contrary to the usual short-range interacting Bose system, long-lived Bloch oscillations of the dipolar condensate are achieved when the dipolar interaction, the contact interaction, and the lattice dimension satisfy an analytical condition. Furthermore, we predict that, in untilted lattices, stable coherent 2D moving soliton and breather states of the dipolar condensate exist. This fact is very different from the purely short-range interacting Bose system (where the moving soliton cannot be stabilized in high-dimensional lattices). The dipolar interaction can lead to some novel phenomena that can not appear in short-range interacting BEC system.

  10. Artificial Staggered Magnetic Field for Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais Smith, Cristiane

    2011-03-01

    Uniform magnetic fields are ubiquitous in nature, but this is not the case for staggered magnetic fields. In this talk, I will discuss an experimental set-up for cold atoms recently proposed by us, which allows for the realization of a ``staggered gauge field'' in a 2D square optical lattice. If the lattice is loaded with bosons, it may be described by an effective Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, with complex and anisotropic hopping coefficients. A very rich phase diagram emerges: besides the usual Mott-insulator and zero-momentum condensate, a new phase with a finite momentum condensate becomes the ground-state at strong gauge fields. By using the technique of Feshbach resonance, the dynamics of a coherent superposition of a vortex-carrying atomic condensate and a conventional zero-momentum molecular condensate can also be studied within the same scheme. On the other hand, if the lattice is loaded with fermions, a highly tunable, graphene-like band structure can be realized, without requiring the honeycomb lattice symmetry. When the system is loaded with a mixture of bosons and two-species fermions, several features of the high-Tc phase diagram can be reproduced. A dome-shaped unconventional superconducting region arises, surrounded by a non-Fermi liquid and a Fermi liquid at low and high doping, respectively. We acknowledge financial support from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  11. Strongly correlated quantum walks in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp M.; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M. Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Zupancic, Philip; Lahini, Yoav; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Full control over the dynamics of interacting, indistinguishable quantum particles is an important prerequisite for the experimental study of strongly correlated quantum matter and the implementation of high-fidelity quantum information processing. We demonstrate such control over the quantum walk—the quantum mechanical analog of the classical random walk—in the regime where dynamics are dominated by interparticle interactions. Using interacting bosonic atoms in an optical lattice, we directly observed fundamental effects such as the emergence of correlations in two-particle quantum walks, as well as strongly correlated Bloch oscillations in tilted optical lattices. Our approach can be scaled to larger systems, greatly extending the class of problems accessible via quantum walks.

  12. The NIM Sr Optical Lattice Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, Q.; Li, Y.; Meng, F.; Lin, B.; Zang, E.; Sun, Z.; Fang, F.; Li, T.; Fang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    A 87Sr optical lattice clock is built at the National Institute of Metrology (NIM) of China. The atoms undergo two stages of laser cooling before being loaded into a horizontal optical lattice at the magic wavelength of 813 nm. After being interrogated by a narrow linewidth 698 nm clock laser pulse, the normalized excitation rate is measured to get the frequency error, which is then used to lock the clock laser to the ultra-narrow 1S0-3P0 clock transition. The total systematic uncertainty of the clock is evaluated to be 2.3 × 10-16, and the absolute frequency of the clock is measured to be 429 228 004 229 873.7(1.4) Hz with reference to the NIM5 cesium fountain.

  13. Optomechanical Enhancement of Doubly Resonant 2D Optical Nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fei; Ren, Mingliang; Reed, Jason C; Zhu, Hai; Hou, Jiechang; Naylor, Carl H; Johnson, A T Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh; Cubukcu, Ertugrul

    2016-03-01

    Emerging two-dimensional semiconductor materials possess a giant second order nonlinear response due to excitonic effects while the monolayer thickness of such active materials limits their use in practical nonlinear devices. Here, we report 3300 times optomechanical enhancement of second harmonic generation from a MoS2 monolayer in a doubly resonant on-chip optical cavity. We achieve this by engineering the nonlinear light-matter interaction in a microelectro-mechanical system enabled optical frequency doubling device based on an electrostatically tunable Fabry-Perot microresonator. Our versatile optomechanical approach will pave the way for next generation efficient on-chip tunable light sources, sensors, and systems based on molecularly thin materials. PMID:26854706

  14. Optomechanical Enhancement of Doubly Resonant 2D Optical Nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fei; Ren, Mingliang; Reed, Jason C; Zhu, Hai; Hou, Jiechang; Naylor, Carl H; Johnson, A T Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh; Cubukcu, Ertugrul

    2016-03-01

    Emerging two-dimensional semiconductor materials possess a giant second order nonlinear response due to excitonic effects while the monolayer thickness of such active materials limits their use in practical nonlinear devices. Here, we report 3300 times optomechanical enhancement of second harmonic generation from a MoS2 monolayer in a doubly resonant on-chip optical cavity. We achieve this by engineering the nonlinear light-matter interaction in a microelectro-mechanical system enabled optical frequency doubling device based on an electrostatically tunable Fabry-Perot microresonator. Our versatile optomechanical approach will pave the way for next generation efficient on-chip tunable light sources, sensors, and systems based on molecularly thin materials.

  15. Propagation of optical coherence lattices in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianlong; Yu, Jiayi; Cai, Yangjian; Ponomarenko, Sergey A

    2016-09-15

    We explore the propagation of recently introduced optical coherence lattices (OCLs) in the turbulent atmosphere. We show that the lattice intensity profile and the spatial degree of coherence will display periodicity reciprocity over long propagation distances even though the lattices are affected by the turbulence. The lattice periodicity reciprocity has been previously conjectured to be advantageous for free-space information transfer and optical communications. We then show how one can increase the distance over which the lattice periodicity reciprocity is preserved in the turbulent atmosphere by engineering input lattice beam parameters. We also show that the OCLs have scintillation indices lower than those of Gaussian beams. PMID:27628352

  16. High contrast all-optical logic gates based on 2D nonlinear photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohebbi, Zahra; Nozhat, Najmeh; Emami, Farzin

    2015-11-01

    We have proposed the all optical XOR, XNOR, NAND and NOT logic gates based on two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PCs). In all structures the nonlinear Kerr effect has been used. The gates function is based on the destructive interference of the input signals. The phase difference between the input signals has been caused by the different signal travelling paths. To demonstrate the performance of the XNOR, NOT, and NAND gates a control port has been added to the structure. The gates have been operated at the frequency of 0.341(c/a) where 'a' and 'c' are the lattice constant and the speed of light in vacuum, respectively. Due to the maximum required input power of P0 = 277 (mW /μm2) for the XOR, NOT, and XNOR gates and P0 = 554 (mW /μm2) for the NAND gates, and the high contrast ratio of at least 20 dB between the ON and OFF states, these logic gates are applicable for real time communications. Simulations are based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical method.

  17. Solids and Supersolids of Three-Body Interacting Polar Molecules on an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kai P.; Dorier, Julien; Laeuchli, Andreas M.

    2008-10-10

    We study the physics of cold polar molecules loaded into an optical lattice in the regime of strong three-body interactions, as put forward recently by Buechler et al.[Nature Phys. 3, 726 (2007)]. To this end, quantum Monte Carlo simulations, exact diagonalization, and a semiclassical approach are used to explore hard-core bosons on the 2D square lattice which interact solely by long-ranged three-body terms. The resulting phase diagram shows a sequence of solid and supersolid phases. Our findings are directly relevant for future experimental implementations and open a new route towards the discovery of a lattice supersolid phase in experiment.

  18. Spin frustration in 2D kagomé lattices: a problem for inorganic synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Daniel G; Bartlett, Bart M; Grohol, Daniel; Papoutsakis, Dimitris; Shores, Matthew P

    2004-08-20

    A kagomé antiferromagnet presents an ideal construct for studying the unusual physics that result from the placement of magnetically frustrated spins on a low-dimensional lattice. Jarosites are the prototype for a spin-frustrated magnetic structure, because these materials are composed exclusively of kagomé layers. Notwithstanding, jarosite-type materials have escaped precise magnetic characterization over the past three decades, because they are notoriously difficult to prepare in pure and single-crystal forms. These hurdles have been overcome with the development of redox-based hydrothermal methods. Armed with pure and crystalline materials, several perplexing issues surrounding the magnetic properties of the jarosites have been resolved, yielding a detailed and comprehensive picture of the ground-state physics of this kagomé lattice.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann methods for some 2-D nonlinear diffusion equations:Computational results

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, B.H.; Rodrigue, G.H. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Levermore, C.D. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we examine two lattice Boltzmann methods (that are a derivative of lattice gas methods) for computing solutions to two two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations of the form {partial derivative}/{partial derivative}t u = v ({partial derivative}/{partial derivative}x D(u){partial derivative}/{partial derivative}x u + {partial derivative}/{partial derivative}y D(u){partial derivative}/{partial derivative}y u), where u = u({rvec x},t), {rvec x} {element of} R{sup 2}, v is a constant, and D(u) is a nonlinear term that arises from a Chapman-Enskog asymptotic expansion. In particular, we provide computational evidence supporting recent results showing that the methods are second order convergent (in the L{sub 1}-norm), conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Solutions computed via the lattice Boltzmann methods are compared with those computed by other explicit, second order, conservative, monotone finite difference methods. Results are reported for both the L{sub 1}- and L{sub {infinity}}-norms.

  20. Nuclear spin effects in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Martin M.; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Foreman, Seth M.; Ye Jun

    2007-08-15

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study of the effect of nuclear spin on the performance of optical lattice clocks. With a state-mixing theory including spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions, we describe the origin of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition and the differential g factor between the two clock states for alkaline-earth-metal(-like) atoms, using {sup 87}Sr as an example. Clock frequency shifts due to magnetic and optical fields are discussed with an emphasis on those relating to nuclear structure. An experimental determination of the differential g factor in {sup 87}Sr is performed and is in good agreement with theory. The magnitude of the tensor light shift on the clock states is also explored experimentally. State specific measurements with controlled nuclear spin polarization are discussed as a method to reduce the nuclear spin-related systematic effects to below 10{sup -17} in lattice clocks.

  1. Hybrid plasmonic lattices with tunable magneto-optical activity.

    PubMed

    Kataja, Mikko; Pourjamal, Sara; Maccaferri, Nicolò; Vavassori, Paolo; Hakala, Tommi K; Huttunen, Mikko J; Törmä, Päivi; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-22

    We report on the optical and magneto-optical response of hybrid plasmonic lattices that consist of pure nickel and gold nanoparticles in a checkerboard arrangement. Diffractive far-field coupling between the individual emitters of the lattices results in the excitation of two orthogonal surface lattice resonance modes. Local analyses of the radiation fields indicate that both the nickel and gold nanoparticles contribute to these collective resonances and, thereby, to the magneto-optical activity of the hybrid arrays. The strong effect of noble metal nanoparticles on the magneto-optical response of hybrid lattices opens up new avenues for the realization of sensitive and tunable magneto-plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26907022

  2. Dispersion relations of externally and thermally excited dust lattice modes in 2D complex plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xuefeng; Cui Jian; Zhang Yuan; Liu Yue

    2012-07-15

    The dispersion relations of the externally and thermally (naturally) excited dust lattice modes (both longitudinal and transverse) in two-dimensional Debye-Yukawa complex plasma crystals are investigated. The dispersion relations are calculated numerically by taking the neutral gas damping effects into account and the numerical results are in agreement with the experimental data given by Nunomura et al.[Phys. Rev. E 65, 066402 (2002)]. It is found that for the mode excited by an external disturbance with a real frequency, the dispersion properties are changed at a critical frequency near where the group velocity of the mode goes to zero. Therefore, the high frequency branch with negative dispersion cannot be reached. In contrast, for the thermally excited mode, the dispersion curve can extend all the way to the negative dispersion region, while a 'cut-off' wave number exists at the long wavelength end of the dispersion in the transverse mode.

  3. Kondo lattice on the edge of a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejko, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Much attention has been devoted recently to the experimental and theoretical study of the effect of magnetic impurities on the stability of the gapless boundary modes of topological insulators. When the quantum dynamics of the impurities is considered, those boundary modes constitute novel types of fermionic baths which may affect the nature of possible impurity phases and phase transitions. We study a regular one-dimensional array of quantum magnetic impurities interacting with the helical edge liquid of a two-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulator. Exact solutions at the special Toulouse and Luther-Emery points as well as a renormalization group analysis àla Anderson-Yuval allow us to construct a phase diagram in the space of Kondo coupling, electron-electron interaction strength, and electron density. We point out similarities and differences with the Kondo lattice in a ordinary one-dimensional electron gas.

  4. Landau Levels in Strained Optical Lattices.

    PubMed

    Tian, Binbin; Endres, Manuel; Pekker, David

    2015-12-01

    We propose a hexagonal optical lattice system with spatial variations in the hopping matrix elements. Just like in the valley Hall effect in strained graphene, for atoms near the Dirac points the variations in the hopping matrix elements can be described by a pseudomagnetic field and result in the formation of Landau levels. We show that the pseudomagnetic field leads to measurable experimental signatures in momentum resolved Bragg spectroscopy, Bloch oscillations, cyclotron motion, and quantization of in situ densities. Our proposal can be realized by a slight modification of existing experiments. In contrast to previous methods, pseudomagnetic fields are realized in a completely static system avoiding common heating effects and therefore opening the door to studying interaction effects in Landau levels with cold atoms.

  5. Spatial entanglement of bosons in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Cramer, M; Bernard, A; Fabbri, N; Fallani, L; Fort, C; Rosi, S; Caruso, F; Inguscio, M; Plenio, M B

    2013-01-01

    Entanglement is a fundamental resource for quantum information processing, occurring naturally in many-body systems at low temperatures. The presence of entanglement and, in particular, its scaling with the size of system partitions underlies the complexity of quantum many-body states. The quantitative estimation of entanglement in many-body systems represents a major challenge, as it requires either full-state tomography, scaling exponentially in the system size, or the assumption of unverified system characteristics such as its Hamiltonian or temperature. Here we adopt recently developed approaches for the determination of rigorous lower entanglement bounds from readily accessible measurements and apply them in an experiment of ultracold interacting bosons in optical lattices of ~10(5) sites. We then study the behaviour of spatial entanglement between the sites when crossing the superfluid-Mott insulator transition and when varying temperature. This constitutes the first rigorous experimental large-scale entanglement quantification in a scalable quantum simulator.

  6. Detecting multiatomic composite states in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklov, Anatoly; Moritz, Henning

    2007-01-01

    We propose and discuss methods for detecting quasimolecular complexes which are expected to form in strongly interacting optical lattice systems. Particular emphasis is placed on the detection of composite fermions forming in Bose-Fermi mixtures. We argue that, as an indirect indication of the composite fermions and a generic consequence of strong interactions, periodic correlations must appear in the atom shot noise of bosonic absorption images, similar to the bosonic Mott insulator [S. Fölling , Nature (London) 434, 481 (2005)]. The composites can also be detected directly and their quasimomentum distribution measured. This method—an extension of the technique of noise correlation interferometry [E. Altman , Phys. Rev. A 79, 013603 (2004)]—relies on measuring higher order correlations between the bosonic and fermionic shot noise in the absorption images. However, it fails above a certain number of the constituents due to a dramatic increase of uncorrelated noise.

  7. Arnold diffusion in a driven optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L E

    2016-03-01

    The effect of time-periodic forces on matter has been a topic of growing interest since the advent of lasers. It is known that dynamical systems with 2.5 or more degrees of freedom are intrinsically unstable. As a consequence, time-periodic driven systems can experience large excursions in energy. We analyze the classical and quantum dynamics of rubidium atoms confined to a time-periodic optical lattice with 2.5 degrees of freedom. When the laser polarizations are orthogonal, the system consists of two 1.5 uncoupled dynamical systems. When laser polarizations are turned away from orthogonal, an Arnold web forms and the dynamics undergoes a fundamental change. For parallel polarizations, we find huge random excursions in the rubidium atom energies and significant entanglement of energies in the quantum dynamics. PMID:27078351

  8. A 2 D high accuracy slope measuring system based on a Stitching Shack Hartmann Optical Head.

    PubMed

    Idir, Mourad; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Dovillaire, Guillaume; Legrand, Jerome; Rungsawang, Rakchanok

    2014-02-10

    We present a 2D Slope measuring System based on a Stitching Shack Hartmann Optical Head (SSH-OH) aiming to perform high accuracy optical metrology for X-ray mirrors. This system was developed to perform high-accuracy automated metrology for extremely high quality optical components needed for synchrotrons or Free Electrons Lasers (FEL), EUV lithography and x-ray astronomy with slope error accuracy better than 50 nrad rms. PMID:24663568

  9. Positron beam optics for the 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the NEPOMUC beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, H.; Weber, J. A.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Leitner, M.; Boni, P.

    2014-04-01

    In the last year a conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer has been set up and brought to operation at TUM. Once the NEPOMUC beamline is extended to the new experimental hall at the research reactor FRM-II the conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer will be upgraded with a second sample chamber in order to be integrated to the NEPOMUC beamline facility. This spectrometer will add a complete new quality to 2D-ACAR experiments as it allows to track the evolution of the electronic structure from the surface to the bulk. We present the design features of the positron beam optics and the sample environment.

  10. A hydrodynamically-consistent MRT lattice Boltzmann model on a 2D rectangular grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Min, Haoda; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2016-12-01

    A multiple-relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) model on a D2Q9 rectangular grid is designed theoretically and validated numerically in the present work. By introducing stress components into the equilibrium moments, this MRT-LB model restores the isotropy of diffusive momentum transport at the macroscopic level (or in the continuum limit), leading to moment equations that are fully consistent with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model is derived by an inverse design process which is described in detail. Except one moment associated with the energy square, all other eight equilibrium moments can be theoretically and uniquely determined. The model is then carefully validated using both the two-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green vortex flow and lid-driven cavity flow, with different grid aspect ratios. The corresponding results from an earlier model (Bouzidi et al. (2001) [28]) are also presented for comparison. The results of Bouzidi et al.'s model show problems associated with anisotropy of viscosity coefficients, while the present model exhibits full isotropy and is accurate and stable.

  11. Adiabatic and Hamiltonian computing on a 2D lattice with simple two-qubit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Terhal, Barbara M.

    2016-02-01

    We show how to perform universal Hamiltonian and adiabatic computing using a time-independent Hamiltonian on a 2D grid describing a system of hopping particles which string together and interact to perform the computation. In this construction, the movement of one particle is controlled by the presence or absence of other particles, an effective quantum field effect transistor that allows the construction of controlled-NOT and controlled-rotation gates. The construction translates into a model for universal quantum computation with time-independent two-qubit ZZ and XX+YY interactions on an (almost) planar grid. The effective Hamiltonian is arrived at by a single use of first-order perturbation theory avoiding the use of perturbation gadgets. The dynamics and spectral properties of the effective Hamiltonian can be fully determined as it corresponds to a particular realization of a mapping between a quantum circuit and a Hamiltonian called the space-time circuit-to-Hamiltonian construction. Because of the simple interactions required, and because no higher-order perturbation gadgets are employed, our construction is potentially realizable using superconducting or other solid-state qubits.

  12. A hierarchical lattice spring model to simulate the mechanics of 2-D materials-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brely, Lucas; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    In the field of engineering materials, strength and toughness are typically two mutually exclusive properties. Structural biological materials such as bone, tendon or dentin have resolved this conflict and show unprecedented damage tolerance, toughness and strength levels. The common feature of these materials is their hierarchical heterogeneous structure, which contributes to increased energy dissipation before failure occurring at different scale levels. These structural properties are the key to exceptional bioinspired material mechanical properties, in particular for nanocomposites. Here, we develop a numerical model in order to simulate the mechanisms involved in damage progression and energy dissipation at different size scales in nano- and macro-composites, which depend both on the heterogeneity of the material and on the type of hierarchical structure. Both these aspects have been incorporated into a 2-dimensional model based on a Lattice Spring Model, accounting for geometrical nonlinearities and including statistically-based fracture phenomena. The model has been validated by comparing numerical results to continuum and fracture mechanics results as well as finite elements simulations, and then employed to study how structural aspects impact on hierarchical composite material properties. Results obtained with the numerical code highlight the dependence of stress distributions on matrix properties and reinforcement dispersion, geometry and properties, and how failure of sacrificial elements is directly involved in the damage tolerance of the material. Thanks to the rapidly developing field of nanocomposite manufacture, it is already possible to artificially create materials with multi-scale hierarchical reinforcements. The developed code could be a valuable support in the design and optimization of these advanced materials, drawing inspiration and going beyond biological materials with exceptional mechanical properties.

  13. 2D wave-front shaping in optical superlattices using nonlinear volume holography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Hong, Xu-Hao; Lu, Rong-Er; Yue, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Chao; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear volume holography is employed to realize arbitrary wave-front shaping during nonlinear processes with properly designed 2D optical superlattices. The concept of a nonlinear polarization wave in nonlinear volume holography is investigated. The holographic imaging of irregular patterns was performed using 2D LiTaO3 crystals with fundamental wave propagating along the spontaneous polarization direction, and the results agree well with the theoretical predictions. This Letter not only extends the application area of optical superlattices, but also offers an efficient method for wave-front shaping technology.

  14. Enhanced Optical Cross Section via Collective Coupling of Atomic Dipoles in a 2D Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettles, Robert J.; Gardiner, Simon A.; Adams, Charles S.

    2016-03-01

    Enhancing the optical cross section is an enticing goal in light-matter interactions, due to its fundamental role in quantum and nonlinear optics. Here, we show how dipolar interactions can suppress off-axis scattering in a two-dimensional atomic array, leading to a subradiant collective mode where the optical cross section is enhanced by almost an order of magnitude. As a consequence, it is possible to attain an optical depth which implies high-fidelity extinction, from a monolayer. Using realistic experimental parameters, we also model how lattice vacancies and the atomic trapping depth affect the transmission, concluding that such high extinction should be possible, using current experimental techniques.

  15. Critical point of a rotating Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Badry, Azza M.; Soliman, Shemi S. M.; Hassan, Ahmed S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we have considered the critical point (critical atoms' number and the corresponding critical temperature) of rotating condensate bosons trapped in optical lattices. Our system is formed by loading three dimensional harmonically trapped boson atoms into a 1D (axial direction) or 2D (radial direction) optical lattice. The system subjected to rotating with angular velocity Ω around to the axial direction z-axis. We employ the semiclassical approximation to calculate the critical point. Effects of the optical lattice depth, direction (axial or radial) and the rotation rate on the critical point are investigated using the semiclassical approximation. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the critical point is changed in an optical lattice and depends crucially on the rotation rate. The effect of the finite size for one-dimensional optical lattice case, as required by experiment, is discussed. The outcome results furnish useful qualitatively theoretical results for the future Bose-Einstein condensation experiments in such traps.

  16. Enhanced quantum dot optical down-conversion using asymmetric 2D photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuchyi; Cunningham, Brian T

    2011-02-28

    Asymmetric 2D photonic crystals were fabricated using polymer embedded PbS quantum dots on plastic substrates for enhancing optical down conversion efficiency from blue to near infrared wavelengths through enhanced extraction and excitation effects. We demonstrate 8x improvement of QD emission at normal incidence extraction from enhanced extraction and 2.5x improvement in power conversion efficiency from enhanced excitation.

  17. Toward a 2-D magneto-optical trap for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummon, Matthew; Stuhl, Benjamin; Yeo, Mark; Collopy, Alejandra; Ye, Jun

    2012-06-01

    The additional structure that arises from the rotational degree of freedom in diatomic molecules makes difficult the adaptation of a traditional atomic magneto-optical trap (MOT) for use with molecules. We describe progress toward development of a 2-D MOT for laser cooled yttrium monoxide molecules based on a resonant LC baseball coil geometry.

  18. Strongly Interacting Fermions in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koetsier, A. O.

    2009-07-01

    presented here concerns fermionic atoms in periodic potential formed by interfering laser beams. Indeed, the standing light wave created by the interfering beams gives rise to a lattice potential because of the Stark effect which couples the electronic energy levels of the atoms to the spatially undulating electric field. Furthermore, fermionic atoms can be prepared in two different hyperfine states corresponding to the the spin-up and spin-down quantum states, and as such mimic electrons moving in the lattice structure of solids. This system is well described by the famous Hubbard model which we introduce in chapter 2 and, under certain conditions, undergoes a phase transition into the Néel state which believed to be a precursor to superconductivity in certain high-temperature superconductors. In chapter 3, we calculate precisely how the Néel state may be achieved in an ultracold fermionic atom gas. When the number of spin-up and spin-down atoms is unequal the system becomes spin-canted and exhibits both ferro- and antiferromagnetic characteristics, as we show in chapter 4. We also find there are topological excitations present in the quantum spin texture known as merons which have never unambiguously been observed before. In order to form a Bose-Einstein condensate, fermionic atoms must first form pairs, and can do so in two contrasting ways. The relationship between these two qualitatively di erent forms of pairing is described in chapter 5, and we examine how these two types of pairs transform into one another in an optical lattice in chapter 6. Finally, chapter 7 is a detailed eld-theoretic study of pairing as it occurs in an ultracold Bose gas. There, we find there is an intriguing bosonic analogy of the two forms of fermion pairing and explore the properties of these pairs.

  19. Topological defect formation in 1D and 2D spin chains realized by network of optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerly, Ryan; Inaba, Kensuke; Inagaki, Takahiro; Takesue, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    A network of optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) is used to simulate classical Ising and XY spin chains. The collective nonlinear dynamics of this network, driven by quantum noise rather than thermal fluctuations, seeks out the Ising/XY ground state as the system transitions from below to above the lasing threshold. We study the behavior of this “Ising machine” for three canonical problems: a 1D ferromagnetic spin chain, a 2D square lattice and problems where next-nearest-neighbor couplings give rise to frustration. If the pump turn-on time is finite, topological defects form (domain walls for the Ising model, winding number and vortices for XY) and their density can be predicted from a numerical model involving a linear “growth stage” and a nonlinear “saturation stage”. These predictions are compared against recent data for a 10,000-spin 1D Ising machine.

  20. Topological Varma Superfluid in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Liberto, M.; Hemmerich, A.; Morais Smith, C.

    2016-10-01

    Topological states of matter are peculiar quantum phases showing different edge and bulk transport properties connected by the bulk-boundary correspondence. While noninteracting fermionic topological insulators are well established by now and have been classified according to a tenfold scheme, the possible realization of topological states for bosons has not been explored much yet. Furthermore, the role of interactions is far from being understood. Here, we show that a topological state of matter exclusively driven by interactions may occur in the p band of a Lieb optical lattice filled with ultracold bosons. The single-particle spectrum of the system displays a remarkable parabolic band-touching point, with both bands exhibiting non-negative curvature. Although the system is neither topological at the single-particle level nor for the interacting ground state, on-site interactions induce an anomalous Hall effect for the excitations, carrying a nonzero Chern number. Our work introduces an experimentally realistic strategy for the formation of interaction-driven topological states of bosons.

  1. Superlubric-pinned Aubry transition of two dimensional monolayers in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelli, Davide; Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystalline colloidal monolayers sliding over a laser-induced optical lattice ``corrugation'' potential emulate friction between ideal crystal surfaces. Static friction is always present when the monolayer and the optical lattices are commensurate, but when they are incommensurate the presence or absence of static friction depends upon the system parameters. In 1D, at the Aubry dynamical phase transition the static friction goes continuously from zero (superlubricity) to finite as the periodic corrugation strength is increased. We look for the Aubry-like transition in the more realistic 2D case of a monolayer in an incommensurate periodic potential using molecular dynamics simulations. Results confirm a clear and sharp 2D superlubric-pinned transition upon increasing corrugation strength. Unlike the 1D Aubry transition which is continuous, the 2D transition is first-order, with a jump of static friction. At the 2D Aubry transition there is no change of symmetry, a sudden rise of the colloid-colloid interaction energy, and a compensating drop of the colloid-corrugation energy. The observability of the superlubric-pinned colloid transition is proposed and discussed. This work has been supported by ERC Advanced Grant N. 320796 MODPHYSFRICT.

  2. Optical design of wavelength selective CPVT system with 3D/2D hybrid concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, N.; Ijiro, T.; Yamada, N.; Kawaguchi, T.; Maemura, T.; Ohashi, H.

    2012-10-01

    Optical design of a concentrating photovoltaic/thermal (CPVT) system is carried out. Using wavelength-selective optics, the system demonstrates 3-D concentration onto a solar cell and 2-D concentration onto a thermal receiver. Characteristics of the two types of concentrator systems are examined with ray-tracing analysis. The first system is a glazed mirror-based concentrator system mounted on a 2-axis pedestal tracker. The size of the secondary optical element is minimized to decrease the cost of the system, and it has a wavelength-selective function for performing 3-D concentration onto a solar cell and 2-D concentration onto a thermal receiver. The second system is a non-glazed beamdown concentrator system containing parabolic mirrors in the lower part. The beam-down selective mirror performs 3-D concentration onto a solar cell placed above the beam-down selective mirror, and 2-D concentration down to a thermal receiver placed at the bottom level. The system is mounted on a two-axis carousel tracker. A parametric study is performed for those systems with different geometrical 2-D/3-D concentration ratios. Wavelength-selective optics such as hot/cold mirrors and spectrum-splitting technologies are taken into account in the analysis. Results show reduced heat load on the solar cell and increased total system efficiency compared to a non-selective CPV system. Requirements for the wavelength-selective properties are elucidated. It is also shown that the hybrid concept with 2-D concentration onto a thermal receiver and 3-D concentration onto a solar cell has an advantageous geometry because of the high total system efficiency and compatibility with the piping arrangement of the thermal receiver.

  3. Matter-wave propagation in optical lattices: geometrical and flat-band effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, Mekena; Chern, Gia-Wei; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-04-01

    The geometry of optical lattices can be engineered, allowing the study of atomic transport along paths arranged in patterns that are otherwise difficult to probe in the solid state. A question feasible to atomic systems is related to the speed of matter-wave propagation as a function of the lattice geometry. To address this issue, we investigated, theoretically, the quantum transport of noninteracting and weakly-interacting ultracold fermionic atoms in several 2D optical lattice geometries. We find that the triangular lattice has a higher propagation velocity compared to the square lattice, and the cross-linked square lattice has an even faster propagation velocity. The increase results from the mixing of the momentum states which leads to different group velocities in quantum systems. Standard band theory provides an explanation and allows for a systematic way to search and design systems with controllable matter-wave propagation. Moreover, the presence of a flat band such as in a two-leg ladder geometry leads to a dynamical density discontinuity due to its localized atoms. Possible realizations of those dynamical phenomena are discussed.

  4. An exact and efficient first passage time algorithm for reaction-diffusion processes on a 2D-lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzola, Andri; Bales, Benjamin B.; Alkire, Richard C.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    We present an exact and efficient algorithm for reaction-diffusion-nucleation processes on a 2D-lattice. The algorithm makes use of first passage time (FPT) to replace the computationally intensive simulation of diffusion hops in KMC by larger jumps when particles are far away from step-edges or other particles. Our approach computes exact probability distributions of jump times and target locations in a closed-form formula, based on the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the corresponding 1D transition matrix, maintaining atomic-scale resolution of resulting shapes of deposit islands. We have applied our method to three different test cases of electrodeposition: pure diffusional aggregation for large ranges of diffusivity rates and for simulation domain sizes of up to 4096×4096 sites, the effect of diffusivity on island shapes and sizes in combination with a KMC edge diffusion, and the calculation of an exclusion zone in front of a step-edge, confirming statistical equivalence to standard KMC simulations. The algorithm achieves significant speedup compared to standard KMC for cases where particles diffuse over long distances before nucleating with other particles or being captured by larger islands.

  5. An exact and efficient first passage time algorithm for reaction–diffusion processes on a 2D-lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Bezzola, Andri; Bales, Benjamin B.; Alkire, Richard C.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    We present an exact and efficient algorithm for reaction–diffusion–nucleation processes on a 2D-lattice. The algorithm makes use of first passage time (FPT) to replace the computationally intensive simulation of diffusion hops in KMC by larger jumps when particles are far away from step-edges or other particles. Our approach computes exact probability distributions of jump times and target locations in a closed-form formula, based on the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the corresponding 1D transition matrix, maintaining atomic-scale resolution of resulting shapes of deposit islands. We have applied our method to three different test cases of electrodeposition: pure diffusional aggregation for large ranges of diffusivity rates and for simulation domain sizes of up to 4096×4096 sites, the effect of diffusivity on island shapes and sizes in combination with a KMC edge diffusion, and the calculation of an exclusion zone in front of a step-edge, confirming statistical equivalence to standard KMC simulations. The algorithm achieves significant speedup compared to standard KMC for cases where particles diffuse over long distances before nucleating with other particles or being captured by larger islands.

  6. Formation and Dynamics of Antiferromagnetic Correlations in Tunable Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greif, Daniel; Jotzu, Gregor; Messer, Michael; Desbuquois, Rémi; Esslinger, Tilman

    2015-12-01

    We report on the observation of antiferromagnetic correlations of ultracold fermions in a variety of optical lattice geometries that are well described by the Hubbard model, including dimers, 1D chains, ladders, isolated and coupled honeycomb planes, as well as square and cubic lattices. The dependence of the strength of spin correlations on the specific geometry is experimentally studied by measuring the correlations along different lattice tunneling links, where a redistribution of correlations between the different lattice links is observed. By measuring the correlations in a crossover between distinct geometries, we demonstrate an effective reduction of the dimensionality for our atom numbers and temperatures. We also investigate the formation and redistribution time of spin correlations by dynamically changing the lattice geometry and studying the time evolution of the system. Time scales ranging from a sudden quench of the lattice geometry to an adiabatic evolution are probed.

  7. Evolution of the Hofstadter butterfly in a tunable optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, F.; Ünal, F. Nur; Oktel, M. Ã.-.

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in realizing artificial gauge fields on optical lattices promise experimental detection of topologically nontrivial energy spectra. Self-similar fractal energy structures generally known as Hofstadter butterflies depend sensitively on the geometry of the underlying lattice, as well as the applied magnetic field. The recent demonstration of an adjustable lattice geometry [L. Tarruell, D. Greif, T. Uehlinger, G. Jotzu, and T. Esslinger, Nature (London) 483, 302 (2012), 10.1038/nature10871] presents a unique opportunity to study this dependence. In this paper, we calculate the Hofstadter butterflies that can be obtained in such an adjustable lattice and find three qualitatively different regimes. We show that the existence of Dirac points at zero magnetic field does not imply the topological equivalence of spectra at finite field. As the real-space structure evolves from the checkerboard lattice to the honeycomb lattice, two square-lattice Hofstadter butterflies merge to form a honeycomb lattice butterfly. This merging is topologically nontrivial, as it is accomplished by sequential closings of gaps. Ensuing Chern number transfer between the bands can be probed with the adjustable lattice experiments. We also calculate the Chern numbers of the gaps for qualitatively different spectra and discuss the evolution of topological properties with underlying lattice geometry.

  8. Enhanced Optical Cross Section via Collective Coupling of Atomic Dipoles in a 2D Array.

    PubMed

    Bettles, Robert J; Gardiner, Simon A; Adams, Charles S

    2016-03-11

    Enhancing the optical cross section is an enticing goal in light-matter interactions, due to its fundamental role in quantum and nonlinear optics. Here, we show how dipolar interactions can suppress off-axis scattering in a two-dimensional atomic array, leading to a subradiant collective mode where the optical cross section is enhanced by almost an order of magnitude. As a consequence, it is possible to attain an optical depth which implies high-fidelity extinction, from a monolayer. Using realistic experimental parameters, we also model how lattice vacancies and the atomic trapping depth affect the transmission, concluding that such high extinction should be possible, using current experimental techniques. PMID:27015480

  9. Pulse Propagation Effects in Optical 2D Fourier-Transform Spectroscopy: Theory.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Li, Hebin; Cundiff, Steven T; Jonas, David M

    2015-04-30

    A solution to Maxwell's equations in the three-dimensional frequency domain is used to calculate rephasing two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) spectra of the D2 line of atomic rubidium vapor in argon buffer gas. Experimental distortions from the spatial propagation of pulses through the sample are simulated in 2DFT spectra calculated for the homogeneous Bloch line shape model. Spectral features that appear at optical densities of up to 3 are investigated. As optical density increases, absorptive and dispersive distortions start with peak shape broadening, progress to peak splitting, and ultimately result in a previously unexplored coherent transient twisting of the split peaks. In contrast to the low optical density limit, where the 2D peak shape for the Bloch model depends only on the total dephasing time, these distortions of the 2D peak shape at finite optical density vary with the waiting time and the excited state lifetime through coherent transient effects. Experiment-specific conditions are explored, demonstrating the effects of varying beam overlap within the sample and of pseudo-time domain filtering. For beam overlap starting at the sample entrance, decreasing the length of beam overlap reduces the line width along the ωτ axis but also reduces signal intensity. A pseudo-time domain filter, where signal prior to the center of the last excitation pulse is excluded from the FID-referenced 2D signal, reduces propagation distortions along the ωt axis. It is demonstrated that 2DFT rephasing spectra cannot take advantage of an excitation-detection transformation that can eliminate propagation distortions in 2DFT relaxation spectra. Finally, the high optical density experimental 2DFT spectrum of rubidium vapor in argon buffer gas [J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 6279-6287] is quantitatively compared, in line width, in depth of peak splitting, and in coherent transient peak twisting, to a simulation with optical density higher than that reported.

  10. Quantum Hall physics with cold atoms in cylindrical optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łåcki, Mateusz; Pichler, Hannes; Sterdyniak, Antoine; Lyras, Andreas; Lembessis, Vassilis E.; Al-Dossary, Omar; Budich, Jan Carl; Zoller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study various realizations of a Hofstadter-Hubbard model on a cylinder geometry with fermionic cold atoms in optical lattices. The cylindrical optical lattice is created by copropagating Laguerre-Gauss beams, i.e., light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. By strong focusing of the light beams we create a real-space optical lattice in the form of rings, which are offset in energy. A second set of Laguerre-Gauss beams then induces a Raman-hopping between these rings, imprinting phases corresponding to a synthetic magnetic field (artificial gauge field). In addition, by rotating the lattice potential, we achieve a slowly varying flux through the hole of the cylinder, which allows us to probe the Hall response of the system as a realization of Laughlin's thought experiment. We study how in the presence of interactions fractional quantum Hall physics could be observed in this setup.

  11. Optical theorem for two-dimensional (2D) scalar monochromatic acoustical beams in cylindrical coordinates.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2015-09-01

    The optical theorem for plane waves is recognized as one of the fundamental theorems in optical, acoustical and quantum wave scattering theory as it relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. Here, the optical theorem is extended and generalized in a cylindrical coordinates system for the case of 2D beams of arbitrary character as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. The case of scalar monochromatic acoustical wavefronts is considered, and generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption and scattering cross-sections are derived and extended in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term describing the interaction between the diffracted Franz waves with the resonance elastic waves. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates is applicable to any object of arbitrary geometry in 2D located arbitrarily in the beam's path. Related investigations in optics, acoustics and quantum mechanics will benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by a cloud of particles, as well as the resulting radiation force and torque.

  12. Optical theorem for two-dimensional (2D) scalar monochromatic acoustical beams in cylindrical coordinates.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2015-09-01

    The optical theorem for plane waves is recognized as one of the fundamental theorems in optical, acoustical and quantum wave scattering theory as it relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. Here, the optical theorem is extended and generalized in a cylindrical coordinates system for the case of 2D beams of arbitrary character as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. The case of scalar monochromatic acoustical wavefronts is considered, and generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption and scattering cross-sections are derived and extended in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term describing the interaction between the diffracted Franz waves with the resonance elastic waves. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates is applicable to any object of arbitrary geometry in 2D located arbitrarily in the beam's path. Related investigations in optics, acoustics and quantum mechanics will benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by a cloud of particles, as well as the resulting radiation force and torque. PMID:25773968

  13. Neutral gas heating via non-resonant optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornella, Barry Michael

    The influence of intense optical lattices on atoms or molecules offers a particularly useful method for energy and momentum deposition into a non-resonant gas. In this investigation, a proof-of-concept experiment was conducted to validate high intensity pulsed optical lattices as a means of creating high temperature gases for a myriad of aerospace, basic physics, and nanotechnology applications. Traditional methods for creating these flows have either involved altering the chemical composition of the initial gas sample through combustion or ionization or relied on laser resonant interactions with internal energy modes through laser pyrolysis. Due to its non-resonant nature, the use of optical lattices might be beneficial compared to existing methods since it provides an arbitrary, localized, high temperature gas that is tunable and does not introduce unwanted chemical species or high ionization concentrations. As an intermediate step toward verifying optical lattice gas heating, a coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (CRBS) study was also performed to verify the presented methodology. CRBS is a gas diagnostic technique used for non-intrusive probing of gas thermodynamic properties. In addition to the experimental investigation, a complementary numerical study was conducted using a direct simulation Monte Carlo approach. The numerical study used a modified version of SMILE to predict the gas phenomena within the strong optical potential fields. The goal of substantiating optical lattice heating was accomplished by detecting the acoustic wave generated from the heated volume. The magnitude of the resulting acoustic wave was shown to vary with the optical lattice phase velocity, peaking on the order of the gas' most probable speed. The trend with lattice velocity is consistent with both theory and the numerical study and eliminates other possible heating mechanisms such as laser-induced ionization or molecular dissociation. Limitations for the investigated heating

  14. Dissipation-Induced Symmetry Breaking in a Driven Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gommers, R.; Bergamini, S.; Renzoni, F.

    2005-08-12

    We analyze the atomic dynamics in an ac driven periodic optical potential which is symmetric in both time and space. We experimentally demonstrate that in the presence of dissipation the symmetry is broken, and a current of atoms through the optical lattice is generated as a result.

  15. Quantum Degenerate Strontium in a 3D Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, J. A.; Desalvo, B. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2014-05-01

    We present our experiments with quantum degenerate neutral strontium in a 3-D optical lattice formed with 532 nm light. Precision control and manipulation of quantum degenerate gases in optical lattices allows for the realization and investigation of tunable many-body systems. Strontium, in particular, has been studied extensively in optical lattices due to the narrow 5s21S0 --> 5 s 5 p3Pj transitions for use as an atomic clock. However, in the present work, we take advantage of these narrow transitions together with strontium's unique isotopic properties to investigate interaction regimes inaccessible to alkali atoms. Among the topics we plan to explore are formation of ultracold molecules using an optical Feshbach resonance as well as the effects of dissipation on atom dynamics. This work was supported by Rice University, Shell, the Welch Foundation (C-1579) and the National Science Foundation (PHY-1205946).

  16. Ultracold polar molecules in a 3D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules, with their long-range electric dipolar interactions, offer new opportunities for studying quantum magnetism and many-body physics. KRb molecules loaded into a three-dimensional (3D) optical lattice allow one to study such a spin-lattice system in a stable environment without losses arising from chemical reactions. In the case with strong lattice confinement along two directions and a weak lattice potential along the third, we find the loss rate is suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. In a deep 3D lattice with no tunneling, we observe evidences for spin exchange interactions. We use Ramsey spectroscopy to investigate the spin dynamics. By choosing the appropriate lattice polarizations and implementing a spin echo sequence, the single particle dephasing is largely suppressed, leaving the dipolar exchange interactions as the dominant contribution to the observed dynamics. This is supported by many-body theoretical calculations. While this initial demonstration was done with low lattice fillings, our current experimental efforts are focused on increasing the lattice filling fraction. This will greatly benefit the study of complex many-body dynamics with long-range interactions, such as transport of excitations in an out-of-equilibrium system and spin-orbit coupling in a lattice.

  17. Twofold PT symmetry in doubly exponential optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. T.; Makris, K. G.; Musslimani, Z. H.; Christodoulides, D. N.; Rotter, S.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a family of non-Hermitian optical potentials that are given in terms of double-exponential periodic functions. The center of PT symmetry is not around zero and the potential satisfies a shifted PT -symmetry relation at two distinct locations. Motivated by wave transmission through thin phase screens and gratings, we examine these refractive index modulations from the perspective of optical lattices that are homogeneous along the propagation direction. The diffraction dynamics, abrupt phase transitions in the eigenvalue spectrum, and exceptional points in the band structure are examined in detail. In addition, the nonlinear properties of wave propagation in Kerr nonlinearity media are studied. In particular, coherent structures such as lattice solitons are numerically identified by applying the spectral renormalization method. The spatial symmetries of such lattice solitons follow the shifted PT -symmetric relations. Furthermore, such lattice solitons have a power threshold and their linear and nonlinear stabilities are critically dependent on their spatial symmetry point.

  18. Matter-wave propagation in optical lattices: geometrical and flat-band effects

    DOE PAGES

    Metcalf, Mekena; Chern, Gia-Wei; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-03-17

    Here we report that the geometry of optical lattices can be engineered allowing the study of atomic transport along paths arranged in patterns that are otherwise difficult to probe in the solid state. A question feasible to atomic systems is related to the speed of propagation of matter-waves as a function of the lattice geometry. To address this issue, we have investigated theoretically the quantum transport of non-interacting and weakly-interacting ultracold fermionic atoms in several 2D optical lattice geometries. We find that the triangular lattice has a higher propagation velocity compared to the square lattice, and the cross-linked square latticemore » has an even faster propagation velocity. The increase results from the mixing of the momentum states which leads to different group velocities in quantum systems. Standard band theory provides an explanation and allows for a systematic way to search and design systems with controllable matter-wave propagation. Moreover, the presence of a flat band such as in a two-leg ladder geometry leads to a dynamical density discontinuity due to its localized atoms. Lastly, we discuss possible realizations of those dynamical phenomena.« less

  19. Quantum simulation of 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhou, Xingxiang; Li, Chuan-Feng; Xu, Jin-Shi; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2015-07-06

    Orbital angular momentum of light is a fundamental optical degree of freedom characterized by unlimited number of available angular momentum states. Although this unique property has proved invaluable in diverse recent studies ranging from optical communication to quantum information, it has not been considered useful or even relevant for simulating nontrivial physics problems such as topological phenomena. Contrary to this misconception, we demonstrate the incredible value of orbital angular momentum of light for quantum simulation by showing theoretically how it allows to study a variety of important 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities. This application for orbital angular momentum of light not only reduces required physical resources but also increases feasible scale of simulation, and thus makes it possible to investigate important topics such as edge-state transport and topological phase transition in a small simulator ready for immediate experimental exploration.

