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Sample records for 2d reflection seismic

  1. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made

  2. Geomorphological relationships through the use of 2-D seismic reflection data, Lidar, and aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesce, Meghan Elizabeth

    Barrier Islands are crucial in protecting coastal environments. This study focuses on Dauphin Island, Alabama, located within the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Barrier Island complex. It is one of many islands serving as natural protection for NGOM ecosystems and coastal cities. The NGOM barrier islands formed at 4 kya in response to a decrease in rate of sea level rise. The morphology of these islands changes with hurricanes, anthropogenic activity, and tidal and wave action. This study focuses on ancient incised valleys and and the impact on island morphology on hurricane breaches. Using high frequency 2-D seismic reflection data four horizons, including the present seafloor, were interpreted. Subaerial portions of Dauphin Island were imaged using Lidar data and aerial imagery over a ten-year time span, as well as historical maps. Historical shorelines of Dauphin Island were extracted from aerial imagery and historical maps, and were compared to the location of incised valleys seen within the 2-D seismic reflection data. Erosion and deposition volumes of Dauphin Island from 1998 to 2010 (the time span covering hurricanes Ivan and Katrina) in the vicinity of Katrina Cut and Pelican Island were quantified using Lidar data. For the time period prior to Hurricane Ivan an erosional volume of 46,382,552 m3 and depositional volume of 16,113.6 m3 were quantified from Lidar data. The effects of Hurricane Ivan produced a total erosion volume of 4,076,041.5 m3. The erosional and depositional volumes of Katrina Cut being were 7,562,068.5 m3 and 510,936.7 m3, respectively. More volume change was found within Pelican Pass. For the period between hurricanes Ivan and Katrina the erosion volume was 595,713.8 m3. This was mostly located within Katrina Cut. Total deposition for the same period, including in Pelican Pass, was 15,353,961 m3. Hurricane breaches were compared to ancient incised valleys seen within the 2-D seismic reflection results. Breaches from hurricanes from 1849

  3. Terrace Zone Structure in the Chicxulub Impact Crater Based on 2-D Seismic Reflection Profiles: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Gorney, D. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Barton, P. J.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Melosh, H. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Surendra, A. T.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    Terrace zones, central peaks, and flat floors characterize complex craters like the Chicxulub impact crater located near the northeast coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The subsurface crater structure was studied using seismic reflection surveying in Jan/Feb 2005 by the R/V Maurice Ewing. We present 2-D seismic profiles including constant radius, regional, and grid profiles encompassing the 195 km width of the crater. These diversely oriented lines clearly show the terrace zones and aid in the search for crater ejecta as we investigate the formation of the crater including the incidence angle and direction of the extraterrestrial object that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 65 million years ago (K-T boundary). Terrace zones form in complex craters after the modification stage as a result of the gravitational collapse of overextended sediment back into the crater cavity. The terrace zone is clearly imaged on seismic profiles confirming the complex structure of the Chixculub crater. Recent work on reprocessed 1996 profiles found different sizes and spacing of the terraces and concluded that the variations in radial structure are a result of an oblique impact. A SW-NE profile from this study was the only line to show a concentration of deformation near the crater rim hinting that the northeast was the downrange direction of impact. We confirm this narrowing in terrace spacing using a profile with a similar orientation in the 2005 images. Through integration of the new dense grid of profiles and radial lines from the 1996 and 2005 surveys we map the 3-D variability of the terrace zones to further constrain impact direction and examine the formative processes of the Chixculub and other large impact craters.

  4. The seismic analyzer: interpreting and illustrating 2D seismic data.

    PubMed

    Patel, Daniel; Giertsen, Christopher; Thurmond, John; Gjelberg, John; Gröller, M Eduard

    2008-01-01

    We present a toolbox for quickly interpreting and illustrating 2D slices of seismic volumetric reflection data. Searching for oil and gas involves creating a structural overview of seismic reflection data to identify hydrocarbon reservoirs. We improve the search of seismic structures by precalculating the horizon structures of the seismic data prior to interpretation. We improve the annotation of seismic structures by applying novel illustrative rendering algorithms tailored to seismic data, such as deformed texturing and line and texture transfer functions. The illustrative rendering results in multi-attribute and scale invariant visualizations where features are represented clearly in both highly zoomed in and zoomed out views. Thumbnail views in combination with interactive appearance control allows for a quick overview of the data before detailed interpretation takes place. These techniques help reduce the work of seismic illustrators and interpreters.

  5. Modelling of a coal seam of the deposit Đurđevik (BiH) by means of 2D reflection seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenović, Siniša; Urošević, Milovan; Sretenović, Branislav; Cvetkov, Vesna; Životić, Dragana

    2016-06-01

    A low cost 2D reflection seismic survey was used to map the continuity of the main seams as well as the numerous faults at the Đurđevik sub-bituminous coal deposit (BiH). A 24-channel seismic data acquisition system was available for this survey. The natural high reflectivity of the coal seams and a favourable geometry of seismic profiles enabled the identification and correlation of major faults across the area. Rugged terrain presented challenges to both data acquisition and processing. Stacks of acceptable quality were obtained only after the application of surface consistent statics and careful application of multi-channel filtering. A set of recorded 2D lines was interpreted in a 3D environment. Inferred structural elements disrupting the seam continuity were identified and were in agreement with available drilling results and mine workings. The result of this work was used to reduce mining hazards and also to help optimise mine planning.

  6. Integration of 2D and 3D reflection seismic data with deep boreholes in the Kevitsa Ni-Cu-PGE deposit, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, Emilia; Malehmir, Alireza; Voipio, Teemu; Wijns, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Kevitsa is a large disseminated sulphide Ni-Cu-PGE deposit hosted by the Kevitsa mafic-ultramafic intrusion in northern Finland and dated as about 2.06 Ga old. The Geological Survey of Finland first discovered the Kevitsa deposit in 1987. Open pit mining by Kevitsa Mining Oy/First Quantum Minerals Ltd. commenced in June 2012. The final pit depth is planned to be 550-600 m. The estimated ore reserves of the Kevitsa intrusion are about 240 million tones (using a nickel cut-off grade of 0.1%). The expected life-of-mine is 20-30 years. More than 400 hundred holes have been drilled in the Kevitsa area, but most are concentrated close to the known deposit and do not provide a comprehensive understanding of the extent of the intrusion. The basal contact of the intrusion is penetrated by only about 30 drill holes, most of which are shallow. A better knowledge of the geometry of the intrusion would provide a framework for near-mine and deep exploration in the area. An exact knowledge on the basal contact of the intrusion would also provide an exploration target for the contact-type mineralization that is often more massive and richer in Ni-Cu. In December 2007, a series of 2D reflection seismic profiles was acquired in the Kevitsa area. It consisted of four connected survey lines between 6 and 11 km long. In 2010, the initial positive results of the 2D seismic survey led Kevitsa Mining Oy/First Quantum Minerals Ltd. to initiate a 3D reflection seismic survey. The 3D seismic survey is limited to the closer vicinity of the known deposit, while the 2D seismic survey was designed to provide a more regional view of the Kevitsa intrusive complex. The main aims of the 2D and 3D seismic surveys were to delineate the shape and extent of the ore-bearing Kevitsa intrusion and the geometry of some of the host rock and surrounding units, and extract information about the larger-scale structures and structures important for mine-planning purposes. The 2D and 3D seismic data were used to

  7. Imaging the Ferron Member of the Mancos Shale formation using reprocessed high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data: Emery County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Late in 1982 and early in 1983, Arco Exploration contracted with Rocky Mountain Geophysical to acquired four high-resolution 2-D multichannel seismic reflection lines in Emery County, Utah. The primary goal in acquiring this data was an attempt to image the Ferron Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Design of the high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data acquisition used both a short geophone group interval and a short sample interval. An explosive energy source was used which provided an input pulse with broad frequency content and higher frequencies than typical non-explosive Vibroseis?? sources. Reflections produced by using this high-frequency energy source when sampled at a short interval are usually able to resolve shallow horizons that are relatively thin compared to those that can be resolved using more typical oil and gas exploration seismic reflection methods.The U.S. Geological Survey-Energy Resources Program, Geophysical Processing Group used the processing sequence originally applied by Arco in 1984 as a guide and experimented with processing steps applied in a different order using slightly different parameters in an effort to improve imaging the Ferron Member horizon. As with the Arco processed data there are sections along all four seismic lines where the data quality cannot be improved upon, and in fact the data quality is so poor that the Ferron horizon cannot be imaged at all.Interpretation of the seismic and core hole data indicates that the Ferron Member in the study area represent a deltaic sequence including delta front, lower delta plain, and upper delta plain environments. Correlating the depositional environments for the Ferron Member as indicated in the core holes with the thickness of Ferron Member suggests the presence of a delta lobe running from the northwest to the southeast through the study area. The presence of a deltaic channel system within the delta lobe complex might prove to be an interesting conventional

  8. Reconstruction of a 2D seismic wavefield by seismic gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-12-01

    We reconstructed a 2D seismic wavefield and obtained its propagation properties by using the seismic gradiometry method together with dense observations of the Hi-net seismograph network in Japan. The seismic gradiometry method estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients at any location from a discrete station record by using a Taylor series approximation. From the spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, the properties of a propagating wave packet, including the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading, and radiation pattern can be obtained. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary conditions, the 2D vector elastic wavefield can be decomposed into divergence and rotation components. First, as a feasibility test, we performed an analysis with a synthetic seismogram dataset computed by a numerical simulation for a realistic 3D medium and the actual Hi-net station layout. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives were very well-reproduced for period bands longer than 25 s. Applications to a real large earthquake showed that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield were well reconstructed, along with slowness vector. The slowness of the reconstructed wavefield showed a clear contrast between body and surface waves and regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation, possibly owing to scattering. Slowness vectors together with divergence and rotation decomposition are expected to be useful for determining constituents of observed wavefields in inhomogeneous media.

  9. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  10. Cross Gradient Based Joint Inversion of 2D Wide Angle Seismic Reflection/Refraction and Gravity Data Along the Profile Through the 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, S.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    2D wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction survey has been widely used to investigate crustal structure and Moho topography. Similarly gravity survey is also very important in the study of local and regional earth features. Seismic survey is sensitive to the seismic velocity parameters and interface variations. For gravity survey, it is sensitive to density parameters of the medium but the resolution along the vertical direction is relatively poor. In this study, we have developed a strategy to jointly invert for seismic velocity model, density model and interface positions using the gravity observations and seismic arrival times from different phases. For the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data, it often relies on the empirical relationship between seismic velocity and density. In comparison, our joint inversion strategy also includes the cross-gradient based structure constraint for seismic velocity and density models in addition to the empirical relationship between them. The objective function for the joint inversion includes data misfit terms for seismic travel times and gravity observations, the cross-gradient constraint, the smoothness terms for two models, and the data misfit term between predicted gravity data based on density model converted from velocity model using the empirical relationship. Each term has its respective weight. We have applied the new joint inversion method to the Riwoqe-Yushu-Maduo profile in northwest China. The profile crosses through the Qiangtang block and Bayan Har block from southwest to northeast, respectively. The 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu earthquake is located on the profile, around the Ganzi-Yushu fault zone. The joint inversion produces the velocity and density models that are similar in structure and at the same time fit their respective data sets well. Compared to separate seismic inversion using seismic travel times, the joint inversion with gravity data gives a velocity model that better delineates the fault zones. Low

  11. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE Seismic Reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-05-16

    PDFs of seismic reflection profiles 101,110, 111 local to the West Flank FORGE site. 45 line kilometers of seismic reflection data are processed data collected in 2001 through the use of vibroseis trucks. The initial analysis and interpretation of these data was performed by Unruh et al. (2001). Optim processed these data by inverting the P-wave first arrivals to create a 2-D velocity structure. Kirchhoff images were then created for each line using velocity tomograms (Unruh et al., 2001).

  12. ''Super 2D,'' Innovative seismic reprocessing: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Conne, D.K.M.; Bolander, A.G.; MacDonald, R.J.; Strelioff, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The ''Super 2D'' processing sequence involves taking a randomly oriented grid of multivintage two-dimensional seismic data and reprocessing to tie the data where required, then interpolating the data set to a regular grid suitable for three-dimensional processing and interpretation. A data set from Alberta, provided by a Canadian oil company, comprises 15 two-dimensional seismic lines collected and processed over a period of 6 years by various contractors. Field conditions, advances in technology, and changing objectives combined to result in a data set that densely sampled a small area, but did not tie in well enough to be interpreted as a whole. The data mistied in time, phase, and frequency, as well as having a problem with multiples in the zone of interest that had been partly attenuated in varying degrees. Therefore, the first objective of reprocessing was to resolve these problems. The authors' current land data processing sequence, which includes frequency balancing followed by source wavelet designature, F/K multiple attenuation, trim statics, and F-X filtering, as well as close attention to statics and velocity control, resolved all the mistie issues and produced a standardized data volume. This data volume was now suitable for the second stage of this sequence (i.e., interpolating to a regular grid and subsequent three-dimensional processing). The volume was three-dimensionally migrated (finite difference), filtered, and scaled. The full range of three-dimensional display and interpretational options, including loading on an interactive system, are now possible. This, along with standardizing the data set and improving the spatial location of events via three-dimensional migration are the key results of the ''Super 2D'' sequence.

  13. Structure of the ophiolite-hosted Outokumpu Cu-Co-Zn-Ni-Ag-Au sulfide ore district revealed by combined 3D modelling and 2D high-resolution seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, Kerstin; Laine, Eevaliisa

    2015-04-01

    -dipping faults , (iii) SW-NE to SSW-NNE striking faults which may have formed at an earlier stage and have been reactivated. The specific Outokumpu alteration assemblage around metaperidotite bodies combined with shear zones acting as pathways for fluids are the main vectors to mineralization. Seismic reflection data do not provide a simple tool to directly detect the sites of Outokumpu assemblage bodies at depth but they identify strong reflector zones which are characteristic for though not exclusive to the assemblage. Our approach shows that 3D modelling combining surface geology and geophysical data and a good knowledge about the structural evolution substantially improves the interpretation of reflectors and their assignments to rock units of interest. It thus enhances the chances for locating potentially economic bodies at depth and allows delineating target areas for detailed exploration.

  14. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  15. The Hontomin CO2 geologic storage site: results from 2D seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calahorrano, A.; Martí, D.; Alcalde, J.; Marzán, I.; Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Spanish research program on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS), leaded by the state-owned foundation CIUDEN, initiated the storage project with the creation of the first Spanish technological laboratory devoted to subsurface storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in 2010 near the village of Hontomín (North West of Spain). This research site aims investigating the different phases involved in the CO2 injection process in underground geologic formations at real scale and monitoring its long-term behavior. The seismic baseline study consist on five innovative and non-standard seismic experiments including: 1) a 35 km2 of 3D seismic survey, 2) a 2D seismic survey, 3) a Seismovie survey, 4) a 30 passive-seismic network and 5) a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) survey programmed for this year. Here we focus on the 2D seismic reflection survey that was acquired with new generation 3-component receivers. A total of 408 receivers with 25 m interval were deployed along 2 orthogonal profiles, orientated ~NS-EW, centered near the injection point. The seismic source consisted on 4 15-Tn M22 vibroseis trucks with a 16-sec sweep vibrating at each 25 m distance. Data processing included static corrections, spherical divergence correction, airwave muting, predictive deconvolution, stack, time-variant band-pass filtering and time migration. First analysis of the vertical component data confirm the dome-geometry of the reservoir observed by previous studies and give details on the tectonic structure of the potential injection zone. The data also show two main seismic features corresponding to 1) a loss of the P-wave first arrival amplitudes resulting in a shadow zone at offsets of ~600-1500 m. and 2) a high-amplitude reflection at the base of the shadow zone. We related the presence of the shadow zone with a ~750 m-thick layer of low velocity or small velocity-gradient, associated to Early-Middle Cretaceous deposits that globally correspond to variable grain-size siliciclastic

  16. 2D photonic crystal and its angular reflective azimuthal spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderakova, Dagmar; Drzik, Milan; Tomekova, Juliana

    2016-12-01

    Contemporary, attention is paid to photonic crystals, which can strongly modify light propagation through them and enable a controllable light manipulation. The contribution is focused on a sub-wavelength 2D structure formed by Al2O3 layer on silicon substrate, patterned with periodic hexagonal lattice of deep air holes. Using various laser sources of light at single wavelength, azimuthal angle dependence of the mirror-like reflected light intensity was recorded photo-electrically. The results obtained can be used to sample the band-structure of leaky modes of the photonic crystal more reliably and help us to map the photonic dispersion diagram.

  17. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  18. High Resolution Seismic Reflection Survey for Coal Mine: fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khukhuudei, M.; Khukhuudei, U.

    2014-12-01

    High Resolution Seismic Reflection (HRSR) methods will become a more important tool to help unravel structures hosting mineral deposits at great depth for mine planning and exploration. Modern coal mining requires certainly about geological faults and structural features. This paper focuses on 2D Seismic section mapping results from an "Zeegt" lignite coal mine in the "Mongol Altai" coal basin, which required the establishment of major structure for faults and basement. HRSR method was able to detect subsurface faults associated with the major fault system. We have used numerical modeling in an ideal, noise free environment with homogenous layering to detect of faults. In a coal mining setting where the seismic velocity of the high ranges from 3000m/s to 3600m/s and the dominant seismic frequency is 100Hz, available to locate faults with a throw of 4-5m. Faults with displacements as seam thickness detected down to several hundred meter beneath the surface.

  19. The Reconstruction of the pre Storegga Slide Seafloor and Stratigraphy Using a Dense Grid of 2D Seismic Records.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, C. F. M.

    2014-12-01

    This work was performed as part of the Storegga Slide study that was part of the Ormen Lange Gas Field development on the Mid Norwegian continental margin. The purpose of the reconstruction was to use seismic reflection data as a basis to provide slide volume estimates, pre slide stratigraphy and seafloor morphology that could be used as input to separate conceptual and numerical slide models. A comprehensive database of 2D high resolution and 2D exploration seismic reflection profiles was used. Additionally, the seismic stratigraphy on both sides of the Storegga Slide scar was well known, but had to be applied/interpreted on most of the seismic sections in the database to provide geographical grids of the horizon depths. The reconstruction was performed by "filling" The Storegga Slide scar from bottom up through interpolation and gridding of the thicknesses of successively younger units removed by the slide. The estimated volume of the slide was 3500 km3 with a maximum removal of 500 m of overburden. The loss of overburden due sliding estimated from the reconstructon was confirmed at several sites where geotechnical boreholes had been drilled.

  20. 1D and 2D simulations of seismic wave propagation in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Thomas; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Fractures and cracks have a significant influence on the propagation of seismic waves. Their presence causes reflections and scattering and makes the medium effectively anisotropic. We present a numerical approach to simulation of seismic waves in fractured media that does not require direct modelling of the fracture itself, but uses the concept of linear slip interfaces developed by Schoenberg (1980). This condition states that at an interface between two imperfectly bonded elastic media, stress is continuous across the interface while displacement is discontinuous. It is assumed that the jump of displacement is proportional to stress which implies a jump in particle velocity at the interface. We use this condition as a boundary condition to the elastic wave equation and solve this equation in the framework of a Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin scheme using a velocity-stress formulation. We use meshes with tetrahedral elements to discretise the medium. Each individual element face may be declared as a slip interface. Numerical fluxes have been derived by solving the 1D Riemann problem for slip interfaces with elastic and viscoelastic rheology. Viscoelasticity is realised either by a Kelvin-Voigt body or a Standard Linear Solid. These fluxes are not limited to 1D and can - with little modification - be used for simulations in higher dimensions as well. The Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin code "neXd" developed by Lambrecht (2013) is used as a basis for the numerical implementation of this concept. We present examples of simulations in 1D and 2D that illustrate the influence of fractures on the seismic wavefield. We demonstrate the accuracy of the simulation through comparison to an analytical solution in 1D.

  1. On the distribution of seismic reflection coefficients and seismic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, S.; Paterson, L.; Beresford, G.

    1995-07-01

    Reflection coefficient sequences from 14 wells in Australia have a statistical character consistent with a non-Gaussian scaling noise model based on the Levy-stable family of probability distributions. Experimental histograms of reflection coefficients are accurately approximated by symmetric Levy-stable probability density functions with Levy index between 0.99 and 1.43. These distributions have the same canonical role in mathematical statistics as the Gaussian distribution, but they have slowly decaying tails and infinite moments. The distribution of reflection coefficients is independent of the spatial scale (statistically self-similar), and the reflection coefficient sequences have long-range dependence. These results suggest that the logarithm of seismic impedance can be modeled accurately using fractional Levy motion, which is a generalization of fractional Brownian motion. Synthetic seismograms produced from the authors` model for the reflection coefficients also have Levy-stable distributions. These isolations include transmission losses, the effects of reverberations, and the loss of resolution caused by band-limited wavelets, and suggest that actual seismic amplitudes with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio should also have a Levy-stable distribution. This prediction is verified using post-stack seismic data acquired in the Timor Sea and in the continental USA. However, prestack seismic amplitudes from the Timor Sea are nearly Gaussian. They attribute the difference between prestack and poststack data to the high level of measurement noise in the prestack data.

  2. Development of the Borehole 2-D Seismic Tomography Software Using MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, A. D.; Syahputra, A.; Fatkhan, F.; Sule, R.; Hendriyana, A.

    2011-12-01

    We developed 2-D borehole seismic tomography software that we called "EARTHMAX-2D TOMOGRAPHY" to image subsurface physical properties including P-wave and S-wave velocities between two boreholes. We used Graphic User Interface (GUI) facilities of MATLAB programming language to create the software. In this software, we used travel time of seismic waves from source to receiver by using pseudo bending ray tracing method as input for tomography inversion. We can also set up a model parameterization, initial velocity model, ray tracing processes, conduct borehole seismic tomography inversion, and finally visualize the inversion results. The LSQR method was applied to solve of tomography inversion solution. We provided the Checkerboard Test Resolution (CTR) to evaluate the model resolution of the tomography inversion. As validation of this developed software, we tested it for geotechnical purposes. We then conducted data acquisition in the "ITB X-field" that is located on ITB campus. We used two boreholes that have a depth of 39 meters. Seismic wave sources were generated by impulse generator and sparker and then they were recorded by borehole hydrophone string type 3. Later on, we analyzed and picked seismic arrival time as input for tomography inversion. As results, we can image the estimated weathering layer, sediment layer, and basement rock in the field depicted by seismic wave structures. More detailed information about the developed software will be presented. Keywords: borehole, tomography, earthmax-2D, inversion

  3. Multichannel algorithms for seismic reflectivity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruo; Wang, Yanghua

    2017-02-01

    Seismic reflectivity inversion is a deconvolution process for quantitatively extracting the reflectivity series and depicting the layered subsurface structure. The conventional method is a single channel inversion and cannot clearly characterise stratified structures, especially from seismic data with low signal-to-noise ratio. Because it is implemented on a trace-by-trace basis, the continuity along reflections in the original seismic data is deteriorated in the inversion results. We propose here multichannel inversion algorithms that apply the information of adjacent traces during seismic reflectivity inversion. Explicitly, we incorporate a spatial prediction filter into the conventional Cauchy-constrained inversion method. We verify the validity and feasibility of the method using field data experiments and find an improved lateral continuity and clearer structures achieved by the multichannel algorithms. Finally, we compare the performance of three multichannel algorithms and merit the effectiveness based on the lateral coherency and structure characterisation of the inverted reflectivity profiles, and the residual energy of the seismic data at the same time.

  4. Seismic reflection imaging at a Shallow Site

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, P.; Rector, J.; Bainer, R.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of our studies was to determine the best seismic method to image these sediments, between the water table at 3 m depth to the basement at 35 m depth. Good cross-correlation between well logs and the seismic data was also desirable, and would facilitate the tracking of known lithological units away from the wells. For instance, known aquifer control boundaries may then be mapped out over the boundaries, and may be used in a joint inversion with reflectivity data and other non-seismic geophysical data to produce a 3-D image containing quantitative physical properties of the target area.

  5. Reflection seismic imaging of shallow aquifers in Milano (northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francese, R.; Zaja, A.; Giudici, M.; Schmitt, D.

    2003-04-01

    A high resolution P-wave seismic reflection survey was conducted in the Lambro park within the city of Milano (northern Italy). The objective of the survey was to image structure and stratigraphy of shallow late tertiary and quaternary deposits. This information is necessary to develop a comprehensive 3D hydrological model of the fresh water aquifers where the municipality drilled several production wells. The expected complexity of the acoustic framework and the urban environment with its complications created a challenging test site for the reflection technique. The aquifer system was targeted with a 2-D high resolution seismic reflection survey to outline its vertical and lateral dimensions to a depth of 150-200 m and to estimate some petrophysical properties of the depositional units. A 0.8-km CMP seismic line, with 1-m station spacing, was deployed to collect reflection data. The recording geometry was a 240-channel split spread array, with 6-m shot separation, resulting in a maximum of 20-fold dataset. A single 40-Hz geophone at each station location detected the incoming signals. Field records exhibit clear reflections although the signal to noise ratio is poor because of strong surface waves and severe disturbances from the nearby highway. Optimized FK and KL transforms were used to attenuate these coherent noises and to enhance the primary reflections from the main horizons. The data analysis was also assisted by forward modeling to guide the selection of the processing parameters. The seismic data have a good correlation thourhgout the section and most of the acoustic units show flat bedding. The boundaries of the three major depositional units are clearly resolved by the seismic images. The stacked section clearly indicates that reflection technique provides a powerful method to characterize aquifers, even in a very noisy environment like the urban areas.

  6. Eurasian Seismic Surveillance - 2D FD Seismic Synthetics and Event Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-22

    for 2D finite difference (FD) synthetic seismogram experiments . The results here are encouraging in the sense that models incorporating small scale... ProMAX screendump of synthetic seismograms generated for the model shown in Fig. 2.4.1. The receivers were placed with 3 km intervals in the range x=13 to...our 2D FD synthetic seismogram experiments is that a simple lithosphere model, being moderately heterogeneous, gives rise to complex seismograms which

  7. Retrieval of the P wave reflectivity response from autocorrelation of seismic noise: Jakarta Basin, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil R.; Lumley, David

    2017-01-01

    We autocorrelate the continuously recorded seismic wavefield across a dense network of seismometers to map the P wave reflectivity response of the Jakarta Basin, Indonesia. The proximity of this mega city to known active faults and the subduction of the Australian plate, especially when the predominance of masonry construction and thick sedimentary basin fill are considered, suggests that it is a hot spot for seismic risk. In order to understand the type of ground motion that earthquakes might cause in the basin, it is essential to obtain reliable information on its seismic velocity structure. The body wave reflections are sensitive to the sharp velocity contrasts, which makes them useful in seismic imaging. Results show autocorrelograms at different seismic stations with reflected-wave travel time variations, which reflect the variation in basement depth across the thick sedimentary basin. We also confirm the validity of the observed autocorrelation waveforms by conducting a 2-D full waveform modeling.

  8. Seismic reflection study of Flathead Lake, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wold, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    A seismic reflection survey of Flathead Lake, Montana, was carried out in 1970 to study the geologic structure underlying the lake. Approximately 200 km of track lines were surveyed resulting in about 140 km of useable data (Fig. 1). A one cu. in. air gun was used as the energy source. Navigation was by a series of theodolite sitings of the boat from pairs of shore-based control points. 

  9. High-resolution seismic reflection surveying with a land streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz Tapırdamaz, Mustafa; Cankurtaranlar, Ali; Ergintav, Semih; Kurt, Levent

    2013-04-01

    In this study, newly designed seismic reflection data acquisition array (land streamer) is utilized to image the shallow subsurface. Our acquisition system consist of 24 geophones screwed on iron plates with 2 m spacing, moving on the surface of the earth which are connected with fire hose. Completely original, 4.5 Kg weight iron plates provides satisfactory coupling. This land-streamer system enables rapid and cost effective acquisition of seismic reflection data due to its operational facilities. First test studies were performed using various seismic sources such as a mini-vibro truck, buffalo-gun and hammer. The final fieldwork was performed on a landslide area which was studied before. Data acquisition was carried out on the line that was previously measured by the seismic survey using 5 m geophone and shot spacing. This line was chosen in order to re-image known reflection patterns obtained from the previous field study. Taking penetration depth into consideration, a six-cartridge buffalo-gun was selected as a seismic source to achieve high vertical resolution. Each shot-point drilled 50 cm for gunshots to obtain high resolution source signature. In order to avoid surface waves, the offset distance between the source and the first channel was chosen to be 50 m and the shot spacing was 2 m. These acquisition parameters provided 12 folds at each CDP points. Spatial sampling interval was 1 m at the surface. The processing steps included standard stages such as gain recovery, editing, frequency filtering, CDP sorting, NMO correction, static correction and stacking. Furthermore, surface consistent residual static corrections were applied recursively to improve image quality. 2D F-K filter application was performed to suppress air and surface waves at relatively deep part of the seismic section. Results show that, this newly designed, high-resolution land seismic data acquisition equipment (land-streamer) can be successfully used to image subsurface. Likewise

  10. Numerical upscaling in 2-D heterogeneous poroelastic rocks: Anisotropic attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, J. Germán.; Caspari, Eva; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Barbosa, Nicolás. D.; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    The presence of stiffness contrasts at scales larger than the typical pore sizes but smaller than the predominant seismic wavelengths can produce seismic attenuation and velocity dispersion in fluid-saturated porous rocks. This energy dissipation mechanism is caused by wave-induced fluid pressure diffusion among the different components of the probed geological formations. In many cases, heterogeneities have elongated shapes and preferential orientations, which implies that the overall response of the medium is anisotropic. In this work, we propose a numerical upscaling procedure that permits to quantify seismic attenuation and phase velocity considering fluid pressure diffusion effects as well as generic anisotropy at the sample's scale. The methodology is based on a set of three relaxation tests performed on a 2-D synthetic rock sample representative of the medium of interest. It provides a complex-valued frequency-dependent equivalent stiffness matrix through a least squares procedure. We also derive an approach for computing various poroelastic fields associated with the considered sample in response to the propagation of a seismic wave with arbitrary incidence angle. Using this approach, we provide an energy-based estimation of seismic attenuation. A comprehensive numerical analysis indicates that the methodology is suitable for handling complex media and different levels of overall anisotropy. Comparisons with the energy-based estimations demonstrate that the dynamic-equivalent viscoelastic medium assumption made by the numerical upscaling procedure is reasonable even in the presence of high levels of overall anisotropy. This work also highlights the usefulness of poroelastic fields for the physical interpretation of seismic wave phenomena in strongly heterogeneous and complex media.

  11. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: Results from 2013 high-resolution 2D and multicomponent seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.; Agena, W.; Miller, J. J.; Ruppel, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the spring of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a 16-day seismic acquisition cruise aboard the R/V Pelican in the Gulf of Mexico to survey two established gas hydrate study sites. We used a pair of 105/105 cubic inch generator/injector airguns as the seismic source, and a 450-m 72-channel hydrophone streamer to record two-dimensional (2D) data. In addition, we also deployed at both sites an array of 4-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) to record P- and S-wave energy at the seafloor from the same seismic source positions as the streamer data. At lease block Green Canyon 955 (GC955), we acquired 400 km of 2-D streamer data, in a 50- to 250-m-spaced grid augmented by several 20-km transects that provide long offsets for the OBS. The seafloor recording at GC955 was accomplished by a 2D array of 21 OBS at approximately 400-m spacing, including instruments carefully positioned at two of the three boreholes where extensive logging-while-drilling data is available to characterize the presence of gas hydrate. At lease block Walker Ridge 313 (WR313), we acquired 450 km of streamer data in a set of 11-km, 150- to 1,000-m-spaced, dip lines and 6- to 8-km, 500- to 1000-m-spaced strike lines. These were augmented by a set of 20-km lines that provide long offsets for a predominantly linear array of 25 400- to 800-m spaced OBS deployed in the dip direction in and around WR313. The 2D data provide at least five times better resolution of the gas hydrate stability zone than the available petroleum industry seismic data from the area; this enables considerably improved analysis and interpretation of stratigraphic and structural features including previously unseen faults and gas chimneys that may have considerable impact on gas migration. Initial processing indicates that the OBS data quality is good, and we anticipate that these data will yield estimates of P- and S-wave velocities, as well as PP (reflected) and PS (converted wave) images beneath each sensor location.

  12. Method of reflection point correlation seismic surveying

    SciTech Connect

    Barbier, M.G.; Staron, P.J.

    1982-02-16

    A method of seismic exploration comprises transmitting waves from transmission sources into the medium to be explored and picking up signals in a receiver and recording these as traces, the signals being produced by reflection in the medium, the sequential transmission of the sources taking place at intervals less than the reflection time of the longest transmitted waves, the repeated transmission of any one source taking place at intervals at least equal to the said reflection time and therein being an intercorrelation function of a series of transmission instants of all the sources and a series of transmission instants of any one of the sources to give a relationship between the maximum peak amplitude and the secondary residue amplitude greater than a predetermined value and grouping the recorded traces corresponding to the same reflection point, adjusting the traces in relation to the associated source providing the information relating to the reflection point and adding together the adjusted traces relating to the same reflection point.

  13. Deep Seismic Reflection Imaging of the Queen Charlotte Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. J.

    2009-05-01

    A deep 2-D seismic reflection survey was shot by the Geological Survey of Canada in Hecate Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound in 1988 using a 45 m shot point interval, 15 m group interval and a maximum offset of 3685 m. Subsequent analysis of these data has focused on the shallower section, and helped constrain, together with earlier industry data, the general evolution of the sedimentary section. North-trending sub-basins are found to the south in Queen Charlotte Sound, but relatively closely-spaced NW-trending sub-basins predominate further north in Hecate Strait. Previous interpretation has demonstrated transtensional tectonics during most of the Miocene with evidence for transpression and inversion of some normal faults in Hecate Strait during the Pliocene. Although a range of origins including hot spot rifting have been suggested for the Queen Charlotte basin, currently favoured explanations focus on the effects of, and changes in, large-scale plate motions in this region. To determine if the deeper sections of the 1988 seismic survey can further constrain models of basin evolution, these seismic data have been reprocessed to 14 s. A thick sequence of subhorizontal reflectors, which extend from 4.5-8.5 s, is identified beneath northern Hecate Strait where rocks of the Alexander terrane are identified at the surface. Further south, discrete 0.5-1.0 s thick reflection packages, some of which may be intrusive in origin, are identified in the mid and lower crust of the Wrangellia terrane. Other reflections occur as deep as 10-11 s beneath the central axis of the basin in Hecate Strait, which could locate them beneath the Moho inferred from wide-angle surveys. Deep seismic imaging is more limited beneath southern Hecate Strait and northern Queen Charlotte Sound, perhaps due to the effects of coherent noise, but reflections can be identified at 6-8 s beneath southern Queen Charlotte Sound. Marine surveys are often degraded by water layer multiples and coherent

  14. 3D Seismic Reflection Experiment over the Galicia Deep Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, D. S.; Jordan, B.; Reston, T. J.; Minshull, T. A.; Klaeschen, D.; Ranero, C.; Shillington, D. J.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    In June thru September, 2013, a 3D reflection and a long offset seismic experiment were conducted at the Galicia rifted margin by investigators from the US, UK, Germany, and Spain. The 3D multichannel experiment covered 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2), using the RV Marcus Langseth. Four streamers 6 km long were deployed at 12.5 m hydrophone channel spacing. The streamers were 200 m apart. Two airgun arrays, each 3300 cu in, were fired alternately every 37.5 m, to collectively yield a 400 m wide sail line consisting of 8 CMP lines at 50 m spacing. The long offset seismic experiment included 72 short period OBS's deployed below the 3D reflection survey box. Most of the instruments recorded all the shots from the airgun array shots. The 3D seismic box covered a variety of geologic features. The Peridotite Ridge (PR), is associated with the exhumation of upper mantle rocks to the seafloor during the final stage of the continental separation between the Galicia Bank and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The S reflector is present below most of the continental blocks under the deep Galicia basin. S is interpreted to be a low-angle detachment fault formed late in the rifting process, and a number of rotated fault block basins and ranges containing pre and syn-rift sediments. Initial observations from stacked 3D seismic data, and samples of 2D pre-stack time migrated (PSTM) 3D seismic data show that the PR is elevated above the present seafloor in the South and not exposed through the seafloor in the North. The relative smoothness of the PR surface for the entire 20 km N-S contrasts with the more complex, shorter wavelength, faulting of the continental crustal blocks to the east. The PR does not seem to show offsets or any apparent internal structure. The PSTM dip lines show substantial improvement for the structures in the deep sedimentary basin East of the PR. These seem to extend the S reflector somewhat farther to the West. The migrated data show a substantial network of

  15. 2D Seismic Imaging of Elastic Parameters by Frequency Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2008-12-01

    Thanks to recent advances in parallel computing, full waveform inversion is today a tractable seismic imaging method to reconstruct physical parameters of the earth interior at different scales ranging from the near- surface to the deep crust. We present a massively parallel 2D frequency-domain full-waveform algorithm for imaging visco-elastic media from multi-component seismic data. The forward problem (i.e. the resolution of the frequency-domain 2D PSV elastodynamics equations) is based on low-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method (P0 and/or P1 interpolations). Thanks to triangular unstructured meshes, the DG method allows accurate modeling of both body waves and surface waves in case of complex topography for a discretization of 10 to 15 cells per shear wavelength. The frequency-domain DG system is solved efficiently for multiple sources with the parallel direct solver MUMPS. The local inversion procedure (i.e. minimization of residuals between observed and computed data) is based on the adjoint-state method which allows to efficiently compute the gradient of the objective function. Applying the inversion hierarchically from the low frequencies to the higher ones defines a multiresolution imaging strategy which helps convergence towards the global minimum. In place of expensive Newton algorithm, the combined use of the diagonal terms of the approximate Hessian matrix and optimization algorithms based on quasi-Newton methods (Conjugate Gradient, LBFGS, ...) allows to improve the convergence of the iterative inversion. The distribution of forward problem solutions over processors driven by a mesh partitioning performed by METIS allows to apply most of the inversion in parallel. We shall present the main features of the parallel modeling/inversion algorithm, assess its scalability and illustrate its performances with realistic synthetic case studies.

  16. Can exposure to prenatal sex hormones (2D:4D) predict cognitive reflection?

    PubMed

    Bosch-Domènech, Antoni; Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Espín, Antonio M

    2014-05-01

    The Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) is a test introduced by Frederick (2005). The task is designed to measure the tendency to override an intuitive response that is incorrect and to engage in further reflection that leads to the correct response. The consistent sex differences in CRT performance may suggest a role for prenatal sex hormones. A now widely studied putative marker for relative prenatal testosterone is the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D). This paper tests to what extent 2D:4D, as a proxy for the prenatal ratio of testosterone/estrogens, can predict CRT scores in a sample of 623 students. After controlling for sex, we observe that a lower 2D:4D (reflecting a relative higher exposure to testosterone) is significantly associated with a higher number of correct answers. The result holds for both hands' 2D:4Ds. In addition, the effect appears to be stronger for females than for males. We also control for patience and math proficiency, which are significantly related to performance in the CRT. But the effect of 2D:4D on performance in CRT is not reduced with these controls, implying that these variables are not mediating the relationship between digit ratio and CRT.

  17. Micro-reflectance and transmittance spectroscopy: a versatile and powerful tool to characterize 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Niu, Yue; Gant, Patricia; Molina-Mendoza, Aday J.; Schmidt, Robert; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Liu, Jinxin; Fu, Lei; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; Perez De Lara, David; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2017-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy techniques such as differential reflectance and transmittance have proven to be very powerful techniques for studying 2D materials. However, a thorough description of the experimental setups needed to carry out these measurements is lacking in the literature. We describe a versatile optical microscope setup for carrying out differential reflectance and transmittance spectroscopy in 2D materials with a lateral resolution of ~1 µm in the visible and near-infrared part of the spectrum. We demonstrate the potential of the presented setup to determine the number of layers of 2D materials and characterize their fundamental optical properties, such as excitonic resonances. We illustrate its performance by studying mechanically exfoliated and chemical vapor-deposited transition metal dichalcogenide samples.

  18. A novel simple procedure to consider seismic soil structure interaction effects in 2D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Juan Diego; Gómez, Juan David; Restrepo, Doriam; Rivera, Santiago

    2014-09-01

    A method is proposed to estimate the seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) effects for use in engineering practice. It is applicable to 2D structures subjected to vertically incident shear waves supported by homogenous half-spaces. The method is attractive since it keeps the simplicity of the spectral approach, overcomes some of the difficulties and inaccuracies of existing classical techniques and yet it considers a physically consistent excitation. This level of simplicity is achieved through a response spectra modification factor that can be applied to the free-field 5%-damped response spectra to yield design spectral ordinates that take into account the scattered motions introduced by the interaction effects. The modification factor is representative of the Transfer Function (TF) between the structural relative displacements and the free-field motion, which is described in terms of its maximum amplitude and associated frequency. Expressions to compute the modification factor by practicing engineers are proposed based upon a parametric study using 576 cases representative of actual structures. The method is tested in 10 cases spanning a wide range of common fundamental vibration periods.

  19. Surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and radon transform forward multiple modeling methods applied to 2D multi-channel seismic profiles from the Chukchi Shelf, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, I.; Coakley, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Chukchi Edges project was designed to establish the relationship between the Chukchi Shelf and Borderland and indirectly test theories of opening for the Canada Basin. During this cruise, ~5300 km of 2D multi-channel reflection seismic profiles and other geophysical data (swath bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, sonobuoy refraction seismic) were collected from the RV Marcus G. Langseth across the transition between the Chukchi Shelf and Chukchi Borderland, where the water depths vary from 30 m to over 3 km. Multiples occur when seismic energy is trapped in a layer and reflected from an acoustic interface more than once. Various kinds of multiples occur during seismic data acquisition. These depend on the ray-path the seismic energy follows through the layers. One of the most common multiples is the surface related multiple, which occurs due to strong acoustic impedance contrast between the air and water. The reflected seismic energy from the water surface is trapped within the water column, thus reflects from the seafloor multiple times. Multiples overprint the primary reflections and complicate data interpretation. Both surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and forward parabolic radon transform multiple modeling methods were necessary to attenuate the multiples. SRME is applied to shot gathers starting with the near offset interpolation, multiple estimation using water depths, and subtracting the model multiple from the shot gathers. This method attenuated surface related multiple energy, however, peg-leg multiples remained in the data. The parabolic radon transform method minimized the effect of these multiples. This method is applied to normal moveout (NMO) corrected common mid-point gathers (CMP). The CMP gathers are fitted or modeled with curves estimated from the reference offset, moveout range, moveout increment parameters. Then, the modeled multiples are subtracted from the data. Preliminary outputs of these two methods show that the surface related

  20. Shallow subsurface applications of high-resolution seismic reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeples, Don

    2002-11-01

    Shallow seismic reflection surveys have been applied to a wide variety of problems. For example, in many geologic settings, variations and discontinuities on the surface of bedrock can influence the transport and eventual fate of contaminants introduced at or near the ground surface. Using seismic methods to determine the nature and location of anomalous bedrock can be an essential component of hydrologic characterization. Shallow seismic surveys can also be used to detect earthquake faults and to image underground voids. During the early 1980s, the advent of digital engineering seismographs designed for shallow, high-resolution surveying spurred significant improvements in engineering and environmental reflection seismology. Commonly, shallow seismic reflection methods are used in conjunction with other geophysical and geological methods, supported by a well-planned drilling-verification effort. To the extent that seismic reflection, refraction, and surface-wave methods can constrain shallow stratigraphy, geologic structure, engineering properties, and relative permeability, these methods are useful in civil-engineering applications and in characterizing environmental sites. Case histories from Kansas, California, and Texas illustrate how seismic reflection can be used to map bedrock beneath alluvium at hazardous waste sites, detect abandoned coal mines, follow the top of the saturated zone during an alluvial aquifer pumping test, and map shallow faults that serve as contaminant flowpaths.

  1. Serum flecainide S/R ratio reflects the CYP2D6 genotype and changes in CYP2D6 activity.

    PubMed

    Doki, Kosuke; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Kuga, Keisuke; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Homma, Masato

    2015-08-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify whether the ratio of S- to R-flecainide (S/R ratio) in the serum flecainide concentration was associated with the stereoselectivity of flecainide metabolism, and to investigate the effects of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 (CYP2D6) genotype and CYP2D6 inhibitor on the serum flecainide S/R ratio. In vitro studies using human liver microsomes and cDNA-expressed CYP isoforms suggested that variability in the serum flecainide S/R ratio was associated with the stereoselectivity of CYP2D6-mediated flecainide metabolism. We examined the serum flecainide S/R ratio in 143 patients with supraventricular tachyarrhythmia. The S/R ratio was significantly lower in intermediate metabolizers and poor metabolizers (IMs/PMs) than in extensive metabolizers (EMs) identified by the CYP2D6 genotype. The cut-off value for the S/R ratio to allow the discrimination between CYP2D6 EMs and IMs/PMs was 0.99. The S/R ratio in patients with co-administration of bepridil, a potent CYP2D6 inhibitor, was lower than 0.99, regardless of the CYP2D6 genotype status. Other factors, including age, sex, body weight, and renal function, did not affect the serum flecainide S/R ratio. This study suggests that the serum flecainide S/R ratio reflects the CYP2D6 genotype and changes in CYP2D6 activity on co-administration of a CYP2D6 inhibitor.

  2. Deep Seismic Reflectivity at Volcanic Margins: Reflections from the Petrological Moho or from within the Mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, Nick; Roberts, Alan; Bellingham, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Advances in deep long-offset seismic-reflection acquisition and processing now frequently provide imaging of strong and laterally continuous reflectors in the TWTT range of 10 to 14 seconds. While an initial interpretation might be that these reflectors correspond to the crust-mantle interface, this interpretation may in some cases be incorrect or over-simplistic. Do these deep reflectors correspond to the petrological Moho or could they be located within the mantle? Examples of deep laterally-coherent reflectivity can be seen within the ocean-continent transition of the Argentine, Uruguayan and S Brazilian volcanic margins of the S Atlantic. An initial qualitative interpretation of the seismic data suggests the presence of deep crustal "keels" or crustal roots underlying well developed seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs). Joint inversion of the PSTM time-domain seismic reflection and gravity anomaly data has been used to determine the average interval density and seismic velocity between base sediment and the deep seismic reflectivity. Joint inversion densities and seismic velocities for this depth interval reach values in excess of 3000 kg/m3 and 7.0 km/sec for the entire thickness of the interval, substantially in excess of densities and velocities observed for normal oceanic and continental crust. The high densities determined from joint seismic-gravity inversion under the SDR regions are also consistent with results from flexural subsidence analysis. We consider two interpretations of these results. One interpretation is that the strong deep reflectivity corresponds to the base of the petrological crust and that the crust has an abnormally high average density and seismic velocity due to high-temperature mantle-plume-related magmatism. An alternative interpretation is that the deep seismic reflectivity is located within the mantle beneath the petrological Moho, and that the high density and seismic velocity result from averaging of both crustal basement (~2850

  3. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements of reciprocal space structure of 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Guo, F-W; Lu, T-M; Wang, G-C

    2016-12-02

    Knowledge on the symmetry and perfection of a 2D material deposited or transferred to a surface is very important and valuable. We demonstrate a method to map the reciprocal space structure of 2D materials using reflection high energy diffraction (RHEED). RHEED from a 2D material gives rise to 'streaks' patterns. It is shown that from these streaks patterns at different azimuthal rotation angles that the reciprocal space intensity distribution can be constructed as a function of momentum transfer parallel to the surface. To illustrate the principle, we experimentally constructed the reciprocal space structure of a commercial graphene/SiO2/Si sample in which the graphene layer was transferred to the SiO2/Si substrate after it was deposited on a Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition. The result reveals a 12-fold symmetry of the graphene layer which is a result of two dominant orientation domains with 30° rotation relative to each other. We show that the graphene can serve as a template to grow other materials such as a SnS film that follows the symmetry of graphene.

  4. 2D soil and engineering-seismic bedrock modeling of eastern part of Izmir inner bay/Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamuk, Eren; Akgün, Mustafa; Özdağ, Özkan Cevdet; Gönenç, Tolga

    2017-02-01

    Soil-bedrock models are used as a base when the earthquake-soil common behaviour is defined. Moreover, the medium which is defined as bedrock is classified as engineering and seismic bedrock in itself. In these descriptions, S-wave velocity is (Vs) used as a base. The mediums are called soil where the Vs is < 760 m/s, the bigger ones are called bedrock as well. Additionally, the parts are called engineering bedrock where the Vs is between 3000 m/s and 760 m/s, the parts where are bigger than 3000 m/s called seismic bedrock. The interfacial's horizontal topography where is between engineering and seismic bedrock is effective on earthquake's effect changing on the soil surface. That's why, 2D soil-bedrock models must be used to estimate the earthquake effect that could occur on the soil surface. In this research, surface wave methods and microgravity method were used for occuring the 2D soil-bedrock models in the east of İzmir bay. In the first stage, velocity values were obtained by the studies using surface wave methods. Then, density values were calculated from these velocity values by the help of the empiric relations. 2D soil-bedrock models were occurred based upon both Vs and changing of density by using these density values in microgravity model. When evaluating the models, it was determined that the soil is 300-400 m thickness and composed of more than one layers in parts where are especially closer to the bay. Moreover, it was observed that the soil thickness changes in the direction of N-S. In the study area, geologically, it should be thought the engineering bedrock is composed of Bornova melange and seismic bedrock unit is composed of Menderes massif. Also, according to the geophysical results, Neogene limestone and andesite units at between 200 and 400 m depth show that engineering bedrock characteristic.

  5. Estimation of Random Medium Parameters from 2D Post-Stack Seismic Data and Its Application in Seismic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Zhu, P.; Gu, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Small scale heterogeneities of subsurface medium can be characterized conveniently and effectively using a few simple random medium parameters (RMP), such as autocorrelation length, angle and roughness factor, etc. The estimation of these parameters is significant in both oil reservoir prediction and metallic mine exploration. Poor accuracy and low stability existed in current estimation approaches limit the application of random medium theory in seismic exploration. This study focuses on improving the accuracy and stability of RMP estimation from post-stacked seismic data and its application in the seismic inversion. Experiment and theory analysis indicate that, although the autocorrelation of random medium is related to those of corresponding post-stacked seismic data, the relationship is obviously affected by the seismic dominant frequency, the autocorrelation length, roughness factor and so on. Also the error of calculation of autocorrelation in the case of finite and discrete model decreases the accuracy. In order to improve the precision of estimation of RMP, we design two improved approaches. Firstly, we apply region growing algorithm, which often used in image processing, to reduce the influence of noise in the autocorrelation calculated by the power spectrum method. Secondly, the orientation of autocorrelation is used as a new constraint in the estimation algorithm. The numerical experiments proved that it is feasible. In addition, in post-stack seismic inversion of random medium, the estimated RMP may be used to constrain inverse procedure and to construct the initial model. The experiment results indicate that taking inversed model as random medium and using relatively accurate estimated RMP to construct initial model can get better inversion result, which contained more details conformed to the actual underground medium.

  6. Seismic reflection processing for characterization of a hazardous waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.-M.; Doll, W.E.

    1997-03-01

    Seismic reflection data have been acquired by the Kansas Geological Survey near the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee, to assist in the selection of ground water monitoring well locations. The data were recorded in uncorrelated format to allow flexibility in enhancement of stacked images. During the summer of 1996, five of the thirteen seismic reflection lines acquired were processed. An unconventional correlation procedure, ``Vibroseis Whitening`` (VSW) (Coruh and Costain, 1983) has been applied to produce improved seismic sections. Refraction statics corrections, which remove the detrimental effect of an irregular weathered layer, have also been utilized to improve the seismic sections. The seismic data were stacked using the velocities obtained from a standard semblance velocity analysis tool. Locations and orientations of faults or fault zones can be interpreted from these stacked sections, and they are in agreement with the interpretations of the surface mapping in the area. This paper concludes that VSW and refraction statics can be important to near-surface swept source seismic data processing.

  7. Geofluid Discrimination Incorporating Poroelasticity and Seismic Reflection Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2015-09-01

    Geofluid discrimination plays an important role in the fields of hydrogeology, geothermics, and exploration geophysics. A geofluid discrimination approach incorporating linearized poroelasticity theory and pre-stack seismic reflection inversion with Bayesian inference is proposed in this study to identify the types of geofluid underground. Upon the review of the development of different geofluid indicators, the fluid modulus is defined as the geofluid indicator mainly affected by the fluid contained in reservoirs. A novel linearized P-wave reflectivity equation coupling the fluid modulus is derived to avoid the complicated nonlinear relationship between the fluid modulus and seismic data. Model examples illustrate the accuracy of the proposed linearized P-wave reflectivity equation comparing to the exact P-wave reflectivity equation even at moderate incident angle, which satisfies the requirements of the parameter estimations with P-wave pre-stack seismic data. Convoluting this linearized P-wave reflectivity equation with seismic wavelets as the forward solver, a pragmatic pre-stack Bayesian seismic inversion method is presented to estimate the fluid modulus directly. Cauchy and Gaussian probability distributions are utilized for prior information of the model parameters and the likelihood function, respectively, to enhance the inversion resolution. The preconditioned conjugate gradient method is coupled in the optimization of the objective function to weaken the strong degree of correlation among the four model parameters and enhance the stability of those parameter estimations simultaneously. The synthetic examples demonstrate the feasibility and stability of the proposed novel seismic coefficient equation and inversion approach. The real data set illustrates the efficiency and success of the proposed approach in differentiating the geofluid filled reservoirs.

  8. Mapping bedrock beneath glacial till using CDP seismic reflection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Keiswetter, D.; Black, R.; Steeples, D.

    1994-03-01

    This paper is a case history demonstrating the applicability of the common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to image bedrock beneath glacial till in northwestern Iowa. Reflections from the base of the 40-m thick glacial till are clearly observable on field files at around 45 to 50 ms two-way traveltime and possess a dominant frequency of around 100 Hz. The bedrock reflection is confirmed by drill data. The seismic data are of sufficient quality to detect local bedrock topographic changes and to interpret discontinuities along the till-bedrock interface. Finite-difference synthetic seismograms substantiate the interpreted reflections and the diffraction signatures from faults observed on the field files. At some locations along the seismic line, intra-till reflections are apparent on the field files. These intra-till features are on the order of tens of meters in length along the line traverse and reflections from them are not enhanced by common depth point processing. Intra-till reflections could be indicative of gravels or other alluvial materials that may serve as local aquifers.

  9. Integration of P- and SH-wave high-resolution seismic reflection and micro-gravity techniques to improve interpretation of shallow subsurface structure: New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, C.E.; McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Ravat, D.; Biswas, S.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; Fillerup, M.A.; Tingey, B.E.; Wald, L.; Northcott, M.L.; South, J.V.; Okure, M.S.; Chandler, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    Shallow high-resolution seismic reflection surveys have traditionally been restricted to either compressional (P) or horizontally polarized shear (SH) waves in order to produce 2-D images of subsurface structure. The northernmost Mississippi embayment and coincident New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) provide an ideal laboratory to study the experimental use of integrating P- and SH-wave seismic profiles, integrated, where practicable, with micro-gravity data. In this area, the relation between "deeper" deformation of Paleozoic bedrock associated with the formation of the Reelfoot rift and NMSZ seismicity and "shallower" deformation of overlying sediments has remained elusive, but could be revealed using integrated P- and SH-wave reflection. Surface expressions of deformation are almost non-existent in this region, which makes seismic reflection surveying the only means of detecting structures that are possibly pertinent to seismic hazard assessment. Since P- and SH-waves respond differently to the rock and fluid properties and travel at dissimilar speeds, the resulting seismic profiles provide complementary views of the subsurface based on different levels of resolution and imaging capability. P-wave profiles acquired in southwestern Illinois and western Kentucky (USA) detect faulting of deep, Paleozoic bedrock and Cretaceous reflectors while coincident SH-wave surveys show that this deformation propagates higher into overlying Tertiary and Quaternary strata. Forward modeling of micro-gravity data acquired along one of the seismic profiles further supports an interpretation of faulting of bedrock and Cretaceous strata. The integration of the two seismic and the micro-gravity methods therefore increases the scope for investigating the relation between the older and younger deformation in an area of critical seismic hazard. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Seismic reflection imaging of mixing processes in Fram Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sudipta; Sheen, Katy L.; Klaeschen, Dirk; Brearley, J. Alexander; Minshull, Timothy A.; Berndt, Christian; Hobbs, Richard W.; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.

    2015-10-01

    The West Spitsbergen Current, which flows northward along the western Svalbard continental slope, transports warm and saline Atlantic water (AW) into the Arctic Ocean. A combined analysis of high-resolution seismic images and hydrographic sections across this current has uncovered the oceanographic processes involved in horizontal and vertical mixing of AW. At the shelf break, where a strong horizontal temperature gradient exists east of the warmest AW, isopycnal interleaving of warm AW and surrounding colder waters is observed. Strong seismic reflections characterize these interleaving features, with a negative polarity reflection arising from an interface of warm water overlying colder water. A seismic-derived sound speed image reveals the extent and lateral continuity of such interleaving layers. There is evidence of obliquely aligned internal waves emanating from the slope at 450-500 m. They follow the predicted trajectory of internal S2 tidal waves and can promote vertical mixing between Atlantic and Arctic-origin waters.

  11. The character and amplitude of 'discontinuous' bottom-simulating reflections in marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Jess I. T.; Cook, Ann E.; Sawyer, Derek E.; Küçük, H. Mert; Goldberg, David S.

    2017-02-01

    Bottom-simulating reflections (BSRs) identified in seismic data are well documented; and are commonly interpreted to indicate the presence of gas hydrates along continental margins, as well as to estimate regional volumes of gas hydrate. A BSR is defined as a reflection that sub-parallels the seafloor but is opposite in polarity and cross-cuts dipping sedimentary strata. BSRs form as a result of a strong negative acoustic impedance contrast. BSRs, however, are a diverse seismic phenomena that manifest in strikingly contrasting ways in different geological settings, and in different seismic data types. We investigate the characteristics of BSRs, using conventional and high resolution, 2D and 3D seismic data sets in three locations: the Terrebonne and Orca Basins in the Gulf of Mexico, and Blake Ridge on the US Atlantic Margin. The acquisition geometry and frequency content of the seismic data significantly impact the resultant character of BSRs, as observed with depth and amplitude maps of the BSRs. Furthermore, our amplitude maps reinforce the concept that the BSR represents a zone, over which the transition from hydrate to free gas occurs, as opposed to the conventional model of the BSR occurring at a single interface. Our results show that a BSR can be mapped in three dimensions but it is not spatially continuous, at least not at the basin scale. Rather, a BSR manifests itself as a discontinuous, or patchy, reflection and only at local scales is it continuous. We suggest the discontinuous nature of BSRs is the result of variable saturation and distribution of free gas and hydrate, acquisition geometry and frequency content of the recorded seismic data. The commonly accepted definition of a BSR should be broadened with careful consideration of these factors, to represent the uppermost extent of enhanced amplitude at the shallowest occurrence of free gas trapped by overlying hydrate-bearing sediments.

  12. Deep seismic reflection survey of Queen Charlotte basin

    SciTech Connect

    Rohr, K.; Dietrich, J. )

    1990-05-01

    One thousand kilometers of 14 sec marine seismic reflection data collected in the Queen Charlotte basin region in 1988 provide excellent images of Tertiary sedimentary basin fill as well as deep crustal structure. The Tertiary section is highly variable in thickness, with up to 6,500 m of strata occurring in the deepest depocenters in a complex array of subbasins and half-grabens. Widespread extensional deformation including normal faulting during basin development was followed later by compressional deformation in the northern half of the basin. Sediments have been compressed into open folds and flower structures; some normal faults have been reactivated as reverse faults. Seismic interpretations of structural features suggest that Tertiary extension and compression have developed in response to strike-slip tectonics. Crust under Hecate Strait is more reflective than under Queen Charlotte Sound; geological interpretation of these discontinuous and structurally variable crustal reflections requires further analysis. In some areas of the basin (e.g., near the Sockeye wells, Hecate Strait) coherent reflections occur directly beneath the Tertiary section and may be images of Mesozoic strata. Deep reflections damaged at times of 7.0 to 10.0 sec on many profiles, provide for the seismic differentiation between reflective lower crust and nonreflective upper mantle. Estimated crustal thicknesses of 18-21 km beneath Hecate Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound indicate significant coastal thinning beneath the Queen Charlotte basin.

  13. Reconstruction of 2D seismic wavefield from Long-Period Seismogram and Short-Period Seismogram Envelope by Seismic Gradiometry applied to the Hi-net Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-04-01

    The high-sensitive seismograph network (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has about 800 stations with average separation of 20 km all over the Japanese archipelago. Although it is equipped with short-period seismometers, we also can observe long-period seismic wave up to 100 s in periods for significantly large earthquakes. In this case, we may treat long-period seismic waves as a 2D wavefield with station separations shorter than wavelength rather than individual traces at stations. In this study, we attempt to reconstruct 2D wavefield and obtain its propagation properties from seismic gradiometry (SG) method. The SG estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients from discrete station record by the Taylor series approximation with an inverse problem. By using spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, we can obtain properties of propagating wave packet such as the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading and radiation pattern. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary condition, we may decompose the vector elastic 2D wavefield estimated by the SG into divergence and rotation components. First, we applied the seismic gradiometry to a synthetic long-period (20-50 s) seismogram dataset computed by numerical simulation in realistic 3D medium at the Hi-net station layout as a feasibility test. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives are very well reproduced with average correlation coefficients higher than 0.99 in this period range. Applications to a real large earthquakes show that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield are well reconstructed with additional information of arrival direction and its slowness. The reconstructed wavefield contained a clear contrast in slowness between body and surface waves, regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation which may be attributed to scattering. Slowness

  14. Seismic architecture of the Chalk Group from onshore reflection data in eastern Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Julien; Anderskouv, Kresten; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Boussaha, Myriam; Nielsen, Lars; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn; Thibault, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The Upper Cretaceous-Danian chalk is well exposed in the 14 km long coastal cliff of Stevns Klint (eastern Denmark). The cliff is a world renowned for its spectacular exposure of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary. Based on regional geological knowledge of the field and cores, the characteristics of the Chalk Group have been well constrained. Distinct sedimentary facies have been encountered; the sedimentology, the biostratigraphy, the diagenesis and the reservoir properties have been thoroughly investigated and reported. Stimulated by the intensive geological research, the field studies have been completed with the acquisition of an extensive set of subsurface data. The data include high resolution 2D multichannel seismics onshore and offshore, a seismic refraction profile, two entirely cored boreholes including wireline logs, GPR cross-hole tomography, thermographic analysis, etc. We intend to compile and merge the geological and geophysical datasets to investigate the variation of the Chalk Group properties and their signature in the subsurface. In this communication, the seismic reflection data are being analysed. Very high resolution litho-, bio- and cyclostratigraphy can be correlated with the seismic stratigraphy. Several seismic facies are identified in the Chalk Group: the 'transparent' (white chalk), the stratified (marl-chalk alternations), the crudely stratified (flint-rich chalk) and the hummocky (bryozoan mounds). The units notably vary in thickness at a relatively small scale. The variations confirm the complex shelf organisation which was highly influenced by bottom currents. In addition to the stratigraphic observations, peculiar deformation structures can be recognised. The area has been supposedly tectonically stable since deposition as the coastal cliff lacks fault offset but the succession has been uplifted of c. 1 km. The main fracture patterns are associated with the recent unloading of the ice, opening shallow horizontal fractures

  15. Deep Seismic Reflection Images of the Sumatra Seismic and Aseismic Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Hananto, N. D.; Chauhan, A.; Carton, H. D.; Midenet, S.; Djajadihardja, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is seismically most active region on the Earth, and has been the site of three great earthquakes only in the last four years. The first of the series, the 2004 Boxing Day earthquake, broke 1300 km of the plate boundary and produced the devastating tsunami around the Indian Ocean. The second great earthquake occurred three months later in March 2005, about 150 km SE of the 2004 event. The Earth waited for three years, and then broke again in September 2007 at 1300 km SE of the 2004 event producing a twin earthquake of magnitudes of 8.5 and 7.9 at an interval of 12 hours, leaving a seismic gap of about 600 km between the second and third earthquake, the Sumatra Seismic Gap. Seismological and geodetic studies suggest that this gap is fully locked and may break any time. In order to study the seismic and tsunami risk in this locked region, a deep seismic reflection survey (Tsunami Investigation Deep Evaluation Seismic -TIDES) was carried out in May 2009 using the CGGVeritas vessel Geowave Champion towing a 15 long streamer, the longest ever used during a seismic survey, to image the nature of the subducting plate and associated features, including the seismogenic zone, from seafloor down to 50 km depth. A total of 1700 km of deep seismic reflection data were acquired. Three dip lines traverse the Sumatra subduction zone; one going through the Sumatra Seismic Gap, one crossing the region that broke during the 2007 great earthquake, and one going through the aseismic zone. These three dip profiles should provide insight about the locking mechanism and help us to understand why an earthquake occurs in one zone and not in aseismic zone. A strike-line was shot in the forearc basin connecting the locked zone with broken zone profiles, which should provide insight about barriers that might have stopped propagation of 2007 earthquake rupture further northward.

