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Sample records for 2d seismic line

  1. 2D seismic data processing for straight lines in the loess plateaus in Fuxian of Shanbei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minjie; Chen, Yequan; Zhang, Hai; Pang, Shangming; Deng, Guozhen

    2005-01-01

    The crooked seismic lines along valleys were irregular previously in Fuxian of Shanbei, showing an irregular branch in plane, and hard to complete close grids. Therefore, it’s difficult to conduct reservoir inversion of 2D seismic data. In 2001, Zhongyuan Oilfield Company carried out the study on field acquisition methods and seismic processing technology in Fuxian. Straight lines were passing through plateaus and formed seismic grids by using flexible geometry with variable linear bins. Data processing involved model-inversion based refraction static correction, surface consistent amplitude compensation, deconvolution, and pre-stack noise attenuation. As the result, seismic data with a high fidelity was provided for the subsequent reservoir predictions, small-amplitude structure interpretation and integrative geologic study. Because all lines were jointed to form grids, comprehensive interpretation of reservoir inversion could be finally implemented by using the pseudo logging method to control lines without wells.

  2. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made

  3. 3D constraints on a possible deep > 2.5 km massive sulphide mineralization from 2D crooked-line seismic reflection data in the Kristineberg mining area, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Bongajum, Emmanuel; Bellefleur, Gilles; Juhlin, Christopher; Tryggvason, Ari

    2009-12-01

    2D crooked-line seismic reflection surveys in crystalline environments are often considered challenging in their processing and interpretation. These challenges are more evident when complex diffraction signals that can originate from out-of-the-plane and a variety of geological features are present. A seismic profile in the Kristineberg mining area in northern Sweden shows an impressive diffraction package, covering an area larger than 25 km 2 in the subsurface at depths greater than 2.5 km. We present here a series of scenarios in which each can, to some extent, explain the nature of this extraordinarily large package of diffractions. Cross-dip analysis, diffraction imaging and modeling, as well as 3D processing of the crooked-line data provided constraints on the interpretation of the diffraction package. Overall, the results indicate that the diffraction package can be associated with at least four main short south-dipping diffractors in a depth range of 2.5-4.5 km. Candidate scenarios for the origin of the diffraction package are: (1) a series of massive sulphide deposits, (2) a series of mafic-ultramafic intrusions, (3) a major shear-zone and (4) multiple contact lithologies. We have also investigated the possible contribution of mode-converted scattered energy in the diffraction package using a modified converted-wave 3D prestack depth migration algorithm with the results indicating that a majority of the diffractions are P-wave diffractions. The 3D prestack migration of the data provided improved images of a series of steeply north-dipping mafic-ultramafic sill intrusions to a depth of about 4 km, where the diffractions appear to focus after the migration. The results and associated interpretations presented in this paper have improved our understanding of this conspicuous package of diffractions and may lead to re-evaluation of the 3D geological model of the Kristineberg mining area.

  4. Research of CRP-based irregular 2D seismic acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hu; Yin, Cheng; He, Guang-Ming; Chen, Ai-Ping; Jing, Long-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Seismic exploration in the mountainous areas of western Chinese is extremely difficult because of the complexity of the surface and subsurface, which results in shooting difficulties, seismic data with low signal-to-noise ratio, and strong interference. The complexity of the subsurface structure leads to strong scattering of the reflection points; thus, the curved-line acquisition method has been used. However, the actual subsurface structural characteristics have been rarely considered. We propose a design method for irregular acquisition based on common reflection points (CRP) to avoid difficult-to-shoot areas, while considering the structural characteristics and CRP positions and optimizing the surface-receiving line position. We arrange the positions of the receiving points to ensure as little dispersion of subsurface CRP as possible to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic data. We verify the applicability of the method using actual data from a site in Sichuan Basin. The proposed method apparently solves the problem of seismic data acquisition and facilitates seismic exploration in structurally complex areas.

  5. 2D reflection seismic investigations in the Kevitsa Ni-Cu-PGE deposit, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, E.; Malehmir, A.; Heikkinen, P.; Heinonen, S.; Kukkonen, I.

    2012-04-01

    In 2007, 2D reflection seismic survey was conducted in the Kevitsa Ni-Cu-PGE (platinum group elements) deposit, northern Finland as a part of the HIRE (High Resolution Reflection Seismics for Ore Exploration 2007-2010) project of the Geological Survey of Finland. The Kevitsa 2D seismic survey consists of four connected survey lines, each approximately 6-8 km long. The survey lines traverse the ore-bearing Kevitsa intrusive complex and partly also the geological units surrounding it, thus providing an insight to the structural make-up of the complex. The aim of the survey was to delineate the overall shape and basal contact of the Kevitsa ultramafic intrusive complex at depth, to study the seismic response of the disseminated Kevitsa Ni-Cu-PGE deposit, and to potentially find indications for new ore deposits. Herein, we present results from processing and interpretation of the Kevitsa 2D reflection seismic data. In the data processing sequence, specific focus was given to finding optimal CDP-line geometries for the crooked-line survey profiles, and to detailed velocity analysis. We also conducted a simplified cross-dip analysis to assess the potential cross-profile dips of the reflectors, however, application of the cross-dip corrections was found to be unnecessary, and our conventional processing sequence involving prestack DMO corrections followed by poststack migration resulted in high-quality images of the subsurface. The seismic sections presented in this work reveal a detailed reflectivity structure of the uppermost 5 kilometers. The known Kevitsa deposit was found to have a specific seismic signature, and the seismic images were used to establish previously unknown shape and extent of the ore-bearing Kevitsa intrusive complex, thus providing a framework for effective future exploration in the area. Interestingly, the data reveal complex internal reflectivity structure within the intrusion, suggesting multiple levels of intrusion within the pre

  6. 2-D traveltime and waveform inversion for improved seismic imaging: Naga Thrust and Fold Belt, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Zelt, Colin A.; Bally, Albert W.; Dasgupta, Rahul

    2008-05-01

    Exploration along the Naga Thrust and Fold Belt in the Assam province of Northeast India encounters geological as well as logistic challenges. Drilling for hydrocarbons, traditionally guided by surface manifestations of the Naga thrust fault, faces additional challenges in the northeast where the thrust fault gradually deepens leaving subtle surface expressions. In such an area, multichannel 2-D seismic data were collected along a line perpendicular to the trend of the thrust belt. The data have a moderate signal-to-noise ratio and suffer from ground roll and other acquisition-related noise. In addition to data quality, the complex geology of the thrust belt limits the ability of conventional seismic processing to yield a reliable velocity model which in turn leads to poor subsurface image. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of traveltime and waveform inversion as supplements to conventional seismic imaging and interpretation processes. Both traveltime and waveform inversion utilize the first arrivals that are typically discarded during conventional seismic processing. As a first step, a smooth velocity model with long wavelength characteristics of the subsurface is estimated through inversion of the first-arrival traveltimes. This velocity model is then used to obtain a Kirchhoff pre-stack depth-migrated image which in turn is used for the interpretation of the fault. Waveform inversion is applied to the central part of the seismic line to a depth of ~1 km where the quality of the migrated image is poor. Waveform inversion is performed in the frequency domain over a series of iterations, proceeding from low to high frequency (11-19 Hz) using the velocity model from traveltime inversion as the starting model. In the end, the pre-stack depth-migrated image and the waveform inversion model are jointly interpreted. This study demonstrates that a combination of traveltime and waveform inversion with Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration is a promising approach

  7. Chicxulub Peak Ring Characteristics from 2D Reflection Seismic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Cervantes, K.; Fucugauchi, J. U.; Gulick, S.

    2007-05-01

    Since 1980's research interest over Chicxulub crater located SE Gulf of Mexico, has grown not only because its relationship with the K-P(Cretaseous -Paleogene) extinction but because of its size (diameter ~ 200 km) and grade of preservation. Based on results from several surveys using different geophysical methods, Chicxulub has been classified as a multiring crater. A topographic high rising from crater floor was first recognized as the Chicxulub peak ring on four 1996 reflection seismic profiles but the low density of this data set made impossible to describe on detail this structure. Recently, during 2005 we carried out a marine survey acquiring 29 profiles. A grid located over the central marine portion of the crater was conformed by eleven profiles 80 km long oriented WSW-ENE and ten 25 km long NW-SE. Data was recorded on 480 channels spaced 12.5 cm on a 6 km streamer and air guns were shot every 50 m allowing us to image the earth up to 14 s TWTT. This new data set along with the 1996 profiles allow us to build up the first 3D image of Chicxulub peak ring as well as to analyze some important features of this ring. Results show that the peak ring lays down closer to the surface and the crater rim on its NW portion where it rises more abruptly from the crater floor reaching up to 430 m. Based on the information of the radial lines this characteristics change in clockwise direction being opposite on the NE. The relationship between the peak ring and other Chicxulub structures,such as the slump blocks and the dipping reflector, change as well in the same direction indicating that the peak ring is displaced to the NW. These asymmetries could be related to the process of formation of the peak ring as a result of: a)an asymmetric collapse of the central uplift which has been proved not to be related to impact direction, b) displacement of the central uplift towards the transient cavity rim or c)heterogeneities on impact surface predating the impact.

  8. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  9. 2D seismic residual statics derived from refraction interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Refraction traveltimes have long been applied for deriving long-wavelength statics solutions. These traveltimes are also applied for the derivation of residual statics, but they must be sufficiently accurate at short wavelengths. In this study, we present a seismic residual statics method that applies interferometric theory to produce four stacked virtual refraction gathers with a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. These gathers are composed of forward and backward virtual refraction gathers for receivers and shots. By picking the first arrivals on these four gathers followed by the application of a set of refraction equations, reliable residual statics solutions can be derived. This approach can help deal with noisy data and also avoid using traveltime picks from shot gathers. We demonstrate the approach by applying it to synthetic data as well as real data.

  10. Bernoulli-based random undersampling schemes for 2D seismic data regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rui; Zhao, Qun; She, De-Ping; Yang, Li; Cao, Hui; Yang, Qin-Yong

    2014-09-01

    Seismic data regularization is an important preprocessing step in seismic signal processing. Traditional seismic acquisition methods follow the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem, whereas compressive sensing (CS) provides a fundamentally new paradigm to overcome limitations in data acquisition. Besides the sparse representation of seismic signal in some transform domain and the 1-norm reconstruction algorithm, the seismic data regularization quality of CS-based techniques strongly depends on random undersampling schemes. For 2D seismic data, discrete uniform-based methods have been investigated, where some seismic traces are randomly sampled with an equal probability. However, in theory and practice, some seismic traces with different probability are required to be sampled for satisfying the assumptions in CS. Therefore, designing new undersampling schemes is imperative. We propose a Bernoulli-based random undersampling scheme and its jittered version to determine the regular traces that are randomly sampled with different probability, while both schemes comply with the Bernoulli process distribution. We performed experiments using the Fourier and curvelet transforms and the spectral projected gradient reconstruction algorithm for 1-norm (SPGL1), and ten different random seeds. According to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between the original and reconstructed seismic data, the detailed experimental results from 2D numerical and physical simulation data show that the proposed novel schemes perform overall better than the discrete uniform schemes.

  11. 2D seismic reflection tomography in strongly anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guangnan; Zhou, Bing; Li, Hongxi; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zelin

    2014-12-01

    Seismic traveltime tomography is an effective method to reconstruct underground anisotropic parameters. Currently, most anisotropic tomographic methods were developed under the assumption of weak anisotropy. The tomographic method proposed here can be implemented for imaging subsurface targets in strongly anisotropic media with a known tilted symmetry axis, since the adopted ray tracing method is suitable for anisotropic media with arbitrary degree. There are three kinds of reflection waves (qP, qSV and qSH waves) that were separately used to invert the blocky abnormal body model. The reflection traveltime tomographiy is developed here because a surface observation system is the most economical and practical way compared with crosswell and VSP. The numerical examples show that the traveltimes of qP reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}13},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully. Traveltimes of qSV reflection wave have inverted parameters {{c}11},{{c}33} \\text{and} {{c}44} successfully, with the exception of the {{c}13}, since it is less sensitive than other parameters. Traveltimes of qSH reflection wave also have inverted parameters {{c}44} \\text{and} {{c}66} successfully. In addition, we find that the velocity sensitivity functions (derivatives of phase velocity with respect to elastic moduli parameters) and raypath illuminating angles have a great influence on the qualities of tomograms according to the inversion of theoretical models. Finally, the numerical examples confirm that the reflection traveltime tomography can be applied to invert strongly anisotropic models.

  12. Development of the Borehole 2-D Seismic Tomography Software Using MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, A. D.; Syahputra, A.; Fatkhan, F.; Sule, R.; Hendriyana, A.

    2011-12-01

    We developed 2-D borehole seismic tomography software that we called "EARTHMAX-2D TOMOGRAPHY" to image subsurface physical properties including P-wave and S-wave velocities between two boreholes. We used Graphic User Interface (GUI) facilities of MATLAB programming language to create the software. In this software, we used travel time of seismic waves from source to receiver by using pseudo bending ray tracing method as input for tomography inversion. We can also set up a model parameterization, initial velocity model, ray tracing processes, conduct borehole seismic tomography inversion, and finally visualize the inversion results. The LSQR method was applied to solve of tomography inversion solution. We provided the Checkerboard Test Resolution (CTR) to evaluate the model resolution of the tomography inversion. As validation of this developed software, we tested it for geotechnical purposes. We then conducted data acquisition in the "ITB X-field" that is located on ITB campus. We used two boreholes that have a depth of 39 meters. Seismic wave sources were generated by impulse generator and sparker and then they were recorded by borehole hydrophone string type 3. Later on, we analyzed and picked seismic arrival time as input for tomography inversion. As results, we can image the estimated weathering layer, sediment layer, and basement rock in the field depicted by seismic wave structures. More detailed information about the developed software will be presented. Keywords: borehole, tomography, earthmax-2D, inversion

  13. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: Results from 2013 high-resolution 2D and multicomponent seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.; Agena, W.; Miller, J. J.; Ruppel, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the spring of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a 16-day seismic acquisition cruise aboard the R/V Pelican in the Gulf of Mexico to survey two established gas hydrate study sites. We used a pair of 105/105 cubic inch generator/injector airguns as the seismic source, and a 450-m 72-channel hydrophone streamer to record two-dimensional (2D) data. In addition, we also deployed at both sites an array of 4-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) to record P- and S-wave energy at the seafloor from the same seismic source positions as the streamer data. At lease block Green Canyon 955 (GC955), we acquired 400 km of 2-D streamer data, in a 50- to 250-m-spaced grid augmented by several 20-km transects that provide long offsets for the OBS. The seafloor recording at GC955 was accomplished by a 2D array of 21 OBS at approximately 400-m spacing, including instruments carefully positioned at two of the three boreholes where extensive logging-while-drilling data is available to characterize the presence of gas hydrate. At lease block Walker Ridge 313 (WR313), we acquired 450 km of streamer data in a set of 11-km, 150- to 1,000-m-spaced, dip lines and 6- to 8-km, 500- to 1000-m-spaced strike lines. These were augmented by a set of 20-km lines that provide long offsets for a predominantly linear array of 25 400- to 800-m spaced OBS deployed in the dip direction in and around WR313. The 2D data provide at least five times better resolution of the gas hydrate stability zone than the available petroleum industry seismic data from the area; this enables considerably improved analysis and interpretation of stratigraphic and structural features including previously unseen faults and gas chimneys that may have considerable impact on gas migration. Initial processing indicates that the OBS data quality is good, and we anticipate that these data will yield estimates of P- and S-wave velocities, as well as PP (reflected) and PS (converted wave) images beneath each sensor location.

  14. Modelling of a coal seam of the deposit Đurđevik (BiH) by means of 2D reflection seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenović, Siniša; Urošević, Milovan; Sretenović, Branislav; Cvetkov, Vesna; Životić, Dragana

    2016-06-01

    A low cost 2D reflection seismic survey was used to map the continuity of the main seams as well as the numerous faults at the Đurđevik sub-bituminous coal deposit (BiH). A 24-channel seismic data acquisition system was available for this survey. The natural high reflectivity of the coal seams and a favourable geometry of seismic profiles enabled the identification and correlation of major faults across the area. Rugged terrain presented challenges to both data acquisition and processing. Stacks of acceptable quality were obtained only after the application of surface consistent statics and careful application of multi-channel filtering. A set of recorded 2D lines was interpreted in a 3D environment. Inferred structural elements disrupting the seam continuity were identified and were in agreement with available drilling results and mine workings. The result of this work was used to reduce mining hazards and also to help optimise mine planning.

  15. Terrace Zone Structure in the Chicxulub Impact Crater Based on 2-D Seismic Reflection Profiles: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Gorney, D. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Barton, P. J.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Melosh, H. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Surendra, A. T.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    Terrace zones, central peaks, and flat floors characterize complex craters like the Chicxulub impact crater located near the northeast coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The subsurface crater structure was studied using seismic reflection surveying in Jan/Feb 2005 by the R/V Maurice Ewing. We present 2-D seismic profiles including constant radius, regional, and grid profiles encompassing the 195 km width of the crater. These diversely oriented lines clearly show the terrace zones and aid in the search for crater ejecta as we investigate the formation of the crater including the incidence angle and direction of the extraterrestrial object that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 65 million years ago (K-T boundary). Terrace zones form in complex craters after the modification stage as a result of the gravitational collapse of overextended sediment back into the crater cavity. The terrace zone is clearly imaged on seismic profiles confirming the complex structure of the Chixculub crater. Recent work on reprocessed 1996 profiles found different sizes and spacing of the terraces and concluded that the variations in radial structure are a result of an oblique impact. A SW-NE profile from this study was the only line to show a concentration of deformation near the crater rim hinting that the northeast was the downrange direction of impact. We confirm this narrowing in terrace spacing using a profile with a similar orientation in the 2005 images. Through integration of the new dense grid of profiles and radial lines from the 1996 and 2005 surveys we map the 3-D variability of the terrace zones to further constrain impact direction and examine the formative processes of the Chixculub and other large impact craters.

  16. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  17. 2-D TFPF based on Contourlet transform for seismic random noise attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xian; Li, Yue; Zhuang, Guanghai; Zhang, Chao; Han, Xue

    2016-06-01

    The time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF) algorithm is useful for attenuating seismic random noise. Conventional TFPF processes each channel of the seismic record independently with a fixed window length (WL), which is a one-dimensional algorithm due to filtering along the channel direction. However, the fixed WL is not appropriate for all frequency components at the same time, so using this technique cannot preserve the reflected signals effectively. Also, Conventional TFPF ignores the spatial characteristics of reflection events, resulting in poor continuity of seismic events and serious loss of the correlation among channels. Here we introduce a new spatiotemporal method, called two-dimensional (2-D) TFPF based on Contourlet transform, which considers spatial correlation and improves the performance of the TFPF. Regarding the event as the contour in an image and using Contourlet transform (CT) to the record, we can find the optimal radial filtering trace which best matches the event, and then sample the record to extract signals along the trace. In this way, frequencies of sampled signals are low and similar. After applying the TFPF along the trace instead of along each channel, the estimation bias is decreased due to the low frequency. Moreover, using the same WL is suitable as a result of similar frequencies. Experiments on synthetic models and the field data illustrate that the new method performs well in random noise attenuation and reflection event preservation.

  18. Comparison of conventional (100%), two dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) seismic data: Case histories from the Midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Schloeder, F.X. III

    1995-09-01

    The principal objective of seismic exploration is to determine three geologic parameters, the structural top, the bottom, and the lateral extent of an oil and gas reservoir. Conventional (100%) data is very efficient in locating the structural top and bottom of reservoirs. Two-dimensional (2D) common depth point (CDP) seismic data provides an immense improvement in seismic data quality over conventional (100%) data. This improvement enables the explorer to better visualize and map the reservoir in each direction of the seismic line. Three-dimensional (3D) seismic technology provides even more mappable data and capability. The explorer may visualize every imaginable direction and subtlety of a reservoir. This talk compares conventional (100%), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) seismic data from the Midcontinent. Case histories of the Douglass (Upper Pennsylvanian) in Texas, the Morrow (Lower Pennsylvanian) in Colorado, the {open_quotes}Chat{close_quotes} (Mississippian) and the Hunton (Silurian-Devonian) in Oklahoma, and the Simpson (Ordovician) in Kansas will be discussed. Major and independent operators can maximize their exploration efforts by integrating existing data with three-dimensional (3D) technology and a solid geologic interpretation.

  19. A nearly analytic exponential time difference method for solving 2D seismic wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Yang, Dinghui; Song, Guojie

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a nearly analytic exponential time difference (NETD) method for solving the 2D acoustic and elastic wave equations. In this method, we use the nearly analytic discrete operator to approximate the high-order spatial differential operators and transform the seismic wave equations into semi-discrete ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Then, the converted ODE system is solved by the exponential time difference (ETD) method. We investigate the properties of NETD in detail, including the stability condition for 1-D and 2-D cases, the theoretical and relative errors, the numerical dispersion relation for the 2-D acoustic case, and the computational efficiency. In order to further validate the method, we apply it to simulating acoustic/elastic wave propagation in multilayer models which have strong contrasts and complex heterogeneous media, e.g., the SEG model and the Marmousi model. From our theoretical analyses and numerical results, the NETD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively by using the displacement and gradient to approximate the high-order spatial derivatives. In addition, because NETD is based on the structure of the Lie group method which preserves the quantitative properties of differential equations, it can achieve more accurate results than the classical methods.

  20. Geomorphological relationships through the use of 2-D seismic reflection data, Lidar, and aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesce, Meghan Elizabeth

    Barrier Islands are crucial in protecting coastal environments. This study focuses on Dauphin Island, Alabama, located within the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Barrier Island complex. It is one of many islands serving as natural protection for NGOM ecosystems and coastal cities. The NGOM barrier islands formed at 4 kya in response to a decrease in rate of sea level rise. The morphology of these islands changes with hurricanes, anthropogenic activity, and tidal and wave action. This study focuses on ancient incised valleys and and the impact on island morphology on hurricane breaches. Using high frequency 2-D seismic reflection data four horizons, including the present seafloor, were interpreted. Subaerial portions of Dauphin Island were imaged using Lidar data and aerial imagery over a ten-year time span, as well as historical maps. Historical shorelines of Dauphin Island were extracted from aerial imagery and historical maps, and were compared to the location of incised valleys seen within the 2-D seismic reflection data. Erosion and deposition volumes of Dauphin Island from 1998 to 2010 (the time span covering hurricanes Ivan and Katrina) in the vicinity of Katrina Cut and Pelican Island were quantified using Lidar data. For the time period prior to Hurricane Ivan an erosional volume of 46,382,552 m3 and depositional volume of 16,113.6 m3 were quantified from Lidar data. The effects of Hurricane Ivan produced a total erosion volume of 4,076,041.5 m3. The erosional and depositional volumes of Katrina Cut being were 7,562,068.5 m3 and 510,936.7 m3, respectively. More volume change was found within Pelican Pass. For the period between hurricanes Ivan and Katrina the erosion volume was 595,713.8 m3. This was mostly located within Katrina Cut. Total deposition for the same period, including in Pelican Pass, was 15,353,961 m3. Hurricane breaches were compared to ancient incised valleys seen within the 2-D seismic reflection results. Breaches from hurricanes from 1849

  1. 2D Seismic Imaging of Elastic Parameters by Frequency Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2008-12-01

    Thanks to recent advances in parallel computing, full waveform inversion is today a tractable seismic imaging method to reconstruct physical parameters of the earth interior at different scales ranging from the near- surface to the deep crust. We present a massively parallel 2D frequency-domain full-waveform algorithm for imaging visco-elastic media from multi-component seismic data. The forward problem (i.e. the resolution of the frequency-domain 2D PSV elastodynamics equations) is based on low-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method (P0 and/or P1 interpolations). Thanks to triangular unstructured meshes, the DG method allows accurate modeling of both body waves and surface waves in case of complex topography for a discretization of 10 to 15 cells per shear wavelength. The frequency-domain DG system is solved efficiently for multiple sources with the parallel direct solver MUMPS. The local inversion procedure (i.e. minimization of residuals between observed and computed data) is based on the adjoint-state method which allows to efficiently compute the gradient of the objective function. Applying the inversion hierarchically from the low frequencies to the higher ones defines a multiresolution imaging strategy which helps convergence towards the global minimum. In place of expensive Newton algorithm, the combined use of the diagonal terms of the approximate Hessian matrix and optimization algorithms based on quasi-Newton methods (Conjugate Gradient, LBFGS, ...) allows to improve the convergence of the iterative inversion. The distribution of forward problem solutions over processors driven by a mesh partitioning performed by METIS allows to apply most of the inversion in parallel. We shall present the main features of the parallel modeling/inversion algorithm, assess its scalability and illustrate its performances with realistic synthetic case studies.

  2. 2-D Gaussian beam imaging of multicomponent seismic data in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protasov, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    An approach for true-amplitude seismic beam imaging of multicomponent seismic data in 2-D anisotropic elastic media is presented and discussed. Here, the recovered true-amplitude function is a scattering potential. This approach is a migration procedure based on the weighted summation of pre-stack data. The true-amplitude weights are computed by applying Gaussian beams (GBs). We shoot a pair of properly chosen GBs with a fixed dip and opening angles from the current imaging point towards an acquisition system. This pair of beams is used to compute a true-amplitude selective image of a rapid velocity variation. The total true-amplitude image is constructed by superimposing selective images computed for a range of available dip angles. The global regularity of the GBs allows one to disregard whether a ray field is regular or irregular. P- and S-wave GBs can be used to handle raw multicomponent data without separating the waves. The use of anisotropic GBs allows one to take into account the anisotropy of the background model.

  3. 1D and 2D simulations of seismic wave propagation in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Thomas; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Fractures and cracks have a significant influence on the propagation of seismic waves. Their presence causes reflections and scattering and makes the medium effectively anisotropic. We present a numerical approach to simulation of seismic waves in fractured media that does not require direct modelling of the fracture itself, but uses the concept of linear slip interfaces developed by Schoenberg (1980). This condition states that at an interface between two imperfectly bonded elastic media, stress is continuous across the interface while displacement is discontinuous. It is assumed that the jump of displacement is proportional to stress which implies a jump in particle velocity at the interface. We use this condition as a boundary condition to the elastic wave equation and solve this equation in the framework of a Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin scheme using a velocity-stress formulation. We use meshes with tetrahedral elements to discretise the medium. Each individual element face may be declared as a slip interface. Numerical fluxes have been derived by solving the 1D Riemann problem for slip interfaces with elastic and viscoelastic rheology. Viscoelasticity is realised either by a Kelvin-Voigt body or a Standard Linear Solid. These fluxes are not limited to 1D and can - with little modification - be used for simulations in higher dimensions as well. The Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin code "neXd" developed by Lambrecht (2013) is used as a basis for the numerical implementation of this concept. We present examples of simulations in 1D and 2D that illustrate the influence of fractures on the seismic wavefield. We demonstrate the accuracy of the simulation through comparison to an analytical solution in 1D.

  4. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: 2013 multi-component and high-resolution 2D acquisition at GC955 and WR313

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.; Shedd, William W.; Frye, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data. GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations. In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems. Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

  5. Ultra-high-resolution marine 2D-3D seismic investigation of the Liman Tepe/Karantina Island archaeological site (Urla/Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, C.; Woelz, S.; Ersoy, Y.; Boyce, J.; Jokisch, T.; Wendt, G.; Rabbel, W.

    2009-05-01

    2D and 3D high-resolution seismic investigations were performed on submerged coastal archaeological sites at Iskele and near to Karantina Island in the Bay of Izmir in western Turkey. Tectonic subsidence of the coastline has submerged a number of archaeological features associated with an important Early Bronze Archaic settlement (Liman Tepe) and the classical Ionian city of Clazomenae. Seismic surveys were focused on imaging of an Archaic harbour structure and other submerged Hellenistic and Roman architectural features. Seismic data were acquired with the SEAMAP-3D ultra-high-resolution 3D marine seismic acquisition system developed for detailed archaeological site investigation. A 2D reconnaissance survey was performed over a 2 km 2 area around Karantina Island to evaluate the seismic penetrability and to locate sites for further 3D investigation. This survey predominantly revealed marine sediment layers covering the local bedrock, which is characterized by scattering of seismic energy showing its rocky nature. Two ultra-high-resolution 3D seismic surveys were performed. The first covered a 350 m × 30 m area in the modern harbour targeting a prominent Archaic harbour structure. The second was acquired across a 120 m × 40 m area on the southeast shore of the Karantina Island close to a Roman architectural feature. The 3D surveys were acquired with nominal line spacings of 1 m, using a 8 × 4 pseudo-rigid hydrophone array and a Boomer source firing at 3 Hz shot frequency. Automated processing of the seismic data using a portable Linux cluster provided stacked 3D seismic volumes with 25 cm × 25 cm bin size on-site. The 3D seismic survey of the harbour clearly imaged the submerged Archaic structure and the underlying sediment sequence. The seismic time slices reveal two seismic anomalies (2-3 m in diameter) in the harbour basin sediments. The 3D surveys southeast of Karantina identified a thicker marine sediment sequence overlying steeply dipping bedrock

  6. A novel simple procedure to consider seismic soil structure interaction effects in 2D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Juan Diego; Gómez, Juan David; Restrepo, Doriam; Rivera, Santiago

    2014-09-01

    A method is proposed to estimate the seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) effects for use in engineering practice. It is applicable to 2D structures subjected to vertically incident shear waves supported by homogenous half-spaces. The method is attractive since it keeps the simplicity of the spectral approach, overcomes some of the difficulties and inaccuracies of existing classical techniques and yet it considers a physically consistent excitation. This level of simplicity is achieved through a response spectra modification factor that can be applied to the free-field 5%-damped response spectra to yield design spectral ordinates that take into account the scattered motions introduced by the interaction effects. The modification factor is representative of the Transfer Function (TF) between the structural relative displacements and the free-field motion, which is described in terms of its maximum amplitude and associated frequency. Expressions to compute the modification factor by practicing engineers are proposed based upon a parametric study using 576 cases representative of actual structures. The method is tested in 10 cases spanning a wide range of common fundamental vibration periods.

  7. Monitoring of injected CO2 using the seismic full waveform inversion for 2-D elastic VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. K.; Min, D. J.; KIM, S.; Shin, Y.; Moon, S.

    2014-12-01

    To monitor the injected CO2 in the subsurface, seismic monitoring techniques are extensively applied because of its high resolution. Among the seismic monitoring techniques, seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) has high applicability because it can delineate parameter changes by injected CO2. When seismic FWIs are applied, subsurface media can be generally assumed to be isotropic. However, most subsurface media are not isotropic, and shale is a representative anisotropic medium, particularly vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) medium, which is often encountered as a barrier to injected CO2. Thus, anisotropic properties of subsurface media are important for monitoring of injected CO2. For these issues, we need to consider anisotropy of subsurface media when seismic FWIs are applied as a monitoring tool for CO2 sequestration. In this study, we performed seismic FWI for 2-D elastic VTI media to investigate the effects of anisotropic properties in CO2 monitoring. For this numerical test, we assumed a geological model, which copies after one of CO2 storage prospects in Korea. We also applied seismic FWI algorithm for 2-D elastic isotropic media for comparison. From this comparison, we noticed that we can obtain more reliable results when we apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm. Numerical examples indicate that we should apply the anisotropic FWI algorithm rather than the isotropic FWI algorithm when we interpret seismic monitoring data acquired in anisotropic media to increase the success of monitoring for injected CO2. Our numerical results can also be used as references for real seismic monitoring of the Korea CO2 sequestration projects in the near future. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Human Resources Development program (No. 20134010200510) of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korean government Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy and by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine

  8. Multicomponent, 3-D, and High-Resolution 2-D Seismic Characterization of Gas Hydrate Study Sites in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Ruppel, C. D.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W.; Lee, M. W.; Miller, J.

    2012-12-01

    High saturations of gas hydrates have been identified within coarse-grained sediments in the Green Canyon 955 and Walker Ridge 313 lease blocks of the deepwater northern Gulf of Mexico. The thickness, lateral extent, and hydrate saturations in these deposits are constrained by geological and geophysical data and state-of-the-art logging-while-drilling information obtained in multiple boreholes at each site during a 2009 expedition. Presently lacking are multicomponent seismic data that can provide a thorough understanding of the in-situ compressional and shear seismic properties of the hydrate-bearing sediments. Such data may represent an important tool for future characterization of gas hydrate resources. To address this data gap, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will collaborate on a 20-day research expedition to acquire wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer and high-resolution vertical incidence 2-D seismic data at the study sites. In preparation for this mid-2013 expedition, we have analyzed existing industry 3-D seismic data, along with numerically modeled multicomponent data. The 3-D seismic data allow us to identify and rank specific survey targets and can be combined with the numerical modeling results to determine optimal survey line orientation and acquisition parameters. Together, these data also provide a more thorough understanding of the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  9. Interpretation of Line-Integrated Signals from 2-D Phase Contrast Imaging on LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Clive; Tanaka, Kenji; Vyacheslavov, Leonid; Sanin, Andrei; Kawahata, Kazuo; Okajima, S.

    Two dimensional (2D) phase contrast imaging (PCI) is an excellent method to measure core and edge turbulence with good spatial resolution (Δρ ˜ 0.1). General analytical consideration is given to the signal interpretation of the line-integrated signals, with specific application to images from 2D PCI. It is shown that the Fourier components of fluctuations having any non-zero component propagating along the line of sight are not detected. The ramifications of this constraint are discussed, including consideration of the angle between the sight line and flux surface normal. In the experimental geometry, at the point where the flux surfaces are tangent to the sight line, it is shown that it may be possible to detect large poloidally extended (though with small radial wavelength) structures, such as GAMS. The spatial localization technique of this diagnostic is illustrated with experimental data.

  10. Combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction and geotechnical investigations for Bukit Bunuh complex crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azwin, I. N.; Saad, Rosli; Saidin, Mokhtar; Nordiana, M. M.; Anderson Bery, Andy; Hidayah, I. N. E.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in studying impact crater on earth has increased tremendously due to its importance in geologic events, earth inhabitant history as well as economic value. The existences of few shock metamorphism and crater morphology evidences are discovered in Bukit Bunuh, Malaysia thus detailed studies are performed using geophysical and geotechnical methods to verify the type of the crater and characteristics accordingly. This paper presents the combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction, geotechnical SPT N value, moisture content and RQD within the study area. Three stages of data acquisition are made starting with regional study followed by detailed study on West side and East side. Bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity were digitized from 2-D resistivity and seismic sections at specific distance and depth for corresponding boreholes and samples taken. Generally, Bukit Bunuh shows the complex crater characteristics. Standard table of bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity against SPT N value, moisture content and RQD are produce according to geological classifications of impact crater; inside crater, rim/slumped terrace and outside crater.

  11. Re-processing and interpretation of 2D seismic data from the Kristineberg mining area, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, Siddique Akhtar; Malehmir, Alireza; Dehghannejad, Mahdieh

    2012-05-01

    The Kristineberg mining area in the western part of the Skellefte ore district, northern Sweden, contains the largest massive sulphide deposit in the district. In 2003, two parallel seismic lines, Profiles 1 and 5, each about 25 km long and about 8 km apart were acquired in the Kristineberg area. The initial processing results were successful in imaging the large-scale structures of the area down to 12 km of the crust, but resulted in relatively poor seismic image near the mine. In this paper, we re-processed the seismic data along Profile 1 that crosses the mine. The main objective was to improve the seismic section near the mine for further correlation with new seismic data recently acquired in the area. The crooked-line acquisition geometry, very low fold coverage of less than 17, complex geology and sparse outcrops in the area made the data re-processing and interpretation challenging. Despite these challenges, significant improvement is observed in the seismic data, in terms of event continuity and resolution. Refraction static corrections allowed high frequencies to be retained, which improved the seismic section. The refraction static solution was manually checked and adjusted at every iteration to avoid unstable solutions. 3D visualization of the re-processed data with other seismic profiles recently acquired in the area allowed the seismic reflections to be correlated. The majority of the reflections are interpreted to originate from either fault zones or lithological contacts. A very shallow reflection correlates well with the location of the Kristineberg mineralized horizon.

  12. 2D-photochemical model for forbidden oxygen line emission for comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; De Keyser, J.; Maggiolo, R.; Rubin, M.; Gronoff, G.; Gibbons, A.; Jehin, E.; Dhooghe, F.; Gunell, H.; Vaeck, N.; Loreau, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present here a 2D-model of photochemistry for computing the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1S) and O(1D) states, which are responsible for the emission lines at 577.7 nm, 630 nm, and 636.4 nm, in case of the comet 1P/Halley. The presence of O2 within cometary atmospheres, measured by the in-situ ROSETTA and GIOTTO missions, necessitates a revision of the usual photochemical models. Indeed, the photodissociation of molecular oxygen also leads to a significant production of oxygen in excited electronic states. In order to correctly model the solar UV flux absorption, we consider here a 2D configuration. While the green to red-doublet ratio is not affected by the solar UV flux absorption, estimates of the red-doublet and green lines emissions are, however, overestimated by a factor of two in the 1D model compared to the 2D model. Considering a spherical symmetry, emission maps can be deduced from the 2D model in order to be directly compared to ground and/or in-situ observations.

  13. Estimation of Random Medium Parameters from 2D Post-Stack Seismic Data and Its Application in Seismic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Zhu, P.; Gu, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Small scale heterogeneities of subsurface medium can be characterized conveniently and effectively using a few simple random medium parameters (RMP), such as autocorrelation length, angle and roughness factor, etc. The estimation of these parameters is significant in both oil reservoir prediction and metallic mine exploration. Poor accuracy and low stability existed in current estimation approaches limit the application of random medium theory in seismic exploration. This study focuses on improving the accuracy and stability of RMP estimation from post-stacked seismic data and its application in the seismic inversion. Experiment and theory analysis indicate that, although the autocorrelation of random medium is related to those of corresponding post-stacked seismic data, the relationship is obviously affected by the seismic dominant frequency, the autocorrelation length, roughness factor and so on. Also the error of calculation of autocorrelation in the case of finite and discrete model decreases the accuracy. In order to improve the precision of estimation of RMP, we design two improved approaches. Firstly, we apply region growing algorithm, which often used in image processing, to reduce the influence of noise in the autocorrelation calculated by the power spectrum method. Secondly, the orientation of autocorrelation is used as a new constraint in the estimation algorithm. The numerical experiments proved that it is feasible. In addition, in post-stack seismic inversion of random medium, the estimated RMP may be used to constrain inverse procedure and to construct the initial model. The experiment results indicate that taking inversed model as random medium and using relatively accurate estimated RMP to construct initial model can get better inversion result, which contained more details conformed to the actual underground medium.

  14. Imaging the Ferron Member of the Mancos Shale formation using reprocessed high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data: Emery County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Late in 1982 and early in 1983, Arco Exploration contracted with Rocky Mountain Geophysical to acquired four high-resolution 2-D multichannel seismic reflection lines in Emery County, Utah. The primary goal in acquiring this data was an attempt to image the Ferron Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Design of the high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data acquisition used both a short geophone group interval and a short sample interval. An explosive energy source was used which provided an input pulse with broad frequency content and higher frequencies than typical non-explosive Vibroseis?? sources. Reflections produced by using this high-frequency energy source when sampled at a short interval are usually able to resolve shallow horizons that are relatively thin compared to those that can be resolved using more typical oil and gas exploration seismic reflection methods.The U.S. Geological Survey-Energy Resources Program, Geophysical Processing Group used the processing sequence originally applied by Arco in 1984 as a guide and experimented with processing steps applied in a different order using slightly different parameters in an effort to improve imaging the Ferron Member horizon. As with the Arco processed data there are sections along all four seismic lines where the data quality cannot be improved upon, and in fact the data quality is so poor that the Ferron horizon cannot be imaged at all.Interpretation of the seismic and core hole data indicates that the Ferron Member in the study area represent a deltaic sequence including delta front, lower delta plain, and upper delta plain environments. Correlating the depositional environments for the Ferron Member as indicated in the core holes with the thickness of Ferron Member suggests the presence of a delta lobe running from the northwest to the southeast through the study area. The presence of a deltaic channel system within the delta lobe complex might prove to be an interesting conventional

  15. Reconstruction of 2D seismic wavefield from Long-Period Seismogram and Short-Period Seismogram Envelope by Seismic Gradiometry applied to the Hi-net Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-04-01

    The high-sensitive seismograph network (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has about 800 stations with average separation of 20 km all over the Japanese archipelago. Although it is equipped with short-period seismometers, we also can observe long-period seismic wave up to 100 s in periods for significantly large earthquakes. In this case, we may treat long-period seismic waves as a 2D wavefield with station separations shorter than wavelength rather than individual traces at stations. In this study, we attempt to reconstruct 2D wavefield and obtain its propagation properties from seismic gradiometry (SG) method. The SG estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients from discrete station record by the Taylor series approximation with an inverse problem. By using spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, we can obtain properties of propagating wave packet such as the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading and radiation pattern. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary condition, we may decompose the vector elastic 2D wavefield estimated by the SG into divergence and rotation components. First, we applied the seismic gradiometry to a synthetic long-period (20-50 s) seismogram dataset computed by numerical simulation in realistic 3D medium at the Hi-net station layout as a feasibility test. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives are very well reproduced with average correlation coefficients higher than 0.99 in this period range. Applications to a real large earthquakes show that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield are well reconstructed with additional information of arrival direction and its slowness. The reconstructed wavefield contained a clear contrast in slowness between body and surface waves, regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation which may be attributed to scattering. Slowness

  16. Integrated Seismic Survey for Detecting Landslide Effects on High Speed Rail Line at Istanbul-Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grit, Mert; Kanli, Ali Ismet

    2016-02-01

    In this study, Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves Method (MASW), seismic refraction tomography and seismic reflection methods are used together at Silivri district in Istanbul - a district with a landslide problem because of the high speed rail line project crossing through the area. The landslide structure, border and depth of the slip plane are investigated and correlated within the local geology. According to the obtained 2D seismic sections, the landslide occurs through the East-West direction in the study area and the landslide slip plane with its border are clearly obtained under the subsurface. The results prove that the study area is suitable enough for the landslide development and this evolution also affects the high speed rail line project.

  17. Analysis of Cretaceous (Aptian) strata in central Tunisia, using 2D seismic data and well logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouaghi, Taher; Ferhi, Issam; Bédir, Mourad; Youssef, Mohamed Ben; Gasmi, Mohamed; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a structural and depositional model of lower Cretaceous (Aptian) strata in central Tunisia, using detailed facies relations in outcrops, seismic reflection data, and wells. The study interval (called the "Aptian supersequence") is subdivided into four seismic sequences containing third-order sequences. Sequence architecture was strongly affected by syndepositional tectonic movements, which controlled sequence position and distribution. Specifically, the seismic sections show irregular distribution of different zones of subsidence and uplift. The observed structures identified through the detailed mapping suggest that lower Cretaceous rifting created depressions and grabens that filled with strata characterized by divergent reflectors striking against dipping growth faults. The Aptian-Albian unconformity ("crisis") marked a change of the extensional stress field from NNW-SSE to NE-SW induced rotation of blocks and an evolution of sedimentary basin filling related to the regional tectonic deformation. Local salt tectonic movement accentuated the formation of asymmetric depocenters. The salt ascended at the junction of master faults, resulting in cross-cutting of the strata and local reworking of Triassic evaporites in Aptian strata. Basinward to landward variations of the thickness and facies associated with strata pinch-outs and unconformities are related to the main synsedimentary tectonic events that were synchronous with salt tectonic movements. Triassic salt domes and salt intrusions along faults accentuated the border elevations between basin depocenters and uplifts. These sedimentary phenomena in central Tunisia are interpreted as causally related aspects of a local and global tectonic event during the Aptian.

  18. Comparative 2D BRT and seismic modeling of CO2 plumes in deep saline reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagrey, Said Attia Al; Strahser, Matthias; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    The multi-disciplinary research project 'CO2 MoPa' (modeling and parameterization of CO2 storage in deep saline formations for dimensions and risk analysis) deals, among others, with the parameterization of virtual subsurface storage sites to characterize rock properties with modeling of processes related to CCS in deep saline reservoirs. The geophysical task is to estimate the sensitivity and the resolution of reflection seismic and geoelectrical time-lapses in order to determine the propagation of CO2 within the sediments and the development of the CO2 reservoir. Compared with seismic, borehole electric resistivity tomography (BRT) has lower resolution, but its permanent installation and continuous monitoring can make it an economical alternative or complement. Seismic and geoelectric applications to quantify changes of intrinsic aquifer properties with time are justified by the lower density and velocity and the higher electric resistivity of CO2 in comparison to pore brine. We present here modeling results on scenarios with realistic parameters of deep saline formations of the German Basin (candidate for CCS). The study focuses on effects of parameters related to depth (temperature, pressure), petrophysics (salinity, porosity), plume dimensions/saturations and data acquisition, processing and inversions. Both methods show stronger effects with increasing brine salinity, CO2 reservoir thickness, porosity and CO2 saturation in the pores. Both methods have a pronounced depth dependence due to the pressure and temperature dependence of the velocities, densities and resistivities of the host rock, brine and CO2. Increasing depth means also decreasing frequencies of the seismic signal and hence weaker resolution. Because of the expected limited thickness of the CO2 reservoir, the reflections from its top and bottom will most likely interfere with each other, making it difficult to determine the exact dimensions of the reservoir. In BRT, the resulting resistivity

  19. First Arrival Seismic Tomography (FAST) vs. PStomo_eq applied to crooked line seismic data from the Siljan ring area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tablante, Johiris I.; Juhlin, Christopher; Bergman, Björn

    2006-05-01

    When seismic profiles deviate significantly from straight lines, the results from 2D traveltime inversion programs will be in error due to the inherent 3D component present in the data. Thus, it is necessary to use a program that can handle the 3D aspects of the acquisition geometry. This study compares the performance and results from two computer programs for 3D seismic tomography. These algorithms are the package for First Arrival Seismic Tomography (FAST) and a Local Earthquake tomography program, PStomo_eq. Although both codes invert for the velocity field using the conjugate gradient solver LSQR, the common smoothness constraint is handled differently. In addition, the programs do not incorporate the same options for user-specified constraints. These differences in implementation are clearly observed in the inverted velocity fields obtained in this study. Both FAST and PStomo_eq are applied to synthetic and real data sets with crooked line geometry. First arrival traveltimes from seismic data acquired in the Siljan ring impact area are used for the real data set test. The results show that FAST gives smoother models than PStomo_eq. On the real data set PStomo_eq showed a better correlation to the information at hand. Different criteria exist for what is desirable in a model; thus, the choice of which program to use will mostly depend on the particular goals of the study.

  20. LBQ2D, Extending the Line Broadened Quasilinear Model to TAE-EP Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2012-10-01

    The line broadened quasilinear model was proposed and tested on the one dimensional electrostatic case of the bump on tailfootnotetextH.L Berk, B. Breizman and J. Fitzpatrick, Nucl. Fusion, 35:1661, 1995 to study the wave particle interaction. In conventional quasilinear theory, the sea of overlapping modes evolve with time as the particle distribution function self consistently undergo diffusion in phase space. The line broadened quasilinear model is an extension to the conventional theory in a way that allows treatment of isolated modes as well as overlapping modes by broadening the resonant line in phase space. This makes it possible to treat the evolution of modes self consistently from onset to saturation in either case. We describe here the model denoted by LBQ2D which is an extension of the proposed one dimensional line broadened quasilinear model to the case of TAEs interacting with energetic particles in two dimensional phase space, energy as well as canonical angular momentum. We study the saturation of isolated modes in various regimes and present the analytical derivation and numerical results. Finally, we present, using ITER parameters, the case where multiple modes overlap and describe the techniques used for the numerical treatment.