  20. A mercury optical lattice clock at LNE-SYRTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sarlo, L.; Favier, M.; Tyumenev, R.; Bize, S.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the development of an optical lattice clock based on mercury and the results obtained since the 7 th SFSM. We briefly present a new solution for the cooling laser system and an improved lattice trap that allows us to interrogate a few thousand atoms in parallel. This translates into a fractional short term stability of 1.2 x 10-15 at the clock frequency of 1.129 PHz.

  1. Development of 2-D-MAX-DOAS and retrievals of trace gases and aerosols optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan

    Air pollution is a major problem worldwide that adversely a_ects human health, impacts ecosystems and climate. In the atmosphere, there are hundreds of important compounds participating in complex atmospheric reactions linked to air quality and climate. Aerosols are relevant because they modify the radiation balance, a_ect clouds, and thus Earth albedo. The amount of aerosol is often characterized by the vertical integral through the entire height of the atmosphere of the logarithm fraction of incident light that is extinguished called Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). The AOD at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is 0.19 (multi annual global mean), and that over oceans is 0.13. About 43 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions, sample spatial scales that resemble satellite ground-pixels and atmospheric models, and help integrate remote sensing and in-situ observations to obtain optical closure on the effects of aerosols and trace gases in our changing environment. In this work, I present the recent development of the University of Colorado two dimensional (2-D) Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure the azimuth and altitude distribution of trace gases and aerosol optical properties simultaneously with a single instrument. The instrument measures solar scattered light from any direction in the sky, including direct sun light in the hyperspectral domain. In Chapter 2, I describe the capabilities of 2-D measurements in the context of retrievals of azimuth distributions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), and glyoxal (CHOCHO), which are precursors for tropospheric O3 and aerosols. The measurements were carried out during the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) campaign in Mainz, Germany and show the ability to bridge spatial scales to

  2. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-06-15

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (V{sub eff}(NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well V{sub eff}(LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of V{sub eff}(LOL) increases as k increases and that of V{sub eff}(NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter {tau} drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation

  3. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-06-01

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (Veff(NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well Veff(LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of Veff(LOL) increases as k increases and that of Veff(NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter τ drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation indicates that during evolution

  4. Isospin correlations in two-partite hexagonal optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, Marta; Richter, Eva-Maria; Pfannkuche, Daniela

    2014-07-01

    Two-component mixtures in optical lattices reveal a rich variety of different phases. We employ an exact diagonalization method to obtain the relevant correlation functions in hexagonal optical lattices which characterize those phases. We relate the occupation difference of the two species to the magnetic polarization. "Iso" -magnetic correlations disclose the nature of the system, which can be of easy-axis type, bearing phase segregation, or of easy-plane type, corresponding to super-counter-fluidity. In the latter case, the correlations reveal easy-plane segregation, involving a highly entangled state. We identify striking correlated supersolid phases appearing within the superfluid limit.

  5. Physics of higher orbital bands in optical lattices: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-11-01

    The orbital degree of freedom plays a fundamental role in understanding the unconventional properties in solid state materials. Experimental progress in quantum atomic gases has demonstrated that high orbitals in optical lattices can be used to construct quantum emulators of exotic models beyond natural crystals, where novel many-body states such as complex Bose-Einstein condensates and topological semimetals emerge. A brief introduction of orbital degrees of freedom in optical lattices is given and a summary of exotic orbital models and resulting many-body phases is provided. Experimental consequences of the novel phases are also discussed.

  6. Bose-Fermi mixtures in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, K.; Majumdar, P.

    2007-06-15

    We study an atomic Bose-Fermi mixture with unpolarized fermions in an optical lattice. We obtain the Mott ground states of such a system in the limit of the deep optical lattice and discuss the effect of quantum fluctuations on these states. We also study the superfluid-insulator transitions of bosons and metal-insulator transition of fermions in such a mixture within a slave-rotor mean-field approximation, and obtain the corresponding phase diagram. We discuss experimental implications of our results.

  7. Optical fiber poling by induction: analysis by 2D numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, F; Huang, D; Corbari, C; Healy, N; Sazio, P J A

    2016-04-15

    Since their first demonstration some 25 years ago, thermally poled silica fibers have been used to realize device functions such as electro-optic modulation, switching, polarization-entangled photons, and optical frequency conversion with a number of advantages over bulk free-space components. We have recently developed an innovative induction poling technique that could allow for the development of complex microstructured fiber geometries for highly efficient χ(2)-based device applications. To systematically implement these more advanced poled fiber designs, we report here the development of comprehensive numerical models of the induction poling mechanism itself via two-dimensional (2D) simulations of ion migration and space-charge region formation using finite element analysis. PMID:27082323

  8. Stability of matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk. Golam; Roy, S. K.; Talukdar, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider localized states of both single- and two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) confined in a potential resulting from the superposition of linear and nonlinear optical lattices and make use of Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion to investigate the effect of nonlinear lattice on the stability of the soliton solutions in the linear optical lattice (LOL). For the single-component case we show that a weak nonlinear lattice has very little effect on the stability of such solitons while sufficiently strong nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) squeezes them to produce narrow bound states. For two-component condensates we find that when the strength of the NOL (γ1) is less than that of the LOL (V0) a relatively weak intra-atomic interaction (IAI) has little effect on the stability of the component solitons. This is true for both attractive and repulsive IAI. A strong attractive IAI, however, squeezes the BEC solitons while a similar repulsive IAI makes the component solitons wider. For γ1 > V0, only a strong attractive IAI squeezes the BEC solitons but the squeezing effect is less prominent than that found for γ1 < V0. We make useful checks on the results of our semianalytical stability analysis by solving the appropriate Gross-Pitaevskii equations numerically.

  9. Mixtures of bosonic and fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Albus, Alexander; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Eisert, Jens

    2003-08-01

    We discuss the theory of mixtures of bosonic and fermionic atoms in periodic potentials at zero temperature. We derive a general Bose-Fermi Hubbard Hamiltonian in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a superimposed harmonic trapping potential. We study the conditions for linear stability of the mixture and derive a mean-field criterion for the onset of a bosonic superfluid transition. We investigate the ground-state properties of the mixture in the Gutzwiller formulation of mean-field theory, and present numerical studies of finite systems. The bosonic and fermionic density distributions and the onset of quantum phase transitions to demixing and to a bosonic Mott-insulator are studied as a function of the lattice potential strength. The existence is predicted of a disordered phase for mixtures loaded in very deep lattices. Such a disordered phase possessing many degenerate or quasidegenerate ground states is related to a breaking of the mirror symmetry in the lattice.

  10. Optical lattice polarization effects on magnetically induced optical atomic clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Oates, C. W.

    2007-08-15

    We derive the frequency shift for a forbidden optical transition J=0{yields}J{sup '}=0 caused by the simultaneous actions of an elliptically polarized lattice field and a static magnetic field. We find that a simple configuration of lattice and magnetic fields leads to a cancellation of this shift to first order in lattice intensity and magnetic field. In this geometry, the second-order lattice intensity shift can be minimized as well by use of optimal lattice polarization. Suppression of these shifts could considerably enhance the performance of the next generation of atomic clocks.

  11. Collective excitations of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of weak disorder and a two-dimensional optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Ying; Liang Zhaoxin; Hu Bambi

    2010-05-15

    We investigate the combined effects of weak disorder and a two-dimensional (2D) optical lattice on the collective excitations of a harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) at zero temperature. Accordingly, we generalize the hydrodynamic equations of superfluid for a weakly interacting Bose gas in a 2D optical lattice to include the effects of weak disorder. Our analytical results for the collective frequencies beyond the mean-field approximation reveal the peculiar role of disorder, interplaying with the 2D optical lattice and interatomic interaction, on elementary excitations along the 3D to 1D crossover. In particular, consequences of disorder on the phonon propagation and surface modes are analyzed in detail. The experimental scenario is also proposed.

  12. Veselago lensing with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Leder, Martin; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Veselago pointed out that electromagnetic wave theory allows for materials with a negative index of refraction, in which most known optical phenomena would be reversed. A slab of such a material can focus light by negative refraction, an imaging technique strikingly different from conventional positive refractive index optics, where curved surfaces bend the rays to form an image of an object. Here we demonstrate Veselago lensing for matter waves, using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A relativistic, that is, photon-like, dispersion relation for rubidium atoms is realized with a bichromatic optical lattice potential. We rely on a Raman π-pulse technique to transfer atoms between two different branches of the dispersion relation, resulting in a focusing that is completely analogous to the effect described by Veselago for light waves. Future prospects of the demonstrated effects include novel sub-de Broglie wavelength imaging applications.

  13. Direct Tunneling Delay Time Measurement in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortun, A.; Cabrera-Gutiérrez, C.; Condon, G.; Michon, E.; Billy, J.; Guéry-Odelin, D.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the measurement of the time required for a wave packet to tunnel through the potential barriers of an optical lattice. The experiment is carried out by loading adiabatically a Bose-Einstein condensate into a 1D optical lattice. A sudden displacement of the lattice by a few tens of nanometers excites the micromotion of the dipole mode. We then directly observe in momentum space the splitting of the wave packet at the turning points and measure the delay between the reflected and the tunneled packets for various initial displacements. Using this atomic beam splitter twice, we realize a chain of coherent micron-size Mach-Zehnder interferometers at the exit of which we get essentially a wave packet with a negative momentum, a result opposite to the prediction of classical physics.

  14. Collisional shifts in optical-lattice atom clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Vardi, A.

    2006-09-15

    We theoretically study the effects of elastic collisions on the determination of frequency standards via Ramsey-fringe spectroscopy in optical-lattice atom clocks. Interparticle interactions of bosonic atoms in multiply occupied lattice sites can cause a linear frequency shift, as well as generate asymmetric Ramsey-fringe patterns and reduce fringe visibility due to interparticle entanglement. We propose a method of reducing these collisional effects in an optical lattice by introducing a phase difference of {pi} between the Ramsey driving fields in adjacent sites. This configuration suppresses site-to-site hopping due to interference of two tunneling pathways, without degrading fringe visibility. Consequently, the probability of double occupancy is reduced, leading to cancellation of collisional shifts.

  15. Optical lattice polarization effects on hyperpolarizability of atomic clock transitions.

    PubMed

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G

    2006-10-27

    The light-induced frequency shift due to hyperpolarizability (i.e., terms of second-order in intensity) is studied for a forbidden optical transition, J = 0 --> J = 0. A simple universal dependence on the field ellipticity is obtained. This result allows minimization of the second-order light shift with respect to the field polarization for optical lattices operating at a magic wavelength (at which the first-order shift vanishes). We show the possibility for the existence of a magic elliptical polarization, for which the second-order frequency shift vanishes. The optimal polarization of the lattice field can be either linear, circular, or magic elliptical. The obtained results could improve the accuracy of lattice-based atomic clocks.

  16. Spin-orbit coupling in a strontium optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, Tobias; Bromley, Sarah; Kolkowitz, Shimon; Zhang, Xibo; Wall, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic gauge fields are a promising tool for creating complex Hamiltonians with ultracold neutral atoms that may mimic the fractional Quantum Hall effect and other topological states. A promising approach is to use spin-orbit coupling to treat an internal degree of freedom as an effective `synthetic' spatial dimension. Here, this synthetic dimension is comprised by the internal ground and excited states used for high-precision clock spectroscopy in a fermionic strontium optical lattice clock. We report on our progress towards this goal in a system where atoms tunnel through a 1D optical lattice during clock interrogation. We present measurements of the lattice band structure under varying Lamb-Dicke parameters and in a regime where s-wave collisions are expected to contribute density dependent frequency shifts.

  17. Direct Tunneling Delay Time Measurement in an Optical Lattice.

    PubMed

    Fortun, A; Cabrera-Gutiérrez, C; Condon, G; Michon, E; Billy, J; Guéry-Odelin, D

    2016-07-01

    We report on the measurement of the time required for a wave packet to tunnel through the potential barriers of an optical lattice. The experiment is carried out by loading adiabatically a Bose-Einstein condensate into a 1D optical lattice. A sudden displacement of the lattice by a few tens of nanometers excites the micromotion of the dipole mode. We then directly observe in momentum space the splitting of the wave packet at the turning points and measure the delay between the reflected and the tunneled packets for various initial displacements. Using this atomic beam splitter twice, we realize a chain of coherent micron-size Mach-Zehnder interferometers at the exit of which we get essentially a wave packet with a negative momentum, a result opposite to the prediction of classical physics. PMID:27419545

  18. Excitations of one-dimensional supersolids with optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, C.-H.; Tsai, Y.-C.; Wu, W. C.

    2016-06-01

    Based on mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii and Bogoliubov-de Gennes approaches, we investigate excitations of a one-dimensional soft-core interacting ultracold Bose gas under the effect of an optical lattice. It is found that no matter how deep the lattice is, at q →0 the lowest mode corresponds to a gapless phonon, ω12=v12q2 , whereas the second lowest mode corresponds to a gapped optical phonon, ω22=Δ2±v22q2 . Determination of the velocities v1,v2 , the gap Δ , and the possible sign change in ω2 upon the change of lattice depth can give decisive measures to the transitions across various supersolid and solid states. The power law v1˜(fs) 1 /2 with fs the superfluid fraction is identified in the present system at the tight-binding regime.

  19. Retrieval of aerosol optical and micro-physical properties with 2D-MAX-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Rich; Hair, Johnathan; Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Berg, Larry; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason; Hodges, Gary; Lantz, Kathy; Wagner, Thomas; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Recent retrievals of 2 dimensional (2D) Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2D-MAX-DOAS) have highlighted its importance in order to infer diurnal horizontal in-homogeneities around the measurement site. In this work, we expand the capabilities of 2D measurements in order to estimate simultaneously aerosol optical and micro-physical properties. Specifically, we present a retrieval method to obtain: (1) aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the boundary layer (BL) and free troposphere (FT) and (2) the effective complex refractive index and the effective radius of the aerosol column size distribution. The retrieval method to obtain AOT is based on an iterative comparison of measured normalized radiances, oxygen collision pair (O4), and absolute Raman Scattering Probability (RSP) with the forward model calculations derived with the radiative transfer model McArtim based on defined aerosol extinction profiles. Once the aerosol load is determined we use multiple scattering phase functions and single scattering albedo (SSA) obtained with Mie calculations which then constrain the RTM to forward model solar almucantar normalized radiances. The simulated almucantar normalized radiances are then compared to the measured normalized radiances. The best-fit, determined by minimizing the root mean square, retrieves the complex refractive index, and effective radius. We apply the retrieval approach described above to measurements carried out during the 2012 intensive operation period of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) held on Cape Cod, MA, USA. Results are presented for two ideal case studies with both large and small aerosol loading and similar air mass outflow from the northeast coast of the US over the West Atlantic Ocean. The aerosol optical properties are compared with several independent instruments, including the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) for highly resolved extinction profiles during the overpasses, and with the

  20. Atom optics simulator of lattice transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fangzhao; Meier, Eric; Gadway, Bryce

    2016-05-01

    We report on a novel scheme for studying lattice transport phenomena, based on the controlled momentum-space dynamics of ultracold atomic matter waves. In the effective tight binding models that can be simulated, we demonstrate that this technique allows for a local and time-dependent control over all system parameters, and additionally allows for single-site resolved detection of atomic populations. We demonstrate full control over site-to-site off-diagonal tunneling elements (amplitude and phase) and diagonal site-energies, through the observation of continuous time quantum walks, Bloch oscillations, and negative tunneling. These capabilities open up new prospects in the experimental study of disordered and topological systems.

  1. Doublon dynamics and polar molecule production in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Jacob P.; Moses, Steven A.; Gärttner, Martin; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Fu, Zhengkun; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Julienne, Paul S.; Rey, Ana Maria; Jin, Deborah S.; Ye, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Polar molecules in an optical lattice provide a versatile platform to study quantum many-body dynamics. Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair. By letting this out-of-equilibrium system evolve from a well-defined, but disordered, initial condition, we observe clear effects on pairing that arise from inter-species interactions, a higher partial-wave Feshbach resonance and excited Bloch-band population. These observations facilitate a detailed understanding of molecule formation in the lattice. Moreover, the interplay of tunnelling and interaction of fermions and bosons provides a controllable platform to study Bose-Fermi Hubbard dynamics. Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons. These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

  2. Doublon dynamics and polar molecule production in an optical lattice

    PubMed Central

    Covey, Jacob P.; Moses, Steven A.; Gärttner, Martin; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Fu, Zhengkun; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Julienne, Paul S.; Rey, Ana Maria; Jin, Deborah S.; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Polar molecules in an optical lattice provide a versatile platform to study quantum many-body dynamics. Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair. By letting this out-of-equilibrium system evolve from a well-defined, but disordered, initial condition, we observe clear effects on pairing that arise from inter-species interactions, a higher partial-wave Feshbach resonance and excited Bloch-band population. These observations facilitate a detailed understanding of molecule formation in the lattice. Moreover, the interplay of tunnelling and interaction of fermions and bosons provides a controllable platform to study Bose-Fermi Hubbard dynamics. Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons. These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices. PMID:27075831

  3. Superfluid qubit systems with ring shaped optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Amico, Luigi; Aghamalyan, Davit; Auksztol, Filip; Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    We study an experimentally feasible qubit system employing neutral atomic currents. Our system is based on bosonic cold atoms trapped in ring-shaped optical lattice potentials. The lattice makes the system strictly one dimensional and it provides the infrastructure to realize a tunable ring-ring interaction. Our implementation combines the low decoherence rates of neutral cold atoms systems, overcoming single site addressing, with the robustness of topologically protected solid state Josephson flux qubits. Characteristic fluctuations in the magnetic fields affecting Josephson junction based flux qubits are expected to be minimized employing neutral atoms as flux carriers. By breaking the Galilean invariance we demonstrate how atomic currents through the lattice provide an implementation of a qubit. This is realized either by artificially creating a phase slip in a single ring, or by tunnel coupling of two homogeneous ring lattices. The single qubit infrastructure is experimentally investigated with tailored optical potentials. Indeed, we have experimentally realized scaled ring-lattice potentials that could host, in principle, n ~ 10 of such ring-qubits, arranged in a stack configuration, along the laser beam propagation axis. An experimentally viable scheme of the two-ring-qubit is discussed, as well. Based on our analysis, we provide protocols to initialize, address, and read-out the qubit.

  4. Heavy fermions in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Foss-Feig, Michael; Hermele, Michael; Gurarie, Victor; Rey, Ana Maria

    2010-11-15

    We employ a mean-field theory to study ground-state properties and transport of a two-dimensional gas of ultracold alkaline-earth-metal atoms governed by the Kondo lattice Hamiltonian plus a parabolic confining potential. In a homogenous system, this mean-field theory is believed to give a qualitatively correct description of heavy-fermion metals and Kondo insulators: It reproduces the Kondo-like scaling of the quasiparticle mass in the former and the same scaling of the excitation gap in the latter. In order to understand ground-state properties in a trap, we extend this mean-field theory via local-density approximation. We find that the Kondo insulator gap manifests as a shell structure in the trapped density profile. In addition, a strong signature of the large Fermi surface expected for heavy-fermion systems survives the confinement and could be probed in time-of-flight experiments. From a full self-consistent diagonalization of the mean-field theory, we are able to study dynamics in the trap. We find that the mass enhancement of quasiparticle excitations in the heavy-Fermi liquid phase manifests as slowing of the dipole oscillations that result from a sudden displacement of the trap center.

  5. Numerical analysis using 2D modeling of optical fiber poled by induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; De Lucia, F.; Corbari, C.; Healy, N.; Sazio, P. J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal poling, a technique to introduce effective second-order nonlinearities in silica optical fibers, has found widespread applications in frequency conversion, electro-optic modulation, switching and polarization-entangled photon pair generation. Since its first demonstration around 25 years ago, studies into thermal poling were primarily based on anode-cathode electrode configurations. However, more recently, superior electrode configurations have been investigated that allow for robust and reliable thermally poled fibers with excellent second order nonlinear properties [1, 2]. Very recently, we experimentally demonstrated an electrostatic induction poling technique that creates a stable second-order nonlinearity in a twin-hole fiber without any direct physical contact to internal fiber electrodes whatsoever [3]. This innovative technique lifts a number of restrictions on the use of complex microstructured optical fibers (MOF) for poling, as it is no longer necessary to individually contact internal electrodes and presents a general methodology for selective liquid electrode filling of complex MOF geometries. In order to systematically implement these more advanced device embodiments, it is first necessary to develop comprehensive numerical models of the induction poling mechanism itself. To this end, we have developed two-dimensional (2D) simulations of space-charge region formation using COMSOL finite element analysis, by building on current numerical models [4].

  6. Coherent beam combining using a 2D internally sensed optical phased array.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lyle E; Ward, Robert L; Sutton, Andrew J; Fleddermann, Roland; de Vine, Glenn; Malikides, Emmanuel A; Wuchenich, Danielle M R; McClelland, David E; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2014-08-01

    Coherent combination of multiple lasers using an optical phased array (OPA) is an effective way to scale optical intensity in the far field beyond the capabilities of single fiber lasers. Using an actively phase locked, internally sensed, 2D OPA we demonstrate over 95% fringe visibility of the interfered beam, λ/120 RMS output phase stability over a 5 Hz bandwidth, and quadratic scaling of intensity in the far field using three emitters. This paper presents a new internally sensed OPA architecture that employs a modified version of digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry (DEHI) based on code division multiplexing to measure and control the phase of each emitter. This internally sensed architecture can be implemented with no freespace components, offering improved robustness to shock and vibration exhibited by all-fiber devices. To demonstrate the concept, a single laser is split into three channels/emitters, each independently controlled using separate electro-optic modulators. The output phase of each channel is measured using DEHI to sense the small fraction of light that is reflected back into the fiber at the OPA's glass-air interface. The relative phase between emitters is used to derive the control signals needed to stabilize their relative path lengths and maintain coherent combination in the far field.

  7. Atom-molecular oscillations of a Bose gas in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzen, Daniel

    2005-05-01

    A Bose gas in an optical lattice can undergo a quantum phase transition between a superfluid and a ``Mott insulator'' state [1]. We have created a Mott insulator state of ^87Rb atoms in an optical lattice with a controllable number of atoms per site, and measured its stimulated Raman photoassociation spectrum. We found that higher density samples exhibited a two-peaked spectrum arising from photoassociation in sites with two and three atoms, respectively. The splitting between these peaks provides a measurement of the atom-molecule scattering length. Raman photoassociation of a sample with a central core of Mott insulator with two atoms per site induced macroscopic coherent oscillations between an atomic and a molecular gas, as predicted by Jaksch et al. [2]. Our result implies that at the point of minimum atom number, we have created a molecular quantum gas with one molecule in each lattice site. In addition, we have carried out Bragg spectroscopy of the gas [3], and found evidence of a gap in the excitation spectrum of the insulating state. This work was carried out in collaboration with C. Ryu, Emek Yesilada, Xu Du, and Shoupu Wan. We acknowledge the support of the R.A. Welch Foundation, the N.S.F., and the D.O.E Quantum Optics Initiative. [1] Markus Greiner et al., Nature 415, 39 (2002). [2] D. Jaksch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 040402 (2002). [3] D. Van Oosten et al., cond-mat/0405492 (2004).

  8. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Andrea; Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This allows us to demonstrate super-resolution of the atoms’ position in closely packed ensembles where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a mathematical foundation thereof. We also discuss discretized image sampling in pixel detectors and provide a quantitative model of noise sources in electron multiplying CCD cameras. The techniques developed here are not only beneficial to neutral atom experiments, but could also be employed to improve the localization precision of trapped ions for ultra precise force sensing.

  9. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  10. Nonlinear localized modes in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates in two-dimensional optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Rojas, Santiago; Naether, Uta; Delgado, Aldo; Vicencio, Rodrigo A.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the existence and properties of discrete localized excitations in a Bose-Einstein condensate loaded into a periodic two-dimensional optical lattice, when a dipolar interaction between atoms is present. The dependence of the Number of Atoms (Norm) on the energy of solutions is studied, along with their stability. Two important features of the system are shown, namely, the absence of the Norm threshold required for localized solutions to exist in finite 2D systems, and the existence of regions in the parameter space where two fundamental solutions are simultaneously unstable. This feature enables mobility of localized solutions, which is an uncommon feature in 2D discrete nonlinear systems. With attractive dipolar interaction, a non-trivial behavior of the Norm dependence is obtained, which is well described by an analytical model.

  11. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Vezzani, A.

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of {sup 41}K induces a significant loss of coherence in {sup 87}Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices.

  12. Effective Dirac dynamics of ultracold atoms in bichromatic optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Witthaut, D.; Salger, T.; Kling, S.; Grossert, C.; Weitz, M.

    2011-09-15

    We study the dynamics of ultracold atoms in tailored bichromatic optical lattices. By tuning the lattice parameters, one can readily engineer the band structure and realize a Dirac point, i.e., a true crossing of two Bloch bands. The dynamics in the vicinity of such a crossing is described by the one-dimensional Dirac equation, which is rigorously shown beyond the tight-binding approximation. Within this framework we analyze the effects of an external potential and demonstrate numerically that it is possible to demonstrate Klein tunneling with current experimental setups.

  13. Prospects for Optical Clocks with a Blue-Detuned Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.; Marmo, S. I.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.

    2009-02-13

    We investigated the properties of optical lattice clocks operated with a repulsive light-shift potential. The magic wavelength, where light-shift perturbation for the clock transition cancels, was experimentally determined to be 389.889(9) nm for {sup 87}Sr. The hyperpolarizability effects on the clock transition were investigated theoretically. With minimal trapping field perturbation provided by the blue-detuned lattice, the fractional uncertainty due to the hyperpolarizability effects was found to be 2x10{sup -19} in the relevant clock transition.

  14. Optical-lattice Hamiltonians for relativistic quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kapit, Eliot; Mueller, Erich

    2011-03-15

    We show how interpenetrating optical lattices containing Bose-Fermi mixtures can be constructed to emulate the thermodynamics of quantum electrodynamics (QED). We present models of neutral atoms on lattices in 1+1, 2+1, and 3+1 dimensions whose low-energy effective action reduces to that of photons coupled to Dirac fermions of the corresponding dimensionality. We give special attention to (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED3) and discuss how two of its most interesting features, chiral symmetry breaking and Chern-Simons physics, could be observed experimentally.

  15. Mixtures of strongly interacting bosons in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Buonsante, P; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Penna, V; Vezzani, A

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of 41K induces a significant loss of coherence in 87Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices. PMID:18643555

  16. Terahertz wavefront assessment based on 2D electro-optic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyadi, Harsono; Ichikawa, Ryuji; Degert, Jérôme; Freysz, Eric; Yasui, Takeshi; Abraham, Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    Complete characterization of terahertz (THz) radiation becomes an interesting yet challenging study for many years. In visible optical region, the wavefront assessment has been proved as a powerful tool for the beam profiling and characterization, which consequently requires 2-dimension (2D) single-shot acquisition of the beam cross-section to provide the spatial profile in time- and frequency-domain. In THz region, the main problem is the lack of effective THz cameras to satisfy this need. In this communication, we propose a simple setup based on free-space collinear 2D electrooptic sampling in a ZnTe crystal for the characterization of THz wavefronts. In principle, we map the optically converted, time-resolved data of the THz pulse by changing the time delay between the probe pulse and the generated THz pulse. The temporal waveforms from different lens-ZnTe distances can clearly indicate the evolution of THz beam as it is converged, focused, or diverged. From the Fourier transform of the temporal waveforms, we can obtain the spectral profile of a broadband THz wave, which in this case within the 0.1-2 THz range. The spectral profile also provides the frequency dependency of the THz pulse amplitude. The comparison between experimental and theoretical results at certain frequencies (here we choose 0.285 and 1.035 THz) is in a good agreement suggesting that our system is capable of THz wavefront characterization. Furthermore, the implementation of Hartmann/Shack-Hartmann sensor principle enables the reconstruction of THz wavefront. We demonstrate the reconstruction of THz wavefronts which are changed from planar wave to spherical one due to the insertion of convex THz lens in the THz beam path. We apply and compare two different reconstruction methods: linear integration and Zernike polynomial. Roughly we conclude that the Zernike method provide smoother wavefront shape that can be elaborated later into quantitative-qualitative analysis about the wavefront

  17. Measuring spin correlations in optical lattices using superlattice potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, K. G. L.; Andersen, B. M.; Soerensen, A. S.; Bruun, G. M.; Syljuaasen, O. F.

    2011-10-15

    We suggest two experimental methods for probing both short- and long-range spin correlations of atoms in optical lattices using superlattice potentials. The first method involves an adiabatic doubling of the periodicity of the underlying lattice to probe neighboring singlet (triplet) correlations for fermions (bosons) by the occupation of the resulting vibrational ground state. The second method utilizes a time-dependent superlattice potential to generate spin-dependent transport by any number of prescribed lattice sites, and probes correlations by the resulting number of doubly occupied sites. For experimentally relevant parameters, we demonstrate how both methods yield large signatures of antiferromagnetic correlations of strongly repulsive fermionic atoms in a single shot of the experiment. Lastly, we show how this method may also be applied to probe d-wave pairing, a possible ground-state candidate for the doped repulsive Hubbard model.

  18. Dynamical phase interferometry of cold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    London, Uri; Gat, Omri

    2011-12-15

    We study the propagation of cold-atom wave packets in an interferometer with a Mach-Zehnder topology based on the dynamical phase of Bloch oscillation in a weakly forced optical lattice with a narrow potential barrier that functions as a cold-atom wave-packet splitter. We calculate analytically the atomic wave function, and show that the expected number of atoms in the two outputs of the interferometer oscillates rapidly as a function of the angle between the potential barrier and the forcing direction with period proportional to the external potential difference across a lattice spacing divided by the lattice band energy scale. The interferometer can be used as a high-precision force probe whose principle of operation is different from current interferometers based on the overall position of Bloch oscillating wave packets.

  19. A quantum gas of polar molecules in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Steven A.

    Ultracold polar molecules, because of their long-range, spatially anisotropic interactions, are a new quantum system in which to study novel many-body phenomena. In our lab, we have produced the first quantum gas of 40K 87Rb polar molecules. These molecules were found to undergo exothermic chemical reactions, and this led to interesting studies of chemistry near absolute zero. By creating the molecules at individual sites of a 3D optical lattice, we completely suppress these chemical reactions, and the polar molecule gas becomes stable and lives for tens of seconds. This thesis documents our efforts to explore coherent, many-body phenomena resulting from long-range dipolar interactions in the lattice. By encoding a spin-1/2 system in the rotational states of the molecules, we were able to realize spin-exchange interactions based on a spin Hamiltonian, which is one of the first steps in studying quantum magnetism with polar molecules. While this study was the first realization of such coherent dipolar interactions with polar molecules in a lattice, its full potential was limited by the low lattice filling fractions. Using our ability to exquisitely control the initial atomic gas mixture, we loaded a Mott insulator of Rb and a band insulator of K into the lattice. This quantum synthesis approach led to significantly higher molecular filling fractions and represents the first fully connected system of polar molecules in an optical lattice. This low-entropy quantum gas of polar molecules opens the door to interesting quantum simulations, which should be attainable in the next generation of the experiment.

  20. Wannier functions using a discrete variable representation for optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Saurabh; Tiesinga, Eite

    2016-09-01

    We propose a numerical method using the discrete variable representation (DVR) for constructing real-valued Wannier functions localized in a unit cell for both symmetric and asymmetric periodic potentials. We apply these results to finding Wannier functions for ultracold atoms trapped in laser-generated optical lattices. Following S. Kivelson [Phys. Rev. B 26, 4269 (1982), 10.1103/PhysRevB.26.4269], for a symmetric lattice with inversion symmetry, we construct Wannier functions as eigenstates of the position operators x ̂, y ̂, and z ̂ restricted to single-particle Bloch functions belonging to one or more bands. To ensure that the Wannier functions are real-valued, we numerically obtain the band structure and real-valued eigenstates using a uniform Fourier grid DVR. We then show, by a comparison of tunneling energies, that the Wannier functions are accurate for both inversion-symmetric and asymmetric potentials to better than 10 significant digits when using double-precision arithmetic. The calculations are performed for an optical lattice with double-wells per unit cell with tunable asymmetry along the x axis and a single sinusoidal potential along the perpendicular directions. Localized functions at the two potential minima within each unit cell are similarly constructed, but using a superposition of single-particle solutions from the two lowest bands. We finally use these localized basis functions to determine the two-body interaction energies in the Bose-Hubbard model and show the dependence of these energies on lattice asymmetry.

  1. Ytterbium optical lattice clock with 10-18 level characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nathaniel; Sherman, Jeff; Beloy, Kyle; Hinkley, Nathan; Schioppo, Marco; Oates, Chris; Ludlow, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    A recent comparison of two ytterbium-based optical lattice clocks at NIST demonstrated record stability of 1 . 6 parts in 1018 after 25,000s averaging. We report on measurements of the two primary systematic effects that shift the ultra-narrow clock transition, towards a reduction of the clock uncertainty to the 10-18 level. Uncertainty stemming from the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift is largely due to imprecise knowledge of the thermal environment surrounding the atoms. We detail the construction and operation of an in-vacuum, thermally-regulated radiation shield, which permits laser cooling and trapping while enabling an absolute temperature measurement with < 20 mK precision. Additionally, while operation of the optical lattice at the magic wavelength (λm) cancels the scalar Stark shift (since both clock states shift equally), higher-order vector and two-photon hyperpolarizability shifts remain. To evaluate these effects, as well as the polarizability away from λm, we implement a lattice buildup cavity around the atoms. The resulting twenty-fold enhancement of the lattice intensity provides a significant lever arm for precise measurement of these effects.

  2. Superfluid and Insulating Phases of Fermion Mixtures in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskin, M.; de Melo, C. A. R. Sá

    2007-08-01

    The ground state phase diagram of fermion mixtures in optical lattices is analyzed as a function of interaction strength, fermion filling factor, and tunneling parameters. In addition to standard superfluid, phase-separated or coexisting superfluid excess-fermion phases found in homogeneous or harmonically trapped systems, fermions in optical lattices have several insulating phases, including a molecular Bose-Mott insulator (BMI), a Fermi-Pauli (band) insulator (FPI), a phase-separated BMI-FPI mixture or a Bose-Fermi checkerboard (BFC). The molecular BMI phase is the fermion mixture counterpart of the atomic BMI found in atomic Bose systems, the BFC or BMI-FPI phases exist in Bose-Fermi mixtures, and lastly the FPI phase is particular to the Fermi nature of the constituent atoms of the mixture.

  3. Towards exciting a Rydberg gas in optical lattices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Han, Jingshan; Guo, Ruixiang; Vogt, Thibault; Li, Wenhui; Quantum Matter Group Team

    2013-05-01

    Rydberg atoms are highly excited atoms with principal quantum number n >10. They have exaggerated properties such as large dipole moment and high polarizability. Large dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg atoms, which lead to Rydberg blockade and giant non linearity, provide unique opportunities for studying quantum many-body physics. Rydberg excitation of ground state quantum gas in optical lattices has already shown the formation of spatially organized structures and Rydberg dressed systems are promising for entering the strongly correlated regime. Our current project is to study the collective excitation to Rydberg states from a quantum gas of ground state atoms in an optical lattice. In this poster we present the latest development in building up the experimental apparatus and our plans on spectroscopic measurements and spatially imaging of Rydberg excitations. Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore.

  4. 2D-Visualization of metabolic activity with planar optical chemical sensors (optodes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R. J.; Liebsch, G.

    2015-12-01

    Microbia plays an outstandingly important role in many hydrologic compartments, such as e.g. the benthic community in sediments, or biologically active microorganisms in the capillary fringe, in ground water, or soil. Oxygen, pH, and CO2 are key factors and indicators for microbial activity. They can be measured using optical chemical sensors. These sensors record changing fluorescence properties of specific indicator dyes. The signals can be measured in a non-contact mode, even through transparent walls, which is important for many lab-experiments. They can measure in closed (transparent) systems, without sampling or intruding into the sample. They do not consume the analytes while measuring, are fully reversible and able to measure in non-stirred solutions. These sensors can be applied as high precision fiberoptic sensors (for profiling), robust sensor spots, or as planar sensors for 2D visualization (imaging). Imaging enables to detect thousands of measurement spots at the same time and generate 2D analyte maps over a region of interest. It allows for comparing different regions within one recorded image, visualizing spatial analyte gradients, or more important to identify hot spots of metabolic activity. We present ready-to-use portable imaging systems for the analytes oxygen, pH, and CO2. They consist of a detector unit, planar sensor foils and a software for easy data recording and evaluation. Sensors foils for various analytes and measurement ranges enable visualizing metabolic activity or analyte changes in the desired range. Dynamics of metabolic activity can be detected in one shot or over long time periods. We demonstrate the potential of this analytical technique by presenting experiments on benthic disturbance-recovery dynamics in sediments and microbial degradation of organic material in the capillary fringe. We think this technique is a new tool to further understand how microbial and geochemical processes are linked in (not solely) hydrologic

  5. Dynamic response of trapped ultracold bosons on optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Batrouni, G.G.; Assaad, F.F.; Scalettar, R.T.; Denteneer, P.J.H.

    2005-09-15

    We study the dynamic response of ultracold bosons trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices using Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the boson Hubbard model with a confining potential. The dynamic structure factor reveals the inhomogeneous nature of the low temperature state, which contains coexisting Mott insulator and superfluid regions. We present new evidence for local quantum criticality and discuss implications for the experimental excitation spectrum of {sup 87}Rb atoms confined in one dimension.

  6. Self-similar solitary waves in Bessel optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Siliu; Liang Jianchu; Yi Lin

    2010-01-15

    An analytical solitary wave solution to the generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) with varying coefficients in Bessel optical lattices is obtained based on the self-similar method. Our results indicate that a new family of Bessel (BSL) self-similar spatial solitons can be formed in the Kerr nonlinear media in the confined cylindrical symmetric geometry in sizes. These soliton profiles are rather stable, independent of propagation distance.

  7. Hyperfine spectra of trapped bosons in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hazzard, Kaden R. A.; Mueller, Erich J.

    2007-12-15

    We calculate the interaction induced inhomogeneous broadening of spectral lines in a trapped Bose gas as a function of the depth of a three-dimensional cubic optical lattice. As observed in recent experiments, we find that the terraced 'wedding-cake' structure of Mott plateaus splits the spectrum into a series of discrete peaks. The spectra are extremely sensitive to density corrugations and trap anharmonicities. For example, even when the majority of the cloud is superfluid the spectrum displays discrete peaks.

  8. Tunneling Dynamics and Gauge Potentials in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S. K.; Teo, B. K.; Raithel, G.

    1999-09-01

    We study periodic well-to-well tunneling of 87Rb atoms on adiabatic potential surfaces of a 1D optical lattice. The observed dependence of the lowest-band tunneling period on the depth of the adiabatic potential can only be explained by an additional intensity-independent gauge potential predicted by Dum et al. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with our quantum Monte Carlo wave-function simulations and band structure calculations.

  9. Dynamics of Hubbard-Band Quasiparticles in Disordered Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarola, Vito; Demarco, Brian

    Recent experiments use transport of degenerate Fermi gases in optical lattices (Kondov et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 083002 (2015) to probe the interplay of disorder and strong interactions. These experiments find evidence for an intriguing insulating phase where quantum diffusion is completely suppressed by strong disorder. Quantitative interpretation of these experiments remains an open problem that requires inclusion of non-zero entropy, strong interaction, and trapping in an Anderson-Hubbard model. We construct a theory of dynamics of Hubbard-band quasiparticles tailored to trapped optical lattice experiments. We compare the theory directly with center-of-mass transport experiments of Kondov et al. with no fitting parameters. The close agreement between theory and experiments shows that the suppression of transport is only partly due to finite entropy effects. We argue that the complete suppression of transport is consistent with short-time, finite size precursors of Anderson localization of Hubbard-band quasiparticles. The combination of our theoretical framework and optical lattice experiments offers an important platform for studying localization in isolated many-body quantum systems. V.W.S. acknowledges support from AFOSR under Grant FA9550-11-1-0313.

  10. 2D and 3D micro-XRF based on polycapillary optics at XLab Frascati

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polese, C.; Cappuccio, G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Hampai, D.; Liedl, A.; Pace, E.

    2015-08-01

    XRF imaging spectrometry is a powerful tool for materials characterization. A high spatial resolution is often required, in order to appreciate very tiny details of the studied object. With respect to simple pinholes, polycapillary optics allows much more intense fluxes to be achieved. This is fundamental to detect elements in trace and to strongly reduce the global acquisition time that is actually among the main reasons, in addition to radioprotection issues, affecting the competitiveness of XRF imaging with respect to other faster imaging techniques such as multispectral imaging. Unlike other well-known X-ray optics, principally employed for high brilliant radiation source such as synchrotron facilities, polyCO can be efficiently coupled also with conventional X-ray tubes. All these aspects make them the most suitable choice to realize portable, safe and high performing μXRF spectrometers. In this work preliminary results achieved with a novel 2D and 3D XRF facility, called Rainbow X-Ray (RXR), are reported, with particular attention to the spatial resolution achieved. RXR is based on the confocal arrangement of three polycapillary lenses, one focusing the primary beam and the other two capturing the fluorescence signal. The detection system is split in two couples of lens-detector in order to cover a wider energy range. The entire device is a laboratory user-friendly facility and, though it allows measurements on medium-size objects, its dimensions do not preclude it to be transported for in situ analysis on request, thanks also to a properly shielded cabinet.

  11. Addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscopy based on 2D acousto-optical deflector and spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonghong; Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben

    2013-01-01

    We present an addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscope by combining a 2D acousto-optical deflector with a spatial light modulator. The SLM shapes an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:Sapphire laser beam into a multifocus array, which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a 2D acousto-optical deflector. Compared to the single-beam-scan technique, the multifocus array scan can increase the scanning rate and the field-of-view size with the multi-region imaging ability. PMID:24307756

  12. Experimental investigation on the high chip rate of 2D incoherent optical CDMA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guorui; Wang, Rong; Pu, Tao; Fang, Tao; Zheng, Jilin; Zhu, Huatao; Wu, Weijiang

    2015-08-01

    An innovative approach to realise high chip rate in OCDMA transmission system is proposed and experimentally investigation, the high chip rate is achieved through a 2-D wavelength-hopping time-spreading en/decoder based on the supercontinuum light source. The source used in the experiment is generated by high nonlinear optical fiber (HNLF), Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) which output power is 26 dBm, and distributed feed-back laser diode which works in the gain switch state. The span and the flatness of the light source are 20 nm and 3 dB, respectively, after equalization of wavelength selective switch (WSS). The wavelength-hopping time-spreading coder can be changed 20 nm in the wavelength and 400 ps in the time, is consist of WSS and delay lines. Therefore, the experimental results show that the chip rate can achieve 500 Gchip/s, in the case of 2.5 Gbit/s, while keeping a bit error rate below forward error correction limit after 40 km transmission.

  13. Optical to microwave clock frequency ratios with a nearly continuous strontium optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Bilicki, Sławomir; Bookjans, Eva; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Shi, Chunyan; Vallet, Grégoire; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Nicolodi, Daniele; Le Coq, Yann; Guéna, Jocelyne; Abgrall, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Bize, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    Optical lattice clocks are at the forefront of frequency metrology. Both the instability and systematic uncertainty of these clocks have been reported to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the best microwave clocks. For this reason, a redefinition of the SI second based on optical clocks seems possible in the near future. However, the operation of optical lattice clocks has not yet reached the reliability that microwave clocks have achieved so far. In this paper, we report on the operation of a strontium optical lattice clock that spans several weeks, with more than 80% uptime. We make use of this long integration time to demonstrate a reproducible measurement of frequency ratios between the strontium clock transition and microwave Cs primary and Rb secondary frequency standards.

  14. 2D Lattice Boltzmann Simulation Of Chemical Reactions Within Rayleigh-Bénard And Poiseuille-Bénard Convection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya-Ventura, Gilberto; Rodríguez-Romo, Suemi

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with the computational simulation of the reaction-diffusion-advection phenomena emerging in Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) and Poiseuille-Bénard reactive convection systems. We use the Boussinesq's approximation for buoyancy forces and the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The first kinetic mesoscopic model proposed here is based on the discrete Boltzmann equation needed to solve the momentum balance coupled with buoyancy forces. Then, a second lattice Boltzmann algorithm is applied to solve the reaction-diffusion-advection equation to calculate the evolution of the chemical species concentration. We use a reactive system composed by nitrous oxide (so call laughing gas) in air as an example; its spatio-temporal decomposition is calculated. Two cases are considered, a rectangular enclosed cavity and an open channel. The simulations are performed at low Reynolds numbers and in a steady state between the first and second thermo-hydrodynamic instabilities. The results presented here, for the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior, are in good agreement with experimental data; while our| chemical kinetics simulation yields expected results. Some applications of our approach are related to chemical reactors and atmospheric phenomena, among others.

  15. Optical lattice modulation spectroscopy for spin-orbit coupled bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sarkar, Sangita; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Sengupta, K.

    2015-11-01

    Interacting bosons with two "spin" states in a lattice show superfluid-insulator phase transitions in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. Depending on the parameter regime, bosons in the superfluid phase can condense to either a zero-momentum state or to one or multiple states with finite momentum, leading to an unconventional superfluid phase. We study the response of such a system to modulation of the optical lattice potential. We show that the change in momentum distribution after lattice modulation shows distinct patterns in the Mott and the superfluid phase and these patterns can be used to detect these phases and the quantum phase transition between them. Further, the momentum-resolved optical modulation spectroscopy can identify both the gapless (Goldstone) and gapped amplitude (Higgs) mode of the superfluid phase and clearly distinguish between the superfluid phases with a zero-momentum condensate and a twisted superfluid phase by looking at the location of these modes in the Brillouin zone. We discuss experiments which can test our theory.