  16. Fault zone structure and seismic reflection characteristics in zones of slow slip and tsunami earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Henrys, Stuart; Sutherland, Rupert; Barker, Daniel; Wallace, Laura; Holden, Caroline; Power, William; Wang, Xiaoming; Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Downes, Gaye

    2015-04-01

    Over the last couple of decades we have learned that a whole spectrum of different fault slip behaviour takes place on subduction megathrust faults from stick-slip earthquakes to slow slip and stable sliding. Geophysical data, including seismic reflection data, can be used to characterise margins and fault zones that undergo different modes of slip. In this presentation we will focus on the Hikurangi margin, New Zealand, which exhibits marked along-strike changes in seismic behaviour and margin characteristics. Campaign and continuous GPS measurements reveal deep interseismic coupling and deep slow slip events (~30-60 km) at the southern Hikurangi margin. The northern margin, in contrast, experiences aseismic slip and shallow (<10-15 km) slow slip events (SSE) every 18-24 months with equivalent moment magnitudes of Mw 6.5-6.8. Updip of the SSE region two unusual megathrust earthquakes occurred in March and May 1947 with characteristics typical of tsunami earthquakes. The Hikurangi margin is therefore an excellent natural laboratory to study differential fault slip behaviour. Using 2D seismic reflection, magnetic anomaly and geodetic data we observe in the source areas of the 1947 tsunami earthquakes i) low amplitude interface reflectivity, ii) shallower interface relief, iii) bathymetric ridges, iv) magnetic anomaly highs and in the case of the March 1947 earthquake v) stronger geodetic coupling. We suggest that this is due to the subduction of seamounts, similar in dimensions to seamounts observed on the incoming Pacific plate, to depths of <10 km. We propose a source model for the 1947 tsunami earthquakes based on geophysical data and find that extremely low rupture velocities (c. 300 m/s) are required to model the observed large tsunami run-up heights (Bell et al. 2014, EPSL). Our study suggests that subducted topography can cause the nucleation of moderate earthquakes with complex, low velocity rupture scenarios that enhance tsunami waves, and the role of

  17. Web seismic Un ∗x: making seismic reflection processing more accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M. E.; Gough, C. A.

    1999-05-01

    Web Seismic Un ∗x is a browser-based user interface for the Seismic Un ∗x freeware developed at Colorado School of Mines. The interface allows users to process and display seismic reflection data from any remote platform that runs a graphical Web browser. Users access data and create processing jobs on a remote server by completing form-based Web pages whose Common Gateway Interface scripts are written in Perl. These scripts supply parameters, manage files, call Seismic Un ∗x routines and return data plots. The interface was designed for undergraduate commuter students taking geophysics courses who need to: (a) process seismic data and other time series as a class using computers in campus teaching labs and (b) complete course assignments at home. Students from an undergraduate applied geophysics course tested the Web user interface while completing laboratory assignments in which they acquired and processed common-depth-point seismic reflection data into a subsurface image. This freeware, which will be publicly available by summer 1999, was developed and tested on a Solaris 2.5 server and will be ported to other versions of Unix, including Linux.

  18. Seismic reflection survey conducted in Benton County, Washinton

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, H.G.; Heineck, R.L. )

    1980-01-01

    The massive Columbia River Basalt group that underlies the Hanford Site is being considered as a potential geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. As part of the effort to ascertain and better understand the physical and geological properties of these basalt flows, a multiphased seismic reflection program has been undertaken. This phase was designed to more thoroughly define geologic features and structural attitudes in an areas in the central part of the Hanford Site. The specific feature of interest is known as the Cold Creek Syncline. This seismic survey, utilized the VIBROSEIS'' energy source and multifold common depth point recording. 2 figs.

  19. Crosswell seismic reflection/diffraction tomography: A reservoir characterization application

    SciTech Connect

    Tura, M.A.C. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Greaves, R.J. . Earth Resources Lab.); Beydoun, W.B. )

    1994-03-01

    A crosswell seismic experiment at the San Emidio oil field in Bakersfield, California, is carried out to evaluate crosswell reflection/diffraction tomography and image the interwell region to locate a possible pinchout zone. In this experiment, the two wells used are 2,500 ft (762 m) apart, and the zone to be imaged is 11,000 ft (3,350 m) to 13,000 ft (3,960 m) deep. With the considered distances, this experiment forms the first large scale reservoir characterization application of crosswell reflection/diffraction tomography. A subset of the intended data, formed of two common receiver gathers and one common shot gather, was collected at the San Emidio oil field. The cross-well data display a wide variety of wave modes including tube waves, singly and multiply reflected/diffracted waves, and refracted waves. The data are processed using frequency filters, median filters, and spatial muting filters to enhance the reflected/diffracted energy. With the encouraging results obtained from synthetic data, the ERBMI method, with the smooth background velocity model is used next to image the processed field data. Images obtained from the crosswell data show a good match with the reflected field in the zero-offset VSPs and with migrated surface seismic data. From the interpretation of these images, the potential of this crosswell seismic method for answering questions regarding reservoir continuity and existence of pinchout zones can be seen.

  20. High-resolution Seismic Reflection Imaging of Thin, Diamondiferous Kimberlite Dykes and Sills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, P. T.; Clowes, R. M.; Ramachandran, K.

    2003-12-01

    synthetic seismograms in order to explore thin-bed resolution limitations, tuning effects and acquisition parameters. The seismic survey included two 2-d lines designed to obtain comparative datasets between different sources (explosives and vibroseis) and ground types (land and lake-ice). The explosive-source, land data yield a superb image of the thin dyke with high-amplitude reflections mapping the dyke topography to 1300 m depth. Weaker reflections indicate the dyke can be imaged to depths in excess of 1500 m. The vibroseis data detect the dyke only when sources and geophones are on land; they provide an image with nearly equivalent resolution. The dyke is not imaged beneath the ice by either source, due to reverberation and attenuation effects. The thickness of the thin intrusive layer is not directly resolved and 3-d structure makes the interpretation of fine-scale variations in reflectivity and continuity difficult. However, apparent correlations between variations in reflection characteristics and dyke properties (thickness, feathering, structure, and physical properties) suggest that seismic reflection data may be valuable for guiding drilling programs. The results demonstrate that, in the appropriate situation, seismic reflection methods have great potential for use in kimberlite exploration, subsurface mapping, and detailed imaging for mine development purposes.

  1. Seismic reflection imaging with conventional and unconventional sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros Ugalde, Diego Alonso

    This manuscript reports the results of research using both conventional and unconventional energy sources as well as conventional and unconventional analysis to image crustal structure using reflected seismic waves. The work presented here includes the use of explosions to investigate the Taiwanese lithosphere, the use of 'noise' from railroads to investigate the shallow subsurface of the Rio Grande rift, and the use of microearthquakes to image subsurface structure near an active fault zone within the Appalachian mountains. Chapter 1 uses recordings from the land refraction and wide-angle reflection component of the Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research (TAIGER) project. The most prominent reflection feature imaged by these surveys is an anomalously strong reflector found in northeastern Taiwan. The goal of this chapter is to analyze the TAIGER recordings and to place the reflector into a geologic framework that fits with the modern tectonic kinematics of the region. Chapter 2 uses railroad traffic as a source for reflection profiling within the Rio Grande rift. Here the railroad recordings are treated in an analogous way to Vibroseis recordings. These results suggest that railroad noise in general can be a valuable new tool in imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface in environmental and geotechnical studies. In chapters 3 and 4, earthquakes serve as the seismic imaging source. In these studies the methodology of Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) is borrowed from the oil and gas industry to develop reflection images. In chapter 3, a single earthquake is used to probe a small area beneath Waterboro, Maine. In chapter 4, the same method is applied to multiple earthquakes to take advantage of the increased redundancy that results from multiple events illuminating the same structure. The latter study demonstrates how dense arrays can be a powerful new tool for delineating, and monitoring temporal changes of deep structure in areas characterized by significant

  2. Sub-glacial processes interpreted from 3D and high-resolution 2D seismic data from the Central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Francis

    2013-04-01

    A near complete record of Quaternary deposition, comprising more than 1000m of sediments, is preserved within the Central North Sea (CNS). This study presents evidence interpreted from seismic data of sub-glacial processes at a variety of scales for several Pleistocene glacial events. The study area has been the subject of hydrocarbon exploration since the mid 1960s and is covered by 3D seismic datasets up to 1000km2 as well as high-resolution 2D (HR2D) seismic datasets covering areas of 1-25km2. These data have been examined using a variety of techniques and attributes, including time-slicing, horizon slicing, topographic mapping and attribute analysis, to map erosion surfaces, depositional bodies, sedimentary textures and deformation events. An Early Pleistocene seismic event has been identified on 3D data, at 800-1000m MSL, within the southern part of the CNS, which marks the first appearance of iceberg ploughmarks. This event has been traced into the northern part of the study area, where iceberg ploughmarks are absent, but a set of mega-scale lineations at 700-800ms TWT are interpreted as ice-stream scour marks. A series of complex seismic events overlying the ice-scoured surface are interpreted as glacial deposits, at the top of which a network of channels, interpreted to be the result of glacial meltwaters, is associated with features interpreted as over-bank sand bodies. Higher in the sequence, timeslice images of Early to Middle Pleistocene deposits show trains of sub-parallel, curvi-linear, events, several km in length and 50-300m in width. Analysis of these events on HR2D data reveals them to consist of series of short, imbricated, dipping reflectors, terminated by complex, mounded structures. Individual sheets display up to 60ms TWT (55m) vertical displacement over horizontal distances of 200-250m. Two deformed packages are evident on HR2D data. A lower sequence, consisting of discrete thrust sheets lies above an erosion or dislocation surface (MP1

  3. Advantages of wet work for near-surface seismic reflection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Markiewicz, R.D.; Rademacker, T.R.; Hopkins, R.; Rawcliffe, R.J.; Paquin, J.

    2007-01-01

    Benefits of shallow water settings (0.1 to 0.5 m) are pronounced on shallow, high-resolution seismic reflection images and, for examples discussed here, range from an order of magnitude increased signal-to-noise ratio to resolution potential elevated by more than 8 times. Overall data quality of high-resolution seismic reflection data at three sites notorious for poor near-surface reflection returns was improved by coupling the source and/or receivers to a well sorted and fully saturated surface. Half-period trace-to-trace static offsets evident in reflections from receivers planted into a creek bank were eliminated by moving the geophones to the base of a shallow creek at the toe of the bank. Reflections from a dipping bedrock were recorded with a dominant frequency approaching 1 KHz from hydrophones in 0.5 m of water at the toe of a dam using a hammer impact source. A tamper impacted by a dead blow hammer in a shallow (10-20 cm) deep creek produced reflections with a dominant frequency over 400 Hz at depths as shallow as 6 ms. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. Neotectonic structure in the central new madrid seismic zone: Evidence from multimode seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolery, E.W.; Street, R.L.; Wang, Z.; Harris, J.B.; McIntyre, J.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 14.5 km of conventional P-wave and 2.2 km of horizontally polarized shear-wave seismic-reflection data acquired in the Kentucky Bend area of the central New Madrid Seismic Zone provide evidence of extensive neotectonic near-surface structure. The style and geometry of the deformation are consistent with documented historical geomorphic features, contemporary geomorphic features, and contemporary seismicity. The data image high-angle transpressional faults that strike between N30??W and N50??W. The fault planes exhibit apparent northeast and southwest dips. The opposing high-angle planes represent secondary splay or imbricate faults that responded to torsional bending of a lower-angle master fault.

  5. Deep crustal structure of magma-rich passive margin as revealed by the Northeast GreenlandSPAN 2D seismic survey and airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Stanislaw; Rippington, Stephen; Silva, Mercia; Houghton, Phill; Helwig, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The objective of our project was to integrate the results from the Northeast GreenlandSPAN™ 2D seismic survey with newly acquired airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (FTG) and Magnetic potential field data over the Danmarkshaven Ridge area, NE Greenland. The potential field data were constrained by 32 long offset pre stack depth migrated seismic profiles selected from the Northeast GreenlandSPAN™ survey. The results provide a new insight in the deep crustal architecture of the Greenland passive margin. They also shed a new light on crustal-scale deformation and igneous activity in a magma-rich continental margin. The structural data set is based on the integrated interpretation of 2D seismic data and FTG data, which was further supplemented by the airborne magnetic data plus the gravity and magnetic shipborne data. 2D gravity and magnetic forward modelling was used for testing geological/seismic models against the potential field data. A regional Moho grid derived from 3D gravity inversion was as a starting point and reference for the 2D modelling. The resultant horizons from the 2D potential fields models were subsequently gridded to help create a 3D structural model. The computed residual signal from the 3D model, the difference between the observed gravity and the forward calculated model response, allowed the accuracy of the structural interpretation to be tested. The area is dominated by three structural trends: (1) N-S to NNE-SSW, (2) WNW-ESE, and (3) NW-SE. The first trend is represented by Early Cretaceous normal faults defining the Danmarkshaven Ridge whereas the second set of structures corresponds to the WNW-ESE oriented right-lateral strike slip faults. The third structural trend is delineated by the NW-SE oriented Greenland Fracture Zone (GFZ). Importantly, a distinct step in the COB suggests post-break-up reactivation of the GFZ with left-lateral kinematics. There is a good match between the modelled Moho and the GFZ suggesting its continuation

  6. Modeling the seismic response of 2D models of asteroid 433 Eros, based on the spectral-element method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitz, Celine; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Lognonné, Philippe; Martin, Roland; Le Goff, Nicolas

    The understanding of the interior structure of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) is a fundamental issue to determine their evolution and origin, and also, to design possible mitigation techniques (Walker and Huebner, 2004). Indeed, if an oncoming Potentially Hazardous Object (PHO) were to threaten the Earth, numerous methods are suggested to prevent it from colliding our planet. Such mitigation techniques may involve nuclear explosives on or below the object surface, impact by a projectile, or concentration of solar energy using giant mirrors (Holsapple, 2004). The energy needed in such mitigation techniques highly depends on the porosity of the hazardous threatening object (asteroid or comet), as suggested by Holsapple, 2004. Thus, for a given source, the seismic response of a coherent homogeneous asteroid should be very different from the seismic response of a fractured or rubble-pile asteroid. To assess this hypothesis, we performed numerical simulations of wave propagation in different interior models of the Near Earth Asteroid 433 Eros. The simulations of wave propagation required a shape model of asteroid Eros, kindly provided by A. Cheng and O. Barnouin-Jha (personal communication). A cross-section along the longest axis has been chosen to define our 2D geometrical model, and we study two models of the interior: a homogeneous one, and a complex one characterized by fault networks below the main crosscut craters, and covered by a regolith layer of thickness ranging from 50 m to 150 m. To perform the numerical simulations we use the spectral-element method, which solves the variational weak form of the seismic wave equation (Komatitsch and Tromp, 1999) on the meshes of the 2D models of asteroid Eros. The homogeneous model is composed of an elastic material characterized by a pressure wave velocity Vp = 3000 m.s-1 , a shear wave velocity Vs = 1700 m.s-1 and a density of 2700 kg.m-3 . The fractured model possesses the same characteristics except for the presence of

  7. Seismic reflection characteristics of naturally-induced subsidence affecting transportation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipelines can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  8. Seismic Velocity Structure Across the Quebrada and Gofar Oceanic Transform Faults from 2D Refraction Tomography - A Comparison of Faults with High and Low Seismic Slip Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2009-12-01

    We perform two 2-D tomographic inversions using data collected as a part of the Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar (QDG) Transform Fault Active/Passive Experiment. The QDG transform faults are located in the southern Pacific Ocean and offset the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at approximately 4° south. In the spring of 2008, two ~100 km refraction profiles were collected, each using 8 short period Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) from OBSIP and over 900 shots from the RV Marcus Langseth, across the easternmost segments of the Quebrada and Gofar transform faults. The two refraction profiles are modeled using a 2-D tomographic code that allows joint inversion of the Pg, PmP, and Pn arrivals (Korenaga et al., 2000). Variations in crustal velocity and thickness, as well as the width and depth extent of a significant low velocity zone within and below the transform valley provide some insight into the material properties of each of the fault-zones. Reduced seismic velocities that are 0.5 to over 1.0 km/s slower than velocities associated with the oceanic crust outside the fault zone may indicate the highly fractured fault zone lithology. The low velocity zone associated with the Quebrada fault also extends to the south of the active fault zone, beneath a fossil fault trace. Because Gofar is offset by an intratransform spreading center, we are able to compare ‘normal’ oceanic crust produced at the EPR to the south of the fault with crust associated with the ~15 km intratransform spreading center to the north. These two high slip rate (14 cm/yr) faults look similar morphologically and demonstrate comparable microseismicity characteristics, however their abilities to generate large earthquakes differ significantly. Gofar generates large earthquakes (Mw ~6) regularly every few years, but in the past 24 years only one large (Mw 5.6) event has been reliably located on Quebrada. The contrasting seismic behavior of these faults represents the range of behavior observed in the global

  9. Well log and 2D seismic data character of the Wilcox Group in south-central Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enomoto, Catherine B.

    2014-01-01

    The Wilcox Group is productive in updip areas of Texas and Louisiana from fluvial, deltaic, and near-shore marine shelf sandstones. The reported presence of porous sandstones at 29,000 feet within the Wilcox Group containing about 200 feet of gas in the Davy Jones 1 discovery well in the offshore Louisiana South Marsh Island area illustrates a sand-rich system developed during the Paleocene and early Eocene. This study describes some of the well log and reflection seismic data characteristics of the slope and basin-floor reservoirs with gas-discovery potential that may be in the area between the producing trend onshore Louisiana and the offshore discovery.

  10. Seismic Reflectivity of the Crust in the Northern Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Fuis, G. S.; Goldman, M.; Persaud, P.; Ryberg, T.; Langenheim, V. E.; Scheirer, D. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Catchings, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Salton Trough in southern California is a tectonically active pull-apart basin that was formed by migrating step-overs between strike-slip faults, of which the San Andreas Fault (SAF) and the Imperial Fault are the current, northernmost examples. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was undertaken to improve our knowledge of fault geometry and seismic velocities within the sedimentary basins and underlying crystalline crust around the SAF. Such data are useful as input for modeling scenarios of strong ground shaking in the surrounding high-population areas. We used pre-stack depth migration of line segments from shot gathers in several seismic profiles that were acquired in the northern part of the SSIP study area (Lines 4 - 7). Our migration approach can be considered as an infinite-frequency approximation of the Fresnel volume pre-stack depth migration method. We use line segments instead of the original waveform data. We demonstrate the method using synthetic data and analyze real data from Lines 4 - 7 to illustrate the relationship between distinct phases in the time domain and their resulting image at depth. We show both normal-moveout reflections from sub-horizontal interfaces and reverse-moveout reflections from steep interfaces, such as faults. Migrated images of dipping faults, such as the SAF and the Pinto Mountain Fault, are presented in this way. The SAF is imaged along Line 4, through the Mecca Hills, as a number of steeply dipping fault segments that collectively form a flower structure, above 5 km depth, that sole into a moderately NE-dipping fault below that depth. The individual migrated reflection packages correlate with mapped surface fault traces in the Mecca Hills. A similar geometry is seen on Line 6, from Palm Springs through Yucca Valley, where fault splays sole or project into a moderately dipping SAF below 10-km depth. We also show and discuss the reflectivity pattern of the middle and lower crust for Lines 4 - 7.

  11. High resolution seismic reflection test at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, S.M.; Michelsen, F.B.; Clark, J.C.; Christensen, E.W.

    1995-04-01

    A recent test was conducted to ascertain the benefits of swept source technology for use at the DOE Hanford Site. Previous high resolution seismic surveys suffered from coherent noise interference, poor signal transmission and lack of borehole velocity control. P-wave data were collected with the T-2500 Minivib produced by IVI, Inc. and Oyo Geospace`s DAS-1 acquisition system. Results showed a significant increase m signal-to-noise ratio, increased resolving power and better depth penetration of the signal. It is concluded that swept source technology as part of a total systems approach, significantly expands the capabilities of the shallow high resolution seismic reflection method for use at the DOE Hanford Site.

  12. Seismic reflection images of shallow faulting, northernmost Mississippi embayment, north of the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Nelson, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection surveys document tectonic faults that displace Pleistocene and older strata just beyond the northeast termination of the New Madrid seismic zone, at the northernmost extent of the Mississippi embayment. These faults, which are part of the Fluorspar Area fault complex in southeastern Illinois, are directly in line with the northeast-trending seismic zone. The reflection data were acquired using an elastic weight-drop source recorded to 500 msec by a 48-geophone array (24-fold) with a 10-ft (??3.0m) station interval. Recognizable reflections were recorded to about 200 msec (100-150 m). The effects of multiple reflections, numerous diffractions, low apparent velocity (i.e., steeply dipping) noise, and the relatively low-frequency content of the recorded signal provided challenges for data processing and interpreting subtle fault offsets. Data processing steps that were critical to the detection of faults included residual statics, post-stack migration, deconvolution, and noise-reduction filtering. Seismic migration was crucial for detecting and mitigating complex fault-related diffraction patterns, which produced an apparent 'folding' of reflectors on unmigrated sections. Detected individual offsets of shallow reflectors range from 5 to 10 m for the top of Paleozoic bedrock and younger strata. The migrated sections generally indicate vertical to steeply dipping normal and reverse faults, which in places outline small horsts and/or grabens. Tilting or folding of stratal reflectors associated with faulting is also locally observed. At one site, the observed faulting is superimposed over a prominent antiformal structure, which may itself be a product of the Quaternary deformation that produced the steep normal and reverse faults. Our results suggest that faulting of the Paleozoic bedrock and younger sediments of the northern Mississippi embayment is more pervasive and less localized than previously thought.

  13. A deep reflection seismic line across the Northern Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, F.; Brun, J.-P.; Ecors-Dekorp Working Group

    1991-06-01

    Two reflection seismic lines across the Tertiary Rhine Graben in Central Europe were recorded in 1988 as a joint venture of the French ECORS and the German DEKORP deep seismic reflection programs. In this paper the line across the northern graben is presented. The main results are: The asymmetry of the graben as documented by the sedimentary fill is accompanied by asymmetric features throughout the entire deep crystalline crust: a thin (3.7 s TWT) reflective lower crust in the east—a thick (5.5 s TWT), relatively transparent lower crust in the west, total crustal thicknesses of 8.7 s TWT in the east vs. 10.5 s TWT in the west. Provided a laterally homogeneous crust existed prior to rifting significant differences in upper and lower crustal thinning must be postulated. Extension occurred along localized shear zones that are located in the upper crust and at the crust/mantle boundary. The entire lower crustal layer acts as a decoupling zone.

  14. Marine deep seismic reflection profiles off central California

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J. Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX ); Talwani, M. Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX )

    1991-04-10

    A strong reflection horizon at two-way travel time of approximately 6 s is observed in a deep seismic profile across the outer continental shelf of central California. It is interpreted as the seismic image of subducted oceanic crust emplaced prior to the change from principally convergent to principally transcurrent motion between the Pacific and North American plates during the late Paleogene. The reflector dips landward at a very shallow angle and is at a depth of 14-15 km under Santa Lucia Bank. The reflection is not observed, or at best is very discontinuous, under the inner shelf (Santa Maria Basin). This suggests that tectonic or other processes have produced significantly different structural styles or compositions on the two sides of the Santa Lucia Bank fault. Under the outer shelf a prominent, apparently deeper (later arrival time) horizon dips more steeply and diverges from the 6-s reflector. The deep horizon is at least partially composed of diffracted energy but is nearly linear after migration. Possible interpretations are that the horizon indicates crustal imbrication or out-of-plane diffractions. Alternatively, it is a relict feature imparted to the crust at the now inactive Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge. Reflective zones at intermediate depths are observed in apparently accreted sediments in parts of the Santa Lucia and Santa Maria basins. These features could represent tectonically induced fabrics within the accretionary complex, or they could be coherent depositional sequences.

  15. Mesozoic and Cenozoic plate tectonics in the High Arctic: new 2D seismic data and geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishin, Anatoly; Kazmin, Yuriy; Glumov, Ivan; Petrov, Eugene; Poselov, Viktor; Burov, Evgueni; Gaina, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Our paper is mainly based on the interpretation of 2D seismic lines, obtained from Arctic-2001 and Arctic-2012 projects. We also analyzed all available open-source data concerning Arctic geology. Three domains are distinguished in the abyssal part of Arctic Ocean: (1) Canada Basin, (2) Lomonosov-Podvodnikov-Alpha-Mendeleev-Nautilus-Chukchi Plateau (LPAMNCP) area, (3) Eurasia Basin. Canada Basin has oceanic and transitional crust of different structure. The formation time of this oceanic basin is probably 134-117 Ma. New seismic data for LPAMNCP area shows numerous rift structures parallel to the Lomonosov Ridge and Mendeleev Ridge. These rift structures are also nearly orthogonal to the Canada Basin spreading axis, and this may indicate either a different mechanism for the formation of the LPAMNCP region and Canada Basin, or a very complicated basin architecture formed by processes we do not yet understand. We also observe at the base of the LPAMNCP area sedimentary cover packages of bright reflectors, they were interpreted as basalt flows probably related to the Cretaceous plume volcanism. Approximate time of the volcanism is about 125 Ma. After this event, the area experienced stretching and transtension as documented by large scale rifting structures. The younger Eurasian Basin has oceanic crust of Eocene to Recent age, and our new seismic data confirms that Gakkel Ridge has typical ultraslow-spreading zone topography. Perhaps, Eurasia Basin crust was partly formed by exhumed and serpentinized mantle. Lomonosov and Alpha-Mendeleev Ridges has typical present-day basin and range topography with Oligocene to Recent faults. It means, that all LPAMNCP area was subjected to regional intra-plate stretching during Neogene to Recent time. We assume, that this intra-plate stretching was related to the Gakkel Ridge extension. We suppose, that the deep-water part of Arctic Ocean was formed during three main stages: (1) Valanginian - Early Aptian: formation of Canada Basin

  16. Seismic imaging of sandbox experiments - laboratory hardware setup and first reflection seismic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Buddensiek, M.-L.; Oncken, O.; Kukowski, N.

    2012-10-01

    With the study and technical development introduced here, we combine analogue sandbox simulation techniques with seismic physical modelling of sandbox models. For that purpose, we designed and developed a new mini-seismic facility for laboratory use, comprising a seismic tank, a PC-driven control unit, a positioning system, and piezo-electric transducers used here the first time in an array mode. To assess the possibilities and limits of seismic imaging of small-scale structures in sandbox models, different geometry setups were tested in the first experiments that also tested the proper functioning of the device and studied the seismo-elastic properties of the granular media used. Simple two-layer models of different materials and layer thicknesses as well as a more complex model comprising channels and shear zones were tested using different acquisition geometries and signal properties. We suggest using well sorted and well rounded grains with little surface roughness (glass beads). Source receiver-offsets less than 14 cm for imaging structures as small as 2.0-1.5 mm size have proven feasible. This is the best compromise between wide beam and high energy output, and being applicable with a consistent waveform. Resolution of the interfaces of layers of granular materials depends on the interface preparation rather than on the material itself. Flat grading of interfaces and powder coverage yields the clearest interface reflections. Finally, sandbox seismic sections provide images of very good quality showing constant thickness layers as well as predefined channel structures and fault traces from shear zones. Since these can be regarded in sandbox models as zones of decompaction, they behave as reflectors and can be imaged. The multiple-offset surveying introduced here improves the quality with respect to S/N-ratio and source signature even more; the maximum depth penetration in glass bead layers thereby amounts to 5 cm. Thus, the presented mini-seismic device is

  17. Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Frary, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Eisses, A.

    2016-08-01

    Roxanna Frary, John N. Louie, Sathish Pullammanappallil, Amy Eisses, 2011, Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract T13G-07.

  18. 3D Seismic Reflection Experiment Over the Galicia Deep Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Dale; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Morgan, Julia; Shillington, Donna; Reston, Timothy; Minshull, Timothy; Klaeschen, Dirk; Ranero, César

    2014-05-01

    In June thru September, 2013, a 3D reflection and a long offset seismic experiment were conducted at the Galicia rifted margin by investigators from the US, UK, Germany, and Spain. The 3D multichannel experiment covered 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2), using the RV Marcus Langseth. Four streamers 6 km long were deployed at 12.5 m hydrophone channel spacing. The streamers were 200 m apart. Two airgun arrays, each 3300 cu in, were fired alternately every 37.5 m, to collectively yield a 400 m wide sail line consisting of 8 CMP lines at 50 m spacing. The long offset seismic experiment included 72 short period OBS's deployed below the 3D reflection survey box. Most of the instruments recorded all the shots from the airgun array shots. The 3D seismic box covered a variety of geologic features. The Peridotite Ridge (PR), is associated with the exhumation of upper mantle rocks to the seafloor during the final stage of the continental separation between the Galicia Bank and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The S reflector is present below most of the continental blocks under the deep Galicia basin. S is interpreted to be a low-angle detachment fault formed late in the rifting process, and a number of rotated fault block basins and ranges containing pre and syn-rift sediments. Initial observations from stacked, but not yet migrated, 3D seismic data show that the PR is elevated above the present seafloor in the South and not exposed through the seafloor in the North. The relative smoothness of the PR surface for the entire 20 km N-S contrasts with the more complex, shorter wavelength, faulting of the continental crustal blocks to the east. The PR does not seem to show offsets or any apparent internal structure. However, migration will be required to see internal structure of the PR. Between the PR and the western most rifted continental crustal blocks, is a sedimentary basin about as wide as the PR and very different from the sedimentary basins bounded by the continental crustal

  19. Seismic reflection images of the accretionary wedge of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, T.H.; Stoffa, P.L. ); McIntosh, K.; Silver, E.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The large-scale structure of modern accretionary wedges is known almost entirely from seismic reflection investigations using single or grids of two-dimensional profiles. The authors will report on the first three-dimensional seismic reflection data volume collected of a wedge. This data set covers a 9-km-wide {times} 22-km-long {times} 6-km-thick volume of the accretionary wedge just arcward of the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. The three-dimensional processing has improved the imaging ability of the multichannel data, and the data volume allows mapping of structures from a few hundred meters to kilometers in size. These data illustrate the relationships between the basement, the wedge shape, and overlying slope sedimentary deposits. Reflections from within the wedge define the gross structural features and tectonic processes active along this particular convergent margin. So far, the analysis shows that the subdued basement relief (horst and graben structures seldom have relief of more than a few hundred meters off Costa Rica) does affect the larger scale through going structural features within the wedge. The distribution of mud volcanoes and amplitude anomalies associated with the large-scale wedge structures suggests that efficient fluid migration paths may extend from the top of the downgoing slab at the shelf edge out into the lower and middle slope region at a distance of 50-100 km. Offscraping of the uppermost (about 45 m) sediment occurs within 4 km of the trench, creating a small pile of sediments near the trench lower slope. Underplating of parts of the 400-m-thick subducted sedimentary section begins at a very shallow structural level, 4-10 km arcward of the trench. Volumetrically, the most important accretionary process is underplating.

  20. Deep 3-D seismic reflection imaging of Precambrian sills in the crystalline crust of Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welford, Joanna Kim

    2005-07-01

    Using deep 3-D seismic reflection datasets collected by the Canadian petroleum exploration industry in southwestern and northwestern Alberta, the Head-Smashed-In and Winagami Precambrian sill complexes within the crystalline upper crust, previously identified on Lithoprobe 2-D multichannel reflection lines, are investigated to determine their 3-D geometries and reflective characteristics. During seismic processing of the dataset in southwestern Alberta, a recently developed wavelet-based method, Physical Wavelet Frame Denoising, is applied and shown to successfully suppress ground roll contamination while preserving low frequency signals from deeper structures. A new 3-D empirical trace interpolation scheme, DSInt, is developed to address the problem of spatial aliasing associated with 3-D data acquisition. Results from applying the algorithm to both datasets are comparable to available interpolation codes while allowing for greater flexibility in the handling of irregular acquisition geometries and interpolated trace headers. Evidence of the Head-Smashed-In reflector in southwestern Alberta is obtained using a dataset acquired to 8 s TWTT (approx. 24 km depth). From locally coherent, discontinuous pockets of basement reflectivity, the dataset appears to image the tapering western edge of the deep reflections imaged by Lithoprobe. A statistical approach of tracking reflectivity is developed and applied to obtain the spatial and temporal distribution of reflections. Simple 1-D forward modelling results reveal that the brightest reflections likely arise from a 50 to 150 m thick body of high density/high velocity material although variations in the amplitudes and lateral distribution of the reflections indicate that the thickness of the sills is laterally variable. Thus, the results are consistent with imaging the tapering edge of the sill complex. Clear evidence of the Winagami reflection sequence in northwestern Alberta, emerges from the second dataset acquired to 5

  1. The limits of seaward spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Geersen, Jacob; Behrmann, Jan Hinrich; Ridente, Domenico; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Bialas, Jörg; Papenberg, Cord; Cukur, Deniz; Urlaub, Morelia; Micallef, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Instability of its eastern flank is well documented onshore, and continuously monitored by geodetic and InSAR measurements. Little is known, however, about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank, defining a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired a new high-resolution 2D reflection seismic dataset. The data provide new insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna. The submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. A compressional regime is found at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to a complex basin system. Both, the clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures as well as the compressional regime at the easternmost flank edge, indicate a continental margin gravitational collapse as well as spreading to be present at Mt Etna. Moreover, we find evidence for the offshore southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault north of Catania Canyon. Our findings suggest a coupled volcano edifice/continental margin instability at Mt Etna, demonstrating first order linkage between on- and offshore tectonic processes.

  2. An asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a permeable layer

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.; Goloshubin, G.

    2009-10-15

    Analysis of compression wave propagation in a poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection from a high-permeability layer in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of Biot's model of poroelasticity. A review of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and Darcy's law suggests an alternative new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The absolute value of this parameter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility and the wave frequency. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). Practical applications of the obtained asymptotic formulae are seismic modeling, inversion, and at-tribute analysis.

  3. Reinterpretation of seismic reflection data over the East Pacific Rise

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.D.; Morton, C.J.; Sleep, N.H.

    1982-09-10

    Multichannel seismic reflection data over the axial region of the East Pacific Rise are depth migrated using detailed velocity information from laboratory measurements of ophiolite samples. The data are from the Lamont Doherty Geological Observatory's line 17 shot across the rise at 9/sup 0/N. The migrated data are interpreted to show the structure of the seafloor and what we believe is the magma chamber roof. The polarity and apparent root mean squared velocity of the magma chamber roof are asymmetric with respect to the topographic axis of the ridge. The asymmetry is probably real and not an artifact of data collection. Modeling of the magnetic data gathered along the line shows that spreading has not been proceeding normally. A reasonable explanation for the asymmetry is the possibility that the line intersects a transform fault or an abandoned ridge segment near the ridge axis. The shape of the roof reflection is convex upward with an approximate slope of 10/sup 0/ and a width of 4 km. If extrapolated symmetrically to the other side of the ridge axis, the magma chamber roof event is consistent with the funnel-shaped chamber proposed by Pallister and Hopson (1981) for the Samail ophiolite. If the chamber roof steepens rapidly beyond the extent of the reflection, it would be consistent with the mush-filled model of Sleep (1975, 1978) and Dewey and Kidd (1977).

  4. Seismic reflection exploration of geothermal reservoir at Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alay G., Gebregiorgis

    The Primary objective of this study is to increase geologic and tectonic understanding of the geothermal resources at the Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada. The seismic reflection method is employed to study faults, fractures and other tectonic structures in the subsurface in order to identify geothermal drill targets. The efficiency of geothermal systems is strongly dependent on water circulation. Discrete faults may be permeable and provide pathways for water flow depending on the fracture density. It is therefore desirable to detect and map faults and fracture zones and characterize their physical properties when evaluating a geothermal prospect. The seismic data for this project were provided by the NAS environmental research program in Ridgecrest, CA. However, the data collection information was not available so the work includes determining the line geometry and mapping shot points to field files in order to process the data. ProMAX 2D(TM) is the software used to determine the geometry and to process the data. Data processing includes eliminating noise, datum and refraction statics, trace muting, bandpass filter, automatic gain control, amplitude recovery, CMP sorting, velocity analysis and NMO correction, stacking and migration. The results of this study indicate the presence of thick basin fill including Tertiary and Quaternary sediments underlain by Tertiary basalts which are interpreted to be capping rocks for the geothermal reservoirs. This seismic reflection study also reveals the presence of strongly fractured pre-Tertiary basement complex with their top at about 1500m on the north and west and about 900 m on the eastern and southern part of the study area.

  5. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples; Jerome Eyer

    2001-05-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a 14 month proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are a noninvasive means towards site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This report covers the results of Task 3 and change of scope of Tasks 4-6. Task 1 contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task 2 is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data designed to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task 3 is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. Task 4, 5, and 6 were designing, acquiring, processing, and interpretation of a three dimensional seismic survey (3D) at the Z-9 crib area at 200 west area, Hanford.

  6. Multiple attenuation to reflection seismic data using Radon filter and Wave Equation Multiple Rejection (WEMR) method

    SciTech Connect

    Erlangga, Mokhammad Puput

    2015-04-16

    Separation between signal and noise, incoherent or coherent, is important in seismic data processing. Although we have processed the seismic data, the coherent noise is still mixing with the primary signal. Multiple reflections are a kind of coherent noise. In this research, we processed seismic data to attenuate multiple reflections in the both synthetic and real seismic data of Mentawai. There are several methods to attenuate multiple reflection, one of them is Radon filter method that discriminates between primary reflection and multiple reflection in the τ-p domain based on move out difference between primary reflection and multiple reflection. However, in case where the move out difference is too small, the Radon filter method is not enough to attenuate the multiple reflections. The Radon filter also produces the artifacts on the gathers data. Except the Radon filter method, we also use the Wave Equation Multiple Elimination (WEMR) method to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. The WEMR method can attenuate the long period multiple reflection based on wave equation inversion. Refer to the inversion of wave equation and the magnitude of the seismic wave amplitude that observed on the free surface, we get the water bottom reflectivity which is used to eliminate the multiple reflections. The WEMR method does not depend on the move out difference to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. Therefore, the WEMR method can be applied to the seismic data which has small move out difference as the Mentawai seismic data. The small move out difference on the Mentawai seismic data is caused by the restrictiveness of far offset, which is only 705 meter. We compared the real free multiple stacking data after processing with Radon filter and WEMR process. The conclusion is the WEMR method can more attenuate the long period multiple reflection than the Radon filter method on the real (Mentawai) seismic data.

  7. Urban shear-wave reflection seismics: Reconstruction support by combined shallow seismic and engineering geology investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Guenther, A.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, P.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    After the big 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the massive reconstruction activities in the Aceh province (Northern Sumatra) were promoted by the Republic of Indonesia and the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The aims of the project MANGEONAD (Management of Georisk Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam). are to establish geoscientific on the ground support for a sustainable development and management of save building constructions, lifelines, infrastructure and also natural resources. Therefore, shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in close combination to engineering geology investigations in the period between 2005-2009 since depth and internal structure of the Krueng Aceh River delta (mainly young alluvial sediments) were widely unknown. Due to the requirements in the densely populated Banda Aceh region, lacking also traffic infrastructure, a small and lightweight engineering seismic setup of high mobility and high subsurface resolution capability was chosen. The S-wave land streamer system with 48 channels was applied successfully together with the ELVIS vibratory source using S- and P-waves on paved roads within the city of Banda Aceh. The performance of the S-wave system enabled the detailed seismic investigation of the shallow subsurface down to 50-150 m depth generating shaking frequencies between 20 Hz to 200 Hz. This also provides depth information extending the maximum depths of boreholes and Standard Penetrometer Testings (SPT), which could only be applied to max. 20 m depth. To integrate the results gained from all three methods, and further to provide a fast statistical analysis tool for engineering use, the Information System Engineering Geology (ISEG, BGR) was developed. This geospatial information tool includes the seismic data, all borehole information, geotechnical SPT and laboratory results from samples available in the investigation area. Thereby, the geotechnical 3D analysis of the subsurface units is enabled. The

  8. The damping of seismic waves and its determination from reflection seismograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhard, L.

    1979-01-01

    The damping in theoretical waveforms is described phenomenologically and a classification is proposed. A method for studying the Earth's crust was developed which includes this damping as derived from reflection seismograms. Seismic wave propagation by absorption, attenuation of seismic waves by scattering, and dispersion relations are considered. Absorption of seismic waves within the Earth as well as reflection and transmission of elastic waves seen through boundary layer absorption are also discussed.

  9. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.-Y.; Ni, G. X.; Pan, C.; Fei, Z.; Cheng, B.; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M.; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  10. Tunable Plasmonic Reflection by Bound 1D Electron States in a 2D Dirac Metal.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B-Y; Ni, G X; Pan, C; Fei, Z; Cheng, B; Lau, C N; Bockrath, M; Basov, D N; Fogler, M M

    2016-08-19

    We show that the surface plasmons of a two-dimensional Dirac metal such as graphene can be reflected by linelike perturbations hosting one-dimensional electron states. The reflection originates from a strong enhancement of the local optical conductivity caused by optical transitions involving these bound states. We propose that the bound states can be systematically created, controlled, and liquidated by an ultranarrow electrostatic gate. Using infrared nanoimaging, we obtain experimental evidence for the locally enhanced conductivity of graphene induced by a carbon nanotube gate, which supports this theoretical concept.

  11. Imaging Enhancement on Deep Seismic Reflection with Petrel and Ocean Working Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, P.; Huang, D.; Feng, X.; Li, L.; Liu, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, Q.

    2011-12-01

    SinoProbe has been initiated to enhance understanding of earth deep structure, resources and geological disasters forecasting throughout Chinese continent. Besides traditional deep exploration methods, various state-of-the-art technologies have been carried out in order to acquire data and jointly utilize all possible information reflecting deep crust and mantle structures and evolution.Petrel, a powerful software application developed by Schlumberger, has been successfully applied to the O&G industry. It is now a complete seismic-to-simulation application for 3D and 2D seismic interpretation. However, it has a great potential to allow the user to extend utilization with multiple types of data sets to deal with much deeper geophysical information. Petrel all-in-one concept, that functionally comprises of massive data integration, multiple domains experts participation and 3D geological object-oriented etc., will come benefit to the deep earth study. Currently, there is no special tool designed for this purpose so that Petrel is required to extend its potential to cope with not only O&G area but also a larger area with unique requests of deeper objects.Ocean, a software framework for Petrel, provides an open development environment offering seamless integration of developer intellectual contribution to the Petrel mainstream workflow. It is able to accelerate the development and deployment of user's Petrel-like workflows to resolve complex problems. It can be implemented by means of plug-ins utilities although there is additional challenge to write a robust code with Ocean framework. Deep seismic reflection profiling is a well recognized technique to reveal the fine structure of lithosphere. Moreover, it can perform a significant role for prospective evaluation of O&G and mineral resources, and geological disasters. Its near-vertical deep seismic reflection method can enhance broad band seismic observations for imaging of the deep crust and continental geodynamics

  12. The Northwestern Atlantic Moroccan Margin From Deep Multichannel Seismic Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malod, J. A.; Réhault, J. P.; Sahabi, M.; Géli, L.; Matias, L.; Zitellini, N.; Sismar Group

    The NW Atlantic Moroccan margin, a conjugate of the Nova Scotia margin, is one of the oldest passive margins of the world. Continental break up occurred in the early Jurassic and the deep margin is characterized by a large salt basin. The SISMAR cruise (9 April to 4 May 2001) acquired 3667 km of 360 channel seismic reflection profiles. In addition, refraction data were recorded by means of 48 OBH/OBS deployments. Simultaneously, some of the marine profiles were extended onshore with 16 portable seismic land stations. WNW-ESE profiles 4 and 5 off El Jadida show a good section of the margin. The crustal thinning in this region is fairly abrupt. These profiles image the crust above a strong seismic reflector at about 12 s.twt., interpreted as the Moho. The crust exhibits several different characteristics from the continent towards the ocean.: - highly diffractive with a thickness larger than 25 km beneath the shelf. - stratified at a deep level and topped by few "tilted blocks" with a diffractive acoustic facies and for which 2 hypotheses are proposed: either continental crust tilted during the rifting or large landslides of crustal and sedimentary material slid down later. Liassic evapor- ites are present but seem less thick than to the south. - layered with seaward dipping reflectors: this type of crust correlates with the magnetic anomaly S1 and corresponds to the continent-ocean transition. - diffractive with an oceanic character. Oceanwards, the crust becomes more typically oceanic, but shows internal reflectors that may be re- lated to compressional reactivation during the Tertiary attested by large scale inverted basins. Our results allow us to discuss the nature and location of the continent-ocean transition at a regional scale and the rifting to spreading evolution of the very ma- ture continental margin off El Jadida. This provide us with some constraints for the initial reconstruction between Africa, North America and Iberia. Moreover, these re- sults help

  13. Seismic Images of the Crust across D-E Seismic Profile (TS04-Tsujal Project): Results of Reflection and Wide-Angle Seismic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, D.; Lopez Ortiz, J. Y.; Bartolome, R.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Danobeitia, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Escudero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    As a part of TSUJAL Project (Crustal characterization of the Rivera Plate-Jalisco Block boundary and its implications for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment), a geophysical study has been carried out during February and March 2014 in western continental margin of Jalisco where seismic reflection, wide-angle seismic, bathymetry and potential fields (gravity and magnetism) data have been obtained. Eight land seismic stations vertical component and 4.5 Hz model TEXAN 125A (REFTEK), were deployed along an offshore-onshore seismic profile of 140 km length in SW-NE orientation. These stations registered, in continuous model, the airgun shots provided by RRS James Cook used for Multichannel Seismic Reflection data acquisition every 50 m of distance interval and total capacity of 5800 ci along seismic profile D-E (TS04). In the onshore region, these stations were deployed every 20 km from Pérula to Nacastillo (Jalisco, Mexico). The study region corresponds to onshore-offshore line limited by (18o 54'N, 105o 59'W) (19o 26'N, 105o7'W) coordinates. In this work, seismic images of the crust along a deep seismic profile of 140 km length are presented. These images provide new cortical information about the southern part of Rivera Plate, continental accretionary wedge and first kilometers of Jalisco Block continental zone.

  14. Growth of lithospheric-scale fault system in NE Tibet: numerical modeling constrained by high-resolution seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhen; Zhang, Haiming

    2016-04-01

    The growth of lithospheric-scale fault system is strongly coupled with the deformation of continental lithosphere in Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, prediction of fault growth is important to understand the tectonic history of continental deformation with fault system. Recently, high-resolution seismic reflection profiling across the Kunlun fault in northeasten Tibet reveals several fault systems at the scale of lithosphere. A 2D mid-crustal strain-transfer model, which emphasized on the lateral heterogeneity of crust, was proposed to explain the seismic reflection profiling under the condition of compression. In order to understand the dynamic process of lithospheric deformation, an elastic-plastic constitutive relationship in finite element modeling is used to investigate the mechanism of the fault growth in the section under the condition of compression by allowing permanent strains to develop in response to the applied loads. The vertical and lateral heterogeneity of material, effect of plastic parameters and geometry of models from nature structure are all discussed in this study. The results compared with high-resolution seismic image show that well-designed geomechanical modeling can produce overall process of fault growth for both continuum without preexisting fault and discontinuous deformation with a peexisting fault. But the model of the Kunlun fault cutting down the Moho is not supported by the results compared with the seismic data.

  15. Resource efficient plasmon-based 2D-photovoltaics with reflective support.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Carl; Apell, S Peter

    2010-09-13

    For ultrathin (~10 nm) nanocomposite films of plasmonic materials and semiconductors, the absorptance of normal incident light is typically limited to about 50%. However, through addition of a non-absorbing spacer with a highly reflective backside to such films, close to 100% absorptance can be achieved at a targeted wavelength. Here, a simple analytic model useful in the long wavelength limit is presented. It shows that the spectral response can largely be characterized in terms of two wavelengths, associated with the absorber layer itself and the reflective support, respectively. These parameters influence both absorptance peak position and shape. The model is employed to optimize the system towards broadband solar energy conversion, with the spectrally integrated plasmon induced semiconductor absorptance as a figure of merit. Geometries optimized in this regard are then evaluated in full finite element calculations which demonstrate conversion efficiencies of up to 64% of the Shockley-Queisser limit. This is achieved using only the equivalence of about 10 nanometer composite material, comprising Ag and a thin film solar cell layer of a-Si, CuInSe₂ or the organic semiconductor MDMO-PPV. A potential for very resource efficient solar energy conversion based on plasmonics is thus demonstrated.

  16. Application of 3D reflection seismic methods to mineral exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urosevic, Milovan

    2013-04-01

    Seismic exploration for mineral deposits is often tested by excessively complex structures, regolith heterogeneity, intrinsically low signal to noise ratio, ground relief and accessibility. In brown fields, where the majority of the seismic surveys have been conducted, existing infrastructure, old pits and tailings, heavy machinery in operation, mine drainage and other mine related activities are further challenging the application of seismic methods and furthermore increasing its cost. It is therefore not surprising that the mining industry has been reluctant to use seismic methods, particularly 3D for mineral exploration, primarily due to the high cost, but also because of variable performance, and in some cases ambiguous interpretation results. However, shallow mineral reserves are becoming depleted and exploration is moving towards deeper targets. Seismic methods will be more important for deeper investigations and may become the primary exploration tool in the near future. The big issue is if we have an appropriate seismic "strategy" for exploration of deep, complex mineral reserves. From the existing case histories worldwide we know that massive ore deposits (VMS, VHMS) constitute the best case scenario for the application of 3D seismic. Direct targeting of massive ore bodies from seismic has been documented in several case histories. Sediment hosted deposits could, in some cases, can also produce a detectable seismic signature. Other deposit types such as IOCG and skarn are much more challenging for the application of seismic methods. The complexity of these deposits requires new thinking. Several 3D surveys acquired over different deposit types will be presented and discussed.

  17. On the Extraction of Seismic AVF Information and the Inversion of Anelastic Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, C.; Innanen, K. A.; Lines, L.; Naghizadeh, M.

    2011-12-01

    Strongly dispersive seismic anomalies associated with highly absorptive targets have been observed in seismic data. A frequency by frequency method (AVF) for determining the anelasticity of highly absorptive targets from measurements of the dispersive reflection coefficient is reviewed in this paper. In order to implement the AVF inversion technique, it is necessary that we have a method of estimating the local spectra of recorded seismic reflection events. We demonstrate AVF inversion using a calibrated, fast, non-redundant S-transform (FST) algorithm to estimate the local spectra of dispersive reflection coefficients. We test the effectiveness of the FST for estimating the spectrum of reflection coefficients by comparing with the analytic reflection coefficient. Using forward modeling to generate synthetic seismic traces with anelstic reflection coefficients, we observe accurate results of the AVF inversion using the FST.

  18. Southeast Georgia embayment high-resolution seismic-reflection survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Douglas W.

    1979-01-01

    A high-resolution seismic survey of the offshore part of the Southeast Georgia Embayment on about a 20 km spacing was completed in 1976. A stratigraphic analyses of the data shows that the largest controlling factor in the depositional history of the shelf has been the Gulf Stream. These currents have shifted back and forth across the shelf, at times incising into shelf sediments, and at all times blocking much of the accumulation of Cenozoic sediments seaward of the Florida-Hatteras Slope. In the southern region the Gulf Stream maintained its present position since Miocene time, blocking the accumulation of Pliocene and younger rocks on the Plateau. Northward, in the middle, region the currents turned slightly to the northeast. The inner portion of the Blake Plateau has been scoured of sediments since the Paleocene in this area, and scouring has also occurred on the shelf from time to time. In the northern part of the survey area a more easterly flow of the Gulf Stream has allowed Eocene and younger rocks to be deposited on the Plateau. Line drawings and a geologic map show the distribution of the various Cretaceous and Cenozoic units. A number of potential environmental hazards or constraints to petroleum development seen in the reflection data are identified. Besides current scour and erosion features, these include gravity faults on the slope, a slump, faulting on the inner Blake Plateau, the shelf edge reef, and deep water reefs on the Blake Plateau.

  19. Focused fluid-flow processes through high-quality bathymetric, 2D seismic and Chirp data from the southern parts of the Bay of Biscay, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudon, Catherine; Gillet, Hervé; Cremer, Michel

    2013-04-01

    High-quality bathymetric, 2D seismic and Chirp data located in the southern parts of the Bay of Biscay, France, collected by the University of Bordeaux 1 (Cruises ITSAS 2, 2001; PROSECAN 3, 2006 and SARGASS, 2010) have recently been compiled. The survey area widely covers the Capbreton Canyon, which lies on the boundary between two major structural zones: the Aquitanian passive margin to the North, and the Basque-Cantabrian margin to the South which corresponds to the offshore Pyrenean front. The dataset revealed a large number of key seafloor features potentially associated with focused fluid-flow processes and subsurface sediment-remobilization. Focused fluid migration through sub-seabed sediments is a common phenomenon on continental margins worldwide and has widespread implications from both industrial and fundamental perspectives, from seafloor marine environmental issues to petroleum exploration and hazard assessments. Our study analyses the relationships between seafloor features, deeper structures and fluid migration through the Plio-Quaternary sedimentary pile. The geometrical characteristics, mechanisms of formation and kinematics of four main groups of seabed features have been investigated. (i) A 150km2 field of pockmarks can be observed on the Basque margin. These features are cone-shaped circular or elliptical depressions that are either randomly distributed as small pockmarks (diameter < 20m) or aligned in trains of large pockmarks (ranging from 200 to 600m in diameter) along shallow troughs leading downstream to the Capbreton Canyon. Seismic data show that most pockmarks reach the seabed through vertically staked V-shaped features but some are buried and show evidence of lateral migration through time. (ii) A second field of widely-spaced groups of pockmarks pierce the upper slope of the Aquitanian margin. These depressions are typically a few hundred meters in diameter and seem to be preferentially located in the troughs or on the stoss sides of

  20. Multicomponent, 3-D, and High-Resolution 2-D Seismic Characterization of Gas Hydrate Study Sites in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Ruppel, C. D.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W.; Lee, M. W.; Miller, J.

    2012-12-01

    High saturations of gas hydrates have been identified within coarse-grained sediments in the Green Canyon 955 and Walker Ridge 313 lease blocks of the deepwater northern Gulf of Mexico. The thickness, lateral extent, and hydrate saturations in these deposits are constrained by geological and geophysical data and state-of-the-art logging-while-drilling information obtained in multiple boreholes at each site during a 2009 expedition. Presently lacking are multicomponent seismic data that can provide a thorough understanding of the in-situ compressional and shear seismic properties of the hydrate-bearing sediments. Such data may represent an important tool for future characterization of gas hydrate resources. To address this data gap, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will collaborate on a 20-day research expedition to acquire wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer and high-resolution vertical incidence 2-D seismic data at the study sites. In preparation for this mid-2013 expedition, we have analyzed existing industry 3-D seismic data, along with numerically modeled multicomponent data. The 3-D seismic data allow us to identify and rank specific survey targets and can be combined with the numerical modeling results to determine optimal survey line orientation and acquisition parameters. Together, these data also provide a more thorough understanding of the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  1. The tectonostratigraphic evolution of the offshore Gippsland Basin, Victoria, Australia---results from 3D seismic interpretation and 2D section restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Mitchell

    The Gippsland Basin is located primarily offshore Victoria, Australia (between the Australian mainland and Tasmania) approximately 200 km east of Melbourne. The formation of the east-west trending Gippsland Basin is associated with the break-up of Gondwana during the late Jurassic/early Cretaceous and the basin has endured multiple rifting and inversion events. Strong tectonic control on the sedimentary development of the basin is reflected in the deposition of several major, basin scale sequences ranging in age from the early Cretaceous to Neogene, which are usually bounded by angular unconformities. Schlumberger's Petrel software package has been used to structurally and stratigraphically interpret a basin-wide 3D seismic data set provided by the Australian Government (Geoscience Australia) and four 2D kinematic reconstruction/restorations through the basin have been completed with Midland Valley's Move software to achieve a better understanding of the structural evolution of the Gippsland Basin. Rift phase extension calculated from the restorations (5.0--10.5%) appears anomalously low to accommodate the amount of sediment that has been deposited in the basin (>10km). Distributed extension on small faults and subsidence history from backstripping are employed to answer this anomaly. The 2D restorations completed illustrate structural time relationships across the basin and allow for a minimum estimate of erosion that has occurred along the inverted northern basin margin. Differences between previous work completed by Power et al. (2001) and this study as well as several extension models and associated implications are discussed as they relate to the interpretation carried out in this study. Extension calculated from section restorations ranged from approximately 5.0--10.5%. These measured extensional values appear too low to wholly accommodate the accumulated sediment thickness in the basin. Subsidence modelling and backstripping estimates approximately 50

  2. Subsurface mapping in the Iberian Pyrite Belt using seismic reflection profiling and potential-field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, João; Inverno, Carlos; Matos, João Xavier; Rosa, Carlos; Granado, Isabel; Branch, Tim; Represas, Patrícia; Carabaneanu, Livia; Matias, Luís; Sousa, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) hosts world-class massive sulphide deposits, such as Neves-Corvo in Portugal and Rio Tinto in Spain. In Portugal, the Palaeozoic Volcanic-Sedimentary Complex (VSC) hosts these ore deposits, extending from the Grândola-Alcácer region to the Spanish border with a NW-SE to WNW-ESE trend. In the study area, between the Neves-Corvo mine region and Alcoutim (close to the Spanish border), the VSC outcrops only in a small horst near Alcoutim. Sparse exploration drill-hole data indicate that the depth to the top of the VSC varies from several 100 m to about 1 km beneath the Mértola Formation Flysch cover. Mapping of the VSC to the SE of Neves-Corvo mine is an important exploration goal and motivated the acquisition of six 2D seismic reflection profiles with a total length of approximately 82 km in order to map the hidden extension of the VSC. The data, providing information deeper than 10 km at some locations, were integrated in a 3D software environment along with potential-field, geological and drill-hole data to form a 3D structural framework model. Seismic data show strong reflections that represent several long Variscan thrust planes that smoothly dip to the NNE. Outcropping and previously unknown Late Variscan near-vertical faults were also mapped. Our data strongly suggest that the structural framework of Neves-Corvo extends south-eastwards to Alcoutim. Furthermore, the VSC top is located at depths that show the existence within the IPB of new areas with good potential to develop exploration projects envisaging the discovery of massive sulphide deposits of the Neves-Corvo type.

  3. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: 2013 multi-component and high-resolution 2D acquisition at GC955 and WR313

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.; Shedd, William W.; Frye, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data. GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations. In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems. Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

  4. Are Deep Seismic Reflections at Volcanic Margins from the Petrological Moho or from within the Mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkin, C. J.; Kusznir, N. J.; Roberts, A. M.; Bellingham, P.; Manatschal, G.

    2015-12-01

    Deep long-offset seismic-reflection now frequently provide imaging of strong and laterally continuous reflectors in the TWTT range of 10 to 14 seconds. Examples of deep laterally-coherent reflectivity can be seen within the ocean-continent transition of the Argentine, Uruguayan and S Brazilian volcanic margins of the S Atlantic. Qualitative interpretation of the seismic data suggests the presence of deep crustal "keels" or crustal roots underlying well developed seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs). While an initial interpretation might be that these reflectors correspond to the crust-mantle interface, this interpretation may in some cases be incorrect or over-simplistic. Do these deep reflectors correspond to the petrological Moho or could they be located within the mantle? Joint inversion of the PSTM time-domain seismic reflection and gravity anomaly data has been used to determine the average interval density and seismic velocity between base sediment and the deep seismic reflectivity. Joint inversion densities and seismic velocities for this depth interval reach values in excess of 3000 kg/m3 and 7.0 km/sec for the entire thickness of the interval, substantially in excess of densities and velocities observed for normal oceanic and continental crust. The high densities determined from joint seismic-gravity inversion under the SDR regions are also consistent with results from flexural subsidence analysis. We consider two interpretations of these results. One interpretation is that the strong deep reflectivity corresponds to the base of the petrological crust and that the crust has an abnormally high average density and seismic velocity due to high-temperature mantle-plume-related magmatism. An alternative interpretation is that the deep seismic reflectivity is located within the mantle beneath the petrological Moho, and that the high density and seismic velocity result from averaging of both crustal basement (~2850 kg/m3) and mantle (~3300 kg/m3) values. In some

  5. Basement blocks and basin inversion structures mapped using reprocessed Gulfrex 2D seismic data, Caribbean-South American oblique collisional zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalona, A.; Sena, A.; Mann, P.

    2003-12-01

    We have reprocessed and reinterpreted more than 10,000 km of "Gulfrex" multi-channel 2D seismic reflection lines collected by Gulf Oil Corporation in 1972 along the northern margin of South America (offshore Venezuela and Trinidad). These digital data were donated to the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics and represent the largest single, digital reflection survey of the region. Reprocessing of these data included: format correction, filtering, post-stack multiple suppression, and fk migration. Reprocessed data were loaded and interpreted on a workstation. The data straddle a 2,000,000 km2 zone of Paleocene-Recent, time-transgressive, oblique collision between the Caribbean arc system and the passive continental margin of northern South America. Free-air, satellite gravity data shows the remarkable 1000-km-scale continuity of four basement ridges between the uncollided part of the Caribbean arc system (NS-trending Lesser Antilles arc) and the EW-trending collisional area north of Venezuela. The basement ridges involved in the Venezuelan collisional zone include: 1) Aruba-Bonaire-Curacao ridge that can be traced as a continuous feature to the Aves ridge remnant arc of the Lesser Antilles; 2) the partially inverted Blanquilla-Bonaire basin that can be traced into the Grenada back-arc basin; 3) Margarita-Los Testigos platform that can be traced to the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc; and 4) foreland basins and fold-thrust belts of eastern Venezuela (Serrania del Interior and Maturin basin) that can be traced to the Tobago forearc basin and Barbados accretionary prism. Gulfrex data document the progressive change of basinal fault systems from NS-striking normal faults formed in extensional, Lesser Antilles intra-arc settings to rotated and inverted, NE and EW-striking normal faults deformed in the collisional area north of Venezuela. Age of initial shortening of basinal areas and inversion of normal faults setting does not follow the simple, expected pattern of

  6. New Seismic Reflection Profiling Across the Northern Newark Basin USA: Data Acquisition and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymchak, M.; Collins, D.; Brown, C.; Conrad, J.; Papadeas, P.; Coueslan, M. L.; Tamulonis, K.; Goldberg, D.; Olsen, P. E.

    2011-12-01

    Deep saline formations in basins underlying major population centers represent opportunities for carbon (CO2) sequestration, but intensive surface development in such settings can hinder field operations to acquire geologic and geophysical data critical to effective characterization. Seismic-reflection is a tool that can be used to characterize basins and their potential capacity for carbon storage. The northern part of the Triassic-Jurassic Newark Rift Basin represents a potential storage opportunity for carbon as a result of its proximity to large-scale CO2 emitters; however, a lack of deep geologic and seismic data from this area has precluded evaluation of this basin to date. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Labs (NETL) Carbon Sequestration programs portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)- and NYSERDA-funded TriCarb Consortium for Carbon Sequestration basin characterization project, two new seismic-reflection profiles were acquired in the northern portion of the Newark Basin in Rockland County, NY and Bergen County NJ. This densely developed region, proximal to New York City, presents a variety of challenges for seismic surveys, including route selection and access, community acceptance, high traffic volumes and associated data noise, in addition to regulatory requirements and private property limitations. In spite of these challenges, two high-resolution, perpendicular lines were successfully surveyed in late March and early April, 2011; one dip line extending 21 km (13 mi) across most of the basin (east-west), and a shorter strike line extending 8 km (5 mi, north-south). The survey lines intersected near the location of a planned 8,000 ft stratigraphic borehole to be drilled by the TriCarb consortium. Three vibroseis trucks comprised the source array. Source points were spaced at 36.5 m (120-ft) intervals and geophone accelerometers collected data at a 3.05 m (10 ft) intervals. Seismic-reflection data

  7. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  8. Applications of shallow high-resolution seismic reflection to various environmental problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Steeples, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    Shallow seismic reflection has been successfully applied to environmental problems in a variety of geologic settings. Increased dynamic range of recording equipment and decreased cost of processing hardware and software have made seismic reflection a cost-effective means of imaging shallow geologic targets. Seismic data possess sufficient resolution in many areas to detect faulting with displacement of less than 3 m and beds as thin as 1 m. We have detected reflections from depths as shallow as 2 m. Subsurface voids associated with abandoned coal mines at depths of less than 20 m can be detected and mapped. Seismic reflection has been successful in mapping disturbed subsurface associated with dissolution mining of salt. A graben detected and traced by seismic reflection was shown to be a preferential pathway for leachate leaking from a chemical storage pond. As shown by these case histories, shallow high-resolution seismic reflection has the potential to significantly enhance the economics and efficiency of preventing and/or solving many environmental problems. ?? 1994.

  9. Seismic reflection evidence against a shallow detachment beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Hunter, W. Clay

    1996-01-01

    Intermediate-depth seismic reflection profile across Crater Flat and Yucca Mountain is obtained. The aim of the seismic profiling are discrimination the subsurface geometry of faults and imaging of the boundary between the pre-Tertiary sedimentary strata and the Miocene volcanic rocks of Yucca Mountain. Of major interest is the existence and geometry of a postulated west-dipping detachment fault beneath Yucca Mountain. These reflection profiles provide critical input to efforts to evaluate tectonic models, probabilistic seismic hazards, and potential volcanic hazards near Yucca Mountain, site of investigations for a potential permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste.