  1. Seismic wavefield propagation in 2D anisotropic media: Ray theory versus wave-equation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-ying; Hu, Guang-yi; Zhang, Yan-teng; Li, Zhong-sheng

    2014-05-01

    Despite the ray theory that is based on the high frequency assumption of the elastic wave-equation, the ray theory and the wave-equation simulation methods should be mutually proof of each other and hence jointly developed, but in fact parallel independent progressively. For this reason, in this paper we try an alternative way to mutually verify and test the computational accuracy and the solution correctness of both the ray theory (the multistage irregular shortest-path method) and the wave-equation simulation method (both the staggered finite difference method and the pseudo-spectral method) in anisotropic VTI and TTI media. Through the analysis and comparison of wavefield snapshot, common source gather profile and synthetic seismogram, it is able not only to verify the accuracy and correctness of each of the methods at least for kinematic features, but also to thoroughly understand the kinematic and dynamic features of the wave propagation in anisotropic media. The results show that both the staggered finite difference method and the pseudo-spectral method are able to yield the same results even for complex anisotropic media (such as a fault model); the multistage irregular shortest-path method is capable of predicting similar kinematic features as the wave-equation simulation method does, which can be used to mutually test each other for methodology accuracy and solution correctness. In addition, with the aid of the ray tracing results, it is easy to identify the multi-phases (or multiples) in the wavefield snapshot, common source point gather seismic section and synthetic seismogram predicted by the wave-equation simulation method, which is a key issue for later seismic application.

  2. 2D time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a tradeoff between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second-order in time and fourth-order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  3. Evolution of seismic layer 2B across the Juan de Fuca Ridge from hydrophone streamer 2-D traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kori R.; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Canales, J. Pablo; Carbotte, Suzanne M.

    2011-05-01

    How oceanic crust evolves has important implications for understanding both subduction earthquake hazards and energy and mass exchange between the Earth's interior and the oceans. Although considerable work has been done characterizing the evolution of seismic layer 2A, there has been little analysis of the processes that affect layer 2B after formation. Here we present high-resolution 2-D tomographic models of seismic layer 2B along ˜300 km long multichannel seismic transects crossing the Endeavour, Northern Symmetric, and Cleft segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These models show that seismic layer 2B evolves rapidly following a different course than layer 2A. The upper layer 2B velocities increase on average by 0.8 km/s and reach a generally constant velocity of 5.2 ± 0.3 km/s within the first 0.5 Myr after crustal formation. This suggests that the strongest impact on layer 2B evolution may be that of mineral precipitation due to "active" hydrothermal circulation centered about the ridge crest and driven by the heat from the axial magma chamber. Variations in upper layer 2B velocity with age at time scales ≥0.5 Ma show correlation about the ridge axis indicating that in the long term, crustal accretion processes affect both sides of the ridge axis in a similar way. Below the 0.5 Ma threshold, differences in 2B velocity are likely imprinted during crustal formation or early crustal evolution. Layer 2B velocities at propagator wakes (5.0 ± 0.2 km/s), where enhanced faulting and cracking are expected, and at areas that coincide with extensional or transtensional faulting are on average slightly slower than in normal mature upper layer 2B. Analysis of the layer 2B velocities from areas where the hydrothermal patterns are known shows that the locations of current and paleohydrothermal discharge and recharge zones are marked by reduced and increased upper layer 2B velocities, respectively. Additionally, the distance between present up-flow and down-flow zones is

  4. Optimized arrays for 2-D resistivity survey lines with a large number of electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, M. H.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.; Uhlemann, S. S.; Sorensen, J. P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies show that optimized arrays generated using the 'Compare R' method have significantly better resolution than conventional arrays. This method determines the optimum set of arrays by selecting those that give the maximum model resolution. The number of possible arrays (the comprehensive data set) increases with the fourth power of the number of electrodes. The optimization method faces practical limitations for 2-D survey lines with more than 60 electrodes where the number of possible arrays exceeds a million. Several techniques are proposed to reduce the calculation time for such survey lines. A single-precision version of the 'Compare R' algorithm using a new ranking function reduces the calculation time by two to eight times while providing results similar to the double-precision version. Recent improvements in computer GPU technology can reduce the calculation time by about seven times. The calculation time is reduced by half by using the fact that arrays that are symmetrical about the center of the line produce identical changes in the model resolution values. It is further reduced by more than thirty times by calculating the Sherman-Morrison update for all the possible two-electrode combinations, which are then used to calculate the model resolution values for the four-electrode arrays. The calculation time is reduced by more then ten times by using a subset of the comprehensive data set consisting of only symmetrical arrays. Tests with a synthetic model and field data set show that optimized arrays derived from this subset produce inversion models with differences of less than 10% from those derived using the full comprehensive data set. The optimized data sets produced models that are more accurate than the Wenner-Schlumberger array data sets in all the tests.

  5. Quaternary Deformation History of the Palos Verdes Fault in San Pedro Bay using 3D and 2D Seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigor, A.; Mellors, R. J.; Legg, M.; Francis, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Palos Verdes fault has one of the highest slip rates of the Los Angeles basin structures. Using a combination of exploration industry 3-D seismic data and 2-D high-resolution profiles through San Pedro Bay, we are preparing detailed maps of the shallow geometry and deformation history of the Palos Verdes fault. By mapping prominent shallow reflection horizons, that represent important late Pliocene and Quaternary sedimentary sequences, we can estimate the Quaternary deformation history of this important fault zone and identify whether significant changes in tectonic style or rates of deformation have occurred that may affect estimates of earthquake potential in the southern California region. We have identified about six major seismic stratigraphic sequences in the Wilmington Graben east of the Palos Verdes fault zone representing the time period from Repettian (Pliocene) to late Quaternary. Three of these are in the shallow section and clearly imaged by the high-resolution profiles. One of the more significant features we observe regarding these sequences is that the uplift of the Palos Verdes anticlinorium, represented by sedimentary growth wedges adjacent to the fault zone, appears to stop and start. These changes in vertical deformation character may represent important local changes in the tectonic style along the fault zone. For constraints on lateral deformation history, we are attempting to identify possible meanders or other irregularities in the Los Angeles - San Gabriel river system that generally flows straight along the northeast flank of the Palos Verdes anticlinorium before plunging down the slope in the San Gabriel submarine canyon. Channel thalwegs and margins offset by the Palos Verdes fault zone would provide requisite piercing points for measuring right-slip since channels filled. Major segment boundaries, such as the 3-km long north-trending releasing bend and Beta oil field complex restraining bend structure may provide other important

  6. Preliminary analysis of the Baranof Fan system, Gulf of Alaska, based on 2D seismic reflection and multibeam bathymetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVoir, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Reece, R.; Barth, G. A.; Childs, J. R.; Everson, E. D.; Hart, P. E.; Johnson, K. M.; Lester, W. R.; Sliter, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    The Baranof Fan is a large marine sedimentary system in the eastern Gulf of Alaska, straddling the border between the U.S. and Canada. The volume of the Fan is estimated to be > 200,000 km3. Little is known about the depositional timing, the tectonic and morphologic processes influencing its development, or the role of channel aggradation and avulsion in its progression. Both tectonic and climatic transitions likely influenced the formation and evolution of the Fan, with events including the onset of northern hemisphere glaciation, the Mid-Pleistocene transition, the transport of the Yakutat Terrane along the southeast Alaskan margin, and the uplift of the Coast Mountains. 2D seismic reflection and multibeam bathymetry data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska in June 2011 aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth as a part of the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf (ECS) program assessing potential opportunities under the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention. The purpose of the 2011 survey was to determine sediment thickness, velocity structure, stratigraphic architecture, and crustal structure on of the Gulf of Alaska seafloor in support of U.S. continental shelf maritime zone definition. The surveyed geologic features include the Surveyor and Baranof sedimentary systems, which control active sediment distribution in the Gulf of Alaska. Preliminary analysis of these data show four distinct buried channels throughout the mid to distal Baranof Fan, ranging in width from 5 - 9 km, which may have evolved into modern surface channels (ranging in width from 2 - 7 km) visible in both the seismic data and multibeam bathymetry. The location and trajectory of these buried channels, however, appears distinct from the modern Horizon and Mukluk Channels; the buried channels may have avulsed into the modern channel systems, or could possibly be older and now abandoned branches instrumental in building the westward part of the Fan. All of the imaged channels appear to be depositional

  7. Seismic study of the inner part of the Tyrrhenian basin from 2-D joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, M.; Sallares, V.; Ranero, C. R.; Guzman, M.; Grevemeyer, I.; Zitellini, N.

    2011-12-01

    Located between Italy, Corsica, Sardinia and Sicily the Tyrrhenian Sea is a Neogen back-arc basin formed by continental extension attributed to the southeastward rollback of the subducting Ionian plate. This triangle-shaped basin is an ideal place to study the evolution of extension process. The basin displays different states of extension along its length, finding from the early, low-extension episodes of continental rifting in the northern areas to the exhumation of the mantle in the deepest part of the basin. In order to study the nature of the crust and the 4D evolution of the Tyrrhenian basin, we have collected a survey of multichannel (MCS) and wide angle seismic (WAS) data. This survey was carried out into the framework of the MEDOC project during 2010 with the coordination of 2 research vessels, the R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa and the R/V Urania. During the experiment a total of 17 lines of MCS and 5 lines of WAS were acquired, with more than 100 deployments of both Ocean Bottom Hydrophones (OBH) and Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS). The coordination with more than one team on land made possible to record data by land stations in Corsica, Sardinia and Italy. Here we present 2D P-wave velocity models with the velocity distribution in the crust and uppermost mantle and the geometry of the moho boundary, obtained by joint refraction and reflection tomography of WAS data. The data belong to lines recorded between Sardinia and Italy and Sardinia and Sicily. The data selected for the inversion consist in phases refracted through the crust and upper mantle (phases Pg and Pn) and reflected in the moho boundary (phases PmP). A detailed statistical uncertainty analysis will allow us to use seismic velocities to predict the petrology of the different domains recognized. The aim of this modeling effort is to identify the different crustal units across the basin in order to determine the transition between the continental little extended crust and the exhumed mantle.

  8. Improved Subsurface Imaging of Deep Seismic Data in Areas with Rugged Topography and Crooked-line Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Ito, T.; Brown, L. D.; Ikawa, T.

    2001-12-01

    Deep seismic reflection surveying in mountainous areas imposes serious restrictions and compromises on both data processing and acquisition. In addition to complex subsurface structure, rugged acquisition topography, crookedness of seismic lines and irregular distribution of shots often result in poor data quality. High-velocity rocks at the surface can cause shot and receiver coupling problems, and produce misalignments of seismic traces due to improperly-determined statics. Furthermore back-scattered energy from off-line surfaces can get trapped in weathered layers and generate unwanted coherent noise. We have investigated the applicability and limitations of conventional processing to deal with the problems related to acquisition geometries. We evaluated and modified the following options in data processing to improve the deep seismic image: (1) Simultaneous application of Kirchhoff trace mapping and local-datum corrections (wave-equation datuming or static time shift); (2) Kirchhoff imaging to account for the crookedness of shot and receiver lines; (3) Simultaneous application of 3D DMO trace mapping and cross-dip corrections; (4) Accurate estimation of refraction/reflection statics by turning-ray tomography and global-optimization method. The seismic datasets used for this case study are a 2D seismic profile acquired in Hidaka mountains on Hokkaido, northeast Japan, and a 2D seismic profile from the INDEPTH Project in the Himalayas. The result of imaging crustal structure of the Hidaka collision zone has revealed that the Kuril arc lithosphere is delaminated at about 23km deep in the lower crust. Also, we find that the above processing strategy significantly improved imaging of structure in the upper plate of the Himalayan megathrust.

  9. Deducing the subsurface geological conditions and structural framework of the NE Gulf of Suez area, using 2-D and 3-D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, Hesham Shaker; Nakhla, Adel Mokhles

    2015-06-01

    An interpretation of the seismic data of Ras Budran and Abu Zenima oil fields, northern central Gulf of Suez, is carried out to evaluate its subsurface tectonic setting. The structural configuration, as well as the tectonic features of the concerned area is criticized through the study of 2D and 3D seismic data interpretation with the available geological data, in which the geo-seismic depth maps for the main interesting levels (Kareem, Nukhul, Matulla, Raha and Nubia Formations) are depicted. Such maps reflect that, the Miocene structure of Ras Budran area is a nearly NE-SW trending anticlinal feature, which broken into several panels by a set of NWSE and NE-SW trending faults. The Pre-Miocene structure of the studied area is very complex, where Ras Budran area consists of step faults down stepping to the south and southwest, which have been subjected to cross faults of NE-SW trend with lateral and vertical displacements.

  10. 2D Seismic interpretation of strike-slip faulting, salt tectonics, and Cretaceous unconformities, Atlas Mountains, central Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouaghi, Taher; Bédir, Mourad; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi

    2005-11-01

    The Cretaceous deposits in central Tunisia blocks were studied by sequence stratigraphy, 2D seismic interpretation calibrated to the well and associated outcrop data. The constructing and comparing histories of the northern and southern blocks of the Gafsa master fault was the establishment of platform to basin stratigraphic configuration based on the major unconformity surfaces. Three important basin zones mark subsurface structures: Gafsa to the south, Souinia-Majoura to the northeast and Sidi Aïch-Mèjel Bel Abbès to the northwest. Basin depocenters and upthrown blocks are bounded by the N120° Gafsa and Majoura and N180° Sidi Ali Ben Aoun wrench fault salt-intruded tectonic corridors and subdivided by the associated N60° and N90° trending second-order fault corridors. The Mèjel Bel Abbès block is characterized by brittle structures associated with a deep asymmetric geometry that is organized into depressions and uplifts. Halokinesis of Triassic salt began in the Jurassic and continued during the Cretaceous periods. During extensional deformations, salt movement controlled sedimentation distribution and location of pre-compressional structures. During compressional deformations, salt remobilization accentuated the folded uplifts. The Triassic salt facies constitutes a level of decollement at the base of the Mesozoic deposits during the later displacements. The coeval dextral strike-slip motion along the three northwest-southeast bounding master faults (Gafsa, Sehib-Alima and Majoura-Mech) suggests a pull-apart opening of the Gafsa basin. Synchronous movements of the Gafsa first-order dextral strike-slip fault with the Sidi Ali Ben Aoun sinistral wrench fault caused formation of tectonic obstacles that are shown first by the sealed structures, then by development of the local compressive stress that caused formation of the south overturned folds and the syncline depressions. The transcurrent fault systems caused formation of Turonian and Senonian

  11. Tracking objects outside the line of sight using 2D intensity images

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Jonathan; Peters, Christoph; Martín, Jaime; Laurenzis, Martin; Hullin, Matthias B.

    2016-01-01

    The observation of objects located in inaccessible regions is a recurring challenge in a wide variety of important applications. Recent work has shown that using rare and expensive optical setups, indirect diffuse light reflections can be used to reconstruct objects and two-dimensional (2D) patterns around a corner. Here we show that occluded objects can be tracked in real time using much simpler means, namely a standard 2D camera and a laser pointer. Our method fundamentally differs from previous solutions by approaching the problem in an analysis-by-synthesis sense. By repeatedly simulating light transport through the scene, we determine the set of object parameters that most closely fits the measured intensity distribution. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach is capable of following the translation of unknown objects, and translation and orientation of a known object, in real time. PMID:27577969

  12. Tracking objects outside the line of sight using 2D intensity images.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jonathan; Peters, Christoph; Martín, Jaime; Laurenzis, Martin; Hullin, Matthias B

    2016-01-01

    The observation of objects located in inaccessible regions is a recurring challenge in a wide variety of important applications. Recent work has shown that using rare and expensive optical setups, indirect diffuse light reflections can be used to reconstruct objects and two-dimensional (2D) patterns around a corner. Here we show that occluded objects can be tracked in real time using much simpler means, namely a standard 2D camera and a laser pointer. Our method fundamentally differs from previous solutions by approaching the problem in an analysis-by-synthesis sense. By repeatedly simulating light transport through the scene, we determine the set of object parameters that most closely fits the measured intensity distribution. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach is capable of following the translation of unknown objects, and translation and orientation of a known object, in real time. PMID:27577969

  13. REVIEW ARTICLE: Slow light modes for optical delay lines: 2D photonic crystal-based design structures, performances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talneau, A.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2D photonic crystal-based structures designed to display low group velocity as well as reduced group velocity dispersions. Their main envisioned applications are optical delay lines for telecom transmissions at 1.55 µm. Optical mechanisms responsible for slowing down the optical modes and encountered in the slow light regime serve as a guideline for this paper.

  14. Emission-Line Galaxies from the PEARS Hubble Ultra Deep Field: A 2-D Detection Method and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Straughn, Amber N.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Cohen, Seth H.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, james; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Xu, Chun; Gronwall, Caryl; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Walsh, Jeremy; diSeregoAlighieri, Sperello

    2007-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism PEARS (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) survey provides a large dataset of low-resolution spectra from thousands of galaxies in the GOODS North and South fields. One important subset of objects in these data are emission-line galaxies (ELGs), and we have investigated several different methods aimed at systematically selecting these galaxies. Here we present a new methodology and results of a search for these ELGs in the PEARS observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) using a 2D detection method that utilizes the observation that many emission lines originate from clumpy knots within galaxies. This 2D line-finding method proves to be useful in detecting emission lines from compact knots within galaxies that might not otherwise be detected using more traditional 1D line-finding techniques. We find in total 96 emission lines in the HUDF, originating from 81 distinct "knots" within 63 individual galaxies. We find in general that [0 1111 emitters are the most common, comprising 44% of the sample, and on average have high equivalent widths (70% of [0 1111 emitters having rest-frame EW> 100A). There are 12 galaxies with multiple emitting knots; several show evidence of variations in H-alpha flux in the knots, suggesting that the differing star formation properties across a single galaxy can in general be probed at redshifts approximately greater than 0.2 - 0.4. The most prevalent morphologies are large face-on spirals and clumpy interacting systems, many being unique detections owing to the 2D method described here, thus highlighting the strength of this technique.

  15. Smooth 2-D ocean sound speed from Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion of seismic oceanography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, Tanya M.; Jun, Hyunggu; Rosado, Hayley; Shin, Changsoo

    2016-02-01

    In seismic oceanography, processed images highlight small temperature changes, but inversion is needed to obtain absolute temperatures. Local search-based full waveform inversion has a lower computational cost than global search but requires accurate starting models. Unfortunately, most marine seismic data have little associated hydrographic data and the band-limited nature of seismic data makes extracting the long wavelength sound speed trend directly from seismic data inherently challenging. Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion (LDI) can use rudimentary starting models without prior information about the medium. Data are transformed to the Laplace domain, and a smooth sound speed model is extracted by examining the zero and low frequency components of the damped wavefield. We applied LDI to five synthetic data sets based on oceanographic features and recovered smoothed versions of our synthetic models, showing the viability of LDI for creating starting models suitable for more detailed inversions.

  16. 2D multi-parameter elastic seismic imaging by frequency-domain L1-norm full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, Romain; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is becoming a powerful and efficient tool to derive high-resolution quantitative models of the subsurface. In the frequency-domain, computationally efficient FWI algorithms can be designed for wide-aperture acquisition geometries by limiting inversion to few discrete frequencies. However, FWI remains an ill-posed and highly non-linear data-fitting procedure that is sensitive to noise, inaccuracies of the starting model and definition of multiparameter classes. The footprint of the noise in seismic imaging is conventionally mitigated by stacking highly redundant multifold data. However, when the data redundancy is decimated in the framework of efficient frequency-domain FWI, it is essential to assess the sensitivity of the inversion to noise. The impact of the noise in FWI, when applied to decimated data sets, has been marginally illustrated in the past and least-squares minimisation has remained the most popular approach. We investigate in this study the sensitivity of frequency-domain elastic FWI to noise for realistic onshore and offshore synthetic data sets contaminated by ambient random white noise. Four minimisation functionals are assessed in the framework of frequency domain FWI of decimated data: the classical least-square norm (L2), the least-absolute-values norm (L1), and some combinations of both (the Huber and the so-called Hybrid criteria). These functionals are implemented in a massively-parallel, 2D elastic frequency-domain FWI algorithm. A two-level hierarchical algorithm is implemented to mitigate the non-linearity of the inversion in complex environments. The first outer level consists of successive inversions of frequency groups of increasing high-frequency content. This level defines a multi-scale approach while preserving some data redundancy by means of simultaneous inversion of multiple frequencies. The second inner level used complex-valued frequencies for data preconditioning. This preconditioning controls the

  17. Dynamics of quiescent prominence fine structures analyzed by 2D non-LTE modelling of the Hα line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mein, P.; Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Mein, N.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: We analyze the dynamics of the prominence fine structures of a quiescent prominence observed on April 26, 2007 during a coordinated campaign of several spaceborne and ground-based instruments. We use Lyman spectra observed by SOHO/SUMER and the Hα line spectra obtained by MSDP spectrograph working at the Meudon Solar Tower. Methods: We employ the 2D multi-thread prominence fine-structure modelling that includes randomly distributed line-of-sight (LOS) velocities of individual threads to derive models producing synthetic Lyman lines in good agreement with the SOHO/SUMER observations. We then use these models to produce synthetic Hα line spectra that we compare with the observed spectra using three statistical parameters: the line integrated intensity, the line full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), and the Doppler velocity derived from shifts of the line profiles. Results: We demonstrate that the 2D multi-thread models that produce synthetic Lyman spectra in agreement with observations also generate synthetic Hα spectra in good agreement with the observed ones. The statistical analysis of the FWHM and Doppler velocities of the synthetic Hα line profiles show that the overall LOS velocities in the April 26, 2007 prominence at the time of the observations were below 15 km s-1 and in the prominence core were close to 10 km s-1. In combination with the analysis of the Lyman spectra, we determine several physical parameters of the observed prominence fine-structures that show that the April 26, 2007 prominence had a relatively low-mass weakly magnetized structure. We are also able to impose some constraints on the prominence core temperature, which may be relatively low, with values below 6000 K. Conclusions: The combination of 2D non-LTE prominence fine-structure modelling with the statistical analysis of the observed and synthetic Lyman and Hα spectra allows us to analyze the influence of the model input parameters and the velocity fields on the synthetic H

  18. Kinetic inductance driven nanoscale 2D and 3D THz transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, S Hossein; Williamson, Ian A D; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    We examine the unusual dispersion and attenuation of transverse electromagnetic waves in the few-THz regime on nanoscale graphene and copper transmission lines. Conventionally, such propagation has been considered to be highly dispersive, due to the RC time constant-driven voltage diffusion below 1 THz and plasmonic effects at higher optical frequencies. Our numerical modeling across the microwave, THz, and optical frequency ranges reveals that the conductor kinetic inductance creates an ultra-broadband linear-dispersion and constant-attenuation region in the THz regime. This so-called LC region is an ideal characteristic that is known to be absent in macro-scale transmission lines. The kinetic-LC frequency range is dictated by the structural dimensionality and the free-carrier scattering rate of the conductor material. Moreover, up to 40x wavelength reduction is observed in graphene transmission lines. PMID:27137628

  19. Kinetic inductance driven nanoscale 2D and 3D THz transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Hossein; Williamson, Ian A. D.; Wang, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    We examine the unusual dispersion and attenuation of transverse electromagnetic waves in the few-THz regime on nanoscale graphene and copper transmission lines. Conventionally, such propagation has been considered to be highly dispersive, due to the RC time constant-driven voltage diffusion below 1 THz and plasmonic effects at higher optical frequencies. Our numerical modeling across the microwave, THz, and optical frequency ranges reveals that the conductor kinetic inductance creates an ultra-broadband linear-dispersion and constant-attenuation region in the THz regime. This so-called LC region is an ideal characteristic that is known to be absent in macro-scale transmission lines. The kinetic-LC frequency range is dictated by the structural dimensionality and the free-carrier scattering rate of the conductor material. Moreover, up to 40x wavelength reduction is observed in graphene transmission lines.

  20. Kinetic inductance driven nanoscale 2D and 3D THz transmission lines

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, S. Hossein; Williamson, Ian A. D.; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    We examine the unusual dispersion and attenuation of transverse electromagnetic waves in the few-THz regime on nanoscale graphene and copper transmission lines. Conventionally, such propagation has been considered to be highly dispersive, due to the RC time constant-driven voltage diffusion below 1 THz and plasmonic effects at higher optical frequencies. Our numerical modeling across the microwave, THz, and optical frequency ranges reveals that the conductor kinetic inductance creates an ultra-broadband linear-dispersion and constant-attenuation region in the THz regime. This so-called LC region is an ideal characteristic that is known to be absent in macro-scale transmission lines. The kinetic-LC frequency range is dictated by the structural dimensionality and the free-carrier scattering rate of the conductor material. Moreover, up to 40x wavelength reduction is observed in graphene transmission lines. PMID:27137628

  1. Line-source simulation for shallow-seismic data. Part 1: theoretical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbriger, Thomas; Groos, Lisa; Schäfer, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Equivalent line-source seismograms can be obtained from shallow seismic field recordings by (1) convolving the waveforms with √{t^{-1}}, (2) applying a √{t^{-1}} time-domain taper, where t is traveltime and (3) scaling the waveform with r_{offset}√{2}, where roffset is source-to-receiver offset. We require such a procedure when applying algorithms of 2-D adjoint full-waveform inversion (FWI) to shallow-seismic data. Although derived from solutions for acoustic waves in homogeneous full space this simple procedure performs surprisingly well when applied to vertical and radial components of shallow-seismic recordings from hammer blows or explosions. This is the case even in the near field of the force, although the procedure is derived from a far-field approximation. Similar approximative procedures recommended in literature are optimized for reflected waves and do not convert the amplitudes of all shallow seismic wavefield constituents equally well. We demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method for the viscoelastic case by numerical examples as well as analytical considerations. In contrast to the proposed single-trace procedure, integral-transform approaches are exact for all viscoelastic wavefield constituents of the near- and far-field in unknown 1-D-heterogeneous structure. Unfortunately, integral-transform approaches suffer from artefacts in applications to data sampled on 2-D structures. Here, we use the Fourier-Bessel integral transformation as a reference in 1-D heterogeneous structures. We unroll the wave-theoretical background of both approaches in order to demonstrate, why the simplistic single-trace simulation approach derived from the asymptotic acoustic case can perform so well when applied to the shallow elastic wavefield. Further we give recommendations for practical implementation and application to field data of the proposed simulation method and compare to the results of alternative conversion rules. The performance of the conversion

  2. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  3. Stratigraphic analysis of 3-D and 2-D seismic data to delineate porous carbonate debris flow in permian strata along the northwestern margin of the Midlan

    SciTech Connect

    Pacht, J.A.; Brooks, L.; Messa, F.

    1995-12-31

    Carbonate debris flow are very important plays in Leonard strata along the northwestern margin of the Midland Basin. Delineation of these strata, however, is difficult and detailed stratigraphic analysis of both 2D and 3D seismic data is important in reducing risk. Porous debris flows are best developed during lowstand time. When sea-level falls to a point at or below the shelf margin, sand to boulder-sized clasts created by reef-front erosion are funneled through slope gullies onto the base of the slope. Large debris flows exhibit well-defined mounds which downlap onto the sequence boundary. Many of these flows, however, are too thin to exhibit discrete reflections. 3D seismic data are used to define subtle changes in amplitude and frequency which suggest presence of porous strata. Along the northwest shelf, porous debris flows exhibit lower amplitude (dim spots) and lower frequency than surrounding strata. They are commonly developed immediately downdip of major slump scars.

  4. A deep reflection seismic line across the Northern Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, F.; Brun, J.-P.; Ecors-Dekorp Working Group

    1991-06-01

    Two reflection seismic lines across the Tertiary Rhine Graben in Central Europe were recorded in 1988 as a joint venture of the French ECORS and the German DEKORP deep seismic reflection programs. In this paper the line across the northern graben is presented. The main results are: The asymmetry of the graben as documented by the sedimentary fill is accompanied by asymmetric features throughout the entire deep crystalline crust: a thin (3.7 s TWT) reflective lower crust in the east—a thick (5.5 s TWT), relatively transparent lower crust in the west, total crustal thicknesses of 8.7 s TWT in the east vs. 10.5 s TWT in the west. Provided a laterally homogeneous crust existed prior to rifting significant differences in upper and lower crustal thinning must be postulated. Extension occurred along localized shear zones that are located in the upper crust and at the crust/mantle boundary. The entire lower crustal layer acts as a decoupling zone.

  5. Infrared imaging of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line phenotypes in 2D and 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Smolina, Margarita; Goormaghtigh, Erik

    2015-04-01

    One current challenge in the field of breast cancer infrared imaging is the identification of carcinoma cell subtypes in the tissue. Neither sequencing nor immunochemistry is currently able to provide a cell by cell thorough classification. The latter is needed to build accurate statistical models capable of recognizing the diversity of breast cancer cell lines that may be present in a tissue section. One possible approach for overcoming this problem is to obtain the IR spectral signature of well-characterized tumor cell lines in culture. Cultures in three-dimensional matrices appear to generate an environment that mimics better the in vivo environment. There are, at present, series of breast cancer cell lines that have been thoroughly characterized in two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) cultures by full transcriptomics analyses. In this work, we describe the methods used to grow, to process, and to characterize a triple-negative breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, in 3D laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) culture and compare it with traditional monolayer cultures and tissue sections. While unsupervised analyses did not completely separate spectra of cells grown in 2D from 3D lrECM cultures, a supervised statistical analysis resulted in an almost perfect separation. When IR spectral responses of epithelial tumor cells from clinical triple-negative breast carcinoma samples were added to these data, a principal component analysis indicated that they cluster closer to the spectra of 3D culture cells than to the spectra of cells grown on a flat plastic substrata. This result is encouraging because of correlating well-characterized cell line features with clinical biopsies. PMID:25568895

  6. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L. Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2014-11-15

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  7. Impact of uncertainties in parameterized cloud-microphysical processes on the simulated development of an idealized 2-D squall line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Sara; Bao, Jian-Wen; Grell, Evelyn

    2016-04-01

    In this study, numerical model simulations of an idealized 2-D squall line are investigated using microphysics budget analysis. Four commonly-used microphysics schemes of various complexity are used in the simulations. Diagnoses of the source and sink terms of the hydrometeor budget equations reveal that the differences related to the assumptions of hydrometeor size-distributions between the schemes lead to the differences in the simulations due to the net effect of various microphysical processes on the interaction between latent heating/evaporative cooling and flow dynamics as the squall line develops. Results from this study also highlight the possibility that the advantage of double-moment formulations can be overshadowed by the uncertainties in the spectral definition of individual hydrometeor categories and spectrum-dependent microphysical processes.

  8. The development of magmatism along the Cameroon Volcanic Line: Evidence from seismicity and seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Plaen, R. S. M.; Bastow, I. D.; Chambers, E. L.; Keir, D.; Gallacher, R. J.; Keane, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) straddles the continent-ocean boundary in West Africa but exhibits no clear age progression. This renders it difficult to explain by traditional plume/plate motion hypotheses; thus, there remains no consensus on the processes responsible for its development. To understand better the nature of asthenospheric flow beneath the CVL, and the effects of hotspot tectonism on the overlying lithosphere, we analyze mantle seismic anisotropy and seismicity. Cameroon is relatively aseismic compared to hotspots elsewhere, with little evidence for magmatism-related crustal deformation away from Mount Cameroon, which last erupted in 2000. Low crustal Vp/Vs ratios (˜1.74) and a lack of evidence for seismically anisotropic aligned melt within the lithosphere both point toward a poorly developed magmatic plumbing system beneath the CVL. Null SKS splitting observations dominate the western continental portion of the CVL; elsewhere, anisotropic fast polarization directions parallel the strike of the Precambrian Central African Shear Zone (CASZ). The nulls may imply that the convecting upper mantle beneath the CVL is isotropic, or characterized by a vertically oriented olivine lattice preferred orientation fabric, perhaps due to a mantle plume or the upward limb of a small-scale convection cell. Precambrian CASZ fossil lithospheric fabrics along the CVL may have been thermomechanically eroded during Gondwana breakup ˜130 Ma, with an isotropic lower lithosphere subsequently reforming due to cooling of the slow-moving African plate. Small-scale lithospheric delamination during the 30 Ma recent development of the line may also have contributed to the erosion of the CASZ lithospheric fossil anisotropy, at the same time as generating the low-volume alkaline basaltic volcanism along the CVL.

  9. Basement blocks and basin inversion structures mapped using reprocessed Gulfrex 2D seismic data, Caribbean-South American oblique collisional zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalona, A.; Sena, A.; Mann, P.

    2003-12-01

    We have reprocessed and reinterpreted more than 10,000 km of "Gulfrex" multi-channel 2D seismic reflection lines collected by Gulf Oil Corporation in 1972 along the northern margin of South America (offshore Venezuela and Trinidad). These digital data were donated to the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics and represent the largest single, digital reflection survey of the region. Reprocessing of these data included: format correction, filtering, post-stack multiple suppression, and fk migration. Reprocessed data were loaded and interpreted on a workstation. The data straddle a 2,000,000 km2 zone of Paleocene-Recent, time-transgressive, oblique collision between the Caribbean arc system and the passive continental margin of northern South America. Free-air, satellite gravity data shows the remarkable 1000-km-scale continuity of four basement ridges between the uncollided part of the Caribbean arc system (NS-trending Lesser Antilles arc) and the EW-trending collisional area north of Venezuela. The basement ridges involved in the Venezuelan collisional zone include: 1) Aruba-Bonaire-Curacao ridge that can be traced as a continuous feature to the Aves ridge remnant arc of the Lesser Antilles; 2) the partially inverted Blanquilla-Bonaire basin that can be traced into the Grenada back-arc basin; 3) Margarita-Los Testigos platform that can be traced to the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc; and 4) foreland basins and fold-thrust belts of eastern Venezuela (Serrania del Interior and Maturin basin) that can be traced to the Tobago forearc basin and Barbados accretionary prism. Gulfrex data document the progressive change of basinal fault systems from NS-striking normal faults formed in extensional, Lesser Antilles intra-arc settings to rotated and inverted, NE and EW-striking normal faults deformed in the collisional area north of Venezuela. Age of initial shortening of basinal areas and inversion of normal faults setting does not follow the simple, expected pattern of

  10. American Marten Respond to Seismic Lines in Northern Canada at Two Spatial Scales

    PubMed Central

    Tigner, Jesse; Bayne, Erin M.; Boutin, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Development of hydrocarbon resources across northwest Canada has spurred economic prosperity and generated concerns over impacts to biodiversity. To balance these interests, numerous jurisdictions have adopted management thresholds that allow for limited energy development but minimize undesirable impacts to wildlife. Used for exploration, seismic lines are the most abundant linear feature in the boreal forest and exist at a variety of widths and recovery states. We used American marten (Martes americana) as a model species to measure how line attributes influence species’ response to seismic lines, and asked whether responses to individual lines trigger population impacts. Marten response to seismic lines was strongly influenced by line width and recovery state. Compared to forest interiors, marten used open seismic lines ≥ 3 m wide less often, but used open lines ≤ 2 m wide and partially recovered lines ≥ 6 m wide similarly. Marten response to individual line types appeared to trigger population impacts. The probability of occurrence at the home range scale declined with increasing seismic line density, and the inclusion of behavioral response to line density calculations improved model fit. In our top performing model, we excluded seismic lines ≤ 2 m from our calculation of line density, and the probability of occurrence declined > 80% between home ranges with the lowest and highest line densities. Models that excluded seismic lines did not strongly explain occurrence. We show how wildlife-derived metrics can inform regulatory guidelines to increase the likelihood those guidelines meet intended management objectives. With respect to marten, not all seismic lines constitute disturbances, but avoidance of certain line types scales to population impacts. This approach provides the ecological context required to understand cause and effect relationships among socio-economic and ecological conservation goals. PMID:25768848

  11. American marten respond to seismic lines in northern Canada at two spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Tigner, Jesse; Bayne, Erin M; Boutin, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Development of hydrocarbon resources across northwest Canada has spurred economic prosperity and generated concerns over impacts to biodiversity. To balance these interests, numerous jurisdictions have adopted management thresholds that allow for limited energy development but minimize undesirable impacts to wildlife. Used for exploration, seismic lines are the most abundant linear feature in the boreal forest and exist at a variety of widths and recovery states. We used American marten (Martes americana) as a model species to measure how line attributes influence species' response to seismic lines, and asked whether responses to individual lines trigger population impacts. Marten response to seismic lines was strongly influenced by line width and recovery state. Compared to forest interiors, marten used open seismic lines ≥ 3 m wide less often, but used open lines ≤ 2 m wide and partially recovered lines ≥ 6 m wide similarly. Marten response to individual line types appeared to trigger population impacts. The probability of occurrence at the home range scale declined with increasing seismic line density, and the inclusion of behavioral response to line density calculations improved model fit. In our top performing model, we excluded seismic lines ≤ 2 m from our calculation of line density, and the probability of occurrence declined > 80% between home ranges with the lowest and highest line densities. Models that excluded seismic lines did not strongly explain occurrence. We show how wildlife-derived metrics can inform regulatory guidelines to increase the likelihood those guidelines meet intended management objectives. With respect to marten, not all seismic lines constitute disturbances, but avoidance of certain line types scales to population impacts. This approach provides the ecological context required to understand cause and effect relationships among socio-economic and ecological conservation goals. PMID:25768848

  12. Surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and radon transform forward multiple modeling methods applied to 2D multi-channel seismic profiles from the Chukchi Shelf, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, I.; Coakley, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Chukchi Edges project was designed to establish the relationship between the Chukchi Shelf and Borderland and indirectly test theories of opening for the Canada Basin. During this cruise, ~5300 km of 2D multi-channel reflection seismic profiles and other geophysical data (swath bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, sonobuoy refraction seismic) were collected from the RV Marcus G. Langseth across the transition between the Chukchi Shelf and Chukchi Borderland, where the water depths vary from 30 m to over 3 km. Multiples occur when seismic energy is trapped in a layer and reflected from an acoustic interface more than once. Various kinds of multiples occur during seismic data acquisition. These depend on the ray-path the seismic energy follows through the layers. One of the most common multiples is the surface related multiple, which occurs due to strong acoustic impedance contrast between the air and water. The reflected seismic energy from the water surface is trapped within the water column, thus reflects from the seafloor multiple times. Multiples overprint the primary reflections and complicate data interpretation. Both surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and forward parabolic radon transform multiple modeling methods were necessary to attenuate the multiples. SRME is applied to shot gathers starting with the near offset interpolation, multiple estimation using water depths, and subtracting the model multiple from the shot gathers. This method attenuated surface related multiple energy, however, peg-leg multiples remained in the data. The parabolic radon transform method minimized the effect of these multiples. This method is applied to normal moveout (NMO) corrected common mid-point gathers (CMP). The CMP gathers are fitted or modeled with curves estimated from the reference offset, moveout range, moveout increment parameters. Then, the modeled multiples are subtracted from the data. Preliminary outputs of these two methods show that the surface related

  13. pySeismicFMM: Python based travel time calculation in regular 2D and 3D grids in Cartesian and geographic coordinates using Fast Marching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    Seismic wave travel time calculation is the most common numerical operation in seismology. The most efficient is travel time calculation in 1D velocity model - for given source, receiver depths and angular distance time is calculated within fraction of a second. Unfortunately, in most cases 1D is not enough to encounter differentiating local and regional structures. Whenever possible travel time through 3D velocity model has to be calculated. It can be achieved using ray calculation or time propagation in space. While single ray path calculation is quick it is complicated to find the ray path that connects source with the receiver. Time propagation in space using Fast Marching Method seems more efficient in most cases, especially when there are multiple receivers. In this presentation a Python module pySeismicFMM is presented - simple and very efficient tool for calculating travel time from sources to receivers. Calculation requires regular 2D or 3D velocity grid either in Cartesian or geographic coordinates. On desktop class computer calculation speed is 200k grid cells per second. Calculation has to be performed once for every source location and provides travel time to all receivers. pySeismicFMM is free and open source. Development of this tool is a part of authors PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  14. Well log and 2D seismic data character of the Wilcox Group in south-central Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enomoto, Catherine B.

    2014-01-01

    The Wilcox Group is productive in updip areas of Texas and Louisiana from fluvial, deltaic, and near-shore marine shelf sandstones. The reported presence of porous sandstones at 29,000 feet within the Wilcox Group containing about 200 feet of gas in the Davy Jones 1 discovery well in the offshore Louisiana South Marsh Island area illustrates a sand-rich system developed during the Paleocene and early Eocene. This study describes some of the well log and reflection seismic data characteristics of the slope and basin-floor reservoirs with gas-discovery potential that may be in the area between the producing trend onshore Louisiana and the offshore discovery.

  15. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    DOE Data Explorer

    Michael Lane

    2010-01-01

    Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010. ArcGIS map package containing topographic base map, Township and Range layer, Oski BLM and private leases at time of survey, and locations, with selected shot points, of the five seismic lines.

  16. The structure and stratigraphy of the sedimentary succession in the Swedish sector of the Baltic Basin: New insights from vintage 2D marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopher, Daniel; Erlström, Mikael; Bell, Nicholas; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present five interpreted regional seismic profiles, describing the full sedimentary sequence across the Swedish sector of the Baltic Sea. The data for the study are part of an extensive and largely unpublished 2D seismic dataset acquired between 1970 and 1990 by the Swedish Oil Prospecting Company (OPAB). The Baltic Basin is an intracratonic basin located in northern Europe. Most of the Swedish sector of the basin constitutes the NW flank of a broad synclinal depression, the Baltic Basin. In the SW of the Swedish sector lies the Hanö Bay Basin, formed by subsidence associated with inversion of the Tornquist Zone during the Late Cretaceous. The geological history presented here is broadly consistent with previously published works. We observe an area between the Hanö Bay and the Baltic Basin where the Palaeozoic strata has been affected by transpression and subsequent inversion, associated with the Tornquist Zone during the late Carboniferous-Early Permian and Late Cretaceous, respectively. We propose that the Christiansø High was a structural low during the Late Jurassic, which was later inverted in the Late Cretaceous. We suggest that a fan shaped feature in the seismic data, adjacent to the Christiansø Fault within the Hanö Bay Basin, represents rapidly deposited, coarse-grained sediments eroded from the inverted Christiansø High during the Late Cretaceous. We identify a number of faults within the deeper part of the Baltic Basin, which we also interpret to be transpressional in nature, formed during the Caledonian Orogeny in the Late Silurian-Early Devonian. East of Gotland a number of sedimentary structures consisting of Silurian carbonate reefs and Ordovician carbonate mounds, as well as a large Quaternary glacial feature are observed. Finally, we use the seismic interpretation to infer the structural and stratigraphic history of the Baltic and Hanö Bay basins within the Swedish sector.

  17. Field lines and magnetic surfaces in a two-component slab/2D model of interplanetary magnetic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Pontius, D. H., Jr.; Gray, P. C.; Bieber, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    A two-component model for the spectrum of interplanetary magnetic fluctuations was proposed on the basis of ISEE observations, and has found an intriguing level of application in other solar wind studies. The model fluctuations consist of a fraction of 'slab' fluctuations, varying only in the direction parallel to the locally uniform mean magnetic field B(0) and a complement of 2D (two-dimensional) fluctuations that vary in the directions transverse to B(0). We have developed an spectral method computational algorithm for computing the magnetic flux surfaces (flux tubes) associated with the composite model, based upon a precise analogy with equations for ideal transport of a passive scalar in planar two dimensional geometry. Visualization of various composite models will be presented, including the 80 percent 2D/ 20 percent slab model with delta B/B(0) approximately equals 1 and a minus 5/3 spectral law, that is thought to approximately represent a snapshot of solar wind turbulence. Characteristically, the visualizations show that flux tubes, even when defined as regular on some plane, shred and disperse rapidly as they are viewed along the parallel direction. This diffusive process, which generalizes the standard picture of field line random walk, will be discussed in detail. Evidently, the traditional picture that flux tubes randomize like strands of spaghetti with a uniform tangle along the axial direction is in need of modification.

  18. Warm ionized gas in CALIFA early-type galaxies. 2D emission-line patterns and kinematics for 32 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Lehnert, M. D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Ziegler, B.; Breda, I.; Dos Reis, S. N.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Bomans, D. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; García-Benito, R.; Márquez, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Marino, R. A.; González Delgado, R. M.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Context. The morphological, spectroscopic, and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium (wim) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive, quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer an unprecedented opportunity for advancing our understanding of the wim in ETGs. Aims: This article centers on a 2D investigation of the wim component in 32 nearby (≲150 Mpc) ETGs from CALIFA, complementing a previous 1D analysis of the same sample. Methods: The analysis presented here includes Hα intensity and equivalent width (EW) maps and radial profiles, diagnostic emission-line ratios, and ionized-gas and stellar kinematics. It is supplemented by τ-ratio maps, which are a more efficient means to quantify the role of photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component than alternative mechanisms (e.g., AGN, low-level star formation). Results: Confirming and strengthening our previous conclusions, we find that ETGs span a broad continuous sequence in the properties of their wim, exemplified by two characteristic classes. The first (type i) comprises systems with a nearly constant EW(Hα) in their extranuclear component, which quantitatively agrees with (but is no proof of) the hypothesis that photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component is the main driver of extended wim emission. The second class (type ii) stands for virtually wim-evacuated ETGs with a very low (≤0.5 Å), outwardly increasing EW(Hα). These two classes appear indistinguishable from one another by their LINER-specific emission-line ratios in their extranuclear component. Here we extend the tentative classification we proposed previously by the type i+, which is assigned to a subset of type i ETGs exhibiting ongoing low-level star-forming activity in their periphery. This finding along with faint

  19. A critical appraisal of asymptotic 3D-to-2D data transformation filters and the potential of complex frequency 2.5-D modeling in seismic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, L.; Greenhalgh, S. A.; Maurer, H. R.; Marelli, S.; Nuber, A.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is often based on forward modeling in the computationally attractive 2-D domain. Any solution of the 2-D cartesian wave equation inherently carries the implicit assumption of a line source extended in the out-of-plane medium invariant direction. This implies that the source energy in homogeneous media spreads over the surface of an approximately expanding cylinder, such that the wavefield amplitudes (at least in the far field) scale inversely with the square-root of distance. However, realistic point sources like explosives or airguns, fired in a 3-D medium, generate amplitudes that decay inversely with the first power of distance, since the wavefield expands quasi-spherically in all three dimensions. Usually, practitioners correct for this amplitude difference and the associated phase shift of π/4 by transforming the recorded 3-D field data to the approximate 2-D situation by using simplistic, asymptotic filter algorithms. Such filters operate on a square root of time-sample convolutional basis and implicitly assume straight ray paths and a constant velocity medium. The unsubstantiated usage of these asymptotic filters is in contradiction to their well known limitations. In this study, we present an extensive quantitative appraisal of 3D-to-2D data transformation procedures. Our analysis relies on a simple numerical modeling study, based on propagating 3-D and 2-D wavefields through 2-D media and comparing the true 2-D and the filtered 3-D synthetic data. It is shown that the filtering errors are moderate in purely acoustic situations but become substantial in complex media when arrivals overlap each other or ray paths deviate strongly from straight lines. Normalized root-mean-square deviations up to 5% and maximum relative time domain errors of up to 40% were found in high contrast media, when full elastic treatment was considered. In order to examine if this error translates into a deficient model reconstruction in full waveform

  20. Investigations on a robust profile model for the reconstruction of 2D periodic absorber lines in scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, H.; Richter, J.; Rathsfeld, A.; Bär, M.