  16. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, A.M.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Kraus, C.V.; Martin, M.J.; Bishof, M.; Swallows, M.D.; Zhang, X.; Benko, C.; Ye, J.; Lemke, N.D.; Ludlow, A.D.

    2014-01-15

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA {sup 87}Sr and NIST {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: •Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. •Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. •Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics.

  17. Optical lattices with exceptional points in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The spectral, dynamical, and topological properties of physical systems described by non-Hermitian (including PT-symmetric) Hamiltonians are deeply modified by the appearance of exceptional points and spectral singularities. Here we show that exceptional points in the continuum can arise in non-Hermitian (yet admitting an entirely real-valued energy spectrum) optical lattices with engineered defects. At an exceptional point, the lattice sustains a bound state with an energy embedded in the spectrum of scattered states, similar to the von Neumann-Wigner bound states in the continuum of Hermitian lattices. However, the dynamical and scattering properties of the bound state at an exceptional point are deeply different from those of ordinary von Neumann-Wigner bound states in a Hermitian system. In particular, the bound state in the continuum at an exceptional point is an unstable state that can secularly grow by an infinitesimal perturbation. Such properties are discussed in details for transport of discretized light in a PT-symmetric array of coupled optical waveguides, which could provide an experimentally accessible system to observe exceptional points in the continuum.

  18. Deviations from Boltzmann-Gibbs Statistics in Confined Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechant, Andreas; Kessler, David A.; Barkai, Eli

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the semiclassical phase-space probability distribution P (x ,p ) of cold atoms in a Sisyphus cooling lattice with an additional harmonic confinement. We pose the question of whether this nonequilibrium steady state satisfies the equivalence of energy and probability. This equivalence is the foundation of Boltzmann-Gibbs and generalized thermostatic statistics, and a prerequisite for the description in terms of a temperature. At large energies, P (x ,p ) depends only on the Hamiltonian H (x ,p ) and the answer to the question is yes. In distinction to the Boltzmann-Gibbs state, the large-energy tails are power laws P (x ,p )∝H (x ,p )-1/D, where D is related to the depth of the optical lattice. At intermediate energies, however, P (x ,p ) cannot be expressed as a function of the Hamiltonian and the equivalence between energy and probability breaks down. As a consequence the average potential and kinetic energy differ and no well-defined temperature can be assigned. The Boltzmann-Gibbs state is regained only in the limit of deep optical lattices. For strong confinement relative to the damping, we derive an explicit expression for the stationary phase-space distribution.

  19. Intrinsic Localized Modes in Optical Photonic Lattices and Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, Demetrios

    Discretizing light behavior requires optical elements that can confine optical energy at distinct sites. One possible scenario in implementing such arrangements is to store energy within low loss high Q-microcavities and then allow photon exchange between such components in time. This scheme requires high-contrast dielectric elements that became available with the advent of photonic crystal technologies. Another possible avenue where such light discretization can be directly observed and studied is that based on evanescently coupled waveguide arrays. As indicated in several studies, discrete systems open up whole new directions in terms of modifying light transport properties. One such example is that of discrete solitons. By nature, discrete solitons represent self-trapped wavepackets in nonlinear periodic structures and result from the interplay between lattice diffraction (or dispersion) and material nonlinearity. In optics, this class of self-localized states has been successfully observed in both one- and two-dimensional nonlinear waveguide arrays. In recent years such photonic lattices have been implemented or induced in a variety of material systems, including those with cubic (Kerr), quadratic, photorefractive, and liquid-crystal nonlinearities. In all cases the underlying periodicity or discreteness can lead to new families of optical solitons that have no counterpart whatsoever in continuous systems. Interestingly, these results paved the way for observations in other physical systems obeying similar evolution equations like Bose-Einstein condensates. New developments in laser writing ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses, now allow the realization of all-optical switching networks in fully 3D environments using nonlinear discrete optics. Using this approach all-optical routing can be achieved using blocking operations. The spatio-temporal evolution of optical pulses in both normally and anomalously dispersive arrays can lead to novel schemes for mode

  20. Light scattering by ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Rist, Stefan; Menotti, Chiara; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-15

    We investigate theoretically light scattering of photons by ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in the linear regime. A full quantum theory for the atom-photon interactions is developed as a function of the atomic state in the lattice along the Mott-insulator-superfluid phase transition, and the photonic-scattering cross section is evaluated as a function of the energy and of the direction of emission. The predictions of this theory are compared with the theoretical results of a recent work on Bragg scattering in time-of-flight measurements [A.M. Rey et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 023407 (2005)]. We show that, when performing Bragg spectroscopy with light scattering, the photon recoil gives rise to an additional atomic site-to-site hopping, which can interfere with ordinary tunneling of matter waves and can significantly affect the photonic-scattering cross section.

  1. Tunneling, diffusion, and dissociation of Feshbach molecules in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Taylor; Bertulani, Carlos A.; Timmermans, Eddy

    2012-03-01

    The quantum dynamics of an ultracold diatomic molecule tunneling and diffusing in a one-dimensional optical lattice exhibits unusual features. While it is known that the process of quantum tunneling through potential barriers can break up a bound-state molecule into a pair of dissociated atoms, interference and reassociation produce intricate patterns in the time-evolving site-dependent probability distribution for finding atoms and bound-state molecules. We find that the bound-state molecule is unusually resilient against break up at ultralow binding energy Eb (Eb much smaller than the barrier height of the lattice potential). After an initial transient, the bound-state molecule spreads with a width that grows as the square root of time. Surprisingly, the width of the probability of finding dissociated atoms does not increase with time as a power law.

  2. Dynamical properties of ultracold bosons in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, S. D.; Blatter, G.; Altman, E.; Buechler, H. P.

    2007-02-15

    We study the excitation spectrum of strongly correlated lattice bosons for the Mott-insulating phase and for the superfluid phase close to localization. Within a Schwinger-boson mean-field approach we find two gapped modes in the Mott insulator and the combination of a sound mode (Goldstone) and a gapped (Higgs) mode in the superfluid. To make our findings comparable with experimental results, we calculate the dynamic structure factor as well as the linear response to the optical lattice modulation introduced by Stoeferle et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 130403 (2004)]. We find that the puzzling finite frequency absorption observed in the superfluid phase could be explained via the excitation of the gapped (Higgs) mode. We check the consistency of our results with an adapted f-sum rule and propose an extension of the experimental technique by Stoeferle et al. to further verify our findings.

  3. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock.

    PubMed

    Wall, Michael L; Koller, Andrew P; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-22

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s-wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p- and s-wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures. PMID:26849600

  4. One-dimensional optical lattices and impenetrable bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalilla, M.A. |

    2003-05-01

    We study the limit of large on-site repulsion of the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model at low densities, and derive a strong-coupling effective Hamiltonian. By taking the lattice parameter to zero, the Hamiltonian becomes a continuum model of fermions with attractive interactions. The leading corrections to the internal energy of a hard-core-boson (Tonks) gas as well as the (finite temperature) pair correlations of a strongly interacting Bose gas are calculated. We explore the possibility of realizing, in an optical lattice, a Luttinger liquid with stronger density correlations than the Tonks gas. A quantum phase transition to a charge-density-wave Mott insulator is also discussed.

  5. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael L.; Koller, Andrew P.; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R.; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s -wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p - and s -wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures.

  6. Spin Gradient Thermometry for Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Weld, David M.; Medley, Patrick; Miyake, Hirokazu; Hucul, David; Pritchard, David E.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate spin gradient thermometry, a new general method of measuring the temperature of ultracold atoms in optical lattices. We realize a mixture of spins separated by a magnetic field gradient. Measurement of the width of the transition layer between the two spin domains serves as a new method of thermometry which is observed to work over a broad range of lattice depths and temperatures, including in the Mott insulator regime. We demonstrate the thermometry using ultracold rubidium atoms, and suggest that interesting spin physics can be realized in this system. The lowest measured temperature is 1 nK, indicating that the system has reached the quantum regime, where insulating shells are separated by superfluid layers.

  7. Birefringent breakup of Dirac fermions on a square optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kennett, Malcolm P.; Komeilizadeh, Nazanin; Kaveh, Kamran; Smith, Peter M.

    2011-05-15

    We introduce a lattice model for fermions in a spatially periodic magnetic field that also has spatially periodic hopping amplitudes. We discuss how this model might be realized with cold atoms in an artificial magnetic field on a square optical lattice. When there is an average flux of half a flux quantum per plaquette, the spectrum of low-energy excitations can be described by massless Dirac fermions in which the usually doubly degenerate Dirac cones split into cones with different ''speeds of light.'' These gapless birefringent Dirac fermions arise because of broken chiral symmetry in the kinetic energy term of the effective low-energy Hamiltonian. We characterize the effects of various perturbations to the low-energy spectrum, including staggered potentials, interactions, and domain-wall topological defects.

  8. Optical lattice clock with atoms confined in a shallow trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonde, Pierre; Wolf, Peter

    2005-09-15

    We study the trap depth requirement for the realization of an optical clock using atoms confined in a lattice. We show that site-to-site tunneling leads to a residual sensitivity to the atom dynamics hence requiring large depths [(50-100)E{sub r} for Sr] to avoid any frequency shift or line broadening of the atomic transition at the 10{sup -17}-10{sup -18} level. Such large depths and the corresponding laser power may, however, lead to difficulties (e.g., higher-order light shifts, two-photon ionization, technical difficulties) and therefore one would like to operate the clock in much shallower traps. To circumvent this problem we propose the use of an accelerated lattice. Acceleration lifts the degeneracy between adjacents potential wells which strongly inhibits tunneling. We show that using the Earth's gravity, much shallower traps (down to 5E{sub r} for Sr) can be used for the same accuracy goal.

  9. Zeptonewton force sensing with nanospheres in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Cunningham, Mark; Casey, Kirsten; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2016-05-01

    Optically trapped nanospheres in high vacuum experience little friction and hence are promising for ultrasensitive force detection. Here we demonstrate measurement times exceeding 105 s and zeptonewton force sensitivity with laser-cooled silica nanospheres trapped in an optical lattice. The sensitivity achieved exceeds that of conventional room-temperature solid-state force sensors by over an order of magnitude, and enables a variety of applications including electric-field sensing, inertial sensing, and gravimetry. The particle is confined at the antinodes of the optical standing wave, and by studying the motion of a particle which has been moved to an adjacent trapping site, the known spacing of the antinodes can be used to calibrate the displacement spectrum of the particle. Finally, we study the dependence of the trap stability and lifetime on the laser intensity and gas pressure, and examine the heating rate of the particle in vacuum without feedback cooling.

  10. Development of 171Yb optical lattice clock at KRISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Jongchul; Park, Chang Yong; Yu, Dai-Hyuk; Lee, Won-Kyu; Eon Park, Sang; Kwon, Taeg Yong; Lee, Sang-Bum

    2012-06-01

    We measured the absolute frequency of the optical clock transition 1S0 (F = 1/2) - 3P0 (F = 1/2) of 171Yb atoms confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice and it was determined to be 518 295 836 590 865.7 (9.2) Hz. The measured frequency was calibrated to the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) by using an optical frequency comb of which frequency was phase-locked to a hydrogen maser as a flywheel oscillator traceable to the UTC. The magic wavelength was also measured as 394 798.48 (79) GHz. The results are in good agreement with two previous measurements of other institutes within the specified uncertainty of this work.

  11. Quantum simulations of lattice gauge theories using ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J. Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2016-01-01

    Can high-energy physics be simulated by low-energy, non-relativistic, many-body systems such as ultracold atoms? Such ultracold atomic systems lack the type of symmetries and dynamical properties of high energy physics models: in particular, they manifest neither local gauge invariance nor Lorentz invariance, which are crucial properties of the quantum field theories which are the building blocks of the standard model of elementary particles. However, it turns out, surprisingly, that there are ways to configure an atomic system to manifest both local gauge invariance and Lorentz invariance. In particular, local gauge invariance can arise either as an effective low-energy symmetry, or as an exact symmetry, following from the conservation laws in atomic interactions. Hence, one could hope that such quantum simulators may lead to a new type of (table-top) experiments which will be used to study various QCD (quantum chromodynamics) phenomena, such as the confinement of dynamical quarks, phase transitions and other effects, which are inaccessible using the currently known computational methods. In this report, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of lattice gauge theories, and then describe our recent progress in constructing the quantum simulation of Abelian and non-Abelian lattice gauge theories in 1  +  1 and 2  +  1 dimensions using ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  12. Quantum simulations of lattice gauge theories using ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2016-01-01

    Can high-energy physics be simulated by low-energy, non-relativistic, many-body systems such as ultracold atoms? Such ultracold atomic systems lack the type of symmetries and dynamical properties of high energy physics models: in particular, they manifest neither local gauge invariance nor Lorentz invariance, which are crucial properties of the quantum field theories which are the building blocks of the standard model of elementary particles. However, it turns out, surprisingly, that there are ways to configure an atomic system to manifest both local gauge invariance and Lorentz invariance. In particular, local gauge invariance can arise either as an effective low-energy symmetry, or as an exact symmetry, following from the conservation laws in atomic interactions. Hence, one could hope that such quantum simulators may lead to a new type of (table-top) experiments which will be used to study various QCD (quantum chromodynamics) phenomena, such as the confinement of dynamical quarks, phase transitions and other effects, which are inaccessible using the currently known computational methods. In this report, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of lattice gauge theories, and then describe our recent progress in constructing the quantum simulation of Abelian and non-Abelian lattice gauge theories in 1  +  1 and 2  +  1 dimensions using ultracold atoms in optical lattices. PMID:26684222

  13. Dynamical phase diagram of Gaussian wave packets in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, H.; Neff, T.; Fleischmann, R.

    2016-03-01

    We study the dynamics of self-trapping in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) loaded in deep optical lattices with Gaussian initial conditions, when the dynamics is well described by the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE). In the literature an approximate dynamical phase diagram based on a variational approach was introduced to distinguish different dynamical regimes: diffusion, self-trapping, and moving breathers. However, we find that the actual DNLSE dynamics shows a completely different diagram than the variational prediction. We calculate numerically a detailed dynamical phase diagram accurately describing the different dynamical regimes. It exhibits a complex structure that can readily be tested in current experiments in BECs in optical lattices and in optical waveguide arrays. Moreover, we derive an explicit theoretical estimate for the transition to self-trapping in excellent agreement with our numerical findings, which may be a valuable guide as well for future studies on a quantum dynamical phase diagram based on the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian.

  14. Proposals for quantum simulating simple lattice gauge theory models using optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Unmuth-Yockey, Judah; Bazavov, Alexei; Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    We derive an effective spin Hamiltonian for the (1 +1)-dimensional Abelian Higgs model in the strongly coupled region by integrating out the link variables. With finite spin truncations, the Hamiltonian can be matched with a 1-dimensional two-species Bose Hubbard model in the strong-coupling limit that can be implemented with cold atoms on an optical lattice. We study the phase diagram of the original Abelian Higgs model with Monte Carlo simulation and Tensor Renormalization Group methods. The results show a crossover line which terminates near the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition point. The effective quantum Hamiltonian is also studied with the DMRG method, and we find that they have a similar behavior. We discuss practical experimental implementations for our quantum simulator. Species-dependent optical lattices and ladder systems with double-well potentials are considered. We show how to obtain each of the interaction parameters required in the Bose-Hubbard model that we obtained, and confirm the possibility of tuning these interactions to the region in which our mapping is valid. We emphasize that this proposal for quantum simulating a gauge theory uses a manifestly gauge-invariant formulation and Gauss's Law is therefore automatically satisfied. Supported by DoD ARO under Grant No. W911NF-13-1-0119 and by the NSF under Grants No. DMR-1411345.

  15. Investigating Cold Atom Transport in Optical Lattices and Ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shan; Clements, Ethan; Pollock, Zach; Rapp, Anthony; Ross, Preston; Hachtel, Andrew; Bali, Samir

    2015-05-01

    We experimentally investigate cold atom transport in optical lattices and ratchets in an undergraduate setting using home-built laser and imaging systems. It is well-known that the transport properties exhibited in these situations by ultracold atoms depart from the usual framework of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics. We describe methods to quantify these departures by tracking the atomic momentum and spatial distribution, and measuring the ``dwell time'' and ``crossover time,'' respectively, in a particular well and between wells. We gratefully acknowledge funding from Miami University Physics Department.

  16. Wilson fermions and axion electrodynamics in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, A; Mazza, L; Rizzi, M; Goldman, N; Lewenstein, M; Martin-Delgado, M A

    2010-11-01

    We show that ultracold Fermi gases in optical superlattices can be used as quantum simulators of relativistic lattice fermions in 3+1 dimensions. By exploiting laser-assisted tunneling, we find an analogue of the so-called naive Dirac fermions, and thus provide a realization of the fermion doubling problem. Moreover, we show how to implement Wilson fermions, and discuss how their mass can be inverted by tuning the laser intensities. In this regime, our atomic gas corresponds to a phase of matter where Maxwell electrodynamics is replaced by axion electrodynamics: a 3D topological insulator.

  17. Floquet engineering with quasienergy bands of periodically driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthaus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A primer on the Floquet theory of periodically time-dependent quantum systems is provided, and it is shown how to apply this framework for computing the quasienergy band structure governing the dynamics of ultracold atoms in driven optical cosine lattices. Such systems are viewed here as spatially and temporally periodic structures living in an extended Hilbert space, giving rise to spatio-temporal Bloch waves whose dispersion relations can be manipulated at will by exploiting ac-Stark shifts and multiphoton resonances. The elements required for numerical calculations are introduced in a tutorial manner, and some example calculations are discussed in detail, thereby illustrating future prospects of Floquet engineering.

  18. Dynamics of Weyl quasiparticles in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Wang, Huai-Qiang; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Liang; Xing, Ding-Yu

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the Weyl quasiparticles emerged in an optical lattice where the topological Weyl semimetal and trivial band insulator phases can be adjusted with the on-site energy. The evolution of the density distribution is demonstrated to have an anomalous velocity in the Weyl semimetal but a steady Zitterbewegung effect in the band insulator. Our analysis demonstrates that the chirality of the system can be directly determined from the positions of the atomic center of mass. Furthermore, the amplitude and the period of the relativistic Zitterbewegung oscillations are shown to be observable with the time-of-flight experiments.

  19. Defect-mediated discrete solitons in optically induced photorefractive lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yongyao; Pang Wei; Chen Yongzhu; Yu Zhiqiang; Zhou Jianying; Zhang Huarong

    2009-10-15

    Theoretical analysis to the defect mediated discrete solitons in one- and two-dimensional periodical waveguide lattices is presented. The waveguide arrays with these functional defects are assumed to respond to the light field as an optically induced photorefraction and they are patterned by a holographic technique. It is found that the spatial energy distributions of the solitary waves can be controlled by the defects in the waveguide arrays, and this gives rise to an additional freedom to externally shaping the light field distribution to a special shape.

  20. Wilson Fermions and Axion Electrodynamics in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Mazza, L.; Rizzi, M.; Goldman, N.; Lewenstein, M.

    2010-11-05

    We show that ultracold Fermi gases in optical superlattices can be used as quantum simulators of relativistic lattice fermions in 3+1 dimensions. By exploiting laser-assisted tunneling, we find an analogue of the so-called naive Dirac fermions, and thus provide a realization of the fermion doubling problem. Moreover, we show how to implement Wilson fermions, and discuss how their mass can be inverted by tuning the laser intensities. In this regime, our atomic gas corresponds to a phase of matter where Maxwell electrodynamics is replaced by axion electrodynamics: a 3D topological insulator.

  1. Artificial staggered magnetic field for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Lih-King; Smith, C. Morais; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2010-02-15

    A time-dependent optical lattice with staggered particle current in the tight-binding regime was considered that can be described by a time-independent effective lattice model with an artificial staggered magnetic field. The low-energy description of a single-component fermion in this lattice at half-filling is provided by two copies of ideal two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions. The Dirac cones are generally anisotropic and can be tuned by the external staggered flux {phi}. For bosons, the staggered flux modifies the single-particle spectrum such that in the weak coupling limit, depending on the flux {phi}, distinct superfluid phases are realized. Their properties are discussed, the nature of the phase transitions between them is established, and Bogoliubov theory is used to determine their excitation spectra. Then the generalized superfluid-Mott-insulator transition is studied in the presence of the staggered flux and the complete phase diagram is established. Finally, the momentum distribution of the distinct superfluid phases is obtained, which provides a clear experimental signature of each phase in ballistic expansion experiments.

  2. Observation of optical solitons in PT-symmetric lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Martin; Regensburger, Alois; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Bersch, Christoph; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Peschel, Ulf

    2015-07-01

    Controlling light transport in nonlinear active environments is a topic of considerable interest in the field of optics. In such complex arrangements, of particular importance is to devise strategies to subdue chaotic behaviour even in the presence of gain/loss and nonlinearity, which often assume adversarial roles. Quite recently, notions of parity-time (PT) symmetry have been suggested in photonic settings as a means to enforce stable energy flow in platforms that simultaneously employ both amplification and attenuation. Here we report the experimental observation of optical solitons in PT-symmetric lattices. Unlike other non-conservative nonlinear arrangements where self-trapped states appear as fixed points in the parameter space of the governing equations, discrete PT solitons form a continuous parametric family of solutions. The possibility of synthesizing PT-symmetric saturable absorbers, where a nonlinear wave finds a lossless path through an otherwise absorptive system is also demonstrated.

  3. Accurate Optical Lattice Clock with {sup 87}Sr Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Le Targat, Rodolphe; Baillard, Xavier; Fouche, Mathilde; Brusch, Anders; Tcherbakoff, Olivier; Rovera, Giovanni D.; Lemonde, Pierre

    2006-09-29

    We report a frequency measurement of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition of {sup 87}Sr atoms in an optical lattice clock. The frequency is determined to be 429 228 004 229 879(5) Hz with a fractional uncertainty that is comparable to state-of-the-art optical clocks with neutral atoms in free fall. The two previous measurements of this transition were found to disagree by about 2x10{sup -13}, i.e., almost 4 times the combined error bar and 4 to 5 orders of magnitude larger than the claimed ultimate accuracy of this new type of clocks. Our measurement is in agreement with one of these two values and essentially resolves this discrepancy.

  4. Generation and detection of atomic spin entanglement in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Han-Ning; Yang, Bing; Reingruber, Andreas; Xu, Xiao-Fan; Jiang, Xiao; Chen, Yu-Ao; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices hold promise for the creation of entangled states for quantum technologies. Here we report on the generation, manipulation and detection of atomic spin entanglement in an optical superlattice. Using a spin-dependent superlattice, atomic spins in the left or right sites can be individually addressed and coherently manipulated with near-unity fidelities by microwave pulses. The spin entanglement of the two atoms in the double wells of the superlattice is generated via the dynamical evolution governed by spin superexchange. By monitoring the collisional atom loss with in situ absorption imaging we measure the spin correlations of the atoms inside the double wells and obtain a lower bound on the entanglement fidelity of 0.79 +/- 0.06, and a violation of a Bell's inequality S = 2.21 +/- 0.08.

  5. Observation of optical solitons in PT-symmetric lattices

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Martin; Regensburger, Alois; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Bersch, Christoph; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Peschel, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Controlling light transport in nonlinear active environments is a topic of considerable interest in the field of optics. In such complex arrangements, of particular importance is to devise strategies to subdue chaotic behaviour even in the presence of gain/loss and nonlinearity, which often assume adversarial roles. Quite recently, notions of parity-time (PT) symmetry have been suggested in photonic settings as a means to enforce stable energy flow in platforms that simultaneously employ both amplification and attenuation. Here we report the experimental observation of optical solitons in PT-symmetric lattices. Unlike other non-conservative nonlinear arrangements where self-trapped states appear as fixed points in the parameter space of the governing equations, discrete PT solitons form a continuous parametric family of solutions. The possibility of synthesizing PT-symmetric saturable absorbers, where a nonlinear wave finds a lossless path through an otherwise absorptive system is also demonstrated. PMID:26215165

  6. Stability improvements for the NIST Yb optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, R. J.; Schioppo, M.; McGrew, W. F.; Brown, R. C.; Hinkley, N.; Yoon, T. H.; Beloy, K.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    To reach the fundamental limit given by quantum projection noise, optical lattice clocks require advanced laser stabilization techniques. The NIST ytterbium clock has benefited from several generations of extremely high finesse optical cavities, with cavity linewidths below 1 kHz. Characterization of the cavity drift rate has allowed compensation to the mHz/s level, improving the medium-term stability of the cavity. Based on recent measurements using Ramsey spectroscopy with synchronous interrogation, we report a fractional instability σy(1s) <=10-16 , dominated by atom number fluctuation noise. We also provide updates on our cryogenic sapphire cavity with a reduced thermal noise floor, which will improve our Dick-limited fractional instability at 1 s to below 10-16. Also at University of Colorado.

  7. Effect of random structure on permeability and heat transfer characteristics for flow in 2D porous medium based on MRT lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, PeiPei; Wen, Zhi; Dou, RuiFeng; Liu, Xunliang

    2016-08-01

    Flow and heat transfer through a 2D random porous medium are studied by using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). For the random porous medium, the influence of disordered cylinder arrangement on permeability and Nusselt number are investigated. Results indicate that the permeability and Nusselt number for different cylinder locations are unequal even with the same number and size of cylinders. New correlations for the permeability and coefficient b‧Den of the Forchheimer equation are proposed for random porous medium composed of Gaussian distributed circular cylinders. Furthermore, a general set of heat transfer correlations is proposed and compared with existing experimental data and empirical correlations. Our results show that the Nu number increases with the increase of the porosity, hence heat transfer is found to be accurate considering the effect of porosity.

  8. Optical spectrum and local lattice structure for ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Kuang, X.-Y.; Mao, A.-J.; Huang, X.-F.

    2007-01-01

    By diagonalizing the 120×120 complete energy matrices for d3 ion in trigonal crystal field, which contains the electrostatic interaction, the trigonal field as well as the spin-orbit interaction, the unified calculation of the whole optical and EPR spectra for ruby are made. And matrix elements of the Zeeman energy with the magnetic field parallel or perpendicular to the trigonal axis are introduced into the complete energy matrices for obtaining the g factors of the energy levels. It is concluded that zero-field splitting and optical spectra as well as g factors are in good agreement with the experimental data and the distorted local lattice structure is determined firstly results from a stretching of the O2- ions along the C3 axis. The pressure-induced shifts of energy levels, g factors and local lattice structure are also discussed. In particular, all the calculations are carried out successfully within the framework of the crystal-field model which is consistent with the opinion of Macfarlane and Sturge that if all terms within the d3 configuration are included, one need not go outside conventional crystal-field theory.

  9. Quantum simulation of antiferromagnetic spin chains in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jonathan; Bakr, Waseem S; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M Eric; Preiss, Philipp M; Greiner, Markus

    2011-04-21

    Understanding exotic forms of magnetism in quantum mechanical systems is a central goal of modern condensed matter physics, with implications for systems ranging from high-temperature superconductors to spintronic devices. Simulating magnetic materials in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition is computationally intractable on classical computers, owing to the extreme complexity arising from quantum entanglement between the constituent magnetic spins. Here we use a degenerate Bose gas of rubidium atoms confined in an optical lattice to simulate a chain of interacting quantum Ising spins as they undergo a phase transition. Strong spin interactions are achieved through a site-occupation to pseudo-spin mapping. As we vary a magnetic field, quantum fluctuations drive a phase transition from a paramagnetic phase into an antiferromagnetic phase. In the paramagnetic phase, the interaction between the spins is overwhelmed by the applied field, which aligns the spins. In the antiferromagnetic phase, the interaction dominates and produces staggered magnetic ordering. Magnetic domain formation is observed through both in situ site-resolved imaging and noise correlation measurements. By demonstrating a route to quantum magnetism in an optical lattice, this work should facilitate further investigations of magnetic models using ultracold atoms, thereby improving our understanding of real magnetic materials.

  10. Micro-resonators coupled to atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Andrew; Kitching, John

    2010-03-01

    Recently there has been a convergence of ideas between the fields of solid-state and atomic physics -- examples range from using atoms for quantum simulation of condensed-matter Hamiltonians to physically coupling atoms with solid-state devices such as micro-resonators. In this talk, we discuss an experimental proposal involving an array of cooled microcantilevers coupled to a sample of ultracold atoms trapped near a microfabricated surface [1]. The cantilevers allow individual lattice site addressing for atomic state control and readout, and potentially may be useful in optical lattice quantum computation schemes. Assuming resonators can be cooled to their vibrational ground state, we describe the implementation of a two-qubit controlled-NOT gate with atomic internal states and the motional states of the resonators, along with a protocol for entangling two or more cantilevers on the atom chip using the trapped atoms as an intermediary. Although similar experiments could be carried out with magnetic microchip traps, the optical confinement scheme we consider may exhibit reduced near-field magnetic noise and decoherence. Prospects for using this system for tests of quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales or quantum information processing will be discussed. [4pt] [1] A. Geraci and J. Kitching, Phys. Rev. A 80, 032317 (2009)

  11. Stable Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing states in two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Zi; Wu Congjun; Wang Yupeng

    2011-06-15

    We present the study of the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) pairing states in the p-orbital bands in both two- and three-dimensional optical lattices. Due to the quasi-one-dimensional band structure which arises from the unidirectional hopping of the orthogonal p orbitals, the pairing phase space is not affected by spin imbalance. Furthermore, interactions build up high-dimensional phase coherence which stabilizes the FFLO states in 2D and 3D optical lattices in a large parameter regime in the phase diagram. These FFLO phases are stable with the imposition of the inhomogeneous trapping potential. Their entropies are comparable to the normal states at finite temperatures.

  12. Acentric lattice electro-optic materials by rational design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Larry; Robinson, Bruce; Jen, Alex; Ried, Philip; Eichinger, Bruce; Sullivan, Philip; Akelaitis, Andrew; Bale, Denise; Haller, Marnie; Luo, Jingdong; Liu, Sen; Liao, Yi; Firestone, Kimberly; Bhatambrekar, Nishant; Bhattacharjee, Sanchali; Sinness, Jessica; Hammond, Scott; Buker, Nicholas; Snoeberger, Robert; Lingwood, Mark; Rommel, Harry; Amend, Joe; Jang, Sei-Hum; Chen, Antao; Steier, William

    2005-08-01

    Quantum and statistical mechanical calculations have been used to guide the improvement of the macroscopic electro-optic activity of organic thin film materials to values greater than 300 pm/V at telecommunication wavelengths. Various quantum mechanical methods (Hartree-Fock, INDO, and density functional theory) have been benchmarked and shown to be reliable for estimating trends in molecular first hyperpolarizability, β, for simple variation of donor, bridge, and acceptor structures of charge-transfer (dipolar) chromophores. β values have been increased significantly over the past five years and quantum mechanical calculations suggest that they can be further significantly improved. Statistical mechanical calculations, including pseudo-atomistic Monte Carlo calculations, have guided the design of the super/supramolecular structures of chromophores so that they assemble, under the influence of electric field poling, into macroscopic lattices with high degrees of acentric order. Indeed, during the past year, chromophores doped into single- and multi-chromophore-containing dendrimer materials to form binary glasses have yielded thin films that exhibit electro-optic activities at telecommunication wavelengths of greater than 300 pm/V. Such materials may be viewed as intermediate between chromophore/polymer composites and crystalline organic chromophore materials. Theory suggests that further improvements of electro-optic activity are possible. Auxiliary properties of these materials, including optical loss, thermal and photochemical stability, and processability are discussed. Such organic electro-optic materials have been incorporated into silicon photonic circuitry for active wavelength division multiplexing, reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexing, and high bandwidth optical rectification. A variety of all-organic devices, including stripline, cascaded prism, Fabry-Perot etalon, and ring microresonator devices, have been fabricated and evaluated.

  13. Broadband 7-fs diffractive-optic-based 2D electronic spectroscopy using hollow-core fiber compression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaonan; Dostál, Jakub; Brixner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate noncollinear coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy for which broadband pulses are generated in an argon-filled hollow-core fiber pumped by a 1-kHz Ti:Sapphire laser. Compression is achieved to 7 fs duration (TG-FROG) using dispersive mirrors. The hollow fiber provides a clean spatial profile and smooth spectral shape in the 500-700 nm region. The diffractive-optic-based design of the 2D spectrometer avoids directional filtering distortions and temporal broadening from time smearing. For demonstration we record data of cresyl-violet perchlorate in ethanol and use phasing to obtain broadband absorptive 2D spectra. The resulting quantum beating as a function of population time is consistent with literature data. PMID:27607681

  14. Experiment evaluation of speckle suppression efficiency of 2D quasi-spiral M-sequence-based diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Lapchuk, A; Pashkevich, G A; Prygun, O V; Yurlov, V; Borodin, Y; Kryuchyn, A; Korchovyi, A A; Shylo, S

    2015-10-01

    The quasi-spiral 2D diffractive optical element (DOE) based on M-sequence of length N=15 is designed and manufactured. The speckle suppression efficiency by the DOE rotation is measured. The speckle suppression coefficients of 10.5, 6, and 4 are obtained for green, violet, and red laser beams, respectively. The results of numerical simulation and experimental data show that the quasi-spiral binary DOE structure can be as effective in speckle reduction as a periodic 2D DOE structure. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the speckle suppression efficiency of the 2D DOE structure decreases approximately twice at the boundaries of the visible range. It is shown that a replacement of this structure with the bilateral 1D DOE allows obtaining the maximum speckle suppression efficiency in the entire visible range of light. PMID:26479664

  15. Compact optical true time delay beamformer for a 2D phased array antenna using tunable dispersive elements.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xingwei; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2016-09-01

    A hardware-compressive optical true time delay architecture for 2D beam steering in a planar phased array antenna is proposed using fiber-Bragg-grating-based tunable dispersive elements (TDEs). For an M×N array, the proposed system utilizes N TDEs and M wavelength-fixed optical carriers to control the time delays. Both azimuth and elevation beam steering are realized by programming the settings of the TDEs. An experiment is carried out to demonstrate the delay controlling in a 2×2 array, which is fed by a wideband pulsed signal. Radiation patterns calculated from the experimentally measured waveforms at the four antennas match well with the theoretical results.

  16. Squeezing out the entropy of fermions in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tin-Lun; Zhou, Qi

    2009-01-01

    At present, there is considerable interest in using atomic fermions in optical lattices to emulate the mathematical models that have been used to study strongly correlated electronic systems. Some of these models, such as the 2-dimensional fermion Hubbard model, are notoriously difficult to solve, and their key properties remain controversial despite decades of studies. It is hoped that the emulation experiments will shed light on some of these long-standing problems. A successful emulation, however, requires reaching temperatures as low as 10−12 K and beyond, with entropy per particle far lower than what can be achieved today. Achieving such low-entropy states is an essential step and a grand challenge of the whole emulation enterprise. In this article, we point out a method to literally squeeze the entropy out from a Fermi gas into a surrounding Bose–Einstein condensed gas, which acts as a heat reservoir. This method allows one to reduce the entropy per particle of a lattice Fermi gas to a few percent of the lowest value obtainable today. PMID:19365065

  17. State diagrams for harmonically trapped bosons in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Rigol, Marcos; Batrouni, George G.; Rousseau, Valery G.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2009-05-15

    We use quantum Monte Carlo simulations to obtain zero-temperature state diagrams for strongly correlated lattice bosons in one and two dimensions under the influence of a harmonic confining potential. Since harmonic traps generate a coexistence of superfluid and Mott insulating domains, we use local quantities such as the quantum fluctuations of the density and a local compressibility to identify the phases present in the inhomogeneous density profiles. We emphasize the use of the 'characteristic density' to produce a state diagram that is relevant to experimental optical lattice systems, regardless of the number of bosons or trap curvature and of the validity of the local-density approximation. We show that the critical value of U/t at which Mott insulating domains appear in the trap depends on the filling in the system, and it is in general greater than the value in the homogeneous system. Recent experimental results by Spielman et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 120402 (2008)] are analyzed in the context of our two-dimensional state diagram, and shown to exhibit a value for the critical point in good agreement with simulations. We also study the effects of finite, but low (T{<=}t/2), temperatures. We find that in two dimensions they have little influence on our zero-temperature results, while their effect is more pronounced in one dimension.

  18. Phases of d-orbital bosons in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Fernanda; Matrikainen, Jani-Petri; Larson, Jonas

    2015-05-01

    We explore the properties of bosonic atoms loaded into the d bands of an isotropic square optical lattice. Following the recent experimental success reported in Zhai et al (2013 Phys. Rev. A 87 063638), in which populating d bands with a 99 % fidelity was demonstrated, we present a theoretical study of the possible phases that can appear in this system. Using the Gutzwiller ansatz for the three d band orbitals we map the boundaries of the Mott insulating phases. For not too large occupation, two of the orbitals are predominantly occupied, while the third, of a slightly higher energy, remains almost unpopulated. In this regime, in the superfluid phase we find the formation of a vortex lattice, where the vortices come in vortex/anti-vortex pairs with two pairs locked to every site. Due to the orientation of the vortices time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken. This state also breaks a discrete {{{Z}}2}-symmetry. We further derive an effective spin-1/2 model that describe the relevant physics of the lowest Mott-phase with unit filling. We argue that the corresponding two dimensional phase diagram should be rich with several different phases. We also explain how to generate anti-symmetric spin interactions that can give rise to novel effects like spin canting.

  19. Experimental realization of an optical second with strontium lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Le Targat, R; Lorini, L; Le Coq, Y; Zawada, M; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Gurov, M; Rosenbusch, P; Rovera, D G; Nagórny, B; Gartman, R; Westergaard, P G; Tobar, M E; Lours, M; Santarelli, G; Clairon, A; Bize, S; Laurent, P; Lemonde, P; Lodewyck, J

    2013-01-01

    Progress in realizing the SI second had multiple technological impacts and enabled further constraint of theoretical models in fundamental physics. Caesium microwave fountains, realizing best the second according to its current definition with a relative uncertainty of 2-4 × 10(-16), have already been overtaken by atomic clocks referenced to an optical transition, which are both more stable and more accurate. Here we present an important step in the direction of a possible new definition of the second. Our system of five clocks connects with an unprecedented consistency the optical and the microwave worlds. For the first time, two state-of-the-art strontium optical lattice clocks are proven to agree within their accuracy budget, with a total uncertainty of 1.5 × 10(-16). Their comparison with three independent caesium fountains shows a degree of accuracy now only limited by the best realizations of the microwave-defined second, at the level of 3.1 × 10(-16).

  20. Experimental realization of an optical second with strontium lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Le Targat, R; Lorini, L; Le Coq, Y; Zawada, M; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Gurov, M; Rosenbusch, P; Rovera, D G; Nagórny, B; Gartman, R; Westergaard, P G; Tobar, M E; Lours, M; Santarelli, G; Clairon, A; Bize, S; Laurent, P; Lemonde, P; Lodewyck, J

    2013-01-01

    Progress in realizing the SI second had multiple technological impacts and enabled further constraint of theoretical models in fundamental physics. Caesium microwave fountains, realizing best the second according to its current definition with a relative uncertainty of 2-4 × 10(-16), have already been overtaken by atomic clocks referenced to an optical transition, which are both more stable and more accurate. Here we present an important step in the direction of a possible new definition of the second. Our system of five clocks connects with an unprecedented consistency the optical and the microwave worlds. For the first time, two state-of-the-art strontium optical lattice clocks are proven to agree within their accuracy budget, with a total uncertainty of 1.5 × 10(-16). Their comparison with three independent caesium fountains shows a degree of accuracy now only limited by the best realizations of the microwave-defined second, at the level of 3.1 × 10(-16). PMID:23839206

  1. Frequency comparison of optical lattice clocks beyond the Dick limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamoto, Masao; Takano, Tetsushi; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-05-01

    The supreme accuracy of atomic clocks relies on the universality of atomic transition frequencies. The stability of a clock, meanwhile, measures how quickly the clock's statistical uncertainties are reduced. The ultimate measure of stability is provided by the quantum projection noise, which improves as 1/√N by measuring N uncorrelated atoms. Quantum projection noise limited stabilities have been demonstrated in caesium clocks and in single-ion optical clocks, where the quantum noise overwhelms the Dick effect attributed to local oscillator noise. Here, we demonstrate a synchronous frequency comparison of two optical lattice clocks using 87Sr and 88Sr atoms, respectively, for which the Allan standard deviation reached 1 × 10-17 in an averaging time of 1,600 s by cancelling out the Dick effect to approach the quantum projection noise limit. The scheme demonstrates the advantage of using a large number (N ~ 1,000) of atoms in optical clocks and paves the way to investigating the inherent uncertainties of clocks and relativistic geodesy on a timescale of tens of minutes.

  2. Quantum phases of bosons in double-well optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Danshita, I.; Williams, J. E.; Melo, C. A. R. sa de; Clark, C. W.

    2007-10-15

    We study the superfluid and insulating phases of bosons in double-well optical lattices, and focus on the specific example of a two-legged ladder, which is currently accessible in experiments. We obtain the zero-temperature phase diagram using both mean-field and time-evolving block decimation techniques. We find that the mean-field approach describes the correct phase boundaries only when the intrachain hopping is sufficiently small in comparison to the on-site repulsion. We show the dependence of the phase diagram on the interchain hopping or tilt between double wells. We find that the Mott-insulator phase at unit filling exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the tilt parameter, producing a reentrant phase transition between Mott insulator and superfluid phases. Finally, we determine the critical point separating the insulating and superfluid phases at commensurate fillings, where the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition occurs.

  3. Controllable 3D atomic Brownian motor in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, C. M.; Sjölund, P.; Petra, S. J. H.; Jonsell, S.; Nylén, M.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Kastberg, A.

    2008-06-01

    We study a Brownian motor, based on cold atoms in optical lattices, where atomic motion can be induced in a controlled manner in an arbitrary direction, by rectification of isotropic random fluctuations. In contrast with ratchet mechanisms, our Brownian motor operates in a potential that is spatially and temporally symmetric, in apparent contradiction to the Curie principle. Simulations, based on the Fokker-Planck equation, allow us to gain knowledge on the qualitative behaviour of our Brownian motor. Studies of Brownian motors, and in particular ones with unique control properties, are of fundamental interest because of the role they play in protein motors and their potential applications in nanotechnology. In particular, our system opens the way to the study of quantum Brownian motors.

  4. Quantum states of p-band bosons in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, A.; Larson, J.; Martikainen, J.-P.

    2010-02-15

    We study a gas of repulsively interacting bosons in the first excited band of an optical lattice. We explore this p-band physics both within the framework of a standard mean-field theory as well as with the more accurate generalized Gutzwiller ansatz. We find the phase diagrams for two- and three-dimensional systems and characterize the first Mott-states which typically possess an integer or half-integer vortex structure. Furthermore, we find that even though the p-band model has strongly anisotropic kinetic energies and interflavor interaction terms are missing in the lowest band theory, the mean-field theory becomes useful quite rapidly once the transition from the Mott insulator to the superfluid is crossed.

  5. Dynamics of pattern-loaded fermions in bichromatic optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, Matthew D.; Mueller, Erich J.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by experiments in Munich [M. Schreiber et al., Science 349, 842 (2015)., 10.1126/science.aaa7432], we study the dynamics of interacting fermions initially prepared in charge density wave states in one-dimensional bichromatic optical lattices. The experiment sees a marked lack of thermalization, which has been taken as evidence for an interacting generalization of Anderson localization, dubbed "many-body localization." We model the experiments using an interacting Aubry-Andre model and develop a computationally efficient low-density cluster expansion to calculate the even-odd density imbalance as a function of interaction strength and potential strength. Our calculations agree with the experimental results and shed light on the phenomena. We also explore a two-dimensional generalization. The cluster expansion method we develop should have broad applicability to similar problems in nonequilibrium quantum physics.

  6. Simulating the Wess-Zumino Supersymmetry Model in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yue; Yang Kun

    2010-10-08

    We study a cold atom-molecule mixture in two-dimensional optical lattices. We show that, by fine-tuning the atomic and molecular interactions, the Wess-Zumino supersymmetry (SUSY) model in 2+1 dimensions emerges in the low-energy limit and can be simulated in such mixtures. At zero temperature, SUSY is not spontaneously broken, which implies identical relativistic dispersions of the atom and its superpartner, a bosonic diatom molecule. This defining signature of SUSY can be probed by single-particle spectroscopies. Thermal breaking of SUSY at a finite temperature is accompanied by a thermal Goldstone fermion, i.e., phonino excitation. This and other signatures of broken SUSY can also be probed experimentally.

  7. Localization of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, Elena A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2004-05-01

    We study nonlinear localization of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our theory shows that spin-dependent optical lattices can be used to effectively manipulate the nonlinear interactions between the BEC components, and to observe composite localized states of a BEC in both bands and gaps of the matter-wave spectrum.

  8. Orbit, optics and chromaticity correction for PS2 negative momentum compaction lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Papaphilippou,Y.; Barranco, J.; Bartmann, W.; Benedikt, M.; Carli, C.; de Maria, R.; Peggs, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    The effect of magnet misalignments in the beam orbit and linear optics functions are reviewed and correction schemes are applied to the negative momentum compaction lattice of PS2. Chromaticity correction schemes are also proposed and tested with respect to off-momentum optics properties. The impact of the correction schemes in the dynamic aperture of the lattice is finally evaluated.

  9. Auto- and hetero-associative memory using a 2-D optical logic gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1989-01-01

    An optical associative memory system suitable for both auto- and hetero-associative recall is demonstrated. This system utilizes Hamming distance as the similarity measure between a binary input and a memory image with the aid of a two-dimensional optical EXCLUSIVE OR (XOR) gate and a parallel electronics comparator module. Based on the Hamming distance measurement, this optical associative memory performs a nearest neighbor search and the result is displayed in the output plane in real-time. This optical associative memory is fast and noniterative and produces no output spurious states as compared with that of the Hopfield neural network model.

  10. Dynamic photorefractive self-amplified angular-multiplex 2-D optical beam-array generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Shaomin; Yeh, Pochi; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1993-01-01

    A real-time 2-D angular-multiplex beam-array holographic storage and reconstruction technique using electrically-addressed spatial light modulators(E-SLM's) and photorefractive crystals is described. Using a liquid crystal television (LCTV) spatial light modulator (SLM) for beam steering and lithium niobate photorefractive crystal for holographic recording, experimental results of generating large and complicated arrays of laser beams with high diffraction efficiency and good uniformity are presented.