  10. Salt Tectonics of Basin and Range Systems in the Sub-Himalayas of Northern Pakistan Using InSAR and 2D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad Abir, I.; Khan, S.; Wulamu, A.; Tariq, S.; Tahir Shah, M.

    2014-12-01

    The western end of the Sub-Himalayas is located in northern Pakistan, where salt tectonics greatly affects its deformation style of geological structures, hydrocarbon exploration and seismology. Three foreland sub-basins are located adjacent to each other in this area: the Potwar Plateau-Salt Range, Kohat Plateau-Surghar Range and the Bannu Basin-Marwat-Khisor Ranges. It is strongly believed that the difference in deformation intensity between these sub-basins is attributed to the presence or absence of a Pre-Cambrian salt layer. This study is an attempt to investigate the extent and role of salt in the geological deformation of northern Pakistan using the Small Baseline Subset Interferograms (SBAS) technique and 2-D seismic interpretations. 10 PALSAR images and 5 seismic profiles from the Potwar Plateau-Salt Range region were used in this study. SBAS results, derived from PALSAR images spanning from 2007 to 2010, suggest that the Potwar Plateau-Salt Range may still be tectonically active with the western portion of the region experiencing an uplift at an average rate of 12 mm/year. Time-migrated seismic profiles were interpreted, showing basement ramps due to normal faults. These ramps are believed to act as transition zones between different roles of salt; the salt layer acts as a decollement in northern Potwar Plateau while salt flow-induced structures are prominent in southern Potwar Plateau. These normal fault ramps are located in the central Salt Range and may be affecting the flow of salt by impeding the flow, which results in the salt being pushed to either side of the ramp. The integration of SBAS and 2D seismic interpretation has led to the suggestion that both the presence of the salt layer and the geometry of the basement influence the deformation style in northern Pakistan.

  11. Thermohaline fine structure in an oceanographic front from seismic reflection profiling.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, W Steven; Páramo, Pedro; Pearse, Scott; Schmitt, Raymond W

    2003-08-08

    We present acoustic images of oceanic thermohaline structure created from marine seismic reflection profiles across the major oceanographic front between the Labrador Current and the North Atlantic Current. The images show that distinct water masses can be mapped, and their internal structure imaged, using low-frequency acoustic reflections from sound speed contrasts at interfaces across which temperature changes. The warm/cold front is characterized by east-dipping reflections generated by thermohaline intrusions in the uppermost 1000 meters of the ocean. Our results imply that marine seismic reflection techniques can provide excellent spatial resolution of important oceanic phenomena, including thermohaline intrusions, internal waves, and eddies.

  12. Proposed criteria for recognizing intrastratal deformation features in marine high resolution seismic reflection profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Leary, D. W.; Laine, E.

    1996-01-01

    Intrastratal deformation of marine strata is ordinarily recorded in high-resolution seismic reflection profiles as acoustically transparent or "chaotic" intervals marked by hyperbolic echoes. Intrastratal deformation is easily confused with buried slump or slide deposits formed initially at the sea floor. Correct identification of intrastratal deformation depends on the presence of a warped continuously reflective layer overlying a chaotic/transparent layer. Decollement is the key criterion for identification in seismic reflection profiles. Other criteria include intrusive structures or faults rooted in a chaotic/transparent layer and thickening and thinning of a chaotic/transparent layer with transitions to reflective intervals.

  13. Integrating Reflection Seismic, Gravity and Magnetic Data to Reveal the Structure of Crystalline Basement: Implications for Understanding Rift Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, Antje; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Duffy, Oliver B.; Fossen, Haakon; Gawthorpe, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    Numerous rifts form above crystalline basement containing pervasive faults and shear zones. However, the compositional and mechanical heterogeneity within crystalline basement and the geometry and kinematics of discrete and pervasive basement fabrics are poorly understood. Furthermore, the interpretation of intra-crustal structures beneath sedimentary basins is often complicated by limitations in the depth of conventional seismic imaging, the commonly acoustically transparent nature of basement, limited well penetrations, and complex overprinting of multiple tectonic events. Yet, a detailed knowledge of the structural and lithological complexity of crystalline basement rocks is crucial to improve our understanding of how rifts evolve. Potential field methods are a powerful but perhaps underutilised regional tool that can decrease interpretational uncertainty based solely on seismic reflection data. We use petrophysical data, high-resolution 3D reflection seismic volumes, gridded gravity and magnetic data, and 2D gravity and magnetic modelling to constrain the structure of crystalline basement offshore western Norway. Intra-basement structures are well-imaged on seismic data due to relatively shallow burial of the basement beneath a thin (<3.5 km) sedimentary cover. Variations in basement composition were interpreted from detailed seismic facies analysis and mapping of discrete intra-basement reflections. A variety of data filtering and isolation techniques were applied to the original gravity and magnetic data in order to enhance small-scale field variations, to accentuate formation boundaries and discrete linear trends, and to isolate shallow and deep crustal anomalies. In addition, 2D gravity and magnetic data modelling was used to verify the seismic interpretation and to further constrain the configuration of the upper and lower crust. Our analysis shows that the basement offshore western Norway is predominantly composed of Caledonian allochthonous nappes

  14. Seismic-reflection evidence that the hayward fault extends into the lower crust of the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    1998-01-01

    This article presents deep seismic-reflection data from an experiment across San Francisco Peninsula in 1995 using large (125 to 500 kg) explosive sources. Shot gathers show a mostly nonreflective upper crust in both the Franciscan and Salinian terranes (juxtaposed across the San Andreas fault), an onset of weak lower-crustal reflectivity beginning at about 6-sec two-way travel time (TWTT) and bright southwest-dipping reflections between 11 and 13 sec TWTT. Previous studies have shown that the Moho in this area is no deeper than 25 km (~8 to 9 sec TWTT). Three-dimensional reflection travel-time modeling of the 11 to 13 sec events from the shot gathers indicates that the bright events may be explained by reflectors 15 to 20 km into the upper mantle, northeast of the San Andreas fault. However, upper mantle reflections from these depths were not observed on marine-reflection profiles collected in San Francisco Bay, nor were they reported from a refraction profile on San Francisco Peninsula. The most consistent interpretation of these events from 2D raytracing and 3D travel-time modeling is that they are out-of-plane reflections from a high-angle (dipping ~70??to the southwest) impedance contrast in the lower crust that corresponds with the surface trace of the Hayward fault. These results suggest that the Hayward fault truncates the horizontal detachment fault suggested to be active beneath San Francisco Bay.

  15. Using seismic reflection to locate a tracer testing complex south of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryder, Levi

    Tracer testing in the fractured volcanic aquifer near Yucca Mountain, and in the alluvial aquifer south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been conducted in the past to determine the flow and transport properties of groundwater in those geologic units. However, no tracer testing has been conducted across the alluvium/volcanic interface. This thesis documents the investigative process and subsequent analysis and interpretations used to identify a location suitable for installation of a tracer testing complex, near existing Nye County wells south of Yucca Mountain. The work involved evaluation of existing geologic data, collection of wellbore seismic data, and a detailed surface seismic reflection survey. Borehole seismic data yielded useful information on alluvial P-wave velocities. Seismic reflection data were collected over a line of 4.5-km length, with a 10-m receiver and shot spacing. Reflection data were extensively processed to image the alluvium/volcanic interface. A location for installation of an alluvial/volcanic tracer testing complex was identified based on one of the reflectors imaged in the reflection survey; this site is located between existing Nye County monitoring wells, near an outcrop of Paintbrush Tuff. Noise in the reflection data (due to some combination of seismic source signal attenuation, poor receiver-to-ground coupling, and anthropogenic sources) were sources of error that affected the final processed data set. In addition, in some areas low impedance contrast between geologic units caused an absence of reflections in the data, complicating the processing and interpretation. Forward seismic modeling was conducted using Seismic Un*x; however, geometry considerations prevented direct comparison of the modeled and processed data sets. Recommendations for additional work to address uncertainties identified during the course of this thesis work include: drilling additional boreholes to collect borehole seismic and geologic data; reprocessing a

  16. Seismic Reflection Imaging of the Lithosphere-asthenosphere Boundary Across the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Marjanovic, M.; Audhkhasi, P.; Mehouachi, F.

    2015-12-01

    Until now, the nature of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) has been constrained by teleseismic data, which has resolution of tens of kilometres and sample the LAB sparsely. Seismic reflection imaging technique, in contrast, can provide both lateral and vertical resolution of a few hundred meters, but has not been used for imaging deep structures, thus so far. In March-April 2015, we acquired over 2,750 km of ultra-deep seismic reflection data in the Atlantic Ocean. To image LAB variations as a function of age one of our profiles extends continuously starting from 75 Ma old oceanic lithosphere off the margin of Africa, crosses the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at zero age, to up to 25 Ma old South America lithosphere. To image large differences in the LAB depth we also cross three major fracture zones in the equatorial Atlantic. For imaging deep structures, we used a very large energy source, 10,170 cubic inches, rich in low frequencies and a 12 km long multi-component streamer allowing to record low frequency energy reflected from deep earth and remove reverberation in the water column. Initial results show reflected seismic energy from 50-60 km depth. The seismic reflection experiment will be complemented by seismic refraction study to determine the crustal and upper mantle P-wave velocity, magnetotelluric study to determine resistivity, and broadband ocean bottom seismometer experiment for teleseismic study, collocated with our seismic reflection profiles. In this paper, we will present the design of the seismic reflection experiment and preliminary results from the onboard processed data.

  17. Application of high-resolution 2D-3C seismic for characterization of the perspective Jurassic shale play in Central Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyz, M.; Malinowski, M.; Krzywiec, P.; Mulińska, M.; Słonka, Ł.

    2016-10-01

    Here we show the application of broadband (4-120 Hz) 2D-3C seismic for characterization of the perspective Jurassic shale play in Central Poland. Data were acquired along a network of 250 km 2D profiles using single-point, densely spaced receivers (digital 3C sensors) and acquisition was focused on providing both high-resolution and broadband seismic that would enable structural imaging and quantitative interpretation of the key stratigraphic horizons in the Mesozoic sedimentary cover. Such acquisition parameters resulted in good quality data and allowed for more flexibility during processing, e.g., unaliased F-K filtering or digital group forming for ground-roll removal. Processing was oriented to preserve relative amplitudes and the broadband character of the dataset as the input for future quantitative interpretation. We obtained a high-resolution stratigraphic image of the target Upper Jurassic (Upper Kimmeridgian-Tithonian) sequence as well as overall structural portrait of this part of Mid-Polish Trough characterized by strong imprint of the salt tectonics. Lateral continuity of particular stratigraphic sequences has been determined and a more precise structural context for deposition and present-day structure of the Upper Kimmeridgian-Tithonian has been established.

  18. Structural and Tectonic Map Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Northern Gulf of California, Sonora Desert and Valle de Mexicali, Mexico, from Seismic Reflection Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Escobar, M.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Martin Barajas, A.; Pacheco-Romero, M.; Arregui-Estrada, S.; Gallardo-Mata, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, C.; Chanes-Martinez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) carried on an intense exploration program in the northern Gulf of California, the Sonora Desert and the southern part of the Mexicali Valley. This program was supported by a seismic reflection field operation. The collected seismic data was 2D, with travel time of 6 s recording, in 48 channels, and the source energy was: dynamite, vibroseis and air guns. Since 2007 to present time, the existing seismic data has been re-processing and ire-interpreting as part of a collaboration project between the PEMEX's Subdirección de Exploración (PEMEX) and CICESE. The study area is located along a large portion of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Gulf of California and the Southern part of the Salton Trough tectonic province (Mexicali Valley). We present the result of the processes reflection seismic lines. Many of the previous reported known faults were identify along with the first time described located within the study region. We identified regions with different degree of tectonic activity. In structural map it can see the location of many of these known active faults and their associated seismic activity, as well as other structures with no associated seismicity. Where some faults are mist placed they were deleted or relocated based on new information. We included historical seismicity for the region. We present six reflection lines that cross the aftershocks zone of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010 (Mw7.2). The epicenter of this earthquake and most of the aftershocks are located in a region where pervious to this earthquake no major earthquakes are been reported. A major result of this study is to demonstrate that there are many buried faults that increase the seismic hazard.

  19. pySeismicFMM: Python based travel time calculation in regular 2D and 3D grids in Cartesian and geographic coordinates using Fast Marching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    Seismic wave travel time calculation is the most common numerical operation in seismology. The most efficient is travel time calculation in 1D velocity model - for given source, receiver depths and angular distance time is calculated within fraction of a second. Unfortunately, in most cases 1D is not enough to encounter differentiating local and regional structures. Whenever possible travel time through 3D velocity model has to be calculated. It can be achieved using ray calculation or time propagation in space. While single ray path calculation is quick it is complicated to find the ray path that connects source with the receiver. Time propagation in space using Fast Marching Method seems more efficient in most cases, especially when there are multiple receivers. In this presentation a Python module pySeismicFMM is presented - simple and very efficient tool for calculating travel time from sources to receivers. Calculation requires regular 2D or 3D velocity grid either in Cartesian or geographic coordinates. On desktop class computer calculation speed is 200k grid cells per second. Calculation has to be performed once for every source location and provides travel time to all receivers. pySeismicFMM is free and open source. Development of this tool is a part of authors PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  20. Advances through collaboration: sharing seismic reflection data via the Antarctic Seismic Data Library System for Cooperative Research (SDLS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wardell, N.; Childs, J. R.; Cooper, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Antarctic Seismic Data Library System for Cooperative Research (SDLS) has served for the past 16 years under the auspices of the Antarctic Treaty (ATCM Recommendation XVI-12) as a role model for collaboration and equitable sharing of Antarctic multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data for geoscience studies. During this period, collaboration in MCS studies has advanced deciphering the seismic stratigraphy and structure of Antarctica’s continental margin more rapidly than previously. MCS data compilations provided the geologic framework for scientific drilling at several Antarctic locations and for high-resolution seismic and sampling studies to decipher Cenozoic depositional paleoenvironments. The SDLS successes come from cooperation of National Antarctic Programs and individual investigators in “on-time” submissions of their MCS data. Most do, but some do not. The SDLS community has an International Polar Year (IPY) goal of all overdue MCS data being sent to the SDLS by end of IPY. The community science objective is to compile all Antarctic MCS data to derive a unified seismic stratigraphy for the continental margin – a stratigraphy to be used with drilling data to derive Cenozoic circum-Antarctic paleobathymetry maps and local-to-regional scale paleoenvironmental histories.

  1. Improved 2-D attenuation analysis for Northern Italy using a merged dataset from selected regional seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasca, Paola; Massa, Marco; Laprocina, Enrica; Mayeda, Kevin; Phillips, Scott; Malagnini, Luca; Spallarossa, Daniele; Costa, Giovanni; Augliera, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    A merged, high-quality waveform dataset from different seismic networks has been used to improve our understanding of lateral seismic attenuation for Northern Italy. In a previous study on the same region, Morasca et al. (Bull Seismol Soc Am 98:1936-1946, 2008) were able to resolve only a small area due to limited data coverage. For this reason, the interpretation of the attenuation anomalies was difficult given the complexity of the region and the poor resolution of the available data. In order to better understand the lateral changes in the crustal structure and thickness of this region, we selected 770 earthquakes recorded by 54 stations for a total of almost 16,000 waveforms derived from seismic networks operating totally or partially in Northern Italy. Direct S-wave and coda attenuation images were obtained using an amplitude ratio technique that eliminates source terms from the formulation. Both direct and early-coda amplitudes are used as input for the inversions, and the results are compared. Results were obtained for various frequency bands ranging between 0.3 and 25.0 Hz and in all cases show significant improvement with respect to the previous study since the resolved area has been extended and more crossing paths have been used to image smaller scale anomalies. Quality-factor estimates are consistent with the regional tectonic structure exhibiting a general trend of low attenuation under the Po Plain basin and higher values for the Western Alps and Northern Apennines. The interpretation of the results for the Eastern Alps is not simple, possibly because our resolution for this area is still not adequate to resolve small-scale structures.

  2. Analytical modeling of seismic wave scattered from a 2D fracture simulated by a low-aspect ratio elliptical cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Wang, P.; Fehler, M.; Zhang, Y.; Burns, D.

    2009-12-01

    Localizing subsurface fractures and estimating their mechanical parameters and geometric properties are very important in oil and gas industry as well as geothermal energy research. It is essential to quantitatively understand how the elastic wave propagation is affected by these fractures. In this paper, an analytical expression for the scattered P- and SV waves from a 2D fracture is formulated based on a normal mode method, where the 2D fracture is modeled by a low-aspect ratio elliptical cylinder. The scatter function of this 2D fracture are expressed in terms of the incident angle, the orientation and aspect ratio of the fracture as well as the elastic impedance contrast between the surrounding medium and the inhomogeneity inside the fracture. Results from this analytical solution match well with those from a finite-difference approach. Solutions of this analytical model at two limiting cases (a circular cylinder with aspect ratio equal to one and a strip with aspect ratio equal to zero) are also compared to analytical solutions directly derived for the circular cylinder and strip by other studies.

  3. Pseudo-reflection imaging of the Lunar Moho beneath the Apollo seismic stations using deep-moonquake seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitsuji, Yohei; Rowe, Charlotte; Wapenaar, Kees; Draganov, Deyan

    2016-04-01

    In 30 years following NASA's Apollo missions, numerous geophysical methods have been applied to determine the depth of the Lunar Moho. These methods, such as travel-time analysis and gravity inversion, have yielded inconsistent estimates. Here, we apply a seismic interferometry technique using body waves. We use deep moonquakes recorded by the Apollo stations to retrieve zero-offset reflection responses beneath each seismic station on the Nearside of the Moon. We call this application deep-moonquake seismic interferometry (DMSI). We present here the first pseudo-reflection imaging of the Lunar Moho, which we interpret to reside at around 50 km depth. Our interpretation agrees with JAXA's SELENE result, and with earlier travel-time studies. Our DMSI results also show lateral inhomogeneity beneath the Moho, suggesting strong scattering within a zone characterized by seismic velocity that exhibits little variation at our resolution scale (0.2-2.0 Hz). This zone is where most of the shallow moonquakes are presumed to be occurring.

  4. Application of Fresnel diffraction from a 2D array of reflective disks in optical profilometry of a flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darudi, Ahmad; Asgari, Pegah; Pourvais, Yousef

    2015-05-01

    Optical methods of three-dimensional profilometry have been of growing interest in both industrial and scientific applications. These techniques provide absolutely non-destructive measurement due to their non-contact nature and maintain their high precision in a large field of view. Most of these techniques however, are based on interferometry which happens to be considerably sensitive to environmental noises such as turbulence and vibration. We have used the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction from phase-steps instead of interferometry to maintain a higher precision and reduce sensitivity to environmental noises. This phenomena has been recently introduced as a method for precise measurement of wavelength, thickness and refractive index. A 2D array of reflective disks are placed above the test surface to provide the required phase-steps. In this paper, theoretical principles of Fresnel diffraction from phase-steps are discussed and the experimental results of testing an optical flat surface are presented. A flat mirror surface has been tested as an optical test surface and is been profiled. The results show that the method is precise and is not sensitive to environmental noises such as vibration and turbulence. Furthermore, the method seems to be a powerful means for testing of curved surfaces, too.

  5. Characterization of the Neuhauserwald Quaternary valley, northern Switzerland, using high-resolution seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Fabienne; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Sollberger, David; Rabenstein, Lasse; Maurer, Hansruedi; Robertsson, Johan

    2014-05-01

    The Swiss Molasse basin is largely covered by Quaternary sediments which have a thickness ranging from a few meters to several hundred meters. These glacial, glaciofluvial, and glaciolacustrine sedimentary deposits are of high interest for a number of reasons; for example, they contain a large part of Switzerland's underground freshwater supplies, and resolving their structure and deposition processes is important to reconstruct the climate history. Furthermore, this usually thin, but highly heterogeneous near-surface cover can have a significant deleterious effect on subsurface imaging by regional-scale seismic-reflection surveying. The study presented here was motivated by the observation of a hithertofore unknown Quaternary valley observed on recently acquired regional-scale seismic-reflection data. To characterize the depth and internal structure of the Neuhauserwald Quaternary valley, two high-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction datasets were acquired. The approximately 900 m long line 1 runs parallel to the valley axis, whereas the ~ 700 m long line 3 is oriented perpendicular to it. A borehole on line 1 provides lithological information and seismic velocities for the upper 150 m, which were determined by means of a check-shot experiment. The lithological sequence consists of alternating sand and gravel units over lacustrine silty sands. Mesozoic limestones are found at 128 m depth below surface. The final processed seismic reflection images show reflections down to around 200 ms traveltime (~ 130 m). The first-arrival traveltime tomography models show a distinct velocity increase from around 500 m/s at the surface to around 4000 m/s at about 150 m depth. For line 1, velocity variations between 500 m/s and 2000 m/s indicate vertical and lateral changes within the valley infill. The depth to the high-velocity basement, however, is only poorly constrained by a few rays in the refraction tomogram resulting from the paucity of long-offset traveltime picks

  6. The structure and stratigraphy of the sedimentary succession in the Swedish sector of the Baltic Basin: New insights from vintage 2D marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopher, Daniel; Erlström, Mikael; Bell, Nicholas; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present five interpreted regional seismic profiles, describing the full sedimentary sequence across the Swedish sector of the Baltic Sea. The data for the study are part of an extensive and largely unpublished 2D seismic dataset acquired between 1970 and 1990 by the Swedish Oil Prospecting Company (OPAB). The Baltic Basin is an intracratonic basin located in northern Europe. Most of the Swedish sector of the basin constitutes the NW flank of a broad synclinal depression, the Baltic Basin. In the SW of the Swedish sector lies the Hanö Bay Basin, formed by subsidence associated with inversion of the Tornquist Zone during the Late Cretaceous. The geological history presented here is broadly consistent with previously published works. We observe an area between the Hanö Bay and the Baltic Basin where the Palaeozoic strata has been affected by transpression and subsequent inversion, associated with the Tornquist Zone during the late Carboniferous-Early Permian and Late Cretaceous, respectively. We propose that the Christiansø High was a structural low during the Late Jurassic, which was later inverted in the Late Cretaceous. We suggest that a fan shaped feature in the seismic data, adjacent to the Christiansø Fault within the Hanö Bay Basin, represents rapidly deposited, coarse-grained sediments eroded from the inverted Christiansø High during the Late Cretaceous. We identify a number of faults within the deeper part of the Baltic Basin, which we also interpret to be transpressional in nature, formed during the Caledonian Orogeny in the Late Silurian-Early Devonian. East of Gotland a number of sedimentary structures consisting of Silurian carbonate reefs and Ordovician carbonate mounds, as well as a large Quaternary glacial feature are observed. Finally, we use the seismic interpretation to infer the structural and stratigraphic history of the Baltic and Hanö Bay basins within the Swedish sector.

  7. Deep seismic reflection profiling of the subduction megathrust across the Sagimi trough and Tokyo bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Takaya; Abe, Susumu; Saito, Hideo; Kawanaka, Taku; Hirata, Naoshi

    2010-05-01

    Beneath the metropolitan Tokyo, the Philippine Sea plate, in particular the fore arc portion of the Izu-Bonin island arc, has been subducted. Subduction megathrust beneath Tokyo generated M-8 class earthquakes, such as the 1923 Kanto (M7.9) and 1703 Genroku (M8.0) earthquakes. Due to the buyant subduction of the Izu-Bonin arc, the megathrust lies very shallow part of the crust. The Kozu-Matsuda fault, probable spray fault from the megathrust, emerged at the surface. In 2009, we acquired the deep seismic reflection data across the toe of the thrust system to reveal the connectivity of the probable spray fault to the megathrust. Together with the deep seismic section acquired in 2003, we show a 120-km-long deep seismic reflection profile from the front to 30 km in depth and discuss the geometry and characteristics of the thrust system. We performed deep seismic profiling across the Sagami trough for a 70-km-long seismic line in September 2009, using two ships for offshore seismic data acquisition: a gun-ship with a 3020 cu. inch air-gun and a cable-ship with a 2-km-long, streamer cable and a 480 cu. inch air-gun. The seismic signals were recorded at Miura and Izu peninsulas located both ends of the seismic line. At both sides of the onshore line, off-line recorders were deployed along total 20-km-long seismic lines at a 50m interval. Seismic reflection data were acquired by different offset of ships making large-offset gathers. The northeast end of the seismic line connected with the 2003 Tokyo bay seismic line (Sato et al., 2005: Science). The obtained seismic sections portray the detailed geometry of the spray faults, suggesting an emergent thrust with 4 km thick landward dipping strata. It merges to the megathrust at 6-7 sec (TWT). Judging from the geometry of fault-related fold in the trough fill sediments, the tip of the megathrust is located at 3 sec (TWT) beneath the trough axis. According to the co-seismic crustal deformation, the slip of the 1923 Kanto

  8. Seismic reflection data from Lake Elsinore, Southern CA, reveal a sustained late-Holocene lake lowstand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyke, B. N.; Kirby, M. E.; Scholz, C. A.; Cattaneo, P.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Elsinore, located 120 kilometers southeast of Los Angeles, California, is Southern California’s largest natural lake. In December 2008, we collected over 75 km of high-resolution seismic reflection data using a CHIRP single-channel seismic-reflection Edgetech Geostar and the Geopulse™ Boomer systems. Initial interpretations reveal several interesting seismic sequences over the past 10,000 calendar years before present (cy BP: age control is based on dated sediment cores tied to the seismic lines). Most intriguing is evidence for a sustained interval of low lake level bracketed between ~ 3,000 and 1,800 cy BP. Prominent truncated stratal terminations characterize the upper boundary of this low stand seismic sequence. Sediment core data in the form of mudcracks, grain size variations, and geochemical data from various depositional environments (i.e., littoral and profundal) within Lake Elsinore support the seismic reflection interpretation for a low stand. Regionally, there is evidence for a similar interval of dry climate at Tulare Lake, the Mojave lakes, the Salton Sea, and possibly Dry Lake. A comparison to marine proxies along the eastern Pacific is less straight forward. The reason for this interval of sustained dry climate is not clear at this time. However, these results suggest that the already water-poor, over populated region of Southern California is subject to “droughts” of longer duration than that seen in the historical or tree-ring records from the region.

  9. Pen Branch fault program: Interim report on the High Resolution, Shallow Seismic Reflection surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Stieve, A.L. )

    1991-01-31

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site in 1989 based upon the interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations. A program was initiated at that time to further define the fault in terms of its capability to release seismic energy. The High-Resolution, Shallow Seismic Reflection survey recently completed at SRS was initiated to determine the shallowest extent of the fault and to demonstrate the presence of flat-lying sediments in the top 300 feet of sediments. Conclusions at this time are based upon this shallow seismic survey and the Conoco deep seismic survey (1988--1989). Deformation related to the Pen Branch fault is at least 200 milliseconds beneath the surface in the Conoco data and at least 150 milliseconds in the shallow seismic reflection data. This corresponds to approximately 300 feet below the surface. Sediments at that depth are lower Tertiary (Danian stage) or over 60 million years old. This indicates that the fault is not capable.

  10. Seismic reflection imaging of underground cavities using open-source software

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R J

    2011-12-20

    The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) includes provisions for an on-site inspection (OSI), which allows the use of specific techniques to detect underground anomalies including cavities and rubble zones. One permitted technique is active seismic surveys such as seismic refraction or reflection. The purpose of this report is to conduct some simple modeling to evaluate the potential use of seismic reflection in detecting cavities and to test the use of open-source software in modeling possible scenarios. It should be noted that OSI inspections are conducted under specific constraints regarding duration and logistics. These constraints are likely to significantly impact active seismic surveying, as a seismic survey typically requires considerable equipment, effort, and expertise. For the purposes of this study, which is a first-order feasibility study, these issues will not be considered. This report provides a brief description of the seismic reflection method along with some commonly used software packages. This is followed by an outline of a simple processing stream based on a synthetic model, along with results from a set of models representing underground cavities. A set of scripts used to generate the models are presented in an appendix. We do not consider detection of underground facilities in this work and the geologic setting used in these tests is an extremely simple one.

  11. Imaging the Seismogenic Coupling Zone in Chile: The 3-Component Reflection Seismic Survey of Project TIPTEQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Micksch, U.; Gross, K.; Buske, S.; Stiller, M.; Wigger, P.; Araneda, M.; Bataille, K.; Bribach, J.; Lüth, S.; Mechie, J.; Schulze, A.; Shapiro, S. A.; Ziegenhagen, T.

    2005-12-01

    One of the main tasks in subduction zone research is that of the structural and petrophysical understanding of the seismogenic coupling zone, and especially its down-dip end. Here, mega-thrust earthquakes are suggested to initiate, but the trigger and processes that shape them are less understood. Amongst 13 sub-projects within TIPTEQ (from The Incoming Plate to mega-Thrust EarthQuake processes), the reflection seismic sub-project aims at the imaging and identification of processes in the seismogenic coupling zone of the present state of the ruptured plate interface at the southern Central Chilean margin. Together with the marine SPOC data, the newly acquired high-resolution 3-component reflection seismic land data will yield a reflection seismic section that will cover the entire seismogenic coupling zone. In addition, an expanding spread experiment component focuses on the down-dip limit (30-50 km depth). S-wave source signals were generated and S-waves obtained with 3-component recordings should yield an improved picture of the petrophysical contrasts within the subduction zone system. The first high-resolution reflection seismic section of the seismogenic coupling zone between the subducting Nazca Plate and the South American continent is presented. It shows that the sediment subduction mode observed offshore corresponds well with the landward reflection seismic extension towards the east at 38° 15' S. Structural evidence suggests that material is transported down in a subduction channel. From slow uplift of the Coastal Cordillera we conclude that basal accretion of parts of this material controls the seismic architecture and growth of the south Chilean crust. At present, almost no seismicity is observed along the entire, approximately 130 km wide seismogenic coupling zone, which could point to a higher coupling and stress accumulation in the region. We discuss underplating, forearc uplift and dehydration/serpentinisation processes at the top of the active

  12. Piedmont seismic reflection study: A program integrated with tectonics to probe the cause of eastern seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, L. III; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.; Bollinger, G.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-03-01

    A new tectonic model of the Appalachian orogen indicates that one, not two or more, terrane boundaries is present in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge of the central and southern Appalachians. This terrane boundary is the Taconic suture, it has been transported in the allochthonous Blue Ridge/Piedmont crystalline thrust nappe, and it is repeated at the surface by faulting and folding associated with later Paleozoic orogenies. The suture passes through the lower crust and lithosphere somewhere east of Richmond. It is spatially associated with seismicity in the central Virginia seismic zone, but is not conformable with earthquake focal planes and appears to have little causal relation to their localization.

  13. Seismic Reflection Image Under The Eastern Uplift Zone of Songliao Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Baojun; Liu, Cai

    Songliao Basin is the most important base of oil/gas industry in China. The basin includes 2 uplift zones: the northeastern and southeastern uplifts. In order to understand the formation's mechanism of the basin, 4 nearly vertical reflection profiles were required in these two uplifts during 1996-1999, 2 East-West reflecting profiles were undertaken in the northeastern uplift, and one East-West and another one nearly South-North profile were taken in the southeastern uplift. After seismic processing of thes e seismic data, we obtained the seismic reflection images of the crustal structure with two-way traveltime of 15s under these 4 profiles. There are two or three strong reflection events on these migrated sections. In the northeastern uplift, the two-way traveltime of Moho varies within the range of 9.6-11.3s for the northeastern uplift, and 9.7 -10.3s for the southeastern uplift. In this paper, we present the seismic features of these seismic profiles, and make some discussion about the crustal structure, geodynamic process in these uplifts of Songliao basin.

  14. High-resolution seismic-reflection data offshore of Dana Point, southern California borderland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Ryan, Holly F.; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection profiles in September 2006 in the offshore area between Dana Point and San Mateo Point in southern Orange and northern San Diego Counties, California. Reflection profiles were located to image folds and reverse faults associated with the San Mateo fault zone and high-angle strike-slip faults near the shelf break (the Newport-Inglewood fault zone) and at the base of the slope. Interpretations of these data were used to update the USGS Quaternary fault database and in shaking hazard models for the State of California developed by the Working Group for California Earthquake Probabilities. This cruise was funded by the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Catastrophic Hazards project. Seismic-reflection data were acquired aboard the R/V Sea Explorer, which is operated by the Ocean Institute at Dana Point. A SIG ELC820 minisparker seismic source and a SIG single-channel streamer were used. More than 420 km of seismic-reflection data were collected. This report includes maps of the seismic-survey sections, linked to Google Earth? software, and digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats.

  15. Lithofacies and seismic-reflection interpretation of temperate glacimarine sedimentation in Tarr Inlet, Glacier Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cai, J.; Powell, R.D.; Cowan, E.A.; Carlson, P.R.

    1997-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles of sediment fill within Tart Inlet of Glacier Bay, Alaska, show seismic facies changes with increasing distance from the glacial termini. Five types of seismic facies are recognized from analysis of Huntec and minisparker records, and seven lithofacies are determined from detailed sedimentologic study of gravity-, vibro- and box-cores, and bottom grab samples. Lithofacies and seismic facies associations, and fjord-floor morphology allow us to divide the fjord into three sedimentary environments: ice-proximal, iceberg-zone and ice-distal. The ice-proximal environment, characterized by a morainal-bank depositional system, can be subdivided into bank-back, bank-core and bank-front subenvironments, each of which is characterized by a different depositional subsystem. A bank-back subsystem shows chaotic seismic facies with a mounded surface, which we infer consists mainly of unsorted diamicton and poorly sorted coarse-grained sediments. A bank-core depositional subsystem is a mixture of diamicton, rubble, gravel, sand and mud. Seismic-reflection records of this subsystem are characterized by chaotic seismic facies with abundant hyperbolic diffractions and a hummocky surface. A bank-front depositional subsystem consists of mainly stratified and massive sand, and is characterized by internal hummocky facies on seismic-reflection records with significant surface relief and sediment gravity flow channels. The depositional system formed in the iceberg-zone environment consists of rhythmically laminated mud interbedded with thin beds of weakly stratified diamicton and stratified or massive sand and silt. On seismic-reflection profiles, this depositional system is characterized by discontinuously stratified facies with multiple channels on the surface in the proximal zone and a single channel on the largely flat sediment surface in the distal zone. The depositional system formed in the ice-distal environment consists of interbedded

  16. Seismic reflection imaging of a geothermal aquifer in an urban setting

    SciTech Connect

    Liberty, L.

    1998-07-01

    A seismic reflection survey that was conducted in downtown Boise, Idaho, to help city planners site a new well for injection of spent geothermal water illustrates some methods to safely and successfully employ a seismic reflection survey in an urban setting. The objective of the seismic survey was to estimate the depth and continuity of a basalt and rhyolite volcanic sequence. Well siting was based on geothermal aquifer depth, location of interpreted faults, projected thermal impact of injection on existing wells, surface pipe extension costs, and public land availability. Seismic acquisition tests and careful processing were used to ensure high-quality data while minimizing the potential for damage along city streets. A video camera placed in a sewer and a blast vibration monitor were used to confirm that energy from the seismic source (a 75-in{sup 3} land air gun) did not damage nearby buildings, street surfaces, or buried utilities along the survey lines. Walkaway seismic tests were also used to compare signal quality of the air-gun source to an explosive source for imaging targets up to 800 m depth. These tests show less signal bandwidth from the air-gun source compared to the buried explosive source, but the air-gun signal quality was adequate to meet imaging objectives. Seismic reflection results show that the top of this rhyolite/basalt sequence dips ({approximately}8--1{degree}) southwest away from the Boise foothills at depths of 200 to 800 m. Seismic methods enabled interpretation of aquifer depths along the profiles and located fault zones where injected water may encounter fracture permeability and optimally benefit the existing producing system. The acquisition and processing techniques used to locate the Boise injection well may succeed for other hydrogeologic and environmental studies in urban settings.

  17. Limitations of quantitative analysis of deep crustal seismic reflection data: Examples from GLIMPCE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.

    1992-01-01

    Amplitude preservation in seismic reflection data can be obtained by a relative true amplitude (RTA) processing technique in which the relative strength of reflection amplitudes is preserved vertically as well as horizontally, after compensating for amplitude distortion by near-surface effects and propagation effects. Quantitative analysis of relative true amplitudes of the Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program on Crustal Evolution seismic data is hampered by large uncertainties in estimates of the water bottom reflection coefficient and the vertical amplitude correction and by inadequate noise suppression. Processing techniques such as deconvolution, F-K filtering, and migration significantly change the overall shape of amplitude curves and hence calculation of reflection coefficients and average reflectance. Thus lithological interpretation of deep crustal seismic data based on the absolute value of estimated reflection strength alone is meaningless. The relative strength of individual events, however, is preserved on curves generated at different stages in the processing. We suggest that qualitative comparisons of relative strength, if used carefully, provide a meaningful measure of variations in reflectivity. Simple theoretical models indicate that peg-leg multiples rather than water bottom multiples are the most severe source of noise contamination. These multiples are extremely difficult to remove when the water bottom reflection coefficient is large (>0.6), a condition that exists beneath parts of Lake Superior and most of Lake Huron.

  18. Blind test of methods for obtaining 2-D near-surface seismic velocity models from first-arrival traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Colin A.; Haines, Seth; Powers, Michael H.; Sheehan, Jacob; Rohdewald, Siegfried; Link, Curtis; Hayashi, Koichi; Zhao, Don; Zhou, Hua-wei; Burton, Bethany L.; Petersen, Uni K.; Bonal, Nedra D.; Doll, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic refraction methods are used in environmental and engineering studies to image the shallow subsurface. We present a blind test of inversion and tomographic refraction analysis methods using a synthetic first-arrival-time dataset that was made available to the community in 2010. The data are realistic in terms of the near-surface velocity model, shot-receiver geometry and the data's frequency and added noise. Fourteen estimated models were determined by ten participants using eight different inversion algorithms, with the true model unknown to the participants until it was revealed at a session at the 2011 SAGEEP meeting. The estimated models are generally consistent in terms of their large-scale features, demonstrating the robustness of refraction data inversion in general, and the eight inversion algorithms in particular. When compared to the true model, all of the estimated models contain a smooth expression of its two main features: a large offset in the bedrock and the top of a steeply dipping low-velocity fault zone. The estimated models do not contain a subtle low-velocity zone and other fine-scale features, in accord with conventional wisdom. Together, the results support confidence in the reliability and robustness of modern refraction inversion and tomographic methods.

  19. Insights into Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Study Sites GC955 and WR313 from New Multicomponent and High-Resolution 2D Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, acquiring multicomponent data and high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313). Based on previously collected logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data, these gas hydrate study sites are known to include high concentrations of gas hydrate within sand layers. At GC955 our new 2D data reveal at least three features that appear to be fluid-flow pathways (chimneys) responsible for gas migration and thus account for some aspects of the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. Our new data also show that the main gas hydrate target, a Pleistocene channel/levee complex, has an areal extent of approximately 5.5 square kilometers and that a volume of approximately 3 x 107 cubic meters of this body lies within the gas hydrate stability zone. Based on LWD-inferred values and reasonable assumptions for net sand, sand porosity, and gas hydrate saturation, we estimate a total equivalent gas-in-place volume of approximately 8 x 108 cubic meters for the inferred gas hydrate within the channel/levee deposits. At WR313 we are able to map the thin hydrate-bearing sand layers in considerably greater detail than that provided by previous data. We also can map the evolving and migrating channel feature that persists in this area. Together these data and the emerging results provide valuable new insights into the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  20. Full 40 km crustal reflection seismic datasets in several Indonesian basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinkelman, M. G.; Granath, J. W.; Christ, J. M.; Emmet, P. A.; Bird, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Long offset, deep penetration regional 2D seismic data sets have been acquired since 2002 by GX Technology in a number of regions worldwide (www.iongeo.com/Data_Libraries/Spans/). Typical surveys consist of 10+ lines located to image specific critical aspects of basin structure. Early surveys were processed to 20 km, but more recent ones have extended to 40-45 km from 16 sec records. Pre-stack time migration is followed by pre-stack depth migration using gravity and in some cases magnetic modeling to constrain the velocity structure. We illustrate several cases in the SE Asian and Australasian area. In NatunaSPAN™ two generations of inversion can be distinguished, one involving Paleogene faults with Neogene inversion and one involving strike slip-related uplift in the West Natuna Basin. Crustal structure in the very deep Neogene East Natuna Basin has also been imaged. The JavaSPAN™ program traced Paleogene sediments onto oceanic crust of the Flores Sea, thus equating back arc spreading there to the widespread Eocene extension. It also imaged basement in the Makassar Strait beneath as much as 6 km of Cenozoic sedimentary rocks that accumulated Eocene rift basins (the North and South Makassar basins) on the edge of Sundaland, the core of SE Asia. The basement is seismically layered: a noisy upper crust overlies a prominent 10 km thick transparent zone, the base of which marks another change to slightly noisier reflectivity. Eocene normal faults responsible for the opening of extensional basins root in the top of the transparent layer which may be Moho or a brittle-ductile transition within the extended continental crust. Of particular significance is the first image of thick Precambrian basins comprising the bulk of continental crust under the Arafura Sea in the ArafuraSPAN™ program. Four lines some 1200 km long located between Australia and New Guinea on the Arafura platform image a thin Phanerozoic section overlying a striking Precambrian basement composed of

  1. Downhole seismic logging for high-resolution reflection surveying in unconsolidated overburden

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.A.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.; Harris, J.B.; Pugin, A.; Skvortsov, A.; Goriainov, N.N.

    1998-07-01

    Downhole seismic velocity logging techniques have been developed and applied in support of high-resolution reflection seismic surveys. Data obtained from downhole seismic logging can provide accurate velocity-depth functions and directly correlate seismic reflections to depth. The methodologies described in this paper are designed for slimhole applications in plastic-cased boreholes (minimum ID of 50 mm) and with source and detector arrays that yield similar frequency ranges and vertical depth resolutions as the surface reflection surveys. Compressional- (P-) wave logging uses a multichannel hydrophone array with 0.5-m detector spacings in a fluid-filled borehole and a high-frequency, in-hole shotgun source at the surface. Overlapping array positions downhole results in redundant first-arrival data which can be processed to provide accurate interval velocities. The data also can be displayed as a record suite, showing reflections and directly correlating reflection events with depths. Example applications include identification of gas zones, lithological boundaries within unconsolidated sediments, and the overburden-bedrock interface. Shear- (S-) wave logging uses a slimhole, well-locked, three-component (3-C) geophone pod and a horizontally polarized, hammer-and-loaded-plate source at ground surface. In unconsolidated sediments, shear-wave velocity contrasts can be associated with changes in material density or dynamic shear modulus, which in turn can be related to consolidation. Example applications include identification of a lithological boundary for earthquake hazard applications and mapping massive ice within permafrost materials.

  2. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  3. Impact and implications of the Afro-Eurasian collision south of Cyprus from reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, Jennifer; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2014-06-01

    The Cyprus Arc in the Eastern Mediterranean represents the active collision front between the African and Eurasian (Anatolian) Plates. Along the Cyprus Arc, the Eratosthenes Seamount is believed to have been blocking the northward motion of the African Plate since the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene. Based on a dense grid of 2D reflection seismic profiles covering the Eratosthenes Seamount and western Levant Basin offshore Cyprus, new observations regarding the Cyprus Arc collision front at the triple transition zone Eratosthenes Seamount-Levant Basin-Hecataeus Rise are presented. The data show that the Levant Basin is filled with ~ 10 km of sediments of Early Mesozoic (probably Jurassic) to Plio-Quaternary age with only a localized deformation affecting the Miocene-Oligocene rock units. The sediments onlap directly against the steep eastern flank of the Eratosthenes Seamount to the west and the southern flank of the Hecataeus Rise to the north. The sediments show no deformation that could be associated with collision and are undeformed even very close to the two prominent structures. Pinching out of the Base Miocene reflector in the Levant Basin due to onlapping of the Middle Miocene reflector indicates uplift of the Eratosthenes Seamount and the Hecataeus Rise. In contrast to the Messinian Evaporites north of the Eratosthenes Seamount, the salt in the Levant Basin, even close to the Hecataeus Rise, is tectonically undeformed. It is proposed that the Eratosthenes Seamount, the western Levant Basin and the Hecataeus Rise act as one tectonic unit. This implies that the collision front is located north of this unit and that the Hecataeus Rise shields the sediments south of it from deformation associated with collision of the African and Anatolian Plates.

  4. Spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich; Papenberg, Cord; Geersen, Jacob; Ridente, Domenico; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; Urlaub, Morelia; Bialas, Jörg; Micallef, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Its volcano edifice is located on top of continental crust close to the Ionian shore in east Sicily. Instability of the eastern flank of the volcano edifice is well documented onshore. The continental margin is supposed to deform as well. Little, however, is known about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank and its adjacent continental margin, which is a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired and processed a new marine high-resolution seismic and hydro-acoustic dataset. The data provide new detailed insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics of shallow continental margin structures offshore Mt Etna. In a similiar manner as observed onshore, the submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. We image a compressional regime at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to an asymmetric basin system confining the eastward movement of the flank. In addition, we constrain the proposed southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault movement north of Catania Canyon. From our findings, we consider a major coupled volcano edifice instability and continental margin gravitational collapse and spreading to be present at Mt Etna, as we see a clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures across the entire eastern flank. The new findings will help to evaluate hazards and risks accompanied by Mt Etna's slope- and continental margin instability and will be used as a base for future investigations in this region.

  5. Seismic images of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt, Arctic Alaska, from an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levander, A.; Fuis, G.S.; Wissinger, E.S.; Lutter, W.J.; Oldow, J.S.; Moore, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    We describe results of an integrated seismic reflection/refraction experiment across the Brooks Range and flanking geologic provinces in Arctic Alaska. The seismic acquisition was unusual in that reflection and refraction data were collected simultaneously with a 700 channel seismograph system deployed numerous times along a 315 km profile. Shot records show continuous Moho reflections from 0-180 km offset, as well as numerous upper- and mid-crustal wide-angle events. Single and low-fold near-vertical incidence common midpoint (CMP) reflection images show complex upper- and middle-crustal structure across the range from the unmetamorphosed Endicott Mountains allochthon (EMA) in the north, to the metamorphic belts in the south. Lower-crustal and Moho reflections are visible across the entire reflection profile. Travel-time inversion of PmP arrivals shows that the Moho, at 33 km depth beneath the North Slope foothills, deepens abruptly beneath the EMA to a maximum of 46 km, and then shallows southward to 35 km at the southern edge of the range. Two zones of upper- and middle-crustal reflections underlie the northern Brooks Range above ~ 12-15 km depth. The upper zone, interpreted as the base of the EMA, lies at a maximum depth of 6 km and extends over 50 km from the range front to the north central Brooks Range where the base of the EMA outcrops above the metasedimentary rocks exposed in the Doonerak window. We interpret the base of the lower zone, at ~ 12 km depth, to be from carbonate rocks above the master detachment upon which the Brooks Range formed. The seismic data suggest that the master detachment is connected to the faults in the EMA by several ramps. In the highly metamorphosed terranes south of the Doonerak window, the CMP section shows numerous south-dipping events which we interpret as a crustal scale duplex involving the Doonerak window rocks. The basal detachment reflections can be traced approximately 100 km, and dip southward from about 10-12 km

  6. A pseudo-spectral method for the simulation of poro-elastic seismic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sidler, Rolf; Carcione, José M.; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-02-15

    We present a novel numerical approach for the comprehensive, flexible, and accurate simulation of poro-elastic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates. An important application of this method and its extensions will be the modeling of complex seismic wave phenomena in fluid-filled boreholes, which represents a major, and as of yet largely unresolved, computational problem in exploration geophysics. In view of this, we consider a numerical mesh, which can be arbitrarily heterogeneous, consisting of two or more concentric rings representing the fluid in the center and the surrounding porous medium. The spatial discretization is based on a Chebyshev expansion in the radial direction and a Fourier expansion in the azimuthal direction and a Runge–Kutta integration scheme for the time evolution. A domain decomposition method is used to match the fluid–solid boundary conditions based on the method of characteristics. This multi-domain approach allows for significant reductions of the number of grid points in the azimuthal direction for the inner grid domain and thus for corresponding increases of the time step and enhancements of computational efficiency. The viability and accuracy of the proposed method has been rigorously tested and verified through comparisons with analytical solutions as well as with the results obtained with a corresponding, previously published, and independently benchmarked solution for 2D Cartesian coordinates. Finally, the proposed numerical solution also satisfies the reciprocity theorem, which indicates that the inherent singularity associated with the origin of the polar coordinate system is adequately handled.

  7. Variable post-Paleozoic deformation detected by seismic reflection profiling across the northwestern "prong" of New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; Devera, J.A.; Denny, F.B.; Woolery, E.W.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution shallow seismic reflection profiles across the northwesternmost part of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and northwestern margin of the Reelfoot rift, near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers in the northern Mississippi embayment, reveal intense structural deformation that apparently took place during the late Paleozoic and/or Mesozoic up to near the end of the Cretaceous Period. The seismic profiles were sited on both sides of the northeast-trending Olmsted fault, defined by varying elevations of the top of Mississippian (locally base of Cretaceous) bedrock. The trend of this fault is close to and parallel with an unusually straight segment of the Ohio River and is approximately on trend with the westernmost of two groups of northeast-aligned epicenters ("prongs") in the NMSZ. Initially suspected on the basis of pre-existing borehole data, the deformation along the fault has been confirmed by four seismic reflection profiles, combined with some new information from drilling. The new data reveal (1) many high-angle normal and reverse faults expressed as narrow grabens and anticlines (suggesting both extensional and compressional regimes) that involved the largest displacements during the late Cretaceous (McNairy); (2) a different style of deformation involving probably more horizontal displacements (i.e., thrusting) that occurred at the end of this phase near the end of McNairy deposition, with some fault offsets of Paleocene and younger units; (3) zones of steeply dipping faults that bound chaotic blocks similar to that observed previously from the nearby Commerce geophysical lineament (CGL); and (4) complex internal deformation stratigraphically restricted to the McNairy, suggestive of major sediment liquefaction or landsliding. Our results thus confirm the prevalence of complex Cretaceous deformations continuing up into Tertiary strata near the northern terminus of the NMSZ. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Continuous seismic reflection profiling of hydrogeologic features beneath New River, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardinell, A.P.; Harned, D.A.; Berg, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    A medium-power, wide-frequency seismic system was used to collect more than 100 miles of continuous seismic reflection profiling data over a 4- day period along a 24-mile segment of the New River estuary and Intracoastal Waterway. The seismic reflection data were evaluated to determine the continuity of aquifer sediments and correlation with existing borehole geophysical well-log data at the Base. Results indicate that the Castle Hayne aquifer, the major source of freshwater for the military base and surrounding area, and deeper aquifers are continuous beds that gently dip to the southeast. However, immediately above the Castle Hayne aquifer, the survey showed that sediment beds are thin and discontinuous. This not only allows rainfall to more easily percolate and recharge the aquifer, but also makes the Castle Hayne more vulnerable to contamination.

  9. Low-frequency asymptotic analysis of seismic reflection from afluid-saturated medium

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.B.; Korneev, V.A.; Goloshubin, G.M.; Patzek, T.W.

    2004-04-14

    Reflection of a seismic wave from a plane interface betweentwo elastic media does not depend on the frequency. If one of the mediais poroelastic and fluid-saturated, then the reflection becomesfrequency-dependent. This paper presents a low-frequency asymptoticformula for the reflection of seismic plane p-wave from a fluid-saturatedporous medium. The obtained asymptotic scaling of the frequency-dependentcomponent of the reflection coefficient shows that it is asymptoticallyproportional to the square root of the product of the reservoir fluidmobility and the frequency of the signal. The dependence of this scalingon the dynamic Darcy's law relaxation time is investigated as well.Derivation of the main equations of the theory of poroelasticity from thedynamic filtration theory reveals that this relaxation time isproportional to Biot's tortuosity parameter.

  10. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Jerome Eyer

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface DNAPL carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high-resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are noninvasive means of site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This final report covers the results of Tasks 1, 2, and 3. Task (1) contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task (2) is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task (3) is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. During the commission of these tasks four seismic reflection profiles were collected. Subsurface velocity information was obtained by vertical seismic profile surveys in three wells. The interpretation of these data is in two parts. Part one is the construction and interpretation of structural contour maps of the contact between the Hanford Fine unit and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene unit and of the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the underlying caliche layer. These two contacts were determined to be the most likely surfaces to contain the highest concentration CCl{sub 4}. Part two of the interpretation uses the results of the AVO modeling to locate any seismic amplitude anomalies that might be

  11. IPOD-USGS multichannel seismic reflection profile from Cape Hatteras to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grow, John A.; Markl, Rudi G.

    1977-01-01

    A 3,400-km-long multichannel seismic-reflection profile from Cape Hatteras to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge was acquired commercially under contract to the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Geological Survey. These data show evidence for massive erosion of the continental slope, diapirs at the base of the continental slope, and mantle reflections beneath the Hatteras Abyssal Plain.

  12. Seismic Reflection Image of Lithospheric Structure Beneath Shidara, Using Explosive Sources from the 2001 Deep Seismic Profiling in Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Ito, T.; Miller, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Hirata, N.; Ohishi, M.; Kaip, G.; Kato, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Kwiatkowski, A.; Kurashimo, E.; Kawamura, T.

    2001-12-01

    Central Honshu lies above an active subduction zone where the Philippine Sea plate is being subducted beneath the Eurasian plate. A better understanding of the lithospheric structure of this region is important for assessing the risk of large mega-thrust earthquakes and also for understanding processes of continental growth. In order to define the deep geometry of major structures within the crust as well as the down-going slab, a deep seismic reflection profile was collected in the central part of Honshu, Japan. This experiment was performed as a piggy-back on a larger scale seismic experiment conducted by the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center and Joint Japanese University teams in late August, 2001. In the Shidara area, a 27-km seismic line was deployed perpendicular to the trench axis and major geologic boundaries. In the central part of the seismic line, 10-Hz vertical geophones, connected by a digital telemetry cables, were deployed over 15 km at a 50 m spacing. In addition, 100 TEXAN (Reftek 125) recorders with 4.5 Hz geophones were deployed at ca. 120 m-intervals for 12 km. A total of six shots with a maximum offset of 210 km, were clearly recorded by this dense receiver array. Near-vertical incidence data were obtained with recordings of a 500 kg shot at the northern end of this receiver array and a 100 kg shot at the southern end. The shots were recorded for 60 to 64 s at a 4 ms sampling rate. Records from these shots exhibit strong, layered reflections from 6 to 9.5 s, which we interpret as being derived from the lower crust. North-dipping reflections at 10.5 to 11.5 s can be interpreted as reflections from the down-going slab. Some north-dipping events from the middle and upper crust probably correspond to the deeper extension of the Median Tectonic Line and Butsuzo Tectonic Line, both of which extend for more than 1000 km along western Honshu and Kyushu Islands.

  13. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  14. Seismic reflection characteristics of glacial and glacimarine sediment in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent fjords

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    Glaciation together with tectonism have been dominant factors affecting sedimentation in the Gulf of Alaska area from at least the late Miocene throughout the Quaternary. The effects of tectonism are apparent in high mountains that border the gulf, raised terraces of Middleton Island and the eastern gulf coastal zone, and numerous active faults and related earthquakes. Glacial evidence includes magnificent glaciers and their onshore deposits, spectacular fjords, large sea valleys incised in the continental shelf, submarine morainal ridges at mouths of bays and sea valleys, and thick glacimarine sedimentary sequences (diamicts) that are exposed onshore and at the sea floor along the outer shelf. Seismic-reflection profiling and sampling of the uppermost marine sedimentary sequences in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent fjords and bays have allowed identification of three discrete glacially related stratigraphic units. These units were delineated on the basis of seismic signature, geometry, physiographic location, stratigraphic position, and sedimentologic characteristics. The oldest unit, a Quaternary diamict, is portrayed on seismic profiles by irregular, discontinuous reflections. This unit probably includes till, outwash and glacimarine sediment. A geographically restricted unit, one incorporating Holocene end moraines at bay mouths and associated with some sea valleys, consists of jumbled masses of discontinuous reflections and very irregular surface morphology. The youngest unit, a blanket of Holocene sand to clayey silt prograding as a sediment wedge across the shelf, contains nearly horizontal, parallel reflections except where disrupted by mass movement. Although seismic-reflection data alone cannot provide definitive proof of the presence of glacial sediment, when combined with sea-floor sampling, seismic profiling is a powerful tool for determining the continuity of marine sedimentary units and relationships to past and modern glaciers. ?? 1989.

  15. Seismic reflection structure of intracratonic palmyride fold-thrust belt and surrounding Arabian platform, Syria

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, J.H.; Barazangi, M.; Best, J. ); Al-Saad, D.; Sawaf, T.; Al-Otri, M.; Gebran, A. )

    1990-03-01

    Seismic reflection and drill-hole data from central Syria provide a detailed view of the subsurface structure (10-15 km depth) of the relatively little-studied intracratonic Palmyride fold and thrust belt. The data set, together with surface geologic mapping, constrains a structural/stratigraphic section spanning the northeast sector of the belt and the surrounding subprovinces of the Arabian platform. The seismic reflection and drill-hole data show Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences thickening abruptly into the Palmyrides from the adjacent, arched Paleozoic platforms Neogene (alpine) folding and thrusting of the Mesozoic basin, as documented on the seismic data, are sharply restricted to the narrow width of the belt ({approximately}100 km), in contrast to the relatively undeformed Phanerozoic strata of the platforms to the north and south. The seismic and drill-hole data support the hypothesis that the palmyrides began as a Permian-Triassic failed rift connected to the Levantine passive continental margin, which was inverted and complexly deformed by the interfering effects of Cenozoic movements along the Dead Sea transform fault system and the Turkish Bitlis convergent zone. The seismic data provide a first view into the extent and depth of the early basin formation and subsequent compressional deformation, and as such represent a necessary element for constraining reconstructions of northern Middle East plate motions. 20 figs.

  16. Apalachicola Bay interpreted seismic horizons and updated IRIS chirp seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Twichell, D.C.; Foster, D.S.; O'Brien, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    Apalachicola Bay and St. George Sound contain the largest oyster fishery in Florida, and the growth and distribution of the numerous oyster reefs here are the combined product of modern estuarine conditions and the late Holocene evolution of the bay. A suite of geophysical data and cores were collected during a cooperative study by the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center, and the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve to refine the geology of the bay floor as well as the bay's Holocene stratigraphy. Sidescan-sonar imagery, bathymetry, high-resolution seismic profiles, and cores show that oyster reefs occupy the crests of sandy shoals that range from 1 to 7 kilometers in length, while most of the remainder of the bay floor is covered by mud. The sandy shoals are the surficial expression of broader sand deposits associated with deltas that advanced southward into the bay between 6,400 and 4,400 years before present. The seismic and core data indicate that the extent of oyster reefs was greatest between 2,400 and 1,200 years before present and has decreased since then due to the continued input of mud to the bay by the Apalachicola River. The association of oyster reefs with the middle to late Holocene sandy delta deposits indicates that the present distribution of oyster beds is controlled in part by the geologic evolution of the estuary.

  17. Overdeepened glacigenic landforms in Lake Thun (Switzerland) revealed by a multichannel reflection seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Stefano; Herwegh, Marco; Schlunegger, Fritz; Hübscher, Christian; Weiss, Benedikt J.; Schmelzbach, Cédric; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Buechi, Marius W.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2016-04-01

    Recently acquired high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, in combination with a 2D multichannel reflection seismic campaign on perialpine Lake Thun (Switzerland) reveals new insights into the diverse geometry of the lake basin and a so far unknown subaquatic moraine crest with unprecedented clarity. These new data will improve our comprehension concerning the retreat phases of the Aare glacier, the morphology of its proximal deposits and the facies architecture of the subglacial units. The overdeepened basin of Lake Thun was formed by a combination of tectonically predefined weak zones and glacial erosion during the last glacial periods. The new data indicate that below the outermost edge of a morphologically distinct platform in the south eastern part of the lake basin, a ridge structure marked by strong reflection amplitudes occurs. This structure is interpreted as a subaquatic terminal moraine crest, most likely created by a slightly advancing or stagnant grounded Aare glacier during its major retreating phase. The terminal moraine smoothly transforms downstream into well distinguishable foresets with internally recognisable layering, which dip steeply towards the deepest part of the basin, eventually transforming into bottomsets. This depositional sequence formed by the fore- and bottomsets represents ˜50% of the overall sediment volume that fills the basin and was deposited while the glacier was stagnant, interpreted to represent a rather short period of time of a few hundreds of years. This sequence is overlain by lacustrine deposits formed by late-glacial and Holocene laminated muds comprising intercalated turbidites (Wirth et al. 2011). Little is known about the exact timing and behaviour of retreating glaciers between their recessional phase from the Alpine foreland to the deglaciation of the inner-Alpine ice cap, mostly due to the lack of well-developed moraines that indicate glacial stabilization or slight readvance. Findings from pollen analyses by

  18. Accurate elevation and normal moveout corrections of seismic reflection data on rugged topography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, J.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.; Zhang, G.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the seismic reflection method is often limited in areas of complex terrain. The problem is the incorrect correction of time shifts caused by topography. To apply normal moveout (NMO) correction to reflection data correctly, static corrections are necessary to be applied in advance for the compensation of the time distortions of topography and the time delays from near-surface weathered layers. For environment and engineering investigation, weathered layers are our targets, so that the static correction mainly serves the adjustment of time shifts due to an undulating surface. In practice, seismic reflected raypaths are assumed to be almost vertical through the near-surface layers because they have much lower velocities than layers below. This assumption is acceptable in most cases since it results in little residual error for small elevation changes and small offsets in reflection events. Although static algorithms based on choosing a floating datum related to common midpoint gathers or residual surface-consistent functions are available and effective, errors caused by the assumption of vertical raypaths often generate pseudo-indications of structures. This paper presents the comparison of applying corrections based on the vertical raypaths and bias (non-vertical) raypaths. It also provides an approach of combining elevation and NMO corrections. The advantages of the approach are demonstrated by synthetic and real-world examples of multi-coverage seismic reflection surveys on rough topography. ?? The Royal Society of New Zealand 2005.

  19. Digital continuous seismic reflection profiles of New Jersey inner shelf sand ridges

    SciTech Connect

    Waldner, J.S.; Henne, R.G. Jr. ); Sheridan, R.E.; Carey, J.S.; Ashley, G.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Digital continuous profiling seismic reflection data were collected along the three sand ridges of the inner continental shelf off New Jersey in August 1992. The acquisition system consisted of a conventional analog Geopulse system interfaced with a land-based digital signal-enhancement engineering seismograph. The Global Positioning System (GPS) was used to obtain a navigational accuracy within 5 meters after processing. The raw data exhibit seismic reflections from layers less than 1 meter thick. The seismic tracklines were correlated to Vibracores and known geologic stratigraphy. The data show early to late Holocene depositional sequences overlying a mid-Wisconsinan barrier system located at depths of 20 meters. The sand ridges occur as constructive features above an unconformity in an asymmetrical profile where cross bedding reflections downlap on the unconformity and dip gently seaward. Synthetic seismograms constructed from Vibracores show that these internal reflections are caused by interfaces between shelly gravel and medium sand. Digital profiles show processing enhancements including trace static correction, deconvolution, automatic gain scaling, weighted horizontal stacking and digital filtering in addition to color panels. Problems common to analog data, such as wave motion effects of surface sources, water bottom reverberation, multiple reflections, and bubble pulse width, are addressed by digital processing. The combination of the analog system with the land-based seismograph offers a less expensive technique for digital acquisition and processing, thus providing improved results over older analog data.

  20. Fluid pressure diffusion effects on the seismic reflectivity of a single fracture.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Nicolás D; Rubino, J Germán; Caspari, Eva; Milani, Marco; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    When seismic waves travel through a fluid-saturated porous medium containing a fracture, fluid pressure gradients are induced between the compliant fracture and the stiffer embedding background. The resulting equilibration through fluid pressure diffusion (FPD) produces a frequency dependence of the stiffening effect of the fluid saturating the fracture. As the reflectivity of a fracture is mainly controlled by the stiffness contrast with respect to the background, these frequency-dependent effects are expected to affect the fracture reflectivity. The present work explores the P- and S-wave reflectivity of a fracture modeled as a thin porous layer separating two half-spaces. Assuming planar wave propagation and P-wave incidence, this article analyzes the FPD effects on the reflection coefficients through comparisons with a low-frequency approximation of the underlying poroelastic model and an elastic model based on Gassmann's equations. The results indicate that, while the impact of global flow on fracture reflectivity is rather small, FPD effects can be significant, especially for P-waves and low incidence angles. These effects get particularly strong for very thin and compliant, liquid-saturated fractures and embedded in a high-permeability background. In particular, this study suggests that in common environments and typical seismic experiments FPD effects can significantly increase the seismic visibility of fractures.