    2010-09-01

    Scatterometry as a non-imaging indirect optical method in wafer metrology is applicable to lithography masks designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography , where light with wavelengths of about 13.5 nm is applied. The main goal is to reconstruct the critical dimensions (CD) of the mask, i.e., profile parameters such as line width, line height, and side-wall angle, from the measured diffracted light pattern and to estimate the associated uncertainties. The numerical simulation of the diffraction process for periodic 2D structures can be realized by the finite element solution of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. The inverse problem is expressed as a non-linear operator equation where the operator maps the sought mask parameters to the efficiencies of the diffracted plane wave modes. To solve this operator equation, the deviation of the measured efficiencies from the ones obtained computationally is minimized by a Gauss-Newton type iterative method. In the present paper, the admissibility of rectangular profile models for the evaluations of CD uniformity is studied. More precisely, several sets of typical measurement data are simulated for trapezoidal shaped EUV masks with different mask signatures characterized by various line widths, heights and side-wall angles slightly smaller than 90 degree. Using these sets, but assuming rectangular structures as the basic profiles of the numerical reconstruction algorithm, approximate line height and width parameters are determined as the critical dimensions of the mask. Finally, the model error due to the simplified shapes is analyzed by checking the deviations of the reconstructed parameters from their nominal values.

  1. Blind test of methods for obtaining 2-D near-surface seismic velocity models from first-arrival traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Colin A.; Haines, Seth; Powers, Michael H.; Sheehan, Jacob; Rohdewald, Siegfried; Link, Curtis; Hayashi, Koichi; Zhao, Don; Zhou, Hua-wei; Burton, Bethany L.; Petersen, Uni K.; Bonal, Nedra D.; Doll, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic refraction methods are used in environmental and engineering studies to image the shallow subsurface. We present a blind test of inversion and tomographic refraction analysis methods using a synthetic first-arrival-time dataset that was made available to the community in 2010. The data are realistic in terms of the near-surface velocity model, shot-receiver geometry and the data's frequency and added noise. Fourteen estimated models were determined by ten participants using eight different inversion algorithms, with the true model unknown to the participants until it was revealed at a session at the 2011 SAGEEP meeting. The estimated models are generally consistent in terms of their large-scale features, demonstrating the robustness of refraction data inversion in general, and the eight inversion algorithms in particular. When compared to the true model, all of the estimated models contain a smooth expression of its two main features: a large offset in the bedrock and the top of a steeply dipping low-velocity fault zone. The estimated models do not contain a subtle low-velocity zone and other fine-scale features, in accord with conventional wisdom. Together, the results support confidence in the reliability and robustness of modern refraction inversion and tomographic methods.

  2. Insights into Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Study Sites GC955 and WR313 from New Multicomponent and High-Resolution 2D Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, acquiring multicomponent data and high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313). Based on previously collected logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data, these gas hydrate study sites are known to include high concentrations of gas hydrate within sand layers. At GC955 our new 2D data reveal at least three features that appear to be fluid-flow pathways (chimneys) responsible for gas migration and thus account for some aspects of the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. Our new data also show that the main gas hydrate target, a Pleistocene channel/levee complex, has an areal extent of approximately 5.5 square kilometers and that a volume of approximately 3 x 107 cubic meters of this body lies within the gas hydrate stability zone. Based on LWD-inferred values and reasonable assumptions for net sand, sand porosity, and gas hydrate saturation, we estimate a total equivalent gas-in-place volume of approximately 8 x 108 cubic meters for the inferred gas hydrate within the channel/levee deposits. At WR313 we are able to map the thin hydrate-bearing sand layers in considerably greater detail than that provided by previous data. We also can map the evolving and migrating channel feature that persists in this area. Together these data and the emerging results provide valuable new insights into the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  3. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  4. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  5. Automated 2D-3D registration of a radiograph and a cone beam CT using line-segment enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Munbodh, Reshma; Jaffray, David A.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Chen Zhe; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Cathier, Pascal; Duncan, James S.

    2006-05-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a fully automated two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) registration framework to quantify setup deviations in prostate radiation therapy from cone beam CT (CBCT) data and a single AP radiograph. A kilovoltage CBCT image and kilovoltage AP radiograph of an anthropomorphic phantom of the pelvis were acquired at 14 accurately known positions. The shifts in the phantom position were subsequently estimated by registering digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the 3D CBCT scan to the AP radiographs through the correlation of enhanced linear image features mainly representing bony ridges. Linear features were enhanced by filtering the images with ''sticks,'' short line segments which are varied in orientation to achieve the maximum projection value at every pixel in the image. The mean (and standard deviations) of the absolute errors in estimating translations along the three orthogonal axes in millimeters were 0.134 (0.096) AP(out-of-plane), 0.021 (0.023) ML and 0.020 (0.020) SI. The corresponding errors for rotations in degrees were 0.011 (0.009) AP, 0.029 (0.016) ML (out-of-plane), and 0.030 (0.028) SI (out-of-plane). Preliminary results with megavoltage patient data have also been reported. The results suggest that it may be possible to enhance anatomic features that are common to DRRs from a CBCT image and a single AP radiography of the pelvis for use in a completely automated and accurate 2D-3D registration framework for setup verification in prostate radiotherapy. This technique is theoretically applicable to other rigid bony structures such as the cranial vault or skull base and piecewise rigid structures such as the spine.

  6. Spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich; Papenberg, Cord; Geersen, Jacob; Ridente, Domenico; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; Urlaub, Morelia; Bialas, Jörg; Micallef, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Its volcano edifice is located on top of continental crust close to the Ionian shore in east Sicily. Instability of the eastern flank of the volcano edifice is well documented onshore. The continental margin is supposed to deform as well. Little, however, is known about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank and its adjacent continental margin, which is a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired and processed a new marine high-resolution seismic and hydro-acoustic dataset. The data provide new detailed insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics of shallow continental margin structures offshore Mt Etna. In a similiar manner as observed onshore, the submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. We image a compressional regime at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to an asymmetric basin system confining the eastward movement of the flank. In addition, we constrain the proposed southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault movement north of Catania Canyon. From our findings, we consider a major coupled volcano edifice instability and continental margin gravitational collapse and spreading to be present at Mt Etna, as we see a clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures across the entire eastern flank. The new findings will help to evaluate hazards and risks accompanied by Mt Etna's slope- and continental margin instability and will be used as a base for future investigations in this region.

  7. A pseudo-spectral method for the simulation of poro-elastic seismic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates using domain decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidler, Rolf; Carcione, José M.; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    We present a novel numerical approach for the comprehensive, flexible, and accurate simulation of poro-elastic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates. An important application of this method and its extensions will be the modeling of complex seismic wave phenomena in fluid-filled boreholes, which represents a major, and as of yet largely unresolved, computational problem in exploration geophysics. In view of this, we consider a numerical mesh, which can be arbitrarily heterogeneous, consisting of two or more concentric rings representing the fluid in the center and the surrounding porous medium. The spatial discretization is based on a Chebyshev expansion in the radial direction and a Fourier expansion in the azimuthal direction and a Runge-Kutta integration scheme for the time evolution. A domain decomposition method is used to match the fluid-solid boundary conditions based on the method of characteristics. This multi-domain approach allows for significant reductions of the number of grid points in the azimuthal direction for the inner grid domain and thus for corresponding increases of the time step and enhancements of computational efficiency. The viability and accuracy of the proposed method has been rigorously tested and verified through comparisons with analytical solutions as well as with the results obtained with a corresponding, previously published, and independently benchmarked solution for 2D Cartesian coordinates. Finally, the proposed numerical solution also satisfies the reciprocity theorem, which indicates that the inherent singularity associated with the origin of the polar coordinate system is adequately handled.

  8. A pseudo-spectral method for the simulation of poro-elastic seismic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sidler, Rolf; Carcione, José M.; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-02-15

    We present a novel numerical approach for the comprehensive, flexible, and accurate simulation of poro-elastic wave propagation in 2D polar coordinates. An important application of this method and its extensions will be the modeling of complex seismic wave phenomena in fluid-filled boreholes, which represents a major, and as of yet largely unresolved, computational problem in exploration geophysics. In view of this, we consider a numerical mesh, which can be arbitrarily heterogeneous, consisting of two or more concentric rings representing the fluid in the center and the surrounding porous medium. The spatial discretization is based on a Chebyshev expansion in the radial direction and a Fourier expansion in the azimuthal direction and a Runge–Kutta integration scheme for the time evolution. A domain decomposition method is used to match the fluid–solid boundary conditions based on the method of characteristics. This multi-domain approach allows for significant reductions of the number of grid points in the azimuthal direction for the inner grid domain and thus for corresponding increases of the time step and enhancements of computational efficiency. The viability and accuracy of the proposed method has been rigorously tested and verified through comparisons with analytical solutions as well as with the results obtained with a corresponding, previously published, and independently benchmarked solution for 2D Cartesian coordinates. Finally, the proposed numerical solution also satisfies the reciprocity theorem, which indicates that the inherent singularity associated with the origin of the polar coordinate system is adequately handled.

  9. Deep seismic imaging across the Cameroon Volcanic Line

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, J.B.; Rosendahl, B.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a southwest-trending line of volcanic centers that extends from near Lake Chad to at least the island of Pagalu. The Sao Tome and Principe Islands along the CVL have intrigued explorationists for decades because oil seeps and windows of sediments occur on them. Recently the 'PROBE Study' acquired a grid of deep-imagining multifold seismic data cross submarine portions of the CVL. Profiles crossing the CVL show upward flexure of oceanic crust and Moho reflections of more than 3 km locally. Upper Cretaceous/lower Tertiary drift sequence reflectors are concordant to crustal uplift, and shoal toward the islands where they are enmeshed with volcanics. These sediments are apparently the source of oil seeps on Sao Tome and Principe. On the flanks of CVL islands and seamounts, regionally continuous sequence boundaries are observed onlapping rotated older sediment reflectors. These sequence boundaries display either base-discordant onlap patterns or divergent onlap patterns, both indicative of uplift, not eustatic fluctuation. The 'uplift sequence boundaries' probably result from uplift associated with pulses of colcanism in the Miocene. It is likely this arching is the equivalent of the Miocene Adamawa uplift that occurs on land. The authors hypothesize crustal uplift was produced by upwelling of the asthenosphere and upward percolation of light mantle fluids. Features which may be the tops of magma bodies 2-20 km wide are imaged in some of the reflection profiles, and possible shear zones and fluid conduits are observed as sub-Moho dipping reflector events.

  10. Fracture network evaluation program (FraNEP): A software for analyzing 2D fracture trace-line maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeb, Conny; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Virgo, Simon; Blum, Philipp

    2013-10-01

    Fractures, such as joints, faults and veins, strongly influence the transport of fluids through rocks by either enhancing or inhibiting flow. Techniques used for the automatic detection of lineaments from satellite images and aerial photographs, LIDAR technologies and borehole televiewers significantly enhanced data acquisition. The analysis of such data is often performed manually or with different analysis software. Here we present a novel program for the analysis of 2D fracture networks called FraNEP (Fracture Network Evaluation Program). The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel™ and combines features from different existing software and characterization techniques. The main novelty of FraNEP is the possibility to analyse trace-line maps of fracture networks applying the (1) scanline sampling, (2) window sampling or (3) circular scanline and window method, without the need of switching programs. Additionally, binning problems are avoided by using cumulative distributions, rather than probability density functions. FraNEP is a time-efficient tool for the characterisation of fracture network parameters, such as density, intensity and mean length. Furthermore, fracture strikes can be visualized using rose diagrams and a fitting routine evaluates the distribution of fracture lengths. As an example of its application, we use FraNEP to analyse a case study of lineament data from a satellite image of the Oman Mountains.

  11. FWT2D: A massively parallel program for frequency-domain full-waveform tomography of wide-aperture seismic data—Part 1: Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbier, Florent; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean; Amestoy, Patrick; L'Excellent, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-01

    This is the first paper in a two-part series that describes a massively parallel code that performs 2D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-aperture seismic data for imaging complex structures. Full-waveform inversion methods, namely quantitative seismic imaging methods based on the resolution of the full wave equation, are computationally expensive. Therefore, designing efficient algorithms which take advantage of parallel computing facilities is critical for the appraisal of these approaches when applied to representative case studies and for further improvements. Full-waveform modelling requires the resolution of a large sparse system of linear equations which is performed with the massively parallel direct solver MUMPS for efficient multiple-shot simulations. Efficiency of the multiple-shot solution phase (forward/backward substitutions) is improved by using the BLAS3 library. The inverse problem relies on a classic local optimization approach implemented with a gradient method. The direct solver returns the multiple-shot wavefield solutions distributed over the processors according to a domain decomposition driven by the distribution of the LU factors. The domain decomposition of the wavefield solutions is used to compute in parallel the gradient of the objective function and the diagonal Hessian, this latter providing a suitable scaling of the gradient. The algorithm allows one to test different strategies for multiscale frequency inversion ranging from successive mono-frequency inversion to simultaneous multifrequency inversion. These different inversion strategies will be illustrated in the following companion paper. The parallel efficiency and the scalability of the code will also be quantified.

  12. Seismic response analysis of a tuff cliff by an effective stress non-linear 2D model approach: an example in Sorrento Peninsula, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Fiore, V.; Angelino, A.; Buonocunto, F. P.; Rapolla, A.; Tarallo, D.

    2009-04-01

    We present a model to describe the behavior of a tuff cliff under the dynamic stress considering a law reference input motion. The studied area is located in the Sorrento Peninsula, a major Quaternary morpho-structural unit of the western flank of Southern Apennines. The peninsula forms a narrow and elevated mountain range (up to 1444 m) that separates two major embayments of the eastern Tyrrhenian margin and is characterized by a carbonate bedrock capped by pyroclastic deposits (i.e. "Campania Ignimbrite"), originated from the Campi Flegrei volcanic district. The occurrence of steep slopes and the high relief energy of the area, along with the marine erosion at the base of the coastal cliff creates favorable conditions for the occurrence of a generalized instability of the slopes that is manifested by tuff rock falls as prevailing landslide phenomena. These events are highly dangerous because of the sudden detachments of conspicuous volumes of rocks with high speed, especially when the rock fall initiates in the upper part of the slopes. Prediction of such landslides is difficult if not accompanied by accurate hydrogeologic and geotechnical monitoring and assessment. The geometry of our model is represented by a tuff cliff of 48 m height, covered by a 8 m thick volcaniclastic layer. At the base of the tuff cliff marine sand deposits occur. The geotechnical parameters used for the analysis were selected from the literature. We have used an effective stress non-linear 2D model to determine the dynamic stress field of our model. The effective stress non-linear algorithm uses the Direct Integration Method to compute the motion and excess pore-water pressures arising from inertial forces at user-defined time steps. The seismic response analysis was performed using the field shear stress generated by synthetic 1-30 Hz band-limited accelerogram. The finite elements mesh considered for the test problem was established by 395 element and 401 nodal point. Our results show a

  13. 2D Dynamic Models of Subduction: Links between Surface Plate Motion and Deformation in the Transition Zone from Observations of Deep Slab Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of seismicity and seismic tomography provide constraints on the geometry of slabs within mantle, while compression/tension axis derived from moment tensor solutions provide constraints on the internal deformation of slabs. However, since these observations provide only a somewhat blurred or incomplete snapshot of the slab in time, it is difficult to directly relate these observations to the evolution of the slab geometry and the forces acting on and within the slab. In contrast, plate tectonic reconstructions provide time-dependent constraints on the surface motion of plates and the trench at subduction zones, which are related to the dynamical evolution of the slab. We use 2D geodynamical simulations of subduction to explore the relationship between dynamical process within the deforming slab and the observations of surface plate motion and the state-of-stress in slabs. Specifically we utilize models that include the extended Boussinesq approximation (shear heating and latent heat terms in the energy equation), a layered lithosphere with pyrolite, harzburgite and basalt/eclogite, compositionally-dependent phase transitions, and a composite rheology with yielding. The models employ a weak crustal layer that decouples the overriding and subducting plates and allows for dynamically determined trench motion. Here we show that, 1) multiple phase transitions increase slab folding, 2) ridge push significantly increases trench retreat, and 3) strength of the weak crustal layer influences slab detachment. Compared to past studies a more realistic treatment of the phase transitions makes trench retreat more difficult to generate: a weaker plate may encourage slab retreat but detaches once the slab tip crosses into the transition zone due to the rapid increase in slab density. As suggested by previous studies, slab folding within the transition zone changes the direction of forces on the slab and causes periodic changes from trench retreat to trench advance. We

  14. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-10-01

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

  15. The limits of seaward spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Geersen, Jacob; Behrmann, Jan Hinrich; Ridente, Domenico; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Bialas, Jörg; Papenberg, Cord; Cukur, Deniz; Urlaub, Morelia; Micallef, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Instability of its eastern flank is well documented onshore, and continuously monitored by geodetic and InSAR measurements. Little is known, however, about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank, defining a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired a new high-resolution 2D reflection seismic dataset. The data provide new insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna. The submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. A compressional regime is found at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to a complex basin system. Both, the clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures as well as the compressional regime at the easternmost flank edge, indicate a continental margin gravitational collapse as well as spreading to be present at Mt Etna. Moreover, we find evidence for the offshore southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault north of Catania Canyon. Our findings suggest a coupled volcano edifice/continental margin instability at Mt Etna, demonstrating first order linkage between on- and offshore tectonic processes.

  16. Focused fluid-flow processes through high-quality bathymetric, 2D seismic and Chirp data from the southern parts of the Bay of Biscay, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudon, Catherine; Gillet, Hervé; Cremer, Michel

    2013-04-01

    High-quality bathymetric, 2D seismic and Chirp data located in the southern parts of the Bay of Biscay, France, collected by the University of Bordeaux 1 (Cruises ITSAS 2, 2001; PROSECAN 3, 2006 and SARGASS, 2010) have recently been compiled. The survey area widely covers the Capbreton Canyon, which lies on the boundary between two major structural zones: the Aquitanian passive margin to the North, and the Basque-Cantabrian margin to the South which corresponds to the offshore Pyrenean front. The dataset revealed a large number of key seafloor features potentially associated with focused fluid-flow processes and subsurface sediment-remobilization. Focused fluid migration through sub-seabed sediments is a common phenomenon on continental margins worldwide and has widespread implications from both industrial and fundamental perspectives, from seafloor marine environmental issues to petroleum exploration and hazard assessments. Our study analyses the relationships between seafloor features, deeper structures and fluid migration through the Plio-Quaternary sedimentary pile. The geometrical characteristics, mechanisms of formation and kinematics of four main groups of seabed features have been investigated. (i) A 150km2 field of pockmarks can be observed on the Basque margin. These features are cone-shaped circular or elliptical depressions that are either randomly distributed as small pockmarks (diameter < 20m) or aligned in trains of large pockmarks (ranging from 200 to 600m in diameter) along shallow troughs leading downstream to the Capbreton Canyon. Seismic data show that most pockmarks reach the seabed through vertically staked V-shaped features but some are buried and show evidence of lateral migration through time. (ii) A second field of widely-spaced groups of pockmarks pierce the upper slope of the Aquitanian margin. These depressions are typically a few hundred meters in diameter and seem to be preferentially located in the troughs or on the stoss sides of

  17. The tectonostratigraphic evolution of the offshore Gippsland Basin, Victoria, Australia---results from 3D seismic interpretation and 2D section restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Mitchell

    The Gippsland Basin is located primarily offshore Victoria, Australia (between the Australian mainland and Tasmania) approximately 200 km east of Melbourne. The formation of the east-west trending Gippsland Basin is associated with the break-up of Gondwana during the late Jurassic/early Cretaceous and the basin has endured multiple rifting and inversion events. Strong tectonic control on the sedimentary development of the basin is reflected in the deposition of several major, basin scale sequences ranging in age from the early Cretaceous to Neogene, which are usually bounded by angular unconformities. Schlumberger's Petrel software package has been used to structurally and stratigraphically interpret a basin-wide 3D seismic data set provided by the Australian Government (Geoscience Australia) and four 2D kinematic reconstruction/restorations through the basin have been completed with Midland Valley's Move software to achieve a better understanding of the structural evolution of the Gippsland Basin. Rift phase extension calculated from the restorations (5.0--10.5%) appears anomalously low to accommodate the amount of sediment that has been deposited in the basin (>10km). Distributed extension on small faults and subsidence history from backstripping are employed to answer this anomaly. The 2D restorations completed illustrate structural time relationships across the basin and allow for a minimum estimate of erosion that has occurred along the inverted northern basin margin. Differences between previous work completed by Power et al. (2001) and this study as well as several extension models and associated implications are discussed as they relate to the interpretation carried out in this study. Extension calculated from section restorations ranged from approximately 5.0--10.5%. These measured extensional values appear too low to wholly accommodate the accumulated sediment thickness in the basin. Subsidence modelling and backstripping estimates approximately 50

  18. The effect analysis of strain rate on power transmission tower-line system under seismic excitation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li; Wang, Wenming; Qian, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The effect analysis of strain rate on power transmission tower-line system under seismic excitation is studied in this paper. A three-dimensional finite element model of a transmission tower-line system is created based on a real project. Using theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, incremental dynamic analysis of the power transmission tower-line system is conducted to investigate the effect of strain rate on the nonlinear responses of the transmission tower and line. The results show that the effect of strain rate on the transmission tower generally decreases the maximum top displacements, but it would increase the maximum base shear forces, and thus it is necessary to consider the effect of strain rate on the seismic analysis of the transmission tower. The effect of strain rate could be ignored for the seismic analysis of the conductors and ground lines, but the responses of the ground lines considering strain rate effect are larger than those of the conductors. The results could provide a reference for the seismic design of the transmission tower-line system. PMID:25105157

  19. The Effect Analysis of Strain Rate on Power Transmission Tower-Line System under Seismic Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenming

    2014-01-01

    The effect analysis of strain rate on power transmission tower-line system under seismic excitation is studied in this paper. A three-dimensional finite element model of a transmission tower-line system is created based on a real project. Using theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, incremental dynamic analysis of the power transmission tower-line system is conducted to investigate the effect of strain rate on the nonlinear responses of the transmission tower and line. The results show that the effect of strain rate on the transmission tower generally decreases the maximum top displacements, but it would increase the maximum base shear forces, and thus it is necessary to consider the effect of strain rate on the seismic analysis of the transmission tower. The effect of strain rate could be ignored for the seismic analysis of the conductors and ground lines, but the responses of the ground lines considering strain rate effect are larger than those of the conductors. The results could provide a reference for the seismic design of the transmission tower-line system. PMID:25105157

  20. MiR-451 inhibits proliferation of esophageal carcinoma cell line EC9706 by targeting CDKN2D and MAP3K1

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Wen-Qiao; Yang, Xuan; Wang, Tao; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Du, Yu-Wen; Chen, Xiao-Nan; Li, Min; Zhao, Guo-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of miR-451 to inhibit proliferation of esophageal carcinoma cell line EC9706. METHODS: Assays for cell growth, apoptosis and invasion were used to evaluate the effects of miR-451 expression on EC cells. Luciferase reporter and Western blot assays were used to test whether cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2D (CDKN2D) and MAP3K1 act as major targets of miR-451. RESULTS: The results showed that CDKN2D and MAP3K1 are direct targets of miR-451. CDKN2D and MAP3K1 overexpression reversed the effect of miR-451. MiR-451 inhibited the proliferation of EC9706 by targeting CDKN2D and MAP3K1. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that miR-451 might be a novel prognostic biomarker and a potential target for the treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the future. PMID:26019450

  1. Cytochrome P450 bio-affinity detection coupled to gradient HPLC: on-line screening of affinities to cytochrome P4501A2 and 2D6.

    PubMed

    Kool, Jeroen; van Liempd, Sebastiaan M; Harmsen, Stefan; Beckman, Joran; van Elswijk, Danny; Commandeur, Jan N M; Irth, Hubertus; Vermeulen, Nico P E

    2007-10-15

    Here we describe novel on-line human CYP1A2 and CYP2D6 Enzyme Affinity Detection (EAD) systems coupled to gradient HPLC. The use of the systems lies in the detection of individual inhibitory ligands in mixtures (e.g. metabolic mixtures or herbal extracts) towards two relevant drug metabolizing human CYPs. The systems can rapidly detect individual compounds in mixtures with affinities to CYP1A2 or 2D6. The HPLC-EAD systems were first evaluated and validated in flow injection analysis mode. IC50 values of known ligands for both CYPs, tested both in flow injection and in HPLC mode, were well comparable with those measured in microplate reader formats. Both EAD systems were also connected to gradient HPLC and used to screen known compound mixtures for the presence of CYP1A2 and 2D6 inhibitors. Finally, the on-line CYP2D6 EAD system was used to screen for the inhibitory activities of stereoisomers of a mixture of five methylenedioxy-alkylamphetamines (XTC analogs) on a chiral analytical column. PMID:17826363

  2. A High-Resolution Seismic Survey Across the State Line fault, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beachly, M.; Cox, C. M.; Saldana, S. C.; Snelson, C. M.; Taylor, W. J.; Robins, C.; Davis, R.; Stropky, M.; Phillips, R.; Cothrun, C.

    2007-12-01

    During the summer of 2007, an investigation of the faulting in Stewart Valley was under taken, located within the central Basin and Range province ~90 km west of Las Vegas, Nevada. The goal of this study was to resolve the seismic hazard potential of the State Line fault, a right-lateral strike-slip fault that runs the length of Stewart Valley. Four seismic reflection lines were acquired, two perpendicular and two parallel to the State Line fault. What is presented is an analysis of the western and eastern seismic lines parallel to the State Line fault. The western line was acquired utilizing a 144-channel geode system with each of the 4.5 Hz vertical geophones set out at 5 m intervals to form a 715 m long profile. The eastern line employed 120 of these geophones in a 595 m long profile. A mini-vibroseis served as the seismic source every ten meters, between geophones. The vibroseis was programmed to produce an 8 s linear sweep from 20-160 Hz. Three sweeps were recorded at each shot location without acquisition filters at a sampling rate of 0.5 ms. The three shot gathers were then stacked at each location to reduce noise. The data collected had minimal noise, although; during the processing of the eastern line a notch filtered was used to remove the 60 Hz noise created by adjacent power line. These lines, acquired parallel to the State Line fault, contain matching features that serve to determine how much lateral displacement the fault has undergone. The amount of the displacement can indicate how active the fault is, and thus, what magnitude of earthquake can be expected in the future. This will in turn contribute to determining the seismic hazard potential for southern Nevada. A preliminary interpretation of the seismic reflection sections indicates an average displacement of about 20 - 38 m with greater displacement in the deeper sections of the image. The shallow depth displacement calculations are consistent with previous work in the area. The State Line fault

  3. Deep seismic profiling using off-line recorders, Miura Peninsula, Kanto, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, T.; Hirata, N.; Sato, H.; Onishi, M.; Noda, K.

    2003-12-01

    The deep seismic profiling around Metropolitan Tokyo (Kanto area) began from 2002 under the project named . The deep seismic profiling was performed along the Tokyo Bay (Tokyo Bay 2003) from July to August in 2003, to obtain an image of the source fault of the Kanto earthquake of 1923 (M7.9), and deeper extension of inland active faults in Miura Peninsula. In the Tokyo Bay 2003, seismic reflection data were acquired along a 71-km-long seismic line from the Miura Peninsula to Tokyo Bay, using digital-telemetry cable system, including ocean bottom cables. However, this seismic line at Miura Peninsula passes through the densely populated area and due to the cultural noise the low S/N ratio was expected. Keeping away from the noise along the cable-type receiver line, 51 off-line recorders with a 4.5 Hz and 3-compornent geophone were deployed at carefully selected, quiet receiver points. During 90 days continuous recording, seismic signals produced by four vibroseis trucks at 195 locations and air-guns (1500 cu. inch) at 4280 locations were recorded including ca. 150 of earthquakes. Judging from the preliminary receiver gathers, two later phases (A and B) are recognized. The later phase A, located at TWT (Two-way travel time) 4 to 5.5 sec., is interpreted as a reflection from the top of the Philippine Sea Plate. The later phase B at TWT 7 to 8 sec. corresponds to the deeper reflection under the Philippine Sea Plate, respectively.

  4. Activation of vitamin D receptor (VDR)- and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-signaling pathways through 1,25(OH)2D3 in melanoma cell lines and other skin-derived cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Markus; Tilgen, Wolfgang; Reichrath, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)α, δ, γ in primary cultured normal melanocytes (NHM), melanoma cell lines (MeWo, SK-Mel-5, SK-Mel-25, SK-Mel-28), a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SCL-1) and an immortalized sebocyte cell line (SZ95). LNCaP prostate cancer cells, MCF-7 breast cancer cells and embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293) were used as controls. VDR and PPAR mRNA were detected, quantitated and compared in these cell lines using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTqPCR). The expression patterns of these nuclear receptors (NRs) varied strongly between the different cell lines according to their origin. PPARδ and PPARγ were less strongly expressed in the melanoma cell lines and in the other skin-derived cell lines as compared to the control cell lines. PPARα and VDR were stronger expressed in the 1,25(OH)2D3-sensitive melanoma cells (MeWo and in SK-Mel-28) than in the 1,25(OH)2D3-resistent melanoma cell lines (SK-Mel-5 and SK-Mel-25) or in NHM. Interestingly, VDR expression was increased by the treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 in 1,25(OH)2D3-sensitive melanoma cells but not in 1,25(OH)2D3-resistent melanoma cell lines. 1,25(OH)2D3 increased the expression of PPARα in almost all cell lines analyzed. Our results indicate a cross-talk between VDR- and PPAR-signaling pathways in various cell types including melanoma cells. Further investigations are required to investigate the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of this cross-talk. Because VDRand PPAR-signaling pathways regulate a multitude of genes that are of importance for a multitude of cellular functions including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, immune responses and apoptosis, the provided link between VDR and PPAR may open important new perspectives for treatment and prevention of melanoma and other diseases. PMID:20592797

  5. Cross Gradient Based Joint Inversion of 2D Wide Angle Seismic Reflection/Refraction and Gravity Data Along the Profile Through the 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, S.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    2D wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction survey has been widely used to investigate crustal structure and Moho topography. Similarly gravity survey is also very important in the study of local and regional earth features. Seismic survey is sensitive to the seismic velocity parameters and interface variations. For gravity survey, it is sensitive to density parameters of the medium but the resolution along the vertical direction is relatively poor. In this study, we have developed a strategy to jointly invert for seismic velocity model, density model and interface positions using the gravity observations and seismic arrival times from different phases. For the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data, it often relies on the empirical relationship between seismic velocity and density. In comparison, our joint inversion strategy also includes the cross-gradient based structure constraint for seismic velocity and density models in addition to the empirical relationship between them. The objective function for the joint inversion includes data misfit terms for seismic travel times and gravity observations, the cross-gradient constraint, the smoothness terms for two models, and the data misfit term between predicted gravity data based on density model converted from velocity model using the empirical relationship. Each term has its respective weight. We have applied the new joint inversion method to the Riwoqe-Yushu-Maduo profile in northwest China. The profile crosses through the Qiangtang block and Bayan Har block from southwest to northeast, respectively. The 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu earthquake is located on the profile, around the Ganzi-Yushu fault zone. The joint inversion produces the velocity and density models that are similar in structure and at the same time fit their respective data sets well. Compared to separate seismic inversion using seismic travel times, the joint inversion with gravity data gives a velocity model that better delineates the fault zones. Low

  6. MT2D: an interactive two-dimensional magnetotelluric and line source modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, C.

    1981-04-01

    MT2D.REV3 is the latest revision of a 2-dimensional, finite-element, interactive MT-line source modeling program. The original program was a batch-mode program developed by John Stodt. An interactive program was developed based on Stodt's program for a UNIVAC 1108. The program uses linear interpolation of the unknown field over triangular sub-domains of the region where a solution is sought in conjunction with the Galerkin technique to derive a system of linear equations which approximate the governing partial differential equation. The solution of this linear system of equations gives the approximate field values at the nodes of the discretized domain. MT2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around the finite-element program.

  7. Probing the 2D temperature structure of protoplanetary disks with Herschel observations of high-J CO lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The gas temperature structure of protoplanetary disks is a key ingredient for interpreting various disk observations and for quantifying the subsequent evolution of these systems. The comparison of low- and mid-J CO rotational lines is a powerful tool for assessing the temperature gradient in the warm molecular layer of disks. Spectrally resolved high-J (Ju> 14) CO lines probe intermediate distances and heights from the star that are not sampled by (sub-)millimeter CO spectroscopy. This paper presents new Herschel/HIFI and archival PACS observations of 12CO, 13CO, and [C ii] emission in four Herbig AeBe disks (HD 100546, HD 97048, IRS 48, HD 163296) and three T Tauri disks (AS 205, S CrA, TW Hya). In the case of the T Tauri systems AS 205 and S CrA, the CO emission has a single-peaked profile, likely due to a slow wind. For all the other systems, the Herschel CO spectra are consistent with pure disk emission and the spectrally resolved lines (HIFI) and the CO rotational ladder (PACS) are analyzed simultaneously assuming power-law temperature and column density profiles, using the velocity profile to locate the emission in the disk. The temperature profile varies substantially from disk to disk. In particular, Tgas in the disk surface layers can differ by up to an order of magnitude among the four Herbig AeBe systems; HD 100546 is the hottest and HD 163296 the coldest disk in the sample. Clear evidence of a warm disk layer where Tgas>Tdust is found in all the Herbig Ae disks. The observed CO fluxes and line profiles are compared to predictions of physical-chemical models. The primary parameters affecting the disk temperature structure are the flaring angle, the gas-to-dust mass ratio, the scale height, and the dust settling.

  8. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  9. All-optical XOR and OR logic gates based on line and point defects in 2-D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Kiyanoosh; Mir, Ali; Chaharmahali, Iman; Goudarzi, Dariush

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have proposed an all-optical logic gate structure based on line and point defects created in the two dimensional square lattice of silicon rods in air photonic crystals (PhCs). Line defects are embedded in the ГX and ГZ directions of the momentum space. The device has two input and two output ports. It has been shown analytically whether the initial phase difference between the two input beams is π/2, they interfere together constructively or destructively to realize the logical functions. The simulation results show that the device can acts as a XOR and an OR logic gate. It is applicable in the frequency range of 0-0.45 (a/λ), however we set it at (a/λ=) 0.419 for low dispersion condition, correspondingly the lambda is equal to 1.55 μm. The maximum delay time to response to the input signals is about 0.4 ps, hence the speed of the device is about 2.5 THz. Also 6.767 dB is the maximum contrast ratio of the device.

  10. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D Negative-Refraction Metamaterials at Optical Frequencies: Optical Nano-Transmission-Line and Circuit Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engheta, Nader; Alu, Andrea

    2006-03-01

    In recent years metamaterials have offered new possibilities for overcoming some of the intrinsic limitations in wave propagation. Their realization at microwave frequencies has followed two different paths; one consisting of embedding resonant inclusions in a host dielectric, and the other following a transmission-line approach, i.e., building 1-D, 2-D, or 3-D cascades of circuit elements, respectively, as linear, planar or bulk right- or left-handed metamaterials. The latter is known to provide larger bandwidth and better robustness to ohmic losses. Extending these concepts to optical frequencies is a challenging task, due to changes in material response to electromagnetic waves at these frequencies. However, recently we have studied theoretically how it may be possible to have circuit nano-elements at these frequencies by properly exploiting plasmonic resonances. Here we present our theoretical work on translating the circuit concepts of right- and left-handed metamaterials into optical frequencies by applying the analogy between nanoparticles and nanocircuit elements in transmission lines. We discuss how it is possible to synthesize optical negative-refraction metamaterials by properly cascading plasmonic and non-plasmonic elements in 1-D, 2-D and 3-D geometries.

  11. Extending the Nonlinear-Beam-Dynamics Concept of 1D Fixed Points to 2D Fixed Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchetti, G.; Schmidt, F.

    2015-06-01

    The origin of nonlinear dynamics traces back to the study of the dynamics of planets with the seminal work of Poincaré at the end of the nineteenth century: Les Méthodes Nouvelles de la Mécanique Céleste, Vols. 1-3 (Gauthier Villars, Paris, 1899). In his work he introduced a methodology fruitful for investigating the dynamical properties of complex systems, which led to the so-called "Poincaré surface of section," which allows one to capture the global dynamical properties of a system, characterized by fixed points and separatrices with respect to regular and chaotic motion. For two-dimensional phase space (one degree of freedom) this approach has been extremely useful and applied to particle accelerators for controlling their beam dynamics as of the second half of the twentieth century. We describe here an extension of the concept of 1D fixed points to fixed lines in two dimensions. These structures become the fundamental entities for characterizing the nonlinear motion in the four-dimensional phase space (two degrees of freedom).

  12. Extending the Nonlinear-Beam-Dynamics Concept of 1D Fixed Points to 2D Fixed Lines.

    PubMed

    Franchetti, G; Schmidt, F

    2015-06-12

    The origin of nonlinear dynamics traces back to the study of the dynamics of planets with the seminal work of Poincaré at the end of the nineteenth century: Les Méthodes Nouvelles de la Mécanique Céleste, Vols. 1-3 (Gauthier Villars, Paris, 1899). In his work he introduced a methodology fruitful for investigating the dynamical properties of complex systems, which led to the so-called "Poincaré surface of section," which allows one to capture the global dynamical properties of a system, characterized by fixed points and separatrices with respect to regular and chaotic motion. For two-dimensional phase space (one degree of freedom) this approach has been extremely useful and applied to particle accelerators for controlling their beam dynamics as of the second half of the twentieth century. We describe here an extension of the concept of 1D fixed points to fixed lines in two dimensions. These structures become the fundamental entities for characterizing the nonlinear motion in the four-dimensional phase space (two degrees of freedom). PMID:26196806

  13. A parametric study of nonlinear seismic response analysis of transmission line structures.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li; Wang, Yanming; Yi, Zhenhua; Qian, Hui

    2014-01-01

    A parametric study of nonlinear seismic response analysis of transmission line structures subjected to earthquake loading is studied in this paper. The transmission lines are modeled by cable element which accounts for the nonlinearity of the cable based on a real project. Nonuniform ground motions are generated using a stochastic approach based on random vibration analysis. The effects of multicomponent ground motions, correlations among multicomponent ground motions, wave travel, coherency loss, and local site on the responses of the cables are investigated using nonlinear time history analysis method, respectively. The results show the multicomponent seismic excitations should be considered, but the correlations among multicomponent ground motions could be neglected. The wave passage effect has a significant influence on the responses of the cables. The change of the degree of coherency loss has little influence on the response of the cables, but the responses of the cables are affected significantly by the effect of coherency loss. The responses of the cables change little with the degree of the difference of site condition changing. The effect of multicomponent ground motions, wave passage, coherency loss, and local site should be considered for the seismic design of the transmission line structures. PMID:25133215

  14. A Parametric Study of Nonlinear Seismic Response Analysis of Transmission Line Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanming; Yi, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    A parametric study of nonlinear seismic response analysis of transmission line structures subjected to earthquake loading is studied in this paper. The transmission lines are modeled by cable element which accounts for the nonlinearity of the cable based on a real project. Nonuniform ground motions are generated using a stochastic approach based on random vibration analysis. The effects of multicomponent ground motions, correlations among multicomponent ground motions, wave travel, coherency loss, and local site on the responses of the cables are investigated using nonlinear time history analysis method, respectively. The results show the multicomponent seismic excitations should be considered, but the correlations among multicomponent ground motions could be neglected. The wave passage effect has a significant influence on the responses of the cables. The change of the degree of coherency loss has little influence on the response of the cables, but the responses of the cables are affected significantly by the effect of coherency loss. The responses of the cables change little with the degree of the difference of site condition changing. The effect of multicomponent ground motions, wave passage, coherency loss, and local site should be considered for the seismic design of the transmission line structures. PMID:25133215

  15. On-line quality assurance of rotational radiotherapy treatment delivery by means of a 2D ion chamber array and the Octavius phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ann van; Clermont, Christian; Devillers, Magali; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P.

    2007-10-15

    For routine pretreatment verification of innovative treatment techniques such as (intensity modulated) dynamic arc therapy and helical TomoTherapy, an on-line and reliable method would be highly desirable. The present solution proposed by TomoTherapy, Inc. (Madison, WI) relies on film dosimetry in combination with up to two simultaneous ion chamber point dose measurements. A new method is proposed using a 2D ion chamber array (Seven29, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. The octagonal shape allows easy positioning for measurements in multiple planes. The directional dependence of the response of the detector was primarily investigated on a dual energy (6 and 18 MV) Clinac 21EX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) as no fixed angle incidences can be calculated in the Hi-Art TPS of TomoTherapy. The array was irradiated from different gantry angles and with different arc deliveries, and the dose distributions at the level of the detector were calculated with the AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm) photon dose calculation algorithm implemented in Eclipse (Varian). For validation on the 6 MV TomoTherapy unit, rotational treatments were generated, and dose distributions were calculated with the Hi-Art TPS. Multiple cylindrical ion chamber measurements were used to cross-check the dose calculation and dose delivery in Octavius in the absence of the 2D array. To compensate for the directional dependence of the 2D array, additional prototypes of Octavius were manufactured with built-in cylindrically symmetric compensation cavities. When using the Octavius phantom with a 2 cm compensation cavity, measurements with an accuracy comparable to that of single ion chambers can be achieved. The complete Octavius solution for quality assurance of rotational treatments consists of: The 2D array, two octagonal phantoms (with and without compensation layer), an insert for nine cylindrical ion chambers, and a set of inserts of

  16. On-line quality assurance of rotational radiotherapy treatment delivery by means of a 2D ion chamber array and the Octavius phantom.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Ann; Clermont, Christian; Devillers, Magali; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P

    2007-10-01

    For routine pretreatment verification of innovative treatment techniques such as (intensity modulated) dynamic arc therapy and helical TomoTherapy, an on-line and reliable method would be highly desirable. The present solution proposed by TomoTherapy, Inc. (Madison, WI) relies on film dosimetry in combination with up to two simultaneous ion chamber point dose measurements. A new method is proposed using a 2D ion chamber array (Seven29, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. The octagonal shape allows easy positioning for measurements in multiple planes. The directional dependence of the response of the detector was primarily investigated on a dual energy (6 and 18 MV) Clinac 21EX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) as no fixed angle incidences can be calculated in the Hi-Art TPS of TomoTherapy. The array was irradiated from different gantry angles and with different arc deliveries, and the dose distributions at the level of the detector were calculated with the AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm) photon dose calculation algorithm implemented in Eclipse (Varian). For validation on the 6 MV TomoTherapy unit, rotational treatments were generated, and dose distributions were calculated with the Hi-Art TPS. Multiple cylindrical ion chamber measurements were used to cross-check the dose calculation and dose delivery in Octavius in the absence of the 2D array. To compensate for the directional dependence of the 2D array, additional prototypes of Octavius were manufactured with built-in cylindrically symmetric compensation cavities. When using the Octavius phantom with a 2 cm compensation cavity, measurements with an accuracy comparable to that of single ion chambers can be achieved. The complete Octavius solution for quality assurance of rotational treatments consists of: The 2D array, two octagonal phantoms (with and without compensation layer), an insert for nine cylindrical ion chambers, and a set of inserts of

  17. The Seismic Line I95167 Across The Falkland Trough and The Falkland Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Ben, A.; Mallardi, A.; Geletti, R.; Finetti, I.

    During the 1995 austral summer, a seismic line crossing south north the Scotia Sea and the Falkland Plateau was acquired. The acquisition parameters were designed for the exploration of seismic stratigraphy and crustal targets. The seismic line was processed by the Authors using Landmark software. Because of the deep sea bottom (between 3.4U4.9 sec twt, equivalent to about 2550-3680 m), multiples did not rep- resent a problem for the sedimentary cover, completely above the first multiple, but were a serious problem for the Lower Crust and the Moho. An f-k filter was applied to the CDP gathers in order to remove the unwanted energy. Finally a migration process was applied to some parts of the section. Even if the seismic line doesn't show dipping reflectors, this procedure has been applied to remove the diffraction, mainly present in the scattered seismic facies of the thin sequence deposited by the bottom currents during the Tertiary time. The interpretation of the northern part of the section (from the Falkland Trough to the Falkland Plateau) started from two DSDP boreholes, sited at the south-western margin of the M. Ewing Bank, that calibrated some good reflec- tors (horizons: Z, top of the Pre-Cambrian basement; J, top of the Jurassic sequence; K, top of the Cretaceous sequence), corresponding to regional unconformities evident along the whole seismic section. The top of the Pre-Cambrian basement is interested by a large number of normal faults connected to the first phases of the Gondwana rift- ing in the Jurassic time. In the southern sector of the interpreted section an important normal fault system separating the Falkland Plateau by the Falkland Trough seems to be active during this tectonic phase, also if it was successively reactivated by the transpressional tectonics of the North Scotia Ridge. In the southern part of the section, the tertiary transpressional tectonics of the North Scotia Ridge reactivated some meso- zoic normal faults and produced a

  18. A novel phosphoprotein analysis scheme for assessing changes in premalignant and malignant breast cell lines using 2D liquid separations, protein microarrays and tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Patwa, Tasneem H.; Wang, Yanfei; Miller, Fred R.; Goodison, Steve; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Barder, Timothy J.; Lubman, David M.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of phosphorylation changes that occur during cancer progression would provide insights into the molecular pathways responsible for a malignant phenotype. In this study we employed a novel coupling of 2D-liquid separations and protein microarray technology to reveal changes in phosphoprotein status between premalignant (AT1) and malignant (CA1a) cell lines derived from the human MCF10A breast cell lines. Intact proteins were first separated according to their isoelectric point and hydrophobicities, then arrayed on SuperAmine glass slides. Phosphoproteins were detected using the universal, inorganic phospho-sensor dye, ProQ Diamond. Using this dye, out of 140 spots that were positive for phosphorylation, a total of 85 differentially expressed spots were detected over a pH range of 7.2 to 4.0. Proteins were identified and their peptides sequenced by mass spectrometry. The strategy enabled the identification of 75 differentially expressed phosphoproteins, from which 51 phosphorylation sites in 27 unique proteins were confirmed. Interestingly, the majority of differentially expressed phosphorylated proteins observed were nuclear proteins. Three regulators of apoptosis, Bad, Bax and Acinus, were also differentially phosphorylated in the two cell lines. Further development of this strategy will facilitate an understanding of the mechanisms involved in malignancy progression and other disease-related phenotypes. PMID:19194518

  19. Integrated well log and 2-D seismic data interpretation to image the subsurface stratigraphy and structure in north-eastern Bornu (Chad) basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isyaku, Aminu A.; Rust, Derek; Teeuw, Richard; Whitworth, Malcolm

    2016-09-01

    Structural and stratigraphic mapping within the Bornu Basin in north east Nigeria was commonly carried out using traditional field geological methods. However, such traditional approaches remain inadequate in the semi-arid region characterised by topographically flat areas and lack of continuous bedrock outcrops that are mostly concealed beneath sand cover. Previous studies in the north-eastern part of the basin carried out using ditch cuttings from few wells and disconnected seismic data were largely inadequate and the resulting stratigraphic analyses were more often generalised. This paper presents an integrated structural and stratigraphic study of the basin using combined subsurface geophysical datasets. A Combined Log Pattern (CLP) method is a well log analysis, which utilises various well log data including gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and sonic logs to identify lithology and stratigraphic boundaries of subsurface formations. This method is applied to constrain the subsurface stratigraphy of the north-eastern part of the Bornu Basin bordering the Lake Chad. In addition to qualitative combined well log analysis, the time-depth relationship of the sonic log and seismic data was quantitatively determined by tying a well with an intersecting seismic section to validate the stratigraphic facies horizons identified. Four well log facies and their environments of deposition were characterised from the combined well log analysis of the different log types. It is discovered that the Cretaceous basement structural features controlled the deposition of overlying formations in the basin. Without intact core data, the shallower wells were discovered to have bottomed over subsurface horst features while deeper wells penetrated into the basal facies contained mainly within the grabens. Main subsurface structural lineaments in the area include NW-SE, NE-SW and NNW-SSE trending faults, which mainly formed the horst and graben features. Some stratigraphic formations

  20. Seismic design of circular-section concrete-lined underground openings: Preclosure performance considerations for the Yucca Mountain Site

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, A.M.; Blejwas, T.E.