  11. Towards quantum many-body physics with Sr in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatt, Sebastian; Jansa, Nejc; Escudero, Rodrigo G.; Heinz, André; Park, Annie Jihyun; Snigirev, Stepan; Dalibard, Jean; Bloch, Immanuel

    2016-05-01

    Within the last decade, fermionic alkaline earth atoms in optical lattices have become a platform for precision measurements, culminating in the realization of an atomic clock with the currently highest stability and accuracy at the 2 ×10-18 level. In the meantime, quantum degenerate gases of all bosonic and fermionic isotopes of Sr have been realized. With the extension of the quantum gas microscopy technique to fermionic alkali metal atoms, experiments with quantum degenerate gases in optical lattices have taken another step towards full control over the internal and external degrees of freedom of fermions in optical lattices. Here, we report on the construction of a new experiment with quantum degenerate gases of Sr in optical lattices. Our experiment aims to combine the high spatial control over the atomic degrees of freedom from quantum gas microscopy with the precision control over the internal degrees of freedom enabled by optical lattice clock techniques.

  12. Cooling fermions in optical lattices by faster entropy redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles, Rafael P.; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Paiva, Thereza; Scalettar, Richard T.; Natu, Stefan S.; Hulet, Randall G.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Lower entropy for fermions in optical lattices would unlock new quantum phases, including antiferromagnetism and potentially superconductivity. We propose a method to cool these systems at temperatures where conventional methods fail: slowly turning on a tightly focused optical potential transports entropy from the Mott insulator to a metallic entropy reservoir formed along the beam. Our scheme places the entropy reservoir close to the targeted cooling region, which allows entropy redistribution to be effective at lower temperatures than in prior proposals. Furthermore we require only a straightforwardly-applied Gaussian potential. We compute the temperatures achieved with this scheme using an analytic T >> t approximation and, for low T, determinantal quantum Monte Carlo. We optimize the waist and depth of the focused beam, and we find that repulsive potentials cool better than attractive ones. We estimate that the time required for entropy transport under nearly adiabatic conditions at these low temperatures is compatible with the system lifetime. Finally, we explore further improvements to cooling enabled by sophisticated potential engineering, e.g. using a spatial light modulator. Work supported by CNPq.

  13. Design and implementation of a 2-D endoscopic optical fiber scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihai; Fu, Ling; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Xiongbo

    2008-12-01

    We have designed a small type of endoscopic 2D fiber scanner probe to incorporate OCT with endoscopy imaging. The new probe consists with two piezoelectric ceramics plated with electrode, a conductive thin-film with non-inverse piezoelectric effect and a piece of nude fiber with coating layers removed. To accomplish the scanning, the only thing need to be done is to drive the two piezoelectric ceramic sheets which provides simpler structure and at the same time minimizes the probe effectively. Here we have obtained some preliminary results and verified the feasibility of the program.

  14. Optical properties of GaAs 2D hexagonal and cubic photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, F. Assali, A.; Grain, R.; Kanouni, F.

    2015-03-30

    In this paper we present our theoretical study of 2D hexagonal and cubic rods GaAs in air, with plan wave expansion (PWE) and finite difference time domain (FDTD) by using BandSOLVE and FullWAVE of Rsoft photonic CAD package. In order to investigate the effect of symmetry and radius, we performed calculations of the band structures for both TM and TE polarization, contour and electromagnetic propagation and transmission spectra. Our calculations show that the hexagonal structure gives a largest band gaps compare to cubic one for a same filling factor.

  15. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    With timekeeping being of paramount importance for modern life, much research and major scientific advances have been undertaken in the field of frequency metrology, particularly over the last few years. New Nobel-prize winning technologies have enabled a new era of atomic clocks; namely the optical clock. These have been shown to perform significantly better than the best microwave clocks reaching an inaccuracy of 1.6x10-18 [1]. With such results being found in large lab based apparatus, the focus now has shifted to portability - to enable the accuracy of various ground based clocks to be measured, and compact autonomous performance - to enable such technologies to be tested in space. This could lead to a master clock in space, improving not only the accuracy of technologies on which modern life has come to require such as GPS and communication networks. But also more fundamentally, this could lead to the redefinition of the second and tests of fundamental physics including applications in the fields of ground based and satellite geodesy, metrology, positioning, navigation, transport and logistics etc. Within the European collaboration, Space Optical Clocks (SOC2) [2-3] consisting of various institutes and industry partners across Europe we have tried to tackle this problem of miniaturisation whilst maintaining stability, accuracy (5x10-17) and robustness whilst keeping power consumption to a minimum - necessary for space applications. We will present the most recent results of the Sr optical clock in SOC2 and also the novel compact design features, new methods employed and outlook. References [1] B. J. Bloom, T. L. Nicholson, J. R. Williams, S. L. Campbell, M. Bishof, X. Zhang, W. Zhang, S. L. Bromley, and J. Ye, "An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10-18 level," Nature 506, 71-75 (2014). [2] S. Schiller et al. "Towards Neutral-atom Space Optical Clocks (SOC2): Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and

  16. Characterization of the bistable wideband optical filter on the basis of nonlinear 2D photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Guryev, I. V. Sukhoivanov, I. A. Andrade Lucio, J. A. Manzano, O. Ibarra Rodriguez, E. Vargaz Gonzales, D. Claudio Chavez, R. I. Mata Gurieva, N. S.

    2014-05-15

    In our work, we investigated the wideband optical filter on the basis of nonlinear photonic crystal. The all-optical flip-flop using ultra-short pulses with duration lower than 200 fs is obtained in such filters. Here we pay special attention to the stability problem of the nonlinear element. To investigate this problem, the temporal response demonstrating the flip-flop have been computed within the certain range of the wavelengths as well as at different input power.

  17. Optical nanostructures in 2D for wide-diameter and broadband beam collimation

    PubMed Central

    Clark, James; Anguita, José V.; Chen, Ying; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating curved refracting lensing components used in conventional projection, imaging and sensing optical assemblies, is critical to enable compactness and miniaturisation of optical devices. A suitable means is replacing refracting lenses with two-dimensional optical media in flat-slab form, to achieve an equivalent optical result. One approach, which has been the focus of intense research, uses a Veselago lens which features a negative-index metamaterial. However, practical implementations rely on resonance techniques, thus broadband operation at optical frequencies imposes significant technical challenges that have been difficult to overcome. Here, we demonstrate a highly-collimated, broadband, wide-diameter beam from a compact source in flat-slab form, based on light collimation using nanomaterials ordered in patterns and embedded into flexible polymers. These provide a highly anisotropic absorption coefficient due to patterns created by vertical carbon nanotube structures grown on glass, and the anisotropic electrical conductivity of the nanotubes. We show this nanostructure strongly absorbs unwanted off-axis light rays, whilst transmitting the desired on-axis rays, to achieve the required optical effect over broadband, from visible to short-infrared, thus circumventing some technical limitations of negative-index metamaterials. We further show a low substrate-temperature system for nanotube growth, allowing direct implementation into heat-sensitive large-area devices. PMID:26732851

  18. Optical nanostructures in 2D for wide-diameter and broadband beam collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James; Anguita, José V.; Chen, Ying; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating curved refracting lensing components used in conventional projection, imaging and sensing optical assemblies, is critical to enable compactness and miniaturisation of optical devices. A suitable means is replacing refracting lenses with two-dimensional optical media in flat-slab form, to achieve an equivalent optical result. One approach, which has been the focus of intense research, uses a Veselago lens which features a negative-index metamaterial. However, practical implementations rely on resonance techniques, thus broadband operation at optical frequencies imposes significant technical challenges that have been difficult to overcome. Here, we demonstrate a highly-collimated, broadband, wide-diameter beam from a compact source in flat-slab form, based on light collimation using nanomaterials ordered in patterns and embedded into flexible polymers. These provide a highly anisotropic absorption coefficient due to patterns created by vertical carbon nanotube structures grown on glass, and the anisotropic electrical conductivity of the nanotubes. We show this nanostructure strongly absorbs unwanted off-axis light rays, whilst transmitting the desired on-axis rays, to achieve the required optical effect over broadband, from visible to short-infrared, thus circumventing some technical limitations of negative-index metamaterials. We further show a low substrate-temperature system for nanotube growth, allowing direct implementation into heat-sensitive large-area devices.

  19. Flat-phase loading of a Bose-Einstein condensate into an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sklarz, Shlomo E.; Friedler, Inbal; Tannor, David J.; Band, Yehuda B.; Williams, Carl J.

    2002-11-01

    It has been proposed that the adiabatic loading of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) into an optical lattice via the Mott-insulator transition can be used to initialize a quantum computer [D. Jaksch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3108 (1998)]. The loading of a BEC into the lattice without causing band excitation is readily achievable; however, unless one switches on an optical lattice very slowly, the optical lattice causes a phase to accumulate across the condensate. We show analytically and numerically that a cancellation of this effect is possible by adjusting the harmonic trap force constant of the magnetic trap appropriately, thereby facilitating quick loading of an optical lattice for quantum computing purposes. A simple analytical theory is developed for a nonstationary BEC in a harmonic trap.

  20. Demonstration of flat-band image transmission in optically induced Lieb photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shiqiang; Hu, Yi; Song, Daohong; Zong, Yuanyuan; Tang, Liqin; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple, yet effective, approach for optical induction of Lieb photonic lattices, which typically rely on the femtosecond laser writing technique. Such lattices are established by judiciously overlapping two sublattices (an "egg-crate" lattice and a square lattice) with different periodicities through a self-defocusing photorefractive medium. Furthermore, taking advantage of the superposition of localized flat-band states inherent in the Lieb lattices, we demonstrate distortion-free image transmission in such two-dimensional perovskite-like photonic structures. Our experimental observations find good agreement with numerical simulations.

  1. Simplified and economical 2D IR spectrometer design using a dual acousto-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Skoff, David R; Laaser, Jennifer E; Mukherjee, Sudipta S; Middleton, Chris T; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-08-30

    Over the last decade two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy has proven to be a very useful extension of infrared spectroscopy, yet the technique remains restricted to a small group of specialized researchers because of its experimental complexity and high equipment cost. We report on a spectrometer that is compact, mechanically robust, and is much less expensive than previous designs because it uses a single pixel MCT detector rather than an array detector. Moreover, each axis of the spectrum can be collected in either the time or frequency domain via computer programming. We discuss pulse sequences for scanning the probe axis, which were not previously possible. We present spectra on metal carbonyl compounds at 5 µm and a model peptide at 6 µm. Data collection with a single pixel MCT takes longer than using an array detector, but publishable quality data are still achieved with only a few minutes of averaging.

  2. Simplified and economical 2D IR spectrometer design using a dual acousto-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoff, David R.; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Middleton, Chris T.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2013-08-01

    Over the last decade two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy has proven to be a very useful extension of infrared spectroscopy, yet the technique remains restricted to a small group of specialized researchers because of its experimental complexity and high equipment cost. We report on a spectrometer that is compact, mechanically robust, and is much less expensive than previous designs because it uses a single pixel MCT detector rather than an array detector. Moreover, each axis of the spectrum can be collected in either the time or frequency domain via computer programming. We discuss pulse sequences for scanning the probe axis, which were not previously possible. We present spectra on metal carbonyl compounds at 5 μm and a model peptide at 6 μm. Data collection with a single pixel MCT takes longer than using an array detector, but publishable quality data are still achieved with only a few minutes of averaging.

  3. Optical signatures of a hypercritical 1D potential in a 2D Dirac metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bor-Yuan; Ni, Guangxin; Pan, Cheng; Fei, Zhe; Cheng, Bin; Lau, Chun Ning; Bockrath, Marc; Basov, Dimitri; Fogler, Michael

    Generation of quasi-bound states in graphene near strong charged perturbations is a solid-state analog of atomic collapse of superheavy elements or particle production by hypothetical cosmic strings. We show, for the case of a linelike perturbation, that as the perturbation grows in strength, quasi-bound states are generated sequentially. Each of these critical events is signaled by a sharp change in the local optical conductivity. Tunable linelike perturbations can be realized in experiment using nanowire or nanotube electrostatic gates. We report measurements of local conductivity for such systems obtained through near-field optical microscopy.

  4. Graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid-based transparent 2D optical array.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Il Ha; Bae, Jung Jun; Lee, Sangjin; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Seung Jin; Güneş, Fethullah; Choi, Jun Hee; Baik, Chan Wook; Kim, Sun Il; Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Young Hee

    2011-09-01

    Graphene/carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid structures are fabricated for use as optical arrays. Vertically aligned CNTs are directly synthesized on a graphene/quartz substrate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Graphene preserves the transparency and resistance during CNT growth. Highly aligned single-walled CNTs show a better performance for the diffraction intensity. PMID:21769950

  5. Auto and hetero-associative memory using a 2-D optical logic gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An optical system for auto-associative and hetero-associative recall utilizing Hamming distance as the similarity measure between a binary input image vector V(sup k) and a binary image vector V(sup m) in a first memory array using an optical Exclusive-OR gate for multiplication of each of a plurality of different binary image vectors in memory by the input image vector. After integrating the light of each product V(sup k) x V(sup m), a shortest Hamming distance detection electronics module determines which product has the lowest light intensity and emits a signal that activates a light emitting diode to illuminate a corresponding image vector in a second memory array for display. That corresponding image vector is identical to the memory image vector V(sup m) in the first memory array for auto-associative recall or related to it, such as by name, for hetero-associative recall.

  6. Electro-Optical Switching of Gradient 2D-PDLC Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjichristov, Georgi B.; Marinov, Yordan G.; Petrov, Alexander G.

    2010-01-21

    A tunable electro-optical switching is reported for single-layered polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) films, controlled by the film thickness. Thin planar film of two-dimensional layer of thickness continuously varying from a few micrometers to several tens of micrometers is examined. The wedge-confined PDLC single layer contains E7 liquid-crystal microdroplets dispersed in a transparent polymer matrix of NOA65. The diameters of the droplets with a linear-gradient size distribution along the wedge slope reach several tens of micrometers, defined by the wedge geometry of the film. The electro-optical switching of the single-layered PDLC film is linked to its microstructure and droplet organization.

  7. Instabilities of bosonic spin currents in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Hoi-Yin; Barnett, Ryan; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the dynamical and energetic instabilities of spin currents in a system of two-component bosons in an optical lattice, with a particular focus on the Neel state. We consider both the weakly interacting superfluid and the strongly interacting Mott insulating limits as well as the regime near the superfluid-insulator transition and establish the criteria for the onset of these instabilities. We use Bogoliubov theory to treat the weakly interacting superfluid regime. Near the Mott transition, we calculate the stability phase diagram within a variational Gutzwiller wave-function approach. In the deep Mott limit we discuss the emergence of the Heisenberg model and calculate the stability diagram within this model. Though the Bogoliubov theory and the Heisenberg model (appropriate for the deep superfluid and the deep Mott-insulating phase, respectively) predict no dynamical instabilities, we find, interestingly, that between these two limiting cases there is a regime of dynamical instability. This result is relevant for the ongoing experimental efforts to realize a stable Neel-ordered state in multicomponent ultracold bosons.

  8. Feshbach-stabilized insulator of bosons in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    de Forges de Parny, L; Rousseau, V G; Roscilde, T

    2015-05-15

    Feshbach resonances-namely, resonances between an unbound two-body (atomic) state and a bound (molecular) state, differing in magnetic moment-are a unique tool to tune the interaction properties of ultracold atoms. Here we show that the spin-changing interactions, coherently coupling the atomic and molecular states, can act as a novel mechanism to stabilize an insulating phase-the Feshbach insulator-for bosons in an optical lattice close to a narrow Feshbach resonance. Making use of quantum Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field theory, we show that the Feshbach insulator appears around the resonance, preventing the system from collapsing when the effective atomic scattering length becomes negative. On the atomic side of the resonance, the transition from condensate to Feshbach insulator has a characteristic first-order nature, due to the simultaneous loss of coherence in the atomic and molecular components. These features appear clearly in the ground-state phase diagram of, e.g., ^{87}Rb around its 414 G resonance, and they are therefore directly amenable to experimental observation. PMID:26024178

  9. Finite temperature quenches of fermions in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ian G.; Hulet, Randall G.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Although interaction quenches are known to drive interesting dynamics, most prior work has focused on quenches initiated from states that are well below the system's ordering temperature. Motivated by experiments with ultracold fermions in optical lattices, which currently are outside of this regime, we study interaction quenches in the Fermi-Hubbard model that start from finite-temperature initial states. We show that interesting dynamics occurs even under these conditions. A particularly important scenario is quenching to non-interacting systems, which despite its simplicity has been the focus of recent work as a prototype for integrability and prethermalization. In the limit where the temperature T is much greater than the tunneling t, we find that there is transient growth of short-ranged correlations. However, the steady state created in this case is essentially trivial: it is equivalent to an equilibrium T / t = ∞ state. We find more interesting steady states for large, but finite, T / t . We calculate the associated experimental observables by combining a high- T expansion of the interacting initial state with the exact calculation of the non-interacting dynamics.

  10. Anderson localization in optical lattices with correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, E.; Pilati, S.

    2015-12-01

    We study the Anderson localization of atomic gases exposed to simple-cubic optical lattices with a superimposed disordered speckle pattern. The two mobility edges in the first band and the corresponding critical filling factors are determined as a function of the disorder strength, ranging from vanishing disorder up to the critical disorder intensity where the two mobility edges merge and the whole band becomes localized. Our theoretical analysis is based both on continuous-space models that take into account the details of the spatial correlation of the speckle pattern, and also on a simplified tight-binding model with an uncorrelated distribution of the on-site energies. The mobility edges are computed via the analysis of the energy-level statistics, and we determine the universal value of the ratio between consecutive level spacings at the mobility edge. We analyze the role of the spatial correlation of the disorder, and we also discuss a qualitative comparison with available experimental data for interacting atomic Fermi gases obtained in the moderate interaction regime.

  11. Compact optical true time delay beamformer for a 2D phased array antenna using tunable dispersive elements.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xingwei; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2016-09-01

    A hardware-compressive optical true time delay architecture for 2D beam steering in a planar phased array antenna is proposed using fiber-Bragg-grating-based tunable dispersive elements (TDEs). For an M×N array, the proposed system utilizes N TDEs and M wavelength-fixed optical carriers to control the time delays. Both azimuth and elevation beam steering are realized by programming the settings of the TDEs. An experiment is carried out to demonstrate the delay controlling in a 2×2 array, which is fed by a wideband pulsed signal. Radiation patterns calculated from the experimentally measured waveforms at the four antennas match well with the theoretical results. PMID:27607946

  12. Integrated packaging of 2D MOEMS mirrors with optical position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, M.; Lenzhofer, M.; Kremer, M. P.; Tortschanoff, A.

    2015-02-01

    Many applications of MOEMS microscanners rely on accurate position feedback. For MOEMS devices which do not have intrinsic on-chip feedback, position information can be provided with optical methods, most simply by using a reflection from the backside of a MOEMS scanner. By measuring the intensity distribution of the reflected beam across a quadrant diode, one can precisely detect the mirror's deflection angles. Previously, we have presented a position sensing device, applicable to arbitrary trajectories, which is based on the measurement of the position of the reflected laser beam with a quadrant diode. In this work, we present a novel setup, which comprises the optical position feedback functionality integrated into the device package itself. The new device's System-in-Package (SiP) design is based on a flip-folded 2.5D PCB layout and fully assembled as small as 9.2×7×4 mm³ in total. The device consists of four layers, which supply the MOEMS mirror, a spacer to provide the required optical path length, the quadrant photo-diode and a laser diode to serve as the light source. In addition to describing the mechanical setup of the novel device, we will present first experimental results and optical simulation studies. Accurate position feedback is the basis for closed-loop control of the MOEMS devices, which is crucial for some applications as image projection for example. Position feedback and the possibility of closed-loop control will significantly improve the performance of these devices.

  13. Atomic Bloch-Zener oscillations and Stückelberg interferometry in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Kling, Sebastian; Salger, Tobias; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin

    2010-11-19

    We report on experiments investigating quantum transport and band interferometry of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice with a two-band miniband structure, realized with a Fourier-synthesized optical lattice potential. Bloch-Zener oscillations, the coherent superposition of Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling between the two bands, are observed. When the relative phase between paths in different bands is varied, an interference signal is observed, demonstrating the coherence of the dynamics in the miniband system. Measured fringe patterns of this Stückelberg interferometer allow us to interferometrically map out the band structure of the optical lattice over the full Brillouin zone.

  14. Optical Bloch oscillations and Zener tunneling of Airy beams in ionic-type photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fajun; Zhu, Weiren; Shang, Wuyun; Wang, Meirong; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-08-01

    We report on the existence of optical Bloch oscillations (OBOs) and Zener tunneling (ZT) of Airy beams in ionic-type photonic lattices with a refractive index ramp. Different from their counterparts in uniform lattices, Airy beams undergoing OBOs show an alternatively switched concave and convex trajectory as well as a periodical revival of input beam profiles. Moreover, the ionic-type photonic lattice established in photorefractive crystal exhibits a reconfigurable lattice structure, which provides a flexible way to tune the amplitude and period of the OBOs. Remarkably, it is demonstrated that the band gap of the lattice can be readily controlled by rotating the lattice inducing beam, which forces the ZT rate to follow two significant different decay curves amidst decreasing index gradient. Our results open up new possibilities for all-optical switching, routing and manipulation of Airy beams.

  15. Phase Diagram for a Bose-Einstein Condensate Moving in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Mun, Jongchul; Medley, Patrick; Campbell, Gretchen K.; Marcassa, Luis G.; Pritchard, David E.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2007-10-12

    The stability of superfluid currents in a system of ultracold bosons was studied using a moving optical lattice. Superfluid currents in a very weak lattice become unstable when their momentum exceeds 0.5 recoil momentum. Superfluidity vanishes already for zero momentum as the lattice deep reaches the Mott insulator (MI) phase transition. We study the phase diagram for the disappearance of superfluidity as a function of momentum and lattice depth between these two limits. Our phase boundary extrapolates to the critical lattice depth for the superfluid-to-MI transition with 2% precision. When a one-dimensional gas was loaded into a moving optical lattice a sudden broadening of the transition between stable and unstable phases was observed.

  16. Lattice-Induced Frequency Shifts in Sr Optical Lattice Clocks at the 10{sup -17} Level

    SciTech Connect

    Westergaard, P. G.; Lodewyck, J.; Lecallier, A.; Millo, J.; Lemonde, P.; Lorini, L.; Burt, E. A.; Zawada, M.

    2011-05-27

    We present a comprehensive study of the frequency shifts associated with the lattice potential in a Sr lattice clock by comparing two such clocks with a frequency stability reaching 5x10{sup -17} after a 1 h integration time. We put the first experimental upper bound on the multipolar M1 and E2 interactions, significantly smaller than the recently predicted theoretical upper limit, and give a 30-fold improved upper limit on the effect of hyperpolarizability. Finally, we report on the first observation of the vector and tensor shifts in a Sr lattice clock. Combining these measurements, we show that all known lattice related perturbations will not affect the clock accuracy down to the 10{sup -17} level, even for lattices as deep as 150 recoil energies.

  17. HP-Lattice QSAR for dynein proteins: experimental proteomics (2D-electrophoresis, mass spectrometry) and theoretic study of a Leishmania infantum sequence.

    PubMed

    Dea-Ayuela, María Auxiliadora; Pérez-Castillo, Yunierkis; Meneses-Marcel, Alfredo; Ubeira, Florencio M; Bolas-Fernández, Francisco; Chou, Kuo-Chen; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2008-08-15

    The toxicity and inefficacy of actual organic drugs against Leishmaniosis justify research projects to find new molecular targets in Leishmania species including Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) and Leishmaniamajor (L. major), both important pathogens. In this sense, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods, which are very useful in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry to discover small-sized drugs, may help to identify not only new drugs but also new drug targets, if we apply them to proteins. Dyneins are important proteins of these parasites governing fundamental processes such as cilia and flagella motion, nuclear migration, organization of the mitotic splinde, and chromosome separation during mitosis. However, despite the interest for them as potential drug targets, so far there has been no report whatsoever on dyneins with QSAR techniques. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first QSAR for dynein proteins. We used as input the Spectral Moments of a Markov matrix associated to the HP-Lattice Network of the protein sequence. The data contain 411 protein sequences of different species selected by ClustalX to develop a QSAR that correctly discriminates on average between 92.75% and 92.51% of dyneins and other proteins in four different train and cross-validation datasets. We also report a combined experimental and theoretic study of a new dynein sequence in order to illustrate the utility of the model to search for potential drug targets with a practical example. First, we carried out a 2D-electrophoresis analysis of L. infantum biological samples. Next, we excised from 2D-E gels one spot of interest belonging to an unknown protein or protein fragment in the region M<20,200 and pI<4. We used MASCOT search engine to find proteins in the L. major data base with the highest similarity score to the MS of the protein isolated from L. infantum. We used the QSAR model to predict the new sequence as dynein with probability of 99.99% without

  18. Controlled manipulation of light by cooperative response of atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Stewart; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2013-05-01

    We show that atoms in an optical lattice can respond cooperatively to incident light. Such a cooperative response can be employed to precisely control and manipulate light on the subwavelength scale. As an illustration, we consider an optical lattice whose atoms are in a Mott-insulator state with precisely one atom per lattice site. The cooperative response of the atoms originates from strong dipole-dipole interactions mediated by scattered electromagnetic fields. As a result of these interactions, the atoms exhibit collective modes of electronic excitation distributed over the lattice. By tailoring the spatial phase profile of the incident light, one can address specific linear combinations of these modes. We demonstrate how the cooperative response can be used to produce optical excitations at isolated sites in the lattice. This work was supported by the EPSRC and the Leverhulme Trust.

  19. A Next-Generation Apparatus for Lithium Optical Lattice Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshet, Aviv

    Quantum simulation is emerging as an ambitious and active subfield of atomic physics. This thesis describes progress towards the goal of simulating condensed matter systems, in particular the physics of the Fermi-Hubbard model, using ultracold Lithium atoms in an optical lattice. A major goal of the quantum simulation program is to observe phase transitions of the Hubbard model, into Neal antiferromagnetic phases and d-wave superfluid phases. Phase transitions are generally accompanied by a change in an underlying correlation in a physical system. Such correlations may be most amenable to probing by looking at fluctuations in the system. Experimental techniques for probing density and magnetization fluctuations in a variety of atomic Fermi systems are developed. The suppression of density fluctuations (or atom "shot noise") in an ideal degenerate Fermi gas is observed by absorption imaging of time-of-flight expanded clouds. In-trap measurements of density and magnetization fluctuations are not easy to probe with absorption imaging, due to their extremely high attenuation. A method to probe these fluctuations based on speckle patterns, caused by fluctuations in the index of refraction for a detuned illumination beam, is developed and applied first to weakly interacting and then to strongly interacting in-trap gases. Fluctuation probes such as these will be a crucial tool in future quantum simulation of condensed matter systems. The quantum simulation experiments that we want to perform require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. A distributed GUI-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, The Cicero Word Generator, is described. The system makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature allows this to be extended to other output

  20. Variable FOV optical illumination system with constant aspect ratio for 2-D array lasers diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasa, J.; de la Fuente, M. C.; Ibañez, C.

    2008-09-01

    In this contribution we present a compact system to create an illumination distribution with a constant aspect ratio 3:4 and FOV from 0.4 to 1 degree. Besides, the system must delivery 40 W from 170 individual laser diodes placed in a regular 2-D array distribution of 10 x 20 mm. The main problem that must be solved is the high asymmetry of the individual sources; emission divergence's ratio 3:73 (0.3 vs. 7.4 degree) combined with the flux holes due to the laser's heat drain. In one axis (divergence of 0.3º) the best design strategy approach is a Galileo telescope but in the other axis a collimator configuration is the best solution. To manage both solutions at the same time is the aim of this contribution. Unfortunately for the Galileo strategy, source dimensions are too large so aspheric surfaces are needed, and the collimator configuration requires an EFL that must change from 573 to 1432 mm. The presented solution uses a set of three fixed anamorphic lenses, two of them pure cylinders, combined with a wheel of anamorphic lenses that have the function to change the FOV of the system. The most important contribution of the design is to obtain a constant final ratio 3:4 from an initial ratio of 3:73 with no losses of energy. The proposed solution produces an illumination pattern with peaks and valleys lower than 40%. This pattern distribution might be unacceptable for a standard illumination solution. However, the actual FOV is used to illuminate far away targets thus air turbulence is enough to homogenize the distribution on the target.

  1. Intensifying the response of distributed optical fibre sensors using 2D and 3D image restoration

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Marcelo A.; Ramírez, Jaime A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Distributed optical fibre sensors possess the unique capability of measuring the spatial and temporal map of environmental quantities that can be of great interest for several field applications. Although existing methods for performance enhancement have enabled important progresses in the field, they do not take full advantage of all information present in the measured data, still giving room for substantial improvement over the state-of-the-art. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an approach for performance enhancement that exploits the high level of similitude and redundancy contained on the multidimensional information measured by distributed fibre sensors. Exploiting conventional image and video processing, an unprecedented boost in signal-to-noise ratio and measurement contrast is experimentally demonstrated. The method can be applied to any white-noise-limited distributed fibre sensor and can remarkably provide a 100-fold improvement in the sensor performance with no hardware modification. PMID:26927698

  2. Intensifying the response of distributed optical fibre sensors using 2D and 3D image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Marcelo A.; Ramírez, Jaime A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Distributed optical fibre sensors possess the unique capability of measuring the spatial and temporal map of environmental quantities that can be of great interest for several field applications. Although existing methods for performance enhancement have enabled important progresses in the field, they do not take full advantage of all information present in the measured data, still giving room for substantial improvement over the state-of-the-art. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an approach for performance enhancement that exploits the high level of similitude and redundancy contained on the multidimensional information measured by distributed fibre sensors. Exploiting conventional image and video processing, an unprecedented boost in signal-to-noise ratio and measurement contrast is experimentally demonstrated. The method can be applied to any white-noise-limited distributed fibre sensor and can remarkably provide a 100-fold improvement in the sensor performance with no hardware modification.

  3. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  4. Characterization of 2D colloid aggregations created by optically induced electrohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Work, Andrew H; Williams, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    Rapid electrokinetic patterning (REP) is a technique for creating self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of spherical particles in a liquid medium, and dynamically controlling them though the simultaneous application of an electric field and optically induced temperature gradients. Previous work has investigated and characterized REP axisymmetric aggregations generated from a focus laser within a uniform electric field; work herein characterizes line-shaped particle assemblies derived from the application of a linearly scanned laser. The resulting aggregations of spherical polystyrene particles (1 μm) suspended in low-conductivity aqueous potassium chloride solution (KCl, 2.5 mS/m) resembled elliptical-shaped crystalline geometries. The mean particle-to-particle spacing within the aggregation remained greater than 1.5 diameters for experiments herein (6.5 Vrms , 30 kHz) due to dipole-dipole repulsive forces. Interparticle spacing demonstrated a linear relationship (1.6-2.1 μm) with increasing scanning lengths (up to 83 μm), decreased from 1.9 to 1.7 μm with increasing scanning frequency (0.38-16 Hz) for a 53 μm scan length, and decreased from 2.0 to 1.6 μm with increasing laser power (11.9-18.8 mW) for a 59 μm, 16 Hz laser scan.

  5. Frustrated tunneling of ultracold atoms in a state-dependent optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiangfa; Chen Zhixin; Zhou Zhengwei; Zhang Yongsheng; Guo Guangcan

    2010-02-15

    We propose a general method to realize frustrated tunneling of ultracold atoms in a state-dependent optical lattice. Two typical lattice configurations are considered, the square lattice with competing interaction and the kagome lattice with geometrical frustration. The ideal can be extended to implement frustrated tunneling of ultracold atoms in various geometries, which enable us to investigate the physics of frustration in both bosonic and spin systems. We study the mean-field phase diagrams of the considered models and the experimental situations are also discussed.

  6. Frustrated Cooper pairing and f-wave supersolidity in cold-atom optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Hsiang-Hsuan; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Wu Congjun

    2011-04-01

    Geometric frustration in quantum magnetism refers to the fact that magnetic interactions on different bonds cannot be simultaneously minimized. The usual Cooper pairing systems favor uniform spatial distributions of pairing phases among different lattice sites without frustration. In contrast, we propose ''frustrated Cooper pairing'' in non-bipartite lattices which leads to supersolid states of Cooper pairs. Not only the amplitudes of the pairing order parameter but also its signs vary from site to site. This exotic pairing state naturally occurs in the p-orbital bands in optical lattices with ultracold spinless fermions. In the triangular lattice, it exhibits an unconventional supersolid state with the f-wave symmetry.

  7. Systematic Study of the {sup 87}Sr Clock Transition in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, Andrew D.; Boyd, Martin M.; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Foreman, Seth M.; Blatt, Sebastian; Notcutt, Mark; Ido, Tetsuya; Ye Jun

    2006-01-27

    With ultracold {sup 87}Sr confined in a magic wavelength optical lattice, we present the most precise study (2.8 Hz statistical uncertainty) to date of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} optical clock transition with a detailed analysis of systematic shifts (19 Hz uncertainty) in the absolute frequency measurement of 429 228 004 229 869 Hz. The high resolution permits an investigation of the optical lattice motional sideband structure. The local oscillator for this optical atomic clock is a stable diode laser with its hertz-level linewidth characterized by an octave-spanning femtosecond frequency comb.

  8. Observations of λ /4 structure in a low-loss radio-frequency-dressed optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundblad, N.; Ansari, S.; Guo, Y.; Moan, E.

    2014-11-01

    We load a Bose-Einstein condensate into a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice altered through the use of radio-frequency (rf) dressing. The rf resonantly couples the three levels of the 87Rb F =1 manifold and combines with a spin-dependent "bare" optical lattice to result in adiabatic potentials of variable shape, depth, and spatial frequency content. We choose dressing parameters such that the altered lattice is stable over lifetimes exceeding tens of ms at higher depths than in previous work. We observe significant differences between the BEC momentum distributions of the dressed lattice as compared to the bare lattice, and find general agreement with a 1D band-structure calculation informed by the dressing parameters. Previous work using such lattices was limited by very shallow dressed lattices and strong Landau-Zener tunneling loss between adiabatic potentials, equivalent to failure of the adiabatic criterion. In this work we operate with significantly stronger rf coupling (increasing the avoided-crossing gap between adiabatic potentials), observing dressed lifetimes of interest for optical lattice-based analog solid-state physics.

  9. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Island, Joshua O; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M; Ares, José R; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S J; Ferrer, Isabel J; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  10. Grade-2 Teflon (AF1601) PCF for optical communication using 2D FDTD technique: a simplest design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muduli, N.; Achary, J. S. N.; Padhy, Hemanta ku.

    2016-04-01

    A nonlinear ytterbium-doped rectangular proposed PCF structure of inner and outer cladding is used to analyze effective mode field area (Aeff), nonlinear coefficient (γ), dispersion (D), and confinement loss (CL) in a wide range of wavelength. The fabrication of PCF structure is due to different size doped air hole, pitch, and air hole diameter in a regular periodic geometrical array fashion. The various property of PCF structure such as mode field area, nonlinear coefficient, dispersion, and confinement loss are analyzed by implementing 2D FDTD technique. The above PCF property investigated using suitable parameters like Λ1, ?, ?, and ? in three different situations is discussed in simulation. The high nonlinear coefficient and dispersion property of PCF structure are tailored by setting the cladding parameter. However, highly nonlinear fibers with nonzero dispersion at the wavelength of 1.55 μm are very attractive for a range of optical communication application such as laser amplifier, pulse compression, wavelength conversion, all optical switching, and supercontinuum generation. So our newly proposed ytterbium-doped PCF seems to be most suitable exclusively for supercontinuum generation and nonlinear fiber optics. Finally, it is observed that ytterbium-doped Teflon (AF1601) PCF has more nonlinear coefficient (γ(λ) = 65.27 W-1 km-1) as compared to pure silica PCF (γ(λ) = 52 W-1 km-1) design to have same mode field area (Aeff) 1.7 μm2 at an operating wavelength of 1.55 μm.

  11. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    PubMed Central

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D’Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance. PMID:26931161

  12. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-03-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance.

  13. Vortex formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating deep optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Akira; Nakano, Yuki; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2011-11-15

    We study the dynamics of vortex nucleation and lattice formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating square optical lattice by numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Different dynamical regimes of vortex nucleation are found, depending on the depth and period of the optical lattice. We make an extensive comparison with the experiments by R. A. Williams et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 050404 (2010)], especially focusing on the issues of the critical rotation frequency for the first vortex nucleation and the vortex number as a function of rotation frequency.

  14. Realization of uniform synthetic magnetic fields by periodically shaking an optical square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creffield, C. E.; Pieplow, G.; Sols, F.; Goldman, N.

    2016-09-01

    Shaking a lattice system, by modulating the location of its sites periodically in time, is a powerful method to create effective magnetic fields in engineered quantum systems, such as cold gases trapped in optical lattices. However, such schemes are typically associated with space-dependent effective masses (tunneling amplitudes) and non-uniform flux patterns. In this work we investigate this phenomenon theoretically, by computing the effective Hamiltonians and quasienergy spectra associated with several kinds of lattice-shaking protocols. A detailed comparison with a method based on moving lattices, which are added on top of a main static optical lattice, is provided. This study allows the identification of novel shaking schemes, which simultaneously provide uniform effective mass and magnetic flux, with direct implications for cold-atom experiments and photonics.

  15. Phase-Stable Free-Space Optical Lattices for Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, C T; Kaufmann, H; Ruster, T; Schulz, J; Kaushal, V; Hettrich, M; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Poschinger, U G

    2016-01-22

    We demonstrate control of the absolute phase of an optical lattice with respect to a single trapped ion. The lattice is generated by off-resonant free-space laser beams, and we actively stabilize its phase by measuring its ac-Stark shift on a trapped ion. The ion is localized within the standing wave to better than 2% of its period. The locked lattice allows us to apply displacement operations via resonant optical forces with a controlled direction in phase space. Moreover, we observe the lattice-induced phase evolution of spin superposition states in order to analyze the relevant decoherence mechanisms. Finally, we employ lattice-induced phase shifts for inferring the variation of the ion position over the 157  μm range along the trap axis at accuracies of better than 6 nm.

  16. Fabrication and demonstration of square lattice two-dimensional rod-type photonic bandgap crystal optical intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Selin H. G.; Liu, A. Q.; Yu, M. B.; Singh, J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper reports fabrication and demonstration of optical intersections in two-dimensional (2D) rod-type photonic crystal (PhC) structures. High resolution and aspect ratio 2D square lattice PhC waveguide intersections were designed and fabricated for application at the optical communication wavelengths centered at 1550 nm. In the silicon processing front, challenges resolved to overcome issues of drastically reduced process windows caused by the dense PhC rods arrays with critical dimensions (CDs) reduced to only a few hundred nanometers were addressed not only in terms of critical process flow design but also in the development of each processing module. In the lithographic process of deep ultraviolet laser system working at 248 nm, PhC rods of sub-lithographic wavelength CDs (115 nm in radii) were realized in high resolution, even near periphery regions where proximity errors were prone. In the deep etching module, stringent requirements on etch angle control and low sidewall scallops (undulations arising from time multiplexed etch and passivation actions) were satisfied, to prevent catastrophic etch failures, and enable optical quality facets. The successfully fabricated PhCs were also monolithically integrated with large scale optical testing fiber grooves that enabled macro optical fiber assisted coupling to the micro scale PhC devices. In the optical experiments, the transmission and crosstalk properties for the PhC intersection devices with different rod radii at the center of the PhC optical waveguides crossings were measured with repeatability. The properties of the PhC intersections were therefore optimized and verified to correspond well with first principle finite difference time domain simulations.

  17. An algorithm for circular test and improved optical configuration by two-dimensional (2D) laser heterodyne interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shanzhi; Yu, Shengrui; Han, Qingfu; Li, Ming; Wang, Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Circular test is an important tactic to assess motion accuracy in many fields especially machine tool and coordinate measuring machine. There are setup errors due to using directly centring of the measuring instrument for both of contact double ball bar and existed non-contact methods. To solve this problem, an algorithm for circular test using function construction based on matrix operation is proposed, which is not only used for the solution of radial deviation (F) but also should be applied to obtain two other evaluation parameters especially circular hysteresis (H). Furthermore, an improved optical configuration with a single laser is presented based on a 2D laser heterodyne interferometer. Compared with the existed non-contact method, it has a more pure homogeneity of the laser sources of 2D displacement sensing for advanced metrology. The algorithm and modeling are both illustrated. And error budget is also achieved. At last, to validate them, test experiments for motion paths are implemented based on a gantry machining center. Contrast test results support the proposal.

  18. Optical Lattice Bose-Einstein Condensates and the dd Fusion - Iwamura Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Talbot

    2003-03-01

    My conjecture: LENR dd fusion occurs in PdDx when a subset of the interstitial deuterons occupy tetrahedral sites in a PdDx crystallite. The tetrahedral deuterons(d's), which occupy shallow potential wells, behave as a superfluid, similar to ultracold Na atoms in shallow-well optical traps, as modeled by Jaksch et al.(D. Jaksch, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 81, 3108 (1998).) The tetrahedral d's form a deuteron (d) subsystem, which is neutralized by an electron subsystem containing an equal number of electrons. In the superfluid all the properties of each quasiparticle d are partitioned among N_s_i_te equivalent sites. The partitioning of the d point charge reduces the Coulomb self-repulsion within each quasiparticle pair, which causes wave function overlap at large N_s_i_t_e, allowing d-d fusion. Similarly, partitioning of the point charge of each single quasiparticle d reduces the Coulomb repulsion between it and an obstructing impurity atom, which causes wave function overlap between quasiparticle and atom at large N_s_i_t_e, allowing transmutation of the impurity atom. The Iwamura reaction(Y. Iwamura, et al, Japan J. of Appl. Physics, 41A, 4642 (2002).) is 4 ^2D^+_B_l_o_ch + 4 e^-_B_l_o_ch + ^1^3^3Cs arrow ^1^4^1Pr, with the reaction energy incoherently transferred to the lattice.

  19. A compact acousto-optic lens for 2D and 3D femtosecond based 2-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Paul A.; Naga Srinivas, N.K.M.; Silver, R. Angus

    2010-01-01

    We describe a high speed 3D Acousto-Optic Lens Microscope (AOLM) for femtosecond 2-photon imaging. By optimizing the design of the 4 AO Deflectors (AODs) and by deriving new control algorithms, we have developed a compact spherical AOL with a low temporal dispersion that enables 2-photon imaging at 10-fold lower power than previously reported. We show that the AOLM can perform high speed 2D raster-scan imaging (>150 Hz) without scan rate dependent astigmatism. It can deflect and focus a laser beam in a 3D random access sequence at 30 kHz and has an extended focusing range (>137 μm; 40X 0.8NA objective). These features are likely to make the AOLM a useful tool for studying fast physiological processes distributed in 3D space PMID:20588506

  20. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Gene

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with significant flexibility in mind, but without compromising cost efficiency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of different variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of-flight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  1. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kafka, Gene

    2015-05-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with signi cant exibility in mind, but without compromising cost e ciency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of di erent variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of- ight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  2. Optical Study of Interactions in a d-Electron Kondo Lattice with Ferromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, K. S.; Schafgans, A.; Butch, N. P.; Sayles, T. A.; Maple, M. B.; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David; Basov, D. N.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a comprehensive optical, transport, and thermodynamic study of the Zintl compound Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11}, demonstrating that it is the first ferromagnetic Kondo lattice compound in the underscreened limit. We propose a scenario whereby the combination of Kondo and Jahn-Teller effects provides a consistent explanation of both transport and optical data.

  3. Trapping of neutral mercury atoms and prospects for optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Hachisu, H; Miyagishi, K; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2008-02-01

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for "new physics" beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10;{-18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  4. Controlling dipole-dipole frequency shifts in a lattice-based optical atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.E.; Lukin, M.D.; Ye Jun

    2004-02-01

    Motivated by the ideas of using cold alkaline-earth atoms trapped in an optical lattice for realization of optical atomic clocks, we investigate theoretically the perturbative effects of atom-atom interactions on a clock transition frequency. These interactions are mediated by the dipole fields associated with the optically excited atoms. We predict resonancelike features in the frequency shifts when constructive interference among atomic dipoles occur. We theoretically demonstrate that by fine tuning the coherent dipole-dipole couplings in appropriately designed lattice geometries, the undesirable frequency shifts can be greatly suppressed.

  5. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, H.; Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.; Miyagishi, K.; Porsev, S. G.; Derevianko, A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.

    2008-02-08

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ''new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10{sup -18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  6. Realizing non-Abelian gauge potentials in optical square lattices: an application to atomic Chern insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, N.; Gerbier, F.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-07-01

    We describe a scheme to engineer non-Abelian gauge potentials on a square optical lattice using laser-induced transitions. We emphasize the case of two-electron atoms, where the electronic ground state g is laser-coupled to a metastable state e within a state-dependent optical lattice. In this scheme, the alternating pattern of lattice sites hosting g and e states depicts a chequerboard structure, allowing for laser-assisted tunnelling along both spatial directions. In this configuration, the nuclear spin of the atoms can be viewed as a ‘flavour’ quantum number undergoing non-Abelian tunnelling along nearest-neighbour links. We show that this technique can be useful to simulate the equivalent of the Haldane quantum Hall model using cold atoms trapped in square optical lattices, offering an interesting route to realize Chern insulators. The emblematic Haldane model is particularly suited to investigate the physics of topological insulators, but requires, in its original form, complex hopping terms beyond nearest-neighbouring sites. In general, this drawback inhibits a direct realization with cold atoms, using standard laser-induced tunnelling techniques. We demonstrate that a simple mapping allows us to express this model in terms of matrix hopping operators that are defined on a standard square lattice. This mapping is investigated for two models that lead to anomalous quantum Hall phases. We discuss the practical implementation of such models, exploiting laser-induced tunnelling methods applied to the chequerboard optical lattice.