  1. Pervasive seismic wave reflectivity and metasomatism of the Tonga mantle wedge.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingcai; Lay, Thorne; Flanagan, Megan P; Williams, Quentin

    2007-05-11

    Subduction zones play critical roles in the recycling of oceanic lithosphere and the generation of continental crust. Seismic imaging can reveal structures associated with key dynamic processes occurring in the upper-mantle wedge above the sinking oceanic slab. Three-dimensional images of reflecting interfaces throughout the upper-mantle wedge above the subducting Tonga slab were obtained by migration of teleseismic recordings of underside P- and S-wave reflections. Laterally continuous weak reflectors with tens of kilometers of topography were detected at depths near 90, 125, 200, 250, 300, 330, 390, 410, and 450 kilometers. P- and S-wave impedances decreased at the 330-kilometer and 450-kilometer reflectors, and S-wave impedance decreased near 200 kilometers in the vicinity of the slab and near 390 kilometers, just above the global 410-kilometer increase. The pervasive seismic reflectivity results from phase transitions and compositional zonation associated with extensive metasomatism involving slab-derived fluids rising through the wedge.

  2. Detecting voids in a 0.6 m coal seam, 7 m deep, using seismic reflection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Steeples, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Surface collapse over abandoned subsurface coal mines is a problem in many parts of the world. High-resolution P-wave reflection seismology was successfully used to evaluate the risk of an active sinkhole to a main north-south railroad line in an undermined area of southeastern Kansas, USA. Water-filled cavities responsible for sinkholes in this area are in a 0.6 m thick coal seam, 7 m deep. Dominant reflection frequencies in excess of 200 Hz enabled reflections from the coal seam to be discerned from the direct wave, refractions, air wave, and ground roll on unprocessed field files. Repetitive void sequences within competent coal on three seismic profiles are consistent with the "room and pillar" mining technique practiced in this area near the turn of the century. The seismic survey showed that the apparent active sinkhole was not the result of reactivated subsidence but probably erosion. ?? 1991.

  3. Reflection seismic imaging in the volcanic area of the geothermal field Wayang Windu, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, Ulrich; Wiyono, Wiyono; Pramono, Bambang; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2014-05-01

    Reflection seismic exploration in volcanic areas is still a scientific challenge and requires major efforts to develop imaging workflows capable of an economic utilization, e.g., for geothermal exploration. The SESaR (Seismic Exploration and Safety Risk study for decentral geothermal plants in Indonesia) project therefore tackles still not well resolved issues concerning wave propagation or energy absorption in areas covered by pyroclastic sediments using both active P-wave and S-wave seismics. Site-specific exploration procedures were tested in different tectonic and lithological regimes to compare imaging conditions. Based on the results of a small-scale, active seismic pre-site survey in the area of the Wayang Windu geothermal field in November 2012, an additional medium-scale active seismic experiment using P-waves was carried out in August 2013. The latter experiment was designed to investigate local changes of seismic subsurface response, to expand the knowledge about capabilities of the vibroseis method for seismic surveying in regions covered by pyroclastic material, and to achieve higher depth penetration. Thus, for the first time in the Wayang Windu geothermal area, a powerful, hydraulically driven seismic mini-vibrator device of 27 kN peak force (LIAG's mini-vibrator MHV2.7) was used as seismic source instead of the weaker hammer blow applied in former field surveys. Aiming at acquiring parameter test and production data southeast of the Wayang Windu geothermal power plant, a 48-channel GEODE recording instrument of the Badan Geologi was used in a high-resolution configuration, with receiver group intervals of 5 m and source intervals of 10 m. Thereby, the LIAG field crew, Star Energy, GFZ Potsdam, and ITB Bandung acquired a nearly 600 m long profile. In general, we observe the successful applicability of the vibroseis method for such a difficult seismic acquisition environment. Taking into account the local conditions at Wayang Windu, the method is

  4. FWT2D: A massively parallel program for frequency-domain full-waveform tomography of wide-aperture seismic data—Part 1: Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbier, Florent; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean; Amestoy, Patrick; L'Excellent, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-01

    This is the first paper in a two-part series that describes a massively parallel code that performs 2D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-aperture seismic data for imaging complex structures. Full-waveform inversion methods, namely quantitative seismic imaging methods based on the resolution of the full wave equation, are computationally expensive. Therefore, designing efficient algorithms which take advantage of parallel computing facilities is critical for the appraisal of these approaches when applied to representative case studies and for further improvements. Full-waveform modelling requires the resolution of a large sparse system of linear equations which is performed with the massively parallel direct solver MUMPS for efficient multiple-shot simulations. Efficiency of the multiple-shot solution phase (forward/backward substitutions) is improved by using the BLAS3 library. The inverse problem relies on a classic local optimization approach implemented with a gradient method. The direct solver returns the multiple-shot wavefield solutions distributed over the processors according to a domain decomposition driven by the distribution of the LU factors. The domain decomposition of the wavefield solutions is used to compute in parallel the gradient of the objective function and the diagonal Hessian, this latter providing a suitable scaling of the gradient. The algorithm allows one to test different strategies for multiscale frequency inversion ranging from successive mono-frequency inversion to simultaneous multifrequency inversion. These different inversion strategies will be illustrated in the following companion paper. The parallel efficiency and the scalability of the code will also be quantified.

  5. Processed and interpreted US Geological Survey seismic reflection profile and vertical seismic profile, Powder River and Custer Counties, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, A.H.; Miller, J.J.; Lee, M.W.; Ryder, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A US Geological Survey Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) at the USGS Madison Limestone Test Well No. 2 was run on August 3-5, 1977. The seismic energy source was a single 60 in./sup 3/ Bolt LSS-3/sup 4/ land air gun, operated at 2000 psi. The recording interval was 25 feet from 7900 ft to 3800 ft; 40 ft from 3800 ft to 1500 ft; and 50 ft from 1500 ft to the surface. VSP data were digitally recorded, edited, composited, wavelet shaped, velocity filtered, time shifted, and vertically summed. A band pass filter was applied to match the surface recording frequency band. The surface reflection data were recorded October 15-19, 1978. The energy source was supplied by four Pelco vibrators spaced at 73 ft, with 16 sweeps over a 440 ft line segment. The geophone pattern was 36 detectors in a line 220 ft. long, 48 channels per source point with a five station gap across the source. Major reflecting events on the surface data, shown as continuous lines on the profile, were tied to the summed vertical seismic profile at the USGS Madison Limestone Test Well No. 2. For positive identification, these events were then tracked vertically on the VSP to their point of origin in the earth, and tied at that point to the lithologic log shown in the lower portion of this chart. Formation names corresponding to the lithologic log are also shown. Heavy lines on the lower figure generally correspond to principal geologic formation boundaries. The lighter lines show the general arrangement of lesser reflectors. This data aids petroleum and natural gas investigatons. (DP)

  6. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies.

  7. Gravity and multichannel seismic reflection constraints on the lithospheric structure of the Canary Swell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Torne, M.; Banda, E.

    1995-12-01

    Deep penetrating multichannel seismic reflection and gravity data have been used to study the lithospheric structure of the Canary Swell. The seismic reflection data show the transition from undisturbed Jurassic oceanic crust, away from the Canary Islands, to an area of ocean crust strongly modified by the Canary volcanism (ACV). Outside the ACV the seismic records image a well layered sedimentary cover, underlined by a bright reflection from the top of the igneous basement and also relatively continuous reflections from the base of the crust. In the ACV the definition of the boundary between sedimentary cover and igneous basement and the crust-mantle boundary remains very loose. Two-dimensional gravity modelling in the area outside the influence of the Canary volcanism, where the reflection data constrain the structure of the ocean crust, suggests a thinning of the lithosphere. The base of the lithosphere rises from 100 km, about 400 km west of the ACV, to 80 km at the outer limit of the ACV. In addition, depth conversion of the seismic reflection data and unloading of the sediments indicate the presence of a regional depth anomaly of an extension similar to the lithospheric thinning inferred from gravity modelling. The depth anomaly associated with the swell, after correction for sediment weight, is about 500 m. We interpret the lithospheric thinning as an indication of reheating of old Mesozoic lithosphere beneath the Canary Basin and along with the depth anomaly as indicating a thermal rejuvenation of the lithosphere. We suggest that the most likely origin for the Canary Islands is a hot spot.

  8. 2D Dynamic Models of Subduction: Links between Surface Plate Motion and Deformation in the Transition Zone from Observations of Deep Slab Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of seismicity and seismic tomography provide constraints on the geometry of slabs within mantle, while compression/tension axis derived from moment tensor solutions provide constraints on the internal deformation of slabs. However, since these observations provide only a somewhat blurred or incomplete snapshot of the slab in time, it is difficult to directly relate these observations to the evolution of the slab geometry and the forces acting on and within the slab. In contrast, plate tectonic reconstructions provide time-dependent constraints on the surface motion of plates and the trench at subduction zones, which are related to the dynamical evolution of the slab. We use 2D geodynamical simulations of subduction to explore the relationship between dynamical process within the deforming slab and the observations of surface plate motion and the state-of-stress in slabs. Specifically we utilize models that include the extended Boussinesq approximation (shear heating and latent heat terms in the energy equation), a layered lithosphere with pyrolite, harzburgite and basalt/eclogite, compositionally-dependent phase transitions, and a composite rheology with yielding. The models employ a weak crustal layer that decouples the overriding and subducting plates and allows for dynamically determined trench motion. Here we show that, 1) multiple phase transitions increase slab folding, 2) ridge push significantly increases trench retreat, and 3) strength of the weak crustal layer influences slab detachment. Compared to past studies a more realistic treatment of the phase transitions makes trench retreat more difficult to generate: a weaker plate may encourage slab retreat but detaches once the slab tip crosses into the transition zone due to the rapid increase in slab density. As suggested by previous studies, slab folding within the transition zone changes the direction of forces on the slab and causes periodic changes from trench retreat to trench advance. We

  9. Seismic reflection survey in the geothermal field of the Rotorua Caldera, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, G. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses a seismic reflection survey conducted in the southern part of the Rotorua geothermal field (New Zealand). Geological structures were interpreted along the two profiles to a depth of about 300 m. A seismic image of the Mamaku Ignimbrite is obtained and appears to show normal faulting. Depth of the top of the Mamaku Ignimbrite corroborates data from boreholes. Thickness of the Ignimbrite sheet may reach 280 m near Rotorua City. It is suggested that the Rotorua caldera boundary is not a single fault but a fault zone consisting of at least 4 faults. The displacement on any one fault is no greater than 30 m. The near surface cold-warm thermal boundary, at the northern boundary of the Whakarewarewa thermal area, is also shown in the seismic section.

  10. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  11. Shallow seismic reflection profiles and geological structure in the Benton Hills, southeast Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmer, J.R.; Hoffman, D.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Williams, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    During late May and early June of 1993, we conducted two shallow, high-resolution seismic reflection surveys (Mini-Sosie method) across the southern escarpment of the Benton Hills segment of Crowleys Ridge. The reflection profiles imaged numerous post-late Cretaceous faults and folds. We believe these faults may represent a significant earthquake source zone. The stratigraphy of the Benton Hills consists of a thin, less than about 130 m, sequence of mostly unconsolidated Cretaceous, Tertiary and Quaternary sediments which unconformably overlie a much thicker section of Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The survey did not resolve reflectors within the upper 75-100 ms of two-way travel time (about 60-100 m), which would include all of the Tertiary and Quaternary and most of the Cretaceous. However, the Paleozoic-Cretaceous unconformity (Pz) produced an excellent reflection, and, locally a shallower reflector within the Cretaceous (K) was resolved. No coherent reflections below about 200 ms of two-way travel time were identified. Numerous faults and folds, which clearly offset the Paleozoic-Cretaceous unconformity reflector, were imaged on both seismic reflection profiles. Many structures imaged by the reflection data are coincident with the surface mapped locations of faults within the Cretaceous and Tertiary succession. Two locations show important structures that are clearly complex fault zones. The English Hill fault zone, striking N30??-35??E, is present along Line 1 and is important because earlier workers indicated it has Pleistocene Loess faulted against Eocene sands. The Commerce fault zone striking N50??E, overlies a major regional basement geophysical lineament, and is present on both seismic lines at the southern margin of the escarpment. The fault zones imaged by these surveys are 30 km from the area of intense microseismicity in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ). If these are northeast and north-northeast oriented fault zones like those at Thebes Gap they are

  12. Appraisal of broadband acoustic impedances from first principles and band-limited seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic derived acoustic impedance is an essential output for the quantitative interpretation of seismic data. However, the band limitation of seismic data leads to a nonunique estimate of the acoustic impedance profile. The prevalent methods counter the nonuniqueness either by stabilizing the answer with respect to an initial model or by resorting to an assumption of certain criterion such as sparsity of the reflection coefficients. Making a nominal assumption of a homogeneous layered earth model, we formulate a set of linear equations where the reflection coefficients are the unknowns and the recursively integrated seismic trace constitutes the data. The approach makes a frontal assault on the problem of reconstructing reflection coefficients from band-limited data and stems from first principles, i.e., Zöppritz's equation in this case. Nonuniqueness is countered in part by the layercake assumption, and in part by the adoption of the singular value decomposition (SVD) method of finding an optimal solution to the set of linear equations, provided the objective is to reconstruct a smoothed version of the impedance profile that includes only its coarser structures. The efficacy of the method has been tested with synthetic data added with significant noise and generated from rudimentary earth models as well as from measured logs of acoustic impedance. Emergence of consistent estimates of impedance from synthetic data generated for several frequency bands increases the confidence in the method. The study also proves the successfulness of the method for (a) an accurate estimate of the impedance mean, (b) an accurate reconstruction of the direct-current (dc) frequency of the reflectivity, and (c) an acceptable reconstruction of the broad trend of the original impedance profile. All these outputs can serve as significant constraints for either more refined inversions or geological interpretations. (Keywords: Reflection data, Acoustic impedance, Broadband, Linear

  13. Reflection imaging of the Moon's interior using deep-moonquake seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitsuji, Yohei; Rowe, C. A.; Wapenaar, Kees; Draganov, Deyan

    2016-04-01

    The internal structure of the Moon has been investigated over many years using a variety of seismic methods, such as travel time analysis, receiver functions, and tomography. Here we propose to apply body-wave seismic interferometry to deep moonquakes in order to retrieve zero-offset reflection responses (and thus images) beneath the Apollo stations on the nearside of the Moon from virtual sources colocated with the stations. This method is called deep-moonquake seismic interferometry (DMSI). Our results show a laterally coherent acoustic boundary around 50 km depth beneath all four Apollo stations. We interpret this boundary as the lunar seismic Moho. This depth agrees with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) SELenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) result and previous travel time analysis at the Apollo 12/14 sites. The deeper part of the image we obtain from DMSI shows laterally incoherent structures. Such lateral inhomogeneity we interpret as representing a zone characterized by strong scattering and constant apparent seismic velocity at our resolution scale (0.2-2.0 Hz).

  14. Structural Evolution of a Large Extensional Basin Near Charleston, SC, Illuminated By Seismic-Reflection Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, J. N.; Chapman, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    A comprehensive re-examination and reprocessing of 1980s-vintage seismic-reflection data collected near Charleston, South Carolina, which lies within the South Georgia Rift, has revealed evidence of significant crustal extension and coeval magmatic activity, as well as apparent basin inversion and a late-stage episode of mafic volcanism. The South Georgia Rift is comprised of several large extensional basins separated by intervening structural highs, and is a failed Triassic-Jurassic rift separating the Appalachian Piedmont terrane to the north from the Suwannee terrane to the south. Gravity and magnetic modeling indicate that a significant amount of mafic rock lies within the upper crust near Charleston. Seismic profiles show bright reflections within the early-Mesozoic basement rock beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments that probably represent the interface between clastic sediments and basalt layers. These basalt layers have been sparsely sampled by deep drilling within the South Georgia Rift. The seismic data from Charleston, together with crustal scale, seismic-reflection data from Georgia, show the evolution of the rifting process from the extensional phase which produced the large basins and high rates of sedimentation, through the compressional phase which produced uplift and erosion leading to an inverted basin geometry. Additionally, in the Charleston area, the seismic data show a basalt layer that forms the post-rift unconformity over most of the area. This basalt layer is not present on most of the profiles in Georgia, where the base of the coastal plain sediments is rift-related sedimentary rock. Significantly, near Charleston this basalt layer lacks the large amount of deformation that is characteristic of all of the imaged basalt layers beneath it. This suggests that there is a significant separation in time between the syn-rift basalt layers and the apparently post-rift basalt layer at the top of the rift sequence.

  15. Bedrock mapping of buried valley networks using seismic reflection and airborne electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenborger, G. A.; Logan, C. E.; Hinton, M. J.; Pugin, A. J.-M.; Sapia, V.; Sharpe, D. R.; Russell, H. A. J.

    2016-05-01

    In glaciated terrain, buried valleys often host aquifers that are significant groundwater resources. However, given the range of scales, spatial complexity and depth of burial, buried valleys often remain undetected or insufficiently mapped. Accurate and thorough mapping of bedrock topography is a crucial step in detecting and delineating buried valleys and understanding formative valley processes. We develop a bedrock mapping procedure supported by the combination of seismic reflection data and helicopter time-domain electromagnetic data with water well records for the Spiritwood buried valley aquifer system in Manitoba, Canada. The limited spatial density of water well bedrock observations precludes complete depiction of the buried valley bedrock topography and renders the water well records alone inadequate for accurate hydrogeological model building. Instead, we leverage the complementary strengths of seismic reflection and airborne electromagnetic data for accurate local detection of the sediment-bedrock interface and for spatially extensive coverage, respectively. Seismic reflection data are used to define buried valley morphology in cross-section beneath survey lines distributed over a regional area. A 3D model of electrical conductivity is derived from inversion of the airborne electromagnetic data and used to extrapolate buried valley morphology over the entire survey area. A spatially variable assignment of the electrical conductivity at the bedrock surface is applied to different features of the buried valley morphology identified in the seismic cross-sections. Electrical conductivity is then used to guide construction of buried valley shapes between seismic sections. The 3D locus of points defining each morphological valley feature is constructed using a path optimization routine that utilizes deviation from the assigned electrical conductivities as the cost function. Our resulting map represents a bedrock surface of unprecedented detail with more

  16. Crustal structure of the Morrocan margin from wide-angle and reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanian, D.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Labails, C.; Cosquer, E.; Geli, L.; Olivet, J.; Sahabi, M.; Nouze, H.; Rouzo, S.; Unternehr, P.

    2004-12-01

    Two deep seismic cruises were conducted as joint projects between Ifremer, Total, and the Universities of Brest, El Jadida and Lisbon to constrain the deep crustal structure of the Morrocan continental margin. During the SISMAR cruise four combined wide-angle and reflection seismic profiles were acquired on the northern Morrocan passive margin. Two profiles were shot parallel and two profiles perpendicular to the margin. During the DAKHLA cruise, a total 1500 km of seismic reflection and wide-angle profiles were acquired off the southern Morrocan margin. Modelling of the reflection and wide-angle seismic data from the SISMAR survey images the thick sedimentary cover of the margin, which is locally perturbed by salt tectonics. The sedimentary basin thickens from 1.5 km on normal oceanic crust to a maximum thickness of 6 km at the base of the continental slope. The model reveals basement structures including a few tilted fault blocks and a transition zone to thin oceanic-type crust. The crust thins from 35 km underneath the continent to about 7 km at the western end of the profile. Modelling of the seismic data from the DAKHLA cruise reveals a 10 km deep sedimentary basin including two high velocity carbonate layers. The crustal thinning from 30 km at the continental part to 7 km in the oceanic part occurs over a 100 km wide zone. Oceanic crust east of the M25 magnetic anomaly displays higher velocities in layer 3 than west of the magnetic anomaly. This change in velocity suggests a possible link to changes in accretionary processes of the oceanic crust. A comparison of wide-angle models from the northern and southern experiment show similar continental crustal thickness and structure in both regions, but a wider ocean - continent transition zone in the south. No high velocity layer corresponding to either serpentinized upper mantle or underplating has been imaged in either margin transect.

  17. Crustal structure of the Morrocan margin from wide-angle and reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanian, D.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Labails, C.; Cosquer, E.; Geli, L.; Olivet, J.; Sahabi, M.; Nouze, H.; Rouzo, S.; Unternehr, P.

    2007-12-01

    Two deep seismic cruises were conducted as joint projects between Ifremer, Total, and the Universities of Brest, El Jadida and Lisbon to constrain the deep crustal structure of the Morrocan continental margin. During the SISMAR cruise four combined wide-angle and reflection seismic profiles were acquired on the northern Morrocan passive margin. Two profiles were shot parallel and two profiles perpendicular to the margin. During the DAKHLA cruise, a total 1500 km of seismic reflection and wide-angle profiles were acquired off the southern Morrocan margin. Modelling of the reflection and wide-angle seismic data from the SISMAR survey images the thick sedimentary cover of the margin, which is locally perturbed by salt tectonics. The sedimentary basin thickens from 1.5 km on normal oceanic crust to a maximum thickness of 6 km at the base of the continental slope. The model reveals basement structures including a few tilted fault blocks and a transition zone to thin oceanic-type crust. The crust thins from 35 km underneath the continent to about 7 km at the western end of the profile. Modelling of the seismic data from the DAKHLA cruise reveals a 10 km deep sedimentary basin including two high velocity carbonate layers. The crustal thinning from 30 km at the continental part to 7 km in the oceanic part occurs over a 100 km wide zone. Oceanic crust east of the M25 magnetic anomaly displays higher velocities in layer 3 than west of the magnetic anomaly. This change in velocity suggests a possible link to changes in accretionary processes of the oceanic crust. A comparison of wide-angle models from the northern and southern experiment show similar continental crustal thickness and structure in both regions, but a wider ocean - continent transition zone in the south. No high velocity layer corresponding to either serpentinized upper mantle or underplating has been imaged in either margin transect.

  18. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-10-01

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

  19. Geological Structures of the South Okinawa Trough based on Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, M.; Liu, C.; Teng, L. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Southern Okinawa Trough (SOT) located offshore northeastern Taiwan is an extensional basin north of the Ryukyu Island Arc that opens toward Taiwan. In order to better understand the geological processes in the Southern Okinawa Trough, we collect all the available multi-channel seismic reflection data, reprocess some of them to improve the data quality, and interpret 22 seismic reflection profiles. A structural map, which shows the distribution of fault structures and submarine volcanoes in the study area, is compiled with the aid of seismic sequence analysis. We found that normal faults developed in both the northern and southern flanks of the SOT, and also in the axial area where volcanic extrusions are abundant, suggesting that the SOT is presently undergoing active extension. Some deeply rooted compressional structures are observed below the younger normal faults, which may indicate that the area offshore northern Taiwan was once in a convergent tectonic environment. We use seismic and bathymetry data to discuss the fault activities and related tectonic processes, also examine the volcanic activities and their geological environment.

  20. Pen Branch fault program: Consolidated report on the seismic reflection surveys and the shallow drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Stieve, A.L.; Stephenson, D.E.; Aadland, R.K.

    1991-03-23

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989 based upon interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations (Seismorgraph Services Incorp., 1973; Chapman and DiStefano, 1989; Snipes, Fallaw and Price, 1989). A program was initiated at that time to determine the capability of the fault to release seismic energy (Price and others, 1989) as defined in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines, 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. This report presents the results of the Pen Branch fault investigation based on data acquired from seismic reflection surveys and shallow drilling across the fault completed at this time. The Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has reviewed the results of these investigations and unanimously agrees with the conclusion of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) that the Pen Branch fault is a non-capable fault. ESAC is a committee of 12 earth science professionals from academia and industry with the charter of providing outside peer review of SRS geotechnical, seismic, and ground water modeling programs.

  1. Seismic Reflection - Focusing on Muting Jacquelyn Daves University of Colorado - Boulder SAGE 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daves, J.

    2014-12-01

    The SAGE 2014 survey was conducted directly west of the Santo Domingo Pueblo, along Borrego Canyon Road. This survey is a continuation of the SAGE 2010 and 2011 investigations. The survey was aimed to locate a previously mapped fault running orthogonal to the road. The SAGE 2014 seismic line ran 5.6 km long with 20 meter geophone spacing. 8-80 Hz sweeps were utilized with 10 s sweeps and 4 s of listening. Once the data was converted into the proper file type, preprocesses was conducted. After the preprocessing was complete, various processing methods were used to obtain the final Common Midpoint (CMP) stack. Two CMP stacks were created-one containing the muting method and one without. The ideal result would be to interpret stratigraphic structures and potential faults. The Rio Grande Rift is a Cenozoic continental rift zone that extends approximately 1000 km from Leadville, Colorado to west Texas and Chihuahua, Mexico. The Northern most extent of the rift separates the Great Plains from the Colorado Plateau. The rift consists of a series of interconnected grabbens that lie in an asymmetric pattern (Baldridge, 1989). Basins involved with this rifting are a distinct features along with faults that bound one or both sides. SAGE has been investigating these for over a decade to interpolate the complex structures. By examining Borrego Canyon, we were able to add to the investigation. Various geophysical methods were utilized to study Borrego Canyon. AMT, MT, TEM, gravity, seismic reflection and seismic refraction were individually used to understand the subsurface and were subsequently integrated together in order to have a full spectrum of subsurface depths. Each method has unique processing steps and are critical in order to analyze the gathered data. As such, this paper will focus on processing seismic reflection with an emphasis on muting. Each technique used in processing the SAGE 2014 seismic reflection data will be explained. Next, this paper will validate muting

  2. Solution of the 2-D steady-state radiative transfer equation in participating media with specular reflections using SUPG and DG finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hardy, D.; Favennec, Y.; Rousseau, B.

    2016-08-01

    The 2D radiative transfer equation coupled with specular reflection boundary conditions is solved using finite element schemes. Both Discontinuous Galerkin and Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin variational formulations are fully developed. These two schemes are validated step-by-step for all involved operators (transport, scattering, reflection) using analytical formulations. Numerical comparisons of the two schemes, in terms of convergence rate, reveal that the quadratic SUPG scheme proves efficient for solving such problems. This comparison constitutes the main issue of the paper. Moreover, the solution process is accelerated using block SOR-type iterative methods, for which the determination of the optimal parameter is found in a very cheap way.

  3. Crustal structure of the Kapuskasing Uplift from LITHOPROBE near-vertical/wide-angle seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianjun; Mereu, Robert F.

    1992-11-01

    Reprocessing of one LITHOPROBE Kapuskasing deep seismic reflection profile discloses significant new information on the structure of the Kapuskasing Uplift (KU). The shallow structure of the Ivanhoe Lake fault zone (ILFZ), along which the high-grade granulites of the KU were thrust to the surface, is conspicuously imaged on a seismic section as a series of prominent northwest-dipping reflections with listric geometry. The new images show that the ILFZ is a steep fault (about 50 deg) near the surface which quickly flattens out at shallow depths. These reflections coincide with bright positive aeromagnetic anomalies over the fault zone. Direct correlation with geological observations indicates that the high reflectivity and high magnetism associated with the fault zone likely originate from mylonites. The reprocessing also reveals a pronounced midcrustal reflector within the Abitibi greenstone belt (AGB), dipping northwest and plunging under the KU. The existence of such a reflector is independently confirmed by wide-angle reflection data acquired from a cross-profile. This reflector is apparently also detected on two other reflection profiles crossing the ILFZ about 80 km to the southwest. Its concave-down shape and broad lateral extent suggest that it represents underthrusting of the AGB beneath the KU. With these new results, a more complete structural cross-section is constructed.

  4. Upper Crustal Structure above Off-axis Magma Lenses at RIDGE-2000 East Pacific Rise Integrated Study Site from 3D Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Carbotte, S. M.; Carton, H. D.; Newman, K. R.; Canales, J.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    The 2008 multi-streamer 3D seismic reflection experiment conducted aboard the R/V Marcus Langseth at the RIDGE-2000 East Pacific Rise Integrated Study Site reveals prominent near-axis crustal reflectors on both the east and west flanks of the ridge crest which are interpreted as off-axis melt lenses (OAML) injected at mid-crustal levels. These OAML are probable sites of off-axis volcanism and provide potential heat sources for localized hydrothermal circulation on the ridge flanks, which we speculate may affect off-axis upper crustal structure. To investigate the effect of OAML on the upper crustal structure, we choose two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML on the east flank of the ridge that is present in the southernmost part of our study area: Line 1428P across the middle part of the OAML near 9° 38’N and Line 1476P across the northern end of this OAML near 9° 39’N. Initial analysis includes 2D processing to produce seismic reflection images for each line and 1D travel time modeling on CMP super gathers to characterize Layer 2A and upper Layer 2B velocity structure. Comparison of seismic reflection images and upper crustal velocity structure for the two lines shows a decrease in Layer 2A thickness by 150m and a decrease in the uppermost 2B velocity by 10-20% above the central portion of OAML. We attribute these local anomalies to alteration associated with off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML where enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals may seal porosity within lowermost Layer 2A, converting it to lower velocity uppermost Layer 2B. To further constrain the velocity structure of Layer 2A and Layer 2B, we conduct 2D P-wave tomography with downward continued shot gathers along the studied lines (Harding et al, 2007). The downward continued shot gathers simulate seismic sources and receivers located near the seafloor, and therefore provide travel time information from near-offset refractions that are normally obscured by the

  5. Analysis and modeling of high-resolution multicomponent seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Erich D.

    The facts that seismic body-wave types are sensitive to different physical properties, seismic sources radiate polarized waves, and seismic receivers are sensitive to the polarization of scattered body-waves and coherent noise, mean that it is important to consider recording and analyzing different wave-types and data components prior to high-resolution reflection surveys. In this dissertation, important aspects of elastic-wave propagation relevant to high-resolution multicomponent surveying have been analyzed experimentally and numerically, and methodologies have been tested and developed that will improve near-surface imaging and characterization. Factors affecting the ability of common-mode P- and S-wave reflection surveys for mapping features in the near-surface are described and illustrated through analyses of experimental field data and modeling. It is demonstrated through comparisons of known subsurface conditions and processed stacked sections, that combined P- and S-wave common-mode reflection information can allow a geologic sequence to be imaged more effectively than by using solely P- or S-wave reflection information. Near-surface mode-converted seismic reflection imaging potential was tested experimentally and evaluated through modeling. Modeling results demonstrate that potential advantages of near-surface mode-conversion imaging can be realized in theory. Analyses of acquired multicomponent data however demonstrate that mode-conversion imaging could not be accomplished in the field study area, due to the low amplitudes of events and the presence of noise in field data. Analysis methods are presented that can be used for assessing converted-wave imaging potential in future reflection studies. Factors affecting the ability of SH-wave reflection measurements for allowing near-surface interfaces and discontinuities to be effectively imaged are described. A SH-wave reflection data analysis workflow is presented that provides a methodology for delineating

  6. New methods for engineering site characterization using reflection and surface wave seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiprakaikeow, Susit

    This study presents two new seismic testing methods for engineering application, a new shallow seismic reflection method and Time Filtered Analysis of Surface Waves (TFASW). Both methods are described in this dissertation. The new shallow seismic reflection was developed to measure reflection at a single point using two to four receivers, assuming homogeneous, horizontal layering. It uses one or more shakers driven by a swept sine function as a source, and the cross-correlation technique to identify wave arrivals. The phase difference between the source forcing function and the ground motion due to the dynamic response of the shaker-ground interface was corrected by using a reference geophone. Attenuated high frequency energy was also recovered using the whitening in frequency domain. The new shallow seismic reflection testing was performed at the crest of Porcupine Dam in Paradise, Utah. The testing used two horizontal Vibroseis sources and four receivers for spacings between 6 and 300 ft. Unfortunately, the results showed no clear evidence of the reflectors despite correction of the magnitude and phase of the signals. However, an improvement in the shape of the cross-correlations was noticed after the corrections. The results showed distinct primary lobes in the corrected cross-correlated signals up to 150 ft offset. More consistent maximum peaks were observed in the corrected waveforms. TFASW is a new surface (Rayleigh) wave method to determine the shear wave velocity profile at a site. It is a time domain method as opposed to the Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method, which is a frequency domain method. This method uses digital filtering to optimize bandwidth used to determine the dispersion curve. Results from testings at three different sites in Utah indicated good agreement with the dispersion curves measured using both TFASW and SASW methods. The advantage of TFASW method is that the dispersion curves had less scatter at long wavelengths as a

  7. An Over-Sea-Ice Seismic Reflection Survey: Offshore New Harbor, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunwall, D. A.; Speece, M. A.; Pekar, S. F.; Wilson, G. S.; Tinto, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    During the austral spring of 2008, approximately 48 km of multi-channel seismic reflection data were collected on a sea-ice platform east of New Harbor, Antarctica. The Offshore New Harbor (ONH) survey is third in a series of three successful over-sea-ice seismic reflection surveys recently conducted in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. For rapid data acquisition, the ONH project employed a 60-channel snow streamer cable, with gimbaled geophones installed at 25 m spacing. A dual-chamber Generator-Injector air gun, used as a seismic source, mitigated problems inherent with surface and explosive seismic sources. These ONH data were collected to support the ANtarctic geological DRILLing Program (ANDRILL) which seeks to understand past tectonic and climatic regimes by recovering coevally deposited sediments. ONH data tie into the 2005 Southern McMurdo Sound (SMS) multi-channel seismic survey which successfully delineated sedimentary rock reflectors on the western margin of the Victoria Land Basin (VLB). However, changes in surveying and data processing techniques have improved ONH data quality comparative to SMS data. In order to achieve better signal response at depth than the SMS survey, the GI air gun pressure was increased from 3.4 x 106 Pa to 13.8 x 106 Pa. Unlike SMS data, static and timing errors associated with over-sea-ice surveys were discovered and corrected to improve ONH data resolution. The 2008 ONH project also resurveyed a portion of PD-90-46, a single-channel marine seismic survey collected in 1990 by the Polar Duke research vessel. Unlike Polar Duke’s single-channel data, multi-channel data from the ONH survey has allowed us to remove the sea-floor multiple which masks deeper primary reflections from sedimentary rock boundaries. The ONH data clearly show primary reflector signal beneath the sea-floor multiple where we expect to image Eocene and Oligocene sedimentary rocks. The CIROS-1 borehole was intersected by one of the ONH survey lines and recovered

  8. Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify a potential repository for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range. 31 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-12-01

    This annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), Task 5 (2D seismic design, acquisition, and processing), and Task 6 (2D seismic reflection, interpretation, and AVO analysis) on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford Site. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as a monitoring tool to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The second deployment is to the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Naval Weapons Station Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12), Charleston, SC to further test the technique to detect high concentrations of DNAPL. The Charleston Naval Weapons Station SWMU-12 site was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Based upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth, the project team collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and an experimental P-wave seismic reflection line. After preliminary data analysis of the VSP data and the experimental reflection line data, it was decided to proceed with Task 5 and Task 6. Three high resolution P-wave reflection profiles were collected with two objectives; (1) design the reflection survey to image a target depth of 20 feet below land surface to assist in determining the geologic controls on the DNAPL plume geometry, and (2) apply AVO analysis to the seismic data to locate the zone of high concentration of DNAPL. Based upon the results of the data processing and interpretation of the seismic data, the project team was able to map the channel that is controlling the DNAPL plume

  10. Seismic reflection profile of the Blake Ridge near sites 994, 995, and 997: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Drury, Rebecca M.

    1996-01-01

    Seismic reflection profiles near Sites 994, 995, and 997 were collected with seismic sources that provide maximum resolution with adequate power to image the zone of gas hydrate stability and the region direction beneath it. The overall structure of the sediment drift deposit that constitutes the Blake Ridge consists of southwestward-dipping strata. These strata are approximately conformal to the seafloor on the southwest side of the ridge and are truncated by erosion on the northeast side. A bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) marks the velocity contrast between gas hydrate-bearing sediment and regions containing free gas beneath the zone of gas hydrate stability. The BSR is strong and continuous near the ridge crest but becomes discontinuous on the flanks, where concentration of gas is reduced and dipping strata pass through the level of the base o fgas hydrate stability or the strata are disrupted by faults. Seismic reflection amplitudes appear to be reduced in the region of gas hydrate formation compared to normal amplitudes. A faulted zone ~0.5-0.6 s thick parallels reflections from strata. We infer that this may represent a formerly gas hydrate-bearing zone that was faulted because of a breakdown of hydrate near its phase limit (at the base of the zone). Strong reflections at the top of the faulted zone are caused by free-gas acccumulation at Site 994. Similar strong reflections probably are caused by free-gas accumulations where the top of the faulted zone rises above the BSR, although this would require local free gas within the hydrate-stable zone.

  11. Reflection and transmission of seismic waves at an interface between two saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Wu, Shi-Ming

    1997-01-01

    Based on the modified Biot model for asturated soils, taking the compressibilities of the grains and the pore fluid as well as the viscous coupling into account, the reflection and transmission of seismic aves at an interface between two saturated soils are studied in this paper. A formula is derived for calculation of the amplitude reflection and transmission coefficients of various waves. A aumerical investigation of the dependence of the coefficients on the angle of incidence and the frequency is performed. This study is of a value for seismological studies and geophysical exploration.

  12. Comparison of geoelectric and seismic reflection models of the Zambezi Valley basins, northern Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, David; Whaler, Kathy; Zengeni, Teddy

    2000-09-01

    The Mana Pools and Lower Zambezi Karoo sedimentary basins lie within the Zambezi mobile belt in northern Zimbabwe. The subsurface apparent resistivities measured at both locations are extremely low. Magnetotelluric (MT) data along a profile across part of the Lower Zambezi basin have been inverted using Rapid Relaxation Inversion (Smith & Booker 1991) to find the minimum structure needed to fit the data and compare with an earlier forward model. The resistivity models of both the Mana Pools and the Lower Zambezi basins are then compared with their structure revealed from seismic reflection data. The resistivity structure of the Mana Pools basin is well modelled as a series of different resistivity layers whose boundaries are defined by the seismic data. However, the resistivity structure of the Lower Zambezi basin cannot be matched easily to the seismic structure; additional structure with no seismic expression is required. There is a conductive feature in the two basins in the Upper Karoo sandstone layer that extends below the seismic basement beneath the Lower Zambezi basin. This indicates that the conductors may represent different types of features in the two basins, consistent with their proposed different tectonic origins. A resistive unit is present within the sediments in the Lower Zambezi basin that may represent intercalated basalt dykes, giving an anisotropic MT response. It has been suggested that there might be similar thin basalt layers within the sediments of the Mana Pools basin, but these could not be resolved by MT methods. The low resistivity of the basement, particularly beneath the Lower Zambezi basin, is remarkable and may result from a high degree of either chemical or tectonic alteration to the underlying rocks due to metamorphic processes and tectonic disruption during rift formation. The presence of the Lower Zambezi basin conductor at depths greater than the seismic basement is consistent with observations to the west, in the adjacent

  13. An Evaluation of Seismic Reflection Studies in the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGovern, Thomas F.; Introduction by Pankratz, L. W.; Ackermann, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a total geophysical evaluation of Yucca Mountain for use as a Nuclear Waste Repository the seismic reflection technique has been applied. This study has been conducted to analyze the historical and technical efforts which have been used by three geophysical contractors employing a wide variety of techniques ranging from the most simple to very elaborate 3-D surveys. In each case elaborate noise studies were conducted, and based upon their evaluation parameters were chosen for multifold CDP recording. In every case, the signal-to-noise ratio was such that no reflections were discernable. Since the reflections cannot be separated from the noise even using very elaborate noise suppression techniques and up to 384 fold multiplicity it is apparent that in this volcanic terrain reflection surveys, can not work.

  14. Red Sea isolation history suggested by Plio-Pleistocene seismic reflection sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil C.; Ligi, Marco; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2015-11-01

    High evaporation rates in the desert climate of the Red Sea ensure that, during glacial sea level lowstands when water exchange with the Indian Ocean was more restricted, water salinity and δ18 O became unusually extreme. Modeling of the effect on Red Sea sedimentary δ18 O has been used previously to reconstruct relative sea level to 500 ka and now poses the question of whether that sea-level model could be extended if continuous core material of older sediment became available. We attempt to address this question here by examining seismic reflection data. The upper Pleistocene hemipelagic sediments in the Red Sea contain intervals of inorganic aragonite precipitated during supersaturated conditions of sea-level lowstands. Seismic impedance changes associated with boundaries to those aragonite-rich layers appear to explain seismic reflection sequences. A segment of Chirp sediment profiler data from the central Red Sea reveals prominent reflections at ∼1, ∼5, ∼23, ∼26 and ∼36 ms two-way travel time (TWT) from the seabed. Based on depths to the glacial marine isotope stages (MIS) in cores, we relate the upper three reflections to the tops of aragonite-rich layers and hence the sea level rises immediately following MIS 2, 6 and 12. The reflection at 26 ms is related to an unusually rapid fall into MIS 12 predicted by one sea level reconstruction, which may have created an abrupt lower boundary to the MIS 12 aragonite-rich layer. With the aid of seismogram modeling, we tentatively associate the ∼36 ms reflection with the top of an aragonite-rich layer formed during MIS 16. Furthermore, some segments of lower frequency (airgun and sparker) seismic data from the central and southern Red Sea show a lower (earlier) Plio-Pleistocene (PP) interval that is less reflective than the upper (late) PP interval. This implies less variability in sediment impedance and that extreme variability in water salinity did not develop; water exchange with the Indian Ocean

  15. Seismic slip propagation along a fault in the Shimanto accretionary prism detected by vitrinite reflectance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, M.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Hirose, T.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative assessment of heat generation along faults during fault movement is of primary importance in understanding the dynamics of earthquakes. Last several years localized heat anomaly in a fault zone due to rapid seismic sliding has been detected by various analyses of fault zone materials, such as ferromagnetic resonance signal (Fukuchi et al., 2005), trace elements and isotopes (e.g., Ishikawa et al., 2008) and mineralogical change of clay (e.g., Hirono et al., 2008) and vitrinite reflectance (O'Hara, 2004). Here we report a heat anomaly found in a fault zone in the Shimanto accretionary complex by vitrinite reflectance measurements. Mature faults in nature mostly experience multiple seismic events, resulting in integrated heat anomaly. Thus, in addition to vitrinite reflectance measurements across natural faults, we performed high-velocity friction experiments on a mixture of quartz and vitrinite grains to evaluate how multiple rapid-slip events affect vitrinite reflectance in a fault zone. A localized heat anomaly is found in one of fault zones which are developed within a mélange unit in the Cretaceous Shimanto belt, SW Japan. A principle slip zone with thickness of ~5 mm forms within cataclastic damage zone with thickness of ~3 m. The slip zone is mainly composed of well-foliated clay minerals. Host rocks are characterized by a block-in-matrix texture: aligned sandstone and chert blocks embedded in mudstone matrix. We measured vitrinite reflectance across the fault zone by the same method as reported in Sakaguchi et al., (2011). The measurement reveals that the principle slip zone underwent localized temperature of more than 220°C, while background temperature of both damage zone and host rocks is ~170°C. Since fault motion along most active faults occurs seismological, that inevitably generates frictional heat, the localized heat anomaly is possibly caused by the rapid seismic slip. In order to evaluate the change in vitrinite reflectance by

  16. BASIN STRUCTURE FROM TWO-DIMENSIONAL SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA, CRAZY MOUNTAINS BASIN, MONTANA

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Taylor

    2003-08-01

    Some 140 miles of multichannel seismic reflection data, acquired commercially in the 1970's, were reprocessed by the U.S. Geological Survey in late 2000 and early 2001 to interpret the subsurface geology of the Crazy Mountains Basin, an asymmetric Laramide foreland basin located in south-central Montana. The seismic data indicate that the northwestern basin margin is controlled by a thrust fault that places basement rocks over a thick (22,000 feet) sequence of Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks to the south. From the deep basin trough, Paleozoic through Tertiary rocks slope gently upward to the south and southeast. The northern boundary of the basin, which is not imaged well by the seismic data, appears to be folded over a basement ridge rather than being truncated against a fault plane. Seismic data along the basin margin to the south indicate that several fault controlled basement highs may have been created by thin-skinned tectonics where a series of shallow thrust faults cut Precambrian, Paleozoic, and early Mesozoic rocks, whereas, in contrast, Cretaceous and Tertiary strata are folded. The data are further interpreted to indicate that this fault-bounded asymmetric basin contains several structures that possibly could trap hydrocarbons, provided source rocks, reservoirs, and seals are present. In addition, faults in the deep basin trough may have created enough fracturing to enhance porosity, thus developing ''sweet spots'' for hydrocarbons in basin-centered continuous gas accumulations.

  17. Towards a more comprehensive usage of reflection seismic in near-surface characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouin, M.; Gloaguen, E.; Bellefleur, G.; Pugin, A.

    2014-12-01

    For more than a decade, research groups such as the Geological Survey of Canada built the interest for near-surface reflection seismic by proposing small vibrating sources and three components (3C) landstreamers. Developments in the instrumentation combined with extensive use of shear-wave profiling to image stratigraphy of unconsolidated environments at high resolution got this geophysical method more versatile, more accurate, increased cost effectiveness and allowed to cover greater distance per day. With those major upgrades as a starting point and in a context of regional aquifer characterization in St-Lawrence Lowlands in the province of Quebec, Canada, the present study propose a workflow to further enhance reflection seismic usage for near-surface characterization. First, as high resolution near surface surveys require small shot intervals and multiple channels on three axis, a lot of the acquisition information is received under a raw form yielding to unproductive quality control (QC). Hence, a tool was developed to process data "on the fly" and allow adequate real-time QC and on-site decision making. The algorithm was constructed in a Python environment and is accessible through a graphical user interface where the user is prompted for geometry parameters inputs and desired processing flow steps. Second, at the scale of seismic wavelengths, fine grain and poorly consolidated sediments such as marine clay of the St-Lawrence Lowlands can be viewed as a homogeneous medium presenting anisotropy. This section of the study showed that such geological settings yield to significant seismic velocity variations with angle of propagation that should not be ignore for normal move-out correction, migration or time to depth conversion. Finally, accurate delineation of stratigraphic horizons is an important task of any environmental or hydrogeological characterization study. A methodology was put forward to help integrate geophysical measurements with geological

  18. New insights on shallow and deep crustal geological structures of BABEL line 7 marine reflection seismic data revealed from reprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrokhi, H.; Malehmir, A.; Sopher, D.

    2012-04-01

    The BABEL project (Baltic And Bothnian Echoes from the Lithosphere) was a collaboration among British, Danish, Finnish, German and Swedish geoscientists to collect deep-crustal reflection and wide-angle refraction profiles in Baltic Shield and Gulf of Bothnia. The acquisition of 2,268km of deep marine reflection seismic data was carried out in 1989. The BABEL line 7 runs in E-W direction in the Bothnian Sea, north of the Åland islands and east of the city of Gävle. Several authors presented the seismic results but with a main focus of imaging and interpreting deep crustal geological structures and the nature and the depth of Moho discontinuity along line 7. Based on this seismic data, several publications about velocity distributions within the crust, the depth and texture of Moho discontinuity and seismic reflectivity patterns in the crust were presented. Some evidence from the reflection seismic data was also presented to suggest Early Proterozoic plate tectonics in the Baltic Shield. Previous seismic images of the BABEL line 7 reflection data show a dramatic change in the reflectivity pattern from weakly reflective lower crust in the west to a more reflective lower crust in the east, which was attributed to a change from a rigid crust to a plastic crust from the west to the east. The BABEL line 7 reflection data were acquired with a total profile length of 174km, a set of 48 airguns towed at 7.5m depth, and 3000m long streamer with 60 channels spaced with 50m intervals and towed at 15m depth. Seismic data were recorded for 25s using 4ms sampling interval and 75m shot interval. Seismic data is characterized by strong source-generated noise at shallow travel times and strong but randomly distributed spurious spikes at later arrival times. In this study, we have recovered and reprocessed the seismic data along BABEL line 7. Using modern processing and imaging techniques, which were not available at the time, and with a focus on the shallow parts of the seismic

  19. Fine-scale thermohaline ocean structure retrieved with 2-D prestack full-waveform inversion of multichannel seismic data: Application to the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagnino, D.; Sallarès, V.; Biescas, B.; Ranero, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of 2-D time-domain, adjoint-state acoustic full-waveform inversion (FWI) to retrieve high-resolution models of ocean physical parameters such as sound speed, temperature and salinity. The proposed method is first described and then applied to prestack multichannel seismic (MCS) data acquired in the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia) in 2007 in the framework of the Geophysical Oceanography project. The inversion strategy flow includes specifically designed data preconditioning for acoustic noise reduction, followed by the inversion of sound speed in the shotgather domain. We show that the final sound speed model has a horizontal resolution of ˜ 70 m, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the initial model constructed with coincident eXpendable Bathy Thermograph (XBT) data, and close to the theoretical resolution of O(λ). Temperature (T) and salinity (S) are retrieved with the same lateral resolution as sound speed by combining the inverted sound speed model with the thermodynamic equation of seawater and a local, depth-dependent T-S relation derived from regional conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) measurements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) database. The comparison of the inverted T and S models with XBT and CTD casts deployed simultaneously to the MCS acquisition shows that the thermohaline contrasts are resolved with an accuracy of 0.18oC for temperature and 0.08 PSU for salinity. The combination of oceanographic and MCS data into a common, pseudo-automatic inversion scheme allows to quantitatively resolve submeso-scale features that ought to be incorporated into larger-scale ocean models of oceans structure and circulation.

  20. 3-D Tomography Study of Seismic Refraction/Wide-Angle Reflection Data Across the Variscides, SW Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, B. M.; Landes, M.; Readman, P. W.; Shannon, P. M.; Prodehl, C.

    2002-12-01

    The VARNET-96 seismic experiment acquired three seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles in order to examine the crustal structure in the south-west of Ireland. 170 seismic stations were used on 300 recording sites. The shotpoint geometry was designed to allow for both in-line and off-line fan shot recordings on the three profiles. A total of 34 water shots was fired. Results from 3-D raytrace and inversion modelling illustrate the pervasive lateral heterogeneity of the study area south of the Shannon Estuary. Palaeozoic strata at the south coast are about 5-6 km thick associated with the sedimentary infill of the Munster and South Munster Basins. To the north, shallow upper crust in the vicinity of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone is followed by a 3-4 km thick sedimentary succession in the Dingle-Shannon Basin. A zone of high-velocity upper crust (6.4-6.6 km/s) beneath the South Munster Basin correlates with a gravity high between the Kenmare-Killarney and the Leinster Granite gravity lows. Other high-velocity zones were found beneath Dingle Bay and the Kenmare River region and may be associated with the deep traces of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone and the Cork-Kenmare Line. The 3-D velocity model was taken as a basis for the computation of PmP reflected arrivals from the crust-mantle boundary. The Moho depth varies from about 28-29 km at the south coast to about 32-33 km beneath the Dingle-Shannon Basin, the region where the 2-D inline model shows a south-dipping reflector in the upper mantle. Pervasive Variscan deformation appears to be confined to the sedimentary and upper crustal structure and has not deformed the entire crust supporting a thin-skinned tectonic model for Variscan deformation. Deep-crustal variations only occur where they can be correlated with major tectonic features such as the Caledonian Iapetus Suture near the Shannon Estuary. The shallowing of the Moho towards the coast may result from Mesozoic crustal extension in the adjacent

  1. Using core properties and seismic reflectivity to estimate pore pressure in an active decollement fault

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, H.J.; Moore, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    In the decollement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism, a 3-D seismic image exhibits patchy high-amplitude negative polarity reflections, which have been attributed to large overpressures confined to the fault zone. We collected laboratory P-wave velocity and porosity vs. pore pressure data, using core samples from and adjacent to the decollement zone at ODP Site 948. Logs constrain density and velocity through the decollement zone at Site 948. We use these data to calibrate the reflectivity of the fault zone to pore pressure through waveform and amplitude models of the fault plane reflections. Modeling of the positive polarity Site 948 reflection indicates that it can be explained by a lithologic boundary coincident with the decollement, without anomalous fault properties. By contrast, the dominantly-negative polarity waveform of the reflection {approx}2 km arcward (beneath Site 947) is best modeled by inserting a 16-19 m thick zone of extremely low impedance into the Site 948 impedance structure, with a gradational return to {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} impedance just above the positive boundary. Relative amplitudes in this reflection indicate a larger impedance contrast than can be accounted for at sub-lithostatic fluid pressure, based on the core properties data. We conclude that lithostatic pore pressure with attendant hydraulic dilation of the fault zone is required to generate the negative-polarity reflections. Mapping of these reflections thus delineates zones of elevated fluid content and zero effective stress in the fault zone.

  2. Using core properties and seismic reflectivity to estimate pore pressure in an active decollement fault

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, H.J. ); Moore, J.C. )

    1996-01-01

    In the decollement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism, a 3-D seismic image exhibits patchy high-amplitude negative polarity reflections, which have been attributed to large overpressures confined to the fault zone. We collected laboratory P-wave velocity and porosity vs. pore pressure data, using core samples from and adjacent to the decollement zone at ODP Site 948. Logs constrain density and velocity through the decollement zone at Site 948. We use these data to calibrate the reflectivity of the fault zone to pore pressure through waveform and amplitude models of the fault plane reflections. Modeling of the positive polarity Site 948 reflection indicates that it can be explained by a lithologic boundary coincident with the decollement, without anomalous fault properties. By contrast, the dominantly-negative polarity waveform of the reflection [approx]2 km arcward (beneath Site 947) is best modeled by inserting a 16-19 m thick zone of extremely low impedance into the Site 948 impedance structure, with a gradational return to [open quotes]normal[close quotes] impedance just above the positive boundary. Relative amplitudes in this reflection indicate a larger impedance contrast than can be accounted for at sub-lithostatic fluid pressure, based on the core properties data. We conclude that lithostatic pore pressure with attendant hydraulic dilation of the fault zone is required to generate the negative-polarity reflections. Mapping of these reflections thus delineates zones of elevated fluid content and zero effective stress in the fault zone.

  3. The Northern end of the Dead Sea Basin: Geometry from reflection seismic evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Al-Zoubi, A. S.; Heinrichs, T.; Qabbani, I.; ten Brink, U.S.

    2007-01-01

    Recently released reflection seismic lines from the Eastern side of the Jordan River north of the Dead Sea were interpreted by using borehole data and incorporated with the previously published seismic lines of the eastern side of the Jordan River. For the first time, the lines from the eastern side of the Jordan River were combined with the published reflection seismic lines from the western side of the Jordan River. In the complete cross sections, the inner deep basin is strongly asymmetric toward the Jericho Fault supporting the interpretation of this segment of the fault as the long-lived and presently active part of the Dead Sea Transform. There is no indication for a shift of the depocenter toward a hypothetical eastern major fault with time, as recently suggested. Rather, the north-eastern margin of the deep basin takes the form of a large flexure, modestly faulted. In the N-S-section along its depocenter, the floor of the basin at its northern end appears to deepen continuously by roughly 0.5??km over 10??km distance, without evidence of a transverse fault. The asymmetric and gently-dipping shape of the basin can be explained by models in which the basin is located outside the area of overlap between en-echelon strike-slip faults. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A seismic reflection image for the base of a tectonic plate.

    PubMed

    Stern, T A; Henrys, S A; Okaya, D; Louie, J N; Savage, M K; Lamb, S; Sato, H; Sutherland, R; Iwasaki, T

    2015-02-05

    Plate tectonics successfully describes the surface of Earth as a mosaic of moving lithospheric plates. But it is not clear what happens at the base of the plates, the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). The LAB has been well imaged with converted teleseismic waves, whose 10-40-kilometre wavelength controls the structural resolution. Here we use explosion-generated seismic waves (of about 0.5-kilometre wavelength) to form a high-resolution image for the base of an oceanic plate that is subducting beneath North Island, New Zealand. Our 80-kilometre-wide image is based on P-wave reflections and shows an approximately 15° dipping, abrupt, seismic wave-speed transition (less than 1 kilometre thick) at a depth of about 100 kilometres. The boundary is parallel to the top of the plate and seismic attributes indicate a P-wave speed decrease of at least 8 ± 3 per cent across it. A parallel reflection event approximately 10 kilometres deeper shows that the decrease in P-wave speed is confined to a channel at the base of the plate, which we interpret as a sheared zone of ponded partial melts or volatiles. This is independent, high-resolution evidence for a low-viscosity channel at the LAB that decouples plates from mantle flow beneath, and allows plate tectonics to work.

  5. Cordilleran front range structural features in northwest Montana interpreted from vintage seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Mason C.; Rutherford, Bradley S.; Speece, Marvin A.; Mosolf, Jesse G.

    2016-04-01

    Industry seismic reflection data spanning the Rocky Mountain Cordillera front ranges of northwest Montana were reprocessed and interpreted in this study. Five seismic profiles represent 160 km of deep reflection data collected in 1983 that span the eastern Purcell anticlinorium, Rocky Mountain Trench (RMT), Rocky Mountain Basal Décollement (RMBD), and Lewis thrust. The data were reprocessed using modern techniques including refraction statics, pre-stack time migration (PSTM), and pre- and post-stack depth migration. Results indicate the RMBD is 8-13 km below the Earth's surface and dip 3-10° west. Evidence for the autochthonous Mesoproterozoic Belt and basal Cambrian rocks beneath the RMBD is present in all of the profiles and appears to extend east of the RMT. The Lewis thrust was identified in the seismic profiles and appears to sole into the RMBD east of the RMT. The RMT fault system has a dip displacement of 3-4 km and forms a half graben filled with 1 km of unconsolidated Tertiary sedimentary deposits. The RMT and adjacent Flathead fault systems are interpreted to be structurally linked and may represent a synthetic, en echelon fault system.

  6. Neotectonic analysis of upper klamath lake, oregon: New insights from seismic reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liberty, L.M.; Pratt, T.L.; Lyle, M.; Madin, I.P.

    2009-01-01

    We present marine high-resolution seismic reflection data from Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, to discern the underlying structure and estimate Quaternary slip rates in this actively extending Basin and Range system. The sediment patterns and structures imaged on our seismic profiles reveal a complex geologic system that reflects a changing climate record, shallow water conditions, growth faulting, contrasting sediment sources, and high slip rates. We observe that Upper Klamath Lake is a sedimentsaturated environment, and sediment accumulation rates are therefore controlled by basin subsidence rather than sediment supply. Published slip rates for Holocene extension are greater than our determined late Quaternary slip rates, assuming reasonable rates of deposition. The apparent increased Holocene fault-slip rates may be in part an artifact of long recurrence intervals between major earthquakes, with recent seismicity accommodating long-term strain. The quantity of observed faults below the lake is at least an order of magnitude greater than those mapped outside the lake, suggesting that many hidden faults throughout the region may be unaccounted for when estimating Basin and Range extension rates. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America. All rights reserved.

  7. Digital Seismic-Reflection Data from Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vicinity, 1975-1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Soderberg, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    During 1975 and 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted two seismic-reflection surveys in Rhode Island Sound (RIS) aboard the research vessel Asterias: cruise ASTR75-June surveyed eastern RIS in 1975 and cruise AST-80-6B surveyed southern RIS in 1980. Data from these surveys were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's Data Library. In response to recent interest in the geology of RIS and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from these cruises were scanned and converted to black and white Tagged Image File Format and grayscale Portable Network Graphics images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation time delays to latitudes and longitudes that are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format. This report complements two others that contain analog seismic-reflection data from RIS (McMullen and others, 2009) and Long Island and Block Island Sounds (Poppe and others, 2002) and were converted into digital form.

  8. High-resolution seismic reflection to delineate shallow gas in Eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Watney, W.L.; Begay, D.K.; Xia, J.

    2000-01-01

    Unique amplitude characteristics of shallow gas sands within Pennsylvanian clastic-carbonate dominated sequences are discernible on high-resolution seismic reflection data in eastern Kansas. Upward grading sequences of sand into shale represent a potential gas reservoir with a low-impedence acoustic contrast at the base of the encasing layer. The gas sand and encasing shale, which define the gas reservoir studied here, are part of an erosional incised valley where about 30 m of carbonates and shale have been replaced by sandstone and shale confined to the incised valley. These consolidated geologic settings would normally possess high impedence gas sand reservoirs as defined by abrupt contacts between the gas sand and encasing shale. Based orr core and borehole logs, the gas sand studied here grades from sand into shale in a fashion analogous to that observed in classic low-impedance environments. Amplitude and phase characteristics of high-resolution seismic data across this approximately 400-m wide gas sand are indicative of a low-impedance reservoir. Shot gathers possess classic amplitude with offsett-dependent characteristics which are manifeted on the stacked section as "bright spots." Dominant Frequencies of around 120 Hz allow detection of several reflectors within the 30+ meters of sand/shale that make up this localized gas-rich incised valley fill. The gradational nature of the trapping mechanism observed in this gas reservoir would make detection with conventional seismic reflection methods unlikely.

  9. Updated mapping and seismic reflection data processing along the Queen Charlotte fault system, southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, M. A. L.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Haeussler, P. J.; Rohr, K.; Roland, E. C.; Trehu, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) is an obliquely convergent strike-slip system that accommodates offset between the Pacific and North America plates in southeast Alaska and western Canada. Two recent earthquakes, including a M7.8 thrust event near Haida Gwaii on 28 October 2012, have sparked renewed interest in the margin and led to further study of how convergent stress is accommodated along the fault. Recent studies have looked in detail at offshore structure, concluding that a change in strike of the QCF at ~53.2 degrees north has led to significant differences in stress and the style of strain accommodation along-strike. We provide updated fault mapping and seismic images to supplement and support these results. One of the highest-quality seismic reflection surveys along the Queen Charlotte system to date, EW9412, was shot aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing in 1994. The survey was last processed to post-stack time migration for a 1999 publication. Due to heightened interest in high-quality imaging along the fault, we have completed updated processing of the EW9412 seismic reflection data and provide prestack migrations with water-bottom multiple reduction. Our new imaging better resolves fault and basement surfaces at depth, as well as the highly deformed sediments within the Queen Charlotte Terrace. In addition to re-processing the EW9412 seismic reflection data, we have compiled and re-analyzed a series of publicly available USGS seismic reflection data that obliquely cross the QCF. Using these data, we are able to provide updated maps of the Queen Charlotte fault system, adding considerable detail along the northernmost QCF where it links up with the Chatham Strait and Transition fault systems. Our results support conclusions that the changing geometry of the QCF leads to fundamentally different convergent stress accommodation north and south of ~53.2 degrees; namely, reactivated splay faults to the north vs. thickening of sediments and the upper crust to the south

  10. Crustal evolution of Eocene paleo arc around Ogasawara region obtained by seismic reflection survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, M.; Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Miura, S.; Ishizuka, O.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara)-Mariana (IBM) arc is known to the typical oceanic island arc, and it is the most suitable area to understand the growth process of island arc. The existence of two paleo arc which consists of Oligocene and Eocene paleo age is known in IBM forearc region by geological and geophysical studies. The Ogasawara ridge is also known to locate the initial structure of arc evolution from geologic sampling of research submersible. In this region, IODP drilling site: IBM-2 is proposed in order to understand the temporal and spatial change in arc crust composition from 50 to 40Ma magmatism. Site IBM-2 consists of two offset drilling holes (BON-1, BON-2). BON-1 designed to first encounter forearc basalt and will reach the sheeted dykes. BON-2 will start in boninites and finish in fore arc basalts. The purpose of these drilling is sampling the full volcanic stratigraphy from gabbro to boninite. There is no seismic data around BON-1 and BON-2, therefore it is need to conduct the multi-channel seismic reflection survey. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology carried out multi-channel seismic reflection survey and wide-angle reflection survey using 7,800 cu.in. air gun, 5 km streamer with 444 ch hydrophones and 40 OBSs in March 2011. We obtained two seismic reflection profiles of lines KT06 and KT07 along the paleo arc around Ogasawara ridge. Line KT06 located the north side of Ogasawara ridge. Line KT07 located the trench side of Ogasawara ridge. Lines KT06 is also deployed the OBSs every 5 km interval. Thin sediments are covered with basement in both survey lines. There are some sediment filled in depression topography. The low-frequency reflection from the top of subducting Pacific plate is recognized in line KT06. The continuity of this reflection is not clear due to the complicated bathymetry. The displacement of basement in northern side of Ogasawara ridge is identified along the lineament of bathymetry in Line 06. This structure is

  11. Seismic reflection images of the Moho underlying melt sills at the East Pacific Rise.

    PubMed

    Singh, S C; Harding, A J; Kent, G M; Sinha, M C; Combier, V; Bazin, S; Tong, C H; Pye, J W; Barton, P J; Hobbs, R W; White, R S; Orcutt, J A

    2006-07-20

    The determination of melt distribution in the crust and the nature of the crust-mantle boundary (the 'Moho') is fundamental to the understanding of crustal accretion processes at oceanic spreading centres. Upper-crustal magma chambers have been imaged beneath fast- and intermediate-spreading centres but it has been difficult to image structures beneath these magma sills. Using three-dimensional seismic reflection images, here we report the presence of Moho reflections beneath a crustal magma chamber at the 9 degrees 03' N overlapping spreading centre, East Pacific Rise. Our observations highlight the formation of the Moho at zero-aged crust. Over a distance of less than 7 km along the ridge crest, a rapid increase in two-way travel time of seismic waves between the magma chamber and Moho reflections is observed, which we suggest is due to a melt anomaly in the lower crust. The amplitude versus offset variation of reflections from the magma chamber shows a coincident region of higher melt fraction overlying this anomalous region, supporting the conclusion of additional melt at depth.