    1992-07-01

    Yucca Mountain, the potential site of a repository for high-level radioactive waste, is situated in a region of natural and man-made seismicity. Underground openings excavated at this site must be designed for worker safety in the seismic environment anticipated for the preclosure period. This includes accesses developed for site characterization regardless of the ultimate outcome of the repository siting process. Experience with both civil and mining structures has shown that underground openings are much more resistant to seismic effects than surface structures, and that even severe dynamic strains can usually be accommodated with proper design. This paper discusses the design and performance of lined openings in the seismic environment of the potential site. The types and ranges of possible ground motions (seismic loads) are briefly discussed. Relevant historical records of underground opening performance during seismic loading are reviewed. Simple analytical methods of predicting liner performance under combined in situ, thermal, and seismic loading are presented, and results of calculations are discussed in the context of realistic performance requirements for concrete-lined openings for the preclosure period. Design features that will enhance liner stability and mitigate the impact of the potential seismic load are reviewed. The paper is limited to preclosure performance concerns involving worker safety because present decommissioning plans specify maintaining the option for liner removal at seal locations, thus decoupling liner design from repository postclosure performance issues.

  1. Digital in-line holography for the extraction of 3D trajectories of small particles in a 2D Benard-von Karman flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Nebya; Allano, Daniel; Godard, Gilles; Malek, Mokrane; Lebrun, Denis; Paranthoën, P.

    2006-09-01

    Digital In-line Holography is widely used to visualize fluid flows seeded with small particles. Such holograms record directly the far-field diffraction patterns of particles on a CCD camera. From the successive reconstruction planes, the three-dimensional location of the particles can be determined. This imaging system doesn't need focusing. The principle is based on the direct analysis of the diffraction patterns by mean of space-frequency operators such as Wavelet Transformation or Fractional Fourier Transformation. This method, already tested in our laboratory, leads to a better resolution than classical holography for the estimation of 3D particle locations (50μm instead of 0.5mm in depth). In the case of moving particles, it is interesting to illuminate the sample volume by several laser pulses. This can be easily realized by controlling the input current of a modulated laser diode. Then, the CCD camera cumulates the sum of in-line particle holograms recorded at different times. By searching for the best focus plane of each particle image, the 3D coordinate of each particle can be extracted at a given time. This technique is applied to determine trajectories of small particles in a well-controlled 2D Benard-von Karman street allowing a Lagrangian approach. Preliminary results are presented.

  2. Results and implications of new regional seismic lines in the Malay Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, W.; Ho, W.K.; Ghani, M.A. )

    1994-07-01

    Regional seismic data, which was previously acquired between 1968 and 1971 by early operators in the Malay Basin, has limitations because the sophisticated modern-day acquisition and processing techniques were not available. These old data do not permit confident mapping below 3 s (TWT), equivalent to approximately 3000 m subsea, but aeromagnetic data indicate that the total sedimentary thickness exceeds 13,000 m. Hence, existing regional seismic data with a record length of 5 s (TWT) is neither adequate to map deeper play opportunities nor able to aid in understanding the geological history of the basin. New plays at deeper levels may exist. (1) Geochemical modeling results now predict the top of the oil generation window at depths greater than previously thought. (2) Existing gas fields occur in the upper section in areas of thickest sedimentary fill but underlying targets have not been tested. (3) Past exploration has been focused on oil and not gas in deeper structures. Because of Malaysia's rapid development and its dedication to the protection of the environment, gas is becoming an increasingly important energy source. Hence, ample internal markets for additional gas discoveries are being created. A better understanding of the Malay Basin geological history will assist in locating these potential plays. To do this, Petronas acquired approximately 3000 line km of high-quality regional seismic data to further exploration efforts in this prospective region.

  3. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  4. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  5. Accretion and Subduction of Oceanic Lithosphere: 2D and 3D Seismic Studies of Off-Axis Magma Lenses at East Pacific Rise 9°37-40'N Area and Downgoing Juan de Fuca Plate at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuoshuo

    Two thirds of the Earth's lithosphere is covered by the ocean. The oceanic lithosphere is formed at mid-ocean ridges, evolves and interacts with the overlying ocean for millions of years, and is eventually consumed at subduction zones. In this thesis, I use 2D and 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the accretionary and hydrothermal process on the ridge flank of the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°37-40'N and the structure of the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate at the Cascadia subduction zone offshore Oregon and Washington. Using 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data, I image a series of off-axis magma lenses (OAML) in the middle or lower crust, 2-10 km from the ridge axis at EPR 9°37-40'N. The large OAMLs are associated with Moho travel time anomalies and local volcanic edifices above them, indicating off-axis magmatism contributes to crustal accretion though both intrusion and eruption (Chapter 1). To assess the effect of OAMLs on the upper crustal structure, I conduct 2-D travel time tomography on downward continued MCS data along two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML in our study area. I find higher upper crustal velocity in a region ~ 2 km wide above this OAML compared with the surrounding crust. I attribute these local anomalies to enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals in the pore space of upper crust associated with high-temperature off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML (Chapter 2). At Cascadia, a young and hot end-member of the global subduction system, the state of hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes, yet is poorly known. As local zones of higher porosity and permeability, faults constitute primary conduits for seawater to enter the crust and potentially uppermost mantle. From pre-stack time migrated MCS images, I observe pervasive faulting in the sediment section up to 200 km from the deformation front. Yet faults with large throw and

  6. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-07-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  7. Interpretation of seismic multiattributes using a neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Michelle Chaves; Vidal, Alexandre Campane; de Carvalho, Ancilla Maria Almeida

    2012-10-01

    Geological bodies in 2D seismic section are characterized by differences from the surrounding response. These differences can be highlighted by attributes that are sensitive to the desired feature. In this paper the attributes were carefully chosen and trained by a neural network. These seismic attributes are transformed into a new attribute that allows a different view of the seismic lines. The database used for this study is a 2D seismic line of the Taubaté Basin, São Paulo State, Brazil. Two seismic sets were analyzed and the results bring out the horizons and the boundary between seismic units, which helps a better understanding of the evolution of the Taubaté sedimentary basin.

  8. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2001-01-01

    The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

  9. Preliminary Pseudo 3-D Imagery of the State Line Fault, Stewart Valley, Nevada Using Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldaña, S. C.; Snelson, C. M.; Taylor, W. J.; Beachly, M.; Cox, C. M.; Davis, R.; Stropky, M.; Phillips, R.; Robins, C.; Cothrun, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Pahrump Fault system is located in the central Basin and Range region and consists of three main fault zones: the Nopah range front fault zone, the State Line fault zone and the Spring Mountains range fault zone. The State Line fault zone is made up north-west trending dextral strike-slip faults that run parallel to the Nevada- California border. Previous geologic and geophysical studies conducted in and around Stewart Valley, located ~90 km from Las Vegas, Nevada, have constrained the location of the State Line fault zone to within a few kilometers. The goals of this project were to use seismic methods to definitively locate the northwestern most trace of the State Line fault and produce pseudo 3-D seismic cross-sections that can then be used to characterize the subsurface geometry and determine the slip of the State Line fault. During July 2007, four seismic lines were acquired in Stewart Valley: two normal and two parallel to the mapped traces of the State Line fault. Presented here are preliminary results from the two seismic lines acquired normal to the fault. These lines were acquired utilizing a 144-channel geode system with each of the 4.5 Hz vertical geophones set out at 5 m intervals to produce a 595 m long profile to the north and a 715 m long profile to the south. The vibroseis was programmed to produce an 8 s linear sweep from 20-160 Hz. These data returned excellent signal to noise and reveal subsurface lithology that will subsequently be used to resolve the subsurface geometry of the State Line fault. This knowledge will then enhance our understanding of the evolution of the State Line fault. Knowing how the State Line fault has evolved gives insight into the stick-slip fault evolution for the region and may improve understanding of how stress has been partitioned from larger strike-slip systems such as the San Andreas fault.

  10. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01

    One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now

  11. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2001-10-31

    Two major accomplishments resulted from Phase I. One is the success of the surface geochemistry program, which collected over 800 samples from the site of the 1st demonstration well in Vernon Field and has pretty well provided us with the tools to delineate favorable ground from unfavorable. The second is the recent detailed mapping of the Central Michigan Basin that for the first time revealed the presence of at least two major faults that control the location of many of the reservoirs in the Michigan Basin. These faults were located from structure maps obtained by contouring the surface of the Dundee Formation using top picks from 9861 wells in 14 counties. Faults were inferred where the contour lines were most dense (''stacked'').

  12. THE SPITZER c2d SURVEY OF WEAK-LINE T TAURI STARS. III. THE TRANSITION FROM PRIMORDIAL DISKS TO DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Cieza, Lucas; Koerner, David W.; Case, April; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Chapman, Nicholas; Padgett, Deborah L.; Brooke, Tim; Keller, James R.; MerIn, Bruno; Evans, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul; Sargent, Anneila; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Allen, Lori; Blake, Geoff; Mundy, Lee; Myers, Philip C.

    2010-12-01

    We present 3.6 to 70 {mu}m Spitzer photometry of 154 weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTSs) in the Chamaeleon, Lupus, Ophiuchus, and Taurus star formation regions, all of which are within 200 pc of the Sun. For a comparative study, we also include 33 classical T Tauri stars which are located in the same star-forming regions. Spitzer sensitivities allow us to robustly detect the photosphere in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8 {mu}m) and the 24 {mu}m MIPS band. In the 70 {mu}m MIPS band, we are able to detect dust emission brighter than roughly 40 times the photosphere. These observations represent the most sensitive WTTSs survey in the mid- to far-infrared to date and reveal the frequency of outer disks (r = 3-50 AU) around WTTSs. The 70 {mu}m photometry for half the c2d WTTSs sample (the on-cloud objects), which were not included in the earlier papers in this series, those of Padgett et al. and Cieza et al., are presented here for the first time. We find a disk frequency of 19% for on-cloud WTTSs, but just 5% for off-cloud WTTSs, similar to the value reported in the earlier works. WTTSs exhibit spectral energy distributions that are quite diverse, spanning the range from optically thick to optically thin disks. Most disks become more tenuous than L{sub disk}/L{sub *} = 2 x 10{sup -3} in 2 Myr and more tenuous than L{sub disk}/L{sub *} = 5 x 10{sup -4} in 4 Myr.

  13. Fault segmentation and seismic potential of the Median Tectonic Line in Shikoku, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Ikeda, M.; Zhao, D.; Ohno, Y.

    2001-12-01

    The Median Tectonic Line (MTL) is one of the most active fault system in Japan, which is an east-west trending, 190 km-long fault system and consists of several rupture segments in Shikoku. A long active fault system such as the MTL may not rupture along its entire length in a single earthquake but instead consists of multiple seismic segments that rupture independently of one another. Dominant factors controlling the dynamic behavior of the MTL may be the structure and processes in the deep crust or even down to the uppermost mantle, hence we need to consider a segmentation model taking into account the heterogeneous structure of the crust and upper mantle. We conducted seismic tomography inversions to estimate the crustal structure beneath the MTL in Shikoku. We collected 83875 P and 34106 S wave arrival times from 4374 local earthquakes that occurred from 1985 to 1993 from the Japan University Network Earthquake Catalog (EPDC, 1997). We used the tomographic method of Zhao et al. (1992). A 3-D grid net was set up in the study area with a grid spacing of about 30 km in the horizontal direction and 10-20 km in depth. Strong heterogeneities are revealed in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the MTL in Shikoku. A prominent feature of the obtained tomographic results is that the three segments proposed by Goto et al.(2001) exhibit different velocity patterns. A prominent low-V zone is visible at depths of 15-30 km under the Central-East Shikoku segment. As the low-V zones may represent weak sections of the fault zone and it may influence the generation of large crustal earthquakes (e.g., Zhao et al., 2000), this feature may indicate that fault activity is different in the three segments of MTL. GPS observations for the MTL in eastern Shikoku indicate that the upper crust (0-15 km depths) of the MTL locks and steady slip occurs in the lower crust (Tabei et al., 2000). This steady slip zone coincides with the low-V zone revealed by our tomographic imaging in the

  14. The Nature of the Cameroon Volcanic Line: Evidence from Seismic Anisotropy and Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, I. D.; De Plaen, R. S. M.; Gallacher, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    The Cameroon geological record spans more than 3 billion years, from Congo Craton basement formation during the Archean, to Cenozoic volcanism along the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL). Intriguingly, the CVL, which straddles the continent-ocean boundary in central West Africa, displays no age-progression along its length. Analogies with other hotspot chains worldwide are thus not well established. To help address this issue, we present a receiver function study of bulk crustal structure, and an SKS shear wave splitting study of seismic anisotropy using data from a recent broadband seismic experiment in Cameroon. Within the cratonic Cameroon, crustal Vp/Vs ratios show little variation between Archean and Proterozoic domains, perhaps indicating similar mechanisms of crustal formation during more than 2 billion years of the Precambrian. The edge of the Congo Craton, however, is characterized by an abrupt change in crustal thickness of ~5 km, which constrains the northern and western edges of the craton to be ~4N and ~10E respectively. Along the CVL, Vp/Vs ratios are low (~1.74) compared to other hotspots worldwide, providing no evidence for either partial melt, or mafic crustal intrusion due to Cenozoic volcanism. The anisotropy study indicates that fast polarisation directions parallel the trend of the Central African Sear Zone (CASZ), which developed during the breakup of the Pangea supercontinent during Cretaceous times. Beneath much of the CVL, however, we observe only null SKS splitting observations. The lack of lithospheric fabric here may be the result of it being destroyed during Cenozoic hotspot tectonism. However, there is no evidence for anisotropic aligned melt within the lithosphere, unlike hotspots such as Ethiopia, with the implication that neither a CASZ-related lithospheric fabric nor horizontally oriented asthenospheric fabrics exist beneath the line. This finding is in agreement with the receiver function study, and petrological studies that suggest

  15. Structure of the ophiolite-hosted Outokumpu Cu-Co-Zn-Ni-Ag-Au sulfide ore district revealed by combined 3D modelling and 2D high-resolution seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, Kerstin; Laine, Eevaliisa

    2015-04-01

    The Outokumpu district within the North Karelia Schist Belt in eastern Finland hosts Cu-Co-Zn-Ni-Ag-Au sulfide deposits which are associated with Palaeoproterozoic ophiolitic metaperidotites that were tectonically interleaved with allochthonous metaturbidites. Extensive metasomatism of the peridotites produced a rim of quartz-carbonate-calc-silicate rocks, grouped as the Outokumpu assemblage (OKA). A tectonic history comprising various phases of folding and shearing followed by several faulting events dismembered the metaperidotites so that ore bodies cannot be easily followed along strike. Future exploration has to expand the search into deeper areas and consequently requires better knowledge of the subsurface geology. In order to unravel the complex structure 3D geologic models of different scales have been built using a variety of information: geological maps, aeromagnetic and gravity maps, digital terrain models, mine cross sections, drill core logs combined with observations from underground mine galleries, structural measurements, and data from seismic survey lines. The latter have been used to detect upper crustal-scale structures and have been reprocessed for our purpose. The models reveal that the ore body has formed during remobilisation of a proto-ore and is closely related to thrust zones that truncate the OKA. Later faults dismembered the ore explaining the variable depth of the different ore bodies along the Outokumpu ore zone. On a larger scale, at least four km-scale thrust sheets separated by major listric shear zones (curved dislocations in the seismic lines) can be recognized, each internally further imbricated by subordinate shear zones containing a number of lens-shape bodies of probably OKA rocks. Thrust stacking was followed by at least 3 stages of faulting that divided the ore belt into fault-bounded blocks with heterogeneous displacements: (i) NW-dipping faults with unresolved kinematics, (ii) reverse faulting along c.50°-60° SE

  16. Phenotyping breast cancer cell lines EM-G3, HCC1937, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 using 2-D electrophoresis and affinity chromatography for glutathione-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transformed phenotypes are common to cell lines derived from various cancers. Proteome profiling is a valuable tool that may reveal uncharacteristic cell phenotypes in transformed cells. Changes in expression of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and other proteins interacting with glutathione (GSH) in model cell lines could be of particular interest. Methods We compared the phenotypes of breast cell lines EM-G3, HCC1937, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 using 2-D electrophoresis (2-DE). We further separated GSH-binding proteins from the cell lines using affinity chromatography with GSH-Sepharose 4B, performed 2-DE analysis and identified the main protein spots. Results Correlation coefficients among 2-DE gels from the cell lines were lower than 0.65, pointing to dissimilarity among the cell lines. Differences in primary constituents of the cytoskeleton were shown by the 2-D protein maps and western blots. The spot patterns in gels of GSH-binding fractions from primary carcinoma-derived cell lines HCC1937 and EM-G3 were similar to each other, and they differed from the spot patterns of cell lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 that were derived from pleural effusions of metastatic mammary carcinoma patients. Major differences in the expression of GST P1-1 and carbonyl reductase [NADPH] 1 were observed among the cell lines, indicating differential abilities of the cell lines to metabolize xenobiotics. Conclusions Our results confirmed the applicability of targeted affinity chromatography to proteome profiling and allowed us to characterize the phenotypes of four breast cancer cell lines. PMID:20731849

  17. Development of a V79 cell line expressing human cytochrome P450 2D6 and its application as a metabolic screening tool.

    PubMed

    Rauschenbach, R; Gieschen, H; Salomon, B; Kraus, C; Kühne, G; Hildebrand, M

    1997-02-15

    Expression of human cytochrome P450 (CYP) in heterologous cells is a means of specifically studying the role of these enzymes in drug metabolism. The complete cDNA encoding CYP2D6-VAL(374) was inserted into an expression vector containing the strong mycloproliferative sarcoma virus promotor in combination with the enhancer of the cytomegalovirus and stably expressed in V79 Chinese hamster cells. The presence of genomically integrated CYP2D6 cDNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis. The protein expression was shown by Western blotting. Functional expression could be demonstrated by O-demethylation of dextromethorphan to dextrorphan in live cells. The enzymatic activity of 154 ± 16 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein was comparable with dextromethorphan-O-demethylation activities of human liver. The metabolism of two dopaminergic ergoline derivatives was investigated in whole recombinant V19 cells. Both lisuride and terguride were monodeethylated; in case of lisuride a correlation to the in vivo situation was demonstrated comparing poor and extensive metabolizers. PMID:21781755

  18. Seismic Anisotropy Beneath the Cameroon Volcanic Line from SKS and SKKS Splitting Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, F. W.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Reusch, A. M.; Euler, G. G.; Shore, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is an 1800-km-long line of Cenozoic volcanism that runs from the island of Annobòn in the Atlantic to northeast Cameroon. It does not show a chronological progression consistent with hotspot-related volcanism. We investigate seismic anisotropy to determine the upper mantle lattice preferred orientation and constrain the mantle flow pattern. For this study, we use a temporary array of 32 broadband seismographs deployed throughout Cameroon for 1 to 2 years between 2005 and 2007 along with two additional permanent seismographs in adjacent countries. Using the SKS splitting method described by Silver and Chan (1991) and the analysis program of George Helffrich, we investigate SKS and SKKS arrivals from 44 earthquakes with sources 95 to 145 degrees away and magnitudes greater than 6.0. First we determine the fast direction and lag time indicated beneath each station for each event, and then we stack the high-quality measurements for each station to find the final fast axis and lag time. We interpret the fast directions as indicating the direction of flow in the upper mantle, as suggested by laboratory experiments and previous studies of mantle xenoliths. Our results indicate four regions with different anisotropic parameters in the upper mantle. Two regions indicate anisotropy with a northeast-southwest-oriented fast direction and split time of about 1 s: the Congo craton in Southern Cameroon and the eastern end of the CVL. Between the Congo craton and the CVL, in central Cameroon, the fast direction is variable and has a small lag time of about 0.3 s. Along the CVL, the fast direction has an approximate north-south orientation, with a lag time of about 0.7 s. The splitting values in Southern Cameroon are consistent with large splitting times and NE directions found at GSN stations in Gabon and the Central African Republic and probably indicate a strong consistent anisotropic fabric frozen into the cratonic lithosphere. Splitting

  19. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE Seismic Reflection

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-05-16

    PDFs of seismic reflection profiles 101,110, 111 local to the West Flank FORGE site. 45 line kilometers of seismic reflection data are processed data collected in 2001 through the use of vibroseis trucks. The initial analysis and interpretation of these data was performed by Unruh et al. (2001). Optim processed these data by inverting the P-wave first arrivals to create a 2-D velocity structure. Kirchhoff images were then created for each line using velocity tomograms (Unruh et al., 2001).

  20. Astor Pass Seismic Surveys Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, John; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Faulds, James; Eisses, Amy; Kell, Annie; Frary, Roxanna; Kent, Graham

    2011-08-05

    In collaboration with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and Optim re-processed, or collected and processed, over 24 miles of 2d seismic-reflection data near the northwest corner of Pyramid Lake, Nevada. The network of 2d land surveys achieved a near-3d density at the Astor Pass geothermal prospect that the PLPT drilled during Nov. 2010 to Feb. 2011. The Bureau of Indian Affairs funded additional seismic work around the Lake, and an extensive, detailed single-channel marine survey producing more than 300 miles of section, imaging more than 120 ft below the Lake bottom. Optim’s land data collection utilized multiple heavy vibrators and recorded over 200 channels live, providing a state-of-the-art reflection-refraction data set. After advanced seismic analysis including first-arrival velocity optimization and prestack depth migration, the 2d sections show clear fault-plane reflections, in some areas as deep as 4000 ft, tying to distinct terminations of the mostly volcanic stratigraphy. Some lines achieved velocity control to 3000 ft depth; all lines show reflections and terminations to 5000 ft depth. Three separate sets of normal faults appear in an initial interpretation of fault reflections and stratigraphic terminations, after loading the data into the OpendTect 3d seismic visualization system. Each preliminary fault set includes a continuous trace more than 3000 ft long, and a swarm of short fault strands. The three preliminary normal-fault sets strike northerly with westward dip, northwesterly with northeast dip, and easterly with north dip. An intersection of all three fault systems documented in the seismic sections at the end of Phase I helped to locate the APS-2 and APS-3 slimholes. The seismic sections do not show the faults connected to the Astor Pass tufa spire, suggesting that we have imaged mostly Tertiary-aged faults. We hypothesize that the Recent, active faults that produced the tufa through hotspring

  1. Novel Image Metrics for Retrieval of the Lateral Resolution in Line Scan-Based 2D LA-ICPMS Imaging via an Experimental-Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    van Elteren, Johannes Teun; Izmer, Andrei; Šelih, Vid Simon; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-07-19

    The quality of elemental image maps obtained via line scan-based LA-ICPMS is a function of the temporal response of the entire system, governed by the design of the system and mapping and acquisition conditions used, next to the characteristics of the sample. To quantify image degradation, ablation targets with periodic gratings are required for the construction of a modulation transfer function (MTF) and subsequent determination of the lateral resolution as a function of image noise and contrast. Since such ablation targets, with suitable matrix composition, are not readily available, computer-generated periodic gratings were virtually ablated via a computational process based on a two-step discrete-time convolution procedure using empirical/experimental input data. This experimental-modeling procedure simulates LA-ICPMS imaging based on two consecutive processes, viz., LA sampling (via ablation crater profiles [ACP]) and aerosol washout/transfer/ICPMS measurement (via single pulse responses [SPR]). By random selection of experimental SPRs from a large database for each individual pulse during the simulation, the convolution procedure simulates an accurate elemental image map of the periodic gratings with realistic (proportional or flicker) noise. This facilitates indirect retrieval of the experimental lateral resolution for the matrix targeted without performing actual line scanning on periodic gratings. PMID:27349804

  2. Duality between the dynamics of line-like brushes of point defects in 2D and strings in 3D in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Digal, Sanatan; Ray, Rajarshi; Saumia, P S; Srivastava, Ajit M

    2013-10-01

    We analyze the dynamics of dark brushes connecting point vortices of strength ±1 formed in the isotropic-nematic phase transition of a thin layer of nematic liquid crystals, using a crossed polarizer set up. The evolution of the brushes is seen to be remarkably similar to the evolution of line defects in a three-dimensional nematic liquid crystal system. Even phenomena like the intercommutativity of strings are routinely observed in the dynamics of brushes. We test the hypothesis of a duality between the two systems by determining exponents for the coarsening of total brush length with time as well as shrinking of the size of an isolated loop. Our results show scaling behavior for the brush length as well as the loop size with corresponding exponents in good agreement with the 3D case of string defects. PMID:24026004

  3. Evaluation of the cytotoxic effects of humid lightweight coal ash derived from the disposal of waste on normal human keratinocyte and endothelial cell lines in 2-D and 3-D culture.

    PubMed

    Scanarotti, Chiara; Vernazza, Stefania; Brignone, Massimiliano; Danailova, Jenia; Pronzato, Maria A; Bassi, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    The presence of waste in the environment has frequently been indicated as a significant risk to human health. Therefore, landfill sites and the disposal of urban solid and non-hazardous waste by incineration are subject to much environmental monitoring, in addition to the regulations already in place. However, little action has been taken, and consequently no specific legislation exists, in relation to the assessment of the real biological risk of various substances, including chemical mixtures and ashes, derived from the incineration processes. This study assessed the cytotoxic potential of humid lightweight coal ash (LA) derived from incineration processes and waste management, on two cell lines: NCTC 2544 normal human keratinocytes and HECV endothelial cells. To reach this goal and to assess more-realistic methods for animal replacement, we employed different in vitro experimental approaches: acute and longer exposure to LA, by direct and indirect contact (0-2mg/ml and 16mg, respectively), both in 2-D and 3-D cultures. In 2-D HECV cultures, we observed a decrease in the viability index, but only during direct contact with LA doses higher than 0.1mg/ml. Moreover, some striking differences in cytotoxicity were observed between the 2-D and 3-D models. Taken together, these observations indicate that, for studying pollutant toxicity during longer exposure times, 3-D cultures in direct contact with the pollutant seem to offer a more suitable approach - they mimic the in vivo behaviour of cells more realistically and under strictly controlled conditions. Thus, in readiness for possible forthcoming European regulations, we believe that the proposed study, even in its preliminary phase, can provide new advice on the assessment of the toxic and biological potential of particular chemical compounds derived from waste management processes. PMID:24512233

  4. NKG2D- and T-cell receptor-dependent lysis of malignant glioma cell lines by human γδ T cells: Modulation by temozolomide and A disintegrin and metalloproteases 10 and 17 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chitadze, Guranda; Lettau, Marcus; Luecke, Stefanie; Wang, Ting; Janssen, Ottmar; Fürst, Daniel; Mytilineos, Joannis; Wesch, Daniela; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Held-Feindt, Janka; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interaction of the MHC class I-related chain molecules A and B (MICA and MICB) and UL-16 binding protein (ULBP) family members expressed on tumor cells with the corresponding NKG2D receptor triggers cytotoxic effector functions in NK cells and γδ T cells. However, as a mechanism of tumor immune escape, NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) can be released from the cell surface. In this study, we investigated the NKG2DL system in different human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, the most lethal brain tumor in adults. Flow cytometric analysis and ELISA revealed that despite the expression of various NKG2DLs only ULBP2 is released as a soluble protein via the proteolytic activity of “a disintegrin and metalloproteases” (ADAM) 10 and 17. Moreover, we report that temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapeutic agent in clinical use for the treatment of GBM, increases the cell surface expression of NKG2DLs and sensitizes GBM cells to γδ T cell-mediated lysis. Both NKG2D and the T-cell receptor (TCR) are involved. The cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells toward GBM cells is strongly enhanced in a TCR-dependent manner by stimulation with pyrophosphate antigens. These data clearly demonstrate the complexity of mechanisms regulating NKG2DL expression in GBM cells and further show that treatment with TMZ can increase the immunogenicity of GBM. Thus, TMZ might enhance the potential of the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded γδ T cells for the treatment of malignant glioblastoma. PMID:27141377

  5. A Gravity data along LARSE (Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment) Line II, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooley, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a detailed gravity study along part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE) transect across the San Fernando Basin and Transverse Ranges to help characterize the structure underlying this area. 249 gravity measurements were collected along the transect and to augment regional coverage near the profile. An isostatic gravity low of 50-60 mGal reflects the San Fernando-East Ventura basin. Another prominent isostatic gravity with an amplitude of 30 mGal marks the Antelope Valley basin. Gravity highs occur over the Santa Monica Mountains and the Transverse Ranges. The highest isostatic gravity values coincide with outcrops of Pelona schist.

  6. Seismic damage identification using multi-line distributed fiber optic sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jinping; Hou, Shuang

    2005-06-01

    Determination of the actual nonlinear inelastic response mechanisms developed by civil structures such as buildings and bridges during strong earthquakes and post-earthquake damage assessment of these structures represent very difficult challenges for earthquake structural engineers. One of the main reasons is that the traditional sensor can't serve for such a long period to cover an earthquake and the seismic damage location in the structure can't be predicted in advance definitely. It is thought that the seismic damage of reinforced concrete (RC) structure can be related to the maximum response the structure, which can also be related to the cracks on the concrete. A distributed fiber optic sensor was developed to detect the cracks on the reinforced concrete structure under load. Fiber optic couples were used in the sensor system to extend the sensor system's capacity from one random point detection to more. An optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) is employed for interrogation of the sensor signal. Fiber optic sensors are attached on the surface of the concrete by the epoxy glue. By choosing the strength of epoxy, the damage state of the concrete can be responded to the occurrence of the Fresnel scattering in the fiber optic sensor. Experiments involved monotonic loading to failure. Finally, the experimental results in terms of crack detection capability are presented and discussed.

  7. On-line 1D and 2D porous layer open tubular/LC-ESI-MS using 10-microm-i.d. poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) columns for ultrasensitive proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Quanzhou; Yue, Guihua; Valaskovic, Gary A; Gu, Ye; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry L

    2007-08-15

    Following on our recent work, on-line one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) porous layer open tubular/liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PLOT/LC-ESI-MS) platforms using 3.2 mx10 microm i.d. poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB) PLOT columns have been developed to provide robust, high-performance, and ultrasensitive proteomic analysis. With the use of a PicoClear tee, the dead volume connection between a 50 microm i.d. PS-DVB monolithic micro-SPE column and the PLOT column was minimized. The micro-SPE/PLOT column assembly provided a separation performance similar to that obtained with direct injection onto the PLOT column at a mobile phase flow rate of 20 nL/min. The trace analysis potential of the platform was evaluated using an in-gel tryptic digest sample of a gel fraction (15-40 kDa) of a cervical cancer (SiHa) cell line. As an example of the sensitivity of the system, approximately 2.5 ng of protein in 2 microL of solution, an amount corresponding to 20 SiHa cells, was subjected to on-line micro-SPE-PLOT/LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis using a linear ion trap MS. A total of 237 peptides associated with 163 unique proteins were identified from a single analysis when using stringent criteria associated with a false positive rate of less than 1%. The number of identified peptides and proteins increased to 638 and 343, respectively, as the injection amount was raised to approximately 45 ng of protein, an amount corresponding to 350 SiHa cells. In comparison, only 338 peptides and 231 unique proteins were identified (false positive rate again less than 1%) from 750 ng of protein from the identical gel fraction, an amount corresponding to 6000 SiHa cells, using a typical 15 cmx75 microm i.d. packed capillary column. The greater sensitivity, higher recovery, and higher resolving power of the PLOT column resulted in the increased number of identifications from only approximately 5% of the injected sample amount. The resolving power of the

  8. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  9. Crustal structure of southwestern Montana and east-central Idaho: Results of a reversed seismic refraction line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheriff, Steven D.; Stickney, Michael C.

    1984-04-01

    On October 20, 1982, we collected seismic refraction data on a 250 km line segment between Butte, Montana and Challis, Idaho. These data are from two open pit mine blasts; one at Anaconda Minerals Companys' southeast Berkely pit and the other at Cyprus Mines Corporations' Thompson creek mine. Eight of our ten recorders wrote clear records of both blasts with measured travel times accurate to +/-0.2 seconds. We supplemented these data with data from permanent stations in the Butte area. The Pg (crustal) velocity is 5.8 km/s to the southwest and 6.0 km/s to the northeast. The Pn (mantle) velocity is 7.9 km/s to the northeast and 8.1 km/s to the southwest; total travel-times are equal. The S-wave velocity in the crust is about 3.5 km/s. The symmetry of the travel-time results, with their intersection within one kilometer of the midpoint between the pit blasts, strongly suggests the refraction line overlies a horizontal Moho or parallels the strike line of a dipping Moho surface. These data indicate the crust in southwestern Montana and east-central Idaho is approximately 33 km thick. Contrasting tectonic processes, compression and thickening during the Laramide orogeny with extension and thinning since the Paleocene, resulted in a crust with slightly less than normal thickness.

  10. Seismic full waveform inversion from compressive measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ana; Arce, Gonzalo R.

    2015-05-01

    Traditional methods in seismic acquisition require sources and geophones that are uniformly located along a spatial line, using the Nyquist sampling rate. Depending on the area to be explored, it can be necessary to use seismic surveys with large offsets, or decrease the separation between adjacent geophones to improve the resolution, which generates very high volumes of data. It makes the exploration process more difficult and particularly expensive. This work presents the reconstruction of a compressive set of seismic traces acquired using the compressive sensing paradigm where the pair of sources and geophones are randomly located along the spatial line. The recovery of the wavefield from compressive measurements is feasible due to the capabilities of Curvelets on representing wave propagators with only a small set of coefficients. The method first uses the compressive samples to find a sparse vector representation of each pixel in a 2-D Curvelet dictionary. The sparse vector representation is estimated by solving a sparsity constrained optimization problem using the Gradient Projection for Sparse Reconstruction (GPSR) method. The estimated vector is then used to compute the seismic velocity profiles via acoustic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI). Simulations of the reconstructed image gathers and the resulting seismic velocity profiles illustrate the performance of the method. An improvement in the resulting images is obtained in comparison with traditional F-K filtering used in seismic data processing when traces are missing.

  11. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  12. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  13. Formation of the Cameroon Volcanic Line by lithospheric basal erosion: Insight from mantle seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsheikh, A. A.; Gao, S. S.; Liu, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The formation mechanism of intraplate volcanism such as that along the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is one of the controversial problems in global tectonics. Models proposed by previous studies include re-activation of ancient suture zones, lithospheric thinning by mantle plumes, and edge-driven mantle convection. To provide additional constraints on the models for the formation of the CVL, we measured shear-wave splitting parameters at 36 stations in the vicinity of the CVL using a robust procedure involving automatic batch processing and manual screening to reliably assess and objectively rank shear-wave splitting parameters (fast polarization directions and splitting times). The resulting 432 pairs of splitting parameters show a systematic spatial variation. Most of the measurements with ray-piercing points (at 200 km depth) beneath the CVL show a fast direction that is parallel to the volcanic line, while the fast directions along the coastline are parallel to the continental margin. The observations can best be interpreted using a model that involves a channel flow at the bottom of the lithosphere originated from the NE-ward movement of the asthenosphere relative to the African plate. We hypothesize that progressive thinning of the lithosphere through basal erosion by the flow leads to decompression melting and is responsible for the formation of the CVL. The model is consistent with the lack of age progression of the volcanoes in the CVL, can explain the formation of both the continental and oceanic sections of the CVL, and is supported by previous geophysical observations and geodynamic modeling results.

  14. Coal-seismic, desktop computer programs in BASIC; Part 5, Perform X-square T-square analysis and plot normal moveout lines on seismogram overlay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasbrouck, W.P.

    1983-01-01

    Processing of data taken with the U.S. Geological Survey's coal-seismic system is done with a desktop, stand-alone computer. Programs for this computer are written in the extended BASIC language used by the Tektronix 4051 Graphic System. This report presents computer programs to perform X-square/T-square analyses and to plot normal moveout lines on a seismogram overlay.

  15. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  16. The GLIMPCE seismic experiment: Onshore refraction and wide-angle reflection observations from a fan line over the Lake Superior Midcontinent Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epili, Duryodhan; Mereu, Robert F.

    The 1986 GLIMPCE experiment (Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program for Crustal Evolution) was a combined on-ship seismic reflection and onshore seismic refraction experiment designed to determine the structure of the crust beneath the Great Lakes. The main tectonic targets of interest were the Midcontinent Rift System, the Grenville Front, the Penokean and Huronian Fold Belts and the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt. The source of the seismic energy came from a large air gun array fired at closely spaced intervals (50-350 m) over several long lines (150-350 km) crossing the lakes. Major participants of this experiment were the Geological Survey of Canada, the United States Geological Survey and a number of universities and research institutes on both sides of the border. The University of Western Ontario (UWO) collected data at five separate land stations using portable seismic refraction instruments. In this paper we present the results of a fan profile which was recorded from a UWO station on Michipicoten Island for the N-S line A which crossed the axis of the Lake Superior Synclinal Basin. The azimuth and distance ranges for this profile were 237 to 321 degrees and 120 to 170 km respectively. Detailed observations of the record sections show that p. is not a simple arrival but forms a rather complex pattern of irregular multiple arrivals. The wide-angle PmP reflection signals from the Moho are strong and well obilerved only for the shots fired near the ends of the line. The signals from the middle of the profile arrive relatively late and form very weak complex wave trains. These results indicate that the Moho in that area is probably greatly disrupted and gives added support to the rift theory for the structure under the lake. The observations also support the results of earlier crustal studies of Lake Superior which showed that the crust under the eastern part of the lake was exceedingly thick.

  17. AnisWave2D: User's Guide to the 2d Anisotropic Finite-DifferenceCode

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Aoife

    2005-01-06

    This document describes a parallel finite-difference code for modeling wave propagation in 2D, fully anisotropic materials. The code utilizes a mesh refinement scheme to improve computational efficiency. Mesh refinement allows the grid spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, so that fine grid spacing can be used in low velocity zones where the seismic wavelength is short, and coarse grid spacing can be used in zones with higher material velocities. Over-sampling of the seismic wavefield in high velocity zones is therefore avoided. The code has been implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and allows large-scale models and models with large velocity contrasts to be simulated with ease.

  18. Deep geometry and evolution of the northern part of Itoigwa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system, Central Japan, revealed by Seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Matsuta, N.; Takeda, T.; Kawasaki, S.; Kozawa, T.; Elouai, D.; Hirata, N.; Kawanaka, T.

    2003-12-01

    The northern Fossa Magna (NFM) is a Miocene rift system produced in the final stages of the opening of the Sea of Japan. It divides the major structure of Japan into SW and NE portions. The Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) bounds the western part of the northern Fossa Magna and forms an active fault system showing the one of the largest slip rates in the Japanese islands. Based on the paleo-seismological data, the ISTL active fault system was evaluated to have the highest seismic risk among active faults within inland Japan. A quantitative understanding of active tectonic processes, including crustal deformation and related destructive earthquakes, is important in reducing seismic hazards through precise estimation of strong ground motions. The structure of the crust, especially the deep geometry of active fault systems, is the most important piece information required to construct such a dynamic model. In this context, the seismic reflection profiling was performed across the northern part of the ISTL active fault system by three seismic lines. Obtained seismic sections are interpreted based on the pattern of reflectors, surface geology and velocity model by refraction analysis, using the balanced cross section technique. The 68-km-long Itoshizu 2002 seismic section across the northern middle part of the ISTL active fault system suggest that the Miocene NFM basin was formed by an east dipping normal fault with shallow flat (6 km), deeper ramp (6 15 km) and deeper flat at 15 km in depth. This unique geometry is interpreted that this low-angle normal fault was produced by Miocene high thermal regime, estimated from the thick volcanic rocks at the base of the basin fill. Namely, the normal fault reflects the brittle-ductile boundary in Miocene. Consequently, since the Pliocene, the basin fill was strongly folded by the reverse faulting along the pre-existing normal faults in the Pre-Neogene rocks. The reverse faults in the basin fill produced fault

  19. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  20. Efficient 2d full waveform inversion using Fortran coarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Donghyun; Kim, ahreum; Ha, Wansoo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a time-domain seismic inversion program using the coarray feature of the Fortran 2008 standard to parallelize the algorithm. We converted a 2d acoustic parallel full waveform inversion program with Message Passing Interface (MPI) to a coarray program and examined performance of the two inversion programs. The results show that the speed of the waveform inversion program using the coarray is slightly faster than that of the MPI version. The standard coarray lacks features for collective communication; however, it can be improved in following standards since it is introduced recently. The parallel algorithm can be applied for 3D seismic data processing.

  1. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  2. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Corey L.; Yarberry, Victor; Jorgensen, Craig

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats, are also provided in the library.

  3. Deep-imaging seismic and gravity results from the offshore Cameroon Volcanic Line, and speculation of African hotlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Jayson B.; Rosendahl, Bruce R.; Harrison, Christopher G. A.; Ding, Zan-Dong

    1998-01-01

    Deep-imaging multi-channel seismic reflection data show that volcanic centers along the offshore part of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) are composed of uplifted, Aptian to Late Cretaceous oceanic crust, >4 km of sedimentary overburden, and Neogene igneous rocks, with volcanic material forming a cap < 1.5 km thick over pre-uplift sedimentary deposits. At Príncipe Island, the underlying oceanic basement has been uplifted by as much as 3 km to form a crustal arch less than 200 km wide perpendicular to the CVL trend. Vertical faults having small offsets and dikes are common across this arch. Reflection Moho shallows parallel to the uplifted crust along margins of the arch, but is not observed directly below the arch axis where volcanism and faulting are pervasive. The episode of crustal uplift is marked by a prominent reflection unconformity. This unconformity occurs at other CVL islands and seamounts and represents a synchronous period of crustal uplift and volcanism. Reflectors from this unconformity have been correlated to offshore boreholes indicating a Miocene age. Gravity modelling indicates that an elongate wedge of relatively less dense lithospheric mantle (Δρ = -0.1 g/cm 3) underlies Príncipe Island to a depth of 40 km. This interpreted zone of lighter mantle material may form by a combination of intruded mafic partial melt and reheating of the lithosphere. Dynamic support from asthenospheric upwelling may also have contributed to uplift. Other NE-trending volcanic chains and rises off West Africa (Canary Islands, Cape Verde Rise, Sierra Leone Rise and Walvis Ridge) display similar features to CVL islands. These volcanic chains exhibit crustal uplift unconformities and intraplate volcanism occurring during the Miocene and later; Miocene and older marine sediments crop out on most of the islands; there are no flexural depressions surrounding volcanic centers; their ocean island basalts (OIB) have similar geochemical characteristics; the OIB does not

  4. a Seismic Reflection Study on the Ablation Area of the Taku Glacier, Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechmann, J. M.; Gusmeroli, A.; Booth, A.; Truffer, M.

    2014-12-01

    Active-source seismic reflection techniques have been frequently used to document temporal and spatial variability in subglacial conditions beneath the ice sheets. Seismic surveys may provide the topography of the subglacial landscape as well as information about the properties of subglacial sediments and water. The former is achieved by standard 2D seismic imaging, the latter by amplitude analysis of the base-ice reflection. Seismic techniques for subglacial characterization have not yet been fully explored on mountain glaciers, where the ice is warmer and more attenuative to seismic energy, and the area available for survey is often more restrictive. In March 2014 we collected a high-resolution seismic reflection survey on the lower ablation area of the Taku Glacier in South-East Alaska. The survey line was composed of 120 geophones buried 0.5 m in the snowpack and spaced by 5 meters. The surface of the glacier was covered by a spatially variable 2-6 m thick snow cover. Shots, 99 charges of the binary explosive kinepak (152 grams), were drilled to 6 meters below surface. We present preliminary seismic images, attenuation estimates and amplitude analysis as well as a discussion of the challenges of seismic studies in the ablation area of large mountain glaciers where spatially variable snowpack, rough topography and hidden crevasses hamper standard seismic interpretation and render successful data interpretation more difficult.

  5. Stacking up 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Graphene might be the most famous example, but there are other 2D materials and compounds too. Louise Mayor explains how these atomically thin sheets can be layered together to create flexible “van der Waals heterostructures”, which could lead to a range of novel applications.

  6. Correcting amplitude, time, and phase mis-ties in seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, T.N. ); Nunns, A.G. )

    1994-06-01

    Seismic lines from different vintages frequently mis-tie where they intersect. The mis-ties may stem from different amplitudes, a shift in time, or different wave-let character. The authors can correct these mis-ties to a great extent by applying a scale factor, a static time shift, and a phase rotation to one of the lines. The authors describe algorithms to compute the amplitude, time, and phase differences at each intersection among a series of 2-D seismic lines. They can then use an iterative least-squares technique to derive optimal mis-tie corrections for each line. They include a necessary modification of the least-squares technique for the nonlinear phase data. The various algorithms are stable, fast, and accurate. They have used them in conjunction with an interactive workstation seismic interpretation program for five years. The scalar mis-tie corrections greatly enhance the consistency of the seismic data. The authors show the results of the mis-tie package applied to a 20-line survey consisting of five vintages of seismic data. The resulting mis-tie corrections significantly improve the fit between the 20 lines.

  7. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  9. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  10. Nanoimprint lithography: 2D or not 2D? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is more than a planar high-end technology for the patterning of wafer-like substrates. It is essentially a 3D process, because it replicates various stamp topographies by 3D displacement of material and takes advantage of the bending of stamps while the mold cavities are filled. But at the same time, it keeps all assets of a 2D technique being able to pattern thin masking layers like in photon- and electron-based traditional lithography. This review reports about 20 years of development of replication techniques at Paul Scherrer Institut, with a focus on 3D aspects of molding, which enable NIL to stay 2D, but at the same time enable 3D applications which are "more than Moore." As an example, the manufacturing of a demonstrator for backlighting applications based on thermally activated selective topography equilibration will be presented. This technique allows generating almost arbitrary sloped, convex and concave profiles in the same polymer film with dimensions in micro- and nanometer scale.