  7. Negative refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices with nonuniform artificial gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the reflection and refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices exposed to a nonuniform artificial magnetic field. The introduction of the nonuniform artificial magnetic field to the optical lattice for suitable designer magnetic potential barrier can lead to a series of intriguing reflection and refraction phenomena of atoms, including reflection, positive refraction, negative refraction and atomic matter wave splitting. Both the occurrence and the distribution of these reflection and refraction scenarios can be coherently controlled by the nonuniform artificial magnetic field. In particular, the regions close to the boundary of reflection demonstrate two more interesting propagation modes, i.e., a reflected branch of atoms comprising a positive or negative refracted branch of atoms with almost same atom population will be excited simultaneously at the magnetic potential barrier. The results can be a guide for the coherent control of the matter waves in optical lattices and the design of new atom optics devices.

  8. Towards quantum simulation with two-electron 173Yb fermions in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Zou, Yueyang; He, Chengdong; Haciyev, Elnur; Cai, Geyue; Chan, Wing Kin; Huang, Wei; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2016-05-01

    Recent development of cooling and manipulating Ytterbium atoms opens a new avenue to investigate unprecedented atomic systems with SU(N) spin symmetry and orbital degrees of freedom. The available metastable states and narrow-line optical transitions of Ytterbium atoms allow for the versatile control of the system. Here, we first describe our apparatus for producing ultracold Ytterbium-173 quantum gases in an optical lattice. A gas of 3 ×104 Ytterbium-173 atoms is routinely produced at T /TF ~ 0 . 3 , and loaded into an optical lattice potential. Then we report our recent progress on the spin orbital (SO) coupling interaction realized in optical lattice. As a novel quantum simulator, cold Ytterbium atoms with SO coupling provide a platform to explore the intriguing topological physics. Funded by the Research Grants Council (RGC) of Hong Kong Project# 16300215.

  9. Matter-wave two-dimensional solitons in crossed linear and nonlinear optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Luz, H. L. F.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Gammal, A.; Salerno, M.; Tomio, Lauro

    2010-10-01

    The existence of multidimensional matter-wave solitons in a crossed optical lattice (OL) with a linear optical lattice (LOL) in the x direction and a nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) in the y direction, where the NOL can be generated by a periodic spatial modulation of the scattering length using an optically induced Feshbach resonance is demonstrated. In particular, we show that such crossed LOLs and NOLs allow for stabilizing two-dimensional solitons against decay or collapse for both attractive and repulsive interactions. The solutions for the soliton stability are investigated analytically, by using a multi-Gaussian variational approach, with the Vakhitov-Kolokolov necessary criterion for stability; and numerically, by using the relaxation method and direct numerical time integrations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Very good agreement of the results corresponding to both treatments is observed.

  10. Matter-wave two-dimensional solitons in crossed linear and nonlinear optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Luz, H. L. F. da; Gammal, A.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Salerno, M.; Tomio, Lauro

    2010-10-15

    The existence of multidimensional matter-wave solitons in a crossed optical lattice (OL) with a linear optical lattice (LOL) in the x direction and a nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) in the y direction, where the NOL can be generated by a periodic spatial modulation of the scattering length using an optically induced Feshbach resonance is demonstrated. In particular, we show that such crossed LOLs and NOLs allow for stabilizing two-dimensional solitons against decay or collapse for both attractive and repulsive interactions. The solutions for the soliton stability are investigated analytically, by using a multi-Gaussian variational approach, with the Vakhitov-Kolokolov necessary criterion for stability; and numerically, by using the relaxation method and direct numerical time integrations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Very good agreement of the results corresponding to both treatments is observed.

  11. p-Wave Cold Collisions in an Optical Lattice Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-09-02

    We study ultracold collisions in fermionic ytterbium by precisely measuring the energy shifts they impart on the atoms' internal clock states. Exploiting Fermi statistics, we uncover p-wave collisions, in both weakly and strongly interacting regimes. With the higher density afforded by two-dimensional lattice confinement, we demonstrate that strong interactions can lead to a novel suppression of this collision shift. In addition to reducing the systematic errors of lattice clocks, this work has application to quantum information and quantum simulation with alkaline-earth atoms.

  12. Anderson localization in optical lattices with speckle disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Sucu, Serpil; Aktas, Saban; Okan, S. Erol; Akdeniz, Zehra; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2011-12-15

    We study the localization properties of noninteracting waves propagating in a speckle-like potential superposed on a one-dimensional lattice. Using a combined decimation-renormalization procedure, we estimate the localization length for a tight-binding Hamiltonian where site energies are square-sinc-correlated random variables. By decreasing the width of the correlation function, the disorder patterns approach a {delta}-correlated disorder, and the localization length becomes almost energy independent in the strong disorder limit. We show that this regime can be reached for a size of the speckle grains on the order of (lower than) four lattice steps.

  13. Effects of anisotropy in simple lattice geometries on many-body properties of ultracold fermions in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubeva, Anna; Sotnikov, Andrii; Hofstetter, Walter

    2015-10-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic hopping amplitudes on quantum phases of ultracold fermions in optical lattices described by the repulsive Fermi-Hubbard model. In particular, using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) we investigate the dimensional crossover between the isotropic square and the isotropic cubic lattice. We analyze the phase transition from the antiferromagnetic to the paramagnetic state and observe a significant change in the critical temperature: depending on the interaction strength, the anisotropy can lead to both a suppression or increase. We also investigate the localization properties of the system, such as the compressibility and double occupancy. Using the local-density approximation in combination with DMFT we conclude that density profiles can be used to detect the mentioned anisotropy-driven transitions.

  14. Ultracold Nonreactive Molecules in an Optical Lattice: Connecting Chemistry to Many-Body Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doçaj, Andris; Wall, Michael L.; Mukherjee, Rick; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-04-01

    We derive effective lattice models for ultracold bosonic or fermionic nonreactive molecules (NRMs) in an optical lattice, analogous to the Hubbard model that describes ultracold atoms in a lattice. In stark contrast to the Hubbard model, which is commonly assumed to accurately describe NRMs, we find that the single on-site interaction parameter U is replaced by a multichannel interaction, whose properties we elucidate. Because this arises from complex short-range collisional physics, it requires no dipolar interactions and thus occurs even in the absence of an electric field or for homonuclear molecules. We find a crossover between coherent few-channel models and fully incoherent single-channel models as the lattice depth is increased. We show that the effective model parameters can be determined in lattice modulation experiments, which, consequently, measure molecular collision dynamics with a vastly sharper energy resolution than experiments in a free-space ultracold gas.

  15. Ultracold Nonreactive Molecules in an Optical Lattice: Connecting Chemistry to Many-Body Physics.

    PubMed

    Doçaj, Andris; Wall, Michael L; Mukherjee, Rick; Hazzard, Kaden R A

    2016-04-01

    We derive effective lattice models for ultracold bosonic or fermionic nonreactive molecules (NRMs) in an optical lattice, analogous to the Hubbard model that describes ultracold atoms in a lattice. In stark contrast to the Hubbard model, which is commonly assumed to accurately describe NRMs, we find that the single on-site interaction parameter U is replaced by a multichannel interaction, whose properties we elucidate. Because this arises from complex short-range collisional physics, it requires no dipolar interactions and thus occurs even in the absence of an electric field or for homonuclear molecules. We find a crossover between coherent few-channel models and fully incoherent single-channel models as the lattice depth is increased. We show that the effective model parameters can be determined in lattice modulation experiments, which, consequently, measure molecular collision dynamics with a vastly sharper energy resolution than experiments in a free-space ultracold gas.

  16. Interaction-induced excited-band condensate in a double-well optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qi; Das Sarma, S.; Porto, J. V.

    2011-09-15

    We show theoretically that interaction effects in a double-well optical lattice can induce condensates in an excited band. For a symmetric double-well lattice, bosons condense into the bottom of the excited band at the edge of the Brillouin zone if the chemical potential is above a critical value. For an asymmetric lattice, a condensate with zero momentum is automatically induced in the excited band by the condensate in the lowest band. This is due to a combined effect of interaction and lattice potential, which reduces the band gap and breaks the inversion symmetry. Our work can be generalized to a superlattice composed of multiple-well potentials at each lattice site, where condensates can be induced in even higher bands.

  17. Ultracold nonreactive molecules in an optical lattice: connecting chemistry to many-body physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Rick; Ewart, Kevin; Alam, Shah; Wall, Michael; Doçaj, Andris; Hazzard, Kaden

    2016-05-01

    We derive effective lattice models for ultracold bosonic or fermionic nonreactive molecules (NRMs) in an optical lattice. In stark contrast to the standard Hubbard model, which is commonly assumed to accurately describe NRMs, we find that the single on-site interaction parameter U is replaced by a multi-channel interaction. The complex, multi-channel collisional physics is unrelated to dipolar interactions, and so occurs even in the absence of an electric field or for homonuclear molecules. We find a crossover between coherent few-channel models and fully incoherent single-channel models as the lattice depth is increased. We devise ways to control the effective model parameters using external fields and lattice anisotropy. We show that these parameters can be determined in lattice modulation experiments, which measure molecular collision dynamics with a vastly sharper energy resolution than experiments in an ultracold gas. We will report our progress calculating this novel model's ground state phase diagram.

  18. Weyl points in three-dimensional optical lattices: synthetic magnetic monopoles in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buljan, Hrvoje; Dubcek, Tena; Kennedy, Colin; Lu, Ling; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-05-01

    We show that Hamiltonians with Weyl points can be realized for ultracold atoms using laser-assisted tunneling in three-dimensional (3D) optical lattices. Weyl points are synthetic magnetic monopoles that exhibit a robust, 3D linear dispersion (e.g., see). They are associated with many interesting topological states of matter, such as Weyl semimetals and chiral Weyl fermions. However, Weyl points have yet to be experimentally observed in any system. We show that this elusive goal is well-within experimental reach with an extension of the techniques recently used to obtain the Harper Hamiltonian. We propose using laser assisted tunneling to create a 3D optical lattice, with specifically designed hopping between lattice sites that breaks inversion symmetry. The design leads to creation of four Weyl points in the Brillouin zone of the lattice, which are verified to be monopoles of the synthetic magnetic field. Supported by the Unity through Knowledge Fund (Grant 5/13).

  19. Resolved Sideband Spectroscopy and Cooling of Strontium in a 532-nm Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, James; Hill, Joshua; Killian, T. C.

    2016-05-01

    Resolved sideband cooling is a powerful and well established technique for driving ultracold atoms in optical lattices to the motional ground state of individual lattice sites. Here we present spectroscopy of the narrow 5s21S0 --> 5 s 5 p3P1 transition for neutral strontium-84 in a 532nm optical lattice. Resolved red- and blue-detuned sidebands are observed corresponding to changes in the motional state in the lattice sites. Driving the red sideband, we demonstrate cooling into the ground state, which increases the initial phase-space density before forced evaporative cooling. This is a promising technique for improving the production of strontium quantum degenerate gases. Research supported by the Robert A, Welch Foundation under Grant No. C-1844.

  20. Mechanical and electronic energy eigenstates of neutral Rb atoms in deep optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzner, Andreas; Koerber, Matthias; Morin, Olivier; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    Optical lattices allow for tight three-dimensional confinement of neutral atoms in quasi-harmonic potentials and have become a standard tool in experimental quantum optics. Applications range from fundamental topics like metrology to applications in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here we present an experimental characterization of the motional and internal energy eigenstates of optically trapped 87Rb atoms. We implement different spectroscopy techniques based on non-destructive hyperfine state detection using an optical cavity. Applying these techniques, we observe and explain a series of effects like the decoupling of the hyperfine spin due to a tensor lightshift and mechanical effects associated with a small non-orthogonality of the lattice axes. Furthermore, we succeed to exploit the latter for optical cooling of a single atom into the two-dimensional mechanical groundstate in an environment with restricted optical access.

  1. Spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates in a one-dimensional optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Hamner, C; Zhang, Yongping; Khamehchi, M A; Davis, Matthew J; Engels, P

    2015-02-20

    We investigate a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate loaded into a translating optical lattice. We experimentally demonstrate the lack of Galilean invariance in the spin-orbit-coupled system, which leads to anisotropic behavior of the condensate depending on the direction of translation of the lattice. The anisotropy is theoretically understood by an effective dispersion relation. We experimentally confirm this theoretical picture by probing the dynamical instability of the system.

  2. Spin-Orbit-Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates in a One-Dimensional Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamner, C.; Zhang, Yongping; Khamehchi, M. A.; Davis, Matthew J.; Engels, P.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate loaded into a translating optical lattice. We experimentally demonstrate the lack of Galilean invariance in the spin-orbit-coupled system, which leads to anisotropic behavior of the condensate depending on the direction of translation of the lattice. The anisotropy is theoretically understood by an effective dispersion relation. We experimentally confirm this theoretical picture by probing the dynamical instability of the system.

  3. Resonant control of cold-atom transport through two optical lattices with a constant relative speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, M. T.; Balanov, A. G.; Fromhold, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    We show theoretically that the dynamics of cold atoms in the lowest-energy band of a stationary optical lattice can be transformed and controlled by a second, weaker, periodic potential moving at a constant speed along the axis of the stationary lattice. The atom trajectories exhibit complex behavior, which depends sensitively on the amplitude and speed of the propagating lattice. When the speed and amplitude of the moving potential are low, the atoms are dragged through the static lattice and perform drifting orbits with frequencies an order of magnitude higher than that corresponding to the moving potential. Increasing either the speed or amplitude of the moving lattice induces Bloch-like oscillations within the energy band of the static lattice, which exhibit complex resonances at critical values of the system parameters. In some cases, a very small change in these parameters can reverse the atom's direction of motion. In order to understand these dynamics we present an analytical model, which describes the key features of the atom transport and also accurately predicts the positions of the resonant features in the atom's phase space. The abrupt controllable transitions between dynamical regimes, as well as the associated set of resonances, provide a mechanism for transporting atoms between precise locations in a lattice, as required for using cold atoms to simulate condensed matter or as a stepping stone to quantum information processing. The system also provides a direct quantum simulator of acoustic waves propagating through semiconductor nanostructures in sound analogs of the optical laser (saser).

  4. All-optical XOR and OR logic gates based on line and point defects in 2-D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Kiyanoosh; Mir, Ali; Chaharmahali, Iman; Goudarzi, Dariush

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have proposed an all-optical logic gate structure based on line and point defects created in the two dimensional square lattice of silicon rods in air photonic crystals (PhCs). Line defects are embedded in the DX and DZ directions of the momentum space. The device has two input and two output ports. It has been shown analytically whether the initial phase difference between the two input beams is π/2, they interfere together constructively or destructively to realize the logical functions. The simulation results show that the device can acts as a XOR and an OR logic gate. It is applicable in the frequency range of 0-0.45 (a/λ), however we set it at (a/λ=) 0.419 for low dispersion condition, correspondingly the lambda is equal to 1.55 μm. The maximum delay time to response to the input signals is about 0.4 ps, hence the speed of the device is about 2.5 THz. Also 6.767 dB is the maximum contrast ratio of the device.

  5. Creation of a low-entropy quantum gas of polar molecules in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Moses, Steven A; Covey, Jacob P; Miecnikowski, Matthew T; Yan, Bo; Gadway, Bryce; Ye, Jun; Jin, Deborah S

    2015-11-01

    Ultracold polar molecules, with their long-range electric dipolar interactions, offer a unique platform for studying correlated quantum many-body phenomena. However, realizing a highly degenerate quantum gas of molecules with a low entropy per particle is challenging. We report the synthesis of a low-entropy quantum gas of potassium-rubidium molecules (KRb) in a three-dimensional optical lattice. We simultaneously load into the optical lattice a Mott insulator of bosonic Rb atoms and a single-band insulator of fermionic K atoms. Then, using magnetoassociation and optical state transfer, we efficiently produce ground-state molecules in the lattice at those sites that contain one Rb and one K atom. The achieved filling fraction of 25% should enable future studies of transport and entanglement propagation in a many-body system with long-range dipolar interactions. PMID:26542566

  6. Vortex Formation of Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates in Synthetic Magnetic Field with Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Motivated by recent experiments carried out by Spielman's group at NIST, we study the vortex formation in a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate in synthetic magnetic field confined in a harmonic potential combined with an optical lattice. We obtain numerical solutions of the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation and compare the vortex formation by synthetic magnetic field method with those by rotating frame method. We conclude that a large angular momentum indeed can be created in the presence of the optical lattice. However, it is still more difficult to rotate the condensate by the synthetic magnetic field than by the rotating frame even if the optical lattice is added, and the chemical potential and energy remain almost unchanged by increasing rotational frequency.

  7. Signatures of spatial inversion asymmetry of an optical lattice observed in matter-wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. K.; Barter, T. H.; Leung, T.-H.; Daiss, S.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    The structure of a two-dimensional honeycomb optical lattice potential with small inversion asymmetry is characterized using coherent diffraction of 87Rb atoms. We demonstrate that even a small potential asymmetry, with peak-to-peak amplitude of ≤2.3 % of the overall lattice potential, can lead to pronounced inversion asymmetry in the momentum-space diffraction pattern. The observed asymmetry is explained quantitatively by considering both Kapitza-Dirac scattering in the Raman-Nath regime and also either perturbative or full-numerical treatment of the band structure of a periodic potential with a weak inversion-symmetry-breaking term. Our results have relevance for both the experimental development of coherent atom optics and the proper interpretation of time-of-flight assays of atomic materials in optical lattices.

  8. Signatures of spatial inversion asymmetry of an optical lattice observed in matter-wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Claire K.; Barter, Thomas H.; Leung, Tsz Him; Okano, Masayuki; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2016-05-01

    The structure of a two-dimensional honeycomb optical lattice potential with small inversion asymmetry is characterized using coherent diffraction of 87 Rb atoms. We demonstrate that even a small potential asymmetry, with peak-to-peak amplitude of <= 2 . 3 % of the overall lattice potential, can lead to pronounced inversion asymmetry in the momentum-space diffraction pattern. The observed asymmetry is explained quantitatively by considering both Kaptiza-Dirac scattering in the Raman-Nath regime, and also either perturbative or full-numerical treatment of the band structure of a periodic potential with a weak inversion symmetry breaking term. Our results have relevance both for the experimental development of coherent atom optics and also for the proper interpretation of time-of-flight assays of atomic materials in optical lattices. This work was supported by the NSF and the AFOSR through the MURI program.

  9. Measuring the spin Chern number in time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Cao, Shuai

    2016-10-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to directly measure the spin Chern number of the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model in optical lattices. We first show that this model can be realized by using ultracold Fermi atoms with two pseudo-spin states encoded by the internal Zeeman states in a square optical lattice and the corresponding topological Bloch bands are characterized by the spin Chern number. We then propose and numerically demonstrate that this topological invariant can be extracted from the shift of the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice. By spin-resolved in situ detection of the atomic densities along the transverse direction combined with time-of-flight measurement along another spatial direction, the spin Chern number in this system is directly measured.

  10. Detection of antiferromagnetic order by cooling atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Teles, Rafael; Hazzard, Kaden; Hulet, Randall; Rice University Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We have realized the Fermi-Hubbard model with fermionic 6 Li atoms in a three-dimensional compensated optical lattice. The compensated optical lattice has provided low enough temperatures to produce short-range antiferromagnetic (AF) spin correlations, which we detect via Bragg scattering of light. Previously, we reached temperatures down to 1.4 times that of the AFM phase transition, more than a factor of 2 below temperatures obtained previously in 3D optical lattices with fermions. In order to further reduce the entropy in the compensated lattice, we implement an entropy conduit - which is a single blue detuned laser beam with a waist size smaller than the overall atomic sample size. This repulsive narrow potential provides a conductive metallic path between the low entropy core and the edges of the atomic sample where atoms may be evaporated. In addition, the entropy conduit may store entropy, thus further lowering the entropy in the core. We will report on the status of these efforts to further cool atoms in the optical lattice. Work supported by ARO MURI Grant, NSF and The Welch Foundation.

  11. Dipole-dipole interactions in optical lattices do not follow an inverse cube power law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, M. L.; Carr, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    We study the effective dipole-dipole interactions in ultracold quantum gases on optical lattices as a function of asymmetry in confinement along the principal axes of the lattice. In particular, we study the matrix elements of the dipole-dipole interaction in the basis of lowest band Wannier functions which serve as a set of low-energy states for many-body physics on the lattice. We demonstrate that, for shallow lattices in quasi-reduced dimensional scenarios, the effective interaction between dipoles in an optical lattice is non-algebraic in the inter-particle separation at short to medium distance on the lattice scale and has a long-range power-law tail, in contrast to the pure power-law behavior of the dipole-dipole interaction in free space. The modifications to the free-space interaction can be sizable; we identify differences of up to 36% from the free-space interaction at the nearest-neighbor distance in quasi-one-dimensional arrangements. The interaction difference depends essentially on asymmetry in confinement, due to the d-wave anisotropy of the dipole-dipole interaction. Our results do not depend on statistics, applying to both dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases. Using matrix product state simulations, we demonstrate that use of the correct lattice dipolar interaction leads to significant deviations from many-body predictions using the free-space interaction. Our results are relevant to up and coming experiments with ultracold heteronuclear molecules, Rydberg atoms and strongly magnetic atoms in optical lattices.

  12. Propagation of sound in a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Menotti, C.; Kraemer, M.; Stringari, S.; Smerzi, A.; Pitaevskii, L.

    2004-08-01

    We study the propagation of sound waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We find that the velocity of the propagation of sound wave packets decreases with increasing optical lattice depth, as predicted by the Bogoliubov theory. The strong interplay between nonlinearities and the periodicity of the external potential generates phenomena that are not present in the uniform case. Shock waves, for instance, can propagate slower than sound waves, due to the negative curvature of the dispersion relation. Moreover, nonlinear corrections to the Bogoliubov theory appear to be important even with very small density perturbations, inducing a saturation of the amplitude of the sound signal.

  13. Single-qubit rotations in two-dimensional optical lattices with multiqubit addressing

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Jaewoo; Lim, Yuan Liang; Knight, Peter L.; Beige, Almut

    2006-10-15

    Optical lattices with one atom on each site and interacting via cold controlled collisions provide an efficient way to entangle a large number of qubits with high fidelity. It has already been demonstrated experimentally that this approach is especially suited for the generation of cluster states [O. Mandel et al., Nature 425, 937 (2003)] which reduce the resource requirement for quantum computing to the ability to perform single-qubit rotations and qubit read out. In this paper, we describe how to implement these rotations in one-dimensional and two-dimensional optical lattices without having to address the atoms individually with a laser field.

  14. Response to dynamical modulation of the optical lattice for fermions in the Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhaoxin; Yang Shuxiang; Sheehy, Daniel E.; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Chiesa, Simone; Su Shiquan; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2011-08-15

    Fermionic atoms in a periodic optical lattice provide a realization of the single-band Hubbard model. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations along with the maximum-entropy method, we evaluate the effect of a time-dependent perturbative modulation of the optical lattice amplitude on atomic correlations, revealed in the fraction of doubly occupied sites. We find that the effect of modulation depends strongly on the filling--the response of the double occupation is significantly different in the half-filled Mott insulator from that in the doped Fermi liquid region.

  15. Hidden-symmetry-protected quantum pseudo-spin Hall effect in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jing-Min; Chen, Wei

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a Z2 topological insulator in a square optical lattice. Different from the conventional topological insulator protected by the time-reversal symmetry, here the optical lattice possesses a hidden symmetry, which is responsible for the present Z2 topological order. With a properly defined pseudospin, such a topological insulator is characterized by the helical edge states that exhibits pseudo-spin-momentum locking, so it can be considered as a quantum pseudo-spin Hall insulator. The Z2 topological invariant is derived and its experimental detection is discussed as well.

  16. Stability of Superfluid and Supersolid Phases of Dipolar Bosons in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Danshita, Ippei; Sa de Melo, Carlos A. R.

    2009-11-27

    We perform a stability analysis of superfluid (SF) and supersolid (SS) phases of polarized dipolar bosons in two-dimensional optical lattices at high filling factors and zero temperature, and obtain the phase boundaries between SF, checkerboard SS (CSS), striped SS (SSS), and collapse. We show that the phase diagram can be explored through the application of an external field and the tuning of its direction with respect to the optical lattice plane. In particular, we find a transition between the CSS and SSS phases.

  17. Characterization of Al2O3 optically stimulated luminescence films for 2D dosimetry using a 6 MV photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. F.; Shrestha, N.; Schnell, E.; Ahmad, S.; Akselrod, M. S.; Yukihara, E. G.

    2016-11-01

    This work evaluates the dosimetric properties of newly developed optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) films, fabricated with either Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg, using a prototype laser scanning reader, a developed image reconstruction algorithm, and a 6 MV therapeutic photon beam. Packages containing OSL films (Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg) and a radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT3) were irradiated using a 6 MV photon beam using different doses, field sizes, with and without wedge filter. Dependence on film orientation of the OSL system was also tested. Diode-array (MapCHECK) and ionization chamber measurements were performed for comparison. The OSLD film doses agreed with the MapCHECK and ionization chamber data within the experimental uncertainties (<2% at 1.5 Gy). The system background and minimum detectable dose (MDD) were  <0.5 mGy, and the dose response was approximately linear from the MDD up to a few grays (the linearity correction was  <10% up to ~2–4 Gy), with no saturation up to 30 Gy. The dose profiles agreed with those obtained using EBT3 films (analyzed using the triple channel method) in the high dose regions of the images. In the low dose regions, the dose profiles from the OSLD films were more reproducible than those from the EBT3 films. We also demonstrated that the OSL film data are independent on scan orientation and field size over the investigated range. The results demonstrate the potential of OSLD films for 2D dosimetry, particularly for the characterization of small fields, due to their wide dynamic range, linear response, resolution and dosimetric properties. The negligible background and potential simple calibration make these OSLD films suitable for remote audits. The characterization presented here may motivate further commercial development of a 2D dosimetry system based on the OSL from Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg.

  18. The Sr optical lattice clock at JILA: A new record in atomic clock performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Travis; Bloom, Benjamin; Williams, Jason; Campbell, Sara; Bishof, Michael; Zhang, Xibo; Zhang, Wei; Bromley, Sarah; Hutson, Ross; McNally, Rees; Ye, Jun

    2014-05-01

    The exquisite control exhibited over quantum states of individual particles has revolutionized the field of precision measurement, as exemplified by highly accurate atomic clocks. Optical clocks have been the most accurate frequency standards for the better part of a decade, surpassing even the cesium microwave fountains upon which the SI second is based. Two classes of optical clocks have outperformed cesium: single-ion clocks and optical lattice clocks. Historically ion clocks have always been more accurate, and the precision of ion clocks and lattice clocks has been comparable. For years it has been unclear if lattice clocks can overcome key systematics and become more accurate than ion clocks. In this presentation I report the first lattice clock that has surpassed ion clocks in both precision and accuracy. These measurements represent a tenfold improvement in precision and a factor of 20 improvement in accuracy over the previous best lattice clock results. This work paves the way for a better realization of SI units, the development of more sophisticated quantum sensors, and precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature.

  19. Coherent control of atomic motion in an optical lattice for precise measurements of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarallo, Marco; Alberti, Andrea; Poli, Nicola; Prevedelli, Marco; Wang, Fu-Yuan; Tino, Guglielmo

    2011-05-01

    Coherent control of atomic motion inside an optical lattice allows precise measurement of forces by means amplitude-modulation (AM) driven resonant tunneling. We report about the recently-performed high precision measurements of gravitational acceleration using ultracold strontium atoms trapped in an AM driven vertical optical lattice. We reached an uncertainty Δg / g ~10-7 by measuring at the 5th harmonic of the Bloch oscillation frequency. We analyzed the systematic effects induced by the trapping optical lattice, such as the intensity gradient and the lattice frequency-induced shift. We accurately measured the lattice frequency by means of an fiber link with a home-made frequency comb. The value of g obtained with this microscopic quantum system is consistent with the one we measured with a classical absolute gravimeter. Short-distance measurements of gravity near dielectric surfaces are discussed. These results prospect a new way to new tests of gravity at micrometer scale. A. Alberti et al., New J. Phys. 12, 065037 (2010).

  20. Relaxation Dynamics Of Bose-Fermi Doublons In Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Gärttner, Martin; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Wall, Michael L.; Covey, Jacob P.; Moses, Steven A.; Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Fu, Zhengkun; Rey, Ana Maria; Jin, Deborah S.; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment at JILA we investigate the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of a dilute Fermi-Bose mixture, starting from a well-defined initial state, where each lattice site is either empty or occupied by a Bose-Fermi doublon. Utilizing analytical techniques and numerical simulations using the t-DRMG method, we identify the leading relaxation mechanisms of the doublons. At short times strong interactions tend to hold the doublons together, as previously reported in similar type of experiments made with identical bosons or two component fermions. Since the fermions feel a much shallower lattice than the bosons, the bosons can be visualized as random localization centers for the fermions. However, at longer times the boson tunneling cannot be ignored and additional decay channels unique to Bose-Fermi mixtures become relevant. While cluster expansion allows us to characterize the short time dynamics for dilute arrays, the long time relaxation dynamics at higher densities is strongly correlated. In this regime exact numerical techniques are employed. JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF-1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  1. Zitterbewegung with spin-orbit coupled ultracold atoms in a fluctuating optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argonov, V. Yu; Makarov, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of non-interacting ultracold atoms with artificial spin-orbit coupling is considered. Spin-orbit coupling is created using two moving optical lattices with orthogonal polarizations. Our main goal is to study influence of lattice noise on Rabi oscillations. Special attention is paid to the phenomenon of the Zitterbewegung being trembling motion caused by Rabi transitions between states with different velocities. Phase and amplitude fluctuations of lattices are modelled by means of the two-dimensional stochastic Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, also known as harmonic noise. In the the noiseless case the problem is solved analytically in terms of the momentum representation. It is shown that lattice noise significantly extends duration of the Zitterbewegung as compared to the noiseless case. This effect originates from noise-induced decoherence of Rabi oscillations.

  2. Approach to a permanent electron electric dipole moment search using cold atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Teng; Weiss, David

    2015-05-01

    We present our progress towards measuring the electron EDM using laser-cooled cesium and rubidium atoms trapped in a one dimensional optical lattice. To date, we have collected Cs atoms in two parallel 1D optical lattices that thread three glass electric field plates in a region of well-shielded magnetic fields. As a precursor to the EDM measurement, we have performed a variant of a Hanle effect measurement and used it to study the vector light shifts due to the cavity-built up lattice beams. This gives us a very high sensitivity to the absolute linear polarization of the light, which we have demonstrated to be as good as ~10-8 in fractional power. NSF PHY-13-07096.

  3. Bose-Einstein quantum phase transition in an optical lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenman, Michael; Lieb, Elliott H.; Seiringer, Robert; Solovej, Jan Philip; Yngvason, Jakob

    2004-08-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in cold gases can be turned on and off by an external potential, such as that presented by an optical lattice. We present a model of this phenomenon which we are able to analyze rigorously. The system is a hard core lattice gas at half of the maximum density and the optical lattice is modeled by a periodic potential of strength {lambda}. For small {lambda} and temperature, BEC is proved to occur, while at large {lambda} or temperature there is no BEC. At large {lambda} the low-temperature states are in a Mott insulator phase with a characteristic gap that is absent in the BEC phase. The interparticle interaction is essential for this transition, which occurs even in the ground state. Surprisingly, the condensation is always into the p=0 mode in this model, although the density itself has the periodicity of the imposed potential.

  4. Hidden nonsymmorphic symmetry in optical lattices with one-dimensional spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Xie, X. C.

    2016-05-01

    We uncover the nonsymmorphic symmetry and investigate its effects on the noncollinear band structures of a quasi-two-dimensional optical lattice with synthetic one-dimensional spin-orbit coupling and a tunable Zeeman field. The perpendicular Zeeman field breaks time-reversal symmetry and lifts the Kramers degeneracy which is protected by time-reversal and generalized inversion symmetries. Interestingly, we find that the degeneracy of Bloch bands on the border of the Brillouin zone is immune to the Zeeman field. This degeneracy, reminiscent of that in nonsymmorphic crystals, is protected by the hidden glide-plane symmetry that comprises a physical reflection involving both spatial and spin degrees of freedom followed by a nonprimitive lattice translation. Furthermore, we show that the band degeneracy can be lifted by the glide-plane-symmetry-breaking lattice potential. Finally, we propose to detect these effects by measuring a dynamical structure factor with optical Bragg spectroscopy.

  5. Semiclassical solitons in strongly correlated systems of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Demler, Eugene; Maltsev, Andrei

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Dynamics of their formation in strongly correlated systems of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices. > Regime of very strong interactions between atoms, the so-called hard core bosons regime. > Character of soliton excitations is dramatically different from the usual Gross-Pitaevskii regime. - Abstract: We investigate theoretically soliton excitations and dynamics of their formation in strongly correlated systems of ultracold bosonic atoms in two and three dimensional optical lattices. We derive equations of nonlinear hydrodynamics in the regime of strong interactions and incommensurate fillings, when atoms can be treated as hard core bosons. When parameters change in one direction only we obtain Korteweg-de Vries type equation away from half-filling and modified KdV equation at half-filling. We apply this general analysis to a problem of the decay of the density step. We consider stability of one dimensional solutions to transverse fluctuations. Our results are also relevant for understanding nonequilibrium dynamics of lattice spin models.

  6. Design and fabrication of two-dimensional deterministic aperiodic photonic lattices by optical induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebel, F.; Boguslawski, M.; Lučić, Nemanja M.; Jović Savić, Dragana M.; Denz, C.

    2015-03-01

    Light propagation in structured photonic media covers many fascinating wave phenomena resulting from the band structure of the underlying lattice. Recently, the focus turned towards deterministic aperiodic structures exhibiting distinctive band gap properties. To experimentally study these effects, optical induction of photonic refractive index landscapes turned out to be the method of choice to fabricate these structures. In this contribution, we present a paradigm change of photonic lattice design by introducing a holographic optical induction method based on pixel-like spatially multiplexed single-site nondiffracting Bessel beams. This technique allows realizing a huge class of two-dimensional photonic structures, including deterministic aperiodic golden-angle Vogel spirals, as well as Fibonacci lattices.

  7. Engineering Stark Potentials for Precision Measurements: Optical Lattice Clock and Electrodynamic Surface Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Takamoto, Masao; Hachisu, Hidekazu; Fujiki, Jun; Higashi, Ryoichi; Yasuda, Masami; Kishimoto, Tetsuo

    2005-05-05

    Employing the engineered electric fields, we demonstrate novel platforms for precision measurements with neutral atoms. (1) Applying the light shift cancellation technique, atoms trapped in an optical lattice reveal 50-Hz-narrow optical spectrum, yielding nearly an order of magnitude improvement over existing neutral-atom-based clocks. (2) Surface Stark trap has been developed to manipulate scalar atoms that are intrinsically robust to decoherence.

  8. Atom-optics simulator of lattice transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Eric J.; An, Fangzhao Alex; Gadway, Bryce

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate a scheme for studying lattice transport phenomena, based on the controlled momentum-space dynamics of ultracold atomic matter waves. In the effective tight-binding models that can be simulated, we demonstrate that this technique allows for a local and time-dependent control over all system parameters, and additionally allows for single-site resolved detection of atomic populations. We demonstrate full control over site-to-site off-diagonal tunneling elements (amplitude and phase) and diagonal site energies, through the observation of continuous-time quantum walks, Bloch oscillations, and negative tunneling. These capabilities open up new prospects in the experimental study of disordered and topological systems.

  9. Simulation of non-Abelian gauge theories with optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Tagliacozzo, L; Celi, A; Orland, P; Mitchell, M W; Lewenstein, M

    2013-01-01

    Many phenomena occurring in strongly correlated quantum systems still await conclusive explanations. The absence of isolated free quarks in nature is an example. It is attributed to quark confinement, whose origin is not yet understood. The phase diagram for nuclear matter at general temperatures and densities, studied in heavy-ion collisions, is not settled. Finally, we have no definitive theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Though we have theories that could underlie such physics, we lack the tools to determine the experimental consequences of these theories. Quantum simulators may provide such tools. Here we show how to engineer quantum simulators of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. The systems we consider have several applications: they can be used to mimic quark confinement or to study dimer and valence-bond states (which may be relevant for high-temperature superconductors). PMID:24162080

  10. Simulation of non-Abelian gauge theories with optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Orland, P.; Mitchell, M. W.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-10-01

    Many phenomena occurring in strongly correlated quantum systems still await conclusive explanations. The absence of isolated free quarks in nature is an example. It is attributed to quark confinement, whose origin is not yet understood. The phase diagram for nuclear matter at general temperatures and densities, studied in heavy-ion collisions, is not settled. Finally, we have no definitive theory of high-temperature superconductivity. Though we have theories that could underlie such physics, we lack the tools to determine the experimental consequences of these theories. Quantum simulators may provide such tools. Here we show how to engineer quantum simulators of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. The systems we consider have several applications: they can be used to mimic quark confinement or to study dimer and valence-bond states (which may be relevant for high-temperature superconductors).

  11. Incompressible states of a two-component Fermi gas in a double-well optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Crepin, Francois; Simon, Pascal; Citro, Roberta

    2010-07-15

    We propose a scheme to investigate the effect of frustration on the magnetic phase transitions of cold atoms confined in an optical lattice. We also demonstrate how to get two-leg spin ladders with frustrated spin-exchange coupling that display a phase transition from a spin liquid to a fully incompressible state. Further, various experimental quantities are analyzed for describing this phase.

  12. Critical temperature of noninteracting bosonic gases in cubic optical lattices at arbitrary integer fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimov, Abdulla; Askerzade, Iman N.

    2014-09-01

    We have shown that the critical temperature of a Bose-Einstein condensate to a normal phase transition of noninteracting bosons in cubic optical lattices has a linear dependence on the filling factor, especially at large densities. The condensed fraction exhibits a linear power law dependence on temperature in contrast to the case of ideal homogeneous Bose gases.

  13. Control of diffusion of nanoparticles in an optical vortex lattice.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Ivar; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Sáenz, Juan José

    2016-06-01

    A two-dimensional periodic optical force field, which combines conservative dipolar forces with vortices from radiation pressure, is proposed in order to influence the diffusion properties of optically susceptible nanoparticles. The different deterministic flow patterns are identified. In the low-noise limit, the diffusion coefficient is computed from a mean first passage time and the most probable escape paths are identified for those flow patterns which possess a stable stationary point. Numerical simulations of the associated Langevin equations show remarkable agreement with the analytically deduced expressions. Modifications of the force field are proposed so that a wider range of phenomena could be tested. PMID:27415231

  14. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 2: Raman scattering probability measurements and retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Berg, Larry K.; Lantz, Kathy; Michalsky, Joseph; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    The multiannual global mean of aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is ˜ 0.19, and that over oceans is ˜ 0.13. About 45 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions. We present an inherently calibrated retrieval (i.e., no need for radiance calibration) to simultaneously measure AOD and the aerosol phase function parameter, g, based on measurements of azimuth distributions of the Raman scattering probability (RSP), the near-absolute rotational Raman scattering (RRS) intensity. We employ radiative transfer model simulations to show that for solar azimuth RSP measurements at solar elevation and solar zenith angle (SZA) smaller than 80°, RSP is insensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosols and maximally sensitive to changes in AOD and g under near-molecular scattering conditions. The University of Colorado two-dimensional Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed as part of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA, during the summer of 2012 to measure direct sun spectra and RSP from scattered light spectra at solar relative azimuth angles (SRAAs) between 5 and 170°. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, 0.3 < AOD430 < 0.6) and (2) near-molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD430 < 0.13) we compare RSP-based retrievals of AOD430 and g with data from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), and an airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2). The average difference (relative to DOAS) for AOD430 is +0.012 ± 0.023 (CIMEL), -0.012 ± 0.024 (MFRSR), -0.011 ± 0.014 (HSRL-2), and +0.023 ± 0.013 (CIMELAOD - MFRSRAOD) and yields the following expressions for correlations between different instruments

  15. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  16. Imaging and addressing of individual fermionic atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotzky, Stefan; Edge, Graham; Anderson, Rhys; Xu, Peihang; Venu, Vijin; Jervis, Dylan; McKay, Dave; Day, Ryan; Thywissen, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    The implementation of site-resolved imaging of atoms in short-period optical lattices constitutes a milestone achievement in the study of strongly correlated matter with these systems. Its realization with bosons six years ago has boosted progress in the field. In the last year, site-resolved imaging was demonstrated for fermions in five independent experiments. We present our newest results on site-resolved microscopy of ultracold 40 K in a 527nm-period optical lattice. Atoms remain pinned during imaging due to EIT cooling on the 770nm D1 transition. We observe pinning fidelities of up to 96% for an illumination time of 2.6s during which the atoms scatter > 2000 photons. A 0.8NA objective collects the fluorescence light to be imaged onto a EMCCD camera, giving a 600nm -wide PSF. In conjunction with the known lattice geometry, this allows us to reconstruct the lattice-site occupations from the images. The imaging technique is implemented in an apparatus capable of simulating the Fermi-Hubbard model. The use of tomographic tools enables us to select single lattice planes for background free imaging. We also address in-plane patterns with straight and circular boundaries in order to eliminate inhomogeneity effects on the imaging fidelity, or for controlled entropy removal.

  17. Extended Bose Hubbard model of interacting bosonic atoms in optical lattices: From superfluidity to density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzarella, G.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2006-01-15

    For systems of interacting, ultracold spin-zero neutral bosonic atoms, harmonically trapped and subject to an optical lattice potential, we derive an Extended Bose Hubbard (EBH) model by developing a systematic expansion for the Hamiltonian of the system in powers of the lattice parameters and of a scale parameter, the lattice attenuation factor. We identify the dominant terms that need to be retained in realistic experimental conditions, up to nearest-neighbor interactions and nearest-neighbor hoppings conditioned by the on-site occupation numbers. In the mean field approximation, we determine the free energy of the system and study the phase diagram both at zero and at finite temperature. At variance with the standard on site Bose Hubbard model, the zero-temperature phase diagram of the EBH model possesses a dual structure in the Mott insulating regime. Namely, for specific ranges of the lattice parameters, a density wave phase characterizes the system at integer fillings, with domains of alternating mean occupation numbers that are the atomic counterparts of the domains of staggered magnetizations in an antiferromagnetic phase. We show as well that in the EBH model, a zero-temperature quantum phase transition to pair superfluidity is, in principle, possible, but completely suppressed at the lowest order in the lattice attenuation factor. Finally, we determine the possible occurrence of the different phases as a function of the experimentally controllable lattice parameters.

  18. Three-level Haldane-like model on a dice optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrijauskas, T.; Anisimovas, E.; RačiÅ«nas, M.; Mekys, A.; Kudriašov, V.; Spielman, I. B.; JuzeliÅ«nas, G.

    2015-09-01

    We consider ultracold atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice of the dice geometry in a tight-binding regime. The atoms experience a laser-assisted tunneling between the nearest neighbor sites of the dice lattice accompanied by the momentum recoil. This allows one to engineer staggered synthetic magnetic fluxes over plaquettes, and thus pave a way towards the realization of topologically nontrivial band structures. In such a lattice the real-valued next-nearest neighbor transitions are not needed to reach a topological regime. Yet, such transitions can increase a variety of the obtained topological phases. The dice lattice represents a triangular Bravais lattice with a three-site basis consisting of a hub site connected to two rim sites. As a consequence, the dice lattice supports three energy bands. From this point of view, our model can be interpreted as a generalization of the paradigmatic Haldane model which is reproduced if one of the two rim sublattices is eliminated. We demonstrate that the proposed upgrade of the Haldane model creates a significant added value, including an easy access to topological semimetal phases relying only on the nearest neighbor coupling, as well as enhanced topological band structures featuring Chern numbers higher than one leading to physics beyond the usual quantum Hall effect. The numerical investigation is supported and complemented by an analytical scheme based on the study of singularities in the Berry connection.

  19. Feshbach resonances and BCS-BEC crossover in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhaochuan; Radzihovsky, Leo; Gurarie, Victor

    2012-02-01

    In this talk we study Feshbach resonances of fermionic atoms placed in a periodic potential. We investigate the criteria when such a system can be described by a Hubbard model with variable interaction strength in case of broad resonance, or by a tight binding model of atoms and molecules with can convert into each other on sites of the lattice in case of narrow resonances. Assuming the applicability of these models, we first study the BCS-BEC crossover for broad resonance. We find that while below half filling the system undergoes the conventional crossover from a BCS superconductor to a Bose condensate of molecules, above half filling the nature of the BEC phase changes to that of a condensate of molecules made of holes. Switching our attention to the case of narrow resonance, we find that the crossover takes the system from a BCS to hole-BEC regime, than back to BCS, and finally to a conventional BEC of atomic molecules. In the latter crossover, we find that the size of Cooper pairs/molecules changes non-monotonously, being larger in the BCS and smaller in the BEC regimes. Finally, at a unity filling we find a quantum phase transition from a band insulator to a BCS-BEC superfluid replacing the crossover.

  20. Optical resonance problem in metamaterial arrays: a lattice dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanguo

    2016-11-30

    A systematic dynamic theory is established to deal with the optical collective resonance in metamaterial arrays. As a reference model, we consider an infinite split ring resonator (SRR) array illuminated by a linearly polarized wave and introduce an N-degree-of-freedom forced oscillator equation to simplify the coupled-mode vibration problem. We derive a strict formula of resonance frequency (RF) and its adjustable range from the steady-state response. Unlike a single SRR possesses invariant RF, it successfully explains the mechanism of RF shift effect in the SRR array when the incident angle changes. Instead of full wave analysis, only one or two adjacent resonance modes can give an accurate response line shape. Our approach is applicable for metallic arrays with any N-particle cell at all incident angles and well matched with numerical results. It provides a versatile way to study the vibration dynamics in optical periodic many-body systems. PMID:27633098

  1. Optical resonance problem in metamaterial arrays: a lattice dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanguo

    2016-11-01

    A systematic dynamic theory is established to deal with the optical collective resonance in metamaterial arrays. As a reference model, we consider an infinite split ring resonator (SRR) array illuminated by a linearly polarized wave and introduce an N-degree-of-freedom forced oscillator equation to simplify the coupled-mode vibration problem. We derive a strict formula of resonance frequency (RF) and its adjustable range from the steady-state response. Unlike a single SRR possesses invariant RF, it successfully explains the mechanism of RF shift effect in the SRR array when the incident angle changes. Instead of full wave analysis, only one or two adjacent resonance modes can give an accurate response line shape. Our approach is applicable for metallic arrays with any N-particle cell at all incident angles and well matched with numerical results. It provides a versatile way to study the vibration dynamics in optical periodic many-body systems.