  12. Reflection signature of seismic and aseismic slip on the northern Cascadia subduction interface.

    PubMed

    Nedimović, Mladen R; Hyndman, Roy D; Ramachandran, Kumar; Spence, George D

    2003-07-24

    At the northern Cascadia margin, the Juan de Fuca plate is underthrusting North America at about 45 mm x yr(-1) (ref. 1), resulting in the potential for destructive great earthquakes. The downdip extent of coupling between the two plates is difficult to determine because the most recent such earthquake (thought to have been in 1700) occurred before instrumental recording. Thermal and deformation studies indicate that, off southern Vancouver Island, the interplate interface is presently fully locked for a distance of approximately 60 km downdip from the deformation front. Great thrust earthquakes on this section of the interface (with magnitudes of up to 9) have been estimated to occur at an average interval of about 590 yr (ref. 3). Further downdip there is a transition from fully locked behaviour to aseismic sliding (where high temperatures allow ductile deformation), with the deep aseismic zone exhibiting slow-slip thrust events. Here we show that there is a change in the reflection character on seismic images from a thin sharp reflection where the subduction thrust is inferred to be locked, to a broad reflection band at greater depth where aseismic slip is thought to be occurring. This change in reflection character may provide a new technique to map the landward extent of rupture in great earthquakes and improve the characterization of seismic hazards in subduction zones.

  13. An Algorithm to Calculate the Seismic Reflectivity and Transmissivity from General Anisotropic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Malehmir, R.

    2015-12-01

    While seismic anisotropy is known to exist within the Earth's crust and even deeper, isotropic or simple anisotropy assumptions for seismic imaging is an over simplification resulting in artifacts in the seismic image, wrong target positioning and hence interpretation. To partly overcome issues with anisotropic medium, approximations to the full solutions for wave propagation and reflectivity for specific material symmetries are used. Here, we have developed an algorithm to extend these capabilities to the general case of reflectivity from the interface between two anisotropic slabs of arbitrary symmetry and orientation. To achieve this, the algorithm solves full elastic wave equation for polarization, amplitude and slowness of all six wave modes generated by an incident plane-wave from welded interface. In the first step, the plane-wave slownesses and polarizations of all three orthogonal wave modes are calculated for a given incidence angle. Later, the algorithm determines the reflection and transmission angles of all possible scattered modes followed by their respective velocities and polarization vectors. With this information, the algorithm solves a system of equations incorporating the imposed boundary conditions to arrive at the scattered wave amplitudes. By comparing this reflectivity algorithm against leading approximate solution in a much simpler anisotropic environment, we understood that unlike other simplified linear solution, this algorithm is stable in almost all propagation direction and like its predecessor is not limited to near vertical range. There is no need to emphasis that the algorithm capability to quickly solve plane-wave properties in low symmetric anisotropic medium with arbitrary orientation opens new doors to better understand elasticity.

  14. The tectonic puzzle of the Messina area (Southern Italy): Insights from new seismic reflection data

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, Carlo; Ligi, Marco; Scrocca, Davide; Bigi, Sabina; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Carminati, Eugenio; Cuffaro, Marco; D'Oriano, Filippo; Forleo, Vittoria; Muccini, Filippo; Riguzzi, Federica

    2012-01-01

    The Messina Strait, that separates peninsular Italy from Sicily, is one of the most seismically active areas of the Mediterranean. The structure and seismotectonic setting of the region are poorly understood, although the area is highly populated and important infrastructures are planned there. New seismic reflection data have identified a number of faults, as well as a crustal scale NE-trending anticline few km north of the strait. These features are interpreted as due to active right-lateral transpression along the north-eastern Sicilian offshore, coexisting with extensional and right-lateral transtensional tectonics in the southern Messina Strait. This complex tectonic network appears to be controlled by independent and overlapping tectonic settings, due to the presence of a diffuse transfer zone between the SE-ward retreating Calabria subduction zone relative to slab advance in the western Sicilian side. PMID:23240075

  15. Seismic reflection imaging of large-amplitude lee waves in the Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Dan; Holbrook, W. S.; Fer, Ilker

    2011-11-01

    Results from the first testing of the R/V Marcus Langseth as a platform for collecting seismic reflection data from the water column of the ocean demonstrate that large-amplitude lee waves can be acoustically mapped. A seismic profile collected in the Caribbean Sea offshore Costa Rica shows disturbances in finestructure, which we interpret to be lee waves, propagating hundreds of meters vertically through the water column above seafloor ridges. Waves show vertical displacements of 30-50 m and horizontal wavelengths of 300-3000 m. Reflector displacement spectra calculated in the region containing the lee waves exceed Garrett-Munk energy levels by up to a factor of 10 at horizontal wavelengths of 300-3000 m, suggesting a locally derived source of internal wave energy consistent with our interpretation. Our results show that it is possible to image large-scale lee waves, a phenomenon potentially responsible for dissipation and mixing within the ocean.

  16. Recent faulting in western Nevada revealed by multi-scale seismic reflection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frary, Roxanna N.; Louie, John N.; Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jackson K.; Kell, Annie; Eisses, Amy; Kent, Graham M.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Karlin, Robert; Baskin, Robert L.; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Liberty, Lee M.

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to compare different reflection methods used to image subsurface structure within different physical environments in western Nevada. With all the methods employed, the primary goal is fault imaging for structural information toward geothermal exploration and seismic hazard estimation. We use seismic CHIRP (a swept-frequency marine acquisition system), weight drop (an accelerated hammer source), and two different vibroseis systems to characterize fault structure. We focused our efforts in the Reno metropolitan area and the area within and surrounding Pyramid Lake in northern Nevada. These different methods have provided valuable constraints on the fault geometry and activity, as well as associated fluid movement. These are critical in evaluating the potential for large earthquakes in these areas, and geothermal exploration possibilities near these structures.

  17. Recent faulting in western Nevada revealed by multi-scale seismic reflection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frary, R.N.; Louie, J.N.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Kell, A.; Eisses, A.; Kent, G.M.; Driscoll, N.W.; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R.L.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Liberty, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to compare different reflection methods used to image subsurface structure within different physical environments in western Nevada. With all the methods employed, the primary goal is fault imaging for structural information toward geothermal exploration and seismic hazard estimation. We use seismic CHIRP a swept-frequency marine acquisition system, weight drop an accelerated hammer source, and two different vibroseis systems to characterize fault structure. We focused our efforts in the Reno metropolitan area and the area within and surrounding Pyramid Lake in northern Nevada. These different methods have provided valuable constraints on the fault geometry and activity, as well as associated fluid movement. These are critical in evaluating the potential for large earthquakes in these areas, and geothermal exploration possibilities near these structures. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  18. Digital seismic-reflection data from western Rhode Island Sound, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Soderberg, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research Vessel Neecho. Data from this survey were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Science Center's Data Library. Due to recent interest in the geology of Rhode Island Sound and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from this cruise were scanned and converted to Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation (LORAN-C) time delays to latitudes and longitudes, which are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format.

  19. Comparison of high-resolution P- and SH-wave reflection seismic data in alluvial and pyroclastic deposits in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiyono, Wiyono; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2013-04-01

    Seismic reflection is one of the stable methods to investigate subsurface conditions. However, there are still many unresolved issues, especially for areas with specific and complex geological environments. Here, each location has an own characteristic due to material compounds and the geological structure. We acquired high-resolution, P-and SH-wave seismic reflection profiles at two different locations in Indonesia. The first location was in Semarang (Central Java) and the second one was in Tiris (East Java). The first region is located on an alluvial plain with thick alluvial deposits of more than 100 m estimated thickness, and the second location was located on pyroclastic deposit material. The seismic measurements for both locations were carried out using a 48-channel recording system (14-Hz P-wave, 10-Hz SH-wave geophones) with geophone intervals of 5 m (P-waves) and 1 m (SH-waves), respectively. The seismic source for the P-wave was a ca. 4 kg sledge hammer which generated a seismic signal by by hitting on an aluminum plate of 30x30 cm, whereas the SH-wave source was a mini-vibrator ELVIS (Electrodynamic Vibrator System), version 3. Thirteen seismic profiles at Semarang and eighth profiles at Tiris were acquired. The results of seismic data in Semarang show fair to good seismic records for both P-and SH-waves. The raw data contain high signal-to-noise-ratio. Many clear reflectors can be detected. The P-wave data shows reflectors down to 250 ms two-way time while the SH-wave records show seismic events up to 600 ms two-way time. This result is in strong contrast to the seismic data result from the Tiris region. The P-wave data show very low signal to noise ratio, there is no reflection signal visible, only the surface waves and the ambient noise from the surrounding area are visible. The SH-waves give a fair to good result which enables reflector detection down to 300 ms two-way time. The results from the two seismic campaigns show that SH-wave reflection

  20. Interpretation of seismic reflection data across the Himalayan foreland thrust belt in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.J.; Yeats, R.S.; Leathers, M.; Baker, D.M.; Yousuf, M.; Jaume, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Approximately 5000 km of Pakistan government and industry seismic reflection profiles have been incorporated into studies of the active collisional foreland of the western Himalaya. From south to north, the profiles reveal a gently north-dipping detachment zone separating Precambrian basement of the Indian shield from southward thrusted Phanerozoic strata. At its leading edge, the detachment lies within an Eocambrian evaporite sequence at the base of the section in the Salt Range and southern Potwar Plateau. Strata of the Punjab plains south of the Salt Range can be traced northward on the seismic profiles 25 kilometers beneath the Salt Range thrust. Beneath the north flank of the Salt Range, the reflection data reveal a large normal fault offsetting the top of the basement. This normal fault caused thrusts to ramp upsection, exposing Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata in the Salt Range. Farther north, strata within the southern Potwar Plateau have been transported at least 25 kilometers, but have undergone little internal deformation. In the northern Potwar Plateau, strata within the upper thrust plate are complexly folded and faulted, perhaps indicating that the Eocambrian evaporite sequence is missing or less effective than a decoupling zone beneath the thicker overthrust section. At the north end of the seismic control, the detachment remains at a low angle beneath approximately nine km of allochthonous sedimentary rocks. A continuation of seismic coverage as a deep crustal profile is needed to study the northward continuation of the detachment and its relations to more interior thrust faults, including the Main Boundary and Main Mantle thrusts.

  1. Investigating possible earthquake-related structure beneath the southern Illinois Basin from seismic reflection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Sargent, M.L.; Potter, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between seismicity and faults observed on seismic reflection profiles from the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the central Mississippi Valley has been intensively studied for the past 15 years. However, comparable studies relating reflector sequences and earthquakes in the southern Illinois Basin, located northeast of the NMSZ, have not been undertaken. This study investigates the possible relationship between the source parameters of the November 9, 1968, magnitude (mbLg) 5.5 earthquake (a NNE-trending, previously interpreted west-dipping reverse fault at 21.2 ?? 5.4 km depth) in southern Illinois, and a zone of moderately dipping reflectors in crystalline (?) basement observed on a nearby high-quality seismic reflection profile. The 1968 event was the twentieth century's largest magnitude earthquake in the southern Illinois region. The zone of dipping basement reflectors is part of a broad prominent sequence, in which reflectors are subhorizontal or inclined with a strong west-dipping component, that appears beneath the Wabash Valley Fault System and extends to the west beneath the Illinois Basin where it steepens and plunges deeper into the crust over the 1968 hypocenter. More than one interpretation of the dipping reflector zone is admissible, including intrusion of igneous sills or thrust faults or both within a localized shear zone. The dipping reflector zone cannot be traced from the basement into the overlying Phanerozoic sedimentary section or associated directly with any particular previously mapped fault. If a tectonic interpretation is correct, the correlation between the 1968 reverse fault event and the reflector zone may mean that such quakes are nucleating along a blind compressional structure in the crystalline basement of southern Illinois, possibly analogous to the recent destructive southern California earthquakes.

  2. Iberseis: A Deep Seismic Reflection Image of A Variscan Transpresive Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, R.; Simancas, F.; Juhlin, C.; Ayarza, P.; Gonzalez-Loderio, F.; Perez-Estaun, A.; Plata, J.; Iberseis Group

    As part of EUROPROBE's SW Iberia project a 303 km long deep seismic reflection profile was acquired along one of the most complete transects of the Variscan Oro- gen providing key knowledge on fundamental questions about the dynamics of the southwestern European lithosphere. The seismic profile (IBERSEIS) crosses two su- tures that separate three main tectonic terranes which are: South Portuguese Zone, Ossa-Morena Zone and Central Iberian Zone. A prominent mid- lower crustal seismic fabric is observed along the involved terranes. The geometry of the most prominent surface sutures such as the Beja-Acebuches ophiolite and the Badajoz-Córdoba shear zone are clearly identified. A well defined horizontal Moho reveals an approximately constant crustal thikness of 30-33 km along the entire profile. The South Portuguese Zone features a typical geometry of a thrust and fold belt architecture. The high res- olution achieved by the relatively close receiver and shot spacing has imaged very detailed structures within this thin skinned tectonic unit, including thust staks and du- plexes which implying a realtively large crustal shortning. Good structural detail has also been obtained in the Ossa-Morena Zone, which is characterized by the presence of folded recumbent folds and thrusts. At mid-crutal level a high 2-3 s thick band of high reflectivity has been identified across the Ossa-Morena and Central Iberian Zones which is a unique feature among tanspresive orogens. This seismic image provably re- veals the strain partitioning during the oblique transpression tectonics that build up the orogen.

  3. Seismic-Reflection and Ground Penetrating Radar for Environmental Site Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.; Plumb, Richard

    1999-06-01

    The goals of the project are: (1) To examine the complementary site-characterization capabilities of modern, three component shallow seismic reflection (SSR) techniques and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods at depths ranging from 2 to 8 m at an existing test site; (2) To demonstrate the usefulness of the two methods when used in concert to characterize, in three dimensions, the cone of depression of a pumping well that will serve as a proxy site for fluid-flow at an actual, polluted site; (3) To use the site as an outdoor mesoscale laboratory to validate existing three dimensional ground-penetrating radar and seismic-reflection computer models developed at the University of Kansas. To do this, seismic and GPR data are being collected along the same line(s) and within the same depth range. The principal investigators selected a site in central Kansas as a primary location, and although the site itself is not environmentally sensitive, the area offers attributes that are particularly useful for this research and allow the site to serve as a proxy for areas that are contaminated. As part of an effort to evaluate the strengths of each method, the seismic and GPR surveys are repeated on a seasonal basis to establish how the complementary information obtained varies over time. Because the water table fluctuates seasonally at this site, variations in the two types of data over time also can be observed. Such noninvasive, in-situ methods of identifying and characterizing the hydrologic flow regimes at contaminated sites support the prospect of developing effective, cost conscious cleanup strategies in the near future.

  4. Possible modes of coral-reef development at Molokai, Hawaii, inferred from seismic-reflection profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Richmond, B.M.; Grossman, E.E.; Hart, P.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution, seismic-reflection data elucidate the late Quaternary development of the largest coral-reef complex in the main Hawaiian Islands. Six acoustic facies were identified from reflection characteristics and lithosome geometry. An extensive, buried platform with uniformly low relief was traced beneath fore-reef and marginal shelf environments. This highly reflective surface dips gently seaward to ???130 m depth and locally crops out on the seafloor. It probably represents a wave-cut platform or ancient reef flat. We propose alternative evolutionary models, in which sea-level changes have modulated the development of reef systems, to explain the observed stratigraphic relationships. The primary difference between the models is the origin of the underlying antecedent surface, which arguably could have formed during either regression/lowstand or subsequent transgression. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  5. New multichannel seismic reflection data along the eastern part of Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauermilch, Isabel; Jokat, Wilfried

    2015-04-01

    During the RV Polarstern cruise ARK XXVIII/4 in summer 2014, multichannel seismic reflection data were collected along the eastern part of the Lomonosov Ridge with the aim to provide an appropriate database for an IODP drilling proposal as well as to enhance the knowledge of sedimentary and tectonic processes in this area. Depending on the sea ice conditions and required resolution of the data, four survey set-ups with different streamer settings (300 m, 600 m, 3000 m) and airgun clusters (3, 4 G-Guns, 2 GI-Guns) were used. The dataset contains more than 3000 km of seismic profiles, including one transect along as well as several profiles across the ridge and two detailed networks close to the proposed drilling sites. An erosional unconformity, whose presence has been confirmed first by Moran et al. (2006) by scientific drilling at the Lomonosov Ridge in 2004, is visible in the entire seismic dataset as a continuous prominent reflector band. In the seismic data, this unconformity can be found over the entire length of the investigated ridge. Below, the strata show folded and slightly disturbed Mesozoic sediments, which are lying on top of the basement with intensive faulting. These structures might be created by two past rifting events which are significant for the evolution of the Arctic Ocean. The basement faults might be as old as the Mesozoic formation of the Amerasia Basin, and may have been overprinted during the subsequent unconformity-forming event that initiated the Amundsen Basin and the final ridge's break-up. Within the southern seismic survey additional data were gathered around the primary IODP drilling location. Aim of the drilling program is to reach layers of Oligocene and older sediment. Although, the Miocene sediment cover in this area has an almost constant thickness, at the northern end of a topographic channel the seismic data imaged a 500 m high slide scarp where the entire sedimentary column is exposed down to the proposed Oligocene. This

  6. Pre-stack full waveform inversion of ultra-high-frequency marine seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, Giuseppe; Vardy, Mark E.; Henstock, Timothy J.

    2017-03-01

    The full waveform inversion (FWI) of seismic reflection data aims to reconstruct a detailed physical properties model of the subsurface, fitting both the amplitude and traveltime of the reflections generated at physical discontinuities in the propagation medium. Unlike reservoir-scale seismic exploration, where seismic inversion is a widely adopted remote characterisation tool, ultra high frequency (UHF, 0.2-4.0 kHz) multi-channel marine reflection seismology is still most often limited to a qualitative interpretation of the reflections' architecture. Here we propose an elastic full waveform inversion methodology, custom-tailored for pre-stack UHF marine data in vertically heterogeneous media to obtain a decimetric-scale distribution of P-impedance, density and Poisson's ratio within the shallow sub-seabed sediments. We address the deterministic multi-parameter inversion in a sequential fashion. The complex trace instantaneous phase is first inverted for the P-wave velocity to make-up for the lack of low-frequency in the data and reduce the non-linearity of the problem. This is followed by a short-offset P-impedance optimisation and a further step of full offset range Poisson's ratio inversion. Provided that the seismogram contains wide reflection angles (>40 degrees), we show that it is possible to invert for density and decompose a-posteriori the relative contribution of P-wave velocity and density to the P-impedance. A broad range of synthetic tests is used to prove the potential of the methodology and highlights sensitivity issues specific to UHF seismic. An example application to real data is also presented. In the real case, trace normalisation is applied to minimise the systematic error deriving from an inaccurate source wavelet estimation. The inverted model for the top 15 meters of the sub-seabed agrees with the local lithological information and core-log data. Thus we can obtain a detailed remote characterisation of the shallow sediments using a multi

  7. Crustal imaging using old industry seismic reflection data across the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley in Central Californa, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, Stine; Buske, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    We make use of the old industry seismic reflection data set SJ-6 in order to image middle and lower crustal structures beneath the California Coast Ranges and the Great Valley in Central California. For this purpose we use advanced imaging techniques in combination with a local 3D tomographic velocity model in order to map the reflectivity structure of the crust in particular across the San Andreas fault zone. The SJ-6 data set is so far the only active seismic data set crossing the San Andreas fault where the transitional fault segment approaches into the locked segment that last ruptured during the 1857 M7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake. This particular region shows major non volcanic tremor activity that is related directly to and at close range to the deep San Andreas fault zone. The SJ-6 data have been recorded along a crooked profile line that changes its predominating orientation from SW-NE to W-E after crossing the San Andreas fault surface trace. For this reason the imaging technique is implemented in 3D in order to account for the true source and receiver locations. We use a Prestack Kirchhoff type migration method called Fresnel Volume migration that spatializes the recorded reflection energy to the vicinity of the actual reflector elements according to the subsurface model. The results are high quality seismic images of improved signal- to noise ratio compared to standard Prestack Kirchhoff migration techniques. In order to extract reflection signals recorded from the deep crust we extend the record length of the data by adding zeros to the original field data and then crosscorrelate the latter with the source sweep signal. Several adjustments are applied to the migration and stacking schemes in order to obtain final 2D depth sections that represent the reflectivity structure directly beneath the crooked acquisition line. The most prominent feature southwest of the San Andreas fault is a bundle of strong northeast dipping reflectors within the lower crust of

  8. Seismic-reflection and ground penetrating radar for environmental site characterization. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, D.W.; Plumb, R.

    1998-06-01

    'The project''s goals are threefold: (1) to examine the complementary site-characterization capabilities of modern, three-component shallow-seismic techniques and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods at depths ranging from 2 to 8 m at an existing test site; (2) to demonstrate the usefulness of the two methods when used in concert to characterize, in three-dimensions, the cone of depression of a pumping well, which will serve as a proxy site for fluid-flow at an actual, polluted site; and (3) to use the site as an outdoor mesoscale laboratory to validate existing three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar and seismic-reflection computer models developed at the Univ. of Kansas. To do this, useful seismic and GPR data are being collected along the same line(s) and within the same depth range. The principal investigators selected a site in central Kansas as a primary location and, although the site itself is not environmentally sensitive, the location chosen offers particularly useful attributes for this research and will serve as a proxy site for areas that are contaminated. As part of an effort to evaluate the strengths of each method, the authors will repeat the seismic and GPR surveys on a seasonal basis to establish how the complementary information obtained varies over time. Because the water table fluctuates at this site on a seasonal basis, variations in the two types of data over time also can be observed. Such noninvasive in-situ methods of identifying and characterizing the hydrologic flow regimes at contaminated sites support the prospect of developing effective, cost-conscious cleanup strategies in the near future. As of the end of May 1998, the project is on schedule. The first field work was conducted using both of the geophysical survey methods in October of 1997, and the second field survey employed both methods in March of 1998. One of the stated tasks is to reoccupy the same survey line on a quarterly basis for two years to examine change in both

  9. Seismic-reflection signature of cretaceous continental breakup on the Wilkes Land margin, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eittreim, S.L.; Hampton, M.A.; Childs, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The passive (rifted) continental margin of Wilkes Land, Antarctica, is characterized on seismic reflection records by (i) in the south, a block-faulted sequence of highly stratified continental beds overlain by two distinct unconformities; (ii) a transitional, greatly thinned continental crust overlain by material interpreted to be flood basalt; and (iii) in the north, oceanic crust with a boundary ridge at its edge. The Mohorovic??ic?? discontinuity can be followed across the continent-ocean boundary and shows a progressive thinning of continental crust to a minimum of 2.5 kilometers at its northern edge.

  10. Reprocessing of multi-channel seismic-reflection data collected in the Chukchi Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agena, W.F.; Lee, M.W.; Hart, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Contained on this set of two CD-ROMs are stacked and migrated multi-channel seismic-reflection data for 44 lines recorded in the Chukchi Sea, northern Alaska, by the United States Geological Survey in 1977, 1978, and 1980. All data were reprocessed by the USGS in 2000 using updated methods. The resulting final data have both increased temporal and spatial resolution thus providing improved interpretability. An added benefit of these CD-ROMs is that they are a more stable, long-term archival medium for the data.

  11. High resolution seismic reflection, an exploration tool within an underground environment (example from Zimbabwe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutyorauta, J. J.

    Metallurgical grade chromite ore in Zimbabwe is mined from two underground mines, Peak Mine and Railway Block Mine, in Shurugwi. Peak Mine is at present just over 800 m deep. In the search for new chromite ore bodies, such a depth limits the application of the conventional geophysical exploration tools. Exploration diamond drilling is becoming more and more an expensive resort. Alternative and effective geophysical techniques are therefore being actively sought after. The high resolution seismic reflection technique, carried out right within Peak Mine, has the potential to become a useful exploration tool.

  12. Seismic-reflection signature of cretaceous continental breakup on the wilkes land margin, antarctica.

    PubMed

    Eittreim, S L; Hampton, M A; Childs, J R

    1985-09-13

    The passive (rifted) continental margin of Wilkes Land, Antarctica, is characterized on seismic reflection records by (i) in the south, a block-faulted sequence of highly stratified continental beds overlain by two distinct unconformities; (ii) a transitional, greatly thinned continental crust overlain by material interpreted to be flood basalt; and (iii) in the north, oceanic crust with a boundary ridge at its edge. The Mohorovicić discontinuity can be followed across the continent-ocean boundary and shows a progressive thinning of continental crust to a minimum of 2.5 kilometers at its northern edge.

  13. Deep seismic reflection study of a passive margin, southeatern Gulf of Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendahl, B.R.; Groschel-Becker, H.; Meyers, J.; Kaczmarick, K. )

    1991-04-01

    A large grid of deep-imaging, marine seismic reflection data has been acquired in the Gulf of Guinea. The data show that the architecture of old Atlantic igneous crust and upper mantle is highly variable, particularly if reflection Moho is taken to be the base of the crust. Most abrupt changes in oceanic basement thickness and depth to Moho can be correlated with fracture-zone crossings, but significant variations can occur between fracture zones and along flow lines, especially near the ocean-continent transition. Reflection Moho is usually continuous from ocean to continent and does not display any systematic changes in character, continuity, or reflection time even beneath the innermost shelf areas. There are several varieties of intracrustal reflectors, including those that mark different levels within the oceanic gabbroic complex and events that diagonally link the top of oceanic seismic layer 2 and Moho. Different types of sub-Moho dipping reflections also are observed. Some are associated with fracture zones, some originate within continental crust and dip toward the ocean, dissecting Moho without offsetting it, and still others originate at the oceanic Moho and dip toward the continent. The transition from oceanic to continental crust is generally quite sharp north of lat 1{degree}S, but the exact nature of the transition ranges from rift-block geology to abrupt juxtapositions of oceanic and continental crustal rocks. South of about lat 1{degree}S, the transition to continental crust is more gradual, involving a progressive thickening of oceanic crust toward land. This difference may relate to the occurrence of much more oblique initial rifting north of 1{degree}S.

  14. Reprocessing of multi-channel seismic-reflection data collected in the Beaufort Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agena, W.F.; Lee, Myung W.; Hart, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Contained on this set of two CD-ROMs are stacked and migrated multi-channel seismic-reflection data for 65 lines recorded in the Beaufort Sea by the United States Geological Survey in 1977. All data were reprocessed by the USGS using updated processing methods resulting in improved interpretability. Each of the two CD-ROMs contains the following files: 1) 65 files containing the digital seismic data in standard, SEG-Y format; 2) 1 file containing navigation data for the 65 lines in standard SEG-P1 format; 3) an ASCII text file with cross-reference information for relating the sequential trace numbers on each line to cdp numbers and shotpoint numbers; 4) 2 small scale graphic images (stacked and migrated) of a segment of line 722 in Adobe Acrobat (R) PDF format; 5) a graphic image of the location map, generated from the navigation file; 6) PlotSeis, an MS-DOS Application that allows PC users to interactively view the SEG-Y files; 7) a PlotSeis documentation file; and 8) an explanation of the processing used to create the final seismic sections (this document).

  15. Seismic reflection imaging of two megathrust shear zones in the northern Cascadia subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Andrew J

    2004-03-11

    At convergent continental margins, the relative motion between the subducting oceanic plate and the overriding continent is usually accommodated by movement along a single, thin interface known as a megathrust. Great thrust earthquakes occur on the shallow part of this interface where the two plates are locked together. Earthquakes of lower magnitude occur within the underlying oceanic plate, and have been linked to geochemical dehydration reactions caused by the plate's descent. Here I present deep seismic reflection data from the northern Cascadia subduction zone that show that the inter-plate boundary is up to 16 km thick and comprises two megathrust shear zones that bound a >5-km-thick, approximately 110-km-wide region of imbricated crustal rocks. Earthquakes within the subducting plate occur predominantly in two geographic bands where the dip of the plate is inferred to increase as it is forced around the edges of the imbricated inter-plate boundary zone. This implies that seismicity in the subducting slab is controlled primarily by deformation in the upper part of the plate. Slip on the shallower megathrust shear zone, which may occur by aseismic slow slip, will transport crustal rocks into the upper mantle above the subducting oceanic plate and may, in part, provide an explanation for the unusually low seismic wave speeds that are observed there.

  16. Determination of petrophysical properties of geothermal reservoirs in southern Denmark by integrating information from well logs and reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Marie L.; Balling, Niels; Bording, Thue S.; Clausen, Ole R.

    2013-04-01

    determination of reservoir characteristics in combination with a neural network seismic attribute analysis (courtesy of OpendTect) of seismic reflection data available in the area which are both 2D and 3D industrial seismic data, recently acquired. By this combined data analysis we develop procedures for reducing the risk of drilling tight reservoirs as well as for getting a better understanding of the geological evolution of potential geothermal reservoir units.

  17. Processing of multichannel seismic reflection data acquired in 2013 for seismic investigations of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, John J.; Agena, Warren F.; Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2016-04-13

    As part of a cooperative effort among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, two grids of two-dimensional multichannel seismic reflection data were acquired in the Gulf of Mexico over lease blocks Green Canyon 955 and Walker Ridge 313 between April 18 and May 3, 2013. The purpose of the data acquisition was to fill knowledge gaps in an ongoing study of known gas hydrate accumulations in the area. These data were initially processed onboard the recording ship R/V Pelican for more quality control during the recording. The data were subsequently processed in detail by the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver, Colorado, in two phases. The first phase was to create a “kinematic” dataset that removed extensive noise present in the data but did not preserve relative amplitudes. The second phase was to create a true relative amplitude dataset that included noise removal and “wavelet” deconvolution that preserved the amplitude information. This report describes the processing techniques used to create both datasets.

  18. A Wide-Angle Seismic Reflection Transect across the Moroccan Atlas (SIMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, R.; Harnafi, M.; Teixell, A.; Gallart, J.; Levander, A.; Ayarza, P.; Kchikach, A.; Amrhar, M.; Charroud, M.

    2010-12-01

    The plate boundary between Africa and Europe is a diffuse feature that includes a very young intra-continental Cenozoic orogenic belt, the Atlas Orogen. The Atlas is characterized by a topographic relief which can reach 4000 m; less than 20% shortening has been reported by geologic studies. The small amount of shortening does not explain the high topographic relief. Furthermore, potential field geophysical studies and previous low resolution refraction experiments report a maximum crustal thickness of 40 km. These suggesting that the orogen is out of isostatic equilibrium and that asthenospheric upwelling is needed to support the mountain load. A 700 km long deep seismic wide-angle reflection transect has been acquired by an international team to constrain the crustal thickness, topography of the Moho and the seismic velocity structure. The north-south oriented transect extends from the Sahara Desert south of Merzouga near the Algeria border, to Ceuta at the Gibraltar arc (on the north coast of Morocco) crossing the High and Middle Atlas and the Rif mountain ranges. Seismic energy released at 6 shot points generated by detonating approximately, 1 TM of explosives was recorded by ~ 900 Reftek-125a (TEXAN) seismic recorders from the IRIS-PASSCAL pool. The seismic stations were deployed with an average station spacing of 650-750 m. The 6 shot points were located within the southern part of the transect with a shot spacing of ~60-70 km. The preliminary analysis of this high resolution data reveals: a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio; and interpreted PmP reflected phase which samples the crust mantle boundary. SIMA is one component of the PICASSO research initiative. This multinational research programme that includes a series of multi-disciplinary geophysical projects (The Spanish TopoIberia and Siberia Projects; the US-Spanish-Irish PICASSO project, with participation from Germany and France). These studies are designed to develop new understanding of the

  19. Thrust fault growth within accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, H.; Bell, R. E.; Jackson, C. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. Previous studies have reported en-echelon thrust fault geometries from the NW part of the dataset, and have related this complex structure to seamount subduction. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. We also demonstrate that the majority of faults grew upward from the décollement, although there is some evidence for downward fault propagation. Our observations

  20. Comparison of the bedrock depth from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and seismic profile obtained the Seismic Reflection Data, Eskisehir Basin, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tün, Muammer; Karabulut, Savaş; Özel, Oğuz

    2015-04-01

    Ground motion estimation for future earthquakes is one of the most challenging problems in seismology and earthquake engineering. The bedrock depth has a considerable seismic risk for the urban area of Eskişehir. In this study, multiple station microtremor measurement methods which are more practical, non-distructive, fast and economical compared to seismic reflection method were implemented. These method using microtremor recordings have become a very useful data for microzonation studies because of their simple acquisition and analysis. Extensive ambient noise measurements were performed in the basin of Eskisehir from June 2010 to spring 2012. We use data recorded by a broadband seismometer and digitizer CMG-6TD, Guralp seismometer. Some of the measurement locations, the CMG-6TD sensor was located into 30 cm-deep holes in the ground to avoid strongly wind-generated, long-period noise. Dominant frequency (f), bed-rock depth (h) and shear-wave velocity (Vs) were determined from Spatial Autocorrelation (SPAC) methods. With the SPAC Method, it is possible to constrain the velocity structure underlying the site using microtremor array measurements. The results obtained were compared to the 96-channel seismic reflection data with explosive energy source. Several seismic reflection surveys with P-Gun seismic source have been performed on the same place with array measurements. We used two types of seismic sources: 36 cartridge Gun. Shot interval was 10 meters, group interval (one geophone per group, 48 geophones in total) was 10 meters, near offset was 10 meters, far offset was 480 meters, CDP interval was 5 meters. We adapted the 'Off-End Spread' technique while using the Gun. Reflection images within the sedimentary section correlate well with the velocity structure obtained from SPAC.

  1. Paleozoic continent-ocean transition in the ouachita mountains imaged from PASSCAL wide-angle seismic reflection-refraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, G.R. ); Braile, L.W. ); McMechan, G.A.; Chang, Wen-Fong ); Thomas, W.A. ); Harder, S.H. ); Jardine, W.G. )

    1989-02-01

    A wide-angle reflection-reflection experiment, sponsored by the Program for Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (PASSCAL), was conducted in the Ouachita Mountains area of southwestern Arkansas and northwestern Louisiana. This experimental employed 400 state-of-the-art seismic recorders and overlapped the southern one-third of the COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) deep seismic reflection profile in the area. A wide variety of data processing and interpretation techniques was employed to derive an Earth model from these data. The model depicts a preserved early Paleozoic continental margin buried beneath allochthonous Paleozoic strata and younger sedimentary rocks. The southern part of the model indicates the presence of oceanic or highly extended continental crust overlain by about 15 km of mostly Paleozoic sedimentary rock. These results are consistent with little if any shortening of crystalline continental crust during the Ouachita orogeny.

  2. Seismic tomography and ambient noise reflection interferometry on Reykjanes, SW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Verdel, Arie; Ágústsson, Kristján; Blanck, Hanna; Franke, Steven; Metz, Malte; Ryberg, Trond; Weemstra, Cornelius; Hersir, Gylfi; Bruhn, David

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in volcano-seismology and seismic noise interferometry have introduced new processing techniques for assessing subsurface structures and controls on fluid flow in geothermal systems. We present tomographic results obtained from seismic data recorded around geothermal reservoirs located both on-land Reykjanes, SW-Iceland and offshore along Reykjanes Ridge. We gathered records from a network of 234 seismic stations (including 24 Ocean Bottom Seismometers) deployed between April 2014 and August 2015. In order to determine the orientation of the OBS stations, we used Rayleigh waves planar particle motions from large magnitude earthquakes. This method proved suitable using the on-land stations: orientations determined using this method with the orientations measured using a giro-compass agreed. We obtain 3D velocity images from two fundamentally different tomography methods. First, we used local earthquakes to perform travel time tomography. The processing includes first arrival picking of P- and S- phases using an automatic detection and picking technique based on Akaike Information Criteria. We locate earthquakes by using a non-linear localization technique, as a priori information for deriving a 1D velocity model. We then computed 3D velocity models of velocities by joint inversion of each earthquake's location and lateral velocity anomalies with respect to the 1D model. Our models confirms previous models obtained in the area, with enhanced details. Second, we performed ambient noise cross-correlation techniques in order to derive an S velocity model, especially where earthquakes did not occur. Cross-correlation techniques involve the computation of cross- correlation between seismic records, from which Green's functions are estimated. Surface wave inversion of the Green's functions allows derivation of an S wave velocity model. Noise correlation theory furthermore shows that zero-offset P-wave reflectivity at selected station locations can be

  3. Closure of the Tornquist sea: Constraints from MONA LISA deep seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona LISA Working Group

    1997-12-01

    Deep seismic reflection profiles west of Denmark across the suture between Baltica and Eastern Avalonia reveal weak, southward-dipping reflectors within the crystalline basement. These reflectors are interpreted as thrusts resulting from emplacement of Eastern Avalonia onto the southern edge of Baltica. North of these reflectors are the remains of a dissected Silurian foredeep. The presence of this foredeep and the 440 Ma age of metamorphism in rocks recovered from boreholes into Eastern Avalonian rocks suggest that closure of the Tornquist sea occurred in the Late Ordovician, which is consistent with paleobiogeographic data and paleomagnetic apparent polar wander paths for Eastern Avalonia and Baltica. The similarity between these reflection data and the BABEL AC profile permits correlation of reflectors beneath Denmark into the southern North Sea.

  4. High-resolution seismic reflection survey at the Manson crater, Iowa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiswetter, D. A.; Black, R.; Steeples, D. W.; Anderson, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 17.4 km of high-resolution reflection data were acquired along an east-west radius of the Manson Impact Structure (MIS) to delineate the shallow (upper 300 m) subsurface structural configuration. The geometry of the shallow structure is poorly known due to a 30-90 m thick Pleistocene till cover. The resolution of the new seismic data is roughly 5-10 times that of existing Vibroseis data. Data quality varies rapidly along the line from exceptional to poor, due primarily to velocity variations associated with the geological complexity of the area. Preliminary results indicate subsurface structural blocks previously envisioned to be several hundreds of meters in size are actually an order of magnitude smaller and more complex. A seismogram-by-seismogram analysis is necessary to confidently identify intricate stratigraphic and structural relationships seen on preliminary CDP sections, as numerous faults, diffractions, and complicated reflection patterns create potential pitfalls.

  5. Cocorp Deep Seismic Reflection Profiling in the Northern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, K. D.; Zhu, T. F.; Gibbs, A.; Harris, R.; Oliver, J. E.; Kaufman, S.; Brown, L.; Schweickert, R. A.

    1986-04-01

    A COCORP seismic reflection profile across the northern Sierra Nevada in California shows several east-dipping zones of discontinuous reflections. Correlation with surface geology suggests that these zones probably originate from faults of the Foothills fault system. In particular, the Melones fault, which coincides with the "Mother Lode" of the central and southern Sierra foothills, appears to be marked by prominent reflections in the midcrust. Migration of the COCORP data suggests that these faults are approximately planar, have moderately steep east dips (35°-47°), and penetrate at least to midcrustal depths (>20 km). At present it is unclear whether these faults are primary Nevadan thrusts, "late" Nevadan backthrusts (retrocharriage), or younger Cretaceous or Cenozoic faults, also known to occur in the region. Other more problematic features imaged on the profile include a prominent west-dipping zone of reflections in the midcrust beneath the Eastern belt, and subhorizontal reflections at 22- to 26-km depth beneath the Tahoe graben. The former might represent a west-dipping thrust analogous to the Taylorsville thrust cropping out to the north of the survey route. The latter might represent the base of the Sierra Nevada batholith, the westward extension of any one of several thrust systems cropping out in Nevada, a low-angle extensional detachment, or Moho.

  6. Orogenic structure of the Eastern Alps, Europe, from TRANSALP deep seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüschen, Ewald; Lammerer, Bernd; Gebrande, Helmut; Millahn, Karl; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Transalp Working Group

    2004-09-01

    The TRANSALP Group, comprising of partner institutions from Italy, Austria and Germany, acquired data on a 340 km long deep seismic reflection line crossing the Eastern Alps between Munich and Venice. Although the field work was split into four campaigns, between fall 1998 and summer 2001, the project gathered for the first time a continuous profile across the Alps using consistent field acquisition and data processing parameters. These sections span the orogen itself, at its broadest width, as well as the editor Fred Davey and the two adjacent basins. Vibroseis and explosion data, complementary in their depth penetration and resolution characteristics, were obtained along with wide-angle and teleseismic data. The profile shows a bi-vergent asymmetric structure of the crust beneath the Alpine axis which reaches a maximum thickness of 55 km, and 80-100 km long transcrustal ramps, the southward dipping 'Sub-Tauern-Ramp' and the northward-dipping 'Sub-Dolomites-Ramp'. Strongly reflective patterns of these ramps can be traced towards the north to the Inn Valley and towards the south to the Valsugana thrust belt, both of which show enhanced seismicity in the brittle upper crust. The seismic sections do not reveal any direct evidence for the presence of the Periadriatic Fault system, the presumed equivalent to the Insubric Line in the Western Alps. According to our new evolutionary model, the Sub-Tauern-Ramp is linked at depth with remnants of the subducted Penninic Ocean. The 'crocodile'-type model describes an upper/lower crustal decoupling and wedging of both the European and the Adriatic-African continents.

  7. High-resolution seismic-reflection data from offshore northern California — Bolinas to Sea Ranch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Chin, John L.; Allwardt, Parker; Beeson, Jeffrey; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2016-12-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution seismic-reflection data in September 2009, on survey S-8-09-NC, offshore of northern California between Bolinas and Sea Ranch.The survey area spans about 125 km of California’s coast and extends around Point Reyes. Data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. Cumulatively, ~1,150 km of seismic-reflection data were acquired using a SIG 2mille minisparker. Subbottom acoustic depth of penetration spanned tens to several hundred meters and varied by location and underlying sediments and rock types.This report includes maps and a navigation file of the surveyed transects, utilizing Google Earth™ software, as well as digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y and JPEG formats. The images of bedrock, sediment deposits, and tectonic structure provide geologic information that is essential to hazard assessment, regional sediment management, and coastal and marine spatial planning at Federal, State and local levels. This information is also valuable for future research on the geomorphic, sedimentary, tectonic, and climatic record of central California.

  8. IBERSEIS: A Seismic Reflection Image of the Variscan Orogen, SW Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, R.; Simancas, F.; Juhlin, C.; Ayarza, P.; Gonzalez-Lodeiro, F.; Pérez-Estaún, A.; Plata, J.

    2001-12-01

    The 303 km long IBERSEIS seismic profile was planned within the framework of the EUROPROBE program to study the deep structure of a transpressive part of the Variscan orogen and answer fundamental questions about the dynamics of the southwestern European lithosphere. Four 22 ton Vibroseis trucks generated an 8-80 Hz source signal which was recorded by a 7 km spread with stations located every 35 m. Shot spacing was 70 m. The close receiver and shot spacing resulted in high resolution images of the crust. Preliminary interpretations of the reflection data show that the highly reflective seismic fabric of the different units of the SW Iberian lithosphere correlate with the major tectonic terranes and contacts mapped at the surface. The two main sutures have been well imaged. The Moho can be identified along the entire transect at 10 to 11 s, indicating a 30-35 km average crustal thickness. The sub-horizontal geometry of the crust-mantle boundary that crosses Variscan sutures suggests a relatively young Moho. Diffractions at Moho depth beneath the southernmost suture zone indicate structure at the crust-mantle boundary.

  9. Structure of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge from seismic reflection records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Janet L.; Sleep, Norman H.; Normark, William R.; Tompkins, Donald H.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four-channel seismic reflection records were obtained from the axial region of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. Two profiles are normal to the strike of the spreading center and intersect the ridge at latitude 44°40′N and 45°05′N; a third profile extends south along the ridge axis from latitude 45°20′N and crosses the Blanco Fracture Zone. Processing of the axial portions of the cross-strike lines resolved a weak reflection centered beneath the axis. The reflector is at a depth similar to seismically detected magma chambers on the East Pacific Rise and a Lau Basin spreading center; we suggest that the reflector represents the top of an axial magma chamber. In the migrated sections the top of the probable magma chamber is relatively flat and 1–2 km wide, and the subbottom depth of the chamber is greater where the depth to the ridge axis is greater.

  10. Integration between well logging and seismic reflection techniques for structural a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Adel K.; Ghazala, Hosni H.; Mohamed, Lamees

    2016-12-01

    Abu El Gharadig basin is located in the northern part of the Western Desert, Egypt. Geophysical investigation in the form of thirty (3D) seismic lines and well logging data of five wells have been analyzed in the oil field BED-1 that is located in the northwestern part of Abu El Gharadig basin in the Western Desert of Egypt. The reflection sections have been used to shed more light on the tectonic setting of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rocks. While the well logging data have been analyzed for delineating the petrophysical characteristics of the two main reservoirs, Bahariya and Kharita Formations. The constructed subsurface geologic cross sections, seismic sections, and the isochronous reflection maps indicate that the area is structurally controlled by tectonic trends affecting the current shape of Abu El Gharadig basin. Different types of faults are well represented in the area, particularly normal one. The analysis of the average and interval velocities versus depth has shown their effect by facies changes and/or fluid content. On the other hand, the derived petrophysical parameters of Bahariya and Kharita Formations vary from well to another and they have been affected by the gas effect and/or the presence of organic matter, complex lithology, clay content of dispersed habitat, and the pore volume.

  11. The crustal structure of the NW Moroccan continental margin from wide-angle and reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contrucci, I.; Klingelhöfer, F.; Perrot, J.; Bartolome, R.; Gutscher, M.-A.; Sahabi, M.; Malod, J.; Rehault, J.-P.

    2004-10-01

    The Atlantic margin off Morocco with its neighbouring Jurassic oceanic crust is one of the oldest on earth. It is conjugate to the Nova Scotia margin of North America. The SISMAR marine seismic survey acquired deep reflection seismic data as well as wide-angle seismic profiles in order to image the deep structure of the margin, characterize the nature of the crust in the transitional domain and define the geometry of the synrift basins. We present results from the combined interpretation of the reflection seismic, wide-angle seismic and gravity data along a 440-km-long profile perpendicular to the margin at 33-34°N, extending from nearly normal oceanic crust in the vicinity of Coral Patch seamount to the coast at El Jadida and approximately 130 km inland. The shallow structure is well imaged by the reflection seismic data and shows a thick sedimentary cover that is locally perturbed by salt tectonics and reverse faulting. The sedimentary basin thickens from 1.5 km on the normal oceanic crust to a maximum thickness of 6 km at the base of the continental slope. Multichannel seismic (MCS) data image basement structures including a few tilted fault blocks and a transition zone to a thin crust. A strong discontinuous reflection at 12 s two-way travel-time (TWT) is interpreted as the Moho discontinuity. As a result of the good data quality, the deep crustal structure (depth and velocity field) is well constrained through the wide-angle seismic modelling. The crust thins from 35 km underneath the continent to approximately 7 km at the western end of the profile. The transitional region has a width of 150 km. Crustal velocities are lowest at the continental slope, probably as a result of faulting and fracturing of the upper crust. Upper-mantle velocities could be well defined from the ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) and land station data throughout the model.

  12. Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    John Rogers

    2011-12-31

    The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this

  13. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapor concentration field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially scanning direct tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapor concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m x 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emission from certain soil structures shall be monitored. The whole concentration field was measured with up to 2.5 Hz. In this paper, we present the setup and spectroscopic performance of the instrument regarding the influence of the polygon rotation speed and mode on the absorption signal. Homogeneous H2O distributions were measured and compared to a single channel, bi-static reference TDLAS spectrometer for validation of the instrument. Good accuracy and precision with errors of less than 6% of the absolute concentration and length and bandwidth normalized detection limits of up to 1.1 ppmv . m (Hz)-0.5 were achieved. The spectrometer is a robust and easy to set up instrument for tomographic reconstructions of 2-D-concentration fields that can be considered as a good basis for future field measurements in environmental research.

  14. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapour concentration field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially direct scanning tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapour concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m × 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emission from certain soil structures shall be monitored. The whole concentration field was measured with up to 2.5 Hz. In this paper, we present the setup and spectroscopic performance of the instrument regarding the influence of the polygon rotation speed and mode on the absorption signal. Homogeneous H2O distributions were measured and compared to a single channel, bi-static reference TDLAS spectrometer for validation of the instrument. Good accuracy and precision with errors of less than 6% of the absolute concentration and length and bandwidth normalized detection limits of up to 1.1 ppmv · m · √Hz-1 were achieved. The spectrometer is a robust and easy to set up instrument for tomographic reconstructions of 2-D-concentration fields that can be considered a good basis for future field measurements in environmental research.

  15. Marine High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Data in Southeastern Florida: Indications of a Regional Seal Bypass System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, K. J.; Walker, C.; Reich, C. D.

    2008-05-01

    In southeastern Florida during 2007, about 108 km of marine, multichannel, high-resolution, seismic-reflection data were acquired almost entirely inside Biscayne National Park at water depths ranging from about 0.9 to 100 m. Fourteen profiles were acquired between the shoreline of the Florida peninsula and a series of small keys that separate Biscayne Bay from the Atlantic Ocean. Additionally, three profiles were collected eastward of the islands with two extending seaward of the present-day shelf margin and its discontinuous reefs. The set of seismic images from the 17 profiles is providing recognition of intriguing geologic features beneath and beyond Biscayne Bay. For example, the seismic sections provide clues as to the sealing capacity of confining units above a highly permeable zone (Boulder Zone) in the lower part of the Floridan aquifer system used on the southeastern peninsula for deep well injection of treated wastewater. Many of the seismic profiles exhibit continuous vertical disturbances in parallel seismic reflections that correspond to the rocks of the karst Floridan aquifer system and overlying intermediate confining unit. These features indicate fractures that disrupt seismic reflections representative of confining units and may allow ground water to flow across confinement. Combined, the fractures could act as a regional seal bypass system. If this bypass system allows cross-stratal fluid migration, it could provide many pathways for upward directed ground- water flow with leakage to higher hydrostratigraphic levels or to the surface as submarine ground-water discharge. Future research will include acquisition of additional marine seismic profiles and the use of streaming marine resistivity profiling and radon water column mapping. These data will be used to investigate the source waters of submarine ground-water discharge to Biscayne Bay, which could be associated with the fractures imaged on the seismic sections.

  16. Downdip variations in seismic reflection character: Implications for fault structure and seismogenic behavior in the Alaska subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiyao; Shillington, Donna J.; Bécel, Anne; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Webb, Spahr C.; Saffer, Demian M.; Keranen, Katie M.; Kuehn, Harold

    2015-11-01

    Seismic reflection data collected offshore of Alaska Peninsula across the western edge of the Semidi segment show distinctive variations in reflection characteristics of the megathrust fault with depth, suggesting changes in structure that may relate to seismic behavior. From the trench to ~40 km landward, two parallel reflections are observed, which we interpret as the top and bottom of the subducted sediment section. From ~50 to 95 km from the trench, the plate interface appears as a thin (<400 ms) reflection band. Deeper and farther landward, the plate interface transitions to a thicker (1-1.5 s) package of reflections, where it appears to intersect the fore-arc mantle wedge based on our preferred interpretation of the continental Moho. Synthetic waveform modeling suggests that the thin reflection band is best explained by a single ~100 to 250 m thick low-velocity zone, whereas the thick reflection band requires a 3 to 5 km thick zone of thin layers. The thin reflection band is located at the center of the 1938 Mw 8.2 Semidi earthquake rupture zone that now experiences little interplate seismicity. The thick reflection band starts at the downdip edge of the rupture zone, correlates with a dipping band of seismicity, and projects to the location of tremor at greater depth. We interpret the thin reflection band as a compacted sediment layer and/or localized shear zone. The thick reflection band could be caused by a wide deformation zone with branching faults and/or fluid-rich layers, representing a broad transition from stick-slip sliding to slow slip and tremor.

  17. Reflection seismic investigation of the geodynamically active West -Bohemia/Vogtland region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullick, N.; Buske, S.; Shapiro, S. A.; Wigger, P.

    2013-12-01

    The West Bohemia-Vogtland region in central Europe attracts much scientific interest due to recurrent earthquake swarms and continuous exhalation of CO2 dominated fluid from the subsurface. Seismological and geochemical studies reveal (1) significant upper mantle derived content of the emitted fluid, (2) an updoming of the MOHO below that area (3) possible existence of a magmatic fluid reservoir in the upper mantle and (4) fluid activity as a possible trigger for the swarm earthquakes. In this study the subsurface structure beneath the region is investigated by reprocessing the deep reflection seismic profile 9HR, which runs almost directly across the swarm area. The migrated image confirms the upwelling of the MOHO known from receiver function studies. Directly below one of the major gas escape centres, channel like fault structures are observed which seem to have their roots at the MOHO. They may represent deep reaching degassing channels that allow direct transport of mantle-derived fluid. The middle and lower crust appears highly fractured below the swarm area. This may result in mantle fluid ascending through the crust and then getting blocked in the crust. Such blockage could result in building up of an over-pressured fluid zone at the bottom of near surface rocks. After a critical state is reached, the over-pressured fluid may have sufficient energy to force its way above into near surface rocks and to trigger seismicity. Since the swarm seismicity is found to be restricted along a plane only, such intrusion might have taken place along a semi-permeable zone that extends from the fractured lower crust into the near surface rocks. A comparison of the spatio-temporal evolution of the recent swarms in the years 2000 and 2008 with the subsurface reflectivity shows that in both cases the swarm activity initiates at the upper edge of a highly diffuse reflectivity zone, moves upward, bends at a bright spot above and finally stops after travelling a few kilometers

  18. Reflection seismic investigation of the geodynamically active West-Bohemia/Vogtland region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullick, Nirjhar; Buske, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The West Bohemia-Vogtland region in central Europe attracts much scientific interest due to recurrent earthquake swarms and continuous exhalation of CO2 dominated fluid from the subsurface. Seismological and geochemical studies reveal 1) significant upper mantle derived content of the emitted fluid, 2) an updoming of the MOHO below that area 3) possible existence of a magmatic fluid reservoir in the upper mantle and 4) fluid activity as a possible trigger for the swarm earthquakes. In this study the subsurface structure beneath the region is investigated by reprocessing the deep reflection seismic profile 9HR, which runs almost directly across the swarm area. The migrated image confirms the upwelling of the MOHO known from receiver function studies. Directly below one of the major gas escape centres, channel like fault structures are observed which seem to have their roots at the MOHO. They may represent deep reaching degassing channels that allow direct transport of mantle-derived fluid. The middle and lower crust appears highly fractured below the swarm area. This may result in mantle fluid ascending through the crust and then getting blocked in the crust. Such blockage could result in building up of an over-pressured fluid zone at the bottom of near surface rocks. After a critical state is reached, the over-pressured fluid may have sufficient energy to force its way above into near surface rocks and to trigger seismicity. Since the swarm seismicity is found to be restricted along a plane only, such intrusion might have taken place along a semi-permeable zone that extends from the fractured lower crust into the near surface rocks. A comparison of the spatio-temporal evolution of the recent swarms in the years 2000 and 2008 with the subsurface reflectivity shows that in both cases the swarm activity initiates at the upper edge of a highly diffuse reflectivity zone, moves upward, bends at a bright spot above and finally stops after travelling a few kilometers along

  19. Mapping the megathrust beneath the northern Gulf of Alaska using wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Brocher, T.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Fisher, M.A.; Plafker, G.; Moses, M.J.; Taber, J.J. ); Christensen, N.I. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    In the northern Gulf of Alaska and Prince William Sound, wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiling, earthquake studies, and laboratory measurements of physical properties are used to determine the geometry of the Prince William and Yakutat terranes, and the subducting Pacific plate. In this complex region, the Yakutat terrane is underthrust beneath the Prince William terrane, and both terranes are interpreted to be underlain by the Pacific plate. Wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profiles recorded along 5 seismic lines are used to unravel this terrane geometry. Modeled velocities in the upper crust of the Prince William terrane (to 18-km depth) agree closely with laboratory velocity measurements of Orca Group phyllites and quartzofeldspathic graywackes (the chief components of the Prince William terrane) to hydrostatic pressures as high as 600 MPa (6 KBAR). An interpretation consistent with these data extends the Prince William terrane to at least 18-km depth. A landward dipping reflection at depths of 16--24 km is interpreted as the base of the Prince William terrane. This reflector corresponds to the top of the Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity and is interpreted as the megathrust. Beneath this reflector is a 6.9-km/s refractor, that is strongly reflective and magnetic, and is interpreted to be gabbro in Eocene age oceanic crust of the underthrust Yakutat terrane. Both wide-angle seismic and magnetic anomaly data indicate that the Yakutat terrane has been underthrust beneath the Prince William terrane for at least a few hundred kilometers. Wide-angle seismic data are consistent with a 9 to 10[degree] landward dip of the subducting Pacific plate, distinctly different from the inferred average 3 to 4[degree] dip of the overlying 6.9-km/s refractor and Wadati-Benioff seismic zone. The preferred interpretation of the geophysical data is that one composite plate, composed of the Pacific and Yakutat plates, is subducting beneath southern Alaska.

  20. Estimating the location of baleen whale calls using dual streamers to support mitigation procedures in seismic reflection surveys.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Shima H; Tolstoy, Maya; Wilcock, William S D

    2017-01-01

    In order to mitigate against possible impacts of seismic surveys on baleen whales it is important to know as much as possible about the presence of whales within the vicinity of seismic operations. This study expands on previous work that analyzes single seismic streamer data to locate nearby calling baleen whales with a grid search method that utilizes the propagation angles and relative arrival times of received signals along the streamer. Three dimensional seismic reflection surveys use multiple towed hydrophone arrays for imaging the structure beneath the seafloor, providing an opportunity to significantly improve the uncertainty associated with streamer-generated call locations. All seismic surveys utilizing airguns conduct visual marine mammal monitoring surveys concurrent with the experiment, with powering-down of seismic source if a marine mammal is observed within the exposure zone. This study utilizes data from power-down periods of a seismic experiment conducted with two 8-km long seismic hydrophone arrays by the R/V Marcus G. Langseth near Alaska in summer 2011. Simulated and experiment data demonstrate that a single streamer can be utilized to resolve left-right ambiguity because the streamer is rarely perfectly straight in a field setting, but dual streamers provides significantly improved locations. Both methods represent a dramatic improvement over the existing Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) system for detecting low frequency baleen whale calls, with ~60 calls detected utilizing the seismic streamers, zero of which were detected using the current R/V Langseth PAM system. Furthermore, this method has the potential to be utilized not only for improving mitigation processes, but also for studying baleen whale behavior within the vicinity of seismic operations.

  1. Estimating the location of baleen whale calls using dual streamers to support mitigation procedures in seismic reflection surveys

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Shima H.; Tolstoy, Maya; Wilcock, William S. D.

    2017-01-01

    In order to mitigate against possible impacts of seismic surveys on baleen whales it is important to know as much as possible about the presence of whales within the vicinity of seismic operations. This study expands on previous work that analyzes single seismic streamer data to locate nearby calling baleen whales with a grid search method that utilizes the propagation angles and relative arrival times of received signals along the streamer. Three dimensional seismic reflection surveys use multiple towed hydrophone arrays for imaging the structure beneath the seafloor, providing an opportunity to significantly improve the uncertainty associated with streamer-generated call locations. All seismic surveys utilizing airguns conduct visual marine mammal monitoring surveys concurrent with the experiment, with powering-down of seismic source if a marine mammal is observed within the exposure zone. This study utilizes data from power-down periods of a seismic experiment conducted with two 8-km long seismic hydrophone arrays by the R/V Marcus G. Langseth near Alaska in summer 2011. Simulated and experiment data demonstrate that a single streamer can be utilized to resolve left-right ambiguity because the streamer is rarely perfectly straight in a field setting, but dual streamers provides significantly improved locations. Both methods represent a dramatic improvement over the existing Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) system for detecting low frequency baleen whale calls, with ~60 calls detected utilizing the seismic streamers, zero of which were detected using the current R/V Langseth PAM system. Furthermore, this method has the potential to be utilized not only for improving mitigation processes, but also for studying baleen whale behavior within the vicinity of seismic operations. PMID:28199400

  2. Seismic reflection survey at Ayer Hangat site to investigate shallow subsurface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Amin E.; Nawawi, Mohd; Kamel, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Ayer Hangat site is located in the island of Langkawi, northwest Malaysia. The site is characterized by the presence of hot spring. This hot spring is believed to be related to granitic intrusion nearby. Hence the present work is focusing on defining the shallow subsurface structures that control the migration of hot water to the surface. Seismic reflection method is used to achieve the goal of the present study. Forty three shot points were used with an offset of 5m of the nearest geophone. The shot-points interval is set to 1m. Seismograms were recorded on 24 channel TERRALOC instrument. The Geophone interval used was 1m. Conventional seismic data processing scheme was adopted. However, due to the fact that TERRALOC produce SEG2 data files, a script based on Obspy was written and used to convert to SEG-Y format. Afterwards, analyses were carried out using SU Package. The processed data is used to develop a model for the subsurface controlling structures. Such model will help in the understanding of the geothermal hot spring system in the area.

  3. Multichannel seismic-reflection data collected in 1980 in the eastern Chukchi Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, Arthur; Mann, Dennis M.; May, Steven D.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected approximately 2,652 km of 24-channel seismic-reflection data in early September, 1980, over the continental shelf in the eastern Chukchi Sea (Fig. 1). The profiles were collected on the USGS Research Vessel S.P. Lee. The seismic energy source consisted of a tuned array of five airguns with a total volume of 1213 cubic inches of air compressed to approximately 1900 psi. The recording system consisted of a 24-channel, 2400 meter long streamer with a group interval of 100 m, and a GUS (Global Universal Science) model 4200 digital recording instrument. Shots were fired every 50 meters. Navigational control for the survey was provided by a Magnavox integrated navigation system using transit satellites and doppler-sonar augmented by Loran C (Rho-Rho). A 2-millisecond sampling rate was used in the field; the data were later desampled to 4-milliseconds during the demultiplexing process. 8 seconds data length was recorded. Processing was done at the USGS Pacific Marine Geology Multichannel Processing Center in Menlo Park, California, in the sequence: editing-demultiplexing, velocity analysis, CDP stacking, deconvolution-filtering, and plotting on an electrostatic plotter. Plate 1 is a trackline chart showing shotpoint navigation.

  4. Prestack reverse time migration for 3D marine reflection seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seonghyung; Kim, Taeyoun

    2015-03-10

    Prestack reverse time migration (RTM) is a method for imaging the subsurface using the inner product of wavefield extrapolation in shot domain and in receiver domain. It is well known that RTM is better for preserving amplitudes and phases than other prestack migrations. Since 3D seismic data is huge data volume and it needs heavy computing works, it requires parallel computing in order to have a meaningful depth image of the 3D subsurface. We implemented a parallelized version of 3D RTM for prestack depth migration. The results of numerical example for 3D SEG/EAGE salt model showed good agreement with the original geological model. We applied RTM to offshore 3D seismic reflection data. The study area is 12 × 25 km with 120 survey lines. Shot and receiver spacing is 25 m and 12.5 m. The line spacing is 100 m. Shot gathers were preprocessed to enhance signal to noise ratio and velocity model was calculated from conventional stack velocity. Both of them were used to obtain 3D image using RTM. The results show reasonable subsurface image.

  5. Seismic reflection images beneath Puget Sound, western Washington State: The Puget Lowland thrust sheet hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, T.L.; Johnson, S.; Potter, C.; Stephenson, W.; Finn, C.

    1997-01-01

    Seismic reflection data show that the densely populated Puget Lowland of western Washington state is underlain by subhorizontal Paleogene and Neogene sedimentary rocks deformed by west and northwest trending faults and folds. From south to north beneath the Lowland, features seen on the seismic data include: the horizontally-stratified, 3.5 km thick Tacoma sedimentary basin; the Seattle uplift with south dipping (???20??) strata on its south flank and steeply (50?? to 90??) north dipping strata and the west-trending Seattle fault on its north flank; the 7.5 km thick, northward-thinning Seattle sedimentary basin; the antiformal Kingston arch; and the northwest trending, transpressional Southern Whidbey Island fault zone (SWIF). Interpreting the uplifts as fault-bend and fault-propagation folds leads to the hypothesis that the Puget Lowland lies on a north directed thrust sheet. The base of the thrust sheet may lie at 14 to 20 km depth within or at the base of a thick block of basaltic Crescent Formation; its edges may be right-lateral strike-slip faults along the base of the Cascade Range on the east and the Olympic Mountains on the west. Our model suggests that the Seattle fault has a long-term slip rate of about 0.25 mm/year and is large enough to generate a M7.6 to 7.7 earthquake.