  11. Full waveform forward seismic modeling of geologically complex environment: Comparison of simulated and field seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, S.; Heinonen, M.; Koivisto, E.

    2012-04-01

    Reflection seismic data acquired in hard-rock terrains are often difficult to interpret due to complex geological architecture of the target areas. Even fairly simple geological structures, such as folds, can be difficult to identify from the seismic profiles because the reflection method is only able to image the sub-horizontal fold hinges, and no reflections arise from the steep fold limbs. Furthermore, typically acquisition lines in the hard-rock areas are crooked, and the data can rarely be acquired perpendicular to the strikes of the structures, if the strikes are even known. These further complicate the interpretation, because conventional processing techniques fail to compensate for the associated distortions in the ray paths. Full waveform seismic forward modeling can be used to facilitate the interpretations, to help to find optimal processing algorithms for specific structures, and also to guide the planning of a seismic survey. Recent increases in computational power and development of softwares make full wavefield forward modeling possible also for more complex, realistic geological models. In this study, we use Sofi3D-software for seismic forward modeling of 2D reflection seismic data acquired along a crooked acquisition line over a 3D fold structure. The model presents the structures previously interpreted in the Pyhäsalmi VHMS deposit, central Finland. Density, P and S-wave velocities required for the modeling are derived from in-situ drill hole logging data from the Pyhäsalmi mining camp, and Paradigm GoCad is used to build the geological 3D models. Meaningful modeling results require a sufficiently dense modeling grid, however, increasing the grid density comes at the cost of increased running time of the Sofi3D. Thus, careful parameter selection needs to be done before running the forward modeling. The results of the forward modeling aim to facilitate the interpretation of the 2D reflection seismic data available from Pyhäsalmi mining camp. The

  12. Imaging in 2D media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    Stacking by CDP technique is inapplicable for processing of data from bottom seismic stations or acoustic sonobuoys. In addition, big amount of unknown velocity and structural parameters of the real layered medium do not allow these parameters to be defined by standard processing methods. Local sloped stacking is proposed for simultaneous obtaining the stacked tracks, travel time curve of a chosen wave, and the first derivative of this travel time curve. The additionally defined parameters are second derivative of this travel time curve and integrated average of squared travel time curve. These data are sufficient to reduce the amount of unknown parameters (down to one-two for each boundary) when layer-by-layer top-to-bottom processing. As a result, the stable estimates of velocity parameters of the layered (isotropic or anisotropic) medium can be obtained and stacked tracks obtained by local sloped staking can be transformed into boundaries in the time and depth sections.

  13. Imaging the Carboneras fault zone at depth: preliminary results from reflection/refraction seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nippress, S.; Rietbrock, A.; Faulkner, D. R.; Rutter, E.; Haberland, C. A.; Teixido, T.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding and characterizing fault zone structure at depth is vital to predicting the slip behaviour of faults in the brittle crust. We aim to combine detailed field mapping and laboratory velocity/physical property determinations with seismic measurements on the Carboneras fault zone (S.E. Spain) to improve our knowledge of how fault zone structure affects seismic signals. The CFZ is a large offset (10s of km) strike-slip fault that constitutes part of the diffuse plate boundary between Africa and Iberia. It has been largely passively exhumed from ca. 4 to 6 km depth. The friable fault zone components are excellently preserved in the region’s semi-arid climate, and consist of multiple strands of phyllosilicate-rich fault gouge ranging from 1 to 20 m in thickness. In May 2009 we conducted 4 high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction/first break tomography lines. Two of these lines (~1km long) crossed the entire fault zone while the remaining lines (~150 and ~300m long) concentrated on individual fault strands and associated damage zones. For each of the lines a 2 m-geophone spacing was used with a combination of accelerated drop weight, sledgehammer and 100g explosives as seismic sources. Initial seismic reflection processing has been carried out on each of the 4 lines. First breaks have been picked for each of the shot gathers and inputted into a 2D traveltime inversion and amplitude-modeling package (Zelt & Smith, 1992) to obtain first break tomography images. During this field campaign we also carried out numerous fault zone guided wave experiments on two of the dense seismic lines. At the larger offsets (~600-700m) we observe low frequency guided waves. These experiments will capture the various length scales involved in a mature fault zone and will enable the surface mapping and petrophysical studies to be linked to the seismic field observations.

  14. Multi-method determination of continuous 2D velocity profiles from the surface to 1 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterie, S.; Miller, R. D.; Ivanov, J.; Schwenk, J.; Bailey, B. L.; Schwarzer, J.; Markiewicz, R.

    2012-12-01

    Compressional and shear reflection data provide critical measurements of velocity and attenuation that are necessary for numerical simulations of site response from earthquake energy and seismic investigations to lithologic and pore characterizations. Imperative for accurate site response models is a seismic velocity model extending from the surface to the depth of interest that is representative of the true subsurface. In general, no seismic method can be used to characterize the shallowest (< 30 m) and deepest (30 m to 1 km) portions of the subsurface in a single pass with a consistent set of equipment and acquisition parameters. With four unique seismic surveys targeting different portions of the subsurface and different components of the seismic wavefield, we were able to build a comprehensive dataset that facilitated continuous 2D velocity profiles. The upper kilometer underlying our study site consists of Lake Bonneville lucustrine sediments and post-Bonneville alluvium and colluvium from the nearby Wasatch Front in north central Utah (Eardley, 1938; Hintze, 2005). Four unique seismic surveys were acquired along each of two 1.5 km lines located approximately 3 km apart. Data for tomography and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) were acquired with a bungee accelerated weight drop and 4.5 Hz compressional geophones. P-wave and S-wave reflection data were acquired with an IVI minivib 1 and 28 Hz compressional and 14 Hz SH geophones, respectively. P-wave and S-wave velocities from the surface to 30 m were determined using tomography and MASW, respectively. Stacking velocities of reflections on common midpoint gathers from the vibroseis data were used to determine Vp and Vs from approximately 30 m to nearly 1 km below ground surface. Each Vp and Vs dataset were merged to generate continuous interval and average velocity profiles. The sutured velocity cross-sections were produced for both P- and S-waves in a fashion not previously described in the

  15. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne D. Pennington

    2002-09-29

    The project, "Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization," is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, inlcuding several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on "Reservoir Geophysics" for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along 'phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a

  16. CALIBRATION OF SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne D. Pennington; Horacio Acevedo; Aaron Green; Joshua Haataja; Shawn Len; Anastasia Minaeva; Deyi Xie

    2002-10-01

    The project, ''Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Calibration,'' is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, including several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on ''Reservoir Geophysics'' for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along ''phantom'' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a

  17. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  18. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  19. Collective excitations in 2D hard-disc fluid.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Adrian; Bryk, Taras; Trokhymchuk, Andrij

    2015-07-01

    Collective dynamics of a two-dimensional (2D) hard-disc fluid was studied by molecular dynamics simulations in the range of packing fractions that covers states up to the freezing. Some striking features concerning collective excitations in this system were observed. In particular, the short-wavelength shear waves while being absent at low packing fractions were observed in the range of high packing fractions, just before the freezing transition in a 2D hard-disc fluid. In contrast, the so-called "positive sound dispersion" typically observed in dense Lennard-Jones-like fluids, was not detected for the 2D hard-disc fluid. The ratio of specific heats in the 2D hard-disc fluid shows a monotonic increase with density approaching the freezing, resembling in this way the similar behavior in the vicinity of the Widom line in the case of supercritical fluids. PMID:25595625

  20. Seismic characterization of fracture orientation in the Austin Chalk using azimuthal P-wave AVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif Adulrahman

    The Austin Chalk is a naturally fractured reservoir. Horizontal drilling, to intersect more fractures, is the most efficient method to develop this reservoir. Information about the predominant fracture orientation in the subsurface is essential before horizontal drilling. This information may be provided by cores, well logs, outcrop, or seismic data. In this study, I apply the azimuthal P-wave AVO method suggested by Ruger and Tsvankin (1997) on 2-D P-wave seismic data in Gonzales County, Texas, in order to determine the fracture azimuth in the Austin Chalk. The data also include oil production from horizontal wells and various types of well logs from vertical wells in the study area. The raw seismic data was imaged through a processing sequence that preserved the relative changes of amplitudes with offset. The stacked sections of some seismic lines showed that the top of the Austin Chalk reflector is laterally inconsistent. This is interpreted as an indication of fractured zones in the subsurface. This interpretation was strengthened by well logs that indicated fracturing in nearby wells. The AVO gradient of every CDP in a seismic line was determined. The median AVO gradient of all the CDPs in a seismic line was chosen to represent the whole line. The median AVO gradients of the lines and their corresponding line azimuths were used repeatedly to solve the azimuthal AVO equation, of Ruger and Tsvankin (1997), for the fracture azimuth using a combination of three different lines every time. The resultant fracture-azimuth solutions clustered about two, nearly perpendicular, azimuths: N58E and S31E. To resolve the inherently ambiguous solutions, the results from the production and well log data were used. Since the production and well log data indicated the presence of NE-trending fractures, I chose the N58E direction as the fracture azimuth. This result agreed with the results of other studies in surrounding areas, using different methods, about the fracture azimuth

  1. Geological characterisation of complex reservoirs using 3D seismic: Case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaissa, Zahia; Benaïssa, Abdelkader; Seghir Baghaoui, Mohamed; Bendali, Mohamed; Chami, Adel; Khelifi Touhami, Médina; Ouadfeul, Sid Ali; Boudella, Amar

    2014-05-01

    3D seismic allows getting a set of numerous closely-spaced seismic lines that provide a high spatially sampled measure of subsurface reflectivity. It leads to an accurate interpretation of seismic reflection data, which is one of the most important stages of a successful hydrocarbons exploration, especially in the reservoirs characterised by complex geological setting. We present here two case studies pertaining to two Algerian hydrocarbon fields. Considering the positive results obtained from 2D seismic interpretation, several wells were drilled. Some of them have proved dry, due certainly to inaccurate seismic interpretation because of non standard geological context. For the first case, the high quality of the 3D seismic data allowed to reveal, on all the inlines and crosslines, the existence of paleovalleys under the top of the Ordovician (unit IV) reservoir. The mapping of these paleovalleys clearly showed that the dry well, contrary to the other wells, was implanted outside paleovalleys. This fact was confirmed by the analysis of well data. The second case study concerns the problem of andesitic eruptive deposits on the top of the Ordovician reservoir, which condition the geometry and continuity of this reservoir and cause uncertainties in the mapping of the Hercynian unconformity. Well data associated with 3D seismic response shows that eruptive deposits generate high impedance anomaly because of the high density and velocity of andesites. We used this information to interpret these eruptive rocks as being responsible of high impedance anomalies, inside the Ordovician reservoir, on the impedance volume generated from the 3D seismic data. A 3D extraction of the anomalies allowed an accurate localisation of the andesites. So, it appears, according to these two case studies, that for an efficient recovery of hydrocarbons, we have to rely, first of all, on an accurate seismic interpretation before we use microscopic measurements. 3D seismic, once again, remains

  2. Heat-flow measurements at shot points along the 1978 Saudi Arabia seismic deep-refraction line; Part I, Results of the measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.; Showail, Abdullah

    1982-01-01

    Heat-flow measurements were made at five onland shot points of the 1978 Saudi Arabian seismic deep-refraction line, which sample major tectonic elements of the Arabian Shield along a profile from Ar Riyad to the Farasan Islands. Because of the pattern drilling at each shot point, several holes (60 m deep) could be logged for temperature at each site and thus allow a better estimate of the geothermal gradient. Each site was mapped and sampled in detail, and modal and. chemical analyses of representative specimens were made in the laboratory. Thermal conductivities were computed from the modal analyses and single-mineral conductivity data. The resulting heat-flow values, combined with published values for the Red Sea and coastal plain, indicate a three-level pattern, with a heat flow of about 4.5 heat-flow unit (HFU) over the Red Sea axial trough, about 3.0 HFU over the shelf and coastal plain, and an essentially constant 1.0 HFU over the Arabian Shield at points well away from the suture zone with the oceanic crust. At three sites where the rocks are granitic, gamma-ray spectrometry techniques were employed to estimate thorium, potassium, and uranium concentrations. The resulting plot of heat generation versus heat flow suggests that in the Arabian Shield the relationship between heat flow and heat production is not linear. More heat-flow data are essential to establish or reject this conclusion.

  3. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  4. Comprehensive analysis of the deviatoric stress field from focal mechanisms and slip-line field from conjugate linear seismicity clusters in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Hauksson, E.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the deviatoric stress field and the geometric properties of conjugate linear seismicity clusters in the southern California region using earthquake data recorded by the SCSN from 1981 to 2011. Using a data set with approximate 179,000 high quality focal mechanisms that were determined from P first motions and S/P amplitude ratios, we invert for the variation in the stress field in time and space using several methods. The inversion results match with results from prior studies with a predominant north-south to northnortheast orientation of maximum horizontal stress, but our results reveal the stress field at a higher level of resolution because we use a larger data set than was available before. The results show that the stress field exhibits minimal regional temporal variations, but some variations exist in small areas close to large mainshocks. Similarly, localized depth variations in the stress field suggest the possible existence of vertical strain partitioning. We determine a data set with approximate 8,000 seismicity clusters using waveform cross-correlation and a clustering method. We calculate the geometrical properties of the clusters, such as orientation, area, and concentration. Pairs of conjugate linear clusters exist across southern California. The angles between conjugate linear clusters in the direction of maximum shortening range from 80 [deg] to 160 [deg], with a median value of 120 [deg] and a mode value of 115 [deg]. The bisection of conjugate linear clusters in the direction of maximum shortening generally matches with the maximum horizontal stress orientation, which implies a relation between orientation of the stress field and the orientation of clusters. For clusters located close to the San Andreas Fault (SAF), the strike of one of the conjugate cluster in a pair is often parallel to the local strike of the SAF, and the conjugate angle is relatively large. Also, the conjugate angles are large

  5. Noninvasive deep Raman detection with 2D correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Min; Park, Hyo Sun; Cho, Youngho; Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Kang Taek; Jung, Young Mee; Suh, Yung Doug

    2014-07-01

    The detection of poisonous chemicals enclosed in daily necessaries is prerequisite essential for homeland security with the increasing threat of terrorism. For the detection of toxic chemicals, we combined a sensitive deep Raman spectroscopic method with 2D correlation analysis. We obtained the Raman spectra from concealed chemicals employing spatially offset Raman spectroscopy in which incident line-shaped light experiences multiple scatterings before being delivered to inner component and yielding deep Raman signal. Furthermore, we restored the pure Raman spectrum of each component using 2D correlation spectroscopic analysis with chemical inspection. Using this method, we could elucidate subsurface component under thick powder and packed contents in a bottle.

  6. Inhibitory effects of phytochemicals on metabolic capabilities of CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 using cell-based models in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Qiang; Qu, Jian; Han, Lu; Zhan, Min; Wu, Lan-xiang; Zhang, Yi-wen; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hong-hao

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Herbal products have been widely used, and the safety of herb-drug interactions has aroused intensive concerns. This study aimed to investigate the effects of phytochemicals on the catalytic activities of human CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 in vitro. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 expression vectors. The metabolic kinetics of the enzymes was studied using HPLC and fluorimetry. Results: HepG2-CYP2D6*1 and HepG2-CYP2D6*10 cell lines were successfully constructed. Among the 63 phytochemicals screened, 6 compounds, including coptisine sulfate, bilobalide, schizandrin B, luteolin, schizandrin A and puerarin, at 100 μmol/L inhibited CYP2D6*1- and CYP2D6*10-mediated O-demethylation of a coumarin compound AMMC by more than 50%. Furthermore, the inhibition by these compounds was dose-dependent. Eadie-Hofstee plots demonstrated that these compounds competitively inhibited CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10. However, their Ki values for CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 were very close, suggesting that genotype-dependent herb-drug inhibition was similar between the two variants. Conclusion: Six phytochemicals inhibit CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10-mediated catalytic activities in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Thus herbal products containing these phytochemicals may inhibit the in vivo metabolism of co-administered drugs whose primary route of elimination is CYP2D6. PMID:24786236

  7. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  8. Structural mapping in basin-and-range-like geology by electromagnetic methods: A powerful aid to seismic

    SciTech Connect

    Galibert, P.Y.; Andrieux, P.; Guerin, R.

    1996-11-01

    A case history is presented where electromagnetic (EM) methods were applied as a complement to seismic, for structural mapping in basin-and-range-like geology: 366 five-component magnetotelluric (MT) soundings were carried out together with 331 transient soundings (TDEM) along seismic lines. Due to high structural complexity, seismic shows a number of limitations. For the same reasons, MT is highly perturbed and three specific interpretation techniques were comprehensively applied: (1) a classical correction of static effect using TDEM sounding, to determine the high-frequency nondistorted apparent resistivities and thus the corrected tensor; (2) a so-called regional correction based upon the same concept as the static effect, to transform distorted resistivity curves due to the horst/graben situation into plausible 1D curves, through the use of nomograms built for 2D H-polarization situations; and (3) a stripping technique which made it possible to map areas where a deep conductive Mesozoic shale was present below carbonates, at a depth of 3 km. After the best MT interpretation was obtained along each line, it was integrated with seismic and with the results from two boreholes. A crude empirical law relating resistivity and acoustic velocity was established and the MT horizons were plotted on the two-way traveltime seismic sections. The final integrated cross-sections obtained are undoubtedly of greater use to the explorationist than the initial seismic sections alone and two wells were accurately predicted.

  9. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  10. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  11. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  12. 2-D scalable optical controlled phased-array antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maggie Yihong; Howley, Brie; Wang, Xiaolong; Basile, Panoutsopoulos; Chen, Ray T.

    2006-02-01

    A novel optoelectronically-controlled wideband 2-D phased-array antenna system is demonstrated. The inclusion of WDM devices makes a highly scalable system structure. Only (M+N) delay lines are required to control a M×N array. The optical true-time delay lines are combination of polymer waveguides and optical switches, using a single polymeric platform and are monolithically integrated on a single substrate. The 16 time delays generated by the device are measured to range from 0 to 175 ps in 11.6 ps. Far-field patterns at different steering angles in X-band are measured.

  13. Light field morphing using 2D features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Lin, Stephen; Lee, Seungyong; Guo, Baining; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2005-01-01

    We present a 2D feature-based technique for morphing 3D objects represented by light fields. Existing light field morphing methods require the user to specify corresponding 3D feature elements to guide morph computation. Since slight errors in 3D specification can lead to significant morphing artifacts, we propose a scheme based on 2D feature elements that is less sensitive to imprecise marking of features. First, 2D features are specified by the user in a number of key views in the source and target light fields. Then the two light fields are warped view by view as guided by the corresponding 2D features. Finally, the two warped light fields are blended together to yield the desired light field morph. Two key issues in light field morphing are feature specification and warping of light field rays. For feature specification, we introduce a user interface for delineating 2D features in key views of a light field, which are automatically interpolated to other views. For ray warping, we describe a 2D technique that accounts for visibility changes and present a comparison to the ideal morphing of light fields. Light field morphing based on 2D features makes it simple to incorporate previous image morphing techniques such as nonuniform blending, as well as to morph between an image and a light field. PMID:15631126

  14. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  15. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  16. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  17. An active seismic experiment proposal onboard the NASA 2009 MSL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonné, P.; Experiment Team

    NASA will launch in 2009 a 900 kg class rover to Mars. This rover will land with a new descent system, called the ``sky-crane''. After releasing the rover on the ground, the sky-crane will have a final flight until a hard landing about 2 km away from the rover. The science objectives of the 2009 MSL mission, among others, are to characterize the geology of the landing region at all appropriate spatial scales, to interpret the processes that have formed and modified rocks and regolith and to determine present state, distribution, and cycling of water. We propose to perform with the sky-crane an active seismic experiment for subsurface characterization. This experiment will be conducted after the rover deployment. The proposed idea is to deploy a seismic receiver line by ejecting about 10 seismic nodes from the sky-crane and then to record then the reflected signals from the impact of the sky-crane. Preliminary modeling and tests indicate that a penetration depth of several hundred meters will be reached. The experiment will be used to determine a 2D geological profile of the landing site subsurface, to determine the depth and shape of the dry regolith/icy regolith discontinuity and to identify possible layering structures in the subsurface. In addition, information on the structure of the regolith (mean size of building blocs) and on the presence of liquid water will be obtained by an analysis of the seismic coda and attenuation. The seismic high frequency noise will also be monitored, especially during windy periods, and will be used to get additional information on the subsurface. The proposed experiment is based on a consortium between academics laboratories and seismic industry and will be a first example of a resource oriented experiment on another planet than Earth. The complete mass of the experiment will be 2.5 kg. Seismic nodes will have their own acquisition/power and telemetry system and will be based on high sensitive geophones developed for seismic

  18. Grustal shortening in the Alpine Orogen: Results from deep seismic reflection profiling in the eastern Swiss Alps, Line NFP 20-east

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiffner, O. A.; Frei, W.; Valasek, P.; StäUble, M.; Levato, L.; Dubois, L.; Schmid, S. M.; Smithson, S. B.

    1990-12-01

    The deep crustal seismic line NFP 20-EAST crosses almost the entire Swiss Alps. Despite the complex geometry of the well-exposed nappe structure and the considerable axial plunge of some of the units, the Vibroseis survey yielded coherent reflections from several individually identifiable nappe contacts. In the northern part of the survey the Vibroseis data closely match the internal structure of the Helvetic nappes and the underlying autochthonous-parautochthonous Mesozoic sediments. On the northern flank of the Aar massif, an external basement uplift, these Mesozoic sediments seem to rise from a depth of approximately 7-8 km below sea level to the surface in a series of steps which is interpreted to represent crustal shortening achieved by a combination of folding and thrusting. In the southern part of the survey it was possible to image a number of thin slivers of Mesozoic carbonates pinched between slabs of Penninic basement nappes as well as nappe contacts between lithologically contrasting units. In addition, it seems that the Insubric fault zone, which marks the contact between the Penninic zone and the Southern Alps and which outcrops about 30 km to the south of the survey, shows up as steeply north dipping reflections. The lower European crust in the northern part of the survey is relatively transparent as opposed to the Adriatic lower crust, whose reflective nature may stem from shear zones associated with Mesozoic crustal stretching. The base of both the European and Adriatic crust coincides with a 1-s-thick band of laterally discontinuous reflections. This reflection Moho drops to greater depths going from the north toward the center of the Alpine chain, where it disappears with a steep southerly dip. The Moho reappears as a reflection band farther south. This Moho gap is situated above the lithospheric root and may be caused by perturbations related to subduction of lower crustal material. The crustal-scale structure obtained from the Vibroseis data

  19. Seismic Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Soloviev, V. M.; Emanov, A. F.

    The paper is devoted to researches of influence of seismic actions for industrial and civil buildings and people. The seismic actions bring influence directly on the people (vibration actions, force shocks at earthquakes) or indirectly through various build- ings and the constructions and can be strong (be felt by people) and weak (be fixed by sensing devices). The great number of work is devoted to influence of violent seismic actions (first of all of earthquakes) on people and various constructions. This work is devoted to study weak, but long seismic actions on various buildings and people. There is a need to take into account seismic oscillations, acting on the territory, at construction of various buildings on urbanized territories. Essential influence, except for violent earthquakes, man-caused seismic actions: the explosions, seismic noise, emitted by plant facilities and moving transport, radiation from high-rise buildings and constructions under action of a wind, etc. can exert. Materials on increase of man- caused seismicity in a number of regions in Russia, which earlier were not seismic, are presented in the paper. Along with maps of seismic microzoning maps to be built indicating a variation of amplitude spectra of seismic noise within day, months, years. The presence of an information about amplitudes and frequencies of oscillations from possible earthquakes and man-caused oscillations in concrete regions allows carry- ing out soundly designing and construction of industrial and civil housing projects. The construction of buildings even in not seismically dangerous regions, which have one from resonance frequencies coincident on magnitude to frequency of oscillations, emitted in this place by man-caused objects, can end in failure of these buildings and heaviest consequences for the people. The practical examples of detail of engineering- seismological investigation of large industrial and civil housing projects of Siberia territory (hydro power

  20. Seismic 3D modelling of VHMS deposits: case studies from Pyhäsalmi and Vihanti, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Suvi; Heikkinen, Pekka; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Snyder, David

    2013-04-01

    In the HIRE (HIgh-REsolution reflection seismics for ore exploration 2008-2010, Geological Survey of Finland), 2D seismic reflection profiles were acquired at 15 mining camps in Finland including the Pyhäsalmi, and Vihanti districts. Both Pyhäsalmi and Vihanti are volcanic hosted massive sulphide (VHMS) deposits located in a Proterozoic volcanic belt in central Finland. In Pyhäsalmi, six seismic profiles were acquired with 45 total line kilometres. In Vihanti the total length of 12 profiles exceeds 120 km. Both Vibroseis and explosive sources were used in the surveys. In these study sites, the network of seismic profiles enables modelling of the subsurface structures well beyond the mined depths. In the study areas, seismic velocities and densities derived from drill hole logging provide crucial information about physical rock properties forming basis for seismic interpretation. Besides the acoustic impedance, also the scale and orientation of the geological structures influence reflectivity. In Pyhäsalmi, it was shown that subvertical structures are not imaged directly with seismic reflection data and only the subhorizontal fold hinges are visible in seismic section while steep flanks need to be interpreted indirectly with the help of drill hole data and by recognizing change in reflectivity characteristics. Deformation in the Vihanti area has not been as intensive as in Pyhäsalmi, and the ore hosting volcanic sequence forms gentle folds. Reflection seismic profiles in Vihanti and Pyhäsalmi show the continuation of the volcanic lithologies underneath intrusive granites, thus expanding the area of interest for exploration. Seismic data support the interpretation that thrust faulting that occurred in a compressional tectonic setting has played a main role in deformation of these VHMS areas. Physical properties of massive sulphides predict the ore to be strong reflector in geological settings like Vihanti and Pyhäsalmi, but no clear seismic signal was observed

  1. Report of the 1988 2-D Intercomparison Workshop, chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Brasseur, Guy; Soloman, Susan; Guthrie, Paul D.; Garcia, Rolando; Yung, Yuk L.; Gray, Lesley J.; Tung, K. K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Isaken, Ivar

    1989-01-01

    Several factors contribute to the errors encountered. With the exception of the line-by-line model, all of the models employ simplifying assumptions that place fundamental limits on their accuracy and range of validity. For example, all 2-D modeling groups use the diffusivity factor approximation. This approximation produces little error in tropospheric H2O and CO2 cooling rates, but can produce significant errors in CO2 and O3 cooling rates at the stratopause. All models suffer from fundamental uncertainties in shapes and strengths of spectral lines. Thermal flux algorithms being used in 2-D tracer tranport models produce cooling rates that differ by as much as 40 percent for the same input model atmosphere. Disagreements of this magnitude are important since the thermal cooling rates must be subtracted from the almost-equal solar heating rates to derive the net radiative heating rates and the 2-D model diabatic circulation. For much of the annual cycle, the net radiative heating rates are comparable in magnitude to the cooling rate differences described. Many of the models underestimate the cooling rates in the middle and lower stratosphere. The consequences of these errors for the net heating rates and the diabatic circulation will depend on their meridional structure, which was not tested here. Other models underestimate the cooling near 1 mbar. Suchs errors pose potential problems for future interactive ozone assessment studies, since they could produce artificially-high temperatures and increased O3 destruction at these levels. These concerns suggest that a great deal of work is needed to improve the performance of thermal cooling rate algorithms used in the 2-D tracer transport models.

  2. Regional seismic reflection line, southern Illinois Basin, provides new data on Cambrian rift geometry, Hicks Dome genesis, and the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, C.J.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Taylor, C.D. ); Heigold, P.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Detailed studies of the subsurface structure of the Cambrian Reelfoot rift (RFR) in the Midwestern US provide important insights into continental rifting processes and into the structural fabric of a zone of modern intracratonic seismicity (New Madrid zone). High-quality oil industry seismic reflection data show that in the area of transition between the RFR and the Rough Creek Graben (RCG) the geometry of the Cambrian rift system is that of a half-graben that thickens to the southeast. This contrasts with the northward-thickening half-graben observed to the east in the RCG and with the more symmetric graben to the south in the RFR. An 82.8-km segment of a northwest-southeast seismic reflection profile in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky shows that near Hicks Dome, Illinois, Middle and Lower Cambrian syn-rift sedimentary rocks occupy about 0.35 s (two-way travel time) on the seismic reflection section (corresponding to a thickness of about 970 m). This stratigraphic interval occupies about 0.45 s (1,250 m) near the Ohio river and is thickest against the Tabb Fault System (TFS) in Kentucky, where it occupies 0.7 s (1,940 m). The seismic data show that in this part of the Cambrian rift the master fault was part of the TFS and that normal displacement on the TFS continued through middle Paleozoic time. The seismic data also provide new information on the late Paleozoic development of Hicks-Dome and the surrounding Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky. A series of grabens and horsts in the FAFC document a late Paleozoic reactivation of the RFR. Comparison of the reflection data with surface mineralization patterns shows that in most cases mineralized graben-bounding faults clearly cut basement or are splays from faults that cut basement.

  3. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  4. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  5. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  6. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  7. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  8. Extended 2D generalized dilaton gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, R. O.

    2008-09-01

    We show that an anomaly-free description of matter in (1+1) dimensions requires a deformation of the 2D relativity principle, which introduces a non-trivial centre in the 2D Poincaré algebra. Then we work out the reduced phase space of the anomaly-free 2D relativistic particle, in order to show that it lives in a noncommutative 2D Minkowski space. Moreover, we build a Gaussian wave packet to show that a Planck length is well defined in two dimensions. In order to provide a gravitational interpretation for this noncommutativity, we propose to extend the usual 2D generalized dilaton gravity models by a specific Maxwell component, which guages the extra symmetry associated with the centre of the 2D Poincaré algebra. In addition, we show that this extension is a high energy correction to the unextended dilaton theories that can affect the topology of spacetime. Further, we couple a test particle to the general extended dilaton models with the purpose of showing that they predict a noncommutativity in curved spacetime, which is locally described by a Moyal star product in the low energy limit. We also conjecture a probable generalization of this result, which provides strong evidence that the noncommutativity is described by a certain star product which is not of the Moyal type at high energies. Finally, we prove that the extended dilaton theories can be formulated as Poisson Sigma models based on a nonlinear deformation of the extended Poincaré algebra.

  9. Seismic Imaging Processing and Migration

    2000-06-26

    Salvo is a 3D, finite difference, prestack, depth migration code for parallel computers. It is also capable of processing 2D and poststack data. The code requires as input a seismic dataset, a velocity model and a file of parameters that allows the user to select various options. The code uses this information to produce a seismic image. Some of the options available to the user include the application of various filters and imaging conditions. Themore » code also incorporates phase encoding (patent applied for) to process multiple shots simultaneously.« less

  10. A Trial of the Delineation of Gas Hydrate Bearing Zones using Seismic Methods Offshore Tokai Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, T.; Hato, M.

    2002-12-01

    MITI Research Well 'Nankai Trough' was drilled at offshore Tokai Japan in 1999/2000 and the existence of gas hydrate was confirmed by various proofs through borehole measurement or coring. It gave so big impact to the view of Japan_fs future energy resources and other scientific interests.The METI, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, has started the national project "Methane Hydrate Exploration study" in Japan since the fall 2001. Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) were widely found on the marine seismic data acquired offshore Japan especially in the shelf-slope near Nankai Trough. BSRs are thought to be the bottom of gas hydrate stability zones, we cannot, however, get the information of gas hydrate bearing zones, such as the height of those, the porosity, the gas hydrate saturation etc, only from BSRs. In order to estimate the amount of gas hydrate accurately, we have to get those reservoir parameters of gas hydrate bearing zones from marine seismic data. The velocity of these zones is greater than that of the surrounding sediment, because pure gas hydrate has high velocity that is more than 3,000 m/s. This means the interval velocity is the key for exploration of gas hydrate. First, we have tried to image the gas hydrate bearing zones from seismic stacking velocity analysis. After the conversion to interval velocity from NMO velocity by Dix's equation, we imaged the P-wave velocity section through 2D seismic line. We successfully imaged high velocity zones above BSRs and low velocity zones beneath BSRs on P-wave velocity section. But the resolution of the section from the velocity analysis is not so high. Although we have only two adjacent well log data on the seismic line, in order to make more detailed map, we tried to execute the seismic impedance inversion with MITI Nankai Trough Well data. We made a simple initial model and inverted to seismic impedance value. We got the good impedance section and delineated the gas hydrate bearing zones through it

  11. 2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S; Morasca, P

    2005-07-13

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter

  12. Integration of seismic methods with reservoir simulation, Pikes Peak heavy oil field, Saskatchewan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ying

    The Pikes Peak heavy oil field has been operated by Husky Energy Ltd since 1981. Steam injection has been successfully employed to increase production. Efforts in geophysics and reservoir engineering have been made to improve interpretations in the mapping of reservoir conditions. This dissertation developed tools and a working flow for integrating the analysis of time-lapse seismic surveys with reservoir simulation, and applied them to the Pikes Peak field. Two time-lapse 2D seismic lines acquired in February 1991 and March 2000 in the eastern part of the field were carefully processed to produce wavelet and structure matched final sections. Reservoir simulation based on the field reservoir production history was carried out. It provided independent complementary information for the time-lapse seismic analysis. A rock physics procedure based on Gassmann's equation and Batzle and Wang's empirical relationship successfully linked the reservoir engineering to the seismic method. Based on the resultant seismic models, synthetic seismic sections were generated as the analogy of field seismic sections. The integrated interpretation for the Pikes Peak reservoir drew the following conclusions: The areas with a gas saturation difference, between two compared time steps, have seismic differences. Thicker gas zones correspond with large reflectivity changes on the top of the reservoir and larger traveltime delays in the seismic section. The thin gas zones only induce large reflectivity changes on the top of the reservoir, and do not have large time delays below the reservoir zone. High temperature regions also correlate with areas having large seismic energy differences. High temperature with thick gas (steam and methane) zones may be evidence for steam existence. The seismic differences at locations far from the production zone are due to the lower pressure that causes solution gas to evolve from the oil. Pressure changes propagate much faster (˜20 m in one month) than

  13. Human tumor-derived exosomes down-modulate NKG2D expression.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Aled; Mitchell, J Paul; Court, Jacquelyn; Linnane, Seamus; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2008-06-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor for NK, NKT, CD8(+), and gammadelta(+) T cells, whose aberrant loss in cancer is a key mechanism of immune evasion. Soluble NKG2D ligands and growth factors, such as TGFbeta1 emanating from tumors, are mechanisms for down-regulating NKG2D expression. Cancers thereby impair the capacity of lymphocytes to recognize and destroy them. In this study, we show that exosomes derived from cancer cells express ligands for NKG2D and express TGFbeta1, and we investigate the impact of such exosomes on CD8(+) T and NK cell NKG2D expression and on NKG2D-dependent functions. Exosomes produced by various cancer cell lines in vitro, or isolated from pleural effusions of mesothelioma patients triggered down-regulation of surface NKG2D expression by NK cells and CD8(+) T cells. This decrease was rapid, sustained, and resulted from direct interactions between exosomes and NK cells or CD8(+) T cells. Other markers (CD4, CD8, CD56, CD16, CD94, or CD69) remained unchanged, indicating the selectivity and nonactivatory nature of the response. Exosomal NKG2D ligands were partially responsible for this effect, as down-modulation of NKG2D was slightly attenuated in the presence of MICA-specific Ab. In contrast, TGFbeta1-neutralizing Ab strongly abrogated NKG2D down-modulation, suggesting exosomally expressed TGFbeta as the principal mechanism. Lymphocyte effector function was impaired by pretreatment with tumor exosomes, as these cells exhibited poor NKG2D-dependent production of IFN-gamma and poor NKG2D-dependent killing function. This hyporesponsiveness was evident even in the presence of IL-15, a strong inducer of NKG2D. Our data show that NKG2D is a likely physiological target for exosome-mediated immune evasion in cancer. PMID:18490724

  14. High-resolution seismic reflection surveying with a land streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz Tapırdamaz, Mustafa; Cankurtaranlar, Ali; Ergintav, Semih; Kurt, Levent

    2013-04-01

    In this study, newly designed seismic reflection data acquisition array (land streamer) is utilized to image the shallow subsurface. Our acquisition system consist of 24 geophones screwed on iron plates with 2 m spacing, moving on the surface of the earth which are connected with fire hose. Completely original, 4.5 Kg weight iron plates provides satisfactory coupling. This land-streamer system enables rapid and cost effective acquisition of seismic reflection data due to its operational facilities. First test studies were performed using various seismic sources such as a mini-vibro truck, buffalo-gun and hammer. The final fieldwork was performed on a landslide area which was studied before. Data acquisition was carried out on the line that was previously measured by the seismic survey using 5 m geophone and shot spacing. This line was chosen in order to re-image known reflection patterns obtained from the previous field study. Taking penetration depth into consideration, a six-cartridge buffalo-gun was selected as a seismic source to achieve high vertical resolution. Each shot-point drilled 50 cm for gunshots to obtain high resolution source signature. In order to avoid surface waves, the offset distance between the source and the first channel was chosen to be 50 m and the shot spacing was 2 m. These acquisition parameters provided 12 folds at each CDP points. Spatial sampling interval was 1 m at the surface. The processing steps included standard stages such as gain recovery, editing, frequency filtering, CDP sorting, NMO correction, static correction and stacking. Furthermore, surface consistent residual static corrections were applied recursively to improve image quality. 2D F-K filter application was performed to suppress air and surface waves at relatively deep part of the seismic section. Results show that, this newly designed, high-resolution land seismic data acquisition equipment (land-streamer) can be successfully used to image subsurface. Likewise

  15. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  16. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  17. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  18. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  19. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  20. 2D-Crystal-Based Functional Inks.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bartolotta, Antonino; Coleman, Jonathan N; Backes, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to produce and process graphene, related 2D crystals, and heterostructures in the liquid phase makes them promising materials for an ever-growing class of applications as composite materials, sensors, in flexible optoelectronics, and energy storage and conversion. In particular, the ability to formulate functional inks with on-demand rheological and morphological properties, i.e., lateral size and thickness of the dispersed 2D crystals, is a step forward toward the development of industrial-scale, reliable, inexpensive printing/coating processes, a boost for the full exploitation of such nanomaterials. Here, the exfoliation strategies of graphite and other layered crystals are reviewed, along with the advances in the sorting of lateral size and thickness of the exfoliated sheets together with the formulation of functional inks and the current development of printing/coating processes of interest for the realization of 2D-crystal-based devices. PMID:27273554

  1. Seismic volumetric flattening and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomask, Jesse

    Two novel algorithms provide seismic interpretation solutions that use the full dimensionality of the data. The first is volumetric flattening and the second is image segmentation for tracking salt boundaries. Volumetric flattening is an efficient full-volume automatic dense-picking method applied to seismic data. First local dips (step-outs) are calculated over the entire seismic volume. The dips are then resolved into time shifts (or depth shifts) in a least-squares sense. To handle faults (discontinuous reflections), I apply a weighted inversion scheme. Additional information is incorporated in this flattening algorithm as geological constraints. The method is tested successfully on both synthetic and field data sets of varying degrees of complexity including salt piercements, angular unconformities, and laterally limited faults. The second full-volume interpretation method uses normalized cuts image segmentation to track salt interfaces. I apply a modified version of the normalized cuts image segmentation (NCIS) method to partition seismic images along salt interfaces. The method is capable of tracking interfaces that are not continuous, where conventional horizon tracking algorithms may fail. This method partitions the seismic image into two groups. One group is inside the salt body and the other is outside. Where the two groups meet is the salt boundary. By imposing bounds and by distributing the algorithm on a parallel cluster, I significantly increase efficiency and robustness. This method is demonstrated to be effective on both 2D and 3D seismic data sets.

  2. The 2D lingual appliance system.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio

    2013-09-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) lingual bracket system represents a valuable treatment option for adult patients seeking a completely invisible orthodontic appliance. The ease of direct or simplified indirect bonding of 2D lingual brackets in combination with low friction mechanics makes it possible to achieve a good functional and aesthetic occlusion, even in the presence of a severe malocclusion. The use of a self-ligating bracket significantly reduces chair-side time for the orthodontist, and the low-profile bracket design greatly improves patient comfort. PMID:24005953

  3. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  4. Measurement of 2D birefringence distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Masato; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Masahiro; Tachihara, Satoru

    1992-10-01

    A new measuring method of 2-D birefringence distribution has been developed. It has not been an easy job to get a birefringence distribution in an optical element with conventional ellipsometry because of its lack of scanning means. Finding an analogy between the rotating analyzer method in ellipsometry and the phase-shifting method in recently developed digital interferometry, we have applied the phase-shifting algorithm to ellipsometry, and have developed a new method that makes the measurement of 2-D birefringence distribution easy and possible. The system contains few moving parts, assuring reliability, and measures a large area of a sample at one time, making the measuring time very short.

  5. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  6. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits. PMID:26813882

  7. Baby universes in 2d quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, Jan; Jain, Sanjay; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1993-06-01

    We investigate the fractal structure of 2d quantum gravity, both for pure gravity and for gravity coupled to multiple gaussian fields and for gravity coupled to Ising spins. The roughness of the surfaces is described in terms of baby universes and using numerical simulations we measure their distribution which is related to the string susceptibility exponent γstring.

  8. VECTUM. Irregular 2D Velocity Vector Field Plotting Package

    SciTech Connect

    McClurg, F.R.; Mousseau, V.A.

    1992-05-04

    VECTUM is a NCAR Graphics based package, for generating a plot of an irregular 2D velocity vector field. The program reads an ASCII database of x, y, u, v, data pairs and produces a plot in Computer Graphics Metafile (CGM) format. The program also uses an ASCII parameter file for controlling annotation details such as the plot title, arrowhead style, scale of vectors, windowing, etc. Simple geometry (i.e. lines, arcs, splines) can be defined to be included with the velocity vectors. NCAR Graphics drivers can be used to display the CGM file into PostScript, HPGL, HDF, etc, output.

  9. Areal 3-D seismic technique for reservoir delineation: Case history from offshore Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Idowu, A.O. )

    1993-02-01

    In the 1950s, early exploration period in the Niger Delta witnessed the use of 2-D (two dimensional) seismic reflection method which adequate for imaging large subsurface geologic features including growth faulting and roll-over anticlines. This technique involves the Common-Depth-Point method (CDP) which acquires a plane of seismic information in distance along the surface and in time into the geological section, and is used to improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, to remove multiples and consequently give a representation of the subsurface particularly if the data are collected up- or downdip. By mid-1980s, the obvious geological structures have, in general, been discovered and it became necessary to adopt a more sophisticated technique such as the 3-D (three dimensional) seismic method to delineate more subtle reservoirs and resolve complex fault patterns in order to aid exploration as well as facilitate efficient field development. The case history discussed in this paper involves the use of areal 3-D seismic method for delineating the reservoir characterization of the O-field located in a shallow water area of the western Niger Delta. The areal 3-D seismic technique is superior to the earlier CDP method in that a cube of seismic data can be collected in two dimensions in space and one in time by a variety of techniques including the swath seismic shooting pattern adopted for gathering the 3-D data for the O-field's reservoir which involves the line of sources. The objective is to adequately sample the subsurface so that changes in various parameters such as the amplitude phase or power in the siesmic signal or velocity of propagation can be mapped areally and interpreted as an indication of changes in the physical properties of the rock matrix.

  10. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  11. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  12. Teaching Reflection Seismic Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forel, D.; Benz, T.; Pennington, W. D.

    2004-12-01

    Without pictures, it is difficult to give students a feeling for wave propagation, transmission, and reflection. Even with pictures, wave propagation is still static to many. However, when students use and modify scripts that generate wavefronts and rays through a geologic model that they have modified themselves, we find that students gain a real feeling for wave propagation. To facilitate teaching 2-D seismic reflection data processing (from acquisition through migration) to our undergraduate and graduate Reflection Seismology students, we use Seismic Un*x (SU) software. SU is maintained and distributed by Colorado School of Mines, and it is freely available (at www.cwp.mines.edu/cwpcodes). Our approach includes use of synthetic and real seismic data, processing scripts, and detailed explanation of the scripts. Our real data were provided by Gregory F. Moore of the University of Hawaii. This approach can be used by any school at virtually no expense for either software or data, and can provide students with a sound introduction to techniques used in processing of reflection seismic data. The same software can be used for other purposes, such as research, with no additional expense. Students who have completed a course using SU are well equipped to begin using it for research, as well. Scripts for each processing step are supplied and explained to the students. Our detailed description of the scripts means students do not have to know anything about SU to start. Experience with the Unix operating system is preferable but not necessary -- our notes include Computer Hints to help the beginner work with the Unix operating system. We include several examples of synthetic model building, acquiring shot gathers through synthetic models, sorting shot gathers to CMP gathers, gain, 1-D frequency filtering, f-k filtering, deconvolution, semblance displays and velocity analysis, flattening data (NMO), stacking the CMPs, and migration. We use two real (marine) data sets. One

  13. Seismic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Dennis

    2009-05-01

    Textron Systems (Textron) has been using geophones for target detection for many years. This sensing capability was utilized for detection and classification purposes only. Recently Textron has been evaluating multiaxis geophones to calculate bearings and track targets more specifically personnel. This capability will not only aid the system in locating personnel in bearing space or cartesian space but also enhance detection and reduce false alarms. Textron has been involved in the testing and evaluation of several sensors at multiple sites. One of the challenges of calculating seismic bearing is an adequate signal to noise ratio. The sensor signal to noise ratio is a function of sensor coupling to the ground, seismic propagation and range to target. The goals of testing at multiple sites are to gain a good understanding of the maximum and minimum ranges for bearing and detection and to exploit that information to tailor sensor system emplacement to achieve desired performance. Test sites include 10A Site Devens, MA, McKenna Airfield Ft. Benning, GA and Yuma Proving Ground Yuma, AZ. Geophone sensors evaluated include a 28 Hz triax spike, a 15 Hz triax spike and a hybrid triax spike consisting of a 10 Hz vertical geophone and two 28 Hz horizontal geophones. The algorithm uses raw seismic data to calculate the bearings. All evaluated sensors have triaxial geophone configuration mounted to a spike housing/fixture. The suite of sensors also compares various types of geophones to evaluate benefits in lower bandwidth. The data products of these tests include raw geophone signals, seismic features, seismic bearings, seismic detection and GPS position truth data. The analyses produce Probability of Detection vs range, bearing accuracy vs range, and seismic feature level vs range. These analysis products are compared across test sites and sensor types.