  2. Surface lattice resonances and magneto-optical response in magnetic nanoparticle arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kataja, M.; Hakala, T. K.; Julku, A.; Huttunen, M. J.; van Dijken, S.; Törmä, P.

    2015-01-01

    Structuring metallic and magnetic materials on subwavelength scales allows for extreme confinement and a versatile design of electromagnetic field modes. This may be used, for example, to enhance magneto-optical responses, to control plasmonic systems using a magnetic field, or to tailor magneto-optical properties of individual nanostructures. Here we show that periodic rectangular arrays of magnetic nanoparticles display surface plasmon modes in which the two directions of the lattice are coupled by the magnetic field-controllable spin–orbit coupling in the nanoparticles. When breaking the symmetry of the lattice, we find that the optical response shows Fano-type surface lattice resonances whose frequency is determined by the periodicity orthogonal to the polarization of the incident field. In striking contrast, the magneto-optical Kerr response is controlled by the period in the parallel direction. The spectral separation of the response for longitudinal and orthogonal excitations provides versatile tuning of narrow and intense magneto-optical resonances. PMID:25947368

  3. Possibility of triple magic trapping of clock and Rydberg states of divalent atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, T.; Derevianko, A.

    2016-07-01

    We predict the possibility of ‘triply magic’ optical lattice trapping of neutral divalent atoms. In such a lattice, the {}1{{{S}}}0 and {}3{{{P}}}0 clock states and an additional Rydberg state experience identical optical potentials, fully mitigating detrimental effects of the motional decoherence. In particular, we show that this triply magic trapping condition can be satisfied for Yb atom at optical wavelengths and for various other divalent systems (Ca, Mg, Hg and Sr) in the UV region. We assess the quality of triple magic trapping conditions by estimating the probability of excitation out of the motional ground state as a result of the excitations between the clock and the Rydberg states. We also calculate trapping laser-induced photoionization rates of divalent Rydberg atoms at magic frequencies. We find that such rates are below the radiative spontaneous-emission rates, due to the presence of Cooper minima in photoionization cross-sections.

  4. Long distance transport of ultracold atoms using a 1D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Stefan; Thalhammer, Gregor; Winkler, Klaus; Lang, Florian; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2006-08-01

    We study the horizontal transport of ultracold atoms over macroscopic distances of up to 20 cm with a moving 1D optical lattice. By using an optical Bessel beam to form the optical lattice, we can achieve nearly homogeneous trapping conditions over the full transport length, which is crucial in order to hold the atoms against gravity for such a wide range. Fast transport velocities of up to 6 m s-1 (corresponding to about 1100 photon recoils) and accelerations of up to 2600 m s-2 are reached. Even at high velocities the momentum of the atoms is precisely defined with an uncertainty of less than one photon recoil. This allows for construction of an atom catapult with high kinetic energy resolution, which might have applications in novel collision experiments.

  5. Optical lattice-like cladding waveguides by direct laser writing: fabrication, luminescence, and lasing.

    PubMed

    Nie, Weijie; He, Ruiyun; Cheng, Chen; Rocha, Uéslen; Rodríguez Vázquez de Aldana, Javier; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2016-05-15

    We report on the fabrication of optical lattice-like waveguide structures in an Nd:YAP laser crystal by using direct femtosecond laser writing. With periodically arrayed laser-induced tracks, the waveguiding cores can be located in either the regions between the neighbored tracks or the central zone surrounded by a number of tracks as outer cladding. The polarization of the femtosecond laser pulses for the inscription has been found to play a critical role in the anisotropic guiding behaviors of the structures. The confocal photoluminescence investigations reveal different stress-induced modifications of the structures inscribed by different polarization of the femtosecond laser beam, which are considered to be responsible for the refractive index changes of the structures. Under optical pump at 808 nm, efficient waveguide lasing at ∼1  μm wavelength has been realized from the optical lattice-like structure, which exhibits potential applications as novel miniature light sources. PMID:27176954

  6. Realizing the Harper Hamiltonian with Laser-Assisted Tunneling in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios A.; Kennedy, Colin J.; Burton, William Cody; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally implement the Harper Hamiltonian for neutral particles in optical lattices using laser-assisted tunneling and a potential energy gradient provided by gravity or magnetic field gradients. This Hamiltonian describes the motion of charged particles in strong magnetic fields. Laser-assisted tunneling processes are characterized by studying the expansion of the atoms in the lattice. The band structure of this Hamiltonian should display Hofstadter’s butterfly. For fermions, this scheme should realize the quantum Hall effect and chiral edge states.

  7. Micromagic Clock: Microwave Clock Based on Atoms in an Engineered Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.; Derevianko, A.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-03-27

    We propose a new class of atomic microwave clocks based on the hyperfine transitions in the ground state of aluminum or gallium atoms trapped in optical lattices. For such elements magic wavelengths exist at which both levels of the hyperfine doublet are shifted at the same rate by the lattice laser field, canceling its effect on the clock transition. A similar mechanism for the magic wavelengths may work in microwave hyperfine transitions in other atoms which have the fine-structure multiplets in the ground state.

  8. Collisional Losses, Decoherence, and Frequency Shifts in Optical Lattice Clocks with Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Lisdat, Ch.; Winfred, J. S. R. Vellore; Middelmann, T.; Riehle, F.; Sterr, U.

    2009-08-28

    We have quantified collisional losses, decoherence and the collision shift in a one-dimensional optical lattice clock on the highly forbidden transition {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} at 698 nm with bosonic {sup 88}Sr. We were able to distinguish two loss channels: inelastic collisions between atoms in the upper and lower clock state and atoms in the upper clock state only. Based on the measured coefficients, we determine the operation parameters at which a 1D-lattice clock with {sup 88}Sr shows no degradation due to collisions on the fractional uncertainty level of 10{sup -16}.

  9. Magic wavelength to make optical lattice clocks insensitive to atomic motion.

    PubMed

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Il'inova, E Yu; Ovsiannikov, V D

    2009-10-01

    In a standing wave of light, a difference in spatial distributions of multipolar atom-field interactions may introduce atomic-motion dependent clock uncertainties in optical lattice clocks. We show that the magic wavelength can be defined so as to eliminate the spatial mismatch in electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole interactions for specific combinations of standing waves by allowing a spatially constant light shift arising from the latter two interactions. Experimental prospects of such lattices used with a blue magic wavelength are discussed.

  10. Magic Wavelength to Make Optical Lattice Clocks Insensitive to Atomic Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Il'inova, E. Yu.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2009-10-09

    In a standing wave of light, a difference in spatial distributions of multipolar atom-field interactions may introduce atomic-motion dependent clock uncertainties in optical lattice clocks. We show that the magic wavelength can be defined so as to eliminate the spatial mismatch in electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole interactions for specific combinations of standing waves by allowing a spatially constant light shift arising from the latter two interactions. Experimental prospects of such lattices used with a blue magic wavelength are discussed.

  11. Observation and cancellation of a perturbing dc stark shift in strontium optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Zawada, Michal; Lorini, Luca; Gurov, Mikhail; Lemonde, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    We report on the observation of a dc Stark frequency shift at the 10-(13) level by comparing two strontium optical lattice clocks. This frequency shift arises from the presence of electric charges trapped on dielectric surfaces placed under vacuum close to the atomic sample. We show that these charges can be eliminated by shining UV light on the dielectric surfaces, and characterize the residual dc Stark frequency shift on the clock transition at the 10-(18) level by applying an external electric field. This study shows that the dc Stark shift can play an important role in the accuracy budget of lattice clocks, and should be duly taken into account.

  12. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Energy spectrum and superfluidity of spin-2 ultracold bosons in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Jun; Liu, Xian-Feng; Han, Jiu-Rong

    2009-12-01

    This paper studies the superfluidity of ultracold spin-2 Bose atoms with weak interactions in optical lattices by calculating the excitation energy spectrum using the Bogoliubov approach. The energy spectra exhibit the characteristics of the superfluid-phase explicitly and it finds the nonvanishing critical speeds of superfluid. The obtained results display that the critical speeds of superfluid are different for five spin components and can be controlled by adjusting the lattice parameters in experiments. Finally it discusses the feasibilities of implementing and measuring superfluid.

  13. Dicke superradiance as a nondestructive probe for quantum quenches in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brinke, Nicolai; Schützhold, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    We study Dicke superradiance as collective and coherent absorption and (time-delayed) emission of photons from an ensemble of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Since this process depends on the coherence properties of the atoms (e.g., superfluidity), it can be used as a probe for their quantum state. In analogy to pump-probe spectroscopy in solid-state physics, this detection method facilitates the investigation of nonequilibrium phenomena and is less invasive than time-of-flight experiments or direct (projective) measurements of the atom number (or parity) per lattice site, which both destroy properties of the quantum state such as phase coherence.

  14. Valley-spin polarization in the magneto-optical response of square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang; Wu, Ya-Min

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we try to investigate the magneto-optical response of the square lattice model, in which the quantum spin Hall effect will occur when spin is introduced to the anisotropy next-nearest-neighboring hoppings. In the presence of Landau level quantization, we analyze the optical absorption spectrum and reveal the valley-spin polarization of the electrons when the total filling factor in the system changes. We also study the optical Hall conductivity behavior to find the signatures of valley-spin polarization. The implications of our results are discussed.

  15. Optical lattices of excitons in InGaN/GaN quantum well systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chaldyshev, V. V. Bolshakov, A. S. Zavarin, E. E.; Sakharov, A. V.; Lundin, V. V.; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.; Yagovkina, M. A.

    2015-01-15

    Optical lattices of excitons in periodic systems of InGaN quantum wells with GaN barriers are designed, implemented, and investigated. Due to the collective interaction of quasi-two-dimensional excitons with light and a fairly high binding energy of excitons in GaN, optical Bragg reflection at room temperature is significantly enhanced. To increase the resonance optical response of the system, new structures with two quantum wells in a periodic supercell are designed and implemented. Resonance reflection of 40% at room temperatures for structures with 60 periods is demonstrated.

  16. Frequency ratios of optical lattice clocks at the 17th decimal place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-05-01

    Optical lattice clocks benefit from a low quantum-projection noise by simultaneously interrogating a large number of atoms, which are trapped in an optical lattice tuned to the ``magic wavelength'' to largely cancel out light shift perturbation in the clock transition. About a thousand atoms enable the clocks to achieve 10-18 instability in a few hours of operation, allowing intensive investigation and control of systematic uncertainties. As optical lattice clocks have reached inaccuracies approaching 10-18, it is now the uncertainty of the SI second (~ 10-16) itself that restricts the measurement of the absolute frequencies of such optical clocks. Direct comparisons of optical clocks are, therefore, the only way to investigate and utilize their superb performance beyond the SI second. In this presentation, we report on frequency comparisons of optical lattice clocks with neutral strontium (87 Sr), ytterbium (171 Yb) and mercury (199 Hg) atoms. By referencing cryogenic Sr clocks, we determine frequency ratios, νYb/νSr and νHg/νSr, of a cryogenic Yb clock and a Hg clock with uncertainty at the mid 10-17 level. Such ratios provide an access to search for temporal variation of the fundamental constants. We also present remote comparisons between cryogenic Sr clocks located at RIKEN and the University of Tokyo over a 30-km-long phase-stabilized fiber link. The gravitational red shift Δν /ν0 ~ 1.1× 10-18 Δh cm-1 reads out the height difference of Δh ~ 15 m between the two clocks with uncertainty of 5 cm, which demonstrates a step towards relativistic geodesy. ERATO, JST.

  17. Characterization of dilute optical lattices using pump-probe spectroscopy and photon correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Ethan; Ross, Preston; Rapp, Anthony; Cai, Hong; Reigle, Alex; Schlonsky, Eli; Lee, Hoseong; Clemens, James; Bali, Samir

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate optical lattices using three different methods: pump-probe spectroscopy of vibrational energy levels, photon correlation of light scattered by cold atoms, and fluorescence imaging. Photon correlations of the scattered light can be used to measure lattice dwell times and crossover times between lattice sites. From this information we can derive the diffusion constant which can then be compared to direct measurement via fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, by Fourier transforming the time delayed photon correlations we can obtain the intensity spectrum which can be compared directly to pump-probe spectroscopy of the vibrational energy levels. We plan to carefully study situations in which the atomic transport properties deviate from Boltzman Gibbs statistics.

  18. Lattice-supersolid phase of strongly correlated bosons in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang; He, Liang; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-05-01

    We numerically simulate strongly correlated ultracold bosons coupled to a high-finesse cavity field, pumped by a laser beam in the transverse direction. Assuming a weak classical optical lattice added in the cavity direction, we model this system by a generalized Bose-Hubbard model, which is solved by means of bosonic dynamical mean-field theory. The complete phase diagram is established, which contains two novel self-organized quantum phases, lattice supersolid and checkerboard solid, in addition to conventional phases such as superfluid and Mott insulator. At finite but low temperature, thermal fluctuations are found to enhance the buildup of the self-organized phases. We demonstrate that cavity-mediated long-range interactions can give rise to stable lattice supersolid and checkerboard solid phases even in the regime of strong s-wave scattering. In the presence of a harmonic trap, we discuss coexistence of these self-organized phases, as relevant to experiments.

  19. Instability of insulating states in optical lattices due to collective phonon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Ziegler, K.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of collective phonon excitations on the properties of cold atoms in optical lattices is investigated. These phonon excitations are collective excitations, whose appearance is caused by intersite atomic interactions correlating the atoms, and they do not arise without such interactions. These collective excitations should not be confused with lattice vibrations produced by an external force. No such force is assumed. But the considered phonons are purely self-organized collective excitations, characterizing atomic oscillations around lattice sites, due to intersite atomic interactions. It is shown that these excitations can essentially influence the possibility of atoms' being localized. The states that would be insulating in the absence of phonon excitations can become delocalized when these excitations are taken into account. This concerns long-range as well as local atomic interactions. To characterize the region of stability, the Lindemann criterion is used.

  20. Coexistence of Mott and superfluid domains of bosons confined in optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanore, Mukesh; Dey, Bishwajyoti

    2015-06-01

    We investigate ground state properties of the attractive Bose-gas confined on square optical lattice and superimposed wine-bottle-bottom or Mexican hat trap potential. The system is modeled by two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model with attractive interactions and inhomogeneous lattice potential. We calculate the energy spectrum, the on-site number fluctuation, local density and local compressibility using numerical exact diagonalization method for incommensurate lattice filling. The trap potential has several degenerate minimum sites distributed along a ring at the wine-bottle-bottom. It is shown that beyond a certain value of the attractive interaction strength there is phase coherent condensate on these degenerate sites with finite value of the on-site number fluctuation and local compressibility giving rise to localized superfluidity or superfluidity on a ring. For the same value of the interaction strength the non-degenerate sites produces Mott region.

  1. Effects of Cu Dopant on Lattice and Optical Properties of ZnS Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Shuhua, Lu; Aiji, Wang; Tingfang, Chen; Yinshu, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Doped and undoped ZnS colloidal nanocrystals have drawn much attention due to their versatile applications in the fields of optoelectronics and biotechnology. In this paper, Cu doped ZnS quantum dots were synthesized via the simple thermolysis of ethylxanthate salts. The lattice and optical properties of the nanocrystals were then studied in detail. The quantum dot lattice contracted linearly between Cu concentrations of 0.2-2%, while it continued to contract more gradually as Cu concentrations were further increased from 4 to 6%, due in part to the Cu ions located on the surface of the ZnS lattice. Cu incorporation induces a long tail in absorption at long wavelengths. The PL spectrum shows a red shift at first, and then a blue shift with increases in Cu concentration. Cu doped at low concentrations (0.2-1%) enhanced the emission, while high Cu concentrations (2-6%) quenched emissions. PMID:27451716

  2. Spectroscopy for cold atom gases in periodically modulated optical lattice potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuno, Akiyuki; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices are vigorously studied experimentally and theoretically as one of the candidates for a quantum simulator. At the same time, further development of probes to microscopic structure of systems is needed. We propose a novel spectroscopy in cold atom experiments by use of periodic phase-modulation of optical lattice potentials. Corresponding to the statistics of atoms, we formulate the different observables: The energy absorption rate for bosonic atom gases, and the doublon production rate for fermionic atom gases. These observables are formulated within the linear response theory. Interestingly they are given by the imaginary part of the retarded current-current correlation function which is familiar as a quantity corresponding to an optical conductivity. As an example, we discuss one-dimensional Mott insulating state, and also compare our spectroscopy with another known spectroscopy by amplitude-modulation of an optical lattice. This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  3. Geometric effects on quantum transport of ultracold atoms in optical lattices: Quantum acceleration and flat band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chih-Chun; Metcalf, Mekena; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Chern, Gia-Wei

    2015-05-01

    The realizations of interesting optical lattices for ultracold atoms provide opportunities for investigating geometric effects on many-body physics. Thesquare, triangular, honeycomb, kagome lattices, and other geometries have been experimentally demonstrated. When the atoms are driven out of equilibrium by manipulations of the density or trapping potential, their quantum transport can be monitored and fundamental questions regarding transport in isolated systems can be addressed unambiguously. We found that the propagation velocity of the matter wave representing the flowing atoms can be accelerated by tuning the lattice geometry. This acceleration is a pure quantum effect because no shorter path is created as the geometry changes. For lattice geometries supporting a dispersionless flat band, the localized atoms in the flat band do not participate in transport but interfere with the mobile atoms. We found a generic insulating phase exhibiting a density jump in the profile that can be dynamically generated. Interesting spatial patterns may emerge if those flat-band lattices are manipulated, and an analogue of geometric frustration in quantum transport will be presented.

  4. Realization of the Harper Hamiltonian with Artificial Gauge Fields in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios; Kennedy, Colin; Burton, William Cody; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Systems of charged particles in magnetic fields have led to many discoveries in science-such as the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects-and have become important paradigms of quantum many-body physics. We have proposed and implemented a scheme which realizes the Harper Hamiltonian, a lattice model for charged particles in magnetic fields, whose energy spectrum is the fractal Hofstadter butterfly. We experimentally realize this Hamiltonian for ultracold, charge neutral bosonic particles of 87Rb in a two-dimensional optical lattice by creating an artificial gauge field using laser-assisted tunneling and a potential energy gradient provided by gravity. Laser-assisted tunneling processes are characterized by studying the expansion of the atoms in the lattice. Furthermore, this scheme can be extended to realize spin-orbit coupling and the spin Hall effect for neutral atoms in optical lattices by modifying the motion of atoms in a spin-dependent way by laser recoil and Zeeman shifts created with a magnetic field gradient. Major advantages of our scheme are that it does not rely on near-resonant laser light to couple different spin states and should work even for fermionic particles. Our work is a step towards studying novel topological phenomena with ultracold atoms. Currently at the RAND Corporation.

  5. Large-photon-number extraction from individual atoms trapped in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Shotter, M. D.

    2011-03-15

    The atom-by-atom characterization of quantum gases requires the development of novel measurement techniques. One particularly promising new technique demonstrated in recent experiments uses strong fluorescent laser scattering from neutral atoms confined in a short-period optical lattice to measure the positions of individual atoms in the sample. A crucial condition for the measurements is that atomic hopping between lattice sites must be strongly suppressed despite substantial photon recoil heating. This paper models three-dimensional polarization gradient cooling of atoms trapped within a far-detuned optical lattice. The atomic dynamics are simulated using a hybrid Monte Carlo and master-equation analysis in order to predict the frequency of processes which give rise to degradation or loss of the fluorescent signal during measurements. It is shown, consistently with the experimental results, that there exists a wide parameter range in which the lifetime of strongly fluorescing isolated lattice-trapped atoms is limited by background gas collisions rather than radiative processes. In these cases the total number of scattered photons can be as large as 10{sup 8} per atom. The performance of the technique is related to relevant experimental parameters.

  6. Coherent driving and freezing of bosonic matter wave in an optical Lieb lattice.

    PubMed

    Taie, Shintaro; Ozawa, Hideki; Ichinose, Tomohiro; Nishio, Takuei; Nakajima, Shuta; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2015-11-01

    Although kinetic energy of a massive particle generally has quadratic dependence on its momentum, a flat, dispersionless energy band is realized in crystals with specific lattice structures. Such macroscopic degeneracy causes the emergence of localized eigenstates and has been a key concept in the context of itinerant ferromagnetism. We report the realization of a "Lieb lattice" configuration with an optical lattice, which has a flat energy band as the first excited state. Our optical lattice potential has various degrees of freedom in its manipulation, which enables coherent transfer of a Bose-Einstein condensate into the flat band. In addition to measuring lifetime of the flat band population for different tight-binding parameters, we investigate the inter-sublattice dynamics of the system by projecting the sublattice population onto the band population. This measurement clearly shows the formation of the localized state with the specific sublattice decoupled in the flat band, and even detects the presence of flat-band breaking perturbations, resulting in the delocalization. Our results will open up the possibilities of exploring the physics of flat bands with a highly controllable quantum system.

  7. Coherent driving and freezing of bosonic matter wave in an optical Lieb lattice.

    PubMed

    Taie, Shintaro; Ozawa, Hideki; Ichinose, Tomohiro; Nishio, Takuei; Nakajima, Shuta; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2015-11-01

    Although kinetic energy of a massive particle generally has quadratic dependence on its momentum, a flat, dispersionless energy band is realized in crystals with specific lattice structures. Such macroscopic degeneracy causes the emergence of localized eigenstates and has been a key concept in the context of itinerant ferromagnetism. We report the realization of a "Lieb lattice" configuration with an optical lattice, which has a flat energy band as the first excited state. Our optical lattice potential has various degrees of freedom in its manipulation, which enables coherent transfer of a Bose-Einstein condensate into the flat band. In addition to measuring lifetime of the flat band population for different tight-binding parameters, we investigate the inter-sublattice dynamics of the system by projecting the sublattice population onto the band population. This measurement clearly shows the formation of the localized state with the specific sublattice decoupled in the flat band, and even detects the presence of flat-band breaking perturbations, resulting in the delocalization. Our results will open up the possibilities of exploring the physics of flat bands with a highly controllable quantum system. PMID:26665167

  8. Geopotential measurements with synchronously linked optical lattice clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Tetsushi; Takamoto, Masao; Ushijima, Ichiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Akatsuka, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Kuroishi, Yuki; Munekane, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Basara; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-10-01

    According to Einstein's theory of relativity, the passage of time changes in a gravitational field. On Earth, raising a clock by 1 cm increases its apparent tick rate by 1.1 parts in 1018, allowing chronometric levelling through comparison of optical clocks. Here, we demonstrate such geopotential measurements by determining the height difference of master and slave clocks separated by 15 km with an uncertainty of 5 cm. A subharmonic of the master clock laser is delivered through a telecom fibre to synchronously operate the distant clocks. Clocks operated under such phase coherence reject clock laser noise and facilitate proposals for linking clocks and interferometers. Taken over half a year, 11 measurements determine the fractional frequency difference between the two clocks to be 1,652.9(5.9) × 10-18, consistent with an independent measurement by levelling and gravimetry. Our system demonstrates a building block for an internet of clocks, which may constitute ‘quantum benchmarks’, serving as height references with dynamic responses.

  9. Disorder-induced heating of ultracold neutral plasmas created from atoms in partially filled optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D.; Sparkes, B. M.

    2016-08-01

    We quantify the disorder-induced heating (DIH) of ultracold neutral plasmas (UCNPs) created from cold atoms in optical lattices with partial filling fractions, using a conservation of energy model involving the spatial correlations of the initial state and the equation of state in thermal equilibrium for a one-component plasma. We show, for experimentally achievable filling fractions, that the ionic Coulomb coupling parameter could be increased to a degree comparable to other proposed DIH-mitigation schemes. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed with compensation for finite-size and periodic boundary effects, which agree with calculations using the model. Reduction of DIH using optical lattices will allow for the study of strongly coupled plasma physics using low-density, low-temperature, laboratory-based plasmas, and lead to improved brightness in UCNP-based cold electron and ion beams, where DIH is otherwise a fundamental limitation to beam focal sizes and diffraction imaging capability.

  10. One-dimensional topological chains with Majorana fermions in two-dimensional nontopological optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Qu, Chunlei; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2016-06-01

    The recent experimental realization of one-dimensional (1D) equal Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (ERD-SOC) for cold atoms provides a disorder-free and highly controllable platform for the implementation and observation of Majorana fermions (MFs), analogous to the broadly studied solid-state nanowire-superconductor heterostructures. However, the corresponding 1D chains of cold atoms possess strong quantum fluctuation, which may destroy the superfluids and MFs. In this paper, we show that such 1D topological chains with MFs may be on demand generated in a two- or three-dimensional nontopological optical lattice with 1D ERD-SOC by modifying local potentials on target locations using experimentally already implemented atomic gas microscopes or patterned (e.g., double- or triple-well) optical lattices. All ingredients in our scheme have been experimentally realized, and the combination of them may pave the way for the experimental observation of MFs in a clean system.

  11. Multistable particle-field dynamics in cavity-generated optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterauer, Dominik J.; Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Ritsch, Helmut

    2015-05-01

    Polarizable particles trapped in a resonator-sustained optical-lattice potential generate strong position-dependent backaction on the intracavity field. In the quantum regime, particles in different energy bands are connected to different intracavity light intensities and optical-lattice depths. This generates a highly nonlinear coupled particle-field dynamics. For a given pump strength and detuning, a factorizing mean-field approach predicts several self-consistent stationary solutions of strongly distinct photon numbers and motional states. Quantum Monte Carlo wave-function simulations of the master equation confirm these predictions and reveal complex multimodal photon-number and particle-momentum distributions. Using larger nanoparticles in such a setup thus constitutes a well-controllable playground to study nonlinear quantum dynamics and the buildup of macroscopic quantum superpositions at the quantum-classical boundary.

  12. Fluctuation-driven topological transition of binary condensates in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthar, K.; Roy, Arko; Angom, D.

    2015-04-01

    We show the emergence of a third Goldstone mode in binary condensates at phase separation in quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) optical lattices. We develop the coupled discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equations using Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory with the Popov approximation in the Bose-Hubbard model to investigate the mode evolution at zero temperature, in particular, as the system is driven from the miscible to the immiscible phase. We demonstrate that the position exchange of the species in the 87Rb-85Rb system is accompanied by a discontinuity in the excitation spectrum. Our results show that, in quasi-1D optical lattices, the presence of the fluctuations dramatically changes the geometry of the ground-state density profile of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates.

  13. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction and Spiral Order in Spin-orbit Coupled Optical Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ming; Qian, Yinyin; Yan, Mi; Scarola, V. W.; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-01-01

    We show that the recent experimental realization of spin-orbit coupling in ultracold atomic gases can be used to study different types of spin spiral order and resulting multiferroic effects. Spin-orbit coupling in optical lattices can give rise to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin interaction which is essential for spin spiral order. By taking into account spin-orbit coupling and an external Zeeman field, we derive an effective spin model in the Mott insulator regime at half filling and demonstrate that the DM interaction in optical lattices can be made extremely strong with realistic experimental parameters. The rich finite temperature phase diagrams of the effective spin models for fermions and bosons are obtained via classical Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:26014458

  14. Selective distillation phenomenon in two-species Bose-Einstein condensates in open boundary optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Mei; Xiong, Jun; Yang, Guo-Jian; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the formation of discrete breathers (DBs) and the dynamics of the mixture of two-species Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in open boundary optical lattices using the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equations. The results show that the coupling of intra- and interspecies interaction can lead to the existence of pure single-species DBs and symbiotic DBs (i.e., two-species DBs). Furthermore, we find that there is a selective distillation phenomenon in the dynamics of the mixture of two-species BECs. One can selectively distil one species from the mixture of two-species BECs and can even control dominant species fraction by adjusting the intra- and interspecies interaction in optical lattices. Our selective distillation mechanism may find potential application in quantum information storage and quantum information processing based on multi-species atoms. PMID:26597592

  15. Simulating and exploring Weyl semimetal physics with cold atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Liang; Wang, Z. D.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a scheme to simulate and explore Weyl semimetal physics with ultracold fermionic atoms in a two-dimensional square optical lattice subjected to experimentally realizable spin-orbit coupling and an artificial dimension from an external parameter space, which may increase experimental feasibility compared with the cases in three-dimensional optical lattices. It is shown that this system with a tight-binding model is able to describe essentially three-dimensional Weyl semimetals with tunable Weyl points. The relevant topological properties are also addressed by means of the Chern number and the gapless edge states. Furthermore, we illustrate that the mimicked Weyl points can be experimentally detected by measuring the atomic transfer fractions in a Bloch-Zener oscillation, and the characteristic topological invariant can be measured with the particle pumping approach.

  16. Spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a tilted optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Jonas; Martikainen, Jani-Petri; Collin, Anssi; Sjoeqvist, Erik

    2010-10-15

    Bloch oscillations appear for a particle in a weakly tilted periodic potential. The intrinsic spin Hall effect is an outcome of a spin-orbit coupling. We demonstrate that both of these phenomena can be realized simultaneously in a gas of weakly interacting ultracold atoms exposed to a tilted optical lattice and to a set of spatially dependent light fields inducing an effective spin-orbit coupling. It is found that both the spin Hall and the Bloch oscillation effects may coexist, showing, however, a strong correlation between the two. These correlations are manifested as a transverse spin current oscillating in-phase with the Bloch oscillations. On top of the oscillations originating from the periodicity of the model, a trembling motion is found which is believed to be atomic Zitterbewegung. It is argued that the damping of these Zitterbewegung oscillations may to a large extent be prevented in the present setup considering a periodic optical lattice potential.

  17. Thermodynamics of strongly interacting fermions in two-dimensional optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Khatami, Ehsan; Rigol, Marcos

    2011-11-15

    We study finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated fermions in two-dimensional optical lattices by means of numerical linked cluster expansions, a computational technique that allows one to obtain exact results in the thermodynamic limit. We focus our analysis on the strongly interacting regime, where the on-site repulsion is of the order of or greater than the band width. We compute the equation of state, double occupancy, entropy, uniform susceptibility, and spin correlations for temperatures that are similar to or below the ones achieved in current optical lattice experiments. We provide a quantitative analysis of adiabatic cooling of trapped fermions in two dimensions, by means of both flattening the trapping potential and increasing the interaction strength.

  18. Disorder-induced heating of ultracold neutral plasmas created from atoms in partially filled optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D; Sparkes, B M

    2016-08-01

    We quantify the disorder-induced heating (DIH) of ultracold neutral plasmas (UCNPs) created from cold atoms in optical lattices with partial filling fractions, using a conservation of energy model involving the spatial correlations of the initial state and the equation of state in thermal equilibrium for a one-component plasma. We show, for experimentally achievable filling fractions, that the ionic Coulomb coupling parameter could be increased to a degree comparable to other proposed DIH-mitigation schemes. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed with compensation for finite-size and periodic boundary effects, which agree with calculations using the model. Reduction of DIH using optical lattices will allow for the study of strongly coupled plasma physics using low-density, low-temperature, laboratory-based plasmas, and lead to improved brightness in UCNP-based cold electron and ion beams, where DIH is otherwise a fundamental limitation to beam focal sizes and diffraction imaging capability. PMID:27627236

  19. Controlling coherence via tuning of the population imbalance in a bipartite optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Liberto, Marco Fedele

    2015-03-01

    The control of transport properties is a key tool at the basis of many technologically relevant effects in condensed matter. The clean and precisely controlled environment of ultracold atoms in optical lattices allows one to prepare simplified but instructive models, which can help to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms. Here we show that by tuning a structural deformation of the unit cell in a bipartite optical lattice, one can induce a phase transition from a superfluid into various Mott insulating phases forming a shell structure in the superimposed harmonic trap. The Mott shells are identified via characteristic features in the visibility of Bragg maxima in momentum spectra. The experimental findings are explained by Gutzwiller mean-field and quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Our system bears similarities with the loss of coherence in cuprate superconductors, known to be associated with the doping induced buckling of the oxygen octahedra surrounding the copper sites.

  20. Controlling coherence via tuning of the population imbalance in a bipartite optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Liberto, M.; Comparin, T.; Kock, T.; Ölschläger, M.; Hemmerich, A.; Smith, C. Morais

    2014-12-01

    The control of transport properties is a key tool at the basis of many technologically relevant effects in condensed matter. The clean and precisely controlled environment of ultracold atoms in optical lattices allows one to prepare simplified but instructive models, which can help to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms. Here we show that by tuning a structural deformation of the unit cell in a bipartite optical lattice, one can induce a phase transition from a superfluid into various Mott insulating phases forming a shell structure in the superimposed harmonic trap. The Mott shells are identified via characteristic features in the visibility of Bragg maxima in momentum spectra. The experimental findings are explained by Gutzwiller mean-field and quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Our system bears similarities with the loss of coherence in cuprate superconductors, known to be associated with the doping-induced buckling of the oxygen octahedra surrounding the copper sites.

  1. Evolution from BCS to Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless Superfluidity in One-Dimensional Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskin, M.; de Melo, C. A. R. Sá

    2009-10-01

    We analyze the finite temperature phase diagram of fermion mixtures in one-dimensional optical lattices as a function of interaction strength. At low temperatures, the system evolves from an anisotropic three-dimensional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluid to an effectively two-dimensional Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) superfluid as the interaction strength increases. We calculate the critical temperature as a function of interaction strength, and identify the region where the dimensional crossover occurs for a specified optical lattice potential. Finally, we show that the dominant vortex excitations near the critical temperature evolve from multiplane elliptical vortex loops in the three-dimensional regime to planar vortex-antivortex pairs in the two-dimensional regime, and we propose a detection scheme for these excitations.

  2. Creation of p-wave Feshbach molecules in selected angular momentum states using an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waseem, Muhammad; Zhang, Zhiqi; Yoshida, Jun; Hattori, Keita; Saito, Taketo; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    We selectively create p-wave Feshbach molecules in the {m}l=+/- 1 orbital angular momentum projection state of 6Li. We use an optical lattice potential to restrict the relative momentum of the atoms such that only the {m}l=+/- 1 molecular state couples to the atoms at the Feshbach resonance. We observe the hollow-centered dissociation profile, which is a clear indication of the selective creation of p-wave molecules in the {m}l=+/- 1 states. We also measure the dissociation energy of the p-wave molecules created in the optical lattice and develop a theoretical formulation to explain the dissociation energy as a function of the magnetic field ramp rate for dissociation. The capability of selecting one of the two closely-residing p-wave Feshbach resonances is useful for the precise characterization of the p-wave Feshbach resonances.

  3. Probe of three-dimensional chiral topological insulators in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-T; Deng, D-L; Duan, L-M

    2014-07-18

    We propose a feasible experimental scheme to realize a three-dimensional chiral topological insulator with cold fermionic atoms in an optical lattice, which is characterized by an integer topological invariant distinct from the conventional Z(2) topological insulators and has a remarkable macroscopic zero-energy flat band. To probe its property, we show that its characteristic surface states--the Dirac cones--can be probed through time-of-flight imaging or Bragg spectroscopy and the flat band can be detected via measurement of the atomic density profile in a weak global trap. The realization of this novel topological phase with a flat band in an optical lattice will provide a unique experimental platform to study the interplay between interaction and topology and open new avenues for application of topological states.

  4. Label-free optical detection of C-reactive protein by nanoimprint lithography-based 2D-photonic crystal film.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tatsuro; Kajita, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Yukio; Kosaka, Terumasa; Himi, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    The development of high-sensitive, and cost-effective novel biosensors have been strongly desired for future medical diagnostics. To develop novel biosensor, the authors focused on the specific optical characteristics of photonic crystal. In this study, a label-free optical biosensor, polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PhC) film fabricated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL), was developed for detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum. The nano-hole array constructed NIL-based 2D-PhC (hole diameter: 230 nm, distance: 230, depth: 200 nm) was fabricated on a cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) film (100 µm) using thermal NIL and required surface modifications to reduce nonspecific adsorption of target proteins. Antigen-antibody reactions on the NIL-based 2D-PhC caused changes to the surrounding refractive index, which was monitored as reflection spectrum changes in the visible region. By using surface modified 2D-PhC, the calculated detection limit for CRP was 12.24 pg/mL at an extremely short reaction time (5 min) without the need for additional labeling procedures and secondary antibody. Furthermore, using the dual-functional random copolymer, CRP could be detected in a pooled blood serum diluted 100× with dramatic reduction of nonspecific adsorption. From these results, the NIL-based 2D-PhC film has great potential for development of an on-site, high-sensitivity, cost-effective, label-free biosensor for medical diagnostics applications. PMID:27150702

  5. Control of Wannier orbitals for generating tunable Ising interactions of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Inaba, Kensuke; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Igeta, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Makoto; Tokunaga, Yuuki

    2014-12-04

    In this study, we propose a method for generating cluster states of atoms in an optical lattice. By utilizing the quantum properties of Wannier orbitals, we create an tunable Ising interaction between atoms without inducing the spin-exchange interactions. We investigate the cause of errors that occur during entanglement generations, and then we propose an error-management scheme, which allows us to create high-fidelity cluster states in a short time.

  6. Visibility of cold atomic gases in optical lattices for finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Alexander; Pelster, Axel

    2009-05-15

    In nearly all experiments with ultracold atoms time-of-flight pictures are the only data available. In this paper we present an analytical strong-coupling calculation for those time-of-flight pictures of bosons in a three-dimensional optical lattice in the Mott phase. This allows us to determine the visibility, which quantifies the contrast of peaks in the time-of-flight pictures, and we suggest how to use it as a thermometer.

  7. Bragg scattering as a probe of atomic wave functions and quantum phase transitions in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios A; Puentes, Graciana; Pritchard, David E; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Weld, David M

    2011-10-21

    We have observed Bragg scattering of photons from quantum degenerate ^{87}Rb atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Bragg scattered light directly probes the microscopic crystal structure and atomic wave function whose position and momentum width is Heisenberg limited. The spatial coherence of the wave function leads to revivals in the Bragg scattered light due to the atomic Talbot effect. The decay of revivals across the superfluid to Mott insulator transition indicates the loss of superfluid coherence.

  8. Collective Excitations of an Imbalanced Fermion Gas in a 1D Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, R.; Fortes, M.; Solís, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    The collective excitations that minimize the Helmholtz free energy of a population-imbalanced mixture of a 6Li gas loaded in a quasi one-dimensional optical lattice are obtained. These excitations reveal a rotonic branch after solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation under a generalized random phase approximation based on a single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. The phase diagram describing stability regions of Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov and Sarma phases is also analyzed.

  9. Bragg scattering as a probe of atomic wave functions and quantum phase transitions in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios A; Puentes, Graciana; Pritchard, David E; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Weld, David M

    2011-10-21

    We have observed Bragg scattering of photons from quantum degenerate ^{87}Rb atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Bragg scattered light directly probes the microscopic crystal structure and atomic wave function whose position and momentum width is Heisenberg limited. The spatial coherence of the wave function leads to revivals in the Bragg scattered light due to the atomic Talbot effect. The decay of revivals across the superfluid to Mott insulator transition indicates the loss of superfluid coherence. PMID:22107532

  10. Controlling chaos in a Bose-Einstein condensate loaded into a moving optical lattice potential

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhixia Zhang Xihe; Shen Ke

    2008-11-15

    The spatial structure of a Bose-Einstein condensate loaded into an optical lattice potential is investigated, and spatially chaotic distributions of the condensates are revealed. By means of changing of the s-wave scattering length with a Feshbach resonance, the chaotic behavior can be well controlled to enter into periodicity. Numerical simulation shows that there are different periodic orbits according to different s-wave scattering lengths only if the maximal Lyapunov exponent of the system is negative.

  11. Analysis of the blackbody-radiation shift in an ytterbium optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi-Lin; Xu, Xin-Ye

    2016-10-01

    We accurately evaluate the blackbody-radiation shift in a 171Yb optical lattice clock by utilizing temperature measurement and numerical simulation. In this work. three main radiation sources are considered for the blackbody-radiation shift, including the heated atomic oven, the warm vacuum chamber, and the room-temperature vacuum windows. The temperatures on the outer surface of the vacuum chamber are measured during the clock operation period by utilizing seven calibrated temperature sensors. Then we infer the temperature distribution inside the vacuum chamber by numerical simulation according to the measured temperatures. Furthermore, we simulate the temperature variation around the cold atoms while the environmental temperature is fluctuating. Finally, we obtain that the total blackbody-radiation shift is -1.289(7) Hz with an uncertainty of 1.25 × 10-17 for our 171Yb optical lattice clock. The presented method is quite suitable for accurately evaluating the blackbody-radiation shift of the optical lattice clock in the case of lacking the sensors inside the vacuum chamber. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821302), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11134003), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA123401), and the Shanghai Excellent Academic Leaders Program of China (Grant No. 12XD1402400).

  12. Quantum phases from competing short- and long-range interactions in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landig, Renate; Hruby, Lorenz; Dogra, Nishant; Landini, Manuele; Mottl, Rafael; Donner, Tobias; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-04-01

    Insights into complex phenomena in quantum matter can be gained from simulation experiments with ultracold atoms, especially in cases where theoretical characterization is challenging. However, these experiments are mostly limited to short-range collisional interactions; recently observed perturbative effects of long-range interactions were too weak to reach new quantum phases. Here we experimentally realize a bosonic lattice model with competing short- and long-range interactions, and observe the appearance of four distinct quantum phases—a superfluid, a supersolid, a Mott insulator and a charge density wave. Our system is based on an atomic quantum gas trapped in an optical lattice inside a high-finesse optical cavity. The strength of the short-range on-site interactions is controlled by means of the optical lattice depth. The long (infinite)-range interaction potential is mediated by a vacuum mode of the cavity and is independently controlled by tuning the cavity resonance. When probing the phase transition between the Mott insulator and the charge density wave in real time, we observed a behaviour characteristic of a first-order phase transition. Our measurements have accessed a regime for quantum simulation of many-body systems where the physics is determined by the intricate competition between two different types of interactions and the zero point motion of the particles.

  13. Quantum phases from competing short- and long-range interactions in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Landig, Renate; Hruby, Lorenz; Dogra, Nishant; Landini, Manuele; Mottl, Rafael; Donner, Tobias; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-04-28

    Insights into complex phenomena in quantum matter can be gained from simulation experiments with ultracold atoms, especially in cases where theoretical characterization is challenging. However, these experiments are mostly limited to short-range collisional interactions; recently observed perturbative effects of long-range interactions were too weak to reach new quantum phases. Here we experimentally realize a bosonic lattice model with competing short- and long-range interactions, and observe the appearance of four distinct quantum phases--a superfluid, a supersolid, a Mott insulator and a charge density wave. Our system is based on an atomic quantum gas trapped in an optical lattice inside a high-finesse optical cavity. The strength of the short-range on-site interactions is controlled by means of the optical lattice depth. The long (infinite)-range interaction potential is mediated by a vacuum mode of the cavity and is independently controlled by tuning the cavity resonance. When probing the phase transition between the Mott insulator and the charge density wave in real time, we observed a behaviour characteristic of a first-order phase transition. Our measurements have accessed a regime for quantum simulation of many-body systems where the physics is determined by the intricate competition between two different types of interactions and the zero point motion of the particles. PMID:27064902

  14. Density-dependent light-assisted tunneling in fermionic optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenchao; Morong, William; Demarco, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Many recent theoretical proposals have discussed the possibility to realize density-dependent tunneling in optical lattices via external periodic driving. These methods enable the simulation of novel many-body quantum phases. Here we present experimental progress on realizing density-dependent tunneling for ultracold 40K atoms trapped in a cubic optical lattice via stimulated Raman transitions. After preparing a spin-polarized gas in the Mott insulator regime of the Hubbard model, a pair of Raman beams is applied to flip the spin of atoms. The Raman beams also introduce an effective density-dependent tunneling that can be tuned by the Raman frequency difference and Rabi rate. The Mott gap inferred from measurements of the fraction of atoms transferred between spin states as the Raman frequency difference is adjusted matches the prediction based on a tight-binding model. We also observe the interaction-dependent tunneling by measuring the fraction of doubly-occupied sites created by the Raman driving. This method allows the engineering of density-dependent tunneling and effective nearest-neighbor interactions in fermionic optical lattices. The authors acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY15-05468) and the Army Research Office (Grant No. W911NF-12-1-0462).

  15. Observation of Parity-Time Symmetry in Optically Induced Atomic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yiqi; Sheng, Jiteng; Yang, Liu; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; He, Bing; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2016-09-01

    A wide class of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians can possess entirely real eigenvalues when they have parity-time (PT) symmetric potentials. Due to their unusual properties, this family of non-Hermitian systems has recently attracted considerable attention in diverse areas of physics, especially in coupled gain-loss waveguides and optical lattices. Given that multi-level atoms can be quite efficient in judiciously synthesizing refractive index profiles, schemes based on atomic coherence have been recently proposed to realize optical potentials with PT-symmetric properties. Here, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time PT-symmetric optical lattices in a coherently-prepared four-level N-type atomic system. By appropriately tuning the pertinent atomic parameters, the onset of PT symmetry breaking is observed through measuring an abrupt phase-shift jump. The experimental realization of such readily reconfigurable and effectively controllable PT-symmetric periodic lattice structures sets a new stage for further exploiting and better understanding the peculiar physical properties of these non-Hermitian systems in atomic settings.

  16. 2D and 3D optical diagnostic techniques applied to Madonna dei Fusi by Leonardo da Vinci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, R.; Gambino, M. C.; Greco, M.; Marras, L.; Materazzi, M.; Pampaloni, E.; Pelagotti, A.; Pezzati, L.; Poggi, P.; Sanapo, C.