  6. Tectonic evolution of the Salton Sea inferred from seismic reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, D.S.; Driscoll, N.W.; Kent, G.M.; Harding, A.J.; Babcock, J.M.; Baskin, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Oblique extension across strike-slip faults causes subsidence and leads to the formation of pull-apart basins such as the Salton Sea in southern California. The formation of these basins has generally been studied using laboratory experiments or numerical models. Here we combine seismic reflection data and geological observations from the Salton Sea to understand the evolution of this nascent pull-apart basin. Our data reveal the presence of a northeast-trending hinge zone that separates the sea into northern and southern sub-basins. Differential subsidence (10 mm yr 1) in the southern sub-basin suggests the existence of northwest-dipping basin-bounding faults near the southern shoreline, which may control the spatial distribution of young volcanism. Rotated and truncated strata north of the hinge zone suggest that the onset of extension associated with this pull-apart basin began after 0.5 million years ago. We suggest that slip is partitioned spatially and temporally into vertical and horizontal domains in the Salton Sea. In contrast to previous models based on historical seismicity patterns, the rapid subsidence and fault architecture that we document in the southern part of the sea are consistent with experimental models for pull-apart basins. ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  7. High-resolution seismic reflection profiling for mapping shallow aquifers in Lee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Missimer, T.M.; Gardner, Richard Alfred

    1976-01-01

    High-resolution continuous seismic reflection profiling equipment was utilized to define the configuration of sedimentary layers underlying part of Lee County, Florida. About 45 miles (72 kilometers) of profile were made on the Caloosahatchee River Estuary and San Carlos Bay. Two different acoustic energy sources, a high resolution boomer and a 45-electrode high resolution sparker, both having a power input of 300 joules, were used to obtain both adequate penetration and good resolution. The seismic profiles show that much of the strata of middle Miocene to Holocene age apparently are extensively folded but not faulted. Initial interpretations indicate that: (1) the top of the Hawthorn Formation (which contains the upper Hawthorn aquifer) has much relief due chiefly to apparent folding; (2) the limestone, sandstone, and unconsolidated sand and phosphorite, which together compose the sandstone aquifer, appear to be discontinuous; (3) the green clay unit of the Tamiami Formation contains large scale angular beds dipping eastward; and (4) numerous deeply cut alluvium-filled paleochannels underlie the Caloosahatchee River. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Multichannel seismic-reflection profiling on the R/V Maurice Ewing during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE), California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Clayton, Robert W.; Klitgord, Kim D.; Bohannon, Robert G.; Sliter, Ray; McRaney, John K.; Gardner, James V.; Keene, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the acquisition of deep-crustal multichannel seismic-reflection data in the Inner California Borderland aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing, conducted in October 1994 as part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE). LARSE is a cooperative study of the crustal structure of southern California involving earth scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, Caltech, the University of Southern California, the University of California Los Angeles, and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). During LARSE, the R/V Ewing's 20- element air gun array, totaling 137.7 liters (8470 cu. in.), was used as the primary seismic source for wide-angle recording along three main onshore-offshore lines centered on the Los Angeles basin and the epicenters of the 1933 Long Beach and 1994 Northridge earthquakes. The LARSE onshore-offshore lines were each 200-250 km long, with the offshore portions being between 90 and 150 km long. The nearly 24,000 air gun signals generated by the Ewing were recorded by an array of 170 PASSCAL REFTEK recorders deployed at 2 km intervals along all three of the onshore lines and 9 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed along two of the lines. Separate passes over the OBS-deployment lines were performed with a long air gun repetition rate (60 and 90 seconds) to minimize acoustic-wave interference from previous shots in the OBS data. The Ewing's 4.2-km, 160-channel, digital streamer was also used to record approximately 1250 km of 40-fold multichannel seismic-reflection data. To enhance the fold of the wide-angle data recorded onshore, mitigating against cultural and wind noise in the Los Angeles basin, the entire ship track was repeated at least once resulting in fewer than about 660 km of unique trackline coverage in the Inner Borderland. Portions of the seismic-reflection lines were repeated up to 6 times. A variety of other geophysical data were also continuously recorded, including 3.5 kHz bathymetry, multi

  9. TOMO3D: 3-D joint refraction and reflection traveltime tomography parallel code for active-source seismic data—synthetic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, A.; Korenaga, J.; Sallarès, V.; Miniussi, A.; Ranero, C. R.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new 3-D traveltime tomography code (TOMO3D) for the modelling of active-source seismic data that uses the arrival times of both refracted and reflected seismic phases to derive the velocity distribution and the geometry of reflecting boundaries in the subsurface. This code is based on its popular 2-D version TOMO2D from which it inherited the methods to solve the forward and inverse problems. The traveltime calculations are done using a hybrid ray-tracing technique combining the graph and bending methods. The LSQR algorithm is used to perform the iterative regularized inversion to improve the initial velocity and depth models. In order to cope with an increased computational demand due to the incorporation of the third dimension, the forward problem solver, which takes most of the run time (˜90 per cent in the test presented here), has been parallelized with a combination of multi-processing and message passing interface standards. This parallelization distributes the ray-tracing and traveltime calculations among available computational resources. The code's performance is illustrated with a realistic synthetic example, including a checkerboard anomaly and two reflectors, which simulates the geometry of a subduction zone. The code is designed to invert for a single reflector at a time. A data-driven layer-stripping strategy is proposed for cases involving multiple reflectors, and it is tested for the successive inversion of the two reflectors. Layers are bound by consecutive reflectors, and an initial velocity model for each inversion step incorporates the results from previous steps. This strategy poses simpler inversion problems at each step, allowing the recovery of strong velocity discontinuities that would otherwise be smoothened.

  10. A low-frequency asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a high-permeability layer

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2009-03-01

    Analysis of compression wave propagation through a high-permeability layer in a homogeneous poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of the Biot's model of poroelasticity. A new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity is a result of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and the Darcy's law. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The latter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility, an imaginary unit, and the frequency of the signal. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). The practical implications of the theory developed here are seismic modeling, inversion, and attribute analysis.

  11. Digital single-channel seismic-reflection data from western Santa Monica basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, William R.; Piper, David J.W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter; Gutmacher, Christina E.

    2006-01-01

    During a collaborative project in 1992, Geological Survey of Canada and United States Geological Survey scientists obtained about 850 line-km of high-quality single-channel boomer and sleeve-gun seismic-reflection profiles across Hueneme, Mugu and Dume submarine fans, Santa Monica Basin, off southern California. The goals of this work were to better understand the processes that lead to the formation of sandy submarine fans and the role of sea-level changes in controlling fan development. This report includes a trackline map of the area surveyed, as well as images of the sleeve-gun profiles and the opportunity to download both images and digital data files (SEG-Y) of all the sleeve-gun profiles.

  12. Application of the Empirical Mode Decomposition to Seismic Reflection and Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, B. M.; Addison, A.; Knapp, C.; McGee, T.

    2006-12-01

    Advancements in signal processing may allow for improved imaging and analysis of complex geologic targets found in seismic reflection and ground penetrating radar data (GPR). A recent contribution to signal processing is the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). The EMD empirically reduces a time series to several sub- signals whose sum yield the original time series. The benefit of such a process is to empirically develop signal-dependent, time-variant filters in the time domain. The objective of this work is to determine whether the EMD allows for empirically derived characteristics to be used in filter design and application, resulting in better filter performance and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. Two data sets are used to show successful application of the EMD to geophysical data. Nonlinear cable strum is removed from one data set while the other is used to remove WOW noise from GPR data. Comparison to traditional techniques demonstrates the effectiveness of the technique.

  13. SEISMIC-REFLECTION STUDIES OF SINKHOLES AND LIMESTONE DISSOLUTION FEATURES ON THE NORTHEASTERN FLORIDA SHELF.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Popenoe, Peter; Kohout, F.A.; Manheim, F. T.; ,

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles show that the shelf off northern Florida is underlain by solution deformed limestone of Oligocene, Eocene, Paleocene and late Cretaceous age. Dissolution and collapse features are widely scattered. They are expressed in three general forms: as sinkholes that presently breach the sea floor, such as Red Snapper Sink and the Crescent Beach submarine spring; as sinkholes that have breached the seafloor in the past but are now filled with shelf sands; and as dissolution collapse structures that originate deep within the section and have caused buckling and folding of overlying Eocene, Oligocene, and to a lesser extent, Neogene strata. Although deformation caused by solution and collapse can be shown to be a continuous process, the major episode of karstification occurred in the late Oligocene and early Miocene when the shelf was exposed to subaerial conditions.

  14. Structural interpretation of seismic reflection data from eastern Salt Range and Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, E.S.; Lillie, R.J.; Zaman, A.S.H.; Yousaf, M.

    1989-07-01

    Approximately 1600 km of seismic reflection profiles from the eastern Salt Range and Potwar Plateau (SR/PP) of Pakistan is integrated with available magnetostratigraphic, surface geologic, and well data to classify structural styles, determine the timing of deformation, and estimate the amount of telescoping of the sedimentary cover. The eastern SR/PP are similar to other fold-and-thrust belts underlain by evaporites in that (1) it is part of a zone of overthrusting that extends considerably farther over the Himalayan foreland than adjacent areas not underlain by evaporites, (2) the overall thrust wedge has a narrow cross-sectional taper, (3) structures verge toward the hinterland as well as toward the foreland, and (4) fold trends are long and continuous, consisting of tight salt-cored anticlines separated by broad synclines. 11 figures, 1 table.

  15. Crustal structure of the SW-Moroccan margin from wide-angle and reflection seismic data (the DAKHLA experiment) Part A: Wide-angle seismic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Labails, C.; Cosquer, E.; Rouzo, S.; Géli, L.; Aslanian, D.; Olivet, J.-L.; Sahabi, M.; Nouzé, H.; Unternehr, P.

    2009-04-01

    A total 1500 km of seismic reflection and wide-angle profiles were acquired off the southern Moroccan margin during the DAKHLA cruise, a joint project of Ifremer, the Universities of Brest, El Jadida and Lisbon and Total. The shots along two profiles parallel to the margin and two profiles perpendicular to the margin were also recorded by ocean bottom seismometers (OBS). The profiles perpendicular to the margin were additionally extended on land using 14 stations on the northern profile and 11 stations on the southern profile. Modelling of the reflection and wide-angle seismic data reveals a 10 km deep sedimentary basin including two high velocity carbonate layers. Lateral crustal thinning is observed from a 27 km thick crystalline continental crust to a 7 km thick oceanic crust occurring over less than 100 km. The crystalline continental crust can be divided into two distinct layers of 12 and 15 km thickness. The oceanic crust east of the magnetic anomaly M25 displays higher velocities in layer 3 than west of the magnetic anomaly. The change in seismic velocity suggests a possible link to changes in accretionary processes of the oceanic crust. Some regions show seismic velocities between 6.8 and 7.4 km/s which could be explained by slightly elevated mantle temperatures during accretion of the crust.

  16. Hydrogeologic structure underlying a recharge pond delineated with shear-wave seismic reflection and cone penetrometer data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, S.S.; Pidlisecky, A.; Knight, R.

    2009-01-01

    With the goal of improving the understanding of the subsurface structure beneath the Harkins Slough recharge pond in Pajaro Valley, California, USA, we have undertaken a multimodal approach to develop a robust velocity model to yield an accurate seismic reflection section. Our shear-wave reflection section helps us identify and map an important and previously unknown flow barrier at depth; it also helps us map other relevant structure within the surficial aquifer. Development of an accurate velocity model is essential for depth conversion and interpretation of the reflection section. We incorporate information provided by shear-wave seismic methods along with cone penetrometer testing and seismic cone penetrometer testing measurements. One velocity model is based on reflected and refracted arrivals and provides reliable velocity estimates for the full depth range of interest when anchored on interface depths determined from cone data and borehole drillers' logs. A second velocity model is based on seismic cone penetrometer testing data that provide higher-resolution ID velocity columns with error estimates within the depth range of the cone penetrometer testing. Comparison of the reflection/refraction model with the seismic cone penetrometer testing model also suggests that the mass of the cone truck can influence velocity with the equivalent effect of approximately one metre of extra overburden stress. Together, these velocity models and the depth-converted reflection section result in a better constrained hydrologic model of the subsurface and illustrate the pivotal role that cone data can provide in the reflection processing workflow. ?? 2009 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  17. Reflection seismic investigations of the Beaufort Sea margin, Arctic Ocean: Variable history of Quaternary ice-sheet advance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Christine; Dowdeswell, Julian; Pietras, Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    The seismic stratigraphy and sedimentary architecture of the formerly-glaciated Beaufort Sea shelf and adjacent slope are investigated using a comprehensive grid of high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data collected by ION Geophysical Corporation as part of the BeaufortSPAN East survey. Three cross-shelf troughs, representing locations of former ice streams draining a 1000 km-long section of the Laurentide Ice Sheet are examined; the Mackenzie, Amundsen Gulf and M'Clure Strait systems. These palaeo-ice streams operated during the last, Late Wisconsinan, glacial maximum and a hitherto unknown number of earlier glacial periods. Their dynamics influenced past ice-sheet configuration and may have forced abrupt climate change through transport of ice and freshwater to the Arctic Ocean. The objectives of this work are to constrain the number of ice advances through each trough, to discuss the possible timing of these events, and to examine the impact of Quaternary glaciation on the continental shelf and adjacent slope. The number of cycles of ice-sheet growth and decay varies markedly between the Mackenzie Trough on the western Beaufort Sea margin, with only two recorded events, and the Amundsen Gulf Trough to the east, with at least nine. The Mackenzie Trough was probably occupied by an ice stream during the Late Wisconsinan and either the Illinoian or Early Wisconsinan glaciation. The Amundsen Gulf ice stream was initiated earlier in the Quaternary, suggesting that the onset of cross-shelf glaciation on the eastern Beaufort Sea margin occurred significantly prior to initial glaciation of Mackenzie Trough to the west. Whereas the continental slope beyond the Mackenzie Trough lacks a significant glacial-sedimentary depocentre, major trough-mouth fans (of volumes ~10,000 km³ and ~60,000 km³) are present beyond the Amundsen Gulf and M'Clure Strait, respectively. A number of buried glacigenic landforms, including grounding-zone wedges and lateral moraines, are

  18. Seismic-Reflection Technology Defines Potential Vertical Bypass in Hydrogeologic Confinement within Tertiary Carbonates of the Southeastern Florida Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, K. J.; Walker, C.; Westcott, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Continuous improvements in shallow-focused, high-resolution, marine seismic-reflection technology has provided the opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that breach confining units of the Floridan aquifer system within the southeastern Florida Platform. The Floridan aquifer system is comprised mostly of Tertiary platform carbonates. In southeastern Florida, hydrogeologic confinement is important to sustainable use of the Floridan aquifer system, where the saline lower part is used for injection of wastewater and the brackish upper part is an alternative source of drinking water. Between 2007 and 2011, approximately 275 km of 24- and 48-channel seismic-reflection profiles were acquired in canals of peninsular southeastern Florida, Biscayne Bay, present-day Florida shelf margin, and the deeply submerged Miami Terrace. Vertical to steeply dipping offsets in seismic reflections indicate faults, which range from Eocene to possible early Pliocene age. Most faults are associated with karst collapse structures; however, a few tectonic faults of early Miocene to early Pliocene age are present. The faults may serve as a pathway for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability in the Floridan aquifer system. The faults may collectively produce a regional confinement bypass system. In early 2011, twenty seismic-reflection profiles were acquired near the Key Biscayne submarine sinkhole located on the seafloor of the Miami Terrace. Here the water depth is about 365 m. A steeply dipping (eastward) zone of mostly deteriorated quality of seismic-reflection data underlies the sinkhole. Correlation of coherent seismic reflections within and adjacent to the disturbed zone indicates a series of faults occur within the zone. It is hypothesized that upward movement of groundwater within the zone contributed to development of a hypogenic karst system and the resultant overlying sinkhole

  19. A shallow high-resolution seismic reflection study of dudley ridge, south-east missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, M.; Vaughn, J. D.; Anderson, N. L.; Hoffman, D.; Palmer, J. R.

    1997-12-01

    Dudley Ridge is an arcuate, north-trending terrace remnant of Wisconsinan (late Quaternary) outwash in the Western Lowlands of southeast Missouri. The ridge, an elongate topographic bulge, is approximately 12 km long and 2 km wide with up to 5 m of relief. Previous workers have attributed the ridge to fluvial erosion, or to a combination of fluvial erosion and tectonic deformation during the late Quaternary. The Commerce geophysical lineament, which is a major northeast-trending basement feature, is located a few kilometers to the southeast, and swarms of paleoliquefaction and possible neotectonic deformations have been reported in nearby areas of the Western Lowlands. To test the tectonic hypothesis, in 1994 and 1995 we acquired two west-east high-resolution seismic reflection profiles along the crest and western flank of Dudley Ridge to determine whether Paleozoic, Cretaceous and shallow Quaternary strata are faulted or folded. Profile SPB-1 shows several near-vertical faults indicative of at least three periods of movement: Paleozoic to middle Mesozoic; late Cretaceous to Tertiary; and early to late Wisconsinan (late Quaternary). Profile SPB-2 shows three ambiguous fault-like features which cut Cretaceous and Quaternary reflectors, but cannot be interpreted unequivocally to extend down into the Paleozoic section. These new seismic reflection data are interpreted to show that at least three major periods of faulting have disrupted Paleozoic, Cretaceous and Quaternary strata beneath Dudley Ridge, with the most recent faulting being early to late Wisconsinan in age and producing about 6-8 m (8-10 ms) of near-vertical displacement. Because Quaternary reflectors cannot be resolved above about 30-40 ms, the seismic data alone do not reveal whether or not the Wisconsinan deformation affected the surface of Dudley Ridge or whether the faults may have died out as they propagated up through the soft, saturated Wisconsinan outwash. However, the presence of the Farmdale

  20. Deep Stucture of the Northwestern Atlantic Moroccan Margin Studied by OBS and Deep Multichannel Seismic Reflection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MALOD, J. A.; Réhault, J.; Sahabi, M.; Géli, L.; Matias, L.; Diaz, J.; Zitellini, N.

    2001-12-01

    The Northwestern Atlantic Moroccan margin, a conjugate of the New Scotland margin, is one of the oldest passive margin of the world. Continental break up occurred at early Liassic time and the deep margin is characterized by a large salt basin. A good knowledge of this basin is of major interest to improve the initial reconstruction between Africa, North America and Iberia (Eurasia). It is also a good opportunity to study a mature passive margin and model its structure and evolution.Moreover, there is a need to assess the geological hazards linked to the neotectonic activity within the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary. These topics have been adressed during the SISMAR cruise carried out from April 9th to May 4th 2001.During this cruise, 3667 km of multichannel seismic reflection (360 channels, 4500 m long streamer, 4800 ci array of air guns) were recorded together with refraction records by means of 48 OBH/OBS drops. Simultaneously, some of the marine profiles have been extended onshore with 16 portable seismic land stations. We present the initial results of this study. Off El Jadida, the Moho and structures within the thinned continental crust are well imaged on both the reflection and refraction records. In the northern area, off Casablanca, we follow the deepening of the moroccan margin beneath the up to 9 sec (twtt) allochtonous series forming a prism at the front the Rif-Betic chain. Sismar cruise has been also the opportunity to record long seismic profiles making the junction between the Portuguese margin and the Moroccan one, and crossing the Iberian-African plate boundary. This allows to observe the continuity of the sedimentary sequence after the end of the large inter-plate motion in Early Cretaceous. In addition to the authors, SISMAR Group includes: AMRHAR Mostafa, BERMUDEZ VASQUEZ Antoni, CAMURRI Francesca, CONTRUCCI Isabelle, CORELA Carlos, DIAZ Jordi, DORVAL Philippe, EL ARCHI Abdelkrim, EL ATTARI Ahmed, GONZALEZ Raquel, HARMEGNIES Francois, JAFFAL

  1. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2007-06-30

    The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

  2. Interpretation of a 3D Seismic-Reflection Volume in the Basin and Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Kell, A. M.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Oldow, J. S.; Sabin, A.; Lazaro, M.

    2009-12-01

    A collaborative effort by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Optim Inc. of Reno has interpreted a 3d seismic data set recorded by the U.S. Navy Geothermal Programs Office (GPO) at the Hawthorne Army Depot, Nevada. The 3d survey incorporated about 20 NNW-striking lines covering an area of approximately 3 by 10 km. The survey covered an alluvial area below the eastern flank of the Wassuk Range. In the reflection volume the most prominent events are interpreted to be the base of Quaternary alluvium, the Quaternary Wassuk Range-front normal fault zone, and sequences of intercalated Tertiary volcanic flows and sediments. Such a data set is rare in the Basin and Range. Our interpretation reveals structural and stratigraphic details that form a basis for rapid development of the geothermal-energy resources underlying the Depot. We interpret a map of the time-elevation of the Wassuk Range fault and its associated splays and basin-ward step faults. The range-front fault is the deepest, and its isochron map provides essentially a map of "economic basement" under the prospect area. There are three faults that are the most readily picked through vertical sections. The fault reflections show an uncertainty in the time-depth that we can interpret for them of 50 to 200 ms, due to the over-migrated appearance of the processing contractor’s prestack time-migrated data set. Proper assessment of velocities for mitigating the migration artifacts through prestack depth migration is not possible from this data set alone, as the offsets are not long enough for sufficiently deep velocity tomography. The three faults we interpreted appear as gradients in potential-field maps. In addition, the southern boundary of a major Tertiary graben may be seen within the volume as the northward termination of the strong reflections from older Tertiary volcanics. Using a transparent volume view across the survey gives a view of the volcanics in full

  3. Deep seismic reflection profiling of sedimentary basins offshore Brazil: Geological objectives and preliminary results in the Sergipe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohriak, Webster Ueipass; Lira Rabelo, JoséHenrique; De Matos, Renato Darros; De Barros, Mozart C.

    1995-12-01

    The first deep seismic reflection profiles offshore Brazil were acquired in Campos Basin and processed to 10 s TWT in 1984. Starting in 1989, Petrobrás acquired an extensive data set of deep seismic profiles using special acquisition equipment capable of effectively penetrating through the sedimentary layers and imaging the whole crustal architecture. These deep (18 s TWT) seismic reflection profiles extend across the Atlantic-type marginal basins, from the platform to the deepwater province, presently considered frontier regions for petroleum exploration. This work addresses the geological objectives of a deep seismic profile in the Sergipe Basin and discusses the results obtained by integrating regional seismic, gravity and magnetic data. When combined, these data provide evidence that deep seismic reflectors observed in the Sergipe Basin are related to intracrustal-upper mantle structures rather than sedimentary features. The deep seismic reflection profile in the Sergipe Basin also suggests that, rather than a non-volcanic passive margin, the deepwater extension of this basin is marked by several magmatic structures, including thick wedges of seaward-dipping reflectors and volcanic plugs. These magmatic features are associated with basinforming processes resulting from lithospheric extension during the breakup of Gondwana in the Early Cretaceous and subsequent emplacement of oceanic crust. These results are compared to the crustal scale structures observed in the Campos Basin, in the southeastern margin of Brazil. The interpretation of the deep structure of these basins indicates that final separation between the South American and African plates formed passive margins characterized by different patterns of crustal attenuation underlying the rift blocks.

  4. Imaging near-subsurface subrosion structures and faults using SH-wave reflection seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadas, Sonja; Polom, Ulrich; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Subrosion is a term for underground leaching of soluble rocks and is a global phenomenon. It involves dissolution of evaporites due to the presence of unsaturated water, fractures and faults. Fractures and faults are pathways for water to circulate and to generate subsurface cavities. Depending on the leached material and the parameters of the generation process, especially the dissolution rate, different kinds of subrosion structures evolve in the subsurface. The two end members are collapse and depression structures. Subrosion is a natural process, but it can be enhanced by anthropogenic factors like manipulation of the aquifer system and groundwater flow and by e.g. extraction of saline water. The formation of sinkholes and depressions are a dangerous geohazard, especially if they occur in urban areas, which often leads to building and infrastructural damage and life-threatening situations. For this reason investigations of the processes that induce subrosion and a detailed analysis of the resulting structures are of importance. To develop a comprehensive model of near-subsurface subrosion structures, reflection seismics is one of the methods used by the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics. The study area is located in the city of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by Permian deposits. Bad Frankenhausen is situated directly south of the Kyffhäuser mountain range at the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault. This major fault is one of the main pathways for the circulating ground- and meteoric waters that leach the Permian deposits, especially the Leine-, Staßfurt- and Werra Formations. 2014 and 2015 eight shear wave reflection seismic profiles were carried out in the urban area of Bad Frankenhausen and three profiles in the countrified surroundings. Altogether ca. 3.6 km were surveyed using a landstreamer as receiver and an electro-dynamic vibrator as source. The surveys were

  5. Seismic reflection data imaging and interpretation from Braniewo2014 experiment using additional wide-angle refraction and reflection and well-logs data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Majdański, Mariusz; Białas, Sebastian; Gaczyński, Edward; Maksym, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Braniewo2014 reflection and refraction experiment was realized in cooperation between Polish Oil and Gas Company (PGNiG) and the Institute of Geophysics (IGF), Polish Academy of Sciences, near the locality of Braniewo in northern Poland. PGNiG realized a 20-km-long reflection profile, using vibroseis and dynamite shooting; the aim of the reflection survey was to characterise Silurian shale gas reservoir. IGF deployed 59 seismic stations along this profile and registered additional full-spread wide-angle refraction and reflection data, with offsets up to 12 km; maximum offsets from the seismic reflection survey was 3 km. To improve the velocity information two velocity logs from near deep boreholes were used. The main goal of the joint reflection-refraction interpretation was to find relations between velocity field from reflection velocity analysis and refraction tomography, and to build a velocity model which would be consistent for both, reflection and refraction, datasets. In this paper we present imaging results and velocity models from Braniewo2014 experiment and the methodology we used.

  6. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 96LCA04 in Lakes Mabel and Starr, Central Florida, August 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Swancar, Amy; Tihansky, Ann B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    discharged emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot, which propagates through the water and sediment column. The acoustic energy is reflected at density boundaries (such as the seafloor or sediment layers beneath the lake bottom), detected by the receiver (a hydrophone streamer), and recorded by a PC-based seismic acquisition system. This process is repeated at timed intervals (for example, 0.5 s) and recorded for specific intervals of time (for example, 100 ms). In this way, a two-dimensional (2-D) vertical image of the shallow geologic structure beneath the ship track is produced. Figure 1 displays the acquisition geometry. Refer to table 1 for a summary of acquisition parameters. Table 2 lists trackline statistics. Scanned images of the handwritten cruise logbook (1,020-KB PDF) is also provided as a PDF file. The unprocessed seismic data are stored in SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975). For a detailed description of the data format, refer to the SEG-Y Format page. See the How To Download SEG-Y Data page for download instructions. The printable profiles provided here are GIF images that were filtered and gained using Seismic Unix software. Refer to the Software page for details about the processing and examples of the processing scripts. The processed SEG-Y data were exported to Chesapeake Technology, Inc. (CTI) SonarWeb software to produce an interactive version of the seismic profile that allows the user to obtain a geographic location and depth from the profile for a curser position. This information is displayed in the status bar of the browser.

  7. Lithosphere structure of the west Qinling orogenic belt revealed by deep seismic reflection profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2009-12-01

    The west Qinling orogen located in the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, is transformation zone between the N-S-trending and E-W-trending tectonics in the Chinese continent. Further study of the fine crust structure of the west Qinling orogen and its relationships with surrounding basins have very important significance for understanding tectonic response of the northeastern margin of the plateau about collision convergence of the Indian block and Asian block and learning formation and evolution of the plateau. In 2009, we reprocessed the data of the Tangke-Hezuo deep seismic reflection profiles collected in 2004 across the west Qinling orogen and the northern Songpan block. The new results show the lithosphere fine structure of the west Qinling orogen. Reflection features indicate that an interface at 6.0-7.0s (TWT) divided the crust into the upper and lower crust, whose structural style and deformation are totally different. Integrating geological data, we deduce that the interface at 6.0-7.0s (depth with 18-21 km) was the basement detachment, which made deformation decoupled of the upper and lower crust. The multi-layered reflections in the upper crust reveal the sedimentary covers of the west Qinling orogen, disclose the thickness of the various structure layer and deformation degree, and provide a basis for the prospective evaluation of a multi-metallic mineral and energy exploration. The north dipping strong reflection characteristics of the lower crust in the west Qinling orogen constituted imbricate structure, such imbricate structural features provide seismology evidence for researching the west Qinling thrusting toward the northern Songpan block, and have great significance for studying formation and evolution of the Songpan-Garze structure. Moho reflections are observed around 17.0-17.2s, characterized by nearly horizontal reflections, which implies the west Qinling orogen underwent an intense extension post orogeny caused the lithosphere

  8. A Program for Calculating and Plotting Synthetic Common-Source Seismic-Reflection Traces for Multilayered Earth Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramananantoandro, Ramanantsoa

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a description of a BASIC program to be used on an IBM microcomputer for calculating and plotting synthetic seismic-reflection traces for multilayered earth models. Discusses finding raypaths for given source-receiver offsets using the "shooting method" and calculating the corresponding travel times. (Author/CW)

  9. From the Atlas to the Rif a Crustal seismic image across Morocco: The SIMA & RIFSEIS control source wide-angle seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Ramon; Ayarza, Puy; Gallart, Josep; Diaz, Jordi; Harnafi, Mimoun; Levander, Alan; Teixell, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The velocity structure of the crust and the geometry of the Moho across Morocco has been the main target of two recently acquired wide-angle seismic reflection transects. One is the SIMA experiment which provided seismic constraints beneath the Atlas Mountains and the second has been the RIFSEIS experiment which sampled the RIF orogen. Jointly these controlled source wide-angle seismic reflection data results in an almost 700 km, seismic profile going from the the Sahara craton across the High and Middle Atlas and Rif Mountain till the Gibraltar-Arc (Alboran). Current work on the interpretation of the seismic data-set is based on forward modeling, ray-tracing, as well as low fold wide-angle stacking. The data has resulted in a detailed crustal structure and velocity model for the Atlas Mountains and a 700 km transect revealing the irregular topography of the Moho beneath these two mountain orogens. Results indicate that the High Atlas features a moderate crustal thickness and that shortening is resolved at depth through a crustal root where the Saharan crust under-thrusts below the Moroccan crust, defining a lower crust imbrication which locally places the Moho boundary at, approximately, 40 km depth. The P-wave velocity model is characterized, in averaged, by relatively low velocities. These low deep crustal velocities together with other geophysical observables such as: conductivity estimates derived from Mt measurements; moderate Bouguer gravity anomaly; surface exposures of recent alkaline volcanics; lead the interpretation to propose that partial melts are currently emplaced in the deep crustal levels and in the upper mantle. The Moho discontinuity defines a crust which is in average relatively thin beneath the Atlas which is almost a 4000 m high orogenic belt. The resulting model supports existence of mantle upwelling as a possible mechanism that contributes, significantly, to maintain the High Atlas topography.

  10. The North American Midcontinent rift beneath Lake Superior from GLIMPCE seismic reflection profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Midcontinent rift system is a 1.1-b.y.-old structure extending from Kansas, through the Lake Superior region, and into southern Michigan. The rift is filled with thick sequences of basaltic volcanic rocks and clastic sediments. For most of its extent it is buried beneath Paleozoic rocks but can be traced by its strong gravity and magnetic anomalies. Seismic reflection surveys by the Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program on Crustal Evolution in 1986 imaged much of the deep structure of the rift beneath the lake in detail. The reflection profiles across the rift reveal a deep, asymmetrical central graben whose existence and magnitude was not previously documented. They show that, in addition to crustal sagging documented by previous investigations, normal faulting played a major role in subsidence of the axial region of the rift. The sense of asymmetry of the central graben changes along the trend of the rift, documenting the segmented nature of the structure and suggesting the existence of accommodation zones between the segments. -from Authors

  11. Crustal high-velocity anomaly at the East European Craton margin in SE Poland (TESZ) modelled by 3-D seismic tomography of refracted and reflected arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Środa, Piotr; Dec, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The area of Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland represents a contact of major tectonic units of different consolidation age - from the Precambrian East European Craton, through Palaeozoic West European Platform to Cenozoic Carpathian orogen. The region was built by several phases of crustal accretion, which resulted in a complex collage of tectonic blocks. In 2000, this region was studied by several seismic wide-angle profiles of CELEBRATION 2000 experiment, providing a dense coverage of seismic data in SE Poland and allowing for detailed investigations of the crustal structure and properties in this area. Beneath the marginal part of the EEC, the 2-D modelling of in-line data form several CELEBRATION profiles revealed a prominent high P-wave velocity anomaly in the upper crust, with Vp of 6.7-7.1 km/s, starting at 10-16 km depth (e.g., Środa et al., 2006). Anomalously high velocities are observed in the area located approximately beneath Lublin trough, to the NE of Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone. Based on 3-D tomography of first arrivals of in- and off-line CELEBRATION 2000 recordings (Malinowski et al., 2008), elevated velocities are also reported in the same area and seem to continue to the SW, off the craton margin. Gravimetric modelling also revealed anomalously high density in the same region at similar depths. High seismic velocities and densities are interpreted as indicative for a pronounced mafic intrusion, possibly related to extensional processes at the EEC margin. Previous 3-D models of the high-velocity intrusion were based on first arrivals (crustal refractions) only. In this study, also off-line reflections (not modelled up to now) are used, in order to enlarge the data set and to better constrain the geometry and properties of the velocity anomaly. A code for 3-D joint tomographic inversion of refracted and reflected arrivals, with model parametrization allowing for velocity discontinuities was used (Rawlinson, 2007). With this approach, besides the

  12. Crustal shortening followed by extensional collapse of the Cordilleran orogenic belt in northwestern Montana: Evidence from vintage seismic reflection profiles acquired in the Swan Range and Swan Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, B. S.; Speece, M. A.; Stickney, M. C.; Mosolf, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    Reprocessing of one 24-fold (96 channel) and four 30-fold (120 channel) 2D seismic reflection profiles have revealed crustal scale reflections in the Swan Range and adjacent Swan River Valley of northwestern Montana. The five reprocessed profiles constitute 142.6 of the 303.3 linear km acquired in 1983-84 by Techo of Denver, Colorado. The four 30-fold profiles used helicopter-assisted dynamite shooting (Poulter method) and the 24-fold profile used the Vibroseis method. Acquisition parameters were state of the art for the time. The Swan Range lies east of the Rocky Mountain Trench and is part of the Cordilleran foreland thrust belt where the Lewis thrust system emplaced a thick slab of Proterozoic Belt Supergroup strata eastward and over Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks during the Late Cretaceous to early Paleocene Laramide orogeny. Deeply drilled borehole data are absent within the study area; however, we generated a synthetic seismogram from the Arco-Marathon 1 Paul Gibbs well (total depth=5418 m), located approximately 70 km west of the reprocessed profiles, and correlated the well data to surface seismic profiles. Large impedance contrasts in the log data are interpreted to be tholeiitic Moyie sills within the Prichard Formation argillite (Lower Belt), which produce strong reflection events in regional seismic sections and result in highly reflective, east-dipping events in the reprocessed profiles. We estimate a depth of 10 km (3 to 3.5 seconds) to the basal detachment of the Lewis thrust sheet. The décollement lies within Belt Supergroup strata to the west of the Swan River Valley before contacting unreflective, west-dipping crystalline basement beneath the Swan Range--a geometry that results in a wedge of eastward-thinning, autochthonous Belt rocks. Distinct fault-plane signatures from the west-dipping, range-bounding Swan fault--produced by extensional collapse of the over-thickened Cordillera--are not successfully imaged. However, reflections from Cenozoic

  13. High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection and Marine Magnetic Data Along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.; Watt, Janet T.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data in June 2008 in the offshore areas between the towns of Cayucos and Pismo Beach, Calif., from the nearshore (~6-m depth) to just west of the Hosgri Fault Zone (~200-m depth). These data are in support of the California State Waters Mapping Program and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and the U.S. Geological Survey. Seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data were acquired aboard the R/V Parke Snavely, using a SIG 2Mille minisparker seismic source and a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. More than 550 km of seismic and marine magnetic data was collected simultaneously along shore-perpendicular transects spaced 800 m apart, with an additional 220 km of marine magnetometer data collected across the Hosgri Fault Zone, resulting in spacing locally as smallas 400 m. This report includes maps of the seismic-survey sections, linked to Google Earth software, and digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats, as well as preliminary gridded marine-magnetic-anomaly and residual-magnetic-anomaly (shallow magnetic source) maps.

  14. Accretion and Subduction of Oceanic Lithosphere: 2D and 3D Seismic Studies of Off-Axis Magma Lenses at East Pacific Rise 9°37-40'N Area and Downgoing Juan de Fuca Plate at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuoshuo

    Two thirds of the Earth's lithosphere is covered by the ocean. The oceanic lithosphere is formed at mid-ocean ridges, evolves and interacts with the overlying ocean for millions of years, and is eventually consumed at subduction zones. In this thesis, I use 2D and 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the accretionary and hydrothermal process on the ridge flank of the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°37-40'N and the structure of the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate at the Cascadia subduction zone offshore Oregon and Washington. Using 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data, I image a series of off-axis magma lenses (OAML) in the middle or lower crust, 2-10 km from the ridge axis at EPR 9°37-40'N. The large OAMLs are associated with Moho travel time anomalies and local volcanic edifices above them, indicating off-axis magmatism contributes to crustal accretion though both intrusion and eruption (Chapter 1). To assess the effect of OAMLs on the upper crustal structure, I conduct 2-D travel time tomography on downward continued MCS data along two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML in our study area. I find higher upper crustal velocity in a region ~ 2 km wide above this OAML compared with the surrounding crust. I attribute these local anomalies to enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals in the pore space of upper crust associated with high-temperature off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML (Chapter 2). At Cascadia, a young and hot end-member of the global subduction system, the state of hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes, yet is poorly known. As local zones of higher porosity and permeability, faults constitute primary conduits for seawater to enter the crust and potentially uppermost mantle. From pre-stack time migrated MCS images, I observe pervasive faulting in the sediment section up to 200 km from the deformation front. Yet faults with large throw and

  15. Full waveform inversion of seismic waves reflected in a stratified porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Barros, Louis; Dietrich, Michel; Valette, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    In reservoir geophysics applications, seismic imaging techniques are expected to provide as much information as possible on fluid-filled reservoir rocks. Since seismograms are, to some degree, sensitive to the mechanical parameters and fluid properties of porous media, inversion methods can be devised to directly estimate these quantities from the waveforms obtained in seismic reflection experiments. An inversion algorithm that uses a generalized least-squares, quasi-Newton approach is described to determine the porosity, permeability, interstitial fluid properties and mechanical parameters of porous media. The proposed algorithm proceeds by iteratively minimizing a misfit function between observed data and synthetic wavefields computed with the Biot theory. Simple models consisting of plane-layered, fluid-saturated and poro-elastic media are considered to demonstrate the concept and evaluate the performance of such a full waveform inversion scheme. Numerical experiments show that, when applied to synthetic data, the inversion procedure can accurately reconstruct the vertical distribution of a single model parameter, if all other parameters are perfectly known. However, the coupling between some of the model parameters does not permit the reconstruction of several model parameters at the same time. To get around this problem, we consider composite parameters defined from the original model properties and from a priori information, such as the fluid saturation rate or the lithology, to reduce the number of unknowns. Another possibility is to apply this inversion algorithm to time-lapse surveys carried out for fluid substitution problems, such as CO2 injection, since in this case only a few parameters may vary as a function of time. We define a two-step differential inversion approach which allows us to reconstruct the fluid saturation rate in reservoir layers, even though the medium properties are poorly known.

  16. Structural and tectonic evolution of the eastern Cayman Trough (Caribbean Sea) from seismic reflection data

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, S.; Mauffret, A.; Pubellier, M.

    1996-02-01

    The eastern Cayman Trough preserves a record of the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene Caribbean history that is largely affected by Neogene strike-slip tectonics of the current plate boundary. We conducted an analysis of seismic data within the eastern Cayman Trough, based upon single and multi-channel seismic reflection profiles collected during the Seacarib II cruise in 1987 and the Casis cruise in 1992. These data show that the basement of the eastern Cayman Trough can be divided into four domains from east to west, with distinct morphologic and sedimentary character and inferred older to younger ages: (1) a province of rifted Mesozoic continental crust exhibiting seven parallel horst blocks striking northeast-southwest; (2) a continent-ocean transition between provinces 1 and 3 that exhibits seamounts, small hills, and sedimentary basins; (3) an Eocene oceanic crust with rough basement but smoother relief than the rifted crust; basement trends are roughly north-south and oblique to the northwest trend in domain 1, and (4) the northern Jamaica slope, which forms an east-west-trending slope, with northward-dipping strata that flank the three deeper water domains of the Cayman Trough. The domains are interpreted to be the product of the Eocene east-west opening of the Cayman Trough as a pull-apart basin in a left-lateral strike-slip setting. Closure of the 1100 km of Eocene and younger oceanic crust of the Cayman Trough places the fault-block province adjacent to the Belize margin of Central America. A Neogene phase of transpression has reactivated structures in the four domains, along with on-land structures described by previous authors in Jamaica. The proximity of the eastern margin of the Cayman Trough to petroliferous, continental rocks in Central America suggests an improved possibility of hydrocarbon potential. Unfortunately, sediment thicknesses of less than 1 km probably are not conducive to hydrocarbon formation.

  17. Crustal Structure and Deformation of the Yakutat Microplate: New Insights From STEEP Marine Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, L. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G.; van Avendonk, H.; Reece, R.; Elmore, R.; Pavlis, T.

    2008-12-01

    In fall 2008, we will conduct an active source marine seismic experiment of the offshore Yakutat microplate in the northern Gulf of Alaska. The survey will be conducted aboard the academic research vessel, R/V Marcus Langseth, collecting deep-penetrating multi-channel seismic reflection survey using an 8-km, 640 channel hydrophone streamer and a 6600 cu. in., 36 airgun array. The survey is the concluding data acquisition phase for the ST. Elias Erosion and tectonics Project (STEEP), a multi-institution NSF-Continental Dynamics project investigating the interplay of climate and tectonics in the Chugach-St. Elias Mountains in southern Alaska. The experiment will also provide important site survey information for possible future Integrated Ocean Drilling Program investigations. Two profiles coincident with wide-angle refraction data (see Christeson, et al., this session) will image structural changes across the Dangerous River Zone from east to west and the Transition Fault from south to north. We will also image the western portion of the Transition Fault to determine the nature of faulting along this boundary including whether or not the Pacific Plate is underthrusting beneath the Yakutat microplate as part of this collision. Our westernmost profile will image the Kayak Island Zone, typically described as the northern extension of the Aleutian megathrust but which may be a forming suture acting as a deformation backstop for the converging Yakutat and North American plates. Profiles across the Pamplona Zone, the current Yakutat-North America deformation front, will further constrain relative timing of structural development and the depth of deformation on the broad folds and thrust faults that comprise the area. This new dataset will allow further insight into regional tectonics of the St. Elias region as well as provide more detail regarding the development of the south Alaskan margin during major Plio-Pleistocene glacial- interglacial periods.

  18. Quaternary deformation and fault structure in the Northern Mississippi Embayment as imaged by near-surface seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Magnani, Maria Beatrice; McIntosh, Kirk; Waldron, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Seismicity in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in the central United States constrains the location of present deformation at depth along four main distinct arms, while the surface expression of the ongoing deformation is still unclear. To better constrain the surface deformation in the NMSZ, we integrate existing seismic reflection data with a new ~300 km-long high-resolution seismic reflection profile acquired along the Mississippi River from Cape Girardeau, MO, to Caruthersville, MO. Based on the data, we interpret the Reelfoot Thrust and the New Markham Fault as upward splays of a blind master fault defined by the seismicity and extending at depth farther north. To the south, two faults, the Axial Fault and the Cottonwood Grove Fault, are imaged above the southern arm of the NMSZ. Both fault display deformation of the Paleozoic through the Tertiary sediments, and a relief of ~20-25 m at the base of the Quaternary alluvium, which we interpret as the result of strike-slip motion along a complex fault plane geometry. We propose two alternative interpretations for the relationship between the shallow faults and the seismicity in this area: (1) the faults merge at depth and are presently both active and (2) the faults are distinct at depth and were active during the Quaternary and only the Axial Fault is presently deforming. Geological structures mapped at the surface as part of this study show that Quaternary deformation is accommodated along a fault network that is more complex than the simple four-arm system illuminated by the seismicity, a behavior predicted by analog and computer models.

  19. Waveform Inversion of Marine Seismic Reflection Data from the Queen Charlotte Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takam Takougang, E.; Calvert, A. J.

    2009-05-01

    In order to obtain higher resolution seismic velocity data above approximately 1.5 km depth, two-dimensional waveform inversion was applied to seismic reflection data from the Queen Charlotte sedimentary basin off the west coast of Canada. The inversion, which employs the method of Pratt (1999), was performed using a multi- scale approach in the frequency domain based on the acoustic wave equation. The seismic data are from a survey of 8 lines that was collected in 1988 by the Geological survey of Canada. Data preconditioning, inversion strategies and results from line 88-06 which crosses Tertiary formations in Hecate Strait between Graham Island and Dolphin Island are presented. A starting velocity model, which gives an RMS travel time misfit of 18 ms, is derived from travel-time tomography, and is sufficient to avoid cycle skipping at a starting waveform inversion frequency of 8 Hz. Due to the limited maximum offset of 3700 m the maximum depth of penetration doesn't exceed 1500 m. The relatively high minimum frequency (8 Hz) constitutes a challenge for a successful inversion, as higher frequencies are subject to greater instability. A strategy is presented to mitigate this issue with the inversion implemented in two stages. The first stage consists of enriching at the initial frequency the starting model with intermediate to low wavenumbers, using a filter in the wavenumber domain to ensure continuity in the spectral coverage, and preconditioning the residual by inverting first for the most linear component of the data. The second stage consists of inverting from the initial frequency (8 Hz) up to 15 Hz, using 10 iterations per frequency and following a layer stripping approach to give the same kinematics to all portions of the model. Amplitude scaling and spiking deconvolution constitute the main preconditioning of the data; their effects are also shown. Model appraisal is carried out by comparing synthetic shot gathers obtained by forward modeling with the

  20. A Pilot Near-vertical Seismic Reflection Experiment In Central Chile Landward of The Offshore Spoc Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Onshore Nvr Party, Spoc

    Between 36 and 39 S, the multi-disciplinary offshore project SPOC (Subduction Processes Off Chile) was extended landwards in November 2001 by different active and passive seismic experiments, with the zone of seismic coupling, generally located between 20-40 km depth, as the prime target. Here, we report the first results from the near-vertical incidence reflection (NVR) seismic experiment component that was designed to image that part of the subduction zone between the S-America and over- riding Nazca-Plate that is located in the offshore-onshore transition zone. The NVR profile was located at 37 15`S. Covering the westernmost part of a long E-W refrac- tion seismic line (one amongst three), the profile spread was 54 km long, with three sections of 18 km length each, and extended from the coast in the west to the east. 180 geophone-groups were deployed with 100 m spacing which recorded the offshore pro- file shot by the R/V SONNE with the airgun array. Furthermore, 2 small shots in the Pacific Ocean (50 kg and 25 kg charge), 11 small shots (75 kg charge) at 7 different lo- cations within the onshore reflection seismic line, and 1 shot (150 kg charge) ca. 22.5 km east of the active spread were shot. This active NVR-experiment thereby resulted in a 45 km long 2-fold CDP line, and single-fold coverage along 72 km profile length. The preliminary data processing of single shots gives an image of different reflection bands in the upper and middle crust. On the entire profile, a 1 s TWT thick strong reflection band is observed between 3 and 4 s TWT, which shows almost no dip. On the western half of the profile, prominent reflections dip eastward from ca. 6 s TWT down to ca. 8 s TWT. Finally, in the central part of the seismic reflection profile, some relatively weaker reflections are found between 10 to 14 s TWT. All theses eastward dipping reflection bands between 6 and 14 s TWT could be interpreted as indications for the downgoing plate.

  1. Reconciling deep seismic refraction and reflection data from the grenvillian-appalachian boundary in western New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, S.; Luetgert, J.H.; Christensen, N.I.

    1993-01-01

    The Grenvillian-Appalachian boundary is characterized by pervasive mylonitic deformation and retrograde alteration of a suite of imbricated allochthonous and parautochthonous gneisses that were thrust upon the Grenvillian continental margin during the lower Paleozoic. Seismic reflection profiling across this structural boundary zone reveals prominent dipping reflectors interpreted as overthrust basement slices (parautochthons) of the Green Mountain Anticlinorium. In contrast, a seismic refraction study of the Grenvillian-Appalachian boundary reveals a sub-horizontally layered seismic velocity model that is difficult to reconcile with the pronounced sub-vertical structures observed in the Green mountains. A suite of rock samples was collected from the Green Mountain Anticlinorium and measured at high pressures in the laboratory to determine the seismic properties of these allochthonous and parautochthonous gneisses. The laboratory-measured seismic velocities agree favorably with the modelled velocity structure across the Grenvillian-Appalachian boundary suggesting that the rock samples are reliable indicators of the rock mass as whole. Samples of the parautochthonous Grenvillian basement exposed in the Green Mountains have lower velocities, by about 0.5 km/s, than lithologically equivalent units exposed in the eastern Adirondack Highlands. Velocity reduction in the Green Mountain parautochthons can be accounted for by retrograde metamorphic alteration (hydration) of the paragneisses. Seismic anisotropies, ranging from 2 to 12%, in the mylonitized Green Mountain paragneisses may also contribute to the observation of lower seismic velocities, where the direction of ray propagation is normal to the foliation. The velocity properties of the Green Mountain paragneisses are thus insufficiently different from the mantling Appalachian allochthons to permit their resolution by the Ontario-New York-New England seismic refraction profile. ?? 1993.

  2. Structure of the California Coast Ranges and San Andreas Fault at SAFOD from seismic waveform inversion and reflection imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bleibinhaus, F.; Hole, J.A.; Ryberg, T.; Fuis, G.S.

    2007-01-01

    A seismic reflection and refraction survey across the San Andreas Fault (SAF) near Parkfield provides a detailed characterization of crustal structure across the location of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). Steep-dip prestack migration and frequency domain acoustic waveform tomography were applied to obtain highly resolved images of the upper 5 km of the crust for 15 km on either side of the SAF. The resulting velocity model constrains the top of the Salinian granite with great detail. Steep-dip reflection seismic images show several strong-amplitude vertical reflectors in the uppermost crust near SAFOD that define an ???2-km-wide zone comprising the main SAF and two or more local faults. Another prominent subvertical reflector at 2-4 km depth ???9 km to the northeast of the SAF marks the boundary between the Franciscan terrane and the Great Valley Sequence. A deep seismic section of low resolution shows several reflectors in the Salinian crust west of the SAF. Two horizontal reflectors around 10 km depth correlate with strains of seismicity observed along-strike of the SAF. They represent midcrustal shear zones partially decoupling the ductile lower crust from the brittle upper crust. The deepest reflections from ???25 km depth are interpreted as crust-mantle boundary. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Fault Imaging with High-Resolution Seismic Reflection for Earthquake Hazard and Geothermal Resource Assessment in Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Frary, Roxanna

    2012-05-05

    The Truckee Meadows basin is situated adjacent to the Sierra Nevada microplate, on the western boundary of the Walker Lane. Being in the transition zone between a range-front normal fault on the west and northwest-striking right-lateral strike slip faults to the east, there is no absence of faulting in this basin. The Reno- Sparks metropolitan area is located in this basin, and with a signi cant population living here, it is important to know where these faults are. High-resolution seismic reflection surveys are used for the imaging of these faults along the Truckee River, across which only one fault was previously mapped, and in southern Reno near and along Manzanita Lane, where a swarm of short faults has been mapped. The reflection profiles constrain the geometries of these faults, and suggest additional faults not seen before. Used in conjunction with depth to bedrock calculations and gravity measurements, the seismic reflection surveys provide de nitive locations of faults, as well as their orientations. O sets on these faults indicate how active they are, and this in turn has implications for seismic hazard in the area. In addition to seismic hazard, the faults imaged here tell us something about the conduits for geothermal fluid resources in Reno.

  4. Integrated well log and 2-D seismic data interpretation to image the subsurface stratigraphy and structure in north-eastern Bornu (Chad) basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isyaku, Aminu A.; Rust, Derek; Teeuw, Richard; Whitworth, Malcolm

    2016-09-01

    Structural and stratigraphic mapping within the Bornu Basin in north east Nigeria was commonly carried out using traditional field geological methods. However, such traditional approaches remain inadequate in the semi-arid region characterised by topographically flat areas and lack of continuous bedrock outcrops that are mostly concealed beneath sand cover. Previous studies in the north-eastern part of the basin carried out using ditch cuttings from few wells and disconnected seismic data were largely inadequate and the resulting stratigraphic analyses were more often generalised. This paper presents an integrated structural and stratigraphic study of the basin using combined subsurface geophysical datasets. A Combined Log Pattern (CLP) method is a well log analysis, which utilises various well log data including gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and sonic logs to identify lithology and stratigraphic boundaries of subsurface formations. This method is applied to constrain the subsurface stratigraphy of the north-eastern part of the Bornu Basin bordering the Lake Chad. In addition to qualitative combined well log analysis, the time-depth relationship of the sonic log and seismic data was quantitatively determined by tying a well with an intersecting seismic section to validate the stratigraphic facies horizons identified. Four well log facies and their environments of deposition were characterised from the combined well log analysis of the different log types. It is discovered that the Cretaceous basement structural features controlled the deposition of overlying formations in the basin. Without intact core data, the shallower wells were discovered to have bottomed over subsurface horst features while deeper wells penetrated into the basal facies contained mainly within the grabens. Main subsurface structural lineaments in the area include NW-SE, NE-SW and NNW-SSE trending faults, which mainly formed the horst and graben features. Some stratigraphic formations

  5. Lake Tanganyika Hydroclimate in the Pleistocene: Insights from New Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Christopher; Wood, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Lake Tanganyika, in the western branch of the East African Rift, is one of the world's largest and oldest extant lakes, and undoubtedly holds a tropical paleoclimate record of unparalleled antiquity and fidelity. In anticipation of future scientific drilling in Lake Tanganyika, we present new analyses of basin-scale seismic reflection data from the central-southeastern parts of the lake. These analyses incorporate both newly reprocessed legacy multichannel data, as well as recently acquired commercial data sets from the region near Karema, Tanzania. The new analyses confirm the presence of thick sedimentary sections, in excess of 5 km in some localities, though the section in the immediate vicinity of Karema is thinner. Data from the southern part of the lake reveal a series of marked seismic-facies transitions, including the presence of older sediment packages that underlie previously identified "pre-rift" basement (the "Nyanja Event"). These older sediment packages may substantially predate the modern lake. The high-amplitude Nyanja Event is interpreted as the onset of late-Cenozoic rifting, and the changing character of the overlying depositional sequences reflects increasing relief in the rift valley, the variability of fluvial inputs, and the intermittent connectivity of upstream lake catchments. Earlier Tanganyika sequences are dominated by shallow lake and fluvial-lacustrine facies, whereas later sequences are characterized by extensive gravity flow deposition in deep water, and pronounced erosion and incision in shallow water depths and on littoral platforms. Extensive, well-defined progradational clinoform packages are observed in the Karema area, and are interpreted as paleodeltas of the Ifume River. These deposits are interpreted as Pleistocene in age due to their shallow position in the sedimentary section, and burial depths of less than 600 m. These deposits were laid down when the level of Lake Tanganyika was 250 m or more lower than present. The

  6. University of Texas Institute for Geophysics Seismic Reflection Data Search Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, T. H.; Gahagan, L. M.; Johnson, K. M.

    2001-12-01

    Since 1974 the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) has been acquiring digital seismic reflection data. UTIG's conventional archive contains the equivalent of approximately 16,000 field tapes and 3000 processed sections. There is no simple means to peruse data that are held in the archives resulting in gross under-utilization. This is a common problem for reflection data at other research institutions as well. Conversion of the archive to a modern online searchable data base and download facility is underway. As the first part of this development, UTIG data in the offshore regions of Southwest Japan and Costa Rica-Nicaragua are now available online. Our present efforts are aimed at (1) ensuring the integrity of the digital data, (2) creating descriptive metadata, and (3) providing rudimentary web access to a searchable database with links to downloadable seismic, navigation and image files. For field records, the bulk of the data, our goal is to provide metadata for independent reprocessing for educational or research needs. Older field data require supporting information about the geometry of the experiment, observer logs and other quality control information available in notebooks. More recent experiments are collecting these data in digital form for easier inclusion in the data base and for metadata construction. All shot data are in binary SEG-Y format. A valuable component of the database is the inclusion of stacks, migrations and single-channel sections produced during the course of project-related research. These processed data include the SEG-Y files, images and trace locations (stored in the SEG-Y headers and duplicated in linked ASCII files). Metadata include a simplified processing history. For specialists, the processed SEG-Y files may be used for additional post-stack processing, display or loading into interpretation systems. For non-specialists and students the images provide instant access to geologic cross sections around the world

  7. Enabling Technology for the Exploration of the Arctic Ocean - Multi Channel Seismic Reflection data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, B.; Anderson, R.; Chayes, D. N.; Goemmer, S.; Oursler, M.

    2009-12-01

    Great advances in mapping the Arctic Ocean have recently been made through the relatively routine acquisition of multibeam data from icebreakers operating on various cruise. The USCGC Healy, the German icebreaker Polarstern, the Canadian icebreaker Amundsen and the Swedish icebreaker Oden all routinely collect multibeam data, even while in heavy ice pack. This increase in data has substantially improved our knowledge of the form of the Arctic Ocean seafloor. Unfortunately, it is not possible to routinely collect Multi Channel Seismic Reflection (MCS) data while underway in the ice pack. Our inability to simply collect these data restricts how we understand many of the features that segment the basin by depriving us of the historical information that can be obtained by imaging the stratigraphy. Without these data, scientific ocean drilling, the ultimate ground truth for Marine Geology, cannot be done. The technology and expertise to collect MCS must be adapted for the particular circumstances of the Arctic Ocean. While MCS data have been collected in the Arctic Ocean, the procedures have relied on icebreakers towing equipment. Since icebreakers follow the path of least resistance through the pack, data are acquired in locations that are not scientifically optimal and rarely in the relatively straight lines necessary for optimal processing. Towing in the ice pack is also difficult, inefficient and puts this equipment at substantial risk of crushing or loss. While icebreakers are one means to collect these data, it is time to conduct a systematic evaluation of the costs and benefits of different platforms for MCS data acquisition. This evaluation should enable collection of high-quality data set at selected locations to solve scientific problems. Substantial uncertainties exist about the relative capabilities, costs and limitations for acquisition of MCS data from various platforms in the Arctic Ocean. For example; - Is it possible to collect multi-channel seismic

  8. 3D Seismic Reflection Images of An Off-Axis Melt Lens And Its Associated Upper Crust Around 9°39'N, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Carton, H. D.; Carbotte, S. M.; Mutter, J. C.; Canales, J.; Nedimović, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    During the 3D multi-channel seismic (MCS) survey MGL0812 aboard the R/V Langseth, several mid-crust reflectors were discovered off axis on both flanks of the East Pacific Rise from 9°35.6-57.0'N. The reversed polarity of these off-axis reflections with respect to the seafloor and Moho reflections and the high attenuation of the crust detected beneath two of them in the north suggest that they arise from melts residing at the mid-crust level outside the axial low velocity zone (Canales et al. 2010). These off-axis melt lenses (OAML) are probable sites of off-axis volcanism and potential heat sources for localized hydrothermal circulation on the ridge flanks. We focus here on a prominent OAML discovered on the eastern flank around 9°39'N. Results from 1D travel time modeling and 2D streamer tomography of downward continued shot gathers show the presence of a thinner seismic layer 2A above the center of the OAML compared with its surrounding crust. We attribute this thinning to the effects of alteration associated with localized off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML, where precipitation of secondary minerals infills pore space within the lower basalt section, leading to increased seismic velocities and thereby converting the lowermost seismic layer 2A into seismic layer 2B. To further constrain the respective 3D geometries of the OAML and the AMC, their spatial relations, and the spatial extent and shape of the region of altered upper crust associated with the OAML, we conduct 3D processing of a small MCS grid that encompasses most of this OAML, aimed at imaging both on- and off-axis melt lens events and the base of seismic layer 2A. This grid covers an ~4 km x 24 km area centered on the ridge crest between ˜9°37.5'-40'N and extending on both flanks, within which a third order ridge axis discontinuity and two high temperature hydrothermal vents identified during Alvin dives in 1991 and 1994 are present. The data were recorded by four 468-channel

  9. Seismic Reflection Project Near the Southern Terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi Faults, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    S. M. Jackson; G. S. Carpenter; R. P. Smith; J. L. Casper

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen seismic reflection lines were processed and interpreted to determine the southern terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi faults along the northwest boundary of the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). The southernmost terminations of the Arco and Howe segments were determined to support characterization of the Lost River and Lemhi fault sources, respectively, for the INL probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Keywords:Keywords are required forExternal Release Review*Keywords  Keywords *Contacts (Type and Name are required for each row) Type ofContactContact Name  POC Editor RecordFour commercial seismic reflection lines (Arco lines 81-1 and 81-2; Howe lines 81-3 and 82-2) were obtained from the Montana Power Company. The seismic data were collected in the early 1980’s using a Vibroseis source with station and shot point locations that resulted in 12-fold data. Arco lines 81?1 and 81?2 and Howe lines 81?3 and 82?2 are located within the basins adjacent to the Arco and Howe segments, respectively. Seven seismic lines (Arco lines A1, A2, A3, and A4 and Howe lines H1, H2, and H3) were acquired by EG&G Idaho, Inc. Geosciences for this study using multiple impacts with an accelerated weight drop source. Station and shot point locations yielded 12-fold data. The seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. Two seismic lines (Arco line S2 and Howe line S4) were obtained from Sierra Geophysics. In 1984, they acquired seismic reflection data using an accelerated weight drop source with station and shot point locations that yielded 6-fold data. The two seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. In 1992 for this study, Geotrace Technologies Inc. processed all of the seismic reflection data using industry standard processing techniques. The

  10. Study of a prehistoric landslide using seismic reflection methods integrated with geological data in the Wasatch Mountains, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tingey, B.E.; McBride, J.H.; Thompson, T.J.; Stephenson, W.J.; South, J.V.; Bushman, M.

    2007-01-01

    An integration of geological and geophysical techniques characterizes the internal and basal structure of a landslide along the western margin of the Wasatch Mountains in northern Utah, USA. The study area is within a region of planned and continuing residential development. The Little Valley Landslide is a prehistoric landslide as old as 13??ka B.P. Drilling and trenching at the site indicate that the landslide consists of chaotic and disturbed weathered volcanic material derived from Tertiary age volcanic rocks that comprise a great portion of the Wasatch Range. Five short high-resolution common mid-point seismic reflection profiles over selected portions of the site examine the feasibility of using seismic reflection to study prehistoric landslides in the Wasatch Mountain region. Due to the expected complexity of the near-surface geology, we have pursued an experimental approach in the data processing, examining the effects of muting first arrivals, frequency filtering, model-based static corrections, and seismic migration. The results provide a framework for understanding the overall configuration of the landslide, its basal (failure) surface, and the structure immediately underlying this surface. A glide surface or de??collement is interpreted to underlie the landslide suggesting a large mass movement. The interpretation of a glide surface is based on the onset of coherent reflectivity, calibrated by information from a borehole located along one of the seismic profiles. The glide surface is deepest in the center portion of the landslide and shallows up slope, suggesting a trough-like feature. This study shows that seismic reflection techniques can be successfully used in complex alpine landslide regions to (1) provide a framework in which to link geological data and (2) reduce the need for an extensive trenching and drilling program. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. New seismic reflection results in the central Eromanga Basin, Queensland, Australia: The key to understanding its tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake-Dyster, K. D.; Moss, F. J.; Sexton, M. J.

    1983-12-01

    Regional seismic traverses were recorded from 1980 to 1982 by the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics as part of a major multidisciplinary program aimed at studying the geological evolution of the central Eromanga Basin area and its petroleum potential. Six-fold CDP reflection data were obtained to 20 s reflection time on 1400 km of traverses, up to 400 km long, crossing the main structural features of the area. Additional seismic reflection information to complement the study was obtained from 2300 km of older, mainly single coverage analogue data, which was transcribed to digital format and reprocessed. The central Eromanga Basin area has a complex history and contains four Phanerozoic potentially hydrocarbon-bearing basins each separated by unconformities, i.e. the Devonian Adavale Basin, the Late Carboniferous to Triassic Cooper and Galilee basins, and the Jurassic-Cretaceous Eromanga Basin. The seismic results are being interpreted, with the aid of synthetic seismograms from key wells, to provide information on the extent, nature and relationship of these basins. The quality of the reflection data from the Devonian sequence is generally very good and these data are proving to be most useful in the study. Thick Devonian sediments were deposited over a wide area well beyond the present confines of the Adavale Basin and its associated troughs. Intensive folding and faulting accompanied by major basement uplift, including the Canaway Ridge in the centre of the area, took place during the mid-Carboniferous Kanimblan Orogeny. This was followed by a period of erosion which truncated the Devonian sequence and resulted in separation of the Adavale Basin from the other Devonian Troughs in the area. The preliminary seismic results give some indication also of the extent and nature of the Cooper and Galilee basins sediments. These are generally thin in the central area and thicken to the west and east respectively where coal measures produce good

  12. Thick- and thin-skinned tectonics of the eastern border of the Leinetal Graben, Lower Saxony, Germany, as deduced from reflection seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, David C.; Musmann, Patrick; Wawerzinek, Britta; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Buness, Hermann; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2014-05-01

    The Leinetal Graben in northern Germany is a N-S striking, intra-plate tectonic graben that, according to the youngest sediments within the graben, occurred post-Jurassic, probably late Cretaceous. We show, by interpreting two (1.8 and 3.2 km long), 2D, P-wave, reflection-seismic profiles which cross the eastern border faults of the Leinetal Graben, that the tectonic evolution began much earlier, probably in the Early Triassic. The profiles show information to a depth of approx. 1 km. Using two deep boreholes to calibrate the seismic, we interpreted the Mesozoic sedimentary layers down to Triassic Zechstein salt and the faults that affect these strata. We recognize two sets of faults: firstly steep, planar faults, that are closely clustered and terminate in the Zechstein salt, and secondly shallow faults that connect between two of the first set of faults and have very variable dip, depending on the lithology they cut at that point. These two systems represent thick- and thin-skinned tectonics, respectively. We envisage the late Triassic pro-Leinetal Graben structure as a salt down-building area or as the result of rafting of sandstone units on the salt layer. The system was later reactivated in the Late Cretaceous during intra-plate N-S compression and E-W extension. By restoring the deformation caused by the thin-skinned fault, we are able to determine the amount of area change in the hanging-wall caused by the fault, due to its undulating geometry. Area change is heterogeneous, but reaches 3-4% locally. This may well be sufficient to allow fluids to flow in the fault damage zone in these areas. It would also account for the different seismic appearance of the fault in the two profiles if fluids were heterogeneously distributed along it. This method of retro-deformation is entirely appropriate to determine the suitability of a brittle fault for, for instance, geothermal applications.