  14. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  15. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  16. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  17. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  18. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  19. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  20. 2dF mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg; Lankshear, Allan

    1998-07-01

    2dF is a multi-object instrument mounted at prime focus at the AAT capable of spectroscopic analysis of 400 objects in a single 2 degree field. It also prepares a second 2 degree 400 object field while the first field is being observed. At its heart is a high precision robotic positioner that places individual fiber end magnetic buttons on one of two field plates. The button gripper is carried on orthogonal gantries powered by linear synchronous motors and contains a TV camera which precisely locates backlit buttons to allow placement in user defined locations to 10 (mu) accuracy. Fiducial points on both plates can also be observed by the camera to allow repeated checks on positioning accuracy. Field plates rotate to follow apparent sky rotation. The spectrographs both analyze light from the 200 observing fibers each and back- illuminate the 400 fibers being re-positioned during the observing run. The 2dF fiber position and spectrograph system is a large and complex instrument located at the prime focus of the Anglo Australian Telescope. The mechanical design has departed somewhat from the earlier concepts of Gray et al, but still reflects the audacity of those first ideas. The positioner is capable of positioning 400 fibers on a field plate while another 400 fibers on another plate are observing at the focus of the telescope and feeding the twin spectrographs. When first proposed it must have seemed like ingenuity unfettered by caution. Yet now it works, and works wonderfully well. 2dF is a system which functions as the result of the combined and coordinated efforts of the astronomers, the mechanical designers and tradespeople, the electronic designers, the programmers, the support staff at the telescope, and the manufacturing subcontractors. The mechanical design of the 2dF positioner and spectrographs was carried out by the mechanical engineering staff of the AAO and the majority of the manufacture was carried out in the AAO workshops.

  1. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  2. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  3. TACO (2D AND 3D). Taco

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1983-03-01

    A set of finite element codes for the solution of nonlinear, two-dimensional (TACO2D) and three-dimensional (TACO3D) heat transfer problems. Performs linear and nonlinear analyses of both transient and steady state heat transfer problems. Has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties. Materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, radiation, and internal heat generation.

  4. Tomosynthesis imaging with 2D scanning trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Kedar; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Eberhard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-03-01

    Tomosynthesis imaging in chest radiography provides volumetric information with the potential for improved diagnostic value when compared to the standard AP or LAT projections. In this paper we explore the image quality benefits of 2D scanning trajectories when coupled with advanced image reconstruction approaches. It is intuitively clear that 2D trajectories provide projection data that is more complete in terms of Radon space filling, when compared with conventional tomosynthesis using a linearly scanned source. Incorporating this additional information for obtaining improved image quality is, however, not a straightforward problem. The typical tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms are based on direct inversion methods e.g. Filtered Backprojection (FBP) or iterative algorithms that are variants of the Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART). The FBP approach is fast and provides high frequency details in the image but at the same time introduces streaking artifacts degrading the image quality. The iterative methods can reduce the image artifacts by using image priors but suffer from a slow convergence rate, thereby producing images lacking high frequency details. In this paper we propose using a fast converging optimal gradient iterative scheme that has advantages of both the FBP and iterative methods in that it produces images with high frequency details while reducing the image artifacts. We show that using favorable 2D scanning trajectories along with the proposed reconstruction method has the advantage of providing improved depth information for structures such as the spine and potentially producing images with more isotropic resolution.

  5. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells. PMID:25602462

  6. GSAC - Generic Seismic Application Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, R. B.; Ammon, C. J.; Koper, K. D.

    2004-12-01

    With the success of the IRIS data management center, the use of large data sets in seismological research has become common. Such data sets, and especially the significantly larger data sets expected from EarthScope, present challenges for analysis with existing tools developed over the last 30 years. For much of the community, the primary format for data analysis is the Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) format developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Although somewhat restrictive in meta-data storage, the simplicity and stability of the format has established it as an important component of seismological research. Tools for working with SAC files fall into two categories - custom research quality processing codes and shared display - processing tools such as SAC2000, MatSeis,etc., which were developed primarily for the needs of individual seismic research groups. While the current graphics display and platform dependence of SAC2000 may be resolved if the source code is released, the code complexity and the lack of large-data set analysis or even introductory tutorials could preclude code improvements and development of expertise in its use. We believe that there is a place for new, especially open source, tools. The GSAC effort is an approach that focuses on ease of use, computational speed, transportability, rapid addition of new features and openness so that new and advanced students, researchers and instructors can quickly browse and process large data sets. We highlight several approaches toward data processing under this model. gsac - part of the Computer Programs in Seismology 3.30 distribution has much of the functionality of SAC2000 and works on UNIX/LINUX/MacOS-X/Windows (CYGWIN). This is completely programmed in C from scratch, is small, fast, and easy to maintain and extend. It is command line based and is easily included within shell processing scripts. PySAC is a set of Python functions that allow easy access to SAC files and enable efficient

  7. The seismic traffic footprint: Tracking trains, aircraft, and cars seismically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Nima; Gerstoft, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Although naturally occurring vibrations have proven useful to probe the subsurface, the vibrations caused by traffic have not been explored much. Such data, however, are less sensitive to weather and low visibility compared to some common out-of-road traffic sensing systems. We study traffic-generated seismic noise measured by an array of 5200 geophones that covered a 7 × 10 km area in Long Beach (California, USA) with a receiver spacing of 100 m. This allows us to look into urban vibrations below the resolution of a typical city block. The spatiotemporal structure of the anthropogenic seismic noise intensity reveals the Blue Line Metro train activity, departing and landing aircraft in Long Beach Airport and their acceleration, and gives clues about traffic movement along the I-405 highway at night. As low-cost, stand-alone seismic sensors are becoming more common, these findings indicate that seismic data may be useful for traffic monitoring.

  8. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  9. 3D Seismic Reflection Experiment over the Galicia Deep Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, D. S.; Jordan, B.; Reston, T. J.; Minshull, T. A.; Klaeschen, D.; Ranero, C.; Shillington, D. J.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    In June thru September, 2013, a 3D reflection and a long offset seismic experiment were conducted at the Galicia rifted margin by investigators from the US, UK, Germany, and Spain. The 3D multichannel experiment covered 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2), using the RV Marcus Langseth. Four streamers 6 km long were deployed at 12.5 m hydrophone channel spacing. The streamers were 200 m apart. Two airgun arrays, each 3300 cu in, were fired alternately every 37.5 m, to collectively yield a 400 m wide sail line consisting of 8 CMP lines at 50 m spacing. The long offset seismic experiment included 72 short period OBS's deployed below the 3D reflection survey box. Most of the instruments recorded all the shots from the airgun array shots. The 3D seismic box covered a variety of geologic features. The Peridotite Ridge (PR), is associated with the exhumation of upper mantle rocks to the seafloor during the final stage of the continental separation between the Galicia Bank and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The S reflector is present below most of the continental blocks under the deep Galicia basin. S is interpreted to be a low-angle detachment fault formed late in the rifting process, and a number of rotated fault block basins and ranges containing pre and syn-rift sediments. Initial observations from stacked 3D seismic data, and samples of 2D pre-stack time migrated (PSTM) 3D seismic data show that the PR is elevated above the present seafloor in the South and not exposed through the seafloor in the North. The relative smoothness of the PR surface for the entire 20 km N-S contrasts with the more complex, shorter wavelength, faulting of the continental crustal blocks to the east. The PR does not seem to show offsets or any apparent internal structure. The PSTM dip lines show substantial improvement for the structures in the deep sedimentary basin East of the PR. These seem to extend the S reflector somewhat farther to the West. The migrated data show a substantial network of

  10. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at

  11. Numerical modeling of seismogram envelopes in 2-D random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehler, Michael

    2002-11-01

    Several portions of seismograms recorded from regional earthquakes cannot be easily explained as resulting from waves propagating along deterministic paths within the Earth. For example, seismic coda, which is the tail portion of the seismogram of an earthquake recorded at distances of less than 100 km, is considered as resulting from waves that are multiply scattered from random heterogeneities in the Earth's lithosphere. At greater distances, observations that the duration of the initial arriving wave packet is much longer than the source-time duration is explained as being due to multiple forward scattering along the path between the source and the receiver. To investigate these phenomena, we use a finite difference method to numerically simulate 2-D scalar-waves that propagate through random media characterized by a von Karman autocorrelation function. Such media are considered to be appropriate models for the random component of the structure of the Earth's lithosphere. We investigate the characteristics of the resulting wavefields and compare them with those of observed seismograms.

  12. Seismic signals from asymmetric underground nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.G.

    1993-09-01

    The methods discussed to estimate the effect on the seismic signals from asymmetric underground nuclear explosions, depends on the use of large-scale numerical codes and high-speed computers. The use of a two-dimensional (2D) radiation diffusion coupled Eulerian hydrodynamic code (SOIL) for the early time phenomenology is discussed. The results from this calculation are then coupled into a 2D Lagrangian code that treats the strength of the materials and the effects of fractures, ground reflections and spells. The final step in the simulation is the use of a seismic code (which uses the representation theory) to develop the actual far field seismic signals. These calculations were run on the CRAY YMP computers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  13. Structural and Tectonic Map Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Northern Gulf of California, Sonora Desert and Valle de Mexicali, Mexico, from Seismic Reflection Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Escobar, M.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Martin Barajas, A.; Pacheco-Romero, M.; Arregui-Estrada, S.; Gallardo-Mata, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, C.; Chanes-Martinez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) carried on an intense exploration program in the northern Gulf of California, the Sonora Desert and the southern part of the Mexicali Valley. This program was supported by a seismic reflection field operation. The collected seismic data was 2D, with travel time of 6 s recording, in 48 channels, and the source energy was: dynamite, vibroseis and air guns. Since 2007 to present time, the existing seismic data has been re-processing and ire-interpreting as part of a collaboration project between the PEMEX's Subdirección de Exploración (PEMEX) and CICESE. The study area is located along a large portion of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Gulf of California and the Southern part of the Salton Trough tectonic province (Mexicali Valley). We present the result of the processes reflection seismic lines. Many of the previous reported known faults were identify along with the first time described located within the study region. We identified regions with different degree of tectonic activity. In structural map it can see the location of many of these known active faults and their associated seismic activity, as well as other structures with no associated seismicity. Where some faults are mist placed they were deleted or relocated based on new information. We included historical seismicity for the region. We present six reflection lines that cross the aftershocks zone of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010 (Mw7.2). The epicenter of this earthquake and most of the aftershocks are located in a region where pervious to this earthquake no major earthquakes are been reported. A major result of this study is to demonstrate that there are many buried faults that increase the seismic hazard.

  14. Applications of 2D to 3D conversion for educational purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koido, Yoshihisa; Morikawa, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Saki; Takeuchi, Soya; Maruyama, Wataru; Nakagori, Toshio; Hirakata, Masataka; Shinkai, Hirohisa; Kawai, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    There are three main approaches creating stereoscopic S3D content: stereo filming using two cameras, stereo rendering of 3D computer graphics, and 2D to S3D conversion by adding binocular information to 2D material images. Although manual "off-line" conversion can control the amount of parallax flexibly, 2D material images are converted according to monocular information in most cases, and the flexibility of 2D to S3D conversion has not been exploited. If the depth is expressed flexibly, comprehensions and interests from converted S3D contents are anticipated to be differed from those from 2D. Therefore, in this study we created new S3D content for education by applying 2D to S3D conversion. For surgical education, we created S3D surgical operation content under a surgeon using a partial 2D to S3D conversion technique which was expected to concentrate viewers' attention on significant areas. And for art education, we converted Ukiyoe prints; traditional Japanese artworks made from a woodcut. The conversion of this content, which has little depth information, into S3D, is expected to produce different cognitive processes from those evoked by 2D content, e.g., the excitation of interest, and the understanding of spatial information. In addition, the effects of the representation of these contents were investigated.

  15. Mapping of active faults based on the analysis of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles in offshore Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucic, Ljiljana; Glavatovic, Branislav

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection data analysis is considered as important tool for mapping of active tectonic faults, since seismic exploration methods on varied scales can image subsurface structures of different depth ranges. Mapping of active faults for the offshore area of Montenegro is performed in Petrel software, using reflection database consist of 2D profiles in length of about 3.500 kilometers and 311 square kilometers of 3D seismics, acquired from 1979 to 2003. Montenegro offshore area is influenced by recent tectonic activity with numerous faults, folded faults and over trusts. Based on reflection profiles analysis, the trust fault system offshore Montenegro is reveled, parallel to the coast and extending up to 15 kilometers from the offshore line. Then, the system of normal top carbonate fault planes is mapped and characterized on the southern Adriatic, with NE trending. The tectonic interpretation of the seismic reflection profiles in Montenegro point toward the existence of principally reverse tectonic forms in the carbonate sediments, covered by young Quaternary sandy sediments of thickness 1-3 kilometers. Also, reflective seismic data indicate the active uplifting of evaporite dome on about 10 kilometers of coastline.

  16. Interparticle Attraction in 2D Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-03-01

    Complex (dusty) plasmas allow experimental studies of various physical processes occurring in classical liquids and solids by directly observing individual microparticles. A major problem is that the interaction between microparticles is generally not molecularlike. In this Letter, we propose how to achieve a molecularlike interaction potential in laboratory 2D complex plasmas. We argue that this principal aim can be achieved by using relatively small microparticles and properly adjusting discharge parameters. If experimentally confirmed, this will make it possible to employ complex plasmas as a model system with an interaction potential resembling that of conventional liquids.

  17. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  18. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  19. A scalable 2-D parallel sparse solver

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, S.C.; Mitra, S.

    1995-12-01

    Scalability beyond a small number of processors, typically 32 or less, is known to be a problem for existing parallel general sparse (PGS) direct solvers. This paper presents a parallel general sparse PGS direct solver for general sparse linear systems on distributed memory machines. The algorithm is based on the well-known sequential sparse algorithm Y12M. To achieve efficient parallelization, a 2-D scattered decomposition of the sparse matrix is used. The proposed algorithm is more scalable than existing parallel sparse direct solvers. Its scalability is evaluated on a 256 processor nCUBE2s machine using Boeing/Harwell benchmark matrices.

  20. 2D stepping drive for hyperspectral systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrödy, Csaba; Mehner, Hannes; Grewe, Adrian; Sinzinger, Stefan; Hoffmann, Martin

    2015-07-01

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of a compact 2D stepping microdrive for pinhole array positioning. The miniaturized solution enables a highly integrated compact hyperspectral imaging system. Based on the geometry of the pinhole array, an inch-worm drive with electrostatic actuators was designed resulting in a compact (1 cm2) positioning system featuring a step size of about 15 µm in a 170 µm displacement range. The high payload (20 mg) as required for the pinhole array and the compact system design exceed the known electrostatic inch-worm-based microdrives.

  1. High Voltage Seismic Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacz, Adrian; Pala, Damian; Knafel, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    This contribution describes the preliminary result of annual cooperation of three student research groups from AGH UST in Krakow, Poland. The aim of this cooperation was to develop and construct a high voltage seismic wave generator. Constructed device uses a high-energy electrical discharge to generate seismic wave in ground. This type of device can be applied in several different methods of seismic measurement, but because of its limited power it is mainly dedicated for engineering geophysics. The source operates on a basic physical principles. The energy is stored in capacitor bank, which is charged by two stage low to high voltage converter. Stored energy is then released in very short time through high voltage thyristor in spark gap. The whole appliance is powered from li-ion battery and controlled by ATmega microcontroller. It is possible to construct larger and more powerful device. In this contribution the structure of device with technical specifications is resented. As a part of the investigation the prototype was built and series of experiments conducted. System parameter was measured, on this basis specification of elements for the final device were chosen. First stage of the project was successful. It was possible to efficiently generate seismic waves with constructed device. Then the field test was conducted. Spark gap wasplaced in shallowborehole(0.5 m) filled with salt water. Geophones were placed on the ground in straight line. The comparison of signal registered with hammer source and sparker source was made. The results of the test measurements are presented and discussed. Analysis of the collected data shows that characteristic of generated seismic signal is very promising, thus confirms possibility of practical application of the new high voltage generator. The biggest advantage of presented device after signal characteristics is its size which is 0.5 x 0.25 x 0.2 m and weight approximately 7 kg. This features with small li-ion battery makes

  2. 3-D Seismic Tomographic Modelling of the North-Western Spitsbergen Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, W.

    2015-12-01

    Deep seismic sounding measurements were performed in the continent-ocean transition zone of the north-western Svalbard continental margin in 1976 - 1999 in an international co-operation. Seismic energy (airgun and TNT shots) was recorded by land (onshore) seismic stations, ocean bottom seismometers (OBS), and ocean bottom hydrophone systems (OBH). Data from archival and modern seismic profiles were altogether used for 3-D tomographic inversion using JIVE3D software. The modelling area was chosen to be a rectangle of 420 x 330 km (Fig.). The results are similar to the earlier 2-D modelling, supplemented by off-line information from the profiles and the SPITS permanent station, giving a 3-D image of the crustal structure and Moho interface shape. The continental crust thins to the west and north. A minimum depth of about 6 km to the Moho discontinuity was found east of the Molloy Deep and in the Knipovich Ridge. The Moho interface deepens to about 30 km beneath the continental crust of Spitsbergen.

  3. Intermediate depth seismicity - a reflection seismic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, C.; Rietbrock, A.

    2004-12-01

    During subduction the descending oceanic lithosphere is subject to metamorphic reactions, some of them associated with the release of fluids. It is now widely accepted, that these reactions and associated dehydration processes are directly related with the generation of intermediate depth earthquakes (dehydration embrittlement). However, the structure of the layered oceanic plate at depth and the location of the earthquakes relative to structural units of the subducting plate (sources within the oceanic crust and/or in the upper oceanic mantle lithosphere?) are still not resolved yet. This is in mainly due to the fact that the observational resolution needed to address these topics (in the range of only a few kilometers) is hardly achieved in field experiments and related studies. Here we study the wavefields of intermediate depth earthquakes typically observed by temporary networks in order to assess their high-resolution potential in resolving structure of the down going slab and locus of seismicity. In particular we study whether the subducted oceanic Moho can be detected by the analysis of secondary phases of local earthquakes (near vertical reflection). Due to the irregular geometry of sources and receivers we apply an imaging technique similar to diffraction stack migration. The method is tested using synthetic data both based on 2-D finite difference simulations and 3-D kinematic ray tracing. The accuracy of the hypocenter location and onset times crucial for the successful application of stacking techniques (coherency) was achieved by the use of relatively relocated intermediate depth seismicity. Additionally, we simulate the propagation of the wavefields at larger distance (wide angle) indicating the development of guided waves traveling in the low-velocity waveguide associated with the modeled oceanic crust. We also present application on local earthquake data from the South American subduction zone.

  4. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  5. Repression of multiple CYP2D genes in mouse primary hepatocytes with a single siRNA construct.

    PubMed

    Elraghy, Omaima; Baldwin, William S

    2015-01-01

    The Cyp2d subfamily is the second most abun-dant subfamily of hepatic drug-metabolizing CYPs. In mice, there are nine Cyp2d members that are believed to have redundant catalytic activity. We are testing and optimizing the ability of one short interfering RNA (siRNA) construct to knockdown the expression of multiple mouse Cyp2ds in primary hepatocytes. Expression of Cyp2d10, Cyp2d11, Cyp2d22, and Cyp2d26 was observed in the primary male mouse hepatocytes. Cyp2d9, which is male-specific and growth hormone-dependent, was not expressed in male primary hepatocytes, potentially because of its dependence on pulsatile growth hormone release from the anterior pituitary. Several different siRNAs at different concentrations and with different reagents were used to knockdown Cyp2d expression. siRNA constructs designed to repress only one construct often mildly repressed several Cyp2d isoforms. A construct designed to knockdown every Cyp2d isoform provided the best results, especially when incubated with transfection reagents designed specifically for primary cell culture. Interestingly, a construct designed to knockdown all Cyp2d isoforms, except Cyp2d10, caused a 2.5× increase in Cyp2d10 expression, presumably because of a compensatory response. However, while RNA expression is repressed 24 h after siRNA treatment, associated changes in Cyp2d-mediated metabolism are tenuous. Overall, this study provides data on the expression of murine Cyp2ds in primary cell lines, valuable information on designing siRNAs for silencing multiple murine CYPs, and potential pros and cons of using siRNA as a tool for repressing Cyp2d and estimating Cyp2d's role in murine xenobiotic metabolism. PMID:25124873

  6. Application of an elastic 2D tube-waveform tomography to estimate the shear modulus in the vicinity of the FINO3 offshore platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, D.; Wilken, D.; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    The FINO3 project is aimed at the construction of an offshore research platform in the north-sea, hosting research projects dealing with offshore wind energy topics. As part of FINO3 our sub-project deals with the development of new seismic acquisition and inversion concepts for offshore-building foundation soil analysis. We are focussed on the determination of seismic parameters and structural information of the building plot of the platform. Possible changes of the shear modulus of the sediments in the vicinity of the FINO3 monopile due to mechanic loads on the platform are estimated by a tube-waveform tomography. The tube-waves are excited by a hammer blow at the internal wall of the FINO3 monopile above the water line. The tube-waves are propagating through the water column and the sediments and are measured in situ by hydrophones at the external wall of the monopile. Homogenous long wavelength starting models for the waveform tomography are estimated using simple 2D finite difference models. Possible shear-wave velocity starting models range from 150-300 m/s. The resolution of the tube-waveform tomography is estimated by simple chequerboard and random media models. Additionally first results of the data application in the vicinity of the monopile are presented.

  7. Seismic Symphonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    The project started in 2008 as a sound installation, a collaboration between an artist, a barrel organ builder and a seismologist. The work differs from other attempts of sound transposition of seismic records. In this case seismic frequencies are not converted automatically into the "sound of the earthquake." However, it has been studied a musical translation system that, based on the organ tonal scale, generates a totally unexpected sequence of sounds which is intended to evoke the emotions aroused by the earthquake. The symphonies proposed in the project have somewhat peculiar origins: they in fact come to life from the translation of graphic tracks into a sound track. The graphic tracks in question are made up by copies of seismograms recorded during some earthquakes that have taken place around the world. Seismograms are translated into music by a sculpture-instrument, half a seismograph and half a barrel organ. The organ plays through holes practiced on paper. Adapting the documents to the instrument score, holes have been drilled on the waves' peaks. The organ covers about three tonal scales, starting from heavy and deep sounds it reaches up to high and jarring notes. The translation of the seismic records is based on a criterion that does match the highest sounds to larger amplitudes with lower ones to minors. Translating the seismogram in the organ score, the larger the amplitude of recorded waves, the more the seismogram covers the full tonal scale played by the barrel organ and the notes arouse an intense emotional response in the listener. Elisa Strinna's Seismic Symphonies installation becomes an unprecedented tool for emotional involvement, through which can be revived the memory of the greatest disasters of over a century of seismic history of the Earth. A bridge between art and science. Seismic Symphonies is also a symbolic inversion: the instrument of the organ is most commonly used in churches, and its sounds are derived from the heavens and

  8. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  9. Differentiation of enantiomers by 2D NMR spectroscopy at 1 T using residual dipolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Koos, Martin R M; Danieli, Ernesto; Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-06-01

    Differentiating enantiomers using 2D bench-top NMR spectroscopy. Spectrometers working with permanent magnets at 1 T field strength allow the acquisition of 2D data sets. In conjunction with previously reported chiral alignment media, this setup allows the measurement of enantiomeric excess via residual dipolar couplings in stretched gelatine as a result of the reduced line width obtained by 2D J-resolved spectroscopy. PMID:25773020

  10. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  11. Photocurrent spectroscopy of 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, David

    Confocal photocurrent measurements provide a powerful means of studying many aspects of the optoelectronic and electrical properties of a 2D device or material. At a diffraction-limited point they can provide a detailed absorption spectrum, and they can probe local symmetry, ultrafast relaxation rates and processes, electron-electron interaction strengths, and transport coefficients. We illustrate this with several examples, once being the photo-Nernst effect. In gapless 2D materials, such as graphene, in a perpendicular magnetic field a photocurrent antisymmetric in the field is generated near to the free edges, with opposite sign at opposite edges. Its origin is the transverse thermoelectric current associated with the laser-induced electron temperature gradient. This effect provides an unambiguous demonstration of the Shockley-Ramo nature of long-range photocurrent generation in gapless materials. It also provides a means of investigating quasiparticle properties. For example, in the case of graphene on hBN, it can be used to probe the Lifshitz transition that occurs due to the minibands formed by the Moire superlattice. We also observe and discuss photocurrent generated in other semimetallic (WTe2) and semiconducting (WSe2) monolayers. Work supported by DoE BES and NSF EFRI grants.

  12. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  13. Shallow prospect evaluation in Shahbazpur structure using seismic attributes analysis, Southern Bangladesh.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Shahbazpur structure is located within the Hatia trough a southern extension of prolific Surma Basin, where lies all of the largest Gas fields of Bangladesh. A method is established to delineate the structural mapping precisely by interpreting four 2D seismic lines that are acquired over Shahbazpur structure. Moreover direct hydrocarbon indicators (DHI) related attributes analyzed for further confirmation of presence of hydrocarbon. To do this synthetic generation, seismic well tie, velocity modelling and depth conversion has been performed. Seismic attribute analysis used in this study is mostly related to bright spot identification in reservoir zones as well as to identify the similar response in both below and above of the reservoir zones. Seismic interpretation shows that Shahbazpur structure is roughly an oval shaped anticline with simple four way dip closure which will be a good trap for hydrocarbon accumulation. A limited number of seismic attributes functions that are available in an academic version of Petrel software are applied to analyze attributes. Taking in consideration of possible interpretation pitfalls, attributes analysis confirmed that bright spots exist in the shallower part of the structure above the present reservoir zones which might be a potential shallow gas reserve. The bright spots are located within Shahbazpur sequence I of Dupi Tila Group of Pleistocene age and Shahbazpur sequence II of Tipam Group of Pleistocene-Pliocene age. This signature will play a very important role in next well planning on the same structure to test the shallow accumulation of hydrocarbon. For better understanding of this shallow reserve, it is suggested to acquire 3D seismic data over Shahbazpur structure which will help to evaluate the hydrocarbon accumulation and to identify gas migration pathways.

  14. ADAM10 new selective inhibitors reduce NKG2D ligand release sensitizing Hodgkin lymphoma cells to NKG2D-mediated killing

    PubMed Central

    Zocchi, Maria Raffaella; Camodeca, Caterina; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Venè, Roberta; Tosetti, Francesca; Dapino, Irene; Costa, Delfina; Musso, Alessandra; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) resistant to conventional therapies is increasing, making of interest the search for new schemes of treatment. Members of the “A Disintegrin And Metalloproteases” (ADAMs) family, mainly ADAM10 or ADAM17, have been proposed as therapeutic targets in solid tumors and some ADAMs inhibitors have been shown to exert antitumor effects. We have previously described an overexpression of ADAM10 in HL, together with increased release of NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L) and reduced activation of effector T lymphocytes with anti-lymphoma capacity. Aim of the present work was to verify whether inhibition of ADAM10 in HL cells could restore the triggering of NKG2D-dependent anti-lymphoma T cell response. As no selective ADAM10 blockers have been reported so far, we synthesized the two hydroxamate compounds LT4 and MN8 with selectivity for ADAM10 over metalloproteases (MMPs), LT4 showing higher specificity for ADAM10 over ADAM17. We show that (i) HL lymph nodes (LN) and cultured HL cells express high levels of the mature active membrane form of ADAM10; (ii) ADAM10 is the major sheddase for the NKG2D-L in HL cells; (iii) the new LT4 and MN8 compounds strongly reduce the shedding of NKG2D-L by HL cell lines and enhance the binding of NKG2D receptor; (iv) of note, these new ADAM10 inhibitors increase the sensitivity of HL cell lines to NKG2D-dependent cell killing exerted by natural killer and γδ T cells. Overall, the biologic activity of LT4 and MN8 appears to be more potent than that of the commercial inhibitor GI254023X. PMID:27467923

  15. ADAM10 new selective inhibitors reduce NKG2D ligand release sensitizing Hodgkin lymphoma cells to NKG2D-mediated killing.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, Maria Raffaella; Camodeca, Caterina; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Venè, Roberta; Tosetti, Francesca; Dapino, Irene; Costa, Delfina; Musso, Alessandra; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) resistant to conventional therapies is increasing, making of interest the search for new schemes of treatment. Members of the "A Disintegrin And Metalloproteases" (ADAMs) family, mainly ADAM10 or ADAM17, have been proposed as therapeutic targets in solid tumors and some ADAMs inhibitors have been shown to exert antitumor effects. We have previously described an overexpression of ADAM10 in HL, together with increased release of NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L) and reduced activation of effector T lymphocytes with anti-lymphoma capacity. Aim of the present work was to verify whether inhibition of ADAM10 in HL cells could restore the triggering of NKG2D-dependent anti-lymphoma T cell response. As no selective ADAM10 blockers have been reported so far, we synthesized the two hydroxamate compounds LT4 and MN8 with selectivity for ADAM10 over metalloproteases (MMPs), LT4 showing higher specificity for ADAM10 over ADAM17. We show that (i) HL lymph nodes (LN) and cultured HL cells express high levels of the mature active membrane form of ADAM10; (ii) ADAM10 is the major sheddase for the NKG2D-L in HL cells; (iii) the new LT4 and MN8 compounds strongly reduce the shedding of NKG2D-L by HL cell lines and enhance the binding of NKG2D receptor; (iv) of note, these new ADAM10 inhibitors increase the sensitivity of HL cell lines to NKG2D-dependent cell killing exerted by natural killer and γδ T cells. Overall, the biologic activity of LT4 and MN8 appears to be more potent than that of the commercial inhibitor GI254023X. PMID:27467923

  16. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

    1994-12-13

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

  17. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, Farid U.; Jarpe, Stephen P.; Maurer, William

    1994-01-01

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

  18. Using overlapping sonobuoy data from the Ross Sea to construct a 2D deep crustal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Clayton, R. W.; Stock, J. M.; Granot, R.

    2012-03-01

    Sonobuoys provide an alternative to using long streamers while conducting multi-channel seismic (MCS) studies, in order to provide deeper velocity control. We present analysis and modeling techniques for interpreting the sonobuoy data and illustrate the method with ten overlapping sonobuoys collected in the Ross Sea, offshore from Antarctica. We demonstrate the importance of using the MCS data to correct for ocean currents and changes in ship navigation, which is required before using standard methods for obtaining a 1D velocity profile from each sonobuoy. We verify our 1D velocity models using acoustic finite-difference (FD) modeling and by performing depth migration on the data, and demonstrate the usefulness of FD modeling for tying interval velocities to the shallow crust imaged using MCS data. Finally, we show how overlapping sonobuoys along an MCS line can be used to construct a 2D velocity model of the crust. The velocity model reveals a thin crust (5.5 ± 0.4 km) at the boundary between the Adare and Northern Basins, and implies that the crustal structure of the Northern Basin may be more similar to that of the oceanic crust in the Adare Basin than to the stretched continental crust further south in the Ross Sea.

  19. Human erythrocytes analyzed by generalized 2D Raman correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Kozicki, Mateusz; Czepiel, Jacek; Łabanowska, Maria; Nowak, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Grzegorz; Kurdziel, Magdalena; Birczyńska, Malwina; Biesiada, Grażyna; Mach, Tomasz; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    The most numerous elements of the blood cells, erythrocytes, consist mainly of two components: homogeneous interior filled with hemoglobin and closure which is the cell membrane. To gain insight into their specific properties we studied the process of disintegration, considering these two constituents, and comparing the natural aging process of human healthy blood cells. MicroRaman spectra of hemoglobin within the single RBC were recorded using 514.5, and 785 nm laser lines. The generalized 2D correlation method was applied to analyze the collected spectra. The time passed from blood donation was regarded as an external perturbation. The time was no more than 40 days according to the current storage limit of blood banks, although, the average RBC life span is 120 days. An analysis of the prominent synchronous and asynchronous cross peaks allow us to get insight into the mechanism of hemoglobin decomposition. Appearing asynchronous cross-peaks point towards globin and heme separation from each other, while synchronous shows already broken globin into individual amino acids. Raman scattering analysis of hemoglobin “wrapping”, i.e. healthy erythrocyte ghosts, allows for the following peculiarity of their behavior. The increasing power of the excitation laser induced alterations in the assemblage of membrane lipids. 2D correlation maps, obtained with increasing laser power recognized as an external perturbation, allows for the consideration of alterations in the erythrocyte membrane structure and composition, which occurs first in the proteins. Cross-peaks were observed indicating an asynchronous correlation between the senescent-cell antigen (SCA) and heme or proteins vibrations. The EPR spectra of the whole blood was analyzed regarding time as an external stimulus. The 2D correlation spectra points towards participation of the selected metal ion centers in the disintegration process.

  20. 2D density model of the Chinese continental lithosphere along a NW-SE transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimonová, Barbora; Bielik, Miroslav; Dérerová, Jana

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a 2D density model along a transect from NW to SE China. The model was first constructed by the transformation of seismic velocity to density, revealed by previous deep seismic soundings (DSS) investigations in China. Then, the 2D density model was updated using the GM-SYS software by fitting the computed to the observed gravity data. Based on the density distribution of anomalous layers we divided the Chinese continental crust along the transect into three regions: north-western, central and south-eastern. The first one includes the Junggar Basin, Tianshan and Tarim Basin. The second part consists of the Qilian Orogen, the Qaidam Basin and the Songpan Ganzi Basin. The third region is represented by the Yangtze and the Cathaysia blocks. The low velocity body (vp =5.2 - 6.2 km/s) at the junction of the North-western and Central parts at a depth between 21 - 31 km, which was discovered out by DSS, was also confirmed by our 2D density modelling.

  1. Near-surface Fun with Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, M.

    2015-12-01

    What is happening in the near-surface often has a direct effect on human activity. Seismic exploration has routinely targeted geology at depths of kilometers to tens of kilometers. However, these techniques can be applied to answer questions about shallower targets. Several recent experiments demonstrate seismic applicability to near-surface problems. One example is passive seismic monitoring using ambient noise to identify shallow changes and potential hazards in a producing hydrocarbon field. Another example is the use of seismic reflection data from within the water column to determine layering caused by temperature and salinity differences in depth. A third example is identifying historical elevation changes along coast lines using seismic reflection data. These examples show that exploration seismic methods can be effectively used for a variety of near-surface applications.

  2. MESH2D GRID GENERATOR DESIGN AND USE

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.; Smith, F.

    2012-01-20

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j{sub 0}) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations. The overall mesh is constructed from grid zones that are typically then subdivided into a collection of smaller grid cells. The grid zones usually correspond to distinct materials or larger-scale geometric shapes. The structured grid zones are identified through uppercase indices (I,J). Subdivision of zonal regions into grid cells can be done uniformly, or nonuniformly using either a polynomial or geometric skewing algorithm. Grid cells may be concentrated backward, forward, or toward both ends. Figure 1 illustrates the above concepts in the context of a simple four zone grid.

  3. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT`S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (``port approximation``). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  4. Marginal fluctuations as instantons on M2/D2-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghdi, M.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce some (anti-) M/D-branes through turning on the corresponding field strengths of the 11- and 10-dimensional supergravity theories over spaces, where we use and for the internal spaces. Indeed, when we add M2/D2-branes on the same directions with the near horizon branes of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena model, all symmetries and supersymmetries are preserved trivially. In this case, we obtain a localized object just in the horizon. This normalizable bulk massless scalar mode is a singlet of and , and it agrees with a marginal boundary operator of the conformal dimension of . However, after performing a special conformal transformation, we see that the solution is localized in the Euclideanized space and is attributable to the included anti-M2/D2-branes, which are also necessary to ensure that there is no back-reaction. The resultant theory now breaks all supersymmetries to , while the other symmetries are so preserved. The dual boundary operator is then set up from the skew-whiffing of the representations and for the supercharges and scalars, respectively, while the fermions remain fixed in of the original theory. Besides, we also address another alternate bulk to boundary matching procedure through turning on one of the gauge fields of the full gauge group along the same lines with a similar situation to the one faced in the AdS/CFT correspondence. The latter approach covers the difficulty already faced with in the bulk-boundary matching procedure for as well.

  5. Atmospheric Outflows from Hot Jupiters: 2D MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, A.; Matsakos, T.; Konigl, A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of stellar hydrogen Ly-α line absorption during transits of some hot Jupiter exoplanets suggest the presence of a dense, fast wind that is blowing from planetary atmosphere tep{2003Natur.422..143V,2007ApJ...671L..61B}. Modeling efforts include 1D hydrodynamic models tep{2009ApJ...693...23M,2004Icar..170..167Y,2007P&SS...55.1426G} and 2D isothermal magnetized wind models tep{2014arXiv1404.5817T}, among others. In this work, we model the 2D structure of the irradiated upper atmosphere of a hot Jupiter planet and its interaction with the planetary magnetic field. We calculate self consistently the heating by stellar UV radiation and the cooling of the atmosphere by Ly-α emission. We solve for the ionization structure assuming a 100% hydrogen atmosphere, accounting for the radiative ionization, recombination and advection of the gas. We show the effect of stellar tides and planetary magnetic field on the planet outflow and calculate the Ly-α transmission spectra of the resulting atmosphere.

  6. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field ( port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  7. Differential equation-based seismic data filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianchao; Larner, K.

    1992-05-01

    Suppressing noise and enhancing useful seismic signal by filtering is one of the important tasks of seismic data processing. conventional filtering methods are implemented through either the convolution operation or various mathematical transforms. In this paper, we describe a methodology for studying and implementing filters, which, unlike those conventional filtering methods, is based on solving differential equations in the time and space domain. We call this kind of filtering differential equation-based filtering (DEBF). DEBF does not require that seismic data be stationary, so filtering parameters can vary with every time and space point. Also, in 2-D and 3-D, DEBF has higher computational efficiency than do conventional multiple-trace filtering methods. Examples with synthetic and field seismic data show the DEBF methods presented here to be efficient and effective.

  8. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  9. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  10. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  11. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  12. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  13. 2-D Inhomogeneous Modeling of the Solar CO Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    1996-05-01

    The recent discovery of off-limb emissions in the mid-IR ( ~ 5 mu m) vibration-rotation bands of solar carbon monoxide (CO) has sparked new interest in the formation of the molecular lines, and their ability to diagnose thermal conditions at high altitudes. The off-limb extensions of the strong CO lines indicate the penetration of cool material (T ~ 3500 K) several hundred kilometers into the otherwise hot (T ~ 6000 K) chromosphere. The origin of the cool gas, and its role in the thermal energy balance, remain controversial. The interpretation of the CO observations must rely heavily upon numerical modeling, in particular highly-inhomogeneous thermal structures arrayed in a 2-D scheme that can properly treat the geometry of the grazing rays at the solar limb. The radiation transport, itself, is especially simple for the CO off-limb emissions, because the fundamental bands form quite close to LTE (high collision rates; low spontaneous decay rates) and the background continuum is purely thermal as well (f--f transitions in H(-) and H). Thus, the geometrical aspects of the problem can be treated in considerably more detail than would be practical for typical NLTE scattering lines. I describe the recent modeling efforts, and the diagnostic potential of the CO bands for future observational studies of inhomogeneous surface structure on the Sun, and on other stars of late spectral type. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-9218063 to the University of Colorado.

  14. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  15. Cross well seismic reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, H.E.

    1995-08-01

    A striking example of how Cross Well Seismic reflection data can help characterize a reservoir, has resulted from an ongoing Multi-Discipline study of the carbonate Mishrif reservoir offshore Dubai, U.A.E. Because the study objectives include a more detailed description of intra reservoir structure and layering, Dubai Petroleum Company (DPC) analyzed the feasibility of Cross Well Seismic (CWS) and decided to acquire two surveys between three wells 337 to 523 feet apart. DPC has concluded that CWS can be cost effectively acquired offshore, in a Carbonate reservoir; as well as processed and interpreted. However, generally it is not often easy to acquire cross well seismic when and where it will be most useful. A CWS survey can provide multiple images such as a velocity Tomogram, P-wave reflections, and S-wave reflections. To date, Tomograms and P-wave reflections have been produced, and the reflection data has proven to be the most useful for reservoir characterization. Cross Well Seismic Reflection data have provided a level of vertical seismic reflection resolution of around 2 feet, which is more than 10 times better than surface seismic data (2D or 3D). The increase in vertical resolution has provided important detailed information about the reservoir, it`s continuity/heterogeneity; it`s detailed structure, stratigraphy and layering; and definition of any faults with more than 2 feet of offset. The CWS has shown detailed intra Mishrif reflectors. These reflectors have verified or changed detailed correlations between well bores, and show significant intra Mishrif thinning. These reflectors imply time stratigraphic layering which is consistent with tracer study results and regional sequence stratigraphy. This new data will be used to improve the reservoir model description.

  16. 2-D soft x-ray arrays in the EAST.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaiyun; Xu, Liqing; Hu, Liqun; Duan, Yanmin; Li, Xueqin; Yuan, Yi; Mao, Songtao; Sheng, Xiuli; Zhao, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray (SXR) imaging diagnostic has been installed in EAST for the study of magnetohydrodynamics activities and core high-Z impurity transport. Up to 122 lines of sight view the poloidal plasma from three directions (two up-down symmetrical horizontal arrays and one vertical array), which renders the diagnostic able to provide detailed tomographic reconstructions under various conditions. Fourier-Bessel method based on flux coordinates was employed for 2-D SXR tomographic reconstruction. Examples of several events measured by SXR diagnostic in EAST are shown, namely the crash patterns of sawtooth, periodical burst of edge localized modes, and the transport of high-Z intrinsic impurities. PMID:27370451

  17. 2-D soft x-ray arrays in the EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaiyun; Xu, Liqing; Hu, Liqun; Duan, Yanmin; Li, Xueqin; Yuan, Yi; Mao, Songtao; Sheng, Xiuli; Zhao, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray (SXR) imaging diagnostic has been installed in EAST for the study of magnetohydrodynamics activities and core high-Z impurity transport. Up to 122 lines of sight view the poloidal plasma from three directions (two up-down symmetrical horizontal arrays and one vertical array), which renders the diagnostic able to provide detailed tomographic reconstructions under various conditions. Fourier-Bessel method based on flux coordinates was employed for 2-D SXR tomographic reconstruction. Examples of several events measured by SXR diagnostic in EAST are shown, namely the crash patterns of sawtooth, periodical burst of edge localized modes, and the transport of high-Z intrinsic impurities.

  18. The mouse ruby-eye 2(d) (ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) ) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-09-01

    The novel mutation named ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) , characterized by light-colored coats and ruby-eyes, prohibits differentiation of melanocytes by inhibiting tyrosinase (Tyr) activity, expression of Tyr, Tyr-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), Tyrp2, and Kit. However, it is not known whether the ru2(d) allele affects pheomelanin synthesis in recessive yellow (e/Mc1r(e) ) or in pheomelanic stage in agouti (A) mice. In this study, effects of the ru2(d) allele on pheomelanin synthesis were investigated by chemical analysis of melanin present in dorsal hairs of 5-week-old mice from F2 generation between C57BL/10JHir (B10)-co-isogenic ruby-eye 2(d) and B10-congenic recessive yellow or agouti. Eumelanin content was decreased in ruby-eye 2(d) and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice, whereas pheomelanin content in ruby-eye 2(d) recessive yellow and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice did not differ from the corresponding Ru2(d) /- mice, suggesting that the ru2(d) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis. PMID:23672590

  19. Seismic risk perception in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Risk perception is a fundamental element in the definition and the adoption of preventive counter-measures. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. This paper presents results of a survey on seismic risk perception in Italy conducted from January 2013 to present . The research design combines a psychometric and a cultural theoretic approach. More than 7,000 on-line tests have been compiled. The data collected show that in Italy seismic risk perception is strongly underestimated; 86 on 100 Italian citizens, living in the most dangerous zone (namely Zone 1), do not have a correct perception of seismic hazard. From these observations we deem that extremely urgent measures are required in Italy to reach an effective way to communicate seismic risk. Finally, the research presents a comparison between groups on seismic risk perception: a group involved in campaigns of information and education on seismic risk and a control group.

  20. Estimating 2-D vector velocities using multidimensional spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Oddershede, Niels; Løvstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-08-01

    Wilson (1991) presented an ultrasonic wideband estimator for axial blood flow velocity estimation through the use of the 2-D Fourier transform. It was shown how a single velocity component was concentrated along a line in the 2-D Fourier space, where the slope was given by the axial velocity. Later, it was shown that this approach could also be used for finding the lateral velocity component by also including a lateral sampling. A single velocity component would then be concentrated along a plane in the 3-D Fourier space, tilted according to the 2 velocity components. This paper presents 2 new velocity estimators for finding both the axial and lateral velocity components. The estimators essentially search for the plane in the 3- D Fourier space, where the integrated power spectrum is largest. The first uses the 3-D Fourier transform to find the power spectrum, while the second uses a minimum variance approach. Based on this plane, the axial and lateral velocity components are estimated. Several phantom measurements, for flow-to-depth angles of 60, 75, and 90 degrees, were performed. Multiple parallel lines were beamformed simultaneously, and 2 different receive apodization schemes were tried. The 2 estimators were then applied to the data. The axial velocity component was estimated with an average standard deviation below 2.8% of the peak velocity, while the average standard deviation of the lateral velocity estimates was between 2.0% and 16.4%. The 2 estimators were also tested on in vivo data from a transverse scan of the common carotid artery, showing the potential of the vector velocity estimation method under in vivo conditions. PMID:18986918

  1. The low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element

    SciTech Connect

    Djamal, Mitra; Sanjaya, Edi; Islahudin; Ramli

    2012-06-20

    Vibration like an earthquake is a phenomenon of physics. The characteristics of these vibrations can be used as an early warning system so as to reduce the loss or damage caused by earthquakes. In this paper, we introduced a new type of low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element that we have developed. Its working principle is based on position change of a seismic mass that put in front of a flat coil element. The flat coil is a part of a LC oscillator; therefore, the change of seismic mass position will change its resonance frequency. The results of measurements of low frequency vibration sensor in the direction of the x axis and y axis gives the frequency range between 0.2 to 1.0 Hz.

  2. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L.; Laskar, A.; Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z.; Menq, F.; Tang, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5 Hz to 50 Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  3. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  4. Study on 2D random medium inversion algorithm based on Fuzzy C-means Clustering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Zhu, P.; Gu, Y.; Yang, X.; Jiang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: In seismic exploration for metal deposits, the traditional seismic inversion method based on layered homogeneous medium theory seems difficult to inverse small scale inhomogeneity and spatial variation of the actual medium. The reason is that physical properties of actual medium are more likely random distribution rather than layered. Thus, it is necessary to investigate a random medium inversion algorithm. The velocity of 2D random medium can be described as a function of five parameters: the background velocity (V0), the standard deviation of velocity (σ), the horizontal and vertical autocorrelation lengths (A and B), and the autocorrelation angle (θ). In this study, we propose an inversion algorithm for random medium based on the Fuzzy C-means Clustering (FCM) theory, whose basic idea is that FCM is used to control the inversion process to move forward to the direction we desired by clustering the estimated parameters into groups. Our method can be divided into three steps: firstly, the three parameters (A, B, θ) are estimated from 2D post-stack seismic data using the non-stationary random medium parameter estimation method, and then the estimated parameters are clustered to different groups according to FCM; secondly, the initial random medium model is constructed with clustered groups and the rest two parameters (V0 and σ) obtained from the well logging data; at last, inversion of the random medium are conducted to obtain velocity, impedance and random medium parameters using the Conjugate Gradient Method. The inversion experiments of synthetic seismic data show that the velocity models inverted by our algorithm are close to the real velocity distribution and the boundary of different media can be distinguished clearly.Key words: random medium, inversion, FCM, parameter estimation

  5. Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, S.R.; Flekkoy, E.G.; Aursjo, O.