    2005-06-01

    3D measurement and modelling have been traditionally applied to statues, buildings, archeological sites or similar large structures, but rarely to paintings. Recently, however, 3D measurements have been performed successfully also on easel paintings, allowing to detect and document the painting's surface. We used 3D models to integrate the results of various 2D imaging techniques on a common reference frame. These applications show how the 3D shape information, complemented with 2D colour maps as well as with other types of sensory data, provide the most interesting information. The 3D data acquisition was carried out by means of two devices: a high-resolution laser micro-profilometer, composed of a commercial distance meter mounted on a scanning device, and a laser-line scanner. The 2D data acquisitions were carried out using a scanning device for simultaneous RGB colour imaging and IR reflectography, and a UV fluorescence multispectral image acquisition system. We present here the results of the techniques described, applied to the analysis of an important painting of the Italian Reinassance: `Madonna dei Fusi', attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

  17. Optical NOR logic gate design on square lattice photonic crystal platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'souza, Nirmala Maria; Mathew, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We numerically demonstrate a new configuration of all-optical NOR logic gate with square lattice photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The logic operations are based on interference effect of optical waves. We have determined the operating frequency range by calculating the band structure for a perfectly periodic PhC using plane wave expansion (PWE) method. Response time of this logic gate is 1.98 ps and it can be operated with speed about 513 GB/s. The proposed device consists of four linear waveguides and a square ring resonator waveguides on PhC platform.

  18. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for the SOC mission on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Origlia, S.; Schiller, S.; Pramod, M. S.; Smith, L.; Singh, Y.; He, W.; Viswam, S.; Świerad, D.; Hughes, J.; Bongs, K.; Sterr, U.; Lisdat, Ch.; Vogt, S.; Bize, S.; Lodewyck, J.; Le Targat, R.; Holleville, D.; Venon, B.; Gill, P.; Barwood, G.; Hill, I. R.; Ovchinnikov, Y.; Kulosa, A.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E.-M.; Stuhler, J.; Kaenders, W.

    2016-04-01

    The ESA mission "Space Optical Clock" project aims at operating an optical lattice clock on the ISS in approximately 2023. The scientific goals of the mission are to perform tests of fundamental physics, to enable space-assisted relativistic geodesy and to intercompare optical clocks on the ground using microwave and optical links. The performance goal of the space clock is less than 1 × 10-17 uncertainty and 1 × 10-15 τ-1/2 instability. Within an EU-FP7-funded project, a strontium optical lattice clock demonstrator has been developed. Goal performances are instability below 1 × 10-15 τ-1/2 and fractional inaccuracy 5 × 10-17. For the design of the clock, techniques and approaches suitable for later space application are used, such as modular design, diode lasers, low power consumption subunits, and compact dimensions. The Sr clock apparatus is fully operational, and the clock transition in 88Sr was observed with linewidth as small as 9 Hz.

  19. Inner-shell magnetic dipole transition in Tm atoms: A candidate for optical lattice clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukachev, D.; Fedorov, S.; Tolstikhina, I.; Tregubov, D.; Kalganova, E.; Vishnyakova, G.; Golovizin, A.; Kolachevsky, N.; Khabarova, K.; Sorokin, V.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a narrow magneto-dipole transition in the 169Tm atom at the wavelength of 1.14 μ m as a candidate for a two-dimensional-optical lattice clock. Calculating dynamic polarizabilities of the two clock levels [Xe] 4 f136 s2(J =7 /2 ) and [Xe] 4 f136 s2(J =5 /2 ) in the spectral range from 250 to 1200 nm, we find a "magic" wavelength for the optical lattice at 807 nm. Frequency shifts due to black-body radiation (BBR), the van der Waals interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, and other effects which can perturb the transition frequency are calculated. The transition at 1.14 μ m demonstrates low sensitivity to the BBR shift corresponding to 8 ×10-17 in fractional units at room temperature which makes it an interesting candidate for high-performance optical clocks. The total estimated frequency uncertainty is less than 5 ×10-18 in fractional units. By direct excitation of the 1.14 μ m transition in Tm atoms loaded into an optical dipole trap, we set the lower limit for the lifetime of the upper clock level [Xe] 4 f136 s2(J =5 /2 ) of 112 ms which corresponds to a natural spectral linewidth narrower than 1.4 Hz. The polarizability of the Tm ground state was measured by the excitation of parametric resonances in the optical dipole trap at 532 nm.

  20. In situ optical measurement of the rapid Li intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in colloidal 2D layered TiS2 nanodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiageng; Camacho-Forero, Luis E.; Rossi, Daniel; Park, Yerok; Balbuena, Perla B.; Son, Dong Hee

    2016-05-01

    We report the in situ optical measurements of the rapid Li intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in 2-dimensional (2D) layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) with a nanoscale lateral dimension using thin films fabricated with size-controlled colloidal TiS2 nanodiscs. The films exhibiting high optical homogeneity, where the interband absorption changes near-linearly to the amount of intercalated Li, enabled facile optical probing of the intercalation dynamics overcoming the shortcomings of amperometry susceptible to complications from non-Faradaic processes. The time scale of Li intercalation and deintercalation was on the order of seconds in the nanodiscs of ~100 nm lateral dimension, indicating sufficiently rapid dynamic control of the intercalation-induced material properties with a reduced lateral dimension. The change in the rate and reversibility of the dynamics during the multiple intercalation/deintercalation cycles was also measured, providing a unique window to observe the effect of potential structural changes on the intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in 2D layered TMD structures with a nanoscale lateral dimension.We report the in situ optical measurements of the rapid Li intercalation and deintercalation dynamics in 2-dimensional (2D) layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) with a nanoscale lateral dimension using thin films fabricated with size-controlled colloidal TiS2 nanodiscs. The films exhibiting high optical homogeneity, where the interband absorption changes near-linearly to the amount of intercalated Li, enabled facile optical probing of the intercalation dynamics overcoming the shortcomings of amperometry susceptible to complications from non-Faradaic processes. The time scale of Li intercalation and deintercalation was on the order of seconds in the nanodiscs of ~100 nm lateral dimension, indicating sufficiently rapid dynamic control of the intercalation-induced material properties with a reduced lateral dimension

  1. 2D-GMAX-DOAS measurements during TCAP: Comparison with MFRSR, HSRL and simultaneous retrievals of trace gases and aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Coburn, S.; Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Berg, L. K.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Volkamer, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    The two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) investigates uncertainties in the aerosol direct effect in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) provide an opportunity for 1) atmospheric radiation closure studies, and 2) test retrievals of aerosol optical properties in the presence and absence of clouds. This presentation discusses innovative means to access column information about aerosol optical properties in the lower atmosphere from ground based measurements of solar stray light spectra in the hyperspectral domain, i.e., measurements of the Raman Scattering Probability (RSP, the probability that an observed photon has undergone a rotational Raman scattering event), and oxygen dimer slant column densities (O4 SCD) by means of the University of Colorado 2D scanning ground Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2D-GMAX-DOAS) instrument that was located at the ARM/MAOS site at Cape Cod, MA. We compare retrievals of aerosol optical properties with those retrieved from the MFRSR and the Cimel Sunphotometer, for case studies in the presence/absence of clouds, and assess the need for atmospheric correction of NO2. 2D-GMAX-DOAS also facilitates a link between the ground-based ARM/MAOS dataset and DoE's G1 aircraft, NASA's King Air aircraft, and NASA's OMI satellite (i.e., NO2 vertical column). Early results that explore these linkages are presented for a case study that combines ground based MFRSR, in-situ observations aboard the G1 aircraft, as well as High Spectral Resolution LIDAR aboard the King Air aircraft.

  2. Fermions in Optical Lattices: Cooling Protocol to Observe Anti-ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Nandini

    2011-03-01

    Experiments on ultracold atoms in optical lattices have the potential of probing the complex phase diagrams arising from simple Hamiltonians. One of the most challenging problems for an optical lattice emulator is that of cooling fermions to observe interesting broken symmetry phases. In this talk I will discuss recent theoretical progress on this question for the simplest model of interacting fermions: the Hubbard model. We determine the equation of state, the density ρ (μ , T , U / t) , and the entropy of the 3D repulsive Hubbard model using exact determinental Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations. Using the local density approximation (LDA), we calculate the spatial variation of density, entropy density, double-occupancy, local compressibility and local spin correlations for different trap curvatures and interaction strengths U / t . In contrast to a homogeneous system, we show that in a trap we can locally squeeze out the entropy from certain regions and observe antiferromagnetic order, even though the total entropy per particle in the cloud is quite high. We show that significant cooling due to entropy redistribution in the trap can be achieved by two mechanisms: (a) by increasing the lattice depth, and (b) by decompressing the cloud. Our calculations can be an important guide in the race to observe antiferromagnetic order in optical lattices. In collaboration with: Thereza Paiva (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Mohit Randeria (Ohio State), and Richard Scalettar (UC Davis). We acknowledge support from ARO W911NF-08-1-0338 and NSF-DMR 0706203 and the use of computational facilities at the Ohio Sup.

  3. Bloch oscillations and mean-field effects of Bose-Einstein condensates in 1D optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Morsch, O; Müller, J H; Cristiani, M; Ciampini, D; Arimondo, E

    2001-10-01

    We have loaded Bose-Einstein condensates into one-dimensional, off-resonant optical lattices and accelerated them by chirping the frequency difference between the two lattice beams. For small values of the lattice well depth, Bloch oscillations were observed. Reducing the potential depth further, Landau-Zener tunneling out of the lowest lattice band, leading to a breakdown of the oscillations, was also studied and used as a probe for the effective potential resulting from mean-field interactions as predicted by Choi and Niu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2022 (1999)]. The effective potential was measured for various condensate densities and trap geometries, yielding good qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations.

  4. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs. PMID:27356177

  5. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs.

  6. Subkilohertz comparison of the single-ion optical-clock 2S1/2-2D5/2 transition in two 88Sr+ traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwood, G. P.; Huang, G.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.; Clarke, R. B. M.

    1999-05-01

    A simultaneous observation of the optical-clock 2S1/2-2D5/2 transition at 674 nm, in two separately trapped single 88Sr+ ions, is reported. Two nominally identical miniature rf Paul traps were used together with a 674-nm sideband-injection-locked extended-cavity diode laser. This ``slave'' laser was optically phase locked about 650 MHz away from a ``master'' diode laser, which was itself locked to a high-finesse, ultra-low-expansion (ULE) cavity. The ULE cavity was temperature-stabilized and suspended in an evacuated enclosure, and provided an ``optical flywheel'' reference standard with a relative drift rate of better than 1 part in 1011 per hour. The difference between center frequencies of the single 88Sr+-ion 674-nm (445-THz) transition multiplet in two traps was 120(90) Hz (one standard uncertainty). Thus the two trap center frequencies agree to 3 parts in 1013.

  7. Sudden-quench dynamics of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer states in deep optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuske, Marlon; Mathey, L.; Tiesinga, Eite

    2016-08-01

    We determine the exact dynamics of an initial Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) state of ultracold atoms in a deep hexagonal optical lattice. The dynamical evolution is triggered by a quench of the lattice potential such that the interaction strength Uf is much larger than the hopping amplitude Jf. The quench initiates collective oscillations with frequency | Uf|/2 π in the momentum occupation numbers and imprints an oscillating phase with the same frequency on the BCS order parameter Δ . The oscillation frequency of Δ is not reproduced by treating the time evolution in mean-field theory. In our theory, the momentum noise (i.e., density-density) correlation functions oscillate at frequency | Uf|/2 π as well as at its second harmonic. For a very deep lattice, with zero tunneling energy, the oscillations of momentum occupation numbers are undamped. Nonzero tunneling after the quench leads to dephasing of the different momentum modes and a subsequent damping of the oscillations. The damping occurs even for a finite-temperature initial BCS state, but not for a noninteracting Fermi gas. Furthermore, damping is stronger for larger order parameter and may therefore be used as a signature of the BCS state. Finally, our theory shows that the noise correlation functions in a honeycomb lattice will develop strong anticorrelations near the Dirac point.

  8. Creating topological interfaces and detecting chiral edge modes in a two-dimensional optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, N.; Jotzu, G.; Messer, M.; Görg, F.; Desbuquois, R.; Esslinger, T.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a general scheme to create chiral topological edge modes within the bulk of two-dimensional engineered quantum systems. Our method is based on the implementation of topological interfaces, designed within the bulk of the system, where topologically protected edge modes localize and freely propagate in a unidirectional manner. This scheme is illustrated through an optical-lattice realization of the Haldane model for cold atoms [G. Jotzu et al., Nature (London) 515, 237 (2014), 10.1038/nature13915], where an additional spatially varying lattice potential induces distinct topological phases in separated regions of space. We present two realistic experimental configurations, which lead to linear and radial-symmetric topological interfaces, which both allow one to significantly reduce the effects of external confinement on topological edge properties. Furthermore, the versatility of our method opens the possibility of tuning the position, the localization length, and the chirality of the edge modes, through simple adjustments of the lattice potentials. In order to demonstrate the unique detectability offered by engineered interfaces, we numerically investigate the time evolution of wave packets, indicating how topological transport unambiguously manifests itself within the lattice. Finally, we analyze the effects of disorder on the dynamics of chiral and nonchiral states present in the system. Interestingly, engineered disorder is shown to provide a powerful tool for the detection of topological edge modes in cold-atom setups.

  9. Loading Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms into the ground state of an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Julienne, P. S.; Williams, C. J.; Band, Y. B.; Trippenbach, Marek

    2005-11-15

    We optimize the turning on of a one-dimensional optical potential, V{sub L}(x,t)=S(t)V{sub 0} cos{sup 2}(kx) to obtain the optimal turn-on function S(t) so as to load a Bose-Einstein condensate into the ground state of the optical lattice of depth V{sub 0}. Specifically, we minimize interband excitations at the end of the turn-on of the optical potential at the final ramp time t{sub r}, where S(t{sub r})=1, given that S(0)=0. Detailed numerical calculations confirm that a simple unit cell model is an excellent approximation when the turn-on time t{sub r} is long compared with the inverse of the band excitation frequency and short in comparison with nonlinear time ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})/{mu} where {mu} is the chemical potential of the condensate. We demonstrate using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with an optimal turn-on function S(t) that the ground state of the optical lattice can be loaded with no significant excitation even for times t{sub r} on the order of the inverse band excitation frequency.

  10. Quantum transport of bosonic cold atoms in double-well optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yinyin; Gong Ming; Zhang Chuanwei

    2011-07-15

    We numerically investigate, using the time evolving block decimation algorithm, the quantum transport of ultracold bosonic atoms in a double-well optical lattice through slow and periodic modulation of the lattice parameters (intra- and inter-well tunneling, chemical potential, etc.). The transport of atoms does not depend on the rate of change of the parameters (as along as the change is slow) and can distribute atoms in optical lattices at the quantized level without involving external forces. The transport of atoms depends on the atom filling in each double well and the interaction between atoms. In the strongly interacting region, the bosonic atoms share the same transport properties as noninteracting fermions with quantized transport at the half filling and no atom transport at the integer filling. In the weakly interacting region, the number of the transported atoms is proportional to the atom filling. We show the signature of the quantum transport from the momentum distribution of atoms that can be measured in the time-of-flight image. A semiclassical transport model is developed to explain the numerically observed transport of bosonic atoms in the noninteracting and strongly interacting limits. The scheme may serve as an quantized battery for atomtronics applications.

  11. Coherent driving and freezing of bosonic matter wave in an optical Lieb lattice

    PubMed Central

    Taie, Shintaro; Ozawa, Hideki; Ichinose, Tomohiro; Nishio, Takuei; Nakajima, Shuta; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Although kinetic energy of a massive particle generally has quadratic dependence on its momentum, a flat, dispersionless energy band is realized in crystals with specific lattice structures. Such macroscopic degeneracy causes the emergence of localized eigenstates and has been a key concept in the context of itinerant ferromagnetism. We report the realization of a “Lieb lattice” configuration with an optical lattice, which has a flat energy band as the first excited state. Our optical lattice potential has various degrees of freedom in its manipulation, which enables coherent transfer of a Bose-Einstein condensate into the flat band. In addition to measuring lifetime of the flat band population for different tight-binding parameters, we investigate the inter-sublattice dynamics of the system by projecting the sublattice population onto the band population. This measurement clearly shows the formation of the localized state with the specific sublattice decoupled in the flat band, and even detects the presence of flat-band breaking perturbations, resulting in the delocalization. Our results will open up the possibilities of exploring the physics of flat bands with a highly controllable quantum system. PMID:26665167

  12. Measurement of an electron's electric dipole moment using Cs atoms trapped in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Cheng; Leiber, Véronique; Vuletić, Vladan; Kerman, Andrew J.; Chu, Steven

    2001-03-01

    We propose to measure the electron's permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) using cesium atoms trapped in a sparsely populated, trichromatic, far blue-detuned three-dimensional (3D) optical lattice. In the proposed configuration, the atoms can be strongly localized near the nodes of the light field and isolated from each other, leading to a strong suppression of the detrimental effects of atom-atom and atom-field interactions. Three linearly polarized standing waves with different frequencies create an effectively linearly polarized 3D optical lattice and lead to a strong reduction of the tensor light shift, which remains a potential source of systematic error. Other systematics concerning external field instability and gradients and higher-order polarizabilities are discussed. Furthermore, auxiliary atoms can be loaded into the same lattices as effective ``comagnetometers'' to monitor various systematic effects, including magnetic-field fluctuations and imperfect electric-field reversal. We estimate that a sensitivity 100 times higher than the current upper bound for the electron's EDM of 4×10-27 e cm can be achieved with the proposed technique.

  13. Long-wavelength infrared surface plasmons on Ga-doped ZnO films excited via 2D hole arrays for extraordinary optical transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Justin W.; Esfahani, Nima Nader; Vangala, Shivashankar; Guo, Junpeng; Hendrickson, Joshua R.; Leedy, Kevin D.; Thomson, Darren; Look, David C.

    2013-09-01

    Extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through highly conductive ZnO films with sub-wavelength hole arrays is investigated in the long-wavelength infrared regime. EOT is facilitated by the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and can be tuned utilizing the physical structure size such as period. Pulse laser deposited Ga-doped ZnO has been shown to have fluctuations in optical and electrical parameters based on fabrication techniques, providing a complimentary tuning means. The sub-wavelength 2D hole arrays are fabricated in the Ga-doped ZnO films via standard lithography and etching processes. Optical reflection measurements completed with a microscope coupled FTIR system contain absorption resonances that are in agreement with analytical theories for excitation of SPPs on 2D structures. EOT through Ga-doped ZnO is numerically demonstrated at wavelengths where SPPs are excited. This highly conductive ZnO EOT structure may prove useful in novel integrated components such as tunable biosensors or surface plasmon coupling mechanisms.

  14. Exploring the promising properties of 2D exfoliated black phosphorus for optoelectronic applications under 1.55 μm optical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penillard, A.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Maksimovic, I.; Rosticher, M.; Servet, B.; Liu, Z.; Géron, E.

    2016-04-01

    A great interest has been lately initiated in the optoelectronics field for 2D materials with a tunable bandgap. Being able to choose the bandgap of a material is a huge progress in optoelectronics, since it would permit to overcome the limitation imposed by the graphene lack of energy bandgap, but also the restriction imposed by already used semiconductor whose bandgap are fixed and cannot apply for IR-NIR applications. From DFT simulations predictions, Black Phosphorus (bP) becomes a bidimensional semiconducting material with a direct tunable energy bandgap from 0.3 eV to 2 eV by controlling number of layers. This material also has a picosecond carrier response and exceptional mobilities under external excitation. Hence black phosphorus is a promising 2D material candidate for photoconductive switching under a NIR optical excitation as in telecommunication wavelength range of 1.55 μm. In this paper, material electromagnetic properties analysis is described in a large frequency band from optical to microwave measurements executed on different samples allowing energy bandgap and work function dependency to fabrication techniques, anisotropy and multiscale optoelectronic device realization by switch contact engineering and material passivation or encapsulation. Material implementation in microwave devices opens the route to new broadband electronic functionalities triggered by optics, thanks to light/matter extreme confinement degree. In this paper we present fabrication method of bP based microwave photoconductive switch, with a focus on black phosphorus Raman characterization, and obtained performances.

  15. Off-resonant many-body quantum carpets in strongly tilted optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Arias, Manuel H.; Madroñero, Javier; Parra-Murillo, Carlos A.

    2016-04-01

    A unit filling Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian embedded in a strong Stark field is studied in the off-resonant regime inhibiting single- and many-particle first-order tunneling resonances. We investigate the occurrence of coherent dipole wavelike propagation along an optical lattice by means of an effective Hamiltonian accounting for second-order tunneling processes. It is shown that dipole wave function evolution in the short-time limit is ballistic and that finite-size effects induce dynamical self-interference patterns known as quantum carpets. We also present the effects of the border right after the first reflection, showing that the wave function diffuses normally with the variance changing linearly in time. This work extends the rich physical phenomenology of tilted one-dimensional lattice systems in a scenario of many interacting quantum particles, the so-called many-body Wannier-Stark system.

  16. Design and construction of a fast imaging system for detection and analysis of optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Matthew C.

    A home built system for imaging optical lattices is presented. Our imaging system uses a repurposed astronomy camera--the complete system costs less than 5,000 while rivaling the performance of a commercially available system which costs 40-50k. The camera must have an extremely low dark current, high quantum efficiency, as well as the ability to take precisely timed millisecond exposures. Using LabVIEW a sequence of precise electronic pulses is created to control the laser beams in order to load the lattice structure with cold atoms. When running a LabVIEW VI at millisecond timescales Windows introduces inaccuracies in pulse timing. A master slave computer setup, called a real time target (RTT) is created in order to keep accuracy to the microsecond level.

  17. Design and Implementation of a Fast Imaging System for Detection of Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Matthew; Hachtel, Andrew; Clements, Ethan; Zhong, Shan; Ducay, Ray; Bali, Samir

    2014-05-01

    A home built system for imaging optical lattices is presented. Our imaging system uses a repurposed astronomy camera- the complete system costs less than 5000 while rivaling the performance of a commercially available system which costs 40-50000. The camera must have an extremely low dark current, high quantum efficiency, as well as the ability to take precisely timed millisecond exposures. Using LabVIEW a sequence of precise electronic pulses is created to control the laser beams in order to load the lattice structure with cold atoms. When running a LabVIEW VI at millisecond timescales Windows introduces inaccuracies in pulse timing. A master slave computer setup, called a real time target (RTT) is created in order to increase this accuracy to the microsecond level. We gratefully acknowledge support from the Petroleum Research Fund and Miami University. We acknowledge invaluable help from the Miami University Instrumentation Lab.

  18. Multiple period states of the superfluid Fermi gas in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sukjin; Dalfovo, Franco; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Watanabe, Gentaro

    2016-02-01

    We study multiple period states of a two-component unpolarized superfluid Fermi gas in an optical lattice along the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) crossover. The existence of states whose period is a multiple of the lattice spacing is a direct consequence of the nonlinear behavior of the gas, which is due to the presence of the order parameter associated with superfluidity. By solving Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for a superfluid flow with finite quasimomentum, we find that, in the BCS side of the crossover, the multiple period states can be energetically favorable compared to the normal Bloch states and their survival time against dynamical instability drastically increases, suggesting that these states can be accessible in current experiments, in sharp contrast to the situation in BECs.

  19. Multiple Period States of the Superfluid Fermi Gas in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Gentaro; Yoon, Sukjin; Dalfovo, Franco; Nakatsukasa, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    We study multiple period states (i.e., states whose period is a multiple of the lattice constant) of a two-component unpolarized superfluid Fermi gas in an optical lattice along the crossover between the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) states. By solving Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for a superfluid flow with finite quasimomentum, we find that, in the BCS side of the crossover, the multiple period states can be energetically favorable compared to the normal Bloch states and their survival time against dynamical instability drastically increases, suggesting that these states can be accessible in current experiments. This is in sharp contrast to the situation in BECs.

  20. Topological Properties of Ultracold Bosons in One-Dimensional Quasiperiodic Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Fuyuki; Tezuka, Masaki; Kawakami, Norio

    2014-08-01

    We analyze the topological properties of the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model with a quasiperiodic superlattice potential. This system can be realized in interacting ultracold bosons in an optical lattice in the presence of an incommensurate superlattice potential. We first analyze the quasiperiodic superlattice formed by the cosine function, which we call the Harper-like Bose-Hubbard model. We compute the Chern number and observe gap-closing behavior as the interaction strength U is changed. Also, we discuss the bulk-edge correspondence in our system. Furthermore, we explore the phase diagram as a function of U and a continuous deformation parameter β between the Harper-like model and another important quasiperiodic lattice, the Fibonacci model. We numerically confirm that the incommensurate charge density wave (ICDW) phase is topologically nontrivial and that it is topologically equivalent in the whole ICDW region.

  1. Quantum Critical Dynamics of Bose-Einstein Condensates in a Shaken Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Logan W.; Feng, Lei; Ha, Li-Chung; Chin, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    From condensed matter to cosmology, systems which cross a continuous, symmetry-breaking phase transition are expected to generate topological defects whose density scales universally with the rate at which the phase transition is crossed. We experimentally test the application of this universal Kibble-Zurek scaling prediction to quantum phase transitions by studying ultracold bosons in a shaken optical lattice. When the lattice shaking amplitude crosses a critical threshold, an ordinary Bose condensate transitions to an effectively ferromagnetic pseudo-spinor condensate with discrete, magnetized regions separated by domain walls. We appraise the dynamic scaling laws for both the time at which the domain structure forms and the typical size of the domains by varying the quench rate across the transition. We explore the regime in which the universal prediction applies, as well as potential deviations at extreme quench rates.

  2. Observation of Nonlinear Looped Band Structure of Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Elizabeth; Koller, Silvio; Brown, Roger; Wyllie, Robert; Wilson, Ryan; Porto, Trey

    2016-05-01

    We study experimentally the stability of excited, interacting states of bosons in a double-well optical lattice in regimes where the nonlinear interactions are expected to induce ``swallow-tail'' looped band structure. By carefully preparing different initial coherent states and observing their subsequent decay, we observe distinct decay rates, which provide direct evidence for multi-valued band structure. The double well lattice both stabilizes the looped band structure and allows for dynamic preparation of different initial states, including states within the loop structure. We confirm our state preparation procedure with dynamic Gross-Pitaevskii calculations. The excited loop states are found to be more stable than dynamically unstable ground states, but decay faster than expected based on a mean-field stability calculation, indicating the importance of correlations beyond a mean-field description. Now at Georgia Tech Research Institute.

  3. Frequency Ratio of (199)Hg and (87)Sr Optical Lattice Clocks beyond the SI Limit.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Ushijima, Ichiro; Takamoto, Masao; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-06-12

    We report on a frequency ratio measurement of a (199)Hg-based optical lattice clock referencing a (87)Sr-based clock. Evaluations of lattice light shift, including atomic-motion-dependent shift, enable us to achieve a total systematic uncertainty of 7.2×10(-17) for the Hg clock. The frequency ratio is measured to be νHg/νSr=2.629 314 209 898 909 60(22) with a fractional uncertainty of 8.4×10(-17), which is smaller than the uncertainty of the realization of the International System of Units (SI) second, i.e., the SI limit.

  4. Observation and cancellation of a perturbing dc stark shift in strontium optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Zawada, Michal; Lorini, Luca; Gurov, Mikhail; Lemonde, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    We report on the observation of a dc Stark frequency shift at the 10-(13) level by comparing two strontium optical lattice clocks. This frequency shift arises from the presence of electric charges trapped on dielectric surfaces placed under vacuum close to the atomic sample. We show that these charges can be eliminated by shining UV light on the dielectric surfaces, and characterize the residual dc Stark frequency shift on the clock transition at the 10-(18) level by applying an external electric field. This study shows that the dc Stark shift can play an important role in the accuracy budget of lattice clocks, and should be duly taken into account. PMID:22481773

  5. Frequency Ratio of (199)Hg and (87)Sr Optical Lattice Clocks beyond the SI Limit.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Ushijima, Ichiro; Takamoto, Masao; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-06-12

    We report on a frequency ratio measurement of a (199)Hg-based optical lattice clock referencing a (87)Sr-based clock. Evaluations of lattice light shift, including atomic-motion-dependent shift, enable us to achieve a total systematic uncertainty of 7.2×10(-17) for the Hg clock. The frequency ratio is measured to be νHg/νSr=2.629 314 209 898 909 60(22) with a fractional uncertainty of 8.4×10(-17), which is smaller than the uncertainty of the realization of the International System of Units (SI) second, i.e., the SI limit. PMID:26196788

  6. Density-dependent synthetic magnetism for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greschner, Sebastian; Huerga, Daniel; Sun, Gaoyong; Poletti, Dario; Santos, Luis

    2015-09-01

    Raman-assisted hopping can allow for the creation of density-dependent synthetic magnetism for cold neutral gases in optical lattices. We show that the density-dependent fields lead to a nontrivial interplay between density modulations and chirality. This interplay results in a rich physics for atoms in two-leg ladders, characterized by a density-driven Meissner-superfluid to vortex-superfluid transition, and a nontrivial dependence of the density imbalance between the legs. Density-dependent fields also lead to intriguing physics in square lattices. In particular, it leads to a density-driven transition between a nonchiral and a chiral superfluid, both characterized by nontrivial charge density-wave amplitude. We finally show how the physics due to the density-dependent fields may be easily probed in experiments by monitoring the expansion of doublons and holes in a Mott insulator, which presents a remarkable dependence on quantum fluctuations.

  7. Inter-species entanglement of Bose-Bose mixtures trapped in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (王 巍, Wei Wang; Penna, Vittorio; Capogrosso-Sansone, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we discuss inter-species entanglement in Bose-Bose mixtures trapped in optical lattices. This work is motivated by the observation that, in the presence of a second component, the MI lobe shifts differently on the hole- and particle-side with respect to the Mott lobe of the single species system (Guglielmino et al 2010 Phys. Rev. A 82 021601; Capogrosso-Sansone et al 2011 Laser Phys. 21 1443). We use perturbation theory, formulated in a Hilbert space decomposed by means of lattice symmetries, in order to show that the nonuniform shift of the Mott lobe is a manifestation of inter-species entanglement which differs in the lowest excited states to remove and add a particle. Our results indicate that inter-species entanglement in mixtures can provide a new perspective in understanding quantum phase transitions. To validate our approach, we compare our results from perturbation theory with quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Bound states of two bosons in an optical lattice near an association resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Jerome C.; Odong, Otim; Javanainen, Juha; Mackie, Matt

    2011-03-15

    We model two bosons in an optical lattice near a Feshbach or photoassociation resonance, focusing on the Bose-Hubbard model in one dimension. Whereas the usual atoms-only theory with a tunable scattering length yields one bound state for a molecular dimer for either an attractive or repulsive atom-atom interaction, for a sufficiently small direct background interaction between the atoms a two-channel atom-molecule theory may give two bound states that represent attractively and repulsively bound dimers occurring simultaneously. Such unusual molecular physics may be observable for an atom-molecule coupling strength comparable to the width of the dissociation continuum of the lattice dimer, which is the case, for instance, with narrow Feshbach resonances in Na, {sup 87}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs or low-intensity photoassociation in {sup 174}Yb.

  9. Experimental Realization of Strong Effective Magnetic Fields in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Aidelsburger, M.; Atala, M.; Trotzky, S.; Chen, Y.-A.; Bloch, I.; Nascimbene, S.

    2011-12-16

    We use Raman-assisted tunneling in an optical superlattice to generate large tunable effective magnetic fields for ultracold atoms. When hopping in the lattice, the accumulated phase shift by an atom is equivalent to the Aharonov-Bohm phase of a charged particle exposed to a staggered magnetic field of large magnitude, on the order of 1 flux quantum per plaquette. We study the ground state of this system and observe that the frustration induced by the magnetic field can lead to a degenerate ground state for noninteracting particles. We provide a measurement of the local phase acquired from Raman-induced tunneling, demonstrating time-reversal symmetry breaking of the underlying Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the quantum cyclotron orbit of single atoms in the lattice exposed to the magnetic field is directly revealed.

  10. Use of 2D images of depth and integrated reflectivity to represent the severity of demineralization in cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kenneth H.; Chan, Andrew C.; Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the potential of cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) to quantify the severity of early caries lesions (tooth decay) on tooth surfaces. The purpose of this study is to show that 2D images of the lesion depth and the integrated reflectivity can be used to accurately represent the severity of early lesions. Simulated early lesions of varying severity were produced on tooth samples using simulated lesion models. Methods were developed to convert the 3D CP-OCT images of the samples to 2D images of the lesion depth and lesion integrated reflectivity. Calculated lesion depths from OCT were compared with lesion depths measured from histological sections examined using polarized light microscopy. The 2D images of the lesion depth and integrated reflectivity are well suited for visualization of early demineralization. Polarized light micrographs (PLM) of one of the histological sections from a tooth exposed to demineralization for 48 hrs. (A) PLM image of entire thin section (B) magnified PLM image of region of interest. PMID:24307350

  11. Boresight Calibration of Construction Misalignments for 3D Scanners Built with a 2D Laser Rangefinder Rotating on Its Optical Center

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Jesús; Martínez, Jorge L.; Mandow, Anthony; Reina, Antonio J.; Pequeño-Boter, Alejandro; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Many applications, like mobile robotics, can profit from acquiring dense, wide-ranging and accurate 3D laser data. Off-the-shelf 2D scanners are commonly customized with an extra rotation as a low-cost, lightweight and low-power-demanding solution. Moreover, aligning the extra rotation axis with the optical center allows the 3D device to maintain the same minimum range as the 2D scanner and avoids offsets in computing Cartesian coordinates. The paper proposes a practical procedure to estimate construction misalignments based on a single scan taken from an arbitrary position in an unprepared environment that contains planar surfaces of unknown dimensions. Inherited measurement limitations from low-cost 2D devices prevent the estimation of very small translation misalignments, so the calibration problem reduces to obtaining boresight parameters. The distinctive approach with respect to previous plane-based intrinsic calibration techniques is the iterative maximization of both the flatness and the area of visible planes. Calibration results are presented for a case study. The method is currently being applied as the final stage in the production of a commercial 3D rangefinder. PMID:25347585

  12. Boresight calibration of construction misalignments for 3D scanners built with a 2D laser range finder rotating on its optical center.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jesús; Martínez, Jorge L; Mandow, Anthony; Reina, Antonio J; Pequeño-Boter, Alejandro; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Many applications, like mobile robotics, can profit from acquiring dense, wide-ranging and accurate 3D laser data. Off-the-shelf 2D scanners are commonly customized with an extra rotation as a low-cost, lightweight and low-power-demanding solution. Moreover, aligning the extra rotation axis with the optical center allows the 3D device to maintain the same minimum range as the 2D scanner and avoids offsets in computing Cartesian coordinates. The paper proposes a practical procedure to estimate construction misalignments based on a single scan taken from an arbitrary position in an unprepared environment that contains planar surfaces of unknown dimensions. Inherited measurement limitations from low-cost 2D devices prevent the estimation of very small translation misalignments, so the calibration problem reduces to obtaining boresight parameters. The distinctive approach with respect to previous plane-based intrinsic calibration techniques is the iterative maximization of both the flatness and the area of visible planes. Calibration results are presented for a case study. The method is currently being applied as the final stage in the production of a commercial 3D rangefinder. PMID:25347585

  13. Persistent Scatterer Aided Facade Lattice Extraction in Single Airborne Optical Oblique Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schack, L.; Soergel, U.; Heipke, C.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new method to extract patterns of regular facade structures from single optical oblique images. To overcome the missing three-dimensional information we incorporate structural information derived from Persistent Scatter (PS) point cloud data into our method. Single oblique images and PS point clouds have never been combined before and offer promising insights into the compatibility of remotely sensed data of different kinds. Even though the appearance of facades is significantly different, many characteristics of the prominent patterns can be seen in both types of data and can be transferred across the sensor domains. To justify the extraction based on regular facade patterns we show that regular facades appear rather often in typical airborne oblique imagery of urban scenes. The extraction of regular patterns is based on well established tools like cross correlation and is extended by incorporating a module for estimating a window lattice model using a genetic algorithm. Among others the results of our approach can be used to derive a deeper understanding of the emergence of Persistent Scatterers and their fusion with optical imagery. To demonstrate the applicability of the approach we present a concept for data fusion aiming at facade lattices extraction in PS and optical data.

  14. LBNE lattice & optics for proton extraction at MI-10 and transport to a target above grade

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, John A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    For the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab 120 GeV/c protons will be transported from the Main Injector (MI) to an on-site production target. The lattice design and optics discussed here has the beam extracted vertically upwards from MI-10 and the keeps the majority of the line at an elevation above the glacial till/rock interface and terminates on a target at 10 ft above grade. The LBNE beamline discussed here is a modular optics design comprised of 3 distinct lattice configurations, including the specialized MI {yields} LBNE matching section and Final Focus. The remainder of the line is defined by six FODO cells, in which the length and phase advance are chosen specifically such that beam size does not exceed that of the MI while also making the most efficient use of space for achromatic insertions. Dispersion generated by variations in the beam trajectory are corrected locally and can not bleed out to corrupt the optics elsewhere in the line. Aperture studies indicate that the line should be able to transport the worst quality beam that the Main Injector might provide. New IDS dipole correctors located at every focusing center provide high-quality orbit control and further ensure that LBNE meets the stringent requirements for environmental protection.

  15. Noise and counting statistics of insulating phases in one-dimensional optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Lamacraft, Austen

    2007-07-15

    We discuss the correlation properties of current-carrying states of one-dimensional insulators, which could be realized by applying an impulse to atoms loaded onto an optical lattice. While the equilibrium noise has a gapped spectrum, the quantum uncertainty encoded in the amplitudes for the Zener process gives a zero-frequency contribution out of equilibrium. We derive a general expression for the generating function of the full counting statistics and find that the particle transport obeys binomial statistics with doubled charge, resulting in super-Poissonian noise that originates from the coherent creation of particle-hole pairs.

  16. Quantum Correlations of Two SPIN-1 Particles in the Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jia-Dong; Wu, Tao; Song, Xue-Ke; Ye, Liu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamical behaviors of quantum correlations witnessed by geometric discord and negativity when two three-level spin-1 atoms exist in the optical lattice. The results show that the GD can detect the critical point K = J at finite temperature associated with the quantum phase transition which separates the superfluid phase from the Mott insulator phase, while the negativity cannot. In addition, the system undergoes an entanglement sudden death (ESD), but the GD always exists, meanwhile, the GD is more robust than negativity against temperature T.

  17. Dynamics and stability of Bose-Einstein solitons in tilted optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, E.; Dominguez-Adame, F.; Gaul, C.; Lima, R. P. A.; Mueller, C. A.

    2010-05-15

    Bloch oscillations of Bose-Einstein condensates realize sensitive matter-wave interferometers. We investigate the dynamics and stability of bright-soliton wave packets in one-dimensional tilted optical lattices with a modulated mean-field interaction g(t). By means of a time-reversal argument, we prove the stability of Bloch oscillations of breathing solitons that would be quasistatically unstable. Floquet theory shows that these breathing solitons can be more stable against certain experimental perturbations than rigid solitons or even noninteracting wave packets.

  18. Phase separation in optical lattices in a spin-dependent external potential

    SciTech Connect

    A-Hai Chen; Gao Xianlong

    2010-01-15

    We investigate the phase separation in one-dimensional Fermi gases on optical lattices. The density distributions and the magnetization are calculated by means of the density-matrix renormalization method. The phase separation between spin-up and spin-down atoms is induced by the interplay of the spin-dependent harmonic confinement and the strong repulsive interaction between intercomponent fermions. We find the existence of a critical repulsive interaction strength above which the phase separation evolves. By increasing the trap imbalance, the composite phase of the Mott-insulating core is changed into one of the ferromagnetic insulating core, which is incompressible and originates from the Pauli exclusion principle.

  19. Anisotropic pair superfluidity of trapped two-component Bose gases in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang; He, Liang; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the pair-superfluid phase of two-component ultracold gases with attractive inter-species interactions in an optical lattice. We establish the phase diagram for filling n = 1 at zero and finite temperatures, by applying bosonic dynamical mean-field theory, and observe stable pair-superfluid and charge-density wave quantum phases for asymmetric hopping of the two species. While the pair superfluid is found to be robust in the presence of a harmonic trap, we observe that it is destroyed already by a small population imbalance of the two species.

  20. Magnetic ordering of three-component ultracold fermionic mixtures in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, Andrii; Hofstetter, Walter

    2014-06-01

    We study finite-temperature magnetic phases of three-component mixtures of ultracold fermions with repulsive interactions in optical lattices with simple cubic or square geometry by means of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We focus on the case of one particle per site (1/3 band filling) at moderate interaction strength, where we observe a sequence of thermal phase transitions into two- and three-sublattice ordered states by means of the unrestricted real-space generalization of DMFT. From our quantitative analysis we conclude that long-range ordering in three-component mixtures should be observable at comparable temperatures as in two-component mixtures.

  1. Influence of trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Giampaolo, S.M.; Illuminati, F.; Mazzarella, G.; De Siena, S.

    2004-12-01

    We study the effect of external trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices. We introduce a generalized Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that includes the structure of the energy levels of the trapping potential, and show that these levels are in general populated both at finite and zero temperature. We characterize the properties of the superfluid transition for this situation and compare them with those of the standard Bose-Hubbard description. We briefly discuss similar behaviors for fermionic systems.

  2. Two-component Fermions in Optical Lattice with Spatially Alternating Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Anh-Tuan; Nguyen, Thi-Hai-Yen; Tran, Thi-Thu-Trang; Le, Duc-Anh

    2016-10-01

    We investigate two-component mass-imbalanced fermions in an optical lattice with spatially modulated interactions by using two-site dynamical mean field theory. At half-filling and zero temperature, the phase diagram of the system is analytically obtained, in which the metallic region is reduced with increasing the mass imbalance. The ground-state properties of the fermionic system are discussed from the behaviors of both the spin-dependent quasi-particle weight at the Fermi level and the double occupancy for each sublattice as functions of the local interaction strengths for various values of the mass imbalance.

  3. Rydberg Spectroscopy in an Optical Lattice: Blackbody Thermometry for Atomic Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ovsiannikov, Vitali D.; Derevianko, Andrei; Gibble, Kurt

    2011-08-26

    We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate in situ thermometry at room temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25-30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic-wavelength lattices exist for both strontium and ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with 10{sup -16} accuracy provide 10 mK resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of 10{sup -18}.

  4. Rydberg spectroscopy in an optical lattice: blackbody thermometry for atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Ovsiannikov, Vitali D; Derevianko, Andrei; Gibble, Kurt

    2011-08-26

    We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate in situ thermometry at room temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25-30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic-wavelength lattices exist for both strontium and ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with 10(-16) accuracy provide 10 mK resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of 10(-18).

  5. Three-component fermionic atoms with repulsive interaction in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Shin-ya; Inaba, Kensuke; Suga, Sei-ichiro

    2010-02-15

    We investigate three-component (colors) repulsive fermionic atoms in optical lattices using the dynamical mean-field theory. Depending on the anisotropy of the repulsive interactions, either a color density-wave state or a color-selective staggered state appears at half filling. In the former state, pairs of atoms with two of the three colors and atoms with the third color occupy different sites alternately. In the latter state, atoms with two of the three colors occupy different sites alternately and atoms with the third color are itinerant throughout the system. When the interactions are isotropic, both states are degenerate. We discuss the results using an effective model.

  6. Proposal for a Chaotic Ratchet Using Cold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, T. S.; Dando, P. A.; Hutchings, N. A.; Isherwood, M. R.

    2002-10-01

    We investigate a new type of quantum ratchet which may be realized by cold atoms in a double-well optical lattice, pulsed with unequal periods. The classical dynamics is chaotic and we find the classical diffusion rate D is asymmetric in momentum up to a finite time tr. The quantum behavior produces a corresponding asymmetry in the momentum distribution which is ``frozen-in'' by dynamical localization provided the break time t*>=tr. We conclude that the cold atom ratchets require Db/ℏ~1, where b is a small deviation from period-one pulses.

  7. Phase-Sensitive Detection of Bragg Scattering at 1D Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Slama, S.; Cube, C. von; Deh, B.; Ludewig, A.; Zimmermann, C.; Courteille, Ph.W.

    2005-05-20

    We report on the observation of Bragg scattering at 1D atomic lattices. Cold atoms are confined by optical dipole forces at the antinodes of a standing wave generated by the two counterpropagating modes of a laser-driven high-finesse ring cavity. By heterodyning the Bragg-scattered light with a reference beam, we obtain detailed information on phase shifts imparted by the Bragg scattering process. Being deep in the Lamb-Dicke regime, the scattered light is not broadened by the motion of individual atoms.

  8. Coherent Addressing of Individual Neutral Atoms in a 3D Optical Lattice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xianli; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 5×5×5 array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in nontargeted atoms is smaller than 3×10^{-3} in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  9. Zoo of Quantum Phases and Excitations of Cold Bosonic Atoms in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Alon, Ofir E.; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2005-07-15

    Quantum phases and phase transitions of weakly to strongly interacting bosonic atoms in deep to shallow optical lattices are described by a single multiorbital mean-field approach in real space. For weakly interacting bosons in one dimension, the critical value of the superfluid to Mott insulator (MI) transition found is in excellent agreement with many-body treatments of the Bose-Hubbard model. For strongly interacting bosons (i) additional MI phases appear, for which two (or more) atoms residing in each site undergo a Tonks-Girardeau-like transition and localize, and (ii) on-site excitation becomes the excitation lowest in energy. Experimental implications are discussed.

  10. Trapped Fermi Gases in Rotating Optical Lattices: Realization and Detection of the Topological Hofstadter Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Umucalilar, R. O.; Oktel, M. Oe.; Zhai Hui

    2008-02-22

    We consider a gas of noninteracting spinless fermions in a rotating optical lattice and calculate the density profile of the gas in an external confinement potential. The density profile exhibits distinct plateaus, which correspond to gaps in the single particle spectrum known as the Hofstadter butterfly. The plateaus result from insulating behavior whenever the Fermi energy lies within a gap. We discuss the necessary conditions to realize the Hofstadter insulator in a cold atom setup and show how the quantized Hall conductance can be measured from density profiles using the Streda formula.