  13. Late-stage stretching and subsidence rates in the Danakil Depression, evidenced from borehole records and seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Adam; Bastow, Ian; Magee, Craig; Keir, Derek; Corti, Giacomo; Jackson, Chris; Wilkinson, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The Ethiopian and Afar Rift systems provide a globally unique opportunity to study the incipient transition from continental rifting to sea-floor spreading. A consensus has emerged that a considerable proportion of plate extension in Ethiopia is accommodated by dyke intrusion, with smaller contributions from crustal thinning. However, observations of thinned crust and a pulse in Quaternary-Recent basaltic volcanism within Ethiopia's Danakil Depression have been cited (Bastow and Keir, 2011) as evidence that localised plate stretching may mark the final stages of continent-ocean transition. We explore this hypothesis using an archive of five 2-D seismic reflection profiles, each between 7-10 km in length, and ˜120 borehole records distributed over an area of 225 km2. From depth and age relationships of key marker horizons, we also suggest local subsidence and extension rates. The borehole archive reveals extensive evaporite sequences deposited in and around an asymmetric basin, bounded to the west by a network of east-dipping normal faults. West of the basin, the maximum observed thickness of evaporites is 150 m, beneath which are deposits of clastic sediment, but a sequence of evaporites at least 900 m thick is observed at the basin centre. The sedimentary architecture of these sequences suggests deposition in a shallow salt-pan environment, with seasonal - potentially diurnal - freshening of the brine supply (Warren, 2012). Isotopic analysis of reef carbonates in the basin flank dates the last marine incursion into the Danakil Depression at 24-230ka (Lalou et al., 1970; Bonatti et al., 1971; Bannert et al., 1971), therefore the evaporite sequence must be younger than this. A key marker horizon within the evaporites is the potash-bearing Houston Formation, also distinct in borehole records given its high porosity (25-40%) and radioactivity (50-250 API units). The elevation of the Houston Formation is ˜500 m deeper in the centre of the basin than on the flank

  14. The MIRROR cruise (2011): Deep crustal structure of the Moroccan Atlantic Margin from wide-angle and reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Aslanian, D.; Sahabi, M.; Moulin, M.; Schnurle, P.; Berglar, K.; Biari, Y.; Feld, A.; Graindorge, D.; Corela, C.; Mehdi, K.; Zourarah, B.; Perrot, J.; Alves Ribeiro, J.; Reichert, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The study of conjugate margins is important to test different hypotheses of rifting and initial opening of an ocean. In this scope, seven wide-angle seismic profiles were acquired on the Moroccan Atlantic margin (at the latitudes between 32° and 33° N) together with coincident deep frequency reflection seismic data during the MIRROR cruise in May and June 2011. The main seismic profile is conjugate to an existing wide-angle seismic profile off Nova Scotia (SMART 2). Further objectives of the cruise were to image ocean-continent transition zone, to detect and eventually quantify exhumed upper mantle material present in this zone and to determine the origin of the high amplitude West African Magnetic Anomaly, which is conjugate to the north American East Coast Magnetic Anomaly and can be linked to the opening of the Atlantic. Two of the newly acquired profiles are located perpendicular and five parallel to the Moroccan margin. The seismic profiles are between 130 and 260 km in length and between 28 and 13 ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed on each one. One profile was extended on land by 15 landstations in order to better image the zone of continental thinning. A 4.5 km digital streamer and a 7200 cu inch tuned airgun array were used for the acquisition of the seismic data. Additionally magnetic, bathymetric and high resolution seismic data were acquired in the study region. Preliminary results from tomographic inversion of the first arrivals from the ocean-bottom seismometer data image the zone of crustal thinning from about 25 km to 6 km in the basin along about 70 kilometers of the profiles which are located perpendicular to the margin. The oceanic crust can be divided into 2 regions, based on the lower crustal velocities. Upper mantle velocities are about 8.0 km/s. The coincident reflection seismic data show the fine basement and sedimentary structures including salt tectonics in the basin. The comparative study of the two conjugate profiles on the

  15. Evidence for the use of reflected self-generated seismic waves for spatial orientation in a blind subterranean mammal.

    PubMed

    Kimchi, Tali; Reshef, Moshe; Terkel, Joseph

    2005-02-01

    Subterranean mammals like the blind mole-rat (Rodentia: Spalax ehrenbergi) are functionally blind and possess poor auditory sensitivity, limited to low-frequency sounds. Nevertheless, the mole-rat demonstrates extremely efficient ability to orient spatially. A previous field study has revealed that the mole-rat can assess the location, size and density of an underground obstacle, and accordingly excavates the most efficient bypass tunnel to detour around the obstacles. In the present study we used a multidisciplinary approach to examine the possibility that the mole-rat estimates the location and physical properties of underground obstacles using reflected self-generated seismic waves (seismic 'echolocation'). Our field observations revealed that all the monitored mole-rats produced low-frequency seismic waves (250-300 Hz) at intervals of 8+/-5 s (range: 1-13 s) between head drums while digging a bypass to detour an obstacle. Using a computerized simulation model we demonstrated that it is possible for the mole-rat to determine its distance from an obstacle boundary (open ditch or stone) by evaluating the amplitude (intensity) of the seismic wave reflected back to it from the obstacle interface. By evaluating the polarity of the reflected wave the mole-rat could distinguish between air space and solid obstacles. Further, the model showed that the diffracted waves from the obstacle's corners could give the mole-rat precise information on the obstacle size and its relative spatial position. In a behavioural experiment using a special T-maze setup, we tested whether the mole-rat can perceive seismic waves through the somatosensory system and localize the source. The results revealed that the mole-rat is able to detect low frequency seismic waves using only its paws, and in most cases the mole-rats determined accurately the direction of the vibratory source. In a histological examination of the glabrous skin of the mole-rat's paws we identified lamellate corpuscle

  16. Cocorp Seismic Reflection Profiling in the Ouachita Mountains of Western Arkansas: Geometry and Geologic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, K. Douglas; Lillie, Robert J.; de Voogd, Beatrice; Brewer, Jonathan A.; Oliver, Jack E.; Kaufman, Sidney; Brown, Larry; Viele, George W.

    1982-10-01

    COCORP seismic reflection profiling in the Ouachita Mountains of western Arkansas indicates that (1) Carboniferous foreland basin deposits within the Arkoma Basin thicken dramatically toward the south, reaching an aggregate thickness in excess of 12 km (4.5 s two-way travel time) beneath the southern edge of the Frontal Thrust Zone, (2) evidence for northward directed low-angle thrusting within this clastic sequence is prominent, with a probable decollement surface lying at or near the contact with underlying Early Paleozoic shelf carbonates, (3) beneath the Benton Uplift a sequence of discontinuous events defines a broad antiform cresting at approximately 7 km (2.8 s); this structure appears to mimic the anticlinorial shape of the Benton Uplift indicated by the surface outcrop pattern, (4) beneath the Southern Ouachitas, south dipping stratified events are observed to depths in excess of 14 km (5.0 s), (5) deeper in the section a prominent, gently north dipping reflection occurs at approximately 22 km depth (7.6 s) beneath the northern Coastal Plain/Southern Ouachitas. Extrapolation of data along strike in the Ouachita belt, and consideration of large-scale structure observed in other collisional orogenic belts, suggest that the reflection events observed beneath the Benton Uplift represent Early Paleozoic shelf carbonates correlative with those that floor the Arkoma Basin to the north. This interpretation requires that the Early Paleozoic deep-water sediments exposed in the core of the Ouachitas be allochthonous, and also implies significant basement uplift beneath the core zone. To the south, the prominent package of layered reflections occurring beneath the Southern Ouachitas and northern Coastal Plain indicates that a significant portion of the crust in that region is composed of imbricate sedimentary and/or metasedimentary strata. At relatively `shallow' levels these strata are correlative with the Carboniferous flysch cropping out in the Southern Ouachitas

  17. Deep seismic reflection evidence for ancient subduction and collision zones within the continental lithosphere of northwestern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balling, N.

    2000-12-01

    Deep seismic profiling experiments in the region of NW Europe (including BABEL in the Gulf of Bothnia and the Baltic Sea, Mobil Search in the Skagerrak and MONA LISA in the North Sea) have demonstrated the existence of seismic reflectors in the mantle lithosphere beneath the Baltic Shield, the Tornquist Zone and the North Sea basins. Different sets of reflectors are observed, notably dipping and sub-horizontal. Dipping, distinct reflectivity, which may be followed from Moho/Moho offsets into the deeper parts of the continental lithosphere, is of special interest because of its tectonic and geodynamic significance. Such reflectivity, observed in several places, dipping 15-35° and covering a depth range of 30-90 km, constrained by surface geological information and radiometric age data, is interpreted to represent fossil, ancient subduction and collison zones. Subduction slabs with remnant oceanic basaltic crust transformed into eclogite is assumed, in particular, to generate deep seismic reflectivity. Deep seismic evidence is presented for subduction, crustal accretion and collision processes with inferred ages from 1.9 to 1.1 Ga from the main structural provinces within the Baltic Shield including Svecofennian, Transscandinavian Igneous Belt, Gothian and Sveconorwegian. Along the southwestern border of Baltica (in the southeastern North Sea) south-dipping crustal and sub-crustal reflectivity is observed down to a depth of about 90 km, close to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. These structures are interpreted to reveal a lithosphere-scale Caledonian (ca. 440 Ma) suture zone resulting from the closure of the Tornquist Sea/Thor Ocean and the amalgamation of Baltica and Eastern Avalonia. These results demonstrate that deep structures within the continental lithosphere, originating from early crust-forming plate tectonic processes, may survive for a very long time and form seismic marker reflectivity of great value in geotectonic interpretation and

  18. Ultra-Deep Seismic Reflection Profiles of the Western U.S. from Autocorrelation of USArray Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabolova, A.; Brown, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    A core tenet of the emerging field of seismic interferometry is that autocorrelation of the transmission response recorded at a given seismic station is equivalent to its reflection response. This relation holds true for both specific (earthquake) and distributed (ambient noise) sources. In principle therefore one should be able to reconstruct the equivalent of a zero-offset, surface source-receiver reflection profile from simply autocorrelating the recordings of "natural" sources along a line of seismograph stations. In practice summation of a number of sources from an adequate spatial distribution of quasi random sources is needed to suppress artifacts and enhance the desired reflection response. Recently Ruigrok and Wapennar (2012) reported a lithospheric P-wave reflectivity profile by applying this technique to PKP, PKiKP and PKIKP phases of arthquakes recorded on Hi-CLIMB receivers crossing the Himalaya and southern Tibetan Plateau. Here we show the results of applying similar autocorrelation techniques to both ambient noise and earthquake suites recorded by USArray stations in New Mexico and Arizona to produce P and S wave reflection profiles of lithospheric structure. Our results demonstrate that while this novel approach can provide new (albeit low resolution compared to controlled source surveys) , reflection profiles of lithospheric structure, care must be used to discriminate true reflectivity from artifacts generate by the limited distribution of source regions. However, since the quality of the image is related to stacking fold, results from permanent or long term stations can only improve in clarity and resolution with time.

  19. 3D Seismic Reflection Data: Has the Geological Hubble Retained Its Focus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    In their seminal paper in 2002, Joe Cartwright and Mads Huuse referred to 3D seismic reflection data as the 'Geological Hubble', illustrating how these data had the potential to revolutionise our understanding of the genesis and evolution of sedimentary basins. 14 years on, I will here outline just some of the key recent advances made in our understanding of basin structure and stratigraphy, focusing on: (i) the intrusion and extrusion of igneous rocks; (ii) salt tectonics, with particular emphasis on intrasalt structure and the kinematics and mechanics of diapirism; (iii) the geometry and growth of normal faults; and (iv) the structure and emplacement of mass-transport complexes (MTCs). I will stress that future advances at least partly relies on hydrocarbon exploration companies and government agencies continuing to make their data freely available via easy-to-access data portals. I will issue a clarion call to academics, stressing that 'geodynamicists', sedimentologists, structural geologists and geomorphologists, amongst others, can benefit from utilising what I believe are currently an underused data type.

  20. Seismic reflection study of recessional moraines beneath Lake Superior and their relationship to regional deglaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmesser, C.W.; Johnson, T.C.; Wold, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 8000 km of continuous seismic reflection profiles throughout Lake Superior were examined for evidence of recessional moraines and other ice-margin deposits associated with the retreat of late Wisconsin ice. These features are correlated with the record of glacial-lake evolution in western Lake Superior. An offlapping sequence of glacial and glacial-lacustrine dediments overlying bedrock is recognized in west-central Lake Superior that is progressively younger to the northeast. The sequence underlies more recent glaical-lacustrine and postglacial sediments. Four facies are recognized on the basis of geomorphologic and acoustic properties and are interpreted to represent a southwest-to-northeast assemblage of: proglacial stratified drift (facies A), drift in major end moraines (facies B), till deposited as glacial retreat resumed, or possibly late-stage ablation till (facies C), and basal till (facies D). The prominent moraines of facies B are unusually thick and are believed to mark the ice-margin shorelines of successive major proglacial lakes that formerly occupied parts of western Lake Superior. The moraines are tentatively correlated with Glacial Lake Duluth (unit 1), Glacial Lake Washburn (unit 2), and Glacial Lake Beaver Bay (unit 3), the most prominent of lakes drained via the progressively lower outlets via the Moose Lake/ Brule-St. Croix Rivers, the Huron Mountains, and the Au Train-Whitefish regions, respectively. ?? 1982.

  1. Structure of the eastern Seattle fault zone, Washington state: New insights from seismic reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liberty, L.M.; Pratt, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    We identify and characterize the active Seattle fault zone (SFZ) east of Lake Washington with newly acquired seismic reflection data. Our results focus on structures observed in the upper 1 km below the cities of Bellevue, Sammamish, Newcastle, and Fall City, Washington. The SFZ appears as a broad zone of faulting and folding at the southern boundary of the Seattle basin and north edge of the Seattle uplift. We interpret the Seattle fault as a thrust fault that accommodates north-south shortening by forming a fault-propagation fold with a forelimb breakthrough. The blind tip of the main fault forms a synclinal growth fold (deformation front) that extends at least 8 km east of Vasa Park (west side of Lake Sammamish) and defines the south edge of the Seattle basin. South of the deformation front is the forelimb break-through fault, which was exposed in a trench at Vasa Park. The Newcastle Hills anticline, a broad anticline forming the north part of the Seattle uplift east of Lake Washington, is interpreted to lie between the main blind strand of the Seattle fault and a backthrust. Our profiles, on the northern limb of this anticline, consistently image north-dipping strata. A structural model for the SFZ east of Lake Washington is consistent with about 8 km of slip on the upper part of the Seattle fault, but the amount of motion is only loosely constrained.

  2. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Seismic-reflection profiles of the central part of the Clarendon Linden fault system of western New York in relation to regional seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakundiny, Robert H.; Pomeroy, Paul W.

    2002-08-01

    Geological and geophysical research in upstate New York, with few exceptions, has not definitively associated seismicity with specific Proterozoic basement or Paleozoic bedrock structures. The central part of the Clarendon-Linden fault system (CLFS) between Batavia and Dale, NY is one of those exceptions where seismicity has been studied and has been spatially associated with structure. The CLFS is either a complex system of long faults with associated shorter branches and parallel segments, or a region of many short faults aligned north-south from the Lake Ontario shore southward to Allegany County, NY. Interpretation of 38 km of Vibroseis and approximately 56 km of conventional seismic-reflection data along 13 lines suggests that the CLFS is a broad zone of small faults with small displacements in the lower Paleozoic bedrock section that is at least 77 km long and 7-17 km wide and spatially coincident with a north-trending geophysical (combined aeromagnetic and gravity) lineament within the basement. The relative offset across the faults of the system is more than 91 m near Attica, NY. The CLFS is the expression of tectonic crustal adjustments within the Paleozoic rock above the boundary of two basement megablocks of differing petrologic provinces and differing earthquake characteristics that forms the eastern side of the Elzevir-Frontenac boundary zone. Deep seismic-reflection profiles display concave-eastward listric faults that probably merge at depth near the mid-crustal boundary layer. An interpretive vertical section provides the setting for refined definitions of the CLFS, its extensions at depth and its relation to seismicity. Most modern seismicity in western New York and the Niagara Peninsula of Ontario occurs in apparent patterns of randomly dispersed activity. The sole exception is a line of seven epicenters of small earthquakes that trend east from Attica, NY into the Rochester basement megablock. Earthquakes may be triggered at the intersections of

  4. Seismic-reflection profiles of the central part of the Clarendon-Linden fault system of western New York in relation to regional seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fakundiny, R.H.; Pomeroy, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Geological and geophysical research in upstate New York, with few exceptions, has not definitively associated seismicity with specific Proterozoic basement or Paleozoic bedrock structures. The central part of the Clarendon-Linden fault system (CLFS) between Batavia and Dale, NY is one of those exceptions where seismicity has been studied and has been spatially associated with structure. The CLFS is either a complex system of long faults with associated shorter branches and parallel segments, or a region of many short faults aligned north-south from the Lake Ontario shore southward to Allegany County, NY. Interpretation of 38 km of Vibroseis and approximately 56 km of conventional seismic-reflection data along 13 lines suggests that the CLFS is a broad zone of small faults with small displacements in the lower Paleozoic bedrock section that is at least 77 km long and 7-17 km wide and spatially coincident with a northtrending geophysical (combined aeromagnetic and gravity) lineament within the basement. The relative offset across the faults of the system is more than 91 m near Attica, NY. The CLFS is the expression of tectonic crustal adjustments within the Paleozoic rock above the boundary of two basement megablocks of differing petrologic provinces and differing earthquake characteristics that forms the eastern side of the Elzevir-Frontenac boundary zone. Deep seismic-reflection profiles display concave-eastward listric faults that probably merge at depth near the mid-crustal boundary layer. An interpretive vertical section provides the setting for refined definitions of the CLFS, its extensions at depth and its relation to seismicity. Most modern seismicity in western New York and the Niagara Peninsula of Ontario occurs in apparent patterns of randomly dispersed activity. The sole exception is a line of seven epicenters of small earthquakes that trend east from Attica, NY into the Rochester basement megablock. Earthquakes may be triggered at the intersections of

  5. Characterization of transform faults within the South Georgia Rift using 2-D seismic line SCO2-3 correlated with well data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccormack, K. A.; Heffner, D. M.; Knapp, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The South Georgia Rift Basin (SGR) has long been thought to be relatively simple on terms of its geology: with coastal plain sediments that vary gradually in thickness overlying a relatively uniform basalt province known as the "J-horizon". However recent re-examination of well data collected throughout the SGR suggests there are a number of generally NW-SE striking transform faults within the area due to the fact that the depth of the coastal plain sediments vary drastically over short lateral distances. (Hefner, D.M., 2011) To better understand these anomalies, we interpret the seismic line SCO2-3 collected in 2010 that looks to cross a transform fault at a high angle. By doing so and correlating it with available well and gravity data we will contribute to a better understanding of the South Georgia Rift (SGR) by determining the location and orientation of this transform fault. These possible faults are currently only constrained by well data and thus their exact strike, location and extent remain poorly understood. The characterization of the transform faults within this area is important due to the possibility of CO2 sequestration in parts of the SGR. It has also been suggested that the transform faults cutting through the SGR may line up with, and have originally been connected to, the transform faults that are found along the Mid Atlantic Ridge today. A better understanding of the extent, orientation and movement of these faults through seismic studies is essential to understanding the overall geology of the Sough Georgia Rift Basin.

  6. Structure of the Gabon Margin from integrated seismic reflection and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Stéphanie; Cloetingh, Sierd; Bertotti, Giovanni

    2011-06-01

    In the South Gabon Basin, deep multi-channel seismic reflection and gravity modeling analysis have shed light on key features of the structure of the margin. The thinned continental crust beneath the Gabon Margin appears to be composed of two distinct layers, separated by a clear, strong and more or less continuous reflector running in the 7-10 s TWT window. The lower crust is characterized by a higher density, intermediate between the lower values of the upper crust and the denser values of the mantle. The lower crust is irregularly shaped and presents lateral thickness variations along the direction of thinning and along the coast. In the offshore thinned continental domain, the lower and upper crust form a 20-25 km thick body. Crustal thicknesses point to a relatively sharp and narrow transition, along a few tens of kilometers, between the unthinned and the thinned continental crust. The high density layer identified offshore Gabon presents similar characteristics in density, geometry and spatial distribution, as the underplated magmatic bodies observed along volcanic margins, e.g. along the South Atlantic Namibia Margin or the North Atlantic Vøring Margin. Although this lower crustal body could possibly represent ultra mafic serpentinized rocks or high grade metamorphic crustal rocks, we suggest that it could be composed of mafic rocks. Magmas resulting from partial melting during rifting may underplate the crust and/or be intruded in the lower crust through a system of dykes and sills. In this view, the present-day crustal thicknesses along rifted margins, characterized by magmatic underplating and/or intrusion, are not representative of the thinning that the crust experienced during rifting. Results of this study point to relatively shallow sedimentary basins along the South Gabon Margin. The deepest offshore depocenters located under the westernmost side of the continental platform appear to be associated with the deepest syn-rift basins These basins seem

  7. Prestack depth migration for seismic reflection data in the southern offshore of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, S.

    2009-12-01

    Since exploration seismic problems consist of function of time, velocity, source & receiver position, frequency, and wave-number, these have intrinsically parallel characteristic. Though prestack depth migration is widely used for imaging the complex subsurface structure such as salt dome, fault, and fold, it is needed high performance computers and parallelizing techniques because of huge data volume and large amount of computing time. In this study, we have developed reverse time migration on a low-cost PC cluster using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and we applied it to seismic reflection data in the southern offshore of Korea. This sturdy area is a northern margin of the East China Sea Basin and several subbasins characterized by low gravity anomalies exist in the southern offshore of Korea. The basement structures in the basins are characterized by a series of tilted fault blocks bounded by basement involved listric normal faults. The depth to the basement ranges from about 1.0 s to more than 3.5 s in two-way travel time. We tried conventional data processing for a study line and estimated velocity model from interval velocities which were calculated from stack velocities. In the prestack depth migration, we use inner product of back-propagated wavefields and virtual sources. The observed wavefields were extrapolated backward to the subsurface in order to calculate back-propagated wavefields. When we conduct inner product, we used the virtual sources instead of partial derivative wavefields because of the heavy computing hours and disk storage problem. The virtual source is a forward modeled-wavefield with a source term which results from taking partial derivative wave equation with respect to a velocity. These two wavefields were calculated simultaneously after distributing tasks to every computing node by domain decomposition method. The calculated geological model is 27 km × 4 km with a grid size 12.5 m × 12.5 m. The results of prestack depth

  8. Seismic reflection profiling across Tertiary extensional structures in the eastern Amargosa Desert, southern Nevada, Basin and Range province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Carr, M.D.; Fox, K.F.; Hart, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    Outcrops, shallow well control, and coincident geophysical surveys are used to interpret a seismic reflection profile in the Amargosa Desert, within the Basin and Range province, of southern Nevada. The seismic line crosses all or parts of three Tertiary subbasins, revealing that basin growth occurred by progressive shifts of basin-bounding faults. A shallow laterally continuous, flat-lying, low-frequency reflector, interpreted as a Tertiary basalt flow, suggests that little vertical deformation has occurred within the easternmost of the small Tertiary basins since the eruption of the flow about 10 million years ago. Moderately dipping reflections within the pre-Tertiary bedrock may image Mesozoic thrust faults. Doming of the lower crust resembles that observed elsewhere in the Basin and Range province and is consistent with ductile flow in the lower crust. -from Authors

  9. High-resolution 3D seismic reflection imaging across active faults and its impact on seismic hazard estimation in the Tokyo metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroshi; Abe, Susumu; Kawasaki, Shinji; Kato, Naoko

    2016-10-01

    We collected and interpreted high-resolution 3D seismic reflection data across a hypothesized fault scarp, along the largest active fault that could generate hazardous earthquakes in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The processed and interpreted 3D seismic cube, linked with nearby borehole stratigraphy, suggests that a monocline that deforms lower Pleistocene units is unconformably overlain by middle Pleistocene conglomerates. Judging from structural patterns and vertical separation on the lower-middle Pleistocene units and the ground surface, the hypothesized scarp was interpreted as a terrace riser rather than as a manifestation of late Pleistocene structural growth resulting from repeated fault activity. Devastating earthquake scenarios had been predicted along the fault in question based on its proximity to the metropolitan area, however our new results lead to a significant decrease in estimated fault length and consequently in the estimated magnitude of future earthquakes associated with reactivation. This suggests a greatly reduced seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan area from earthquakes generated by active intraplate crustal faults.

  10. Deep crustal structure of the North-West African margin from combined wide-angle and reflection seismic data (MIRROR seismic survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biari, Y.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Sahabi, M.; Aslanian, D.; Schnurle, P.; Berglar, K.; Moulin, M.; Mehdi, K.; Graindorge, D.; Evain, M.; Benabdellouahed, M.; Reichert, C.

    2015-08-01

    The structure of the Moroccan and Nova Scotia conjugate rifted margins is of key importance for understanding the Mesozoic break-up and evolution of the northern central Atlantic Ocean basin. Seven combined multichannel reflection (MCS) and wide-angle seismic (OBS) data profiles were acquired along the Atlantic Moroccan margin between the latitudes of 31.5° and 33° N during the MIRROR seismic survey in 2011, in order to image the transition from continental to oceanic crust, to study the variation in crustal structure, and to characterize the crust under the West African Coast Magnetic Anomaly (WACMA). The data were modeled using a forward modeling approach. The final models image crustal thinning from 36 km thickness below the continent to approximately 8 km in the oceanic domain. A 100 km wide zone characterized by rough basement topography and high seismic velocities up to 7.4 km/s in the lower crust is observed westward of the West African Coast Magnetic Anomaly. No basin underlain by continental crust has been imaged in this region, as has been identified north of our study area. Comparison to the conjugate Nova Scotian margin shows a similar continental crustal thickness and layer geometry, and the existence of exhumed and serpentinized upper mantle material on the Canadian side only. The oceanic crustal thickness is lower on the Canadian margin.

  11. Seismic Reflection Images of the 1946 Nankai Megasplay Fault off Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kodaira, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Nankai Trough subduction zone, where the Philippine Sea Plate subducts beneath the Eurasian Plate to the NNW, is known as one of the best-suited convergent plate margins for studying subduction zone earthquakes. Historically, large earthquakes along the subduction zone have occurred with a recurrence interval of 100-200 years. The Nankai subduction zone has been of interest from the viewpoints of seismic hazards and earthquake potential since the last two large megathrust earthquakes, i.e., the 1944 Tonankai (M = 8.1) and 1946 Nankaido (M = 8.3) events, which occurred off the Kii peninsula, southwest Japan. The Nankai subduction zone may be divided into four discrete domains (A through D) marked by the megathrust earthquake rupture, each of which roughly corresponds to a geologically well-defined forearc basin. The boundary between domains A-B (western Nankai) and C-D (eastern Nankai) has almost persisted over the historic earthquake cycles, except for Hoei earthquake (M = 8.7) in 1707. Even though a numerical experiment has succeeded in simulating the 1707 Hoei event simultaneously rupturing the domains A, B, and C, there has been no direct geologic and geophysical observations to discuss the existence of boundary between domains A-B and C-D. In order to obtain detailed crustal structure images of the 1946 Nankai earthquake rupture zone, we conducted a multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection survey in the Nankai Trough subduction zone off Kii Peninsula, using R/V Kairei of the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center in 2001. For deep-penetration seismic imaging, a large volume (~200 liters) air gun array was used as the controlled sound source. The MCS data recording was done with a 4 km, 160-channel streamer with 25 m group spacing. Data processing included trace editing, pre-filtering, spherical divergence correction, signature deconvolution, CMP (Common Mid Point) sort, NMO correction, multiple suppression by parabolic radon transform, CMP stack, and time

  12. Present activity and seismogenic potential of a low-angle normal fault system (Città di Castello, Italy): Constraints from surface geology, seismic reflection data and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, Francesco; Boncio, Paolo; Lavecchia, Giusy; Pace, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    We present new constraints on an active low-angle normal fault system in the Città di Castello-Sansepolcro basin (CSB) of the northern Apennines of Italy. New field data from the geological survey of the Carta Geologica d' Italia (CARG project) define the surface geometry of the normal fault system and lead to an interpretation of the CROP 03 deep-crust seismic reflection profile (Castiglion Fiorentino-Urbania segment), with particular attention paid to the geometry of the Plio-Quaternary extensional structures. Surface and sub-surface geological data are integrated with instrumental and historical seismicity in order to define the seismotectonics of the area. Low-angle east-dipping reflectors are the seismic expression of the well-known Altotiberina Fault (AF), a regional extensional detachment on which both east- and west-dipping high-angle faults, bounding the CSB, sole out. The AF breakaway zone is located ˜ 10 km west of the CSB. Within the extensional allochthon, synthetic east-dipping planes prevail. Displacement along the AF is ˜ 4.5 km, which agrees with the cumulative offset due to its synthetic splays. The evolution of the CSB has mainly been controlled by the east-dipping fault system, at least since Early Pleistocene time; this system is still active and responsible for the seismicity of the area. A low level of seismic activity was recorded instrumentally within the CSB, but several damaging earthquakes have occurred in historical times. The instrumental seismicity and the intensity data points of the largest historical earthquakes (5 events with maximum MCS intensity of IX to IX-X) allow us to propose two main seismogenic structures: the Monte Santa Maria Tiberina (Mmax = 5.9) and Città di Castello (Mmax up to 6.5) normal faults. Both are synthetic splays of the AF detachment, dipping to the NE at moderate (45-50°) to low (25-30°) angles and cutting the upper crust up to the surface. This study suggests that low-angle normal faults (at least

  13. Fine-scale velocity structure of upper oceanic crust from full waveform inversion of downward continued seismic reflection data at the Lucky Strike Volcano, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Singh, S. C.; Kent, G. M.; Crawford, W.

    2012-04-01

    We present a fine-scale 2D velocity structure beneath the Lucky Strike Volcano on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) using an elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) method. The FWI is a data driven procedure that allows simultaneous exploitation of both reflections and refractions energy in multi-channel seismic data to create a single self-consistent, high-resolution velocity image of the upper crust that can be used for geologic interpretation. The long-wavelength background P-wave velocity model required by the local optimization approach was created using a combination of downward continuation and 3D first-arrival travel-time tomography. The elastic waveform inversion was applied to carefully windowed downward continued data, where wide-angle reflections and refractions arrive in front of the water-wave and are thus isolated from the high-amplitude seafloor scattering energy that is particularly acute in areas of rough igneous seafloor. Waveform inversion reduces the misfit of the initial model by 76% after 19 iterations and strongly reduced the size of the residuals relative to the signal size. The final model shows fine scale structure beneath the northern part of the Lucky Strike volcano on a resolution of tens of meters. Evidence for successive lava sequences testifies to the constructional origin of the upper section of layer 2A. Normal faults are revealed within the shallow crust and are strongly correlated with seafloor observations.

  14. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-07-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  15. Simulation of seismic wave propagation in 2-D poroelastic media using weighted-averaging finite difference stencils in the frequency-space domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingjie; Mao, Weijian

    2017-01-01

    The poroelastodynamic equations are used to describe the dynamic solid-fluid interaction in the reservoir. To obtain the intrinsic properties of reservoir rocks from geophysical data measured in both laboratory and field, we need an accurate solution of the wave propagation in porous media. At present, the poroelastic wave equations are mostly solved in the time domain, which involves a difficult and complicated time convolution. In order to avoid the issues caused by the time convolution, we propose a frequency-space domain method. The poroelastic wave equations are composed of a linear system in the frequency domain, which easily takes into account the effects of all frequencies on the dispersion and attenuation of seismic wave. A 25-point weighted-averaging finite different scheme is proposed to discretize the equations. For the finite model, the perfectly matched layer technique is applied at the model boundaries. We validated the proposed algorithm by testing three numerical examples of poroelastic models, which are homogenous, two-layered and heterogeneous with different fluids, respectively. The testing results are encouraging in the aspects of both computational accuracy and efficiency.

  16. Ground magnetic studies along a regional seismic-reflection profile across Bare Mountain, Crater Flat and Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Langenheim, V.E.; Ponce, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Ground magnetic data were collected along a 26-km-long regional seismic-reflection profile in southwest Nevada that starts in the Amargosa Desert, crosses Bare Mountain, Crater Flat and Yucca Mountain, and ends in Midway Valley. Parallel ground magnetic profiles were also collected about 100 m to either side of the western half of the seismic-reflection line. The magnetic data indicate that the eastern half of Crater Flat is characterized by closely-spaced faulting (1--2 km) in contrast to the western half of Crater Flat. Modeling of the data indicates that the Topopah Spring Tuff is offset about 250 m on the Solitario Canyon fault and about 50 m on the Ghost Dance fault. These estimates of fault offset are consistent with seismic-reflection data and geologic mapping. A broad magnetic high of about 500--600 nT is centered over Crater Flat. Modeling of the magnetic data indicates that the source of this high is not thickening and doming of the Bullfrog Tuff, but more likely lies below the Bullfrog Tuff. Possible source lithologies for this magnetic high include altered argillite of the Eleana Formation, Cretaceous or Tertiary intrusions, and mafic sills.

  17. High-resolution seismic-reflection images across the ICDP-USGS Eyreville deep drilling site, Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powars, David S.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Goldman, Mark R.; Gohn, Gregory S.; Horton, J. Wright; Edwards, Lucy E.; Rymer, Michael J.; Gandhok, Gini

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired two 1.4-km-long, high-resolution (~5 m vertical resolution) seismic-reflection lines in 2006 that cross near the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-USGS Eyreville deep drilling site located above the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure in Virginia, USA. Five-meter spacing of seismic sources and geophones produced high-resolution images of the subsurface adjacent to the 1766-m-depth Eyreville core holes. Analysis of these lines, in the context of the core hole stratigraphy, shows that moderate-amplitude, discontinuous, dipping reflections below ~527 m correlate with a variety of Chesapeake Bay impact structure sediment and rock breccias recovered in the cores. High-amplitude, continuous, subhorizontal reflections above ~527 m depth correlate with the uppermost part of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure crater-fill sediments and postimpact Eocene to Pleistocene sediments. Reflections with ~20-30 m of relief in the uppermost part of the crater-fill and lowermost part of the postimpact section suggest differential compaction of the crater-fill materials during early postimpact time. The top of the crater-fill section also shows ~20 m of relief that appears to represent an original synimpact surface. Truncation surfaces, locally dipping reflections, and depth variations in reflection amplitudes generally correlate with the lithostrati-graphic and sequence-stratigraphic units and contacts in the core. Seismic images show apparent postimpact paleochannels that include the first possible Miocene paleochannels in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. Broad downwarping in the postim-pact section unrelated to structures in the crater fill indicates postimpact sediment compaction.

  18. Precambrian crust beneath the Mesozoic northern Canadian Cordillera discovered by Lithoprobe seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Frederick A.; Clowes, Ronald M.; Snyder, David B.; van der Velden, Arie J.; Hall, Kevin W.; Erdmer, Philippe; Evenchick, Carol A.

    2004-04-01

    The Cordillera in northern Canada is underlain by westward tapering layers that can be followed from outcrops of Proterozoic strata in the Foreland belt to the lowermost crust of the orogenic interior, a distance of as much as 500 km across strike. They are interpreted as stratified Proterozoic rocks, including ˜1.8-0.7 Ga supracrustal rocks and their basement. The layering was discovered on two new deep seismic reflection profiles in the Yukon (Line 3; ˜650 km) and northern British Columbia (Line 2; ˜1245 km in two segments) that were acquired as part of the Lithoprobe Slave-Northern Cordillera Lithospheric Evolution (SNORCLE) transect. In the Mackenzie Mountains of the eastern Yukon, the layering in Line 3 is visible between 5.0 and 12.0 s (˜15 to 36 km depth). It is followed southwestward for nearly 650 km (˜500 km across strike) and thins to less than 1.0 s (˜3.0-3.5 km thickness) near the Moho at the Yukon-Alaska international boundary. In the northern Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, the upper part of the layering on Line 2 correlates with outcrops of Proterozoic (1.76-1.0 Ga) strata in the Muskwa anticlinorium. At this location, the layering is at least 15 km thick and is followed westward then southward into the middle and lower crust for ˜700 km (˜300 km across strike). It disappears as a thin taper at the base of the crust ˜150 km east of the coast of the Alaskan panhandle. The only significant disruption in the layering occurs at the Tintina fault zone, a late to postorogenic strike-slip fault with up to 800 km of displacement, which appears as a vertical zone of little reflectivity that disrupts the continuity of the deep layering on both profiles (˜300 km apart). The base of the layered reflection zone coincides with the Moho, which exhibits variable character and undulates in a series of broad arches with widths of ˜150 km. In general, the mantle appears to have few reflections. However, at the southwest end of Line 3 near the Alaska

  19. Palaeoceanographic significance of sedimentary features at the Argentine continental margin revealed by multichannel seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruetzner, Jens; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Franke, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    The thermohaline circulation in the Argentine Basin today is characterized by the interaction of northward flowing Antarctic water masses (Antarctic Intermediate Water, AAIW; Circumpolar Deep Water, CDW; Antarctic Bottom Water, AABW) and southward flowing North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). The transfer of heat and energy via both AABW and NADW constitutes an important component in maintaining the global conveyor belt. We aim at a better understanding of both paths and intensity of this current system in the past by investigating an extensive (> 11000 km) set of high quality seismic reflection profiles from the Argentine continental margin. The profiles show a significant contourite system containing both erosive and depositional features that formed through the evolution of water masses and their modifications (path, physical and chemical properties) due to plate tectonic events such as the opening of the Drake Passage or the extensive emplacement of volcanic flows at the Rio Grande Rise. Overall the depositional features indicate that along slope (contour current) transport dominates over down slope (turbiditic) processes at the southern Argentine margin south of 45° S. Further to the North down slope transport was more extensive as indicated by the presence of submarine canyons crossing the slope down to a depth of ~3500 m. Here we present preliminary results from the southern part of the continental margin (42°-50° S) where we focus on a set of ~50 km wide terraces on the slope and rise separated by contouritic channels. The terraces developed over time in alternating constructional (depositional) and erosive phases. An initial age frame was developed by mapping regional reflectors and seismic units known from previous studies. The sedimentary layer between regional reflectors AR 4 and AR 5 spanning roughly the time interval from the Eocene/Oligocene boundary to the early middle Miocene is thin (0.1 - 0.4 s TWT) below the Valentine Feilberg Terrace but

  20. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 18 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and six monitor surveys clearly imaged changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators.

  1. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2006-08-31

    The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in an attempt to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data.

  2. Application of advanced seismic reflection imaging techniques to mapping permeable zones at Dixie Valley, Nevada. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-18

    Multifold seismic reflection data from the Dixie Valley geothermal field in Nevada were reprocessed using a nonlinear optimization scheme called simulated annealing to model subsurface acoustic velocities, followed by a pre-stack Kirchhoff migration to produce accurate and detailed depth-migrated images of subsurface structure. In contrast to conventional processing techniques, these methods account for significant lateral variations in velocity and thus have the potential ability to image steeply-dipping faults and fractures that may affect permeability within geothermal fields. The optimization scheme develops two-dimensional velocity models to within 6% of velocities obtained from well and surface geologic data. Only the seismic data (i.e., first arrival times of P waves) are used to construct the velocity models and pre-stack migration images, and no other a priori assumptions are invoked. Velocities obtained by processing individual seismic tracks were integrated to develop a block diagram of velocities to 2.3 km depth within the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Details of the tectonic and stratigraphic structure allowed three dimensional extension of the interpretations of two dimensional data. Interpretations of the processed seismic data are compared with well data, surface mapping, and other geophysical data. The Dixie Valley fault along the southeastern Stillwater Range Piedmont is associated with a pronounced lateral velocity gradient that is interpreted to represent the juxtaposition of relatively low velocity basin-fill strata in the hanging wall against higher velocity crystalline rocks in the footwall. The down-dip geometry of the fault was evaluated by inverting arrival times from a negative move-out event, which we associate with the dipping fault plane, on individual shot gathers for seismic line SRC-3 for the location and depth of the associated reflection points on the fault.

  3. Classification of earthquake site effects by shallow reflection seismics using a shear-wave land-streamer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, S.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    Touched in the SW by the Great Sumatra Fault, the densely populated delta of the Krueng Aceh River consists mainly of young alluvial sediments of clay, sand and gravel with partially high organic content. The depth of this sediment body and its internal structure are widely unknown. Whereas traditional timber constructed buildings are mostly unaffected by strong earthquakes, the change to concrete building techniques added a significant new and locally unknown seismic risk in this region. The classification of earthquake site effects in the city of Banda Aceh and the surrounding region of Aceh Besar was the aim of a high-resolution shear-wave reflection seismic survey in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. In cooperation with the Government of Indonesia and local counterparts, this was part of the Project "Management of Georisk" of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources. Using shear-wave reflection seismics in combination with a land streamer has proven to be an enormously useful method in the sedimentary regions of the Aceh province with an easy and fast recording operation. In addition, the specialized seismic system accounts for compacted soil surfaces which allows a wide range of applications within cities, industrial sites, paved roads and also on small dirt roads. Using a vibrator seismic source, this technique was applied successfully also in areas of high building density in the city of Banda Aceh or in the surrounding mostly agricultural environment. Combined with standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests, it was possible to evaluate the soil stiffness in populated urban areas down to 100 m depth in terms of the IBC2003. This is important for the exploration of new areas for save building foundation and groundwater aquifer detection in the tsunami-flooded region.

  4. Thrust fault segmentation and downward fault propagation in accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, Haydn; Bell, Rebecca; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. Although we often assume imbricate faults are likely to have propagated upwards from the décollement we show strong evidence for fault nucleation at shallow depths and downward propagation to intersect the décollement. The complex fault interactions documented here have implications for hydraulic compartmentalisation and pore

  5. Geophysical Investigation of Avon Valley, West-Central Montana, using Gravity and Seismic Reflection Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knatterud, L.; Mosolf, J.; Speece, M. A.; Zhou, X.

    2014-12-01

    The Avon Valley and adjacent mountains in west-central Montana lie within the Lewis and Clark Line, a major system of WNW-striking faults and folds that transect the more northerly structural grain of the northern Rockies and represent alternating episodes of transtensional and transpressional deformation. The northwest-trending valley has been previously interpreted as an extensional half graben filled with Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic deposits; however, little-to-no geophysical constraints on basin architecture or the thickness of Tertiary fill have been reported. A major northwest-striking fault with significant normal displacement clearly bounds the valley to the northeast, juxtaposing Tertiary sedimentary deposits against Proterozoic-Mesozoic units deformed by shortening structures and crosscut by Cretaceous granitic intrusions. Tertiary volcanic deposits unconformably overlying faulted and folded Phanerozoic-Proterozoic sequences in the eastern Garnet Range bound the valley to the southwest, but in the past no faults had been mapped along this margin. New mapping by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) has identified a system of high-angle, northwest- and northeast-striking, oblique-slip faults along the southwest border of the Avon calling into question if the valley is a half, full, or asymmetrical graben. Geophysical data has recently been acquired by Montana Tech to help define the structural architecture of the Avon Valley and the thickness of its Tertiary fill. Gravity data and a short seismic reflection profile have been collected and a preliminary interpretation of these data indicates a half graben with a series of normal faults bounding the western side of the valley. Ongoing gravity data collection throughout 2014 should refine this interpretation by better defining the bedrock-Tertiary interface at depth.

  6. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2001-01-01

    The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

  7. Shear Wave Reflection Seismics Image Internal Structure of Quick-Clay Landslides in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Malehmir, A.

    2014-12-01

    Covering many different sizes of scale, landslides are widespread and pose a severe hazard in many areas as soon as humans or infrastructure are affected. In order to provide geophysical tools and techniques to better characterize sites prone to sliding, a geophysical assessment working towards a geotechnical understanding of landslides is necessary. As part of a joint project studying clay-related landslides in Nordic countries by a suite of geophysical methods, we therefore tested the use of shear wave reflection seismics to survey shallow structures that are known to be related to quick-clay landslide processes in southern Sweden. On two crossing profiles, a land streamer consisting of 120 SH-geophones with 1 m spacing was deployed, and an ELVIS micro-vibrator was shaking every 4 m to generate the shear wave signal. SH-wave data of high quality were thereby acquired to resolve the gaps between P-wave data and electrical and surface wave based methods of lower resolution. After quality control, correlation, subtractive stack, and geometry setup, single shot gathers already demonstrate the high data quality gained in the region, especially on a gravel road. The migrated depth sections image the structural inventory down to ca. 50 m depth with vertical resolution of less than 1 m. Horizontally layered sediments are visible in the upper 40 m of soft (marine) sediments, followed by top basement with a rough topography varying between ca. 20-40 m depth. The imaged, bowl-shaped basement morphology centres near the profile crossing, and basement is exposed at three sides of the profiles. Three distinct sediment sequences are separated by high-amplitude unconformities. The quick-clay layer may be located above the marked reflection set that lies on top of the more transparent sequence that levels out the basement. Located between 15-20 m depth, this correlates with the height of the last scarp that occurred in the area. In addition, shear wave velocities are determined

  8. A high-resolution seismic reflection/refraction study of the Chugach- Peninsular terrane boundary, southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Fisher, M.A.; Geist, E.L.; Christensen, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    We present results from a high-resolution seismic refraction analysis of the shallow (approximately 2 km) crustal structure along the 107-km-long Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect Chugach reflection line in southern Alaska and a comparison with laboratory measurements of field samples. The refraction analysis includes the two-dimensional interpretation of several thousand first- and secondary-arrival travel times digitized from 1024-channel split-spread common shot gathers. The velocity model derived from this analysis better defines the location and geometry of terrane boundaries than does the normal incidence reflection section and agrees well with surface mapping of lithologies. Furthermore, the model predicts travel times within 100 ms of the reflection times recorded from the base of the Quaternary on the Chugach reflection section. -from Authors

  9. Precambrian crust and lithosphere beneath the Northern Canadian Cordillera discovered by LITHOPROBE seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clowes, R. M.; Cook, F. A.; Snyder, D. B.; van der Velden, A. J.; Hall, K. W.; Erdmer, P.; Evenchick, C. A.

    2003-04-01

    The Cordillera in northern Canada is underlain by westward tapering layers that can be followed from outcrops of Proterozoic strata in the Foreland Belt to the lowermost crust of the orogenic interior, a distance of as much as 500 km across strike. The layering was discovered on two new deep seismic reflection profiles in the Yukon (Line 3; ~650 km) and northern British Columbia (Line 2; ~1245 km in two segments) that were acquired as part of the LITHOPROBE Slave - Northern Cordillera Lithospheric Evolution (SNORCLE) transect. Along Line 3, the layering is visible between 5.0 and 12.0 s (~15 to 36 km depth). It is followed southwestward for nearly 650 km (~500 km across strike) and thins to less than 1.0 s (~3.0-3.5 km thickness) near the Moho at the Yukon-Alaska international boundary. Farther south, along Line 2, the upper part of the layering correlates with outcrops of Proterozoic (1.76-1.0 Ga) strata on the east. Near the outcrop, the layering is >15 km thick. It projects westward into the middle and lower crust for ~700 km (~300 km across strike) where it disappears as a thin taper at the base of the crust. The layering is disrupted at the Tintina fault zone, a late to post-orogenic strike-slip fault with up to 800 km of displacement, which appears as a vertical zone of little reflectivity on both profiles (~300 km apart). The base of the layered reflection zone coincides with the Moho, which exhibits variable character and undulates in a series of broad (~150 km) arches. Although the mantle is generally non-reflective, an event dips eastward from ~14.0 s (~45 km) at the western end of Line 3 near the coast to ~21.0 s (73 km depth) beneath exposed Eocene magmatic rocks. It is interpreted as a relict subduction surface of the Kula plate. Some implications of the interpretation of Proterozoic layered rocks beneath most of the northern Cordillera are: (1) ancient North American crust and lithosphere project westward beneath most of the Northern Cordillera, (2

  10. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 02LCA02 in Lakes Ada, Crystal, Jennie, Mary, Rice, and Sylvan, Central Florida, July 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    seafloor), detected by the receiver, and recorded by a PC-based seismic acquisition system. This process is repeated at timed intervals (for example, 0.5 s) and recorded for specific intervals of time (for example, 100 ms). In this way, a two-dimensional (2-D) vertical profile of the shallow geologic structure beneath the ship track is produced. Figure 1 displays the acquisition geometry. Refer to table 1 for a summary of acquisition parameters. Table 2 lists trackline statistics. The unprocessed seismic data are stored in SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975). For a detailed description of the data format, refer to the SEG-Y Format page. See the How To Download SEG-Y Data page for download instructions. The printable profiles provided here are GIF images that were filtered and gained using Seismic Unix software. Refer to the Software page for details about the processing and examples of the processing scripts. The processed SEG-Y data were exported to Chesapeake Technology, Inc. (CTI) SonarWeb software to produce an interactive Web page of the profile, which allows the user to obtain a geographic location and depth from the profile for a curser position. This information is displayed in the status bar of the browser.

  11. Archive of digital boomer seismic reflection data collected offshore east-central Florida during USGS cruise 00FGS01, July 14-22, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Subino, Janice A.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Wiese, Dana S.; Calderon, Karynna; Phelps, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    at density boundaries (such as the seafloor, sediment, or rock layers beneath the seafloor), detected by the receiver, and recorded by a PC-based seismic acquisition system. This process is repeated at timed intervals (for example, 0.5 s) and recorded for specific intervals of time (for example, 100 ms). In this way, a two-dimensional (2D) vertical profile of the shallow geologic structure beneath the ship track is produced. Figure 1 displays the acquisition geometry. Refer to table 1 for a summary of acquisition parameters. The unprocessed seismic data are stored in SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975). For a detailed description of the data format, refer to the SEG-Y Format page. See the How To Download SEG-Y Data page for download instructions. The printable profiles provided are GIF images that were filtered and gained using Seismic Unix software. Refer to the Software page for details about the processing and examples of the processing scripts. The printable profiles can be viewed from the Profiles page or from links located on the trackline maps. To view the trackline maps and navigation files, and for more information about these items, see the Navigation page. Detailed information about the navigation system used can be found in table 1. Of a total record length of 200 ms, only the upper 100 ms of each profile are displayed because no useful information was observed deeper in the sections. A 10 ms deep water delay appears on lines b57-b63 and sl2-sl28. No digital data were collected for line sl6. However, line sl6r is a second attempt to collect digital data for this line. Digital data and 500-shot-interval location navigation are not available for the last 1,161 shots of line sl26 due to an equipment malfunction.

  12. Near-surface, marine seismic-reflection data defines potential hydrogeologic confinement bypass in a tertiary carbonate aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Walker, Cameron; Westcott, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 210 km of near-surface, high-frequency, marine seismic-reflection data were acquired on the southeastern part of the Florida Platform between 2007 and 2011. Many high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles, interpretable to a depth of about 730 m, were collected on the shallow-marine shelf of southeastern Florida in water as shallow as 1 m. Landward of the present-day shelf-margin slope, these data image middle Eocene to Pleistocene strata and Paleocene to Pleistocene strata on the Miami Terrace. This high-resolution data set provides an opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that cut across confining units of the Paleocene to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that form the Floridan aquifer system.Seismic profiles image two structural systems, tectonic faults and karst collapse structures, which breach confining beds in the Floridan aquifer system. Both structural systems may serve as pathways for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability rocks in the Floridan aquifer system. The tectonic faults occur as normal and reverse faults, and collapse-related faults have normal throw. The most common fault occurrence delineated on the reflection profiles is associated with karst collapse structures. These high-frequency seismic data are providing high quality structural analogs to unprecedented depths on the southeastern Florida Platform. The analogs can be used for assessment of confinement of other carbonate aquifers and the sealing potential of deeper carbonate rocks associated with reservoirs around the world.

  13. 3D reflection seismic imaging at the 2.5 km deep COSC-1 scientific borehole, central Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Peter; Almqvist, Bjarne; Berthet, Théo; Juhlin, Christopher; Buske, Stefan; Simon, Helge; Giese, Rüdiger; Krauß, Felix; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Alm, Per-Gunnar

    2016-10-01

    The 2.5 km deep scientific COSC-1 borehole (ICDP 5054-1-A) was successfully drilled with nearly complete core recovery during spring and summer of 2014. Downhole and on-core measurements through the targeted Lower Seve Nappe provide a comprehensive data set. An observed gradual increase in strain below 1700 m, with mica schists and intermittent mylonites increasing in frequency and thickness, is here interpreted as the basal thrust zone of the Lower Seve Nappe. This high strain zone was not fully penetrated at the total drilled depth and is thus greater than 800 m in thickness. To allow extrapolation of the results from downhole logging, core analysis and other experiments into the surrounding rock and to link these with the regional tectonic setting and evolution, three post-drilling high-resolution seismic experiments were conducted in and around the borehole. One of these, the first 3D seismic reflection land survey to target the nappe structures of the Scandinavian Caledonides, is presented here. It provides new information on the 3D geometry of structures both within the drilled Lower Seve Nappe and underlying rocks down to at least 9 km. The observed reflectivity correlates well with results from the core analysis and downhole logging, despite challenges in processing. Reflections from the uppermost part of the Lower Seve Nappe have limited lateral extent and varying dips, possibly related to mafic lenses or boudins of variable character within felsic rock. Reflections occurring within the high strain zone, however, are laterally continuous over distances of a kilometer or more and dip 10-15° towards the southeast. Reflections from structures beneath the high strain unit and the COSC-1 borehole can be followed through most of the seismic volume down to at least 9 km and have dips of varying degree, mainly in the east-west thrust direction of the orogen.

  14. High-resolution seismic-reflection images across the ICDP-USGS Eyreville deep drilling site, Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powars, D.S.; Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Gohn, G.S.; Horton, J.W.; Edwards, L.E.; Rymer, M.J.; Gandhok, G.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired two 1.4-km-long, high-resolution (??5 m vertical resolution) seismic-reflection lines in 2006 that cross near the International Continental Scientifi c Drilling Program (ICDP)-USGS Eyreville deep drilling site located above the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure in Virginia, USA. Five-meter spacing of seismic sources and geophones produced high-resolution images of the subsurface adjacent to the 1766-m-depth Eyreville core holes. Analysis of these lines, in the context of the core hole stratigraphy, shows that moderateamplitude, discontinuous, dipping reflections below ??527 m correlate with a variety of Chesapeake Bay impact structure sediment and rock breccias recovered in the cores. High-amplitude, continuous, subhorizontal reflections above ??527 m depth correlate with the uppermost part of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure crater-fi ll sediments and postimpact Eocene to Pleistocene sediments. Refl ections with ??20-30 m of relief in the uppermost part of the crater-fi ll and lowermost part of the postimpact section suggest differential compaction of the crater-fi ll materials during early postimpact time. The top of the crater-fi ll section also shows ??20 m of relief that appears to represent an original synimpact surface. Truncation surfaces, locally dipping reflections, and depth variations in reflection amplitudes generally correlate with the lithostratigraphic and sequence-stratigraphic units and contacts in the core. Seismic images show apparent postimpact paleochannels that include the fi rst possible Miocene paleochannels in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. Broad downwarping in the postimpact section unrelated to structures in the crater fi ll indicates postimpact sediment compaction. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Improved Dead Sea sinkhole site characterization at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, based on repeated shear wave reflection seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    In October 2014 a high-resolution shallow shear wave reflection seismic survey was carried out at the Dead Sea sinkhole site Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan. It extended a survey undertaken in 2013, also in order to gather time-lapse profiles. In the framework of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association and international partners, this investigation is part of a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ. At the investigation site, characterized by alluvial fan deposits, ongoing subsidence and sinkhole processes in the subsurface create massive reshaping of farming areas, including the destruction of housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure. The sinkhole hazard at the Dead Sea is significant, since similar processes are observed at several coastal segments of the Dead Sea. The new survey (in total 2.1 profile km) was targeted to improve the knowledge about the subsurface structures and to confine the results of the initial survey (1.8 km profile km), with respect to the presence or non-presence of a massive salt layer proposed at nearly 40 m depth. This salt layer is the central part of a widely established process hypothesis to generate shallow cavities by salt subrosion, which subsequently collapse to sinkholes at the surface. Results of the initial survey carried out in 2013 highlighted a new process hypothesis of subsurface mass transport by Dead Sea mud mobilization enclosed in the alluvial fan, so that an extended survey was undertaken in 2014. This, indeed, confirmed that there are no reflection seismic signal responses that would be expected to occur in the presence of a massive salt layer. Since evaluation of both hypothesis by new drilling could not be carried out due to safety reasons and permissions, it remained unclear which hypothesis is valid for the investigation site. However, we combined the 2013 and 2014 reflection seismic profiles and the

  16. Phase-Shifted Based Numerical Method for Modeling Frequency-Dependent Effects on Seismic Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Qi, Yingkai; He, Xilei; He, Zhenhua; Chen, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The significant velocity dispersion and attenuation has often been observed when seismic waves propagate in fluid-saturated porous rocks. Both the magnitude and variation features of the velocity dispersion and attenuation are frequency-dependent and related closely to the physical properties of the fluid-saturated porous rocks. To explore the effects of frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation on the seismic responses, in this work, we present a numerical method for seismic data modeling based on the diffusive and viscous wave equation (DVWE), which introduces the poroelastic theory and takes into account diffusive and viscous attenuation in diffusive-viscous-theory. We derive a phase-shift wave extrapolation algorithm in frequencywavenumber domain for implementing the DVWE-based simulation method that can handle the simultaneous lateral variations in velocity, diffusive coefficient and viscosity. Then, we design a distributary channels model in which a hydrocarbon-saturated sand reservoir is embedded in one of the channels. Next, we calculated the synthetic seismic data to analytically and comparatively illustrate the seismic frequency-dependent behaviors related to the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir, by employing DVWE-based and conventional acoustic wave equation (AWE) based method, respectively. The results of the synthetic seismic data delineate the intrinsic energy loss, phase delay, lower instantaneous dominant frequency and narrower bandwidth due to the frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation when seismic wave travels through the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir. The numerical modeling method is expected to contribute to improve the understanding of the features and mechanism of the seismic frequency-dependent effects resulted from the hydrocarbon-saturated porous rocks.

  17. High-resolution shallow reflection seismic image and surface evidence of the Upper Tiber Basin active faults (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donne, D.D.; Plccardi, L.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow seismic reflection prospecting has been carried out in order to investigate the faults that bound to the southwest and northeast the Quaternary Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy). On the northeastern margin of the basin a ??? 1 km long reflection seismic profile images a fault segment and the associated up to 100 meters thick sediment wedge. Across the southwestern margin a 0.5 km-long seismic profile images a 50-55??-dipping extensional fault, that projects to the scarp at the base of the range-front, and against which a 100 m thick syn-tectonic sediment wedge has formed. The integration of surface and sub-surface data allows to estimate at least 190 meters of vertical displacement along the fault and a slip rate around 0.25 m/kyr. Southwestern fault might also be interpreted as the main splay structure of regional Alto Tiberina extensional fault. At last, the 1917 Monterchi earthquake (Imax=X, Boschi et alii, 2000) is correlable with an activation of the southwestern fault, and thus suggesting the seismogenic character of this latter.

  18. Magnetic and seismic reflection study of Lake Cheko, a possible impact crater for the 1908 Tunguska Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, L.; Cocchi, L.; Stanghellini, C.; Stanghellini, G.; Del Bianco, F.; Serrazanetti, M.; Carmisciano, C.

    2012-05-01

    A major explosion occurred on 30 June 1908 in the Tunguska region of Siberia, causing the destruction of over 2,000 km2 of taiga; pressure and seismic waves detected as far as 1,000 km away; bright luminescence in the night skies of Northern Europe and Central Asia; and other unusual phenomena. This "Tunguska Event" is probably related to the impact with the Earth of a cosmic body that exploded about 5-10 km above ground, releasing in the atmosphere 10-15 Mton of energy. Fragments of the impacting body have never been found, and its nature (comet or asteroid) is still a matter of debate. We report here results from a magnetic and seismic reflection study of a small (˜500 m diameter) lake, Lake Cheko, located about 8 km NW of the inferred explosion epicenter, that was proposed to be an impact crater left by a fragment of the Tunguska Cosmic Body. Seismic reflection and magnetic data revealed a P wave velocity/magnetic anomaly close to the lake center, about 10 m below the lake floor; this anomaly is compatible with the presence of a buried stony object and supports the impact crater origin for Lake Cheko.

  19. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01

    One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now

  20. Long-term deformation in the Mississippi Embayment (Central USA) imaged by high-resolution seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yanjun

    Large magnitude intraplate earthquakes are a puzzling exception to plate tectonic theory. Unlike earthquakes occurring along plate boundaries, large continental intraplate earthquakes are a rare occurrence and are often distributed over broad regions. Albeit rare, their occurrence can cause widespread damage because of the low attenuation of seismic energy typical of plate interiors [Hanks and Johnston, 1992]. In the Central USA, most of the recent tectonic intraplate seismicity concentrates along the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), where three large (M>7) earthquakes occurred between 1811--1812 [Johnston and Schweig, 1996]. Here the low surface deformation rates [Calais and Stein, 2009] conflict with the elevated instrument-recorded seismicity and the occurrence of historical and prehistorical large magnitude events [Tuttle et al., 2002]. One of the promising hypotheses proposed to reconcile this apparent contradiction is that intraplate earthquakes may be temporally clustered, episodic or cyclic, and may migrate spatially at the regional or continental scale across multiple faults or fault systems. In order to test this hypothesis and to understand how and where the long-term deformation is accommodated in the Mississippi Embayment, Central USA, I utilize high-resolution seismic reflection data acquired by the Mississippi River Project [Magnani and McIntosh, 2009] and by a 2010 survey across the Meeman-Shelby fault [Magnani, 2011; Hao et al., 2013]. To identify the location of Quaternary deformation and characterize deformation history, I acquired, processed, and interpreted the seismic reflection data and integrated them with other available geophysical (e.g. seismicity, crustal and lithospheric models) and geological (e.g. magmatism and borehole) data. For my research, I focus on three regions in the Mississippi Embayment: 1) the Meeman-Shelby fault west of Memphis, Tennessee, 2) the eastern Reelfoot rift margin north of Memphis, Tennessee, and 3) the area in

  1. Geology of the continental margin beneath Santa Monica Bay, Southern California, from seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Normark, W.R.; Bohannon, R.G.; Sliter, R.W.; Calvert, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    We interpret seismic-reflection data, which were collected in Santa Monica Bay using a 70-in3 generator-injector air gun, to show the geologic structure of the continental shelf and slope and of the deep-water, Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins. The goal of this research is to investigate the earthquake hazard posed to urban areas by offshore faults. These data reveal that northwest of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, the Palos Verdes Fault neither offsets the seafloor nor cuts through an undeformed sediment apron that postdates the last sea level rise. Other evidence indicates that this fault extends northwest beneath the shelf in the deep subsurface. However, other major faults in the study area, such as the Dume and San Pedro Basin Faults, were active recently, as indicated by an arched seafloor and offset shallow sediment. Rocks under the lower continental slope are deformed to differing degrees on opposite sides of Santa Monica Canyon. Northwest of this canyon, the continental slope is underlain by a little-deformed sediment apron; the main structures that deform this apron are two lower-slope anticlines that extend toward Point Dume and are cored by faults showing reverse or thrust separation. Southeast of Santa Monica Canyon, lower-slope rocks are deformed by a complex arrangement of strike-slip, normal, and reverse faults. The San Pedro Escarpment rises abruptly along the southeast side of Santa Monica Canyon. Reverse faults and folds underpinning this escarpment steepen progressively southeastward. Locally they form flower structures and cut downward into basement rocks. These faults merge downward with the San Pedro Basin fault zone, which is nearly vertical and strike slip. The escarpment and its attendant structures diverge from this strike-slip fault zone and extend for 60 km along the margin, separating the continental shelf from the deep-water basins. The deep-water Santa Monica Basin has large extent but is filled with only a thin (less than 1.5-km

  2. Seismic-reflection imaging of Tertiary faulting and related post-Eocene deformation 20 km North of Memphis, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Worley, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Other than the Crittenden County fault zone (CCFZ), little is known about the seismic hazard from earthquake faults within 50 km of Memphis, Tennessee, a city that contains a large inventory of older buildings that are vulnerable to moderate and strong earthquake ground shaking. To address this lack of knowledge about faulting near Memphis, we acquired a 4.5 km long Mini-Sosie seismic-reflection profile across the boundary between the loess-covered bluffs and modern Mississippi River flood plain in Meeman-Shelby Forest State Park north of Memphis. We imaged a previously unknown reverse/thrust fault that displaces Paleozoic and Cretaceous rocks and upwarps Tertiary deposits on the floodplain portion of the profile about 25 km north of downtown Memphis. The Paleozoic and Cretaceous rocks are vertically faulted about 70 and 40 m, respectively, in an up-to-the-west sense of displacement. The fault displacement apparently terminates in the basal portion of the Paleocene section and causes only an upwarping of the overlying deposits. The overlying Paleocene and Eocene deposits, which are probably the youngest deposits imaged, are upwarped about 50-60 m with the same sense of displacement as the underlying older units. The sense of displacement, amplitude, and appearance of the fault in the seismic data are very similar to that observed in the seismic reflection images of the CCFZ 15 km west of this profile. Although we have imaged this new fault in only one location, its proximity to Memphis and similarities to the CCFZ, leads us to speculate that it may be a parallel structure to the CCFZ and thus warrants further study. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of the Vajont landslide (North-Eastern Italy) by means of reflection and surface wave seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronio, Lorenzo; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of the disastrous Vajont rockslide (North-Eastern Italy, October 9, 1963) have been studied in great detail over the past five decades. Nevertheless, the reconstruction of the rockslide dynamics still presents several uncertainties, including those related to the accurate estimation of the actual landslide mass. This work presents the results of a geophysical characterization of the Vajont landslide body in terms of material properties and buried geometry. Both aspects add new information to the existing dataset and will help a better understanding of the rockslide failure mechanisms and dynamics. In addition, some general considerations concerning the intricacies of landslide characterization can be drawn, with due attention to potential pitfalls. The employed techniques are: (i) high resolution P-wave reflection, (ii) high resolution SH-wave reflection, (iii) controlled source surface wave analysis. We adopted as a seismic source a vibrator both for P waves and SH waves, using vertical and horizontal geophones respectively. For the surface wave seismic survey we used a heavy drop-weight source and low frequency receivers. Despite the high noise level caused by the fractured conditions of the large rock body, a common situation in landslide studies, we managed to achieve a satisfying imaging quality of the landslide structure thanks to the large number of active channels, the short receiver interval and the test of appropriate seismic sources. The joint use of different seismic techniques help focus the investigation on the rock mass mechanical properties. Results are in good agreement with the available borehole data, the geological sections and the mechanical properties of the rockmass estimated by other studies. In general the proposed approach is likely to be applicable successfully to similar situations where scattering and other noise sources are a typical bottleneck to geophysical data acquisition on landslide bodies.