    2008-07-22

    The pore-scale effects of seismic stimulation on two-phase flow are modeled numerically in random 2D grain0pack geometries. Seismic stimulation aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic waves across a reservoir to liberate immobile patches of oil. For seismic amplitudes above a well-defined (analytically expressed) dimensionless criterion, the force perturbation associated with the waves indeed can liberate oil trapped on capillary barriers and get it flowing again under the background pressure gradient. Subsequent coalescence of the freed oil droplets acts to enhance oil movement further because longer bubbles overcome capillary barriers more efficiently than shorter bubbles do. Poroelasticity theory defines the effective force that a seismic wave adds to the background fluid-pressure gradient. The lattice-Boltzmann model in two dimensions is used to perform pore-scale numerical simulations. Dimensionless numbers (groups of material and force parameters) involved in seismic stimulation are defined carefully so that numerical simulations can be applied to field-scale conditions. Using the analytical criteria defined in the paper, there is a significant range of reservoir conditions over which seismic stimulation can be expected to enhance oil production.

  6. Skeleton-migration: Applications in deep crustal reflection seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W.; Vasudevan, K.

    2009-12-01

    The reflection geometry of the sub-surface is three-dimensional in character. A 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing would be the ideal modus operandi for true seismic interpretation. However, almost all deep-crustal reflection profiles recorded on land follow quasi-linear geometry, for economic reasons. Although conventional processing of the lines accommodates crooked-line geometry, the migration algorithms used to produce seismic images for interpretation are generally 2-D in nature. Consequently, the effects of 3-D geometry are not usually well-accounted for. For example, the out-of-plane reflections lead to mislocation errors that increase with recording time. The events may be mislocated by 10’s of km and show spurious apparent dip after migration. In order to circumvent these problems and to gain insight into 3-D structures, we present an easy-to-implement “Skeleton-migration” algorithm. The skeleton-migration method follows a two-step procedure. In the first step, we introduce a fast skeletonization of the final pre-processed stack to generate a digital catalogue containing a variety of event attributes including two-way travel times and location information in UTM co-ordinates. In the second step, we apply ray-based migration to the catalogue of events or two-way travel times of the 2-D stack using an appropriate velocity model for the crust and upper mantle. Since often we do not know a priori the strike direction of the reflectors, we have implemented a fast visualization-based optimization procedure to determine the strike. In subsequent steps, we use visualization methods to view and interpret the skeleton-migration results. We illustrate the usefulness of the method with examples from both the synthetic and deep crustal seismic reflection data. For the synthetic examples, we consider physical models corresponding to a point-scatterer, a synform, a fault and a subducting slab. In all these instances, we use an elastic Kirchhoff algorithm

  7. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  8. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  9. 2D Radiative Processes Near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, T.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance and complexity of dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes taking place near cloud edges, the transition zone between clouds and cloud free air has been the subject of intense research both in the ASR program and in the wider community. One challenge in this research is that the one-dimensional (1D) radiative models widely used in both remote sensing and dynamical simulations become less accurate near cloud edges: The large horizontal gradients in particle concentrations imply that accurate radiative calculations need to consider multi-dimensional radiative interactions among areas that have widely different optical properties. This study examines the way the importance of multidimensional shortwave radiative interactions changes as we approach cloud edges. For this, the study relies on radiative simulations performed for a multiyear dataset of clouds observed over the NSA, SGP, and TWP sites. This dataset is based on Microbase cloud profiles as well as wind measurements and ARM cloud classification products. The study analyzes the way the difference between 1D and 2D simulation results increases near cloud edges. It considers both monochromatic radiances and broadband radiative heating, and it also examines the influence of factors such as cloud type and height, and solar elevation. The results provide insights into the workings of radiative processes and may help better interpret radiance measurements and better estimate the radiative impacts of this critical region.

  10. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse. PMID:26988702

  11. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  12. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  13. Parallel map analysis on 2-D grids

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.; Comiskey, J.; Minser, K.

    1993-12-31

    In landscape ecology, computer modeling is used to assess habitat fragmentation and its ecological iMPLications. Specifically, maps (2-D grids) of habitat clusters must be analyzed to determine number, sizes and geometry of clusters. Models prior to this study relied upon sequential Fortran-77 programs which limited the sizes of maps and densities of clusters which could be analyzed. In this paper, we present more efficient computer models which can exploit recursion or parallelism. Significant improvements over the original Fortran-77 programs have been achieved using both recursive and nonrecursive C implementations on a variety of workstations such as the Sun Sparc 2, IBM RS/6000-350, and HP 9000-750. Parallel implementations on a 4096-processor MasPar MP-1 and a 32-processor CM-5 are also studied. Preliminary experiments suggest that speed improvements for the parallel model on the MasPar MP-1 (written in MPL) and on the CM-5 (written in C using CMMD) can be as much as 39 and 34 times faster, respectively, than the most efficient sequential C program on a Sun Sparc 2 for a 512 map. An important goal in this research effort is to produce a scalable map analysis algorithm for the identification and characterization of clusters for relatively large maps on massively-parallel computers.

  14. 2D Turbulence with Complicated Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullet, G.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the consequences of lateral viscous boundary layers on the 2D turbulence that arises in domains with complicated boundaries (headlands, bays etc). The study is carried out numerically with LES. The numerics are carefully designed to ensure all global conservation laws, proper boundary conditions and a minimal range of dissipation scales. The turbulence dramatically differs from the classical bi-periodic case. Boundary layer separations lead to creation of many small vortices and act as a continuing energy source exciting the inverse cascade of energy throughout the domain. The detachments are very intermittent in time. In free decay, the final state depends on the effective numerical resolution: laminar with a single dominant vortex for low Re and turbulent with many vortices for large enough Re. After very long time, the turbulent end-state exhibits a striking tendency for the emergence of shielded vortices which then interact almost elastically. In the forced case, the boundary layers allow the turbulence to reach a statistical steady state without any artificial hypo-viscosity or other large-scale dissipation. Implications are discussed for the oceanic mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence.

  15. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  16. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  17. 2-D wavelet with position controlled resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Andrzej; Puzio, Leszek

    2005-09-01

    Wavelet transformation localizes all irregularities in the scene. It is most effective in the case when intensities in the scene have no sharp details. It is the case often present in a medical imaging. To identify the shape one has to extract it from the scene as typical irregularity. When the scene does not contain sharp changes then common differential filters are not efficient tool for a shape extraction. The new 2-D wavelet for such task has been proposed. Described wavelet transform is axially symmetric and has varied scale in dependence on the distance from the centre of the wavelet symmetry. The analytical form of the wavelet has been presented as well as its application for details extraction in the scene. Most important feature of the wavelet transform is that it gives a multi-scale transformation, and if zoom is on the wavelet selectivity varies proportionally to the zoom step. As a result, the extracted shape does not change during zoom operation. What is more the wavelet selectivity can be fit to the local intensity gradient properly to obtain best extraction of the irregularities.

  18. Heat-flow measurements at shot points along the 1978 Saudi Arabia seismic deep-refraction line; Part II, Discussion and interpretation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    The heat-flow profile across the Arabian Shield from Ar Riyad to Ad Darb and across the Red Sea is examined for compatibility with the lithospheric structure of the area as deduced from geologic and other geophysical data. Broad continental uplift associated with Red Sea rifting is symmetric about the Red Sea axis, and geologic and geochronologic evidence indicate that uplift has occurred mainly in the interval 25-13 Ma (mega-annum) ago. Thermal-profile changes in the upper mantle resulting from an influx of hot material associated with rifting yield the correct order of magnitude of uplift, and this mechanism is suggested as the explanation for the regional doming. A lithospheric section, constructed from seismic refraction, gravity, and regional geologic data, provides the framework for construction of thermal models. Thermal gradient measurements were made in drill holes at five shot points. Geotherms for the Shield, which assume a radiogenic heat-source distribution that decreases exponentially with depth, yield temperatures of about 450?C at a depth of 40 km (base of the crust) for shot points 2 (Sabhah) and 3. The geotherm for shot point 4 (near Bishah) yields a distinctly higher temperature (about 580?C) for the same depth. Static models used to model the heat flow in the oceanic crust of the Red Sea shelf and coastal plain either yield too small a heat flow to match the observed heat flow or give lithosphere thicknesses that are so thin as to be improbable. Dynamic (solid-state accretion) models, which account for mantle flow at the base of the lithosphere, adequately match the observed heat-flow values. In the deep-water trough of the Red Sea, which is presently undergoing active sea-floor spreading, classical models of heat flow for a moving slab with accretion at the spreading center are adequate to explain the average heat-flow level. At shot point 5 (Ad Darb), the anomalous heat flow of 2 HFU (heat-flow units) can be explained in terms of a Shield

  19. Adding a dimension to the infrared spectra of interfaces using heterodyne detected 2D sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Mehlenbacher, Randy D.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten years, two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has become an important technique for studying molecular structures and dynamics. We report the implementation of heterodyne detected two-dimensional sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy, which is the analog of 2D infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, but is selective to noncentrosymmetric systems such as interfaces. We implement the technique using mid-IR pulse shaping, which enables rapid scanning, phase cycling, and automatic phasing. Absorptive spectra are obtained, that have the highest frequency resolution possible, from which we extract the rephasing and nonrephasing signals that are sometimes preferred. Using this technique, we measure the vibrational mode of CO adsorbed on a polycrystalline Pt surface. The 2D spectrum reveals a significant inhomogenous contribution to the spectral line shape, which is quantified by simulations. This observation indicates that the surface conformation and environment of CO molecules is more complicated than the simple “atop” configuration assumed in previous work. Our method can be straightforwardly incorporated into many existing SFG spectrometers. The technique enables one to quantify inhomogeneity, vibrational couplings, spectral diffusion, chemical exchange, and many other properties analogous to 2D IR spectroscopy, but specifically for interfaces. PMID:22143772

  20. L-plastin is involved in NKG2D recruitment into lipid rafts and NKG2D-mediated NK cell migration.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Brdička, Tomáš; Hoøejši, Václav; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Membrane rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane that have multiple biological functions. The involvement of these structures in the biology of T cells, namely in signal transduction by the TCR, has been widely studied. However, the role of membrane rafts in immunoreceptor signaling in NK cells is less well known. We studied the distribution of the activating NKG2D receptor in lipid rafts by isolating DRMs in a sucrose density gradient or by raft fractionation by β-OG-selective solubility in the NKL cell line. We found that the NKG2D-DAP10 complex and pVav are recruited into rafts upon receptor stimulation. Qualitative proteomic analysis of these fractions showed that the actin cytoskeleton is involved in this process. In particular, we found that the actin-bundling protein L-plastin plays an important role in the clustering of NKG2D into lipid rafts. Moreover, coengagement of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A partially disrupted NKG2D recruitment into rafts. Furthermore, we demonstrated that L-plastin participates in NKG2D-mediated inhibition of NK cell chemotaxis. PMID:24803550

  1. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  2. The Use of Geometric Properties of 2D Arrays across Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Brett M.; Leichtman, Michelle D.; Costa, Rachel; Bemis, Rhyannon

    2009-01-01

    Four- to 10-year-old children (n = 50) participated in a 2D search task that included geometry (with- and without lines) and feature conditions. During each of 27 trials, participants watched as a cartoon character hid behind one of three landmarks arranged in a triangle on a computer screen. During feature condition trials, participants could use…

  3. Passive Seismic Reflectivity Imaging with Ocean-Bottom Cable Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohl, D.; Mateeva, A.

    2005-12-01

    The idea of imaging the subsurface reflectivity distribution by correlating long traces of seismic ``noise'' (i.e. seismic data recorded without active sources) goes back more than 30 years [1]. To this day, passive seismic reflectivity imaging has not been exploited for business use in the E&P industry. The conditions for successful passive seismic reflection imaging have greatly improved over the past few years, and the prize of cheap continuous sourceless seismic imaging and possibly monitoring is still large. Nearly unlimited quantities of very high quality passive noise data are now available from permanent 4C ocean bottom cable (OBC) installations. In the present contribution, we report our initial results for single-line (2D) OBC data collected in the North Sea and GOM. The OBCs used for the experiment are of length 6-10 km with 4C receivers spaced 50 m apart. They are deployed in both shallow and deep water over large hydrocarbon reservoirs. Passive noise data were recorded for 8-24 h periods, sometimes several times, and months apart. In the analysis presented here only the hydrophone records are used, and the data from all recording periods are used together to produce a single 2D migrated reflectivity section. We observe that environmental noise (e.g. boat and rig activity) play an important role for imaging and usually requires pre-migration seismic processing steps to filter out unwanted signals. At the core of our image generation and processing sequence is the crosscorrelation of noise trace pairs and subsequent prestack time migration [1] with a velocity model established for the active-source OBC data processing. We compute 4 sec of lag time to either side of t=0. After removing unwanted signals (e.g. seafloor interface waves) from these ``virtual shot gathers'' one can clearly detect the linear-moveout direct water wave with velocity 1500 m/s, and a linear interface wave with velocity 2000 m/s. Other ``events'' with moveout are visible, but the

  4. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  5. On 2D graphical representation of DNA sequence of nondegeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yusen; Liao, Bo; Ding, Kequan

    2005-08-01

    Some two-dimensional (2D) graphical representations of DNA sequences have been given by Gates, Nandy, Leong and Mogenthaler, Randić, and Liao et al., which give visual characterizations of DNA sequences. In this Letter, we introduce a nondegeneracy 2D graphical representation of DNA sequence, which is different from Randić's novel 2D representation and Liao's 2D representation. We also present the nondegeneracy forms corresponding to the representations of Gates, Nandy, Leong and Mogenthaler.

  6. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  7. Seismic Station Functionality Improvements of Seismic Network of Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sincic, Peter; Tasic, Izidor; Mali, Marko; Pancur, Luka; Vidrih, Renato

    2010-05-01

    The Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, the Office of Seismology and Geology is responsible for the fast and reliable information about earthquakes, originating in the area of Slovenia and nearby. The Seismic Network of Slovenia, which covers the entire Slovenian territory, involving an area of 20,256 km2, consists of 26 seismic stations equipped with broadband seismometers (CMG-40T, CMG-3ESPC, CMG-3T and STS2) and Quanterra Q730 data loggers. The seismic data is transmitted in real-time to the Data Center in Ljubljana (DCL). Leased lines, xDSL and satellite communication are used for data transfer from stations to DCL. When an event occurs main earthquake parameters (magnitude and the location of the epicenter) can be evaluated at sufficient accuracy only if data from several seismic stations is available. In case of temporary communication failure loss of important seismic data can occur. The duration of communication failure, which exceeds 2 hours can cause data loss. This is due to low memory storage of Quanterra Q730 acquisition unit. In this paper our solution for extending storage capabilities of particular seismic station to several months is presented (momentarily the storage capabilities of particular seismic station lies between 1 and 2 hours). To extend storage capabilities we used a special Industrial Computer (JetBox 8100), which runs on Linux. To collect seismic data from the Q730 unit the acquisition software SeiComP is used. The combination of Q730 and JetBox 8100 assures that in case of temporary communication failure there will be no data loss. Seismic data is simply retrieved from JetBox 8100 (from ring buffer that is generated by SeiComP acquisition software) after communication is once again established. Moreover, an advanced state of health system was build and installed on JetBox 8100, that makes identifying, predicting and solving of different problems quick and effective. With combining Q730 data logger and JetBox 8100 we did

  8. Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.

    2004-12-09

    This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could

  9. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  10. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  11. Ultrasonic 2D matrix PVDF transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptchelintsev, A.; Maev, R. Gr.

    2000-05-01

    During the past decade a substantial amount of work has been done in the area of ultrasonic imaging technology using 2D arrays. The main problems arising for the two-dimensional matrix transducers at megahertz frequencies are small size and huge count of the elements, high electrical impedance, low sensitivity, bad SNR and slower data acquisition rate. The major technological difficulty remains the high density of the interconnect. To solve these problems numerous approaches have been suggested. In the present work, a 24×24 elements (24 transmit+24 receive) matrix and a switching board were developed. The transducer consists of two 52 μm PVDF layers each representing a linear array of 24 elements placed one on the top of the other. Electrodes in these two layers are perpendicular and form the grid of 0.5×0.5 mm pitch. The layers are bonded together with the ground electrode being monolithic and located between the layers. The matrix is backed from the rear surface with an epoxy composition. During the emission, a linear element from the emitting layer generates a longitudinal wave pulse propagating inside the test object. Reflected pulses are picked-up by the receiving layer. During one transmit-receive cycle one transmit element and one receive element are selected by corresponding multiplexers. These crossed elements emulate a small element formed by their intersection. The present design presents the following advantages: minimizes number of active channels and density of the interconnect; reduces the electrical impedance of the element improving electrical matching; enables the transmit-receive mode; due to the efficient backing provides bandwidth and good time resolution; and, significantly reduces the electronics complexity. The matrix can not be used for the beam steering and focusing. Owing to this impossibility of focusing, the penetration depth is limited as well by the diffraction phenomena.

  12. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  13. SeismicCanvas: Interactive software for accessing and analyzing seismic waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    SeismicCavas, a cross-platform, graphically interactive application for accessing and analyzing waveform data is presented. Unlike command-line driven packages like SAC and MatSeis, SeismicCanvas adopts a graphically interactive interface to minimize the learning curve for classroom and laboratory application. The menu structure is patterned after common desktop word processing and spreadsheet applications. Direct graphical interaction with traces adopts a "select, then operate" paradigm used in familiar desktop graphics packages. Viewing options include arbitrary arrangement of traces, seismic sections, spectra and spectrograms. Operations include stacking, filtering, windowing and tapering. Interactive picking and measurement of times and amplitudes and WYSIWYG printing are implemented. SeismicCanvas can import data from local files, or through the new web services interface of the IRIS Data Management System. We invite feedback including suggestions for changes to the user interface or additional capabilities that will allow SeismicCanvas to support classroom and laboratory use of digital seismic data.

  14. 2D kinematic signatures of boxy/peanut bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannuzzi, Francesca; Athanassoula, E.

    2015-07-01

    We study the imprints of boxy/peanut structures on the 2D line-of-sight kinematics of simulated disc galaxies. The models under study belong to a family with varying initial gas fraction and halo triaxiality, plus few other control runs with different structural parameters; the kinematic information was extracted using the Voronoi-binning technique and parametrized up to the fourth order of a Gauss-Hermite series. Building on a previous work for the long-slit case, we investigate the 2D kinematic behaviour in the edge-on projection as a function of the boxy/peanut strength and position angle; we find that for the strongest structures the highest moments show characteristic features away from the mid-plane in a range of position angles. We also discuss the masking effect of a classical bulge and the ambiguity in discriminating kinematically this spherically symmetric component from a boxy/peanut bulge seen end-on. Regarding the face-on case, we extend existing results to encompass the effect of a second buckling and find that this phenomenon spurs an additional set of even deeper minima in the fourth moment. Finally, we show how the results evolve when inclining the disc away from perfectly edge-on and face-on. The behaviour of stars born during the course of the simulations is discussed and confronted to that of the pre-existing disc. The general aim of our study is providing a handle to identify boxy/peanut structures and their properties in latest generation Integral Field Unit observations of nearby disc galaxies.

  15. Refined seismic stratigraphy in prograding carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomar, L. )

    1991-03-01

    Complete exposure of the upper Miocene Reef Complex in the sea cliffs of Mallorca (Spain) allows for a more refined interpretation of seismic lines with similar progradational patterns. A 6 km long high-resolution cross section in the direction of reef progradation displays four hierarchical orders of accretional units. Although all these units are of higher order, they all exhibit similar characteristics as a third order depositional sequence and can likewise be interpreted as the result of high order sea-level cycles. The accretional units are composed of lagoonal horizontal beds, reefal sigmoids and gently dipping slope deposits. They are bounded by erosion surfaces at the top and basinwards by their correlative conformities. These architectural patterns are similar to progradational sequences seen on seismic lines. On seismic lines, the progradational pattern often shows the following geometrical details: (1) discontinuous climbing high-energy reflectors, (2) truncation of clinoforms by these high-energy reflectors with seaward dips, (3) transparent areas intercalated between clinoforms. Based on facies distribution in the outcrops of Mallorca the high-energy reflectors are interpreted as sectors where the erosion surfaces truncated the reef wall and are overlain by lagoonal sediments deposited during the following sealevel rise. The more transparent zones seem to correspond with areas of superposition of undifferentiated lagoonal beds. Offlapping geometries can also be detected in highest quality seismic lines. The comparison between seismic and outcrop data provides a more accurate prediction of lithologies, facies distribution, and reservoir properties on seismic profiles.

  16. Exosomes and the MICA-NKG2D system in cancer.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Aled; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2005-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer sized vesicles, secreted by a diverse range of cell types, whose biological functions remain ambiguous. Several groups have demonstrated the potential of manipulating exosomes for activating cellular immune responses. The possibility that exosomes may inhibit immunological responses, however, has not been widely addressed. We have investigated if exosomes produced by tumor cells can inhibit immunological functions, through modulating expression of the NKG2D receptor by effector cells. Incubating tumor exosomes with fresh peripheral blood leukocytes resulted in a marked reduction in the proportion of NKG2D-positive CD3+CD8+ Cells, and CD3- cells by 48 h. This effect was dose dependent and was shown with exosomes from different tumor cells including breast cancer and mesothelioma. Analysis of tumor exosome-phenotype revealed positive expression of several NKG2D ligands, and antibody blocking experiments revealed the importance of such ligands in driving the reduction in the proportion of NKG2D-positive effector cells. The functional importance of the decrease in NKG2D-positive cells was addressed in vitro cytotoxicity assays. For example a CD8+ T cell line pre-incubated with tumor exosomes had significant decreased capacity to kill peptide-pulsed T2 target cells. These data highlight a role for tumor exosomes bearing NKG2D ligands as a mechanism contributing to cancer immune evasion. PMID:15885603

  17. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  18. Progress in Understanding the Infrared Spectra of He- and Ne-C_2D_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, Nasser; McKellar, Bob

    2014-06-01

    Infrared spectra of He-C_2H_2 were recorded around 1990 in Roger Miller's lab, but detailed rotational assignment was apparently not possible even with the help of theoretical predictions. So there were no published experimental spectra of helium-acetylene van der Waals complexes until our recent work on He-C_2D_2 in the νb{3} region (˜2440 wn). The problem is that this complex lies close to the free rotor limit, so that most of the intensity in the spectrum piles up in tangles of closely spaced lines located close to the monomer rotational transitions, R(0), P(1), etc. Our previous He-C_2D_2 assignments were limited to the R(0) region, that is, the j = 1 ← 0 subband, where j represents C_2D_2 rotation. Here, we extend the analysis to j = 0 ← 1 and 2 ← 1 transitions with the help of new spectra obtained using a tunable OPO laser probe and a cooled supersonic jet nozzle. These subbands are weaker, not only because of the Boltzmann factor, but also the 2:1 nuclear spin statistics of j" = even:odd C_2D_2 levels. Moreover, the j = 0 ← 1 subband is overlapped by strong (C_2D_2)_2 transitions. We use a term value approach, obtaining a self-consistent set of ``experimental" energy levels which can be directly compared with theory or fitted in terms of a Coriolis model. Challenges also arise with Ne-C_2D_2, which is not quite so close to the free rotor limit, but still has many overlapping lines. Insights gained here help in assigning the tricky R(1) region for Ne-C_2D_2. M. Rezaei, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, A.R.W. McKellar, B. Fernández, and D. Farrelly, Mol. Phys. 110, 2743 (2012).

  19. Transdimensional Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, T.; Sambridge, M.

    2009-12-01

    In seismic imaging the degree of model complexity is usually determined by manually tuning damping parameters within a fixed parameterization chosen in advance. Here we present an alternative methodology for seismic travel time tomography where the model complexity is controlled automatically by the data. In particular we use a variable parametrization consisting of Voronoi cells with mobile geometry, shape and number, all treated as unknowns in the inversion. The reversible jump algorithm is used to sample the transdimensional model space within a Bayesian framework which avoids global damping procedures and the need to tune regularisation parameters. The method is an ensemble inference approach, as many potential solutions are generated with variable numbers of cells. Information is extracted from the ensemble as a whole by performing Monte Carlo integration to produce the expected Earth model. The ensemble of models can also be used to produce velocity uncertainty estimates and experiments with synthetic data suggest they represent actual uncertainty surprisingly well. In a transdimensional approach, the level of data uncertainty directly determines the model complexity needed to satisfy the data. Intriguingly, the Bayesian formulation can be extended to the case where data uncertainty is also uncertain. Experiments show that it is possible to recover data noise estimate while at the same time controlling model complexity in an automated fashion. The method is tested on synthetic data in a 2-D application and compared with a more standard matrix based inversion scheme. The method has also been applied to real data obtained from cross correlation of ambient noise where little is known about the size of the errors associated with the travel times. As an example, a tomographic image of Rayleigh wave group velocity for the Australian continent is constructed for 5s data together with uncertainty estimates.

  20. High-resolution seismic imaging of near-surface fault structures in the Upper Rhine Graben, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musmann, Patrick; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte

    2010-05-01

    Faults systems are important targets in different fields of exploration geophysics. Recently, exploration is focussed on deep-seated faults systems for hydro-geothermal utilization, where fluid flow may be enhanced compared to the surrounding host rock (fracture dominated aquifers). In fault related exploration, special interest of geothermal research is given to size, shape and age of fault patterns as well as to the geological periods of fault activity, because fluid flow critically depends on those parameters. A well-established way to explore structural architecture of fault systems is the use of 3D reflection seismics. This technique, if applied to targets at several kilometers depth, inevitably leaves a gap in the near-surface domain due economic line spacing. To bridge the gap between target exploration at several kilometers depth (here 2-4 km) and the need to trace structures from the reservoir to the near surface, a study in the Upper Rhine Graben, Germany, was performed to supplement large-scale 3D seismic imaging of fault systems with high-resolution 2D reflection seismics. Here, we present results from three different high-resolution reflection seismic profiles, which were carried out across the projected outcrop of local fault structures. These structures appear in 3D seismic datasets recently acquired for hydro-geothermal exploration, but fade out towards surface. The new shallow seismic sections image Quaternary and Late Tertiary units between approximately 20 m and 1000 m depth. The sedimentary strata are resolved at high-resolution and different fault patterns can be identified therein. At one site, a 300 m wide normal fault zone was observed, while the other site shows a prominent horst structure with bounding faults branching into smaller ones at depth. From these fault images the last geological time of activity could be narrowed. Imaging limitations can be explained by an increasingly high-energy depositional system on one site, preventing

  1. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  2. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  3. Continuous recording of seismic signals in Alpine permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, H.; Krainer, K.; Staudinger, M.; Brückl, E.

    2009-04-01

    Over the past years various geophysical methods were applied to study the internal structure and the temporal variation of permafrost whereof seismic is of importance. For most seismic investigations in Alpine permafrost 24-channel equipment in combination with long data and trigger cables is used. Due to the harsh environment source and geophone layouts are often limited to 2D profiles. With prospect for future 3D-layouts we introduce an alternative of seismic equipment that can be used for several applications in Alpine permafrost. This study is focussed on controlled and natural source seismic experiments in Alpine permafrost using continuous data recording. With recent data from an ongoing project ("Permafrost in Austria") we will highlight the potential of the used seismic equipment for three applications: (a) seismic permafrost mapping of unconsolidated sediments, (b) seismic tomography in rock mass, and (c) passive seismic monitoring of rock falls. Single recording units (REFTEK 130, 6 channels) are used to continuously record the waveforms of both the seismic signals and a trigger signal. The combination of a small number of recording units with different types of geophones or a trigger allow numerous applications in Alpine permafrost with regard to a high efficiency and flexible seismic layouts (2D, 3D, 4D). The efficiency of the light and robust seismic equipment is achieved by the simple acquisition and the flexible and fast deployment of the (omni-directional) geophones. Further advantages are short (data and trigger) cables and the prevention of trigger errors. The processing of the data is aided by 'Seismon' which is an open source software project based on Matlab® and MySQL (see SM1.0). For active-source experiments automatic stacking of the seismic signals is implemented. For passive data a program for automatic detection of events (e.g. rock falls) is available which allows event localization. In summer 2008 the seismic equipment was used for the

  4. What's under the long line of heavy rocks? Waves can tell us. (Seismic tomography of the lithosphere below the Midcontinent Rift)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolin, E.

    2015-12-01

    A long long time ago, the middle of my home land started to tear. But it didn't tear all the way, and actually the torn part ended up getting pushed back together. This left a long line of heavy rocks in the top part of the ground. We don't know why the tearing stopped instead of forming a new big water place in the middle of the land. We also didn't know know if the deeper ground still looked like it was torn too, because we couldn't see it very well. We hoped by looking at the deep ground, we could figure out why the tearing stopped. I make pictures of the deep under ground places using waves that are made when the ground breaks quickly. I look at waves that go through the torn area and try to match them. I match the real waves by making my own pretend waves and changing how fast they move through the ground. After I match a lot of waves, I put them all together to make a picture that shows what's deep under ground.

  5. Near-surface seismic surveys at Rifle, Colorado for shallow groundwater contamination risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Zelt, C. A.; Levander, A.

    2013-12-01

    In August 2012, we carried out a series of seismic surveys at a site located approximately 0.3 mile east of the city of Rifle in Garfield County, Colorado. The ground water beneath this site was contaminated by former vanadium and uranium ore-processing operations from 1924 through 1958. The site is on an alluvial terrace created by a flood-plain meander of the Colorado River. On the south side, the terrace is bounded by a steep descending slope to the Colorado River; on the other sides, it is bounded by ascending slopes of the more resistant sedimentary rocks of the Wasatch Formation. Although remedial actions have been taken to remove the contaminated surface materials, there are still potential risks from residual materials and redistribution of the contaminated water harming human health. This seismic project, funded by The U.S. Department of Energy, was designed to provide hydrogeologic information through sub-surface velocity model building and imaging of the water aquifer. A 3D compressional wave seismic survey covers an area that is 96 m in the N-S direction by 60 m in the E-W direction. An orthogonal, symmetric receiver and source template was used with 24 receiver lines, 96 channels per receiver line, and 2.5 m between lines. The inline shot and receiver spacing is 2 m and 1 m, respectively. The source was an accelerated weight drop striking a metal plate. The source has a dominant frequency at ~60 Hz, and is down by 20 db at 20 Hz and 150 Hz, providing data suitable for seismic tomography and seismic migration methods. Besides this 3D survey, three other seismic experiments were performed: (1) a 2D multi-component source and receiver survey, (2) a 3D surface wave experiment using 4.5 Hz geophones, and (3) an ambient noise experiment using 4.5 Hz geophones to record passing vehicles and trains. Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented.

  6. Method for determining source and receiver statics in marine seismic exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Zachariadis, R.G.

    1986-04-08

    A method for seismic exploration at a marine exploration site, is described which consists of the steps of: a. fixing a seismic energy source and a seismic energy detector on the water bottom at a point offset from a marine exploration line, b. traversing the marine vessel towing a seismic energy source and a seismic marine cable employing a plurality of spaced-apart hydrophones, c. generating seismic energy from the towed seismic energy source to produce a seismic reflection signal that is detected by the plurality of hydrophones on the seismic marine cable and a first seismic refraction signal that is detected by the fixed seismic energy detector, the first seismic refraction signal including a source statics attributable to time delay in the near surface earth formation directly below the towed seismic energy source, d. generating seismic energy from the fixed seismic energy source to produce a second seismic refraction signal that is detected by each of the plurality of hydrophones on the seismic marine cable, the second seismic refraction signal including a receiver statics attributable to time delay in the near surface earth formation directly below each of the pluarlity of hydrophones.

  7. Integration of seismic data, iodine geochemistry yields Lodgepole exploration model

    SciTech Connect

    Tedesco, S.A.; Andrew, J.A.

    1995-09-18

    The recent discovery of prolific Mississippian Lodgepole mounds near Dickinson, N.D., has resulted in one of the most exciting US exploration plays in several decades. the presence of the mounds in the Williston basin around Dickinson in North Dakota; in outcrop in central Montana; and in the subsurface of eastern Montana, northern Alberta, southwestern Manitoba, and southeastern Saskatchewan suggests a potential target that could be found over the entire basin and especially on the eastern margin. However, as prolific as the Lodgepole wells near Dickinson are, they are not easily found by simple subsurface mapping, interpreting existing 2D seismic, or newly acquired 3D seismic data (as proved by dry holes located on 3D seismic data). Presented here are a section and map examples of two different exploration methods used together over two producing areas near Dickinson, N.D. When the two methods are used together, in synergistic fashion, they provide a higher degree of success than when used apart. this approach can be used as a model for future exploration. The empirical signature of a Lodgepole mound on conventionally acquired and processed, high-resolution 2D and swath 2D seismic data is clearly expressed in the nature and character of the seismic event representing the contrast between the lodgepole and underlying rocks. Furthermore, and more importantly, there is direct correlation between the occurrence of surface iodine geochemical anomalies and the location of Lodgepole mounds on map and profile views of the seismic data.

  8. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  9. 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulates miRNA expression in human bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyu; Hu, Qiang; Luo, Wei; Pratt, Rachel N.; Glenn, Sean T.; Liu, Song; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and eighth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Epidemiological and experimental studies strongly suggest a role for 1α,25(OH)2D3 in cancer prevention and treatment. The antitumor activities of 1α,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and the inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis. MiRNAs play important regulatory roles in cancer development and progression. However, the role of 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the regulation of miRNA expression and the potential impact in bladder cancer has not been investigated. Therefore, we studied 1α,25(OH)2D3-regulated miRNA expression profiles in human bladder cancer cell line 253J and the highly tumorigenic and metastatic derivative line 253J-BV by miRNA qPCR panels. 253 J and 253J-BV cells express endogenous vitamin D receptor (VDR) which can be further induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. VDR target gene 24-hydroxylase was induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3 in both cell lines, indicating functional 1α,25(OH)2D3 signaling. The miRNA qPCR panel assay results showed that 253J and 253J-BV cells have distinct miRNA expression profiles. Further, 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulated miRNA expression profiles in 253J and 253 J-BV cells in a dynamic manner. Pathway analysis of the miRNA target genes revealed distinct patterns of contribution to the molecular functions and biological processes in the two cell lines. In conclusion, 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulates the expression of miRNAs, which may contribute to distinct biological functions, in human bladder 253J and 253J-BV cells. PMID:25263658

  10. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite differences (FD) to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10 kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P and slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High-order explicit FD can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here, we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  11. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite-differences to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P, slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High order explicit finite-differences (FD) can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  12. Integration of Seismic Sequence Analysis and High Resolution Sequence Stratigraphy for Delineating the Sedimentation Characteristics and Modeling of Baltim Area, Off-Shore Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr El-Deen Badawy, A. M. E. S.; Abu El-Ata, A. S. A.; El-Gendy, N. H.

    2014-12-01

    The current study is aiming to discuss the Messinian Prospectivity of the concerned area, which is located in the offshore Nile Delta, about 25 Km from the Mediterranean Sea shoreline. An integrated exploration approach applied, using a variety of the 2D/3D seismic data, subsurface borehole geologic and log data of the selected wells distributed in the study area, as well as the geophysical and biostratigraphic data. The well data comprise well markers, and electric logs, where the geological data represented by litho-stratigraphic information, as well as ditch samples analysis of the studied interval. The geophysical data include check shots, VSP, velocity cubes and 3D seismic lines. Biostratigraphic data include biozones, benthonic to planktonic ratios, nannofossils and foraminiferal data. Seismic interpretation and seismic stratigraphic analysis, in the form of seismic sequence analysis, seismic facies analysis, seismic unit analysis and geologic confirmation have been done by the aid of Petrel and Kingdom computer softwares. The seismic lines were interpreted for defining the different parasequences and picking the various smaller sequences for mapping, after picking each sequence from the seismic correlation, it is facilitated the mapping of every sequence laterally. In addition, the interpretation of structures and isopach of every sequence has been carried out, and the seismic attributes for every sequence were possible, to extract the sands present in each sequence, and to study the extensions of these sands that act as a reservoir. The integration of all results was taken as a base to produce the various models for the study area. The first one was the depositional environmental model, which showed that, the area varies from intertidal-littoral southward at Nidoco wells to inner-middle neritic at Baltim East wells then to outer neritic, and changes to bathyal and then to abyssal at the extreme north. The geologic model for the area was constructed

  13. Seismic refraction exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehle, W.H.

    1980-12-30

    In seismic exploration, refracted seismic energy is detected by seismic receivers to produce seismograms of subsurface formations. The seismograms are produced by directing seismic energy from an array of sources at an angle to be refracted by the subsurface formations and detected by the receivers. The directivity of the array is obtained by delaying the seismic pulses produced by each source in the source array.

  14. Differential CYP 2D6 Metabolism Alters Primaquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Brittney M. J.; Xie, Lisa H.; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T.; Bandara Herath, H. M. T.; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N. P.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity. PMID:25645856

  15. SEISMIC MODELING ENGINES PHASE 1 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BRUCE P. MARION

    2006-02-09

    Seismic modeling is a core component of petroleum exploration and production today. Potential applications include modeling the influence of dip on anisotropic migration; source/receiver placement in deviated-well three-dimensional surveys for vertical seismic profiling (VSP); and the generation of realistic data sets for testing contractor-supplied migration algorithms or for interpreting AVO (amplitude variation with offset) responses. This project was designed to extend the use of a finite-difference modeling package, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, to the advanced applications needed by industry. The approach included a realistic, easy-to-use 2-D modeling package for the desktop of the practicing geophysicist. The feasibility of providing a wide-ranging set of seismic modeling engines was fully demonstrated in Phase I. The technical focus was on adding variable gridding in both the horizontal and vertical directions, incorporating attenuation, improving absorbing boundary conditions and adding the optional coefficient finite difference methods.

  16. 2D dynamic studies combined with the surface curvature analysis to predict Arias Intensity amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torgoev, Almaz; Havenith, Hans-Balder

    2016-01-01

    A 2D elasto-dynamic modelling of the pure topographic seismic response is performed for six models with a total length of around 23.0 km. These models are reconstructed from the real topographic settings of the landslide-prone slopes situated in the Mailuu-Suu River Valley, Southern Kyrgyzstan. The main studied parameter is the Arias Intensity (Ia, m/sec), which is applied in the GIS-based Newmark method to regionally map the seismically-induced landslide susceptibility. This method maps the Ia values via empirical attenuation laws and our studies investigate a potential to include topographic input into them. Numerical studies analyse several signals with varying shape and changing central frequency values. All tests demonstrate that the spectral amplification patterns directly affect the amplification of the Ia values. These results let to link the 2D distribution of the topographically amplified Ia values with the parameter called as smoothed curvature. The amplification values for the low-frequency signals are better correlated with the curvature smoothed over larger spatial extent, while those values for the high-frequency signals are more linked to the curvature with smaller smoothing extent. The best predictions are provided by the curvature smoothed over the extent calculated according to Geli's law. The sample equations predicting the Ia amplification based on the smoothed curvature are presented for the sinusoid-shape input signals. These laws cannot be directly implemented in the regional Newmark method, as 3D amplification of the Ia values addresses more problem complexities which are not studied here. Nevertheless, our 2D results prepare the theoretical framework which can potentially be applied to the 3D domain and, therefore, represent a robust basis for these future research targets.

  17. 2D dynamic studies combined with the surface curvature analysis to predict Arias Intensity amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torgoev, Almaz; Havenith, Hans-Balder

    2016-07-01

    A 2D elasto-dynamic modelling of the pure topographic seismic response is performed for six models with a total length of around 23.0 km. These models are reconstructed from the real topographic settings of the landslide-prone slopes situated in the Mailuu-Suu River Valley, Southern Kyrgyzstan. The main studied parameter is the Arias Intensity (Ia, m/sec), which is applied in the GIS-based Newmark method to regionally map the seismically-induced landslide susceptibility. This method maps the Ia values via empirical attenuation laws and our studies investigate a potential to include topographic input into them. Numerical studies analyse several signals with varying shape and changing central frequency values. All tests demonstrate that the spectral amplification patterns directly affect the amplification of the Ia values. These results let to link the 2D distribution of the topographically amplified Ia values with the parameter called as smoothed curvature. The amplification values for the low-frequency signals are better correlated with the curvature smoothed over larger spatial extent, while those values for the high-frequency signals are more linked to the curvature with smaller smoothing extent. The best predictions are provided by the curvature smoothed over the extent calculated according to Geli's law. The sample equations predicting the Ia amplification based on the smoothed curvature are presented for the sinusoid-shape input signals. These laws cannot be directly implemented in the regional Newmark method, as 3D amplification of the Ia values addresses more problem complexities which are not studied here. Nevertheless, our 2D results prepare the theoretical framework which can potentially be applied to the 3D domain and, therefore, represent a robust basis for these future research targets.

  18. 2D to 3D to 2D Dimensionality Crossovers in Thin BSCCO Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    With increasing temperature the superfluid fraction in very thin BSCCO films undergoes a series of dimensionality crossovers. At low temperatures the strong anisotropy causes the thermal excitations to be 2D pancake-antipancake pairs in uncoupled layers. At higher temperatures where the c-axis correlation length becomes larger than a layer there is a crossover to 3D vortex loops. These are initially elliptical, but as the 3D Tc is approached they become more circular as the anisotropy scales away, as modeled by Shenoy and Chattopadhyay [1]. Close to Tc when the correlation length becomes comparable to the film thickness there is a further crossover to a 2D Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, with a drop of the superfluid fraction to zero at T_KT which can be of the order of 1 K below T_c. Good agreement with this model is found for experiments on thin BSCCO 2212 films [2]. 1. S. R. Shenoy and B. Chattopadhyay, Phys. Rev. B 51, 9129 (1995). 2. K. Osborn et al., cond-mat/0204417.

  19. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  20. High Resolution Seismic Study of the Holocene Infill of the Elkhorn Slough, Central California

    EPA Science Inventory

    The seismic analysis of the sedimentary infill of the Elkhorn Slough, central California, reveals a succession of three main seismic units: U1, U2, U3, with their correspondent discontinuities d2, d3. These units are deposited over a paleorelief representing the channel location ...

  1. 3D seismic imaging around the 2.5 km deep COSC-1 scientific borehole, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Peter; Juhlin, Christopher; Buske, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Following the successful completion of the COSC-1 drilling campaign, a number of geophysical investigations have been performed in and around the 2.5 km deep borehole. Three different seismic experiments were conducted simultaneously in the fall of 2014 to take advantage of the same source points; 1) a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) in the borehole, 2) three 2D seismic profiles across the borehole, and 3) a limited 3D seismic survey (presented here). The latter is the first 3D seismic survey on land in Scandinavia to target the Caledonian Nappes and will allow mapping a small part of the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) in 3D. Furthermore, it will allow extrapolation of results from downhole logging, core analysis and other seismic surveys to structures surrounding the borehole. A total number of 429 receivers (10 Hz single component geophones) were planted with 20 m separation along 7 lines spaced 200 m apart. The total area with receivers covered approximately 1.5 km2 and was centered on the drill site. A combination of a mechanical source (a rock breaking hydraulic hammer, near offsets) and explosive charges (0.5 kg fired at 3.5 - 5 m depth, far offsets) were used. The source points were activated along roads radiating outwards from the COSC-1 drill site in a star pattern. The nominal shot spacing was 20 m (vibrating source) or 80 m (explosives) and maximum horizontal offset was about 5.75 km. The high-grade metamorphic SNC is well known from previous 2D seismic studies to be a highly reflective unit. However, due to the complex 3D geometry and lithological variation within the unit, it has not been clearly imaged. The new 3D data provide a means to image these structures in more detail and to follow the lithological and structural interfaces observed in the core into the surrounding unit. Preliminary results from the 3D processing and correlation with borehole data will be presented.

  2. Active Seismic Monitoring for Earthquake Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonova, M.; Korneev, V.

    2005-12-01

    Earthquake prediction remains high priority issue for disaster prevention. Study of the M6.0 2004 Parkfield and M7.0 1989 Loma Prieta strike-slip earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) reveal seismicity peaks in the surrounding crust several months prior to the main events. Earthquakes directly within the SAF zone were intentionally excluded from the analysis because they manifest stress-release processes rather than stress accumulation. The observed increase in seismicity is interpreted as a signature of the increasing stress level in the surrounding crust, while the peak that occurs several months prior to the main event and the subsequent decrease in seismicity are attributed to damage-induced softening processes. Furthermore, in both cases there is a distinctive zone of low seismic activity that surrounds the epicentral region in the pre-event period. The increase of seismicity in the crust surrounding a potential future event and the development of a low-seismicity epicentral zone can be regarded as promising precursory information that could help signal the arrival of large earthquakes. We modeled the seismicity precursor phenomena using finite-element 2D model capable to replicate non-linear breaking of elastic rock. The distinctive seismicity peak was observed for a model simulating SAF properties at Park field. Such peaks are likely to be a good mid-term precursors allowing to declare alerts several months before earthquakes and pointing on their epicenter regions. The short tern alerts require use of active sources and their proper placement in order to monitor the developments of rock softening processes.

  3. Stray-light correction in 2D spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichenmaier, R.; Franz, M.

    2013-07-01

    Context. In solar physics, spectropolarimeters based on Fabry-Pérot interferometers are commonly used for high spatial resolution observations. In the data pipeline, corrections for scattered light may be performed on each narrow band image. Aims: We elaborate on the effects of stray-light corrections on Doppler maps. Methods: First, we demonstrate the basic correction effect in a simplified situation of two profiles that suffer from stray light. Then, we study the correction effects on velocity maps by transforming a Hinode SP map into a two-dimensional spectroscopic data set with i(x,y) at each wavelength point, which mimicks narrow band images. Velocity maps are inferred from line profiles of original and stray-light corrected data. Results: The correction of scattered light in narrow band images affects the inferred Doppler velocity maps: relative red shifts always become more red, and relative blue shifts become more blue. This trend is independent of whether downflows have dark or bright intensities. As a result, the effects of overcorrection produce both downflows and upflows. Conclusions: In 2D spectropolarimetry, corrections for scattered light can improve the image intensity and velocity contrast but inherently produce downflow signatures in the penumbra. Hence, such corrections are justified only if the properties of the stray light (seeing, telescope, and instrument) are well known.

  4. 2D XAFS-XEOL Spectroscopy - Some recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. J.; Smith, J. G.; Regier, T. Z.; Sham, T. K.

    2013-03-01

    The use of optical photons to measure the modulation of the absorption coefficient upon X-ray excitation, or optical XAFS, is of particular interest for application to the study of light emitting semiconducting nanomaterials due to the additional information that may be gained. The potential for site-selectivity, elemental and excitation energy specific luminescence decay channels, and surface vs. bulk effects all make the use of X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) desirable as a detection method. Previous experiments have made use of a monochromator to select the optical emission wavelength used to monitor optical XAFS. This method of detection suffers from the primary limitation of only being able to monitor the optical response at one emission wavelength. By combining the high resolution soft X-ray Spherical Grating Monochromator beam-line at the Canadian Light Source with an Ocean Optics QE 65000 fast CCD spectrophotometer and custom integration software we have developed a technique for collecting 2D XAFS-XEOL spectra, in which the excitation energy is scanned and a XEOL spectra is collected for every energy value. Herein we report the development of this technique and its capabilities using the study of the luminescence emitted from single crystal zinc oxide as an example.

  5. Application of Bessel beams to 2D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.-F.; Winfield, R. J.; O'Brien, S.; Crean, G. M.