  11. Phase boundary of the boson Mott insulator in a rotating optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Umucalilar, R. O.; Oktel, M. Oe.

    2007-11-15

    We consider the Bose-Hubbard model in a two-dimensional rotating optical lattice and investigate the consequences of the effective magnetic field created by rotation. Using a Gutzwiller-type variational wave function, we find an analytical expression for the Mott insulator (MI)-superfluid (SF) transition boundary in terms of the maximum eigenvalue of the Hofstadter butterfly. The dependence of phase boundary on the effective magnetic field is complex, reflecting the self-similar properties of the single particle energy spectrum. Finally, we argue that fractional quantum Hall phases exist close to the MI-SF transition boundaries, including MI states with particle densities greater than one.

  12. Routes Towards Anderson-Like Localization of Bose-Einstein Condensates in Disordered Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, T.; Drenkelforth, S.; Kruse, J.; Ertmer, W.; Arlt, J.; Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-10-21

    We investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, possible routes towards Anderson-like localization of Bose-Einstein condensates in disordered potentials. The dependence of this quantum interference effect on the nonlinear interactions and the shape of the disorder potential is investigated. Experiments with an optical lattice and a superimposed disordered potential reveal the lack of Anderson localization. A theoretical analysis shows that this absence is due to the large length scale of the disorder potential as well as its screening by the nonlinear interactions. Further analysis shows that incommensurable superlattices should allow for the observation of the crossover from the nonlinear screening regime to the Anderson localized case within realistic experimental parameters.

  13. Chiral phase from three-spin interactions in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    D'Cruz, Christian; Pachos, Jiannis K.

    2005-10-15

    A spin-1/2 chain model that includes three-spin interactions can effectively describe the dynamics of two species of bosons trapped in an optical lattice with a triangular-ladder configuration. A perturbative theoretical approach and numerical study of its ground state is performed that reveals a rich variety of phases and criticalities. We identify phases with periodicity one, two, or three, as well as critical points that belong in the same universality class as the Ising or the three-state Potts model. We establish a range of parameters, corresponding to a large degeneracy present between phases with period 2 and 3, that nests a gapless incommensurate chiral phase.

  14. Equilibration Rates and Negative Absolute Temperatures for Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Akos; Mandt, Stephan; Rosch, Achim

    2010-11-01

    As highly tunable interacting systems, cold atoms in optical lattices are ideal to realize and observe negative absolute temperatures, T<0. We show theoretically that, by reversing the confining potential, stable superfluid condensates at finite momentum and T<0 can be created with low entropy production for attractive bosons. They may serve as “smoking gun” signatures of equilibrated T<0. For fermions, we analyze the time scales needed to equilibrate to T<0. For moderate interactions, the equilibration time is proportional to the square of the radius of the cloud and grows with increasing interaction strengths as atoms and energy are transported by diffusive processes.

  15. Compensation of noise in optical lattices via feedback: Low-temperature limit

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, T. Yu.; Ivanov, D. A.

    2008-02-15

    We consider the problem of suppression of noise acting on atomic ensembles trapped in optical lattices in the low-energy limit. Noise affecting external degrees of freedom of each atom independently and noise influencing only the center-of-mass (c.m.) mode of the ensemble are addressed. Taking into account the quantum character of the atomic motion, we show that negative feedback loop acting on the c.m. coordinate of the atomic ensemble is able to partially compensate both noise sources mentioned above.

  16. Chaos control of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a moving optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiying; Feng, Xiuqin; Yao, Zhihai

    2016-07-01

    Chaos control of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) loaded into a moving optical lattice with attractive interaction is investigated on the basis of Lyapunov stability theory. Three methods are designed to control chaos in BEC. As a controller, a bias constant, periodic force, or wavelet function feedback is added to the BEC system. Numerical simulations reveal that chaotic behavior can be well controlled to achieve periodicity by regulating control parameters. Different periodic orbits are available for different control parameters only if the maximal Lyapunov exponent of the system is negative. The abundant effect of chaotic control is also demonstrated numerically. Chaos control can be realized effectively by using our proposed control strategies.

  17. Removal of Lattice Imperfections that Impact the Optical Quality of Ti:Sapphire using Advanced Magnetorheological Finishing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Schaffers, K I; Bayramian, A J; Davis, P J; Ebbers, C A; Wolfe, J E; Caird, J A; Barty, C J

    2008-02-26

    Advanced magnetorheological finishing (MRF) techniques have been applied to Ti:sapphire crystals to compensate for sub-millimeter lattice distortions that occur during the crystal growing process. Precise optical corrections are made by imprinting topographical structure onto the crystal surfaces to cancel out the effects of the lattice distortion in the transmitted wavefront. This novel technique significantly improves the optical quality for crystals of this type and sets the stage for increasing the availability of high-quality large-aperture sapphire and Ti:sapphire optics in critical applications.

  18. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors. PMID:23189239

  19. Metallic and Insulating Phases of Interacting Fermions in a 3D Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackermueller, Lucia

    2010-03-01

    Ultracold fermions in optical lattices are a promising tool to simulate solid state physics, since they represent an ideal and highly tunable implementation of the Hubbard Hamiltonian. A proof of principle is to demonstrate a Mott insulating state, where repulsive interactions between the atoms lead to an insulating behavior in a half-filled conduction band. In our experiments we study repulsively and attractively interacting ^40K atoms within the combination of a red-detuned dipole trap and a blue detuned lattice. This setup allows us to gradually transform the system from metallic to Mott-insulating and band insulating states. We measure the phase of the system by analyzing the system size and the number of doubly occupied sites and compare our findings to DMFT theory. In addition we investigate the dynamical behavior of interacting fermionic mixtures. We prepare a band insulating system and suddenly release it into a homogenous lattice. We detect a symmetric behavior from a ballistic expansion for non-interacting clouds to a strongly suppressed expansion due to the formation of attractively or repulsively bound pairs. This experiment allows us to study transport properties of the Hubbard model. This work was done together with U.Schneider, S. Will, Th. Best, S. Braun, I. Bloch and with theoretical support from T.A. Costi, R.W. Helmes, D. Rasch, A.Rosch, B. Paredes, M. Moreno-Cardoner, T. Kitagawa, E.Demler.

  20. Tight-binding models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices: general formulation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modugno, Michele; Ibañez-Azpiroz, Julen; Pettini, Giulio

    2016-06-01

    Tight-binding models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices can be properly defined by using the concept of maximally localized Wannier functions for composite bands. The basic principles of this approach are reviewed here, along with different applications to lattice potentials with two minima per unit cell, in one and two spatial dimensions. Two independent methods for computing the tight-binding coefficients—one ab initio, based on the maximally localized Wannier functions, the other through analytic expressions in terms of the energy spectrum—are considered. In the one dimensional case, where the tight-binding coefficients can be obtained by designing a specific gauge transformation, we consider both the case of quasi resonance between the two lowest bands, and that between s and p orbitals. In the latter case, the role of the Wannier functions in the derivation of an effective Dirac equation is also reviewed. Then, we consider the case of a two dimensional honeycomb potential, with particular emphasis on the Haldane model, its phase diagram, and the breakdown of the Peierls substitution. Tunable honeycomb lattices, characterized by movable Dirac points, are also considered. Finally, general considerations for dealing with the interaction terms are presented.

  1. Valley-spin polarization in the magneto-optical response of silicene and other similar 2D crystals.

    PubMed

    Tabert, C J; Nicol, E J

    2013-05-10

    We calculate the magneto-optical conductivity and electronic density of states for silicene, the silicon equivalent of graphene, and similar crystals such as germanene. In the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field and electric field gating, we note that four spin- and valley-polarized levels can be seen in the density of states, and transitions between these levels lead to similarly polarized absorption lines in the longitudinal, transverse Hall, and circularly polarized dynamic conductivity. While previous spin and valley polarization predicted for the conductivity is only present in the response to circularly polarized light, we show that distinct spin and valley polarization can also be seen in the longitudinal magneto-optical conductivity at experimentally attainable energies. The frequency of the absorption lines may be tuned by the electric and magnetic field to onset in a range varying from THz to the infrared. This potential to isolate charge carriers of definite spin and valley label may make silicene a promising candidate for spin- and valleytronic devices.

  2. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Bose-Einstein Condensates in a One-Dimensional Optical Lattice: from Superfluidity to Number-Squeezed States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Lu; Tan, Xin-Zhou; Xiong, Hong-Wei; Lu, Bao-Long

    2009-08-01

    We study the phase coherence property of Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by a standing-wave laser field. The lattice depth is determined using a method of Kapitza-Dirac scattering between a condensate and a short pulse lattice potential. Condensates are then adiabatically loaded into the optical lattice. The phase coherence property of the confined condensates is reflected by the interference patterns of the expanded atomic cloud released from the optical lattice. For weak lattice, nearly all of the atoms stay in a superfluid state. However, as the lattice depth is increased, the phase coherence of the whole condensate sample is gradually lost, which confirms that the sub-condensates in each lattice well have evolved into number-squeezed states.

  3. Optical generation of a spatially variant two-dimensional lattice structure by using a phase only spatial light modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manish Joseph, Joby

    2014-08-04

    We propose a simple and straightforward method to generate spatially variant lattice structures by optical interference lithography method. Using this method, it is possible to independently vary the orientation and period of the two-dimensional lattice. The method consists of two steps which are: numerical synthesis of corresponding phase mask by employing a two-dimensional integrated gradient calculations and experimental implementation of synthesized phase mask by making use of a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. As a working example, we provide the experimental fabrication of a spatially variant square lattice structure which has the possibility to guide a Gaussian beam through a 90° bend by photonic crystal self-collimation phenomena. The method is digitally reconfigurable, is completely scalable, and could be extended to other kind of lattices as well.

  4. Cold-collision-shift cancellation and inelastic scattering in a Yb optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, A. D.; Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Quemener, G.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-11-15

    Recently, p-wave cold collisions were shown to dominate the density-dependent shift of the clock transition frequency in a {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clock. Here we demonstrate that by operating such a system at the proper excitation fraction, the cold-collision shift is canceled below the 5x10{sup -18} fractional frequency level. We report inelastic two-body loss rates for {sup 3} P{sub 0} -{sup 3} P{sub 0} and {sup 1} S{sub 0} -{sup 3} P{sub 0} scattering. We also measure interaction shifts in an unpolarized atomic sample. Collision measurements for this spin-1/2 {sup 171}Yb system are relevant for high-performance optical clocks as well as strongly interacting systems for quantum information and quantum simulation applications.

  5. 2D silicon-based surface-normal vertical cavity photonic crystal waveguide array for high-density optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, JaeHyun; Subbaraman, Harish; Zhu, Liang; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Tutuc, Emanuel; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present the design guidelines, fabrication challenges and device evaluation results of a surface-normal photonic crystal waveguide array for high-density optical interconnects. We utilize the slow light effect of photonic crystals to increase the effective interaction length between photons and medium, which in turn can be used to decrease the physical length and make compact devices. The effect of the structural parameters variations on the guided mode are studied in order to provide a guideline for fabrication. Photonic crystal waveguides are vertically implemented in a silicon-on insulator substrate. Our structure possesses advantages such as universal design, CMOS compatibility, and simple fabrication process, suitable for high dense on-chip applications. Transmission results show increase of power near 1.67 μm wavelength, which agrees with our simulation results.

  6. ROXA: a new multi-frequency selected large sample of blazars with SDSS and 2dF optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Giommi, Paolo; Turriziani, Sara

    2007-07-12

    Blazars are a small fraction of the overall AGN population but contribute in a fundamental way to the extragalactic cosmic backgrounds in the hard X-ray and {gamma}-ray bands and are the largest contaminant of CMB fluctuation maps. So far the number of known blazars is of the order of several hundreds, but the forthcoming AGILE, GLAST and Planck space observatories will detect a very large number of new objects of this type. We present the Radio - Optical - X-ray catalog (ROXA), a list of 816 objects among which are 510 confirmed blazars. This is useful for the planning of future identification work using SWIFT, AGILE, GLAST and Planck data.

  7. Design and testing of space-domain minimum average correlation energy (SMACE) filters for 2-D acousto-optic correlators

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, J.M.; Vijaya Kumar, B.V.K. ); Molley, P.A.; Stalker, K.T.; Kast, B.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional Acousto-optic (AO) correlators differ from the frequency plane correlators in that multiplying, shifting, and adding, rather than Fourier transforming are used to obtain the correlations. Thus, many of the available composite filter design techniques are not aimed at designing filters for use in AO correlators since they yield frequency-domain functions. In this paper, a method is introduced for designing filter impulse responses of arbitrary extents for implementation on AO correlators. These filters are designed to yield sharp correlation peaks. Simulation results are included to illustrate the viability of the proposed approach. Also included are some initial results from the first successful use of grey-level composite filters on an AO correlator. 12 refs,. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Semi-automated 2D Bruch's membrane shape analysis in papilledema using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jui-Kai; Sibony, Patrick A.; Kardon, Randy H.; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the Bruch's membrane (BM) and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), visualized on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), is deformed anteriorly towards the vitreous in patients with intracranial hypertension and papilledema. The BM/RPE shape has been quantified using a statistical-shape-model approach; however, to date, the approach has involved the tedious and time-consuming manual placement of landmarks and correspondingly, only the shape (and shape changes) of a limited number of patients has been studied. In this work, we first present a semi-automated approach for the extraction of 20 landmarks along the BM from an optic-nerve-head (ONH) centered OCT slice from each patient. In the approach, after the manual placement of the two Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) points, the remaining 18 landmarks are automatically determined using a graph-based segmentation approach. We apply the approach to the OCT scans of 116 patients (at baseline) enrolled in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial and generate a statistical shape model using principal components analysis. Using the resulting shape model, the coefficient (shape measure) corresponding to the second principal component (eigenvector) for each set of landmarks indicates the degree of the BM/RPE is oriented away from the vitreous. Using a subset of 20 patients, we compare the shape measure computed using this semi-automated approach with the resulting shape measure when (1) all landmarks are specified manually (Experiment I); and (2) a different expert specifies the two BMO points (Experiment II). In each case, a correlation coefficient >= 0.99 is obtained.

  9. Using superlattice potentials to probe long-range magnetic correlations in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Kim G. L.; Andersen, Brian M.; Bruun, Georg M.; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2015-12-01

    We previously proposed [K. G. L. Pedersen, B. M. Andersen, G. M. Bruun, O. F. Syljuåsen, and A. S. Sørensen, Phys. Rev. A 84, 041603 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.041603] a method to utilize a temporally dependent superlattice potential to mediate spin-selective transport and thereby probe long- and short-range magnetic correlations in optical lattices. Specifically, this can be used for detecting antiferromagnetic ordering in repulsive fermionic optical lattice systems, but more generally it can serve as a means of directly probing correlations among the atoms by measuring the mean value of an observable, the number of double occupied sites. Here we provide a detailed investigation of the physical processes that limit the effectiveness of this "conveyer belt method." Furthermore, we propose a simple way to improve the procedure, resulting in an essentially perfect (error-free) probing of the magnetic correlations. These results shows that suitably constructed superlattices constitute a promising way of manipulating atoms of different spin species as well as probing their interactions.

  10. Stability of emergent kinetics in optical lattices with artificial spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mengsu; Scarola, V. W.

    2016-10-01

    Artificial spin-orbit coupling in optical lattices can be engineered to tune band structure into extreme regimes where the single-particle band flattens leaving only interparticle interactions to define many-body states of matter. Lin et al. [F. Lin, C. Zhang, and V. W. Scarola, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 110404 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.110404] showed that under such conditions interactions lead to a Wigner crystal of fermionic atoms under approximate conditions: no bandwidth or band mixing. The excitations were shown to possess emergent kinetics with fractionalized charge derived entirely from interactions. In this work we use numerical exact diagonalization to study a more realistic model with nonzero bandwidth and band mixing. We map out the stability phase diagram of the Wigner crystal. We find that emergent properties of the Wigner crystal excitations remain stable for realistic experimental parameters. Our results validate the approximations made by Lin et al. and define parameter regimes where strong interaction effects generate emergent kinetics in optical lattices.

  11. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-05: Preliminary Results On a 2D Dosimetry System Based On the Optically Stimulated Luminescence of Al2O3

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M; Eller, S; Yukihara, E; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; Akselrod, M; Hanson, O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a precise 2D dose mapping technique based on the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films for medical applications. Methods: A 2D laser scanning reader was developed using fast F{sup +}-center (lifetime of <7 ns) and slow F-center (lifetime of 35 ms) OSL emission from newly developed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films (Landauer Inc.). An algorithm was developed to correct images for both material and system properties. Since greater contribution of the F??-center emission in the recorded signal increases the readout efficiency and robustness of image corrections, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C,Mg film samples are being investigated in addition to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C samples. Preliminary investigations include exposure of the films to a 6 MV photon beam at 10 cm depth in solid water phantom with an SSD of 100 cm, using a 10 cm × 10 cm flat field or a 4 cm × 4 cm field with a 60° wedge filter. Kodak EDR2 radiographic film and EBT2 Gafchromic film were also exposed for comparison. Results: The results indicate that the algorithm is able to correct images and calculate 2D dose. For the wedge field irradiation, the calculated dose at the center of the field was 0.9 Gy for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 0.87 Gy for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C,Mg, whereas, the delivered dose was 0.95 Gy. A good qualitative agreement of the dose profiles was obtained between the OSL films and EDR2 and EBT2 films. Laboratory tests using a beta source suggest that a large dynamic range (10{sup −2}−10{sup 2} Gy) can be achieved using this technique. Conclusion: A 2D dosimetry system and an in-house image correction algorithm were developed for 2D film dosimetry in medical applications. The system is in the preliminary stage of development, but the data demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. This work was supported by Landauer, Inc.

  12. Polaron-induced lattice distortion of (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots by optically excited carriers.

    PubMed

    Tiemeyer, S; Bombeck, M; Göhring, H; Paulus, M; Sternemann, C; Nase, J; Wirkert, F J; Möller, J; Büning, T; Seeck, O H; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D; Bayer, M; Tolan, M

    2016-10-21

    We report on a high resolution x-ray diffraction study unveiling the effect of carriers optically injected into (In,Ga)As quantum dots on the surrounding GaAs crystal matrix. We find a tetragonal lattice expansion with enhanced elongation along the [001] crystal axis that is superimposed on an isotropic lattice extension. The isotropic contribution arises from excitation induced lattice heating as confirmed by temperature dependent reference studies. The tetragonal expansion on the femtometer scale is tentatively attributed to polaron formation by carriers trapped in the quantum dots.

  13. Polaron-induced lattice distortion of (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots by optically excited carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemeyer, S.; Bombeck, M.; Göhring, H.; Paulus, M.; Sternemann, C.; Nase, J.; Wirkert, F. J.; Möller, J.; Büning, T.; Seeck, O. H.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; Bayer, M.; Tolan, M.

    2016-10-01

    We report on a high resolution x-ray diffraction study unveiling the effect of carriers optically injected into (In,Ga)As quantum dots on the surrounding GaAs crystal matrix. We find a tetragonal lattice expansion with enhanced elongation along the [001] crystal axis that is superimposed on an isotropic lattice extension. The isotropic contribution arises from excitation induced lattice heating as confirmed by temperature dependent reference studies. The tetragonal expansion on the femtometer scale is tentatively attributed to polaron formation by carriers trapped in the quantum dots.

  14. Polaron-induced lattice distortion of (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots by optically excited carriers.

    PubMed

    Tiemeyer, S; Bombeck, M; Göhring, H; Paulus, M; Sternemann, C; Nase, J; Wirkert, F J; Möller, J; Büning, T; Seeck, O H; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D; Bayer, M; Tolan, M

    2016-10-21

    We report on a high resolution x-ray diffraction study unveiling the effect of carriers optically injected into (In,Ga)As quantum dots on the surrounding GaAs crystal matrix. We find a tetragonal lattice expansion with enhanced elongation along the [001] crystal axis that is superimposed on an isotropic lattice extension. The isotropic contribution arises from excitation induced lattice heating as confirmed by temperature dependent reference studies. The tetragonal expansion on the femtometer scale is tentatively attributed to polaron formation by carriers trapped in the quantum dots. PMID:27622774

  15. Optically transparent thin-film transistors based on 2D multilayer MoS2 and indium zinc oxide electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Junyeon; Hong, Young Ki; Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Park, Yu Jin; Yoo, Byungwook; Kim, Jiwan; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Oh, Min Suk; Kim, Sunkook

    2015-01-01

    We report on optically transparent thin film transistors (TFTs) fabricated using multilayered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as the active channel, indium tin oxide (ITO) for the back-gated electrode and indium zinc oxide (IZO) for the source/drain electrodes, respectively, which showed more than 81% transmittance in the visible wavelength. In spite of a relatively large Schottky barrier between MoS2 and IZO, the n-type behavior with a field-effect mobility (μeff) of 1.4 cm2 V-1 s-1 was observed in as-fabricated transparent MoS2 TFT. In order to enhance the performances of transparent MoS2 TFTs, a picosecond pulsed laser was selectively irradiated onto the contact region of the IZO electrodes. Following laser annealing, μeff increased to 4.5 cm2 V-1 s-1, and the on-off current ratio (Ion/Ioff) increased to 104, which were attributed to the reduction of the contact resistance between MoS2 and IZO.

  16. Optical Bloch oscillations of an Airy beam in a photonic lattice with a linear transverse index gradient.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fajun; Li, Baoran; Wang, Meirong; Zhu, Weiren; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2014-09-22

    We theoretically report the existence of optical Bloch oscillations (BO) of an Airy beam in a one-dimensional optically induced photonic lattice with a linear transverse index gradient. The Airy beam experiencing optical BO shows a more robust non-diffracting feature than its counterparts in free space or in a uniform photonic lattice. Interestingly, a periodical recurrence of Airy shape accompanied with constant alternation of its acceleration direction is also found during the BO. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the period and amplitude of BO of an Airy beam can be readily controlled over a wide range by varying the index gradient and/or the lattice period. Exploiting these features, we propose a scheme to rout an Airy beam to a predefined output channel without losing its characteristics by longitudinally modulating the transverse index gradient.

  17. Frequency ratio measurement of 171Yb and 87Sr optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Daisuke; Yasuda, Masami; Inaba, Hajime; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Tanabe, Takehiko; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2014-04-01

    The frequency ratio of the (1)S(0)(F = 1/2)-(3)P(0)(F = 1/2) clock transition in (171)Yb and the (1)S(0)(F = 9/2)-(3)P(0)(F = 9/2) clock transition in (87)Sr is measured by an optical-optical direct frequency link between two optical lattice clocks. We determined the ratio (ν(Yb)/ν(Sr)) to be 1.207 507 039 343 341 2(17) fractional standard uncertainty of 1.4 × 10(-15) [corrected]. The measurement uncertainty of the frequency ratio is smaller than that obtained from absolute frequency measurements using the International Atomic Time (TAI) link. The measured ratio agrees well with that derived from the absolute frequency measurement results obtained at NIST and JILA, Boulder, CO using their Cs-fountain clock. Our measurement enables the first international comparison of the frequency ratios of optical clocks. The measured frequency ratio will be reported to the International Committee for Weights and Measures for a discussion related to the redefinition of the second.

  18. Frequency ratio measurement of 171Yb and 87Sr optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Daisuke; Yasuda, Masami; Inaba, Hajime; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Tanabe, Takehiko; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2014-04-01

    The frequency ratio of the (1)S(0)(F = 1/2)-(3)P(0)(F = 1/2) clock transition in (171)Yb and the (1)S(0)(F = 9/2)-(3)P(0)(F = 9/2) clock transition in (87)Sr is measured by an optical-optical direct frequency link between two optical lattice clocks. We determined the ratio (ν(Yb)/ν(Sr)) to be 1.207 507 039 343 341 2(17) fractional standard uncertainty of 1.4 × 10(-15) [corrected]. The measurement uncertainty of the frequency ratio is smaller than that obtained from absolute frequency measurements using the International Atomic Time (TAI) link. The measured ratio agrees well with that derived from the absolute frequency measurement results obtained at NIST and JILA, Boulder, CO using their Cs-fountain clock. Our measurement enables the first international comparison of the frequency ratios of optical clocks. The measured frequency ratio will be reported to the International Committee for Weights and Measures for a discussion related to the redefinition of the second. PMID:24718165

  19. Preliminary clinical results: an analyzing tool for 2D optical imaging in detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi Aizudin Bin Radin Nasirudin, Radin; Meier, Reinhard; Ahari, Carmen; Sievert, Matti; Fiebich, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; No"l, Peter B.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging (OI) is a relatively new method in detecting active inflammation of hand joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). With the high number of people affected by this disease especially in western countries, the availability of OI as an early diagnostic imaging method is clinically highly relevant. In this paper, we present a newly in-house developed OI analyzing tool and a clinical evaluation study. Our analyzing tool extends the capability of existing OI tools. We include many features in the tool, such as region-based image analysis, hyper perfusion curve analysis, and multi-modality image fusion to aid clinicians in localizing and determining the intensity of inflammation in joints. Additionally, image data management options, such as the full integration of PACS/RIS, are included. In our clinical study we demonstrate how OI facilitates the detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. The preliminary clinical results indicate a sensitivity of 43.5%, a specificity of 80.3%, an accuracy of 65.7%, a positive predictive value of 76.6%, and a negative predictive value of 64.9% in relation to clinical results from MRI. The accuracy of inflammation detection serves as evidence to the potential of OI as a useful imaging modality for early detection of active inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. With our in-house developed tool we extend the usefulness of OI imaging in the clinical arena. Overall, we show that OI is a fast, inexpensive, non-invasive and nonionizing yet highly sensitive and accurate imaging modality.-

  20. An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10(-18) level.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B J; Nicholson, T L; Williams, J R; Campbell, S L; Bishof, M; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Bromley, S L; Ye, J

    2014-02-01

    Progress in atomic, optical and quantum science has led to rapid improvements in atomic clocks. At the same time, atomic clock research has helped to advance the frontiers of science, affecting both fundamental and applied research. The ability to control quantum states of individual atoms and photons is central to quantum information science and precision measurement, and optical clocks based on single ions have achieved the lowest systematic uncertainty of any frequency standard. Although many-atom lattice clocks have shown advantages in measurement precision over trapped-ion clocks, their accuracy has remained 16 times worse. Here we demonstrate a many-atom system that achieves an accuracy of 6.4 × 10(-18), which is not only better than a single-ion-based clock, but also reduces the required measurement time by two orders of magnitude. By systematically evaluating all known sources of uncertainty, including in situ monitoring of the blackbody radiation environment, we improve the accuracy of optical lattice clocks by a factor of 22. This single clock has simultaneously achieved the best known performance in the key characteristics necessary for consideration as a primary standard-stability and accuracy. More stable and accurate atomic clocks will benefit a wide range of fields, such as the realization and distribution of SI units, the search for time variation of fundamental constants, clock-based geodesy and other precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature. This work also connects to the development of quantum sensors and many-body quantum state engineering (such as spin squeezing) to advance measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit.

  1. An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10(-18) level.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B J; Nicholson, T L; Williams, J R; Campbell, S L; Bishof, M; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Bromley, S L; Ye, J

    2014-02-01

    Progress in atomic, optical and quantum science has led to rapid improvements in atomic clocks. At the same time, atomic clock research has helped to advance the frontiers of science, affecting both fundamental and applied research. The ability to control quantum states of individual atoms and photons is central to quantum information science and precision measurement, and optical clocks based on single ions have achieved the lowest systematic uncertainty of any frequency standard. Although many-atom lattice clocks have shown advantages in measurement precision over trapped-ion clocks, their accuracy has remained 16 times worse. Here we demonstrate a many-atom system that achieves an accuracy of 6.4 × 10(-18), which is not only better than a single-ion-based clock, but also reduces the required measurement time by two orders of magnitude. By systematically evaluating all known sources of uncertainty, including in situ monitoring of the blackbody radiation environment, we improve the accuracy of optical lattice clocks by a factor of 22. This single clock has simultaneously achieved the best known performance in the key characteristics necessary for consideration as a primary standard-stability and accuracy. More stable and accurate atomic clocks will benefit a wide range of fields, such as the realization and distribution of SI units, the search for time variation of fundamental constants, clock-based geodesy and other precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature. This work also connects to the development of quantum sensors and many-body quantum state engineering (such as spin squeezing) to advance measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit. PMID:24463513

  2. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  3. From optical lattice clocks to the measurement of forces in the Casimir regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Peter; Lemonde, Pierre; Bize, Sebastien; Landragin, Arnaud; Clairon, Andre; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2007-06-15

    We describe an experiment based on atoms trapped close to a macroscopic surface, to study the interactions between the atoms and the surface at very small separations (0.6-10 {mu}m). In this range the dominant potential is the QED interaction (Casimir-Polder and van der Waals) between the surface and the atom. Additionally, several theoretical models suggest the possibility of Yukawa-type potentials with sub-millimeter range, arising from new physics related to gravity. The proposed setup is very similar to neutral atom optical lattice clocks, but with the atoms trapped in lattice sites close to the reflecting mirror. A sequence of pulses of the probe laser at different frequencies is then used to create an interferometer with a coherent superposition between atomic states at different distances from the mirror (in different lattice sites). Assuming atom interferometry state-of-the-art measurement of the phase difference and a duration of the superposition of about 0.1 s, we expect to be able to measure the potential difference between separated states with an uncertainty of {approx_equal}10{sup -4} Hz. An analysis of systematic effects for different atoms and surfaces indicates no fundamentally limiting effect at the same level of uncertainty, but does influence the choice of atom and surface material. Based on those estimates, we expect that such an experiment would improve the best existing measurements of the atom-wall QED interaction by {>=} 2 orders of magnitude, while gaining up to four orders of magnitude on the best present limits on new interactions in the range between 100 nm and 100 {mu}m.

  4. Nearly-one-dimensional self-attractive Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, L.; Toigo, F.; Cetoli, A.; Malomed, B. A.

    2007-03-15

    Within the framework of a mean-field description, we investigate atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, with attraction between atoms, under the action of a strong transverse confinement and periodic [optical-lattice (OL)] axial potential. Using a combination of the variational approximation, one-dimensional (1D) nonpolynomial Schroedinger equation, and direct numerical solutions of the underlying 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we show that the ground state of the condensate is a soliton belonging to the semi-infinite band gap of the periodic potential. The soliton may be confined to a single cell of the lattice or extended to several cells, depending on the effective self-attraction strength g (which is proportional to the number of atoms bound in the soliton) and depth of the potential, V{sub 0}, the increase of V{sub 0} leading to strong compression of the soliton. We demonstrate that the OL is an effective tool to control the soliton's shape. It is found that, due to the 3D character of the underlying setting, the ground-state soliton collapses at a critical value of the strength, g=g{sub c}, which gradually decreases with the increase of V{sub 0}; under typical experimental conditions, the corresponding maximum number of {sup 7}Li atoms in the soliton, N{sub max}, ranges between 8000 and 4000. Examples of stable multipeaked solitons are also found in the first finite band gap of the lattice spectrum. The respective critical value g{sub c} again slowly decreases with the increase of V{sub 0}, corresponding to N{sub max}{approx_equal}5000.

  5. Non-destructive evaluation of fiber-reinforced composites with a fast 2D fiber-optic laser-ultrasound scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; Shtokolov, Alex; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Laser ultrasonic (LU) inspection represents an attractive, non-contact method to evaluate composite materials. Current non-contact systems, however, have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact piezoelectric detection. They are also difficult to adjust, very expensive, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Here, we demonstrate that most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe scheme. In particular, a new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of an all-optical LU pump-probe system for high speed non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) of aircraft composites. The performance of the LU system is demonstrated on a composite sample typically used in the aircraft industry. Wide-band ultrasound probe signals are generated directly at the sample surface with a pulsed diode-pumped laser delivering nanosecond laser pulses at a 1 kHz repetition rate with a pulse energy of 2 mJ. A balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is employed to detect pressure signals in a 1-10 MHz frequency range at the same point (an 8 μm focal spot) on the composite surface. A fast (up to 100 mm/s) 2D translation system is employed to move the sample during scanning and produce a complete B-scan consisting of one thousand A-scans in less than a second. The sensitivity of this system, in terms of the noise equivalent pressure, is found to be only 10 dB above the Nyquist thermal noise limit. To our knowledge, this is the best reported sensitivity for a non-contact ultrasonic detector of this dimension.

  6. Inhomogeneous BCS-BEC crossover for trapped cold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaricci, A.; Privitera, A.; Capone, M.

    2014-05-01

    The BCS-BEC (Bose-Einstein condensation) crossover in a lattice is a powerful paradigm that describes how a superconductor deviates from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer physics as the attractive interaction increases. Optical lattices loaded with binary mixtures of cold atoms allow one to access this phenomenon experimentally in a clean and controlled way. We show that, however, the possibility to study this phenomenon in actual cold-atoms experiments is limited by the effect of the trapping potential. Real-space dynamical mean-field theory calculations show indeed that interactions and the confining potential conspire to pack the fermions in the center of the trap, which approaches a band insulator when the attraction becomes sizeable. Interestingly, the energy gap is spatially more homogeneous than the superfluid condensate order parameter. We show how this physics reflects in several observables, and we propose an alternative strategy to disentangle the effect of the harmonic potential and measure the intrinsic properties resulting from the interaction strength.

  7. Robust site-resolvable quantum gates in an optical lattice via inhomogeneous control.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Montano, E; Deutsch, I H; Jessen, P S

    2013-01-01

    The power of optical lattices for quantum simulation and computation is greatly enhanced when atoms at individual lattice sites can be accessed for measurement and control. Experiments routinely use high-resolution microscopy to obtain site-resolved images in real time, and site-resolved spin flips have been implemented using microwaves resonant with frequency-shifted target atoms in focused light fields. Here we show that methods adapted from inhomogeneous control can greatly increase the performance of such resonance addressing, allowing the targeting of arbitrary single-qubit quantum gates on selected sites with minimal cross-talk to neighbouring sites and significant robustness against uncertainty in the atom position. We further demonstrate the simultaneous implementation of different gates at adjacent sites with a single global microwave pulse. Coherence is verified through two-pulse experiments, and the average gate fidelity is measured to be 95±3%. Our approach may be useful in other contexts such as ion traps and nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond. PMID:23774119

  8. Bloch oscillations and quench dynamics of interacting bosons in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, K. W.; Jiang, L.; Tiesinga, E.; Johnson, P. R.

    2014-02-01

    We study the dynamics of interacting superfluid bosons in a one-dimensional vertical optical lattice after a sudden increase of the lattice potential depth. We show that this system can be exploited to investigate the effects of strong interactions on Bloch oscillations. We perform theoretical modeling of this system, identify experimental challenges, and explore a regime of Bloch oscillations characterized by interaction-induced matter-wave collapse and revivals which modify the Bloch oscillations dynamics. In addition, we study three dephasing mechanisms: finite value of tunneling, effective three-body interactions, and a background harmonic potential. We also find that the center-of-mass motion in the presence of finite tunneling goes through collapse and revivals, giving an example of quantum transport where interaction-induced revivals are important. We quantify the effects of residual harmonic trapping on the momentum distribution dynamics and show the occurrence of an interaction-modified temporal Talbot effect. Finally, we analyze the prospects and challenges of exploiting Bloch oscillations of cold atoms in the strongly interacting regime for precision measurement of the gravitational acceleration g.

  9. Gauge-invariant implementation of the Abelian-Higgs model on optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Meurice, Y.; Tsai, S.-W.; Unmuth-Yockey, J.; Zhang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    We present a gauge-invariant effective action for the Abelian-Higgs model (scalar electrodynamics) with a chemical potential μ on a (1 +1 )-dimensional lattice. This formulation provides an expansion in the hopping parameter κ which we test with Monte Carlo simulations for a broad range of the inverse gauge coupling βp l=1 /g2 and small values of the scalar self-coupling λ . In the opposite limit of infinitely large λ , the partition function can be written as a traced product of local tensors which allows us to write exact blocking formulas. Gauss's law is automatically satisfied and the introduction of μ has consequences only if we have an external electric field, g2=0 or an explicit gauge symmetry breaking. The time-continuum limit of the blocked transfer matrix can be obtained numerically and, for g2=0 and a spin-1 truncation, the small volume energy spectrum is identical to the low energy spectrum of a two-species Bose-Hubbard model in the limit of large on-site repulsion. We extend this procedure for finite βp l and derive a spin-1 approximation of the Hamiltonian. It involves new terms corresponding to transitions among the two species in the Bose-Hubbard model. We propose an optical lattice implementation involving a ladder structure.

  10. Spatially localized structures and oscillons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charukhchyan, M. V.; Sedov, E. S.; Arakelian, S. M.; Alodjants, A. P.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the problem of formation of small-amplitude spatially localized oscillatory structures for atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined in two- and three-dimensional optical lattices, respectively. Our approach is based on applying the regions with different signs of atomic effective masses where an atomic system exhibits effective hyperbolic dispersion within the first Brillouin zone. By using the kp method we have demonstrated mapping of the initial Gross-Pitaevskii equation on nonlinear Klein-Gordon and/or Ginzburg-Landau-Higgs equations, which is inherent in matter fields within ϕ4-field theories. Formation of breatherlike oscillating localized states—atomic oscillons—as well as kink-shaped states have been predicted in this case. Apart from classical field theories atomic field oscillons occurring in finite lattice structures possess a critical number of particles for their formation. The obtained results pave the way to simulating some analogues of fundamental cosmological processes occurring during our Universe's evolution and to modeling nonlinear hyperbolic metamaterials with condensed matter (atomic) systems.

  11. Quantum anomalous Hall states in the p-orbital honeycomb optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Machi; Hung Hsianghsuan; Wu Congjun; Zhang Chuanwei

    2011-02-15

    We study the quantum anomalous Hall states in the p-orbital bands of the honeycomb optical lattices loaded with single-component fermions. Such an effect has not yet been realized in both condensed-matter and cold-atom systems. By applying the available experimental techniques to rotate each lattice site around its own center, the band structures become topologically nontrivial. At a certain rotation angular velocity {Omega}, a flat band structure appears with localized eigenstates carrying chiral current moments. By imposing the soft confining potential, the density profile exhibits a wedding-cake-shaped distribution with insulating plateaus at commensurate fillings. Moreover, the inhomogeneous confining potential induces dissipationless circulation currents, the magnitudes and chiralities of which vary with the distance from the trap center. In the insulating regions, the Hall conductances are quantized, and in the metallic regions, the directions and magnitudes of chiral currents can not be described by the usual local-density approximation. The quantum anomalous Hall effects are robust at temperature scales that are small compared to band gaps, which increase the feasibility of experimental realizations.

  12. First-principles study of the electronic, optical properties and lattice dynamics of tantalum oxynitride.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Fan, Weiliu; Li, Yanlu; Sun, Honggang; Cheng, Xiufeng; Zhao, Xian; Jiang, Minhua

    2010-08-01

    First-principles calculations of the electronic, optical properties and lattice dynamics of tantalum oxynitride are performed with the density functional theory plane-wave pseudopotential method. The analysis of the electronic structure shows a covalent nature in Ta-N bonds and Ta-O bonds. The hybridization of anion 2p and Ta 5d states results in enhanced dispersion of the valence band, raising the top of the valence band and leading to the visible-light response in TaON. It has a high dielectric constant, and the anisotropy is displayed obviously in the lower energy region. Our calculation indicated that TaON has excellent dielectric properties along [010] direction. Various optical properties, including the reflectivity, absorption coefficient, refractive index, and the energy-loss spectrum are derived from the complex dielectric function. We also present phonon dispersion relation, zone-center optical mode frequency, density of phonon states, and some thermodynamic properties. The experimental IR modes (B(u) at 808 cm(-1) and A(u) at 863 cm(-1)) are reproduced well and assigned to a combination of stretching and bending vibrations for the Ta-N bond and Ta-O bond. The thermodynamic properties of TaON, such as heat capacity and Debye temperature, which were important parameters for the measurement of crystal physical properties, were first given for reference. Our investigations provide useful information for the potential application of this material.

  13. Strong Local-Field Effect on the Dynamics of a Dilute Atomic Gas Irradiated by Two Counterpropagating Optical Fields: Beyond Standard Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jiang; Dong Guangjiong; Zhang Weiping; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2011-05-27

    We study a recent experiment [K. Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 250401 (2008)] on diffracting a Bose-Einstein condensate by two counterpropagating optical fields. Including the local-field effect, we explain the asymmetric momentum distribution and self-imaging of the Bose-Einstein condensate self-consistently. Moreover, we find that the two counterpropagating optical fields could not produce a perfect optical lattice, which is actually deformed by the local-field effect. Our work implies that the local-field effect could be essential for getting a better quantitative analysis of other optical lattice experiments. In particular, the intensity imbalance of the two optical fields could act as a new means to tailor both cold atom dynamics and light propagation.

  14. Role of transverse excitations in the instability of Bose-Einstein condensates moving in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Modugno, M.; Tozzo, C.; Dalfovo, F.

    2004-10-01

    The occurrence of energetic and dynamical instabilities in a Bose-Einstein condensate moving in a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice is analyzed by means of the Gross-Pitaevskii theory. Results of full 3D calculations are compared with those of an effective 1D model, the nonpolynomial Schroedinger equation, pointing out the role played by transverse degrees of freedom. The instability thresholds are shown to be scarcely affected by transverse excitations, so that they can be accurately predicted by effective 1D models. Conversely, transverse excitations turn out to be important in characterizing the stability diagram and the occurrence of a complex radial dynamics above the threshold for dynamical instability. This analysis provides a realistic framework to discuss the dissipative dynamics observed in recent experiments.

  15. Bethe ansatz density-functional theory of ultracold repulsive fermions in one-dimensional optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Xianlong, Gao; Polini, Marco; Tosi, M. P.; Campo, Vivaldo L. Jr.; Capelle, Klaus; Rigol, Marcos

    2006-04-15

    We present an extensive numerical study of the ground-state properties of confined repulsively interacting fermions in one-dimensional optical lattices. Detailed predictions for the atom-density profiles are obtained from parallel Kohn-Sham density-functional calculations and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The density-functional calculations employ a Bethe ansatz based local-density approximation for the correlation energy that accounts for Luttinger-liquid and Mott-insulator physics. Semianalytical and fully numerical formulations of this approximation are compared with each other and with a cruder Thomas-Fermi-type local-density approximation for the total energy. Precise quantum Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the reliability of the various local-density approximations, and in conjunction with these provide a detailed microscopic picture of the consequences of the interplay between particle-particle interactions and confinement in one-dimensional systems of strongly correlated fermions.

  16. Cavity quantum optomechanics of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice: Normal-mode splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2009-10-15

    We consider the dynamics of a movable mirror (cantilever) of a cavity coupled through radiation pressure to the light scattered from ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Scattering from different atomic quantum states creates different quantum states of the scattered light, which can be distinguished by measurements of the displacement spectrum of the cantilever. We show that for large pump intensities the steady-state displacement of the cantilever shows bistable behavior. Due to atomic back action, the displacement spectrum of the cantilever is modified and depends on the position of the condensate in the Brillouin zone. We further analyze the occurrence of splitting of the normal mode into three modes due to mixing of the mechanical motion with the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the condensate with finite atomic two-body interaction.

  17. Simulation of the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Yang, Xu-Chen

    2016-05-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to simulate the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect with ultra-cold bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We first show that the required model Hamiltonian of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain with an effective magnetic field and tunable parameters can be realized in this system. For dynamical response to ramping the external fields, the quantized plateaus emerge in the Berry curvature of the interacting atomic spin chain as a function of the effective spin-exchange interaction. The quantization of this response in the parameter space with the interaction-induced topological transition characterizes the many-body dynamical quantum Hall effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this phenomenon can be observed in practical cold atom experiments with numerical simulations.

  18. Vortices of a rotating two-component dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Xue; Dong, Biao; Chen, Guang-Ping; Han, Wei; Zhang, Shou-Gang; Shi, Yu-Ren; Zhang, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    We consider a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate, which consists of both dipolar and scalar bosonic atoms, in a confinement that is composed of a harmonic oscillator and an underlying optical lattice set rotation. When the dipoles are polarized along the symmetry axis of the harmonic potential, the ground-state density distributions of such a system are investigated as a function of the relative strength between the dipolar and contact interactions, and of the rotation frequency. Our results show that the number of vortices and its related vortex structures of such a system depend strongly on such system parameters. The special two-component system considered here opens up alternate ways for exploring the rich physics of dipolar quantum gases.

  19. Magnetic phase transitions of spin-1 ultracold bosons in a cubic optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang; He, Liang; Hofstetter, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We investigate strongly correlated spin-1 ultracold bosons with antiferromagnetic interactions in a cubic optical lattice, based on bosonic dynamical mean-field theory. Rich phase diagrams of the system are mapped out at both zero and finite temperature, and in particular the existence of a spin-singlet condensate is established. Interestingly, at finite temperature, we find that the superfluid can be heated into a Mott insulator with even (odd) filling via a first- (second-) order phase transition, analogous to the Pomeranchuk effect in 3He. Moreover, for typical experimental setups, we estimate the critical temperature (entropy) for different ordered phases and our results suggest that direct experimental observation of these phases is promising.

  20. Magnetic phases of mass- and population-imbalanced ultracold fermionic mixtures in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, Andrii; Snoek, Michiel; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-05-01

    We study magnetic phases of two-component mixtures of ultracold fermions with repulsive interactions in optical lattices in the presence of both hopping and population imbalance by means of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). It is shown that these mixtures can have easy-axis antiferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, charge-density wave, and canted-antiferromagnetic order or be unordered depending on parameters of the system. We study the resulting phase diagram in detail and investigate the stability of the different phases with respect to thermal fluctuations. We also perform a quantitative analysis for a gas confined in a harmonic trap, both within the local density approximation and using a full real-space generalization of DMFT.