  4. Location, structure, and seismicity of the Seattle fault zone, Washington: Evidence from aeromagnetic anomalies, geologic mapping, and seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Wells, R.E.; Weaver, C.S.; Johnson, S.Y.

    2002-01-01

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the Puget Lowland shows details of the Seattle fault zone, an active but largely concealed east-trending zone of reverse faulting at the southern margin of the Seattle basin. Three elongate, east-trending magnetic anomalies are associated with north-dipping Tertiary strata exposed in the hanging wall; the magnetic anomalies indicate where these strata continue beneath glacial deposits. The northernmost anomaly, a narrow, elongate magnetic high, precisely correlates with magnetic Miocene volcanic conglomerate. The middle anomaly, a broad magnetic low, correlates with thick, nonmagnetic Eocene and Oligocene marine and fluvial strata. The southern anomaly, a broad, complex magnetic high, correlates with Eocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks. This tripartite package of anomalies is especially clear over Bainbridge Island west of Seattle and over the region east of Lake Washington. Although attenuated in the intervening region, the pattern can be correlated with the mapped strike of beds following a northwest-striking anticline beneath Seattle. The aeromagnetic and geologic data define three main strands of the Seattle fault zone identified in marine seismic-reflection profiles to be subparallel to mapped bedrock trends over a distance of >50 km. The locus of faulting coincides with a diffuse zone of shallow crustal seismicity and the region of uplift produced by the M 7 Seattle earthquake of A.D. 900-930.

  5. Crust structure across the Rif Cordillera from 'RIFSIS' seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Alba; Gallart, Josep; Díaz, Jordi; Carbonell, Ramon; Harnafi, Mimoun; Levander, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The Rif Cordillera, located in North Morocco forms, together with the Betic Range, the Gibraltar Arc around the Alboran Sea. This asymmetric curved mountain belt originated during a Miocene continent-continent collision as a result of the westward motion of the Alboran domain between northwest Africa and Iberia. The complexity of the area favored the proposition of diverse tectonic models, such as roll-back, accompanied and followed by lithospheric convective down-welling, and delamination. In this study, we present models of crustal structure derived from a seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection experiment which took place in October 2011 within the Spanish project RIFSIS complemented by the US-PICASSO one. Two profiles oriented N-S and E-W respectively were carried out across the Rif domains. Five shots of 1 Tn each were detonated along the lines and at the crossing point, recorded by about 900 stations from US-Iris pool deployed at an average spacing of 750 m. The N-S line was extended northwards by a 70 km long segment in Spain, in the Betic Range. Southwards, this profile connects with the one recorded in 2010 across the Atlas Mountains, within the SIMA project. The interpreted crustal structure differentiates two sedimentary layers on top of the basement, inferred from the observed first arrivals at short offsets, followed by upper, mid and lower crustal levels constrained by reflected phases visible in the record sections. The bottom of the crust is well defined from PmP phases, although the absence of Pn arrivals prevents to constrain upper mantle velocities. Average velocity values for the different layers in the models are respectively: 3.5 and 4.2 km/s for the sediments, 5.9, 6.3 and 6.6 km/s within the crust, and 8 km/s below Moho. These velocity depth models obtained at the Rif Cordillera hold major variations in crustal thickness, especially along the E-W profile, that shows a rapid change of 15-20 km in Moho depths within 30 km horizontal

  6. Deep Seismic Reflection Constraints on Paleogene Crustal Extension in the South-Central Intermontane Belt of British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. J.; Talinga, D.

    2013-12-01

    Following growth of the Canadian Cordillera during the Mesozoic, the southern Cordillera was subject to extension during the Paleocene and Eocene that correlated with widespread volcanic activity in south-central British Columbia, including across the Nechako-Chilcotin plateau, which forms part of the Intermontane belt. In 2008, 330 km of deep vibroseis reflection profiles were acquired by Geoscience BC over the plateau, which includes the Stikinia arc and oceanic Cache Creek terranes. The objectives of the survey was to characterize the overall crustal structure and the distribution of Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, which are of interest for hydrocarbon exploration, beneath the surface cover of volcanic rocks and glacial deposits. Near-surface lithologies were also constrained to depths of 1-4 km using P wave velocity models derived by first arrival tomography using source-receiver offsets up to 14 km. All seven reflection lines reveal a strongly reflective lower crust that extends from 7-9 s down to the Moho, which is defined by the downward termination of reflectivity at 11-12 s. In the uppermost crust, extension occurred by block faulting with faults soling into sub-horizontal to shallowly dipping detachments above 10 km depth. Extension in the deeper upper and middle crust, which was partly controlled by antiforms likely related to earlier shortening, was accommodated on a network of anastomosing shear zones that sole out into the top of the reflective lower crust. The lower crustal reflections correlate with seismic P wave velocities of 6.6-6.8 km/s, indicating that the reflective lower crust has a more mafic composition than the middle crust. As in other areas of continental extension, we suggest that this pervasive fabric of reflectors arises from the intrusion of mantle-derived basaltic magma into zones of ductile shearing, and that differentiation of these melts resulted in the widespread Paleocene to Eocene volcanism. Our seismic observations are

  7. Continuous seismic-reflection survey of the Great Salt Lake, Utah- east of Antelope and Fremont Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, P.M.; West, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous seismic-reflection survey of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, was conducted east of Fremont and Antelope Islands in 1984 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources and produced data along approximately 80 miles of seismic lines. The survey was conducted to determine depth to consolidated rock, and definition and continuity of overlying basin fill under the lake. Interpretation of the data indicates the presence of faulted rock dipping away from Fremont and Antelope Islands. A north-south-trending consolidated-rock ridge is identified 200 ft below lake bottom, 275 miles east of Fremont Island. Shallow rock is also inferred 380 ft below lake bottom, near Hooper Hot Springs, and 520 ft below lake bottom approximately 4 miles east of the south end of Antelope Island. Interpretation of reflections from overlying basin fill indicates fine-grained, thinly-bedded deposits that become coarser with depth. Strong reflectors in the basin fill can be correlated with water-bearing strata penetrated by wells near the north end of Antelope Island and along the east shore of the lake. Many continuous, high-amplitude reflections can be identified in data from basin fill and may represent sedimentary sections or aquifer boundaries but cannot be defined because of a lack of subsurface control in the area. (USGS)

  8. High-resolution seismic reflection imaging of growth folding and shallow faults beneath the Southern Puget Lowland, Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odum, Jackson K.; Stephenson, William J.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Marine seismic reflection data from southern Puget Sound, Washington, were collected to investigate the nature of shallow structures associated with the Tacoma fault zone and the Olympia structure. Growth folding and probable Holocene surface deformation were imaged within the Tacoma fault zone beneath Case and Carr Inlets. Shallow faults near potential field anomalies associated with the Olympia structure were imaged beneath Budd and Eld Inlets. Beneath Case Inlet, the Tacoma fault zone includes an ∼350-m wide section of south-dipping strata forming the upper part of a fold (kink band) coincident with the southern edge of an uplifted shoreline terrace. An ∼2 m change in the depth of the water bottom, onlapping postglacial sediments, and increasing stratal dips with increasing depth are consistent with late Pleistocene to Holocene postglacial growth folding above a blind fault. Geologic data across a topographic lineament on nearby land indicate recent uplift of late Holocene age. Profiles acquired in Carr Inlet 10 km to the east of Case Inlet showed late Pleistocene or Holocene faulting at one location with ∼3 to 4 m of vertical displacement, south side up. North of this fault the data show several other disruptions and reflector terminations that could mark faults within the broad Tacoma fault zone. Seismic reflection profiles across part of the Olympia structure beneath southern Puget Sound show two apparent faults about 160 m apart having 1 to 2 m of displacement of subhorizontal bedding. Directly beneath one of these faults, a dipping reflector that may mark the base of a glacial channel shows the opposite sense of throw, suggesting strike-slip motion. Deeper seismic reflection profiles show disrupted strata beneath these faults but little apparent vertical offset, consistent with strike-slip faulting. These faults and folds indicate that the Tacoma fault and Olympia structure include active structures with probable postglacial motion.

  9. Proterozoic structure, cambrian rifting, and younger faulting as revealed by a regional seismic reflection network in the Southern Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potter, C.J.; Drahovzal, J.A.; Sargent, M.L.; McBride, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Four high-quality seismic reflection profiles through the southern Illinois Basin, totaling 245 km in length, provide an excellent regional subsurface stratigraphic and structural framework for evaluation of seismic risk, hydrocarbon occurrence, and other regional geologic studies. These data provide extensive subsurface information on the geometry of the intersection of the Cambrian Reelfoot and Rough Creek rifts, on extensive Proterozoic reflection sequences, and on structures (including the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex and Hicks Dome) that underlie a transitional area between the well-defined New Madrid seismic zone (to the southwest) and a more diffuse area of seismicity in the southern Illinois Basin. Our principal interpretations from these data are listed here in order of geologic age, from oldest to youngest: 1. Prominent Proterozoic layering, possibly equivalent to Proterozoic (???1 Ga) Middle Run Formation clastic strata and underlying (1.3-1.5 Ga) volcanic rocks of the East Continent rift basin, has been strongly deformed, probably as part of the Grenville foreland fold and thrust belt. 2. A well-defined angular unconformity is seen in many places between Proterozoic and Cambrian strata; a post-Grenville Proterozoic sequence is also apparent locally, directly beneath the base of the Cambrian. 3. We infer a major reversal in Cambrian rift polarity (accommodation zone) in the Rough Creek Graben in western Kentucky. 4. Seismic facies analysis suggests the presence of basin-floor fan complexes at and near the base of the Cambrian interval and within parts of a Proterozoic post-Grenville sequence in several parts of the Rough Creek Graben. 5. There is an abrupt pinchout of the Mount Simon Sandstone against crystalline basement beneath the Dale Dome (near the Texaco no. 1 Cuppy well, Hamilton County) in southeastern Illinois, and a more gradual Mount Simon pinchout to the southeast. 6. Where crossed by the seismic reflection line in southeast Illinois, some

  10. Structure of northeastern New Mexico from deep seismic reflection profiles: Implications for the Proterozoic tectonic evolution of southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshete, Tefera Gashu

    2001-09-01

    Previous geologic, geochronologic, structural, isotope, and xenolith studies have shown that the Precambrian rocks of northern New Mexico belong to the Yavapai and Mazatzal provinces. The boundary between the provinces is a wide zone defined on its northern edge by the northern extent of 1.65 Ga deformation and southern edge by the southern most extent of Yavapai crust (pre-1.7 Ga). However, the nature of the Precambrian province boundary at depth, its evolution through time, and the tectonic processes that affected the interior of these provinces, are not well understood. In order to obtain new information concerning these problems, processing and interpretation of reflection seismic data was conducted on data collected during the 1999 Continental Dynamics-Rocky Mountain (CD-ROM) project and data obtained from industry. In this study I present new information on the crustal structure of northern New Mexico provided by processing and interpretation of three seismic reflection profiles (NM-1, TB-1 and TB-2).The seismic data present evidence for Precambrian crustal growth and amalgamation, followed by subsequent reactivation of Precambrian structures. A seismic profile and gravity modeling across the NM-1 show a strongly reflective high-density (2850 kg-m-3) dome-shaped body in the middle to lower crust. On the basis of the absence of a hanging-wall antiform, the occurrence of normal sense of deflection of reflectors in the footwall, possibly Moho pullup, and geological information such as an exposed Proterozoic extensional shear zone in the Sandia Mountains, this feature is interpreted to represent a 1.4 Ga? extensional shear zone which resulted in rotation of ˜1.65 Ga imbricate thrust zones. Layered reflectivity directly below the top of Precambrian basement on profiles TB-1 and the eastern part of TB-2, based on geophysical and geological information from nearby areas is interpreted as a sequence of ˜1.4 Ga volcanic and sedimentary rocks within the Proterozoic

  11. Modeling of time-lapse seismic reflection data from CO2 sequestration at West Pearl Queen Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, L. C.; Haney, M. M.; Aldridge, D. F.; Symons, N. P.; Elbring, G. J.

    2006-12-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs, saline aquifers, or unminable coal sequences may prove to be an economical and environmentally safe means for long-term removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Requirements for storage of CO2 in subsurface geologic repositories (e.g., less than 0.1% per year leakage) pose significant challenges for geophysical remote sensing techniques. The many issues relevant to successful CO2 sequestration (volume in place, migration, leakage rate) require improved understanding of the advantages and pitfalls of potential monitoring methods. Advanced numerical modeling of time-lapse seismic reflection responses offers a controlled environment for testing hypotheses and exploring alternatives. The U.S. Department of Energy has conducted CO2 sequestration and monitoring tests at West Pearl Queen (WPQ) field in southeastern New Mexico. High-quality 9C/3D seismic reflection data were acquired before and after injection of ~2 kt of CO2 into a depleted sandstone unit at ~4200 ft depth. Images developed from time- lapse seismic data appear to reveal strong reflectivity changes attributed to displacement of brine by CO2. We are pursuing seismic numerical modeling studies with the goal of understanding and assessing the reliability and robustness of the time-lapse reflection responses. A 3D time-domain finite-difference isotropic elastic wave propagation algorithm generates realistic synthetic data. With this capability, we examine how various types of errors and noise in the 4D data degrade the ability to image a deep CO2 plume. Source/receiver sampling, subsurface illumination, correlated geologic heterogeneity, and static shifts are considered. As a result, we are able to make quantitative estimates of the tolerable errors for monitoring CO2 injection at WPQ field. Future plans include incorporating 3D poroelastic wave propagation modeling into the analysis. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram science and engineering facility

  12. Geometry of basement faults around the Soultz geothermal wells from reflected and converted seismic waves recorded during the 2007 multisource VSP survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubrano Lavadera, P.; Marthelot, J.; Zillmer, M.; Cornet, F. H.; Genter, A.

    2012-12-01

    reflected on this fault and recorded in the two wells provides traveltimes that fit the high apparent velocity downgoing waves for the shots located in positions allowing reflections. Depending on the incidence angles of the reflected waves at the geophones, these waves are observed in a complementary way on vertical or horizontal geophones. The geometry of the VSP survey allows illuminating vertically and horizontally the GPK3 fault in the depth range 3 to 4.7 km and in a 1000m lateral interval respectively. In contrast, the 2D surface seismic lines shot around the wells show no reliable reflections within the basement. In addition to the major fault, the Soultz VSP data include several evidences of basement faults where reflected waves and converted waves coincide at the well. VSP is one of the few geophysical techniques able to image fault zones within a deep seated granite.

  13. New seismic reflection techniques applied to gas recognition in the Rharb Basin, Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Jabour, H.; Dakki, M. )

    1994-07-01

    The Rharb basin in Morocco is a Tertiary foreland filled by clastic series during the Miocene and Pliocene. This terrigenous influx, derived from the prerif to the northeast and the Meseta to the south, is characterized by a sandy episode during much of the Messinian and the Tortonian. The sand deposits were probably related to the uplift and major erosion of a part of the prerif during the sliding of an olistostrome (prerif nappe). Although most of the wells drilled in the basin have encountered biogenic gas accumulations, the problem still facing exploration in the area is seismic resolution and thin-bed tuning analysis. Recent studies using high seismic resolution techniques have permitted the authors to gain a deep insight into the stratigraphy and depositional environment of the thin sand reservoirs and their fluid content. AVO stratigraphy, inversion of seismic traces into acoustic impedance traces and seismic attributes calculation, and computing provide a remarkable example of the possibilities of depicting the lateral and vertical evolution of reservoir facies and localizing biogenic gas accumulations. Out of five recent exploratory wells drilled based on this new technique, three encountered gas-bearing sands with economic potential. Fifty-three amplitude anomalies have been identified and await processing.

  14. Seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in Canada Basin, Northwind Ridge and Northwind Basin, Arctic Ocean in 1988, 1992 and 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, Arthur; Hart, Patrick E.; May, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data were collected in generally ice-covered waters of the Canada Basin and the eastern part of the Chukchi Continental Borderland of the Amerasia Basin, Arctic Ocean, during the late summers of 1988, 1992, and 1993. The data were acquired from a Polar class icebreaker, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, using a seismic reflection system designed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The northernmost data extend to 78? 48' N latitude. In 1988, 155 km of reflection data were acquired with a prototype system consisting of a single 195 cubic inch air gun seismic source and a two-channel hydrophone streamer with a 150-m active section. In 1992 and 1993, 500 and 1,900 km, respectively, of seismic reflection profile data were acquired with an improved six air gun, 674 to 1303 cubic inch tuned seismic source array and the same two-channel streamer. In 1993, a 12-channel streamer with a 150-m active section was used to record five of the reflection lines and one line was acquired using a three air gun, 3,000 cubic inch source. All data were recorded with a DFS-V digital seismic recorder. Processed sections feature high quality vertical incidence images to more than 6 km of sub-bottom penetration in the Canada Basin. Refraction data were acquired with U.S. Navy sonobuoys recorded simultaneously with the seismic reflection profiles. In 1988 eight refraction profiles were recorded with the single air gun, and in 1992 and 1993 a total of 47 refraction profiles were recorded with the six air gun array. The sonobuoy refraction records, with offsets up to 35 km, provide acoustic velocity information to complement the short-offset reflection data. The report includes trackline maps showing the location of the data, as well as both digital data files (SEG-Y) and images of all of the profiles.

  15. High-resolution reflection seismic investigations of quick-clay and associated formations at a landslide scar in southwest Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Saleem, Muhammad Umar; Bastani, Mehrdad

    2013-05-01

    We present high-resolution reflection seismic data from four lines (total 1.9 km) that cross a quick-clay landslide scar located close to the shore of the Göta River in southwest Sweden, and compare the results with geotechnical data from boreholes. The seismic data allow the imaging of bedrock topography and normally to weakly consolidated sediments to a subsurface depth of about 100 m. Different types of seismic sources, including sledgehammer, accelerated weight-drop and dynamite were utilized and compared with each other. Analysis of their power spectra suggests that weight-drop and dynamite have higher frequency content and energy than the sledgehammer, which makes these two sources suitable also for waveform tomography and surface-wave data analysis. The shallowest non-bedrock reflector is observed at about 10-20 m below the surface, it overlays the bedrock, and is interpreted to originate from the contact between clay formations above and a coarse-grained layer below. The coarse-grained layer appears to be spatially linked to the presence of quick-clays. It is a regional scale formation, laterally heterogeneous, which deepens to the west of the study area and correlates well with the available geotechnical data. Continuity of the coarse-grained layer becomes obscured by the landslide scar. There may be a link between the coarse-grained layer and landslides in the study area, although this possibility requires further hydrogeological and geotechnical investigations. Reflectors from the top of the bedrock suggest a depression zone with its deepest point below the landslide scar and a bowl-shaped structure in the northern portion of one of the seismic lines.

  16. Near-vertical and intermediate offset seismic reflection data from west of the Whipple Mountains, SE California

    SciTech Connect

    Flueh, E.R.; Okaya, D.A.

    1989-01-10

    During a seismic reflection survey conducted by the California Consortium for Crustal Studies in the Basin and Range Province west of the Whipple Mountains, SE California, a piggyback experiment was carried out to collect intermediate offset data (12--31 km). These data were obtained by recording the Vibroseis energy with a second, passive recording array, deployed twice at fixed positions at opposite ends of the reflected lines. The reflection midpoints fall into a 3-km-wide and 15-km-long region in Vidal Valley, roughly parallel to a segment of one of the near-vertical reflection profiles. This data set makes three unique contributions to the geophysical study of this region. (1) From forward modeling of the observed travel times using ray-tracing techniques, a shallow layer with velocities ranging from 6.0 to 6.5 km/s was found. This layer dips to the south from 2-km depth near the Whipple Mountains to a depth of 5-km in Rice Valley. These depths correspond closely to the westward projection of the Whipple detachment fault, which is exposed 1 km east of the near-vertical profiles in the Whipple Mountains. (2) On the near-vertical profile, the reflections from the mylonitically deformed lower plate at upper crustal and mid crustal depths are seen to cease underneath a sedimentary basin in Vidal Valley. However, the piggyback data, which undershoot this basin, show that these reflections are continuous beneath the basin. Thus near-surface energy transmission problems were responsible for the apparent lateral termination of the reflections on the near-vertical reflection profile.

  17. Seismic reflection images of a near-axis melt sill within the lower crust at the Juan de Fuca ridge.

    PubMed

    Canales, J Pablo; Nedimović, Mladen R; Kent, Graham M; Carbotte, Suzanne M; Detrick, Robert S

    2009-07-02

    The oceanic crust extends over two-thirds of the Earth's solid surface, and is generated along mid-ocean ridges from melts derived from the upwelling mantle. The upper and middle crust are constructed by dyking and sea-floor eruptions originating from magma accumulated in mid-crustal lenses at the spreading axis, but the style of accretion of the lower oceanic crust is actively debated. Models based on geological and petrological data from ophiolites propose that the lower oceanic crust is accreted from melt sills intruded at multiple levels between the Moho transition zone (MTZ) and the mid-crustal lens, consistent with geophysical studies that suggest the presence of melt within the lower crust. However, seismic images of molten sills within the lower crust have been elusive. Until now, only seismic reflections from mid-crustal melt lenses and sills within the MTZ have been described, suggesting that melt is efficiently transported through the lower crust. Here we report deep crustal seismic reflections off the southern Juan de Fuca ridge that we interpret as originating from a molten sill at present accreting the lower oceanic crust. The sill sits 5-6 km beneath the sea floor and 850-900 m above the MTZ, and is located 1.4-3.2 km off the spreading axis. Our results provide evidence for the existence of low-permeability barriers to melt migration within the lower section of modern oceanic crust forming at intermediate-to-fast spreading rates, as inferred from ophiolite studies.

  18. Examples of deep-water-bottom multiple dereverberation techniques applied to seismic-reflection data from the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Steven D.; Balch, A.H.; Patterson, W.C.; Taylor, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Seismic-reflection data recorded in deep water over the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf are often dominated by multiply-reflected seismic energy. This energy reverberates between the surface of the water and the seafloor (or other strong reflectors), and makes portions of the seismic data completely useless. Several different data-processing techniques can be applied to partially suppress these multiples and enhance the interpretability of the data. These techniques include (1) the three-point operator, (2) predictive deconvolution, (3) near-trace muting, (4) spatially variant bandpass filters, (5) Nth root stack, and (6) trace distance weighting. Application of these methods to several seismic lines indicates that trace distance weighting is the most useful method studied for suppressing deep-water-bottom multiples for data from the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf.

  19. Feasibility of High Resolution P- and S-Wave Seismic Reflection to Detect Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.A.

    2000-08-02

    In March, 1999, a combined geophysical field team from the Kansas Geological Survey, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Geological Survey of Canada, performed some experimental high resolution seismic testing at the Mallik drill site in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, where drilling and sampling had previously identified gas hydrates at depth beneath a thick permafrost zone. In this information document, we show data from this seismic test, along with comparisons and observations significant to the effective use of high resolution imaging and important considerations about high resolution operations in this environment. Included are discussions and examples based on previous studies at this site, data acquisition, processing, correlation of results with other data sets and some recommendations for future surveying.

  20. Contourite Deposition in the North Atlantic Ocean Moderated By Mantle Plume Activity: Evidence from Seismic Reflection Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell-Turner, R. E.; McCave, I. N. N.; White, N. J.; Henstock, T.; Murton, B. J.; Jones, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the strength of Northern Component Water overflow, the ancient precursor of North Atlantic Deep Water, has varied throughout Neogene times. Variations in dynamic support of the lithosphere, due to transient behavior of the Iceland mantle plume, probably control spatial and temporal water depth variations this region. Pathways and intensities of oceanic bottom currents, together with deposition of contourite drifts, are strongly influenced by changing bathymetry. Here, we combine detailed observations of contourite drift deposits from seismic reflection profiles with a chronology of plume activity, to test the relationships between deep-water circulation, sedimentary drift accumulation and mantle convection. We present multi-channel seismic reflection profiles acquired over Bjorn, Gardar and Hatton Drifts in the Iceland Basin and over the northernmost portion of Eirik Drift, east of Greenland. Depositional hiatuses are easily identified and correlated between these high-quality images and nearby boreholes, which allows us to construct history of sedimentation across the North Atlantic Ocean over the past 5 Ma. We observe kilometer-scale westward-migration of Bjorn Drift, which can be explained by varying current strength and sediment supply, probably moderated by fluctuating dynamic support on overall subsidence. We place these observations into a new continuous 55 Ma record of Iceland mantle plume activity. There is compelling evidence to support the hypothesis that variations in mantle convection deep beneath the plates has profound consequences for deep-water flow and sediment deposition at Earth's surface.

  1. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: Results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Lovalvo, D.A.; Johnson, S.Y.; Stephenson, W.J.; Pierce, K.L.; Harlan, S.S.; Finn, C.A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Duhn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-01-01

    Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (???1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  2. High-resolution seismic-reflection imaging 25 years of change in I-70 sinkhole, Russell County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Steeples, D.W.; Lambrecht, J.L.; Croxton, N.

    2006-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic reflection imaging improved our understanding of the consistent, gradual surface subsidence ongoing at two sinkholes in the Gorham Oilfield discovered beneath a stretch of Interstate Highway 70 through Russell and Ellis Counties in Kansas in 1966. With subsidence occurring at a rate of around 10 cm per year since discovery, monitoring has been beneficial to ensure public safety and optimize maintenance. A miniSOSIE reflection survey conducted in 1980 delineated the affected subsurface and successfully predicted development of a third sinkhole at this site. In 2004 and 2005 a high-resolution vibroseis survey was completed to ascertain current conditions of the subsurface, rate and pattern of growth since 1980, and potential for continued growth. With time and improved understanding of the salt dissolution affected subsurface in this area it appears that these features represent little risk to the public from catastrophic failure. However, from an operational perspective the Kansas Department of Transportation should expect continued subsidence, with future increases in surface area likely at a slightly reduced vertical rate. Seismic characteristics appear empirically consistent with gradual earth material compaction/settling. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  3. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. A.; Shanks, W. C.; Lovalvo, D. A.; Johnson, S. Y.; Stephenson, W. J.; Pierce, K. L.; Harlan, S. S.; Finn, C. A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Dühn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-04-01

    'No portion of the American continent is perhaps so rich in wonders as the Yellow Stone' (F.V. Hayden, September 2, 1874) Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (˜1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem.

  4. Identifying the Structure of a Brine Cavern Using Two-Dimensional Seismic Reflection Imagery, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J. M.; Goodman, W. M.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow depths to the salt-bearing formations of the Permian Basin provide for cost-effective solution-mining operations in southeastern New Mexico and northwestern Texas. Over extraction of salt, coupled with limited overburden thickness and competency, led to the collapse of two solution-mined caverns near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in 2008. These collapses prompted the New Mexico Oil Conservation Division (OCD) to conduct an investigation focusing on brine extraction wells with geologic conditions and dimensions comparable to the collapsed wells. OCD concluded that the operations and geologic setting of the I&W, Inc. well site, located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 285 and 62 in the city of Carlsbad, shared similarities to sites where caverns failed. In 2009, a high-resolution, two-dimensional, P-wave seismic reflection analysis assisted in defining the lateral extent of the cavern and deformation of the overlying bridging strata at the I&W site. Cavern effects include downwarping and loss of amplitude of reflectors interpreted to represent upper Salado and overlying Rustler Formation strata. The snapshot of subsurface conditions provided by the seismic reflection data is being augmented with routine surface subsidence measure measurements as well as additional surface geophysical programs.

  5. Reprocessing and Interpretation of Vintage Seismic Reflection Data: Evidence for the Tectonic History of the Rocky Mountain Trench, Northwest Montana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M.; Speece, M. A.; Rutherford, B. S.; Constenius, K. N.

    2014-12-01

    In 1983 Techno, Inc. collected five seismic reflection profiles in the region between Whitefish, Montana and the United States-Canada border. The poulter method was used to gather four of these profiles and one profile was collected using a vibroseis source. We are currently reprocessing these data in order to construct a regional geological interpretation. The profiles cover a key position in the hinterland of the Cordillera in the lee of the Lewis thrust salient where the east-northeast verging Lewis thrust fault system translated (horizontal displacement >100 km) and inverted a thick, strong slab of primarily Belt-Purcell rocks out of a deep Precambrian depositional basin onto a cratonic platform. In this event, Belt-Purcell rocks were thrust over complexly imbricated Phanerozoic strata in the foreland. Late Mesozoic compressional deformation was followed by Cenozoic extensional collapse of the over-thickened Cordillera and subsequent basin and range style deformation that produced an array of northwest trending grabens. Three of the seismic profiles cross the Rocky Mountain Trench; the Trench is a linear structure of regional dimension that is an expression of the extensional fragmentation of the Cordillera. Strong reflections, interpreted as sills encased within Lower Belt rocks (encountered in the Arco-Marathon 1 Paul Gibbs borehole), outline the complexly folded and faulted structure of the eastern limb of the Purcell anticlinorium. East of the Rocky Mountain Trench stratified reflections within Belt rocks clearly outline the Wigwam Thrust. Beneath the Whitefish Range, an apparent inflection in the strongly reflective basal Cambrian veneer marks the westerly increase in dip of the Rocky Mountain Basal Detachment. The dip contrast between the foreland and hinterland might be a manifestation of the tectonic loading of the Belt basin margin and the loading might have localized extension across the Rocky Mountain Trench.

  6. Recent high-resolution seismic reflection studies of active faults in the Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    In the past four years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in key gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland, western Washington State. Although extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area, these marine profiles lack coverage on land and in shallow or restricted waterways. The recent high-resolution seismic surveys have targeted key structures beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate, and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. The surveys can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test key elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. Results from these surveys have: 1) documented several meters of vertical displacement on at least two separate faults in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the Catfish Lake scarp and the underlying kink band in the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a first look at the structures beneath the north portion of the western Tacoma fault zone, north of previous marine profiles; 4) documented that deformation along the Seattle fault extends well east of Lake Sammamish; 5) imaged the Seattle fault beneath the Vasa Park trench; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in and south of the Seattle fault zone south of Bellevue. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic investigations of past earthquakes on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  7. Galicia Bank Ocean-Continent Transition Zone: New Seismic Reflection Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, S. L.; Sawyer, D. S.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    The West Iberia continental margin is a type locale for magma-poor rifting, and studies there have been instrumental in changing the classical view of the ocean-continent transition (OCT) from a discrete boundary juxtaposing continental and oceanic crust, into a more complicated zone of varying width that can include exhumed mantle. This study examines two new seismic lines in the Galicia Bank area extending west of the Peridotite Ridge, showing high resolution images of five new ridges. These ridges could be hyperextended continental crust, exhumed continental mantle, or rough ultra-slow spreading oceanic crust. There are no tilted fault blocks with pre-syn rift stratigraphy that would indicate continental crust. There are also no faults indicating mid-ocean spreading with seismic layer stratigraphy indicating normal oceanic crust. The ridges have no coherent internal seismic structure, and some resemble the topographic profile of the Peridotite Ridge. Therefore, it is likely the western ridges are also mainly composed of serpentinized mantle. These western ridges are also similar to small oceanic core complexes observed along the active part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which also contain exhumed serpentinized mantle. This implies that there is a gradual transition within our study area from continental extension to seafloor spreading. Exhumation of continental mantle results in the formation of peridotite ridges, then transitions to episodic volcanism, which produces local thin basaltic crust, and exhumation of oceanic core complexes. Asymmetric processes during initial rifting and spreading results in contrasting structures on the two resulting margins.

  8. Galicia Bank ocean-continent transition zone: New seismic reflection constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, S. L.; Sawyer, D. S.; Morgan, J. K.

    2015-03-01

    The West Iberia continental margin is a type locale for magma-poor rifting, and studies there have been instrumental in changing the classical view of the ocean-continent transition (OCT) from a discrete boundary juxtaposing continental and oceanic crust, into a more complicated zone of varying width that can include exhumed mantle. This study examines two new seismic lines in the Galicia Bank area extending west of the Peridotite Ridge, showing high resolution images of five new ridges. These ridges could be hyperextended continental crust, exhumed continental mantle, or rough ultra-slow spreading oceanic crust. There are no tilted fault blocks with pre-syn rift stratigraphy that would indicate continental crust. There are also no faults indicating mid-ocean spreading with seismic layer stratigraphy indicating normal oceanic crust. The ridges have no coherent internal seismic structure, and some resemble the topographic profile of the Peridotite Ridge. Therefore, it is likely the western ridges are also mainly composed of serpentinized mantle. These western ridges are also similar to small oceanic core complexes observed along the active part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which also contain exhumed serpentinized mantle. This implies that there is a gradual transition within our study area from continental extension to seafloor spreading. Exhumation of continental mantle results in the formation of peridotite ridges, then transitions to episodic volcanism, which produces local thin basaltic crust, and exhumation of oceanic core complexes. Asymmetric processes during initial rifting and spreading result in contrasting structures on the two resulting margins.

  9. First results of a high resolution reflection seismic survey of the Central Northern Venezuelan Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, J.; van Welden, A.; Audemard, F.; de Batist, M.; Beck, C.; Scientific Party, G.

    2008-05-01

    In September - November 2007 the first high resolution marine seismic campaign on the North-Central coast of Venezuela was carried out between Cabo Codera and Golfo Triste. The principal aim of this work was to characterize the active San Sebastian Fault (SSF) and to analyze Cenozoic sedimentation on the Venezuela shelf focusing on: i) effects of active tectonics and ii) coastal landslides/flashflood deposits related to 1999 Vargas catastrophic event or to similar phenomena. Data were acquired onboard R/V GUAIQUERI II from the Oceanographic Institute of the Oriente University. The seismic source was a "CENTIPEDE" sparker (RCGM) operated between 300 and 600 J, 1.3 kHz main frequency. We used a single-channel streamer with 10 hydrophones. In total, 49 seismic profiles were collected, with a cumulative length of 1000 km approximately. In these seismic profiles we identified and separated the deposits into three main units. Unit (U1) comprises low energy reflectors mainly dipping in southward direction (i.e. toward the coast bounded by the San Sebastian Fault). This unit also includes a number of isolated acoustic anomalies, which we tentatively interpret as coral reefs. Its top is defined as Basal Erosional Discontinuity (BED) onto which Unit 2 (U2) deposits are onlapping. U2 is acoustically well-stratified, with strong reflectors. Gradual variations in thickness and a wavy configuration allow us to interpret U2 as probably Quaternary current-related deposits. Last Unit (U3) was defined on the Venezuela shelf and corresponds to prograding sequences probably related to the terrigenous input of the Tuy River. Impact of eustatic fluctuations on these deposits are discussed. The data were also used to construct a simplified bathymetry of the studied area. The lateral transition from the western Cariaco-Tuy pull-apart basin to the (single) SSF was clearly imaged (mostly folds and gravity faults). The survey also displayed prograding sediments bodies in La Tortuga Shelf

  10. Evaluation of seismic reflection data in the Davis and Lavender Canyons study area, Paradox Basin, Utah. [Faults, folds, joints, and collapse structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kitcho, C.A.; Wong, I.G.; Turcotte, F.T.

    1986-08-01

    Seismic reflection data purchased from petroleum industry brokers and acquired through group speculative surveys were interpreted for information on the regional subsurface geologic structure and stratigraphy within and surrounding the Davis and Lavender Canyons study area in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah. Structures of interest were faults, folds, joints, and collapse structures related to salt dissolution. The seismic reflection data were used to interpret stratigraphy by identifying continuous and discontinuous reflectors on the seismic profiles. Thickening and thinning of strata and possible areas of salt flowage or dissolution could be identified from the seismic data. Identifiable reflectors included the tops of the Precambrian and Mississippian, a distinctive interbed close to the middle of the Pennsylvanian Paradox salt formation (probably the interval between Salt Cycles 10 and 13), and near the top of the Paradox salt. Of the 56 faults identified from the seismic reflection interpretation, 33 trend northwest, west-northwest, or west, and most affect only the deeper part of the stratigraphic section. These faults are part of the deep structural system found throughout the Paradox Basin, including the fold and fault belt in the northeast part of the basin. The faults bound basement Precambrian blocks that experienced minor activity during Mississippian and early Pennsylvanian deposition, and showed major displacement during early Paradox salt deposition as the Paradox Basin subsided. Based on the seismic data, most of these faults appear to have an upward terminus between the top of the Mississippian and the salt interbed reflector.

  11. The Grenville Front Tectonic Zone: Results from the 1986 Great Lakes Onshore Seismic Wide-Angle Reflection and Refraction Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epili, Duryodhan; Mereu, Robert F.

    1991-09-01

    The Grenville Front, which marks the orogenic boundary between the Archean Superior Structural Province and the much younger Grenville Province to the southeast, is one of the major tectonic features of the Canadian Shield. Within Canada, it is approximately 1900 km in length extending from the north shore of Lake Huron across Ontario and Quebec to Labrador. In 1986, a major coincident onship near-vertical reflection and onshore wide-angle reflection/refraction experiment (GLIMPCE-Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program on Crustal Evolution) was conducted along a series of lines across the Great lakes. One of the lines, line J, ran across Georgian Bay and Lake Huron for a distance of 350 km and crossed the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone (GFTZ). The seismic signals from the air gun array source were well recorded by the onshore stations up to distances of 250 km with a seismic trace spacing of 50-62.5 m. The GFTZ had a profound effect on the nature of the reflector patterns observed on the onshore seismic sections. Data recorded by the stations on the east end of the line indicate that the crustal P phases are very complex and form a "shinglelike" pattern of reflected waves. Data recorded by stations at the center and at the western end of the line show that the Pg phases are normal and lack the shinglelike appearance. This character of arrivals was also observed on the corresponding S wave sections. A combined P and S wave forward modeling analysis shows that the GFTZ is composed of bands of reflectors dipping at angles of 20°-35° extending to the lower crust. These reflectors were also well imaged on the coincident near-vertical reflection data. Reflectors under the Britt domain to the east of the GFTZ have a shallower dip than those along the zone. The structure of the crust under the Manitoulin terrane to the west of the GFTZ is laterally homogeneous with a major intracrustal reflector at a depth of 17-20 km below the surface. Poisson's ratio is

  12. Anatomy of a Complex Fault Zone: Land Seismic Reflection Imaging of the Tacoma Fault Zone, Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, K.; Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    Preliminary interpretations of new land-based seismic reflection images across the Tacoma fault zone in western Washington State document a complex pattern of faulting and folding. The Tacoma fault zone bounds gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies for 50 km across the central Puget Lowland west of the city of Tacoma, and tomography data suggest there is as much as 6 km of post-Eocene uplift of the hanging wall relative to Tacoma basin sediments to the south. We acquired four north-south seismic reflection profiles to define the character and tectonic history of the Tacoma fault zone. The 6-km long Powerline Road profile, located west of Case Inlet, perpendicularly crosses the 4-km-long Catfish Lake scarp discerned from Lidar data and trenching. The profile shows flat-lying strata on the south, but the north part of the profile is dominated by south-dipping Tertiary and older strata that appear to form the limb of an anticline. There appears to be at least one, and likely two faults in the Tertiary and older strata, although it is not clear these faults penetrate the shallowest Pleistocene strata. The 8.5-km long Carney Lake profile is located east of Case Inlet and spans two scarps imaged on Lidar data. This profile shows a similar geometry to the Powerline Road profile, folded and faulted Tertiary and older strata adjacent to flat-lying marine sediments of the Tacoma Basin. The 9-km long Bethel-Burley profile across the east portion of the Tacoma fault near Gig Harbor shows a significantly different reflector geometry than the profiles to the west. The Bethel-Burley profile is dominated by a strong, south-dipping reflection that becomes a prominent arch near the north end of the section. The strength of the reflector suggests that it marks the top of the Eocene basement rocks. South-dipping strata on this profile match those imaged on marine profiles from Carr Inlet. The new seismic reflection data support an interpretation in which the north edge of the Tacoma basin

  13. Astor Pass Seismic Surveys Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, John; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Faulds, James; Eisses, Amy; Kell, Annie; Frary, Roxanna; Kent, Graham

    2011-08-05

    In collaboration with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and Optim re-processed, or collected and processed, over 24 miles of 2d seismic-reflection data near the northwest corner of Pyramid Lake, Nevada. The network of 2d land surveys achieved a near-3d density at the Astor Pass geothermal prospect that the PLPT drilled during Nov. 2010 to Feb. 2011. The Bureau of Indian Affairs funded additional seismic work around the Lake, and an extensive, detailed single-channel marine survey producing more than 300 miles of section, imaging more than 120 ft below the Lake bottom. Optim’s land data collection utilized multiple heavy vibrators and recorded over 200 channels live, providing a state-of-the-art reflection-refraction data set. After advanced seismic analysis including first-arrival velocity optimization and prestack depth migration, the 2d sections show clear fault-plane reflections, in some areas as deep as 4000 ft, tying to distinct terminations of the mostly volcanic stratigraphy. Some lines achieved velocity control to 3000 ft depth; all lines show reflections and terminations to 5000 ft depth. Three separate sets of normal faults appear in an initial interpretation of fault reflections and stratigraphic terminations, after loading the data into the OpendTect 3d seismic visualization system. Each preliminary fault set includes a continuous trace more than 3000 ft long, and a swarm of short fault strands. The three preliminary normal-fault sets strike northerly with westward dip, northwesterly with northeast dip, and easterly with north dip. An intersection of all three fault systems documented in the seismic sections at the end of Phase I helped to locate the APS-2 and APS-3 slimholes. The seismic sections do not show the faults connected to the Astor Pass tufa spire, suggesting that we have imaged mostly Tertiary-aged faults. We hypothesize that the Recent, active faults that produced the tufa through hotspring

  14. Oceanic Character of Sub-Salt Crust in the NW Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Using Seismic Refraction and Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karner, G. D.; Johnson, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Significant renewed interest in the geological development of the NW GOM is exemplified by the acquisition of academic seismic refraction and oil industry seismic reflection data. There is agreement that the GOM formed by Jurassic separation of North America and Yucatan, but disagreements remain on the distribution and timing of extended continental versus oceanic crust. Van Avendonk et al. (Geology, v43, 2015) interpreted seismic refraction data from the 2010 "GUMBO" expedition as rifted continental crust thinned by large-scale extensional faulting and syn-rift magmatism beneath the NW GOM. However, seismic reflection evidence for this extension is non-existent, and diagnostic fault-controlled syn-rift packages are not resolved. A very different interpretation of basement type and basin evolution is possible by applying geological process linked to hyper-extended margin formation to the same data. We note: 1) Base salt and Moho interfaces are well imaged; top basement is not resolved. We interpret a pre-salt sedimentary sequence 5-10 km thick, with velocities up to 6 km/s; high velocities in this sequence likely relate to greenschist-facies metamorphism associated with early high heat flow and deep burial. 2) Velocities of 6-8 km/s characterize crystalline basement but do not uniquely determine crustal type (i.e., velocity does not equate to rock type). Lateral variations (0-8 km) in crustal thickness are consistent with slow/ultra-slow seafloor spreading. 3) The undeformed base salt reflector and pre-salt sediment sequence imply a post-kinematic setting and a substantial delay between breakup and Callovian salt deposition. 4) Liassic Central Atlantic breakup is kinematically linked to the GOM and related SDR magmatism. Inboard SDRs, observed on both conjugate margins of the GOM, imply outboard oceanic crust. Together, these observations are consistent with regional sub-salt basement of early-mid Jurassic slow/ultra-slow spreading oceanic crust, associated with

  15. Basement depth and sedimentary infill from deep seismic reflection data at the western tip of the offshore Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Arnaud; Tripsanas, Efthymios; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurélia; Beck, Christian; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    The Corinth rift is a young continental rift located in central Greece. The active part of the rift forms an E-W striking depression - the Gulf of Corinth - that is the deepest in its central part. Extensive seismic surveys have imaged the basin's basement and allowed to estimate the total extension across most of the Gulf except its western tip. Extension is high in the central part and decreases westward and eastward, as reflected in the present-day bathymetry. Two decades of GPS measurements have shown that the extension rate increases westwards from ~5 to 10-15 mm yr-1, but this is not consistent with the long term pattern. However, no data allowed so far to estimate the basement depth at the western tip of the Gulf, where the geodetic extension rate is the largest. Such data would allow to check the apparent inconsistency between the present rate and the long-term estimates of crustal extension. We present here an unpublished multichannel seismic line dating from 1979 and crossing the western tip of the Gulf of Corinth. The line is 22 km long and strikes WNW-ESE, from the Mornos delta to the West-Channel fault. A Maxipulse source has been used, allowing to image the basement below the synrift sedimentary infill. To the east, a ~1.6 km deep basin is imaged between the southern margin of the Gulf and an inactive south-dipping fault located between the Aigion and the Trizonia faults. The sedimentary infill consists in an alternation between basin-focused bodies made of incoherent reflections and more extensive high-amplitude reflectors. Attributing this alternation to eustatic variations give an age of 300-350 ka to the oldest well imaged deposits. Northwest of the Trizonia fault, the basement is imaged at shallower depth, i.e. ~450 m. The western tip of the seismic line reaches the Mornos delta, close to the northern shoreline. There, the depth to the basement is larger, reaching ~1.2 km. The infill is made of 3 units : on the basement lies a thin unit of

  16. Use of Seismic Reflection Data and Traveltime Tomography to Image the Near Surface Velocity Structure in the Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Magnani, M.; Waldron, B.; Powell, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Memphis aquifer represents one of the highest quality reservoirs of drinking water in the nation and it is separated from the shallow unconfined aquifer by the Upper Claiborne clay. Recent studies show that the confining unit might be discontinuous over the greater Memphis area exposing the Memphis aquifer to potential contamination. We present the results of a seismic reflection profile collected near Memphis, TN with the goal of imaging the structures and potential breaches in the Upper Claiborne confining clay. The imaged area is characterized by a highly heterogeneous shallow velocity structure and low P wave velocities in the ultrashallow unconsolidated materials. The data were collected using a shotgun source and a 1 m source spacing, 0.25 m receiver spacing and a 168-geophone spread for a max offset of 42 m. Raw seismic data show several reflected arrivals in the first 200ms, widespread ground roll, and air wave energy as well as consistent refracted phases across the 1 km - long profile. In addition to the reflection profile we present the preliminary results of first arrival travel time tomography performed along the profile to constrain the velocity field in the shallow portion of the profile. The velocity was then used to remove the effect of the near surface velocity variations. The main data processing steps included elevation statics and frequency and FK filtering. First arrival travel time modeling started with an initial estimate of the 2-layer velocity model using the slope/intercept method. We then modeled first-arrival picks on 1095 shot gathers using the Geo TOMO+ package. The algorithm computes travel times by tracing turning rays and is also able to handle raypaths through low-velocity zones (blind zones). The final resolution is estimated through a ray-information density map, which shows the cumulative contribution of the ray segments traversing different areas of the model. Synthetic models were generated and tested for the tomography

  17. Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS) with 2D Reflective Grating for Ultraviolet to Long-Wave Infrared Detection Especially Useful for Surveying Transient Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Mouroulis, Pantazis Z. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The optical system of this invention is an unique type of imaging spectrometer, i.e. an instrument that can determine the spectra of all points in a two-dimensional scene. The general type of imaging spectrometer under which this invention falls has been termed a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS). CTIS's have the ability to perform spectral imaging of scenes containing rapidly moving objects or evolving features, hereafter referred to as transient scenes. This invention, a reflective CTIS with an unique two-dimensional reflective grating, can operate in any wavelength band from the ultraviolet through long-wave infrared. Although this spectrometer is especially useful for events it is also for investigation of some slow moving phenomena as in the life sciences.

  18. Computed tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS) with 2D reflective grating for ultraviolet to long-wave infrared detection especially useful for surveying transient events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Mouroulis, Pantazis Z. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The optical system of this invention is an unique type of imaging spectrometer, i.e. an instrument that can determine the spectra of all points in a two-dimensional scene. The general type of imaging spectrometer under which this invention falls has been termed a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS). CTIS's have the ability to perform spectral imaging of scenes containing rapidly moving objects or evolving features, hereafter referred to as transient scenes. This invention, a reflective CTIS with an unique two-dimensional reflective grating, can operate in any wavelength band from the ultraviolet through long-wave infrared. Although this spectrometer is especially useful for rapidly occurring events it is also useful for investigation of some slow moving phenomena as in the life sciences.

  19. Structural and Seismic Stratigrapic study in the Center of the Magdalena Shelf in the Western Margin of Baja California Based on Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Escobar, Mario; Salazar-Cárdenas, Rosa M.; Munguía, Luis; Martín, Arturo; Suárez-Vidal, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    The Magdalena Shelf is a shallow, low-relief surface located along the Baja California Pacific margin. As part of a forearc basin, the shelf was a convergent margin setting before the oblique divergent plate boundary formed in the Gulf of California at 12 Ma. It is thought that since 12-8 Ma, this basin has been a transtensional or strike-slip basin. To constrain the geometry, structural characteristics and some stratigraphic relationships, an active-source, seismic-reflection study was carried out in the central part of the shelf. As a result, the analyzed data show faults, basins and unconformities. Two out of four observed basins are clearly controlled by the Santa Margarita and San Lázaro faults that dip ~40° NE; a third basin is controlled by the Tosco-Abreojos fault. These three basins are part of the deformation zone that is associated with the Tosco-Abreojos fault system. The Iray-Margarita basin, on the other hand, is a fourth basin located at the northeast sector of the study area. An additional feature observed is a stepover lying between the overlapping ends of the Santa Margarita and San Lázaro faults. Small faults oriented sub-parallel to the above major faults are present, mainly throughout the western sector of the study area. Some of those minor faults cut through the seafloor indicating recent tectonic activity. Santa Margarita, San Lázaro and Tosco-Abreojos are also the names given to half-grabens controlled by the active faults that have the same names. The first two basins are affected by many more small faults in comparison with what we see in the third basin. Tectonically, this means that those two basins are the more active in the area of study. In all four basins, the upper seismic sequence consists of sediments controlled by faults of Neogene age. We found that the Iray-Santa Margarita basin is the deepest of all four basins (beyond the resolution of the data, >5 km), and lack of minor faults there indicates that the basin is not

  20. Deep reflection seismic imaging in SE Poland using extended correlation method applied to PolandSPAN™ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    Here I apply the extended correlation technique to a 156-km long regional seismic profile, PL1-5100, from the PolandSPAN™ survey located in SE Poland. This method allows the extension of the nominal record length of the survey (12 s in this case) to much longer times (22 s tested here), given that in the field the raw uncorrelated data were stored and a broadband sweep was used. Processing of the ground force correlated data compared to pilot sweep correlated one produced qualitatively similar results. Based on the consistency of the ground force measured along the profile, data were correlated with the mean of the ground force estimates. Results of the processing were validated against the coincident wide-angle reflection/refraction (WARR) profile (CELEBRATION 2000 CEL05 profile) and a deep reflection profile located further to the SE (POLCRUST-01 profile). I found a good correspondence between the wide-angle Moho signature and the near-vertical incidence (NVI) Moho reflectivity, both in terms of the depth and the reflection strength, with the exception of the area of the crustal keel (Moho > 50 km) interpreted from the WARR data, where the NVI reflectivity is observed at depth ca. 47 km. Similarly to POLCRUST-01, line PL1-5100 is portraying the attenuated crust of the East European Platform margin with the dipping crystalline basement down to ca. 20 km depth and the reflective lower crust. Two important fault zones: Izbica-Zamość Fault and Wilczopole Fault Zone are interpreted as the deeply-rooted crustal features, but there is no evidence for the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone itself.

  1. New process model for the Dead Sea sinkholes at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, derived from shear-wave reflection seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    In October 2013 a shear wave reflection seismic pilot study was carried out at the most destructive sinkhole site in Jordan, close to the village of Ghor Al Haditha at the South-East end of the Dead Sea. The investigation is part of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association, designed as a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ, and their partners. Since nearly 30 years - apparently contemporaneous to the rapid decrease of the Dead Sea level - ongoing unknown sinkhole processes in the subsurface continuously compromise farming areas, housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure at the investigation site, resulting in massive destructions. Similar processes are observed also at the western border of the Dead Sea. Although many geophysical studies have been carried out at the site since more than 20 years, the subsurface structure and the process itself is quite unknown until yet. In recent years, a massive salt layer at 40 m depth or more was proposed below alluvial fan deposits, which was the target of this reflection seismic pilot study. We spent 10 days in the field and acquired four shear-wave reflection seismic profiles of 1.8 km total length to yield a high-resolution structural image of the subsurface. The lines cover in NW-SE and NE-SW direction the sinkhole-affected area as close as possible to recent collapse structures. There is no evidence for the hypothesized shallow salt layer, at least not down to 100 m probably up to 200 m depth. Instead, the detected subsurface structures show a complex interlock of alluvial fan deposits and marine sedimentation layers of the Dead Sea between 0-200 m depth. Therefore, we propose a new hypothesis for the sinkhole processes in the region: salt-rich marine clay layers are present in the fresh water contact zones inside the alluvial fan, which are destabilized and mobilized by dissolution of the salt contained

  2. Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic reflection data in their flexural moat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, J. S.; Watts, A. B.

    2001-12-01

    We use multichannel seismic reflection profiles to determine the seismic stratigraphy of the flexural moat that flanks the Canary Islands. The moat stratigraphy has been divided into 5 units on the basis of internal character and correlation of distinctive reflections. The deepest units, I and II, which well-ties indicate are Eocene and older, thicken towards the east suggesting they are the consequence of sediment loading at the Moroccan continental margin. Units III, IV and V, which are Oligocene and younger and highly reflective, thicken concentrically around individual islands suggesting they are dominantly the result of volcanic loading. Distinct stratigraphic patterns of onlap at the base and offlap at the top of individual flexural units are seen on the across-moat profiles but they were not easily identified on our limited along-moat profiles. The thickness of the upper three units is in accord with the predictions of flexural loading models. Moreover, a model in which the volcanoes that make up the Canary Islands progressively load the underlying lithosphere from east to west generally accounts for the thickness variations that are observed in the region of individual islands. We date the shield building stages of the Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria and La Gomera as Oligocene to Early Miocene, that of Tenerife as Middle Miocene to Late Miocene and those of La Palma and El Hierro as Pliocene to Quaternary. The best overall fit to stratigraphic data in the northern moat is for an elastic thickness of the lithosphere, T e , of 35km, which is similar to the 30-40km which would be expected for Oligocene and Neogene loading of Jurassic oceanic lithosphere. There is evidence that a contribution from the margin is required to explain the divergence of Units III, IV and V along the Moroccan margin. Detailed modelling of an along-strike seismic profile of the moat north of Tenerife and Gran Canaria, however, suggests that flexure due to island loading fully explains the

  3. Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

    1990-01-01

    The seismic performance of steel moment-framed buildings has been of particular interest since brittle fractures were discovered at the beam-column connections of some frames following the M6.7 1994 Northridge earthquake. This report presents an investigation of the seismic behavior of an instrumented 13-story steel moment frame building located in the greater Los Angeles area of California. An extensive strong motion dataset, ambient vibration data, engineering drawings and earthquake damage reports are available for this building. The data are described and subsequently analyzed. The results of the analyses show that the building response is more complex than would be expected from its highly symmetrical geometry. The building's response is characterized by low damping in the fundamental mode, larger peak accelerations in the intermediate stories than at the roof, extended periods of vibration after the cessation of strong input shaking, beating in the response, and significant torsion during strong shaking at the top of the concrete piers which extend from the basement to the second floor. The analyses of the data and all damage detection methods employed except one method based on system identification indicate that the response of the structure was elastic in all recorded earthquakes. These findings are in general agreement with the results of intrusive inspections (meaning fireproofing and architectural finishes were removed) conducted on approximately 5 percent of the moment connections following the Northridge earthquake, which found no earthquake damage.

  4. DOBRE-2000: Deep Reflection Seismic, Gravimetric and Surface Structural Controls Across a Devonian Failed Rift in the Southeastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Chowdhury, K.; Bayer, U.; Gajewski, D.; Huebscher, C.; Rabbel, W.; Saintot, A.; Starostenko, V. I.; Stephenson, R.; Stovba, S. M.; Tolkunov, A.; Thybo, H.

    2001-12-01

    Situated between the Ukrainian Shield and the Voronezh Masif, the Pripyat-Dniepr-Donets Basin (PDD) is a crustal-scale geodynamic feature associated with the Late Devonian rifting of the East European Craton. The Donbas Foldbelt (DF), comprising the eastern part of the PDD, includes pre- & syn-rift deposits below a large thickness of post-rift successions. Later, DF has been inverted (elevated, eroded, deformed). With 20+ km of sediments, it has a large economic potential, but its tectonic history - and the cause for its isolated evolution - is not well understood. Recently, 130+ km multi-channel reflection seismic profiling data has been acquired across the southern part of the DF in the framework of an international industry-academic collaboration. Coincident gravity data has been collected along the profile too, and extensive structural studies have been carried out to understand the spatio-temporal distribution of the stress-regime in the area. The high-resolution seismic images reveal an extensive stair-step like fragmentation of the basement including faults with upto 2km offset. The typical size of these "steps" are influenced by the ambient conditions at the time of their formation. Combined use of the different datasets is expected to shed light on several intriguing features associated with DF. The presence/extent of salt, causing localization and/or partition of strain both laterally and vertically, may be studied by using its seismic and gravitational reponses simultaneously. The interaction between the lower crust and the upper mantle may also be studied in the same manner, which should result in a lithological interpretation at depth favoring in turn one of the causative mechanisms.

  5. Measuring Quality Factors From Multicomponent Reflection Seismic Data and its Significance for Lithology and Fluid Type Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Osornio, M.; Calder¢n-Macias, C.; Ramos-Matinez, J.

    2003-12-01

    Relationships among shear and compressional wave velocities (VP and VS) and quality factors (QP and QS) for predicting lithology and fluid content, have been previously studied and proposed by some researchers. Thus, for example, VP/VS has been used as a lithology indicator for sandstone, shale and limestone. Likewise, QP/QS has been related to fluid content, mainly to discriminate oil, brine, and gas saturation. The velocities and quality factors for both P and S waves can be obtained from multicomponent reflection seismic data. Multicomponent data are most commonly recorded from compressional sources in the oil industry. Converted P to S waves or PS waves are generally measured in the radial component. In cases where there are heterogeneity and/or azimuthal anisotropy, the transverse component is also considered. Processing of the converted wave results in a PS image and an interpreted converted-wave velocity field (VPS). Likewise, it is possible to estimate a converted-wave quality factor (QPS) field. The converted-wave quality factor can also be used as a lithology and fluid content indicator since this parameter depends on VP/VS and QP/QS ratios. Crossplots involving QPS obtained from previously published laboratory measurements of P- and S-wave velocities and quality factors, reveal the significance of estimating QPS from multicomponent seismic data. An important advantage of using QPS as a lithology indicator is that it can be mapped directly from multicomponent surface seismic data. In this work we present a new methodology to obtain QPS. In the pure mode case, approaches for estimating Q are well known. However for converted-waves, some simplifying assumptions need to be made due to the propagation characteristics of the converted P- to S-wavepath.

  6. Reflection seismic characterization of the Grängesberg iron deposit and its mining-induced structures, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Place, Joachim; Malehmir, Alireza; Högdahl, Karin; Juhlin, Christopher; Persson Nilsson, Katarina

    2014-05-01

    Reflection seismic investigation has been conducted on the Grängesberg apatite iron deposit where over 150 Mt of iron ore were produced until the mine closed in 1989. The mine infrastructure with shafts and tunnels extend down to ca. 650 m below the surface. Both natural and mine induced fracture and fault systems are today water-filled (some of them extending to the surface). The disputed ore genesis of the apatite-iron ores and its exploration potential due to large remaining quantities once again attracts both scientific and commercial interests. A good understanding of the geometry of mineral deposits and their hostrock structures at depth is essential for optimizing their exploration and exploitation. In addition, deep understanding of the fracture system is vital if mining activity is resumed as these may impact the terrain stability and seismicity, which may put at risk new populated and industrial areas. To address some of these challenging issues related to the past mining and also to obtain information about the depth continuation of the existing deposit, two E-W oriented reflection lines with a total length of 3.5 km were acquired in May 2013 by Uppsala University. A weight drop mounted on an hydraulic bobcat truck (traditionally used for concrete breaking in demolition sector) was used to generate seismic signal. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, several impacts were generated at each shot point and stacked together. The seismic lines intersect at high angle the Grängesberg ore body and open pit, as well as several mining-induced faults. A combination of cabled and wireless receivers placed at every 10 m was used for the data recording. Use of wireless receivers was necessary as deploying cabled sensors was not possible due to city infrastructures, roads and houses. A careful analysis of the data suggested that several field-related issues such as (1) the crooked geometry of the lines (due to the available path and road network), (2

  7. High-resolution chirp seismic reflection data acquired from the Cap de Creus shelf and canyon area, Gulf of Lions, Spain in 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, Eric E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Field, Michael E.; Triezenberg, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Seismic reflection data were collected from the Cap de Creus shelf and canyon in the southwest portion of the Gulf of Lions in October 2004. The data were acquired using the U.S. Geological Survey`s (USGS) high-resolution Edgetech CHIRP 512i seismic reflection system aboard the R/V Oceanus. Data from the shipboard 3.5 kHz echosounder were also collected but are not presented here. The seismic reflection data were collected as part of EuroSTRATAFORM funded by the Office of Naval Research. In October 2004, more than 200 km of high resolution seismic reflection data were collected in water depths ranging 30 m - 600 m. All data were recorded with a Delph Seismic PC-based digital recording system and processed with Delph Seismic software. Processed sections were georeferenced into tiff images for digital archive, processing and display. Penetration ranged 20-80 m. The data feature high quality vertical cross-section imagery of numerous sequences of Quaternary seismic stratigraphy. The report includes trackline maps showing the location of the data, as well as both digital data files (SEG-Y) and images of all of the profiles. The data are of high quality and provide new information on the location and thickness of sediment deposits overlying a major erosion surface on the Cap de Creus shelf; they also provide new insight into sediment processes on the walls and in the channel of Cap de Creus Canyon. These data are under study by researchers at the US Geological Survey, the University of Barcelona, and Texas A and M University. Copies of the data are available to all researchers.

  8. Tectonic Evolution of the Bristol Bay basin, southeast Bering Sea: Constraints from seismic