    2009-03-01

    Fs laser-based two-photon polymerisation (2PP) has been widely reported as a means of directly writing three-dimensional nanoscale structures. Usually the voxel of a high numerical aperture microscope objective is scanned through the resin to build up the required model. In the case of high aspect ratio two-dimensional structures, such as cell scaffolds, repeated scanning is required to build up the height. The voxel shape can be substantially elongated by the inclusion of an axicon lens in the laser beam line. In this report we describe the use of a Bessel beam produced in the region beyond the focus of an objective lens when the beam has been modified in this way. A Ti:sapphire laser was used to write a range of 2D square cell structures in a Zr-loaded sol-gel system. The process was characterised, in terms of the dimensions of the polymerised Bessel region, for different processing conditions. Examples of the structures are also described.

  6. Computing 2D constrained delaunay triangulation using the GPU.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meng; Cao, Thanh-Tung; Tan, Tiow-Seng

    2013-05-01

    We propose the first graphics processing unit (GPU) solution to compute the 2D constrained Delaunay triangulation (CDT) of a planar straight line graph (PSLG) consisting of points and edges. There are many existing CPU algorithms to solve the CDT problem in computational geometry, yet there has been no prior approach to solve this problem efficiently using the parallel computing power of the GPU. For the special case of the CDT problem where the PSLG consists of just points, which is simply the normal Delaunay triangulation (DT) problem, a hybrid approach using the GPU together with the CPU to partially speed up the computation has already been presented in the literature. Our work, on the other hand, accelerates the entire computation on the GPU. Our implementation using the CUDA programming model on NVIDIA GPUs is numerically robust, and runs up to an order of magnitude faster than the best sequential implementations on the CPU. This result is reflected in our experiment with both randomly generated PSLGs and real-world GIS data having millions of points and edges. PMID:23492377

  7. Differential Cytochrome P450 2D Metabolism Alters Tafenoquine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Chau; Xie, Lisa H.; Potter, Brittney M. J.; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Nolan, Christina K.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Zottig, Victor E.; Nanayakkara, N. P. Dhammika; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.; Smith, Philip L.; Paris, Robert M.; Read, Lisa T.; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S.; Sousa, Jason C.; Reichard, Gregory A.; Smith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D metabolism is required for the liver-stage antimalarial efficacy of the 8-aminoquinoline molecule tafenoquine in mice. This could be problematic for Plasmodium vivax radical cure, as the human CYP 2D ortholog (2D6) is highly polymorphic. Diminished CYP 2D6 enzyme activity, as in the poor-metabolizer phenotype, could compromise radical curative efficacy in humans. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism for tafenoquine liver-stage efficacy, the exact role that CYP 2D metabolism plays in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of tafenoquine and other 8-aminoquinoline molecules has not been extensively studied. In this study, a series of tafenoquine pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with different CYP 2D metabolism statuses, including wild-type (WT) (reflecting extensive metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) and CYPmouse 2D knockout (KO) (reflecting poor metabolizers for CYP 2D6 substrates) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single 20-mg/kg of body weight dose of tafenoquine differed between the strains; however, the differences were less striking than previous results obtained for primaquine in the same model. Additionally, the presence of a 5,6-ortho-quinone tafenoquine metabolite was examined in both mouse strains. The 5,6-ortho-quinone species of tafenoquine was observed, and concentrations of the metabolite were highest in the WT extensive-metabolizer phenotype. Altogether, this study indicates that CYP 2D metabolism in mice affects tafenoquine pharmacokinetics and could have implications for human tafenoquine pharmacokinetics in polymorphic CYP 2D6 human populations. PMID:25870069

  8. Pokemon and MEF2D co-operationally promote invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Hong, Xing-Yu; Li, Tao; He, Cheng-Yan

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human malignancy, and frequent invasion and metastasis is closely associated with its poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion is still not completely elucidated. Pokemon is a well-established oncogene for HCC growth, but its contribution to HCC invasion has not been studied yet. In this paper, Pokemon was found to be overexpressed in MHCC-97H HCC cell line, which possesses higher invasiveness. Downregulation of Pokemon abolished the invasion of MHCC-97H HCC cell lines. Pokemon overexpression was able to enhance the invasion of MHCC-97L cells with lower invasiveness. MEF2D, an oncogene promoting the invasion of HCC cells, was further detected to be upregulated and downregulated when Pokemon was overexpressed and silenced, respectively. Online database analysis indicated that one Pokemon recognition site was located within the promoter of MEF2D. Chromatin co-precipitation, luciferase, and qPCR assays all proved that Pokemon can promote the expression of MEF2D in HCC cells. Restoration of MEF2D expression can prevent the impaired invasion of HCC cells with Pokemon silencing, while suppression of MEF2D abolished the effect of Pokemon overexpression on HCC invasion. More interestingly, MEF2D was also found to increase the transcription of Pokemon by binding myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) sites within its promoter region, implying an auto-regulatory circuit consisting of these two oncogenes that can promote HCC invasion. Our findings can contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism underlying HCC invasion, and provided evidence that targeting this molecular loop may be a promising strategy for anti-invasion therapy. PMID:26164003

  9. Automatic 2D-to-3D image conversion using 3D examples from the internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, J.; Brown, G.; Wang, M.; Ishwar, P.; Wu, C.; Mukherjee, D.

    2012-03-01

    The availability of 3D hardware has so far outpaced the production of 3D content. Although to date many methods have been proposed to convert 2D images to 3D stereopairs, the most successful ones involve human operators and, therefore, are time-consuming and costly, while the fully-automatic ones have not yet achieved the same level of quality. This subpar performance is due to the fact that automatic methods usually rely on assumptions about the captured 3D scene that are often violated in practice. In this paper, we explore a radically different approach inspired by our work on saliency detection in images. Instead of relying on a deterministic scene model for the input 2D image, we propose to "learn" the model from a large dictionary of stereopairs, such as YouTube 3D. Our new approach is built upon a key observation and an assumption. The key observation is that among millions of stereopairs available on-line, there likely exist many stereopairs whose 3D content matches that of the 2D input (query). We assume that two stereopairs whose left images are photometrically similar are likely to have similar disparity fields. Our approach first finds a number of on-line stereopairs whose left image is a close photometric match to the 2D query and then extracts depth information from these stereopairs. Since disparities for the selected stereopairs differ due to differences in underlying image content, level of noise, distortions, etc., we combine them by using the median. We apply the resulting median disparity field to the 2D query to obtain the corresponding right image, while handling occlusions and newly-exposed areas in the usual way. We have applied our method in two scenarios. First, we used YouTube 3D videos in search of the most similar frames. Then, we repeated the experiments on a small, but carefully-selected, dictionary of stereopairs closely matching the query. This, to a degree, emulates the results one would expect from the use of an extremely large 3D

  10. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  11. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, Michael A.; Cook, Neville G. W.; McEvilly, Thomas V.; Majer, Ernest L.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  12. Probabilistic seismic demand analysis of nonlinear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shome, Nilesh

    Recent earthquakes in California have initiated improvement in current design philosophy and at present the civil engineering community is working towards development of performance-based earthquake engineering of structures. The objective of this study is to develop efficient, but accurate procedures for probabilistic analysis of nonlinear seismic behavior of structures. The proposed procedures help the near-term development of seismic-building assessments which require an estimation of seismic demand at a given intensity level. We also develop procedures to estimate the probability of exceedance of any specified nonlinear response level due to future ground motions at a specific site. This is referred as Probabilistic Seismic Demand Analysis (PSDA). The latter procedure prepares the way for the next stage development of seismic assessment that consider the uncertainties in nonlinear response and capacity. The proposed procedures require structure-specific nonlinear analyses for a relatively small set of recorded accelerograms and (site-specific or USGS-map-like) seismic hazard analyses. We have addressed some of the important issues of nonlinear seismic demand analysis, which are selection of records for structural analysis, the number of records to be used, scaling of records, etc. Initially these issues are studied through nonlinear analysis of structures for a number of magnitude-distance bins of records. Subsequently we introduce regression analysis of response results against spectral acceleration, magnitude, duration, etc., which helps to resolve these issues more systematically. We illustrate the demand-hazard calculations through two major example problems: a 5story and a 20-story SMRF building. Several simple, but quite accurate closed-form solutions have also been proposed to expedite the demand-hazard calculations. We find that vector-valued (e.g., 2-D) PSDA estimates demand hazard more accurately. This procedure, however, requires information about 2

  13. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C.; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. PMID:25381333

  14. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  15. Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.; Rohay, A.C.

    2000-02-23

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EWRN uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 311 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Twelve seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46{degree}-47{degree}N latitude and 119{degree}-120{degree}W longitude; 2 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 3 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 9 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 1 was a quarry blast. Two earthquakes appear to be related to a major geologic structure, no earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 9 earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion

  16. Waveform tomography in 2.5D: Parameterization for crooked-line acquisition geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithyman, B. R.; Clowes, R. M.

    2013-05-01

    A method for 2.5D viscoacoustic waveform tomography that can be applied to generate 2D models of velocity and attenuation from inversion of refraction waveforms on land seismic reflection data acquired along crooked roads is developed. It is particularly useful for typical crustal reflection surveys. First-arrival travel time tomography is applied using a 3D method, but with constraints on the intermediate 3D velocity model; the result is the starting model for the next step. A 2.5D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion stage parameterizes 3D geometry in the seismic source and receiver arrays, with the assumption that the velocity and attenuation models are homogeneous in the out-of-plane direction. This approach results in superior results compared to a strictly 2D approach when the acquisition line is crooked, with a moderate increase in computational cost. A case study using data acquired in the Nechako Basin in south-central British Columbia, Canada, exemplifies and validates the procedure. The velocity model derived from 2.5D waveform tomography is compared with that from a previous study in which 2D waveform tomography was applied to the same data set and with results from 3D travel time tomography. The resolution and accuracy of the velocity model from 2.5D waveform tomography are demonstrated to be greater than those from travel time or 2D waveform tomography. A model of viscoacoustic attenuation, which was not possible in the 2D case, is also generated. These models are interpreted jointly to highlight features of geological interest, such as a sedimentary basin, basement rocks, and faults, from surface to about 3 km depth.

  17. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  18. Near-Surface Seismic Reflection and GPR Imaging of the Active Emigrant Peak Fault, Fish Lake Valley, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, R. A.; Christie, M. W.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Stockli, D. F.

    2007-12-01

    Multifaceted near-surface geophysical studies of active faulting in the Eastern California Shear Zone are being conducted at the University of Kansas. During the summer of 2006 shallow seismic reflection and GPR data sets were acquired across the active Emigrant Peak fault on the east side of Fish Lake Valley, Nevada. This fault is a normal fault that aids in the transfer of regional right-lateral deformation associated with the Death Valley/Fish Lake Valley fault zone. Locally a 20 m high scarp marks the trace of the main fault across a large, active alluvial fan. The GPR experiment produced a pseudo-3D image approximately 500m by 115m in size with a bin size of 1m by 5m. Depth penetration was dependent on antenna frequency, but reached approximately 25m in the dry alluvial fan sediments. Two 2-D seismic lines were acquired with a depth penetration of approximately 200m using a 30.06 caliber rifle source. The main line was over 400m in length and the cross line over 150m in length. CMP bins were 0.25m in size. Both data types were processed to migrated images and imported into an industry-standard reflection interpretation package. Analysis of the GPR volume allowed the interpretation of numerous normal faults parallel to the main Emigrant fault both near the main scarp and as 'off-fault' deformation. Some are down-to-the-basin 'growth faults' and some are antithetic in nature. Faults were only mapped if they were continuous across many x-lines. The migrated seismic images contain numerous reflections, grouped in packages of short reflectors of different amplitudes and dip orientations. The GPR fault planes were transferred onto the seismic data and correlated with obvious breaks in dip and amplitude between the reflection packages. After basic interpretation of the faults the stratigraphic changes across the fault planes were analyzed on the seismic data to estimate offsets at different depths for each fault. Currently, we are working to estimate a quantitative

  19. New Zealand Seismic Risk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molas, G.; Aslani, H.; Bryngelson, J.; Khan, Z.

    2006-12-01

    A seismic risk model for New Zealand has been developed to assisted insurers and reinsurers in assessing their financial risk posed by earthquakes. This presentation summarizes the methodology and data within the model and includes a discussion of the key results from the hazard and risk perspectives. The earthquake, risk-model framework has four components. First, the stochastic event set is determined, as well as its associated event probabilities. A ground-motion model including geotechnical data is added to complete the seismic hazard model. To determine risk, regional building vulnerability curves and a financial model are incorporated. An insurer property exposure database was developed to determine the insured seismic risk in these countries. Using this model, examination of resulting hazard maps (200, 475, 1000 and 2500 years) and of city-level, hazard-curves gives insight to the key drivers of risk across the region. Hazard de-aggregation allow for examination of key drivers of risk in terms of seismic sources, event magnitude and events types. Examination of loss costs for residential and commercial (short and mid-rise) structures gives insight into the risk perspective for these various lines of business. Finally, incorporation of the insurer property exposure allows for an examination of the insured risk across the region and between exposure concentrations including Wellington, Auckland and Christchurch.

  20. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  1. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  2. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  3. Unitary quantum lattice gas representation of 2D quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Soe, Min

    2011-05-01

    Quantum vortex structures and energy cascades are examined for two dimensional quantum turbulence (2D QT) using a special unitary evolution algorithm. The qubit lattice gas (QLG) algorithm, is employed to simulate the weakly-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) governed by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation. A parameter regime is uncovered in which, as in 3D QT, there is a very short Poincare recurrence time. This short recurrence time is destroyed as the nonlinear interaction energy is increased. Energy cascades for 2D QT are considered to examine whether 2D QT exhibits the inverse cascades of 2D classical turbulence. In the parameter regime considered, the spectra analysis reveals no such dual cascades---dual cascades being a hallmark of 2D classical turbulence.

  4. CYP2D6 polymorphism in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Peñas-Lledó, E M; Dorado, P; Agüera, Z; Gratacós, M; Estivill, X; Fernández-Aranda, F; Llerena, A

    2012-04-01

    CYP2D6 polymorphism is associated with variability in drug response, endogenous metabolism (that is, serotonin), personality, neurocognition and psychopathology. The relationship between CYP2D6 genetic polymorphism and the risk of eating disorders (ED) was analyzed in 267 patients with ED and in 285 controls. A difference in the CYP2D6 active allele distribution was found between these groups. Women carrying more than two active genes (ultrarapid metabolizers) (7.5 vs 4.6%) or two (67 vs 58.9%) active genes were more frequent among patients with ED, whereas those with one (20.6 vs 30.2%) or zero active genes (4.9 vs 6.3%) were more frequent among controls (P<0.05). Although further research is needed, present findings suggest an association between CYP2D6 and ED. CYP2D6 allele distribution in patients with ED seems related to increased enzyme activity. PMID:20877302

  5. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices. PMID:27471306

  6. Oceanic crust deep seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, J. H.; White, R. S.

    In September 1991, the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) collected 578 km of deep seismic reflection profiles over the oceanic crust beneath the Cape Verde abssyal plain in approximately 4900 m of water (Fig. 1). The survey, under the direction of J. H. McBride, was undertaken in response to a proposal made by R. S. White at the 1990 BIRPS open syndicate meeting in Birmingham, England, and was acquired using GECO-PRAKLA'S M/V Bin Hai 511. The survey consisted of two strike lines parallel to magnetic sea-floor lineations and nine orthogonal crossing lines oriented parallel to the spreading direction (Fig. 2). Adjacent lines are spaced at 4 km. For the first time, this provides the ability to map oceanic crust in “3D,” since the line spacing is less than or equal to the Fresnel-zone diameter for the lower crust.

  7. Simulation of complete seismic surveys for evaluation of experiment design and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Oezdenvar, T.; McMechan, G.A.; Chaney, P.

    1996-03-01

    Synthesis of complete seismic survey data sets allows analysis and optimization of all stages in an acquisition/processing sequence. The characteristics of available survey designs, parameter choices, and processing algorithms may be evaluated prior to field acquisition to produce a composite system in which all stages have compatible performance; this maximizes the cost effectiveness for a given level of accuracy, or for targets with specific characteristics. Data sets synthesized for three salt structures provide representative comparisons of time and depth migration, post-stack and prestack processing, and illustrate effects of varying recording aperture and shot spacing, iterative focusing analysis, and the interaction of migration algorithms with recording aperture. A final example demonstrates successful simulation of both 2-D acquisition and processing of a real data line over a salt pod in the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Computational efficient segmentation of cell nuclei in 2D and 3D fluorescent micrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vylder, Jonas; Philips, Wilfried

    2011-02-01

    This paper proposes a new segmentation technique developed for the segmentation of cell nuclei in both 2D and 3D fluorescent micrographs. The proposed method can deal with both blurred edges as with touching nuclei. Using a dual scan line algorithm its both memory as computational efficient, making it interesting for the analysis of images coming from high throughput systems or the analysis of 3D microscopic images. Experiments show good results, i.e. recall of over 0.98.

  9. Studies of a suitable mask error enhancement factor for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chih I.; Cheng, Yung Feng; Chen, Ming Jui

    2013-04-01

    In advanced 20nm and below technology nodes, the mask enhanced error factor (MEEF) plays an important rule due to the request of stable process control and quality of mask manufacture. It provides us an effective parameter to analyze the process window for lithography. In advanced nodes, MEEF criterion becomes more important than previous nodes because very tight process tolerance is requested, especially in OPC and mask capability control. Therefore, we have to do further studies on this topic. In the simple line/trench design layers (for example: Active and poly), the MEEF is easy to be defined because mask bias is isotropic. However, in the complicated two-dimensional (2D) design layers (for example: Contact and Mvia), they are hard to be defined a suitable definition of MEEF. In the first part, we used the global bias to calculate the MEEF on all patterns. It makes calculation easier to compare with other patterns which are different shapes. However, when we inspected the 2D line-end patterns on the wafer, we found the significant differences between the MEEF of wafer data and aerial simulation. In order to clarify this issue, we perform series simulation studies of the line-end MEEF. Then we knew that it came from the different bias strategies. Furthermore, the simulation studies show that the line-end MEEF of non-preferable orientation is very sensitive to mask X/Y ratio bias due to strong OAI optical behavior by the SMO source. As a result, a new point of view of 2D MEEF is suggested according to physical mask CD error measurement data. In this study, we would find a better description of the MEEF than traditional one for lithographic process development on 2D region.

  10. 2D Representation of Transcriptomes by t-SNE Exposes Relatedness between Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Reinders, Marcel J. T.

    2016-01-01

    The GTEx Consortium reported that hierarchical clustering of RNA profiles from 25 unique tissue types among 1641 individuals accurately distinguished the tissue types, but a multidimensional scaling failed to generate a 2D projection of the data that separates tissue-subtypes. In this study we show that a projection by t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding is in line with the cluster analysis which allows a more detailed examination and visualization of human tissue relationships. PMID:26906061

  11. 2D Traveling Wave Array Employing a Trapezoidal Dielectric Wedge for Beam Steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas K.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranada, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation addresses the progress made so far in the development of an antenna array with reconfigurable transmission line feeds connecting each element in series. In particular, 2D traveling wave array employing trapezoidal Dielectric Wedge for Beam Steering will be discussed. The presentation includes current status of the effort and suggested future work. The work is being done as part of the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship (NSTRF).

  12. High-resolution seismic array imaging based on numerical seismic wave simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Tong, P.; Chen, C.

    2012-12-01

    Adjoint tomography, i.e., seismic tomography based on full numerical simulations and adjoint methods, is a powerful tool for high-resolution imaging in heterogeneous media. It resolves large velocity contrasts through the use of 3D initial models and exploits more quantitative information from observed seismograms. However, for regions with limited local seismicity, seismic imaging relies more on teleseismic records. In particular coda and converted waves of main teleseismic arrivals used in scattering imaging are vital in resolving subsurface interfaces and velocity anomalies beneath seismic arrays. It remains numerically challenging to accurately and efficiently simulate the full propagation of seismic waves at the frequencies relevant to scattering imaging. In this work, to simulate the propagation of teleseismic planes waves into localized heterogeneous structures, we apply a hybrid method that interacts a spectral-element solver within the domain with a semi-analytical solution for 1D background medium at the absorbing boundaries. This technique will be implemented in both SPECFEM2D and SPECFEM3D packages and make it possible to invert both regional and teleseismic recordings in the framework of adjoint tomography. Synthetic tests will be performed to show the feasibility of high-resolution seismic array imaging of coda and converted waves based on adjoint techniques.

  13. Successes and failures of recording and interpreting seismic data in structurally complex area: seismic case history

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, V.C.; Johnson, J.H.; Crittenden, J.L.; Anderson, T.D.

    1986-05-01

    There are successes and failures in recording and interpreting a single seismic line across the South Owl Creek Mountain fault on the west flank of the Casper arch. Information obtained from this type of work should help explorationists who are exploring structurally complex areas. A depth cross section lacks a subthrust prospect, but is illustrated to show that the South Owl Creek Mountain fault is steeper with less apparent displacement than in areas to the north. This cross section is derived from two-dimensional seismic modeling, using data processing methods specifically for modeling. A flat horizon and balancing technique helps confirm model accuracy. High-quality data were acquired using specifically designed seismic field parameters. The authors concluded that the methodology used is valid, and an interactive modeling program in addition to cross-line control can improve seismic interpretations in structurally complex areas.

  14. The shallow velocity structure of the Carboneras fault zone from high-resolution seismic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C.; Nippress, S.; Rietbrock, A.; Faulkner, D. R.; Rutter, E. H.; Haberland, C. A.; Teixido, T.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding and characterizing fault zone structure at depth is vital to predicting the slip behaviour of faults in the brittle crust. The CFZ is a large offset (10s of km) strike-slip fault that constitutes part of the diffuse plate boundary between Africa and Iberia. It has been largely passively exhumed from ca. 4 to 6 km depth. The friable fault zone components are excellently preserved in the region’s semi-arid climate, and consist of multiple strands of phyllosilicate-rich fault gouge ranging from 1 to 20 m in thickness. We conducted four high-resolution seismic refraction tomography lines. Two of these lines crossed the entire width of the fault zone (~1km long) while the remaining lines concentrated on individual fault strands and associated damage zones (~100m long). For each line a combination of seismic sources (accelerated drop weight, sledgehammer and 100g explosives) was used, with 2m-geophone spacing. First breaks have been picked for each of the shot gathers and inputted into a 2D travel time inversion and amplitude-modeling package (Zelt & Smith, 1992) to obtain first break tomography images down to a depth 100m for the longer lines. The fault zone is imaged as a series of low velocity zones associated with the gouge strands, with Vp=1.5-1.75 km/s a velocity reduction of 40-60% compared to the wall-rock velocities (Vp=2.8-3.2km/s). These velocities are consistent with first break tomographic observations across the Dead Sea Transform fault (Haberland et al., 2007), but lower than the velocities imaged along the Punchbowl fault zone (part of the San Andreas system). Along the longer profiles we image multiple fault strands that exhibit a variety of thicknesses (~20-80m).

  15. A new wrinkle in seismic filtering aids interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, P.

    1984-11-01

    Application of continuous time-variant deconvolution on a seismic record provides for improvement in resolution, suppression of residual ground roll, elimination of spurious geophone resonances and reduction of moderate power line interference. The overall benefit, of course, is improved interpretability of a seismic section, which allows for the identification of more subtle, often overlooked, geologic features.

  16. Seismic intrusion detector system

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Hervey L.; Hawley, James G.; Portlock, John M.; Scheibner, James E.

    1976-01-01

    A system for monitoring man-associated seismic movements within a control area including a geophone for generating an electrical signal in response to seismic movement, a bandpass amplifier and threshold detector for eliminating unwanted signals, pulse counting system for counting and storing the number of seismic movements within the area, and a monitoring system operable on command having a variable frequency oscillator generating an audio frequency signal proportional to the number of said seismic movements.

  17. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples. PMID:27378648

  18. A synthetic seismicity model for the Middle America Trench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Steven N.

    1991-01-01

    A novel iterative technique, based on the concept of fault segmentation and computed using 2D static dislocation theory, for building models of seismicity and fault interaction which are physically acceptable and geometrically and kinematically correct, is presented. The technique is applied in two steps to seismicity observed at the Middle America Trench. The first constructs generic models which randomly draw segment strengths and lengths from a 2D probability distribution. The second constructs predictive models in which segment lengths and strengths are adjusted to mimic the actual geography and timing of large historical earthquakes. Both types of models reproduce the statistics of seismicity over five units of magnitude and duplicate other aspects including foreshock and aftershock sequences, migration of foci, and the capacity to produce both characteristic and noncharacteristic earthquakes. Over a period of about 150 yr the complex interaction of fault segments and the nonlinear failure conditions conspire to transform an apparently deterministic model into a chaotic one.

  19. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, R. B.; Smith, G. C.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J. W.

    1997-02-01

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 × 640 mm 2. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimise parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa 3He plus 100 kPa CF 4, and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count rate of the detector was 10 5 events per secod. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2 Å neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 × 5 mm 2) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16-channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise line width of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp, USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display.

  20. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  1. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  2. Barren Acidic Soil Assessment using Seismic Refraction Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Madun, A.; Zawawi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the geophysics subsurface exploration techniques used to determine subsurface profile characteristics. From past experience, seismic refraction method is commonly used to detect soil layers, overburden, bedrock, etc. However, the application of this method on barren geomaterials remains limited due to several reasons. Hence, this study was performed to evaluate the subsurface profile characteristics of barren acidic soil located in Ayer Hitam, Batu Pahat, Johor using seismic refraction survey. The seismic refraction survey was conducted using ABEM Terraloc MK 8 (seismograph), a sledge hammer weighing 7 kg (source) and 24 units of 10 Hz geophones (receiver). Seismic data processing was performed using OPTIM software which consists of SeisOpt@picker (picking the first arrival and seismic configureuration data input) and SeisOpt@2D (generating 2D image of barren acidic soil based on seismic velocity (primary velocity, Vp) distribution). It was found that the barren acidic soil profile consists of three layers representing residual soil (Vp= 200-400 m/s) at 0-2 m, highly to completely weathered soil (Vp= 500-1800 m/s) at 3-8 m and shale (Vp= 2100-6200 m/s) at 9-20 m depth. Furthermore, result verification was successfully done through the correlation of seismic refraction data based on physical mapping and the geological map of the study area. Finally, it was found that the seismic refraction survey was applicable for subsurface profiling of barren acidic soil as it was very efficient in terms of time, cost, large data coverage and sustainable.

  3. A framework for grand scale parallelization of the combined finite discrete element method in 2d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.; Rougier, E.; Knight, E. E.; Munjiza, A.

    2014-09-01

    Within the context of rock mechanics, the Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM) has been applied to many complex industrial problems such as block caving, deep mining techniques (tunneling, pillar strength, etc.), rock blasting, seismic wave propagation, packing problems, dam stability, rock slope stability, rock mass strength characterization problems, etc. The reality is that most of these were accomplished in a 2D and/or single processor realm. In this work a hardware independent FDEM parallelization framework has been developed using the Virtual Parallel Machine for FDEM, (V-FDEM). With V-FDEM, a parallel FDEM software can be adapted to different parallel architecture systems ranging from just a few to thousands of cores.

  4. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  5. Full-waveform inversion in 2D VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, Nishant

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique designed to produce a high-resolution model of the subsurface by using information contained in entire seismic waveforms. This thesis presents a methodology for FWI in elastic VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical axis of symmetry) media and discusses synthetic results for heterogeneous VTI models. First, I develop FWI for multicomponent data from a horizontally layered VTI model. The reflectivity method, which permits computation of only PP reflections or a combination of PP and PSV events, is employed to model the data. The Gauss-Newton technique is used to invert for the interval Thomsen parameters, while keeping the densities fixed at the correct values. Eigenvalue/eigenvector decompostion of the Hessian matrix helps analyze the sensitivity of the objective function to the model parameters. Whereas PP data alone are generally sufficient to constrain all four Thomsen parameters even for conventional spreads, including PS reflections provides better constraints, especially for the deeper part of the model. Next, I derive the gradients of the FWI objective function with respect to the stiffness coefficients of arbitrarily anisotropic media by employing the adjoint-state method. From these expressions, it is straightforward to compute the gradients for parameters of 2D heterogeneous VTI media. FWI is implemented in the time domain with the steepest-descent method used to iteratively update the model. The algorithm is tested on transmitted multicomponent data generated for Gaussian anomalies in Thomsen parameters embedded in homogeneous VTI media. To test the sensitivity of the objective function to different model parameters, I derive an an- alytic expression for the Frechet kernel of FWI for arbitrary anisotropic symmetry by using the Born approximation and asymptotic Green's functions. The amplitude of the kernel, which represents the radiation pattern of a secondary source (that source describes a perturbation

  6. CAS2D- NONROTATING BLADE-TO-BLADE, STEADY, POTENTIAL TRANSONIC CASCADE FLOW ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    An exact, full-potential-equation model for the steady, irrotational, homoentropic, and homoenergetic flow of a compressible, inviscid fluid through a two-dimensional planar cascade together with its appropriate boundary conditions has been derived. The CAS2D computer program numerically solves an artificially time-dependent form of the actual full-potential-equation, providing a nonrotating blade-to-blade, steady, potential transonic cascade flow analysis code. Comparisons of results with test data and theoretical solutions indicate very good agreement. In CAS2D, the governing equation is discretized by using type-dependent, rotated finite differencing and the finite area technique. The flow field is discretized by providing a boundary-fitted, nonuniform computational mesh. This mesh is generated by using a sequence of conformal mapping, nonorthogonal coordinate stretching, and local, isoparametric, bilinear mapping functions. The discretized form of the full-potential equation is solved iteratively by using successive line over relaxation. Possible isentropic shocks are captured by the explicit addition of an artificial viscosity in a conservative form. In addition, a four-level, consecutive, mesh refinement feature makes CAS2D a reliable and fast algorithm for the analysis of transonic, two-dimensional cascade flows. The results from CAS2D are not directly applicable to three-dimensional, potential, rotating flows through a cascade of blades because CAS2D does not consider the effects of the Coriolis force that would be present in the three-dimensional case. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 200K of 8 bit bytes. The CAS2D program was developed in 1980.

  7. 2D constant-loss taper for mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horth, Alexandre; Kashyap, Raman; Quitoriano, Nathaniel J.

    2015-03-01

    Proposed in this manuscript is a novel taper geometry, the constant-loss taper (CLT). This geometry is derived with 1D slabs of silicon embedded in silicon dioxide using coupled-mode theory (CMT). The efficiency of the CLT is compared to both linear and parabolic tapers using CMT and 2D finite-difference time-domain simulations. It is shown that over a short 2D, 4.45 μm long taper the CLT's mode conversion efficiency is ~90% which is 10% and 18% more efficient than a 2D parabolic or linear taper, respectively.

  8. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  9. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  10. Materials for Flexible, Stretchable Electronics: Graphene and 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Choi, Kyoungjun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Yuna; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-07-01

    Recently, 2D materials have been intensively studied as emerging materials for future electronics, including flexible electronics, photonics, and electrochemical energy storage devices. Among representative 2D materials (such as graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides) that exhibit extraordinary properties, graphene stands out in the flexible electronics field due to its combination of high electron mobility, high thermal conductivity, high specific surface area, high optical transparency, excellent mechanical flexibility, and environmental stability. This review covers the synthesis, transfer, and characterization methods of graphene and 2D materials and graphene's application to flexible devices as well as comparison with other competing materials.

  11. Whole-exome sequencing defines the mutational landscape of pheochromocytoma and identifies KMT2D as a recurrently mutated gene.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, C Christofer; Stenman, Adam; Haglund, Felix; Clark, Victoria E; Brown, Taylor C; Baranoski, Jacob; Bilguvar, Kaya; Goh, Gerald; Welander, Jenny; Svahn, Fredrika; Rubinstein, Jill C; Caramuta, Stefano; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat; Bäckdahl, Martin; Gimm, Oliver; Söderkvist, Peter; Prasad, Manju L; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P; Carling, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    As subsets of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) lack a defined molecular etiology, we sought to characterize the mutational landscape of PCCs to identify novel gene candidates involved in disease development. A discovery cohort of 15 PCCs wild type for mutations in PCC susceptibility genes underwent whole-exome sequencing, and an additional 83 PCCs served as a verification cohort for targeted sequencing of candidate mutations. A low rate of nonsilent single nucleotide variants (SNVs) was detected (6.1/sample). Somatic HRAS and EPAS1 mutations were observed in one case each, whereas the remaining 13 cases did not exhibit variants in established PCC genes. SNVs aggregated in apoptosis-related pathways, and mutations in COSMIC genes not previously reported in PCCs included ZAN, MITF, WDTC1, and CAMTA1. Two somatic mutations and one constitutional variant in the well-established cancer gene lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D, MLL2) were discovered in one sample each, prompting KMT2D screening using focused exome-sequencing in the verification cohort. An additional 11 PCCs displayed KMT2D variants, of which two were recurrent. In total, missense KMT2D variants were found in 14 (11 somatic, two constitutional, one undetermined) of 99 PCCs (14%). Five cases displayed somatic mutations in the functional FYR/SET domains of KMT2D, constituting 36% of all KMT2D-mutated PCCs. KMT2D expression was upregulated in PCCs compared to normal adrenals, and KMT2D overexpression positively affected cell migration in a PCC cell line. We conclude that KMT2D represents a recurrently mutated gene with potential implication for PCC development. PMID:26032282

  12. Design and synthesis of novel tamoxifen analogues that avoid CYP2D6 metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nermin S; Elghazawy, Nehal H; ElHady, Ahmed K; Engel, Matthias; Hartmann, Rolf W; Abadi, Ashraf H

    2016-04-13

    Tamoxifen (TAM) is a widely used drug in the prophylaxis and treatment of breast cancer. TAM is metabolized to the more active 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OH-TAM) and endoxifen by cytochrome P450 (CYP) mainly CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 enzymes. Due to the genetic polymorphisms in CYP2D6 genes, high variation in the clinical outcomes of TAM treatment is observed among women of different populations. To address this issue, novel TAM analogues with possible altered activation pathways were synthesized. These analogues were tested for their antiproliferative action on MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines as well as their binding affinity for estrogen receptor (ER) ER-α and ER-β receptors. These entire novel compounds showed better antiproliferative activity than did TAM on the MCF-7 cells. Moreover, compound 10 exhibited a half maximal growth inhibition (GI50) that was 1000 times more potent than that of TAM (GI50 < 0.005 μM vs 1.58 μM, respectively). Along with a broad spectrum activity on various cancer cell lines, all the TAM analogues showed considerable activity on the ER-negative breast cancer cell line. For further study, compound 10 was incubated in human liver microsomes (HLM), human hepatocytes (hHEP) and CYP2D6 supersomes. The active hydroxyl metabolite was detected after incubation in HLM and hHEP, implicating the involvement of other enzymes in its metabolism. These results prove that this novel series of TAM analogues might provide improved clinical outcomes for poor 2D6 metabolizers. PMID:26896706

  13. Recent developments in 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Late, Dattatray J.; Morgan, Hywel; Rout, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional layered inorganic nanomaterials (2D-LINs) have recently attracted huge interest because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties and potential technological applications. The properties of these layered materials can be tuned via both physical and chemical processes. Some 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials like MoS2, WS2 and SnS2 have been recently developed and employed in various applications, including new sensors because of their layer-dependent electrical properties. This article presents a comprehensive overview of recent developments in the application of 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials as sensors. Some of the salient features of 2D materials for different sensing applications are discussed, including gas sensing, electrochemical sensing, SERS and biosensing, SERS sensing and photodetection. The working principles of the sensors are also discussed together with examples.

  14. 2. D Street facade and rear (east) blank wall of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. D Street facade and rear (east) blank wall of parking garage. Farther east is 408 8th Street (National Art And Frame Company). - PMI Parking Garage, 403-407 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices. PMID:26839956

  16. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  17. From weakly to strongly interacting 2D Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Paul; Fenech, Kristian; Lingham, Marcus; Peppler, Tyson; Hoinka, Sascha; Vale, Chris

    2014-05-01

    We study ultracold 2D Fermi gases of 6Li formed in a highly oblate trapping potential. The potential is generated by a cylindrically focused, blue detuned TEM01 mode laser beam. Weak magnetic field curvature provides highly harmonic confinement in the radial direction and we can readily produce single clouds with an aspect ratio of 230. Our experiments investigate the dimensional crossover from 3D to 2D for a two component Fermi gas in the Bose-Einstein Condensate to Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer crossover. Observation of an elbow in measurements of the cloud width vs. atom number is consistent with populating only the lowest transverse harmonic oscillator state for weak attractive interactions. This measurement is extended to the strongly interacting region using the broad Feshbach resonance at 832 G. We also report our progress towards measurement of the 2D equation of state for an interacting 2D Fermi gas via in-situ absorption imaging.

  18. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-11-01

    The unique properties of 2D materials, such as graphene or transition metal dichalcogenides, have been attracting much attention in the past decade. Now, metallically conductive and even superconducting transition metal carbides are entering the game.

  19. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevector aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of inertial ranged magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between perpendicular and parallel reduced power spectra which is expected for the 2D component but not for the slab component. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant (approximately 85 percent by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  20. Dominant 2D magnetic turbulence in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, John W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Matthaeus, William H.

    1996-07-20

    There have been recent suggestions that solar wind magnetic turbulence may be a composite of slab geometry (wavevectors aligned with the mean magnetic field) and 2D geometry (wavevectors perpendicular to the mean field). We report results of two new tests of this hypothesis using Helios measurements of mid-inertial range magnetic spectra in the solar wind. The first test is based upon a characteristic difference between reduced magnetic power spectra in the two different directions perpendicular to the mean field. Such a difference is expected for 2D geometry but not for slab geometry. The second test examines the dependence of power spectrum density upon the magnetic field angle (i.e., the angle between the mean magnetic field and the radial direction), a relationship which is expected to be in opposite directions for the slab and 2D components. Both tests support the presence of a dominant ({approx}85% by energy) 2D component in solar wind magnetic turbulence.

  1. Efficient framework for deformable 2D-3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluck, Oliver; Aharon, Shmuel; Khamene, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Using 2D-3D registration it is possible to extract the body transformation between the coordinate systems of X-ray and volumetric CT images. Our initial motivation is the improvement of accuracy of external beam radiation therapy, an effective method for treating cancer, where CT data play a central role in radiation treatment planning. Rigid body transformation is used to compute the correct patient setup. The drawback of such approaches is that the rigidity assumption on the imaged object is not valid for most of the patient cases, mainly due to respiratory motion. In the present work, we address this limitation by proposing a flexible framework for deformable 2D-3D registration consisting of a learning phase incorporating 4D CT data sets and hardware accelerated free form DRR generation, 2D motion computation, and 2D-3D back projection.

  2. Poor boy 3D seismic effort yields South Central Kentucky discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hanratty, M.

    1996-11-04

    Clinton County, Ky., is on the eastern flank of the Cincinnati arch and the western edge of the Appalachian basin and the Pine Mountain overthrust. Clinton County has long been known for high volume fractured carbonate wells. The discovery of these fractured reservoir, unfortunately, has historically been serendipitous. The author currently uses 2D seismic and satellite imagery to design 3D high resolution seismic shoots. This method has proven to be the most efficient and is the core of his program. The paper describes exploration methods, seismic acquisition, well data base, and seismic interpretation.

  3. Modeling of two-storey precast school building using Ruaumoko 2D program

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, N. H.; Tarmizi, L. H.; Ghani, K. D.

    2015-05-15

    The long-distant earthquake loading from Sumatra and Java Island had caused some slight damages to precast and reinforced concrete buildings in West Malaysia such as cracks on wall panels, columns and beams. Subsequently, the safety of existing precast concrete building is needed to be analyzed because these buildings were designed using BS 8110 which did not include the seismic loading in the design. Thus, this paper emphasizes on the seismic performance and dynamic behavior of precast school building constructed in Malaysia under three selected past earthquakes excitations ; El Centro 1940 North-South, El Centro East-West components and San Fernando 1971 using RUAUMOKO 2D program. This program is fully utilized by using prototype precast school model and dynamic non-linear time history analysis. From the results, it can be concluded that two-storey precast school building has experienced severe damage and partial collapse especially at beam-column joint under San Fernando and El Centro North-South Earthquake as its exceeds the allowable inter-storey drift and displacement as specified in Eurocode 8. The San Fernando earthquake has produced a massive destruction to the precast building under viscous damping, ξ = 5% and this building has generated maximum building displacement of 435mm, maximum building drift of 0.68% and maximum bending moment at 8458kNm.

  4. Modeling of two-storey precast school building using Ruaumoko 2D program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, N. H.; Tarmizi, L. H.; Ghani, K. D.

    2015-05-01

    The long-distant earthquake loading from Sumatra and Java Island had caused some slight damages to precast and reinforced concrete buildings in West Malaysia such as cracks on wall panels, columns and beams. Subsequently, the safety of existing precast concrete building is needed to be analyzed because these buildings were designed using BS 8110 which did not include the seismic loading in the design. Thus, this paper emphasizes on the seismic performance and dynamic behavior of precast school building constructed in Malaysia under three selected past earthquakes excitations ; El Centro 1940 North-South, El Centro East-West components and San Fernando 1971 using RUAUMOKO 2D program. This program is fully utilized by using prototype precast school model and dynamic non-linear time history analysis. From the results, it can be concluded that two-storey precast school building has experienced severe damage and partial collapse especially at beam-column joint under San Fernando and El Centro North-South Earthquake as its exceeds the allowable inter-storey drift and displacement as specified in Eurocode 8. The San Fernando earthquake has produced a massive destruction to the precast building under viscous damping, ξ = 5% and this building has generated maximum building displacement of 435mm, maximum building drift of 0.68% and maximum bending moment at 8458kNm.

  5. Seismic transducer modeling using ABAQUS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Novascone

    2004-05-01

    A seismic transducer, known as an orbital vibrator, consists of a rotating imbalance driven by an electric motor. When suspended in a liquid-filled wellbore, vibrations of the device are coupled to the surrounding geologic media. In this mode, an orbital vibrator can be used as an efficient rotating dipole source for seismic imaging. Alternately, the motion of an orbital vibrator is affected by the physical properties of the surrounding media. From this point of view, an orbital vibrator can be used as a stand-alone sensor. The reaction to the surroundings can be sensed and recorded by geophones inside the orbital vibrator. These reactions are a function of the media’s physical properties such as modulus, damping, and density, thereby identifying the rock type. This presentation shows how the orbital vibrator and surroundings were modeled with an ABAQUS acoustic FEM. The FEM is found to compare favorably with theoretical predictions. A 2D FEM and analytical model are compared to an experimental data set. Each model compares favorably with the data set.

  6. Computational Design of 2D materials for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Since the successful synthesis of graphene, tremendous efforts have been devoted to two-dimensional monolayers such as boron nitride (BN), silicene and MoS2. These 2D materials exhibit a large variety of physical and chemical properties with unprecedented applications. Here we report our recent studies of computational design of 2D materials for fuel cell applications which include hydrogen storage, CO2 capture, CO conversion and O2 reduction.

  7. Generating a 2D Representation of a Complex Data Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program, designed to assist in the development and debugging of other software, generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of a possibly complex n-dimensional (where n is an integer >2) data structure or abstract rank-n object in that other software. The nature of the 2D representation is such that it can be displayed on a non-graphical output device and distributed by non-graphical means.

  8. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  9. Deep Seismic Reflection Images of the Sumatra Seismic and Aseismic Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Hananto, N. D.; Chauhan, A.; Carton, H. D.; Midenet, S.; Djajadihardja, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is seismically most active region on the Earth, and has been the site of three great earthquakes only in the last four years. The first of the series, the 2004 Boxing Day earthquake, broke 1300 km of the plate boundary and produced the devastating tsunami around the Indian Ocean. The second great earthquake occurred three months later in March 2005, about 150 km SE of the 2004 event. The Earth waited for three years, and then broke again in September 2007 at 1300 km SE of the 2004 event producing a twin earthquake of magnitudes of 8.5 and 7.9 at an interval of 12 hours, leaving a seismic gap of about 600 km between the second and third earthquake, the Sumatra Seismic Gap. Seismological and geodetic studies suggest that this gap is fully locked and may break any time. In order to study the seismic and tsunami risk in this locked region, a deep seismic reflection survey (Tsunami Investigation Deep Evaluation Seismic -TIDES) was carried out in May 2009 using the CGGVeritas vessel Geowave Champion towing a 15 long streamer, the longest ever used during a seismic survey, to image the nature of the subducting plate and associated features, including the seismogenic zone, from seafloor down to 50 km depth. A total of 1700 km of deep seismic reflection data were acquired. Three dip lines traverse the Sumatra subduction zone; one going through the Sumatra Seismic Gap, one crossing the region that broke during the 2007 great earthquake, and one going through the aseismic zone. These three dip profiles should provide insight about the locking mechanism and help us to understand why an earthquake occurs in one zone and not in aseismic zone. A strike-line was shot in the forearc basin connecting the locked zone with broken zone profiles, which should provide insight about barriers that might have stopped propagation of 2007 earthquake rupture further northward.

  10. A subordinate status position increases the present value of financial resources for low 2D:4D men.

    PubMed

    Millet, Kobe; Dewitte, Siegfried

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that the ratio of the length of the 2nd and 4th fingers (digit ratio or 2D:4D) is related to prenatal testosterone with lower ratios thought to be influenced by higher prenatal testosterone levels. Accordingly, low 2D:4D has been associated to a number of fitness-related factors, such as high status in competitive sports and in music. Recent evidence suggests that 2D:4D is also related to economic decision making. We combine both streams of research in the present paper. In two studies we manipulated status in two different ways. We found that a subordinate position raises discount rates, consistent with the reasoning that the present utility of money is higher for men in this position. Moreover, the effect was more pronounced for men with a low 2D:4D. There was a significant negative relationship between 2D:4D and level of discounting in a subordinate status position, but no significant relationship emerged in the dominant status position. Our studies add evidence to the recent line of research associating digit ratio and economic decision making. Moreover, our studies show that future 2D:4D research should focus on plausible interactions between 2D:4D and context cues rather than on linear relations. PMID:17972318

  11. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  12. 3-D Autojuggie: Automating Deployment of Two-Dimensional Geophone Arrays for Efficient Ultra-Shallow Seismic-Reflection Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Steeples, D. W.; Czarnecki, G.; Sloan, S. D.; Eslick, R.

    2005-12-01

    Near-surface seismic reflection methods require dense spatial sampling of the wavefield. Seismic surveys imaging the top ten meters of the subsurface employ geophone spacing on the order of decimeters. Two-dimensional (2-D), ultra-shallow seismic reflection methods have increased in popularity. However, placement of geophones remains a labor-intensive deterrent to the acquisition of near-surface, 3-D seismic data. Although 3-D seismic imaging is a mature hydrocarbon-exploration technique, only a handful of 3-D shallow seismic surveys have been acquired over the last decade. We present the development and field-testing of instrumentation for automatic deployment of a 2-D array of 72 geophones for acquisition of ultra-shallow 3-D reflection seismic data, referred to as the 3-D Autojuggie. The main components of the instrumentation include: a) two vertically stacked rigid steel frames used for positioning, planting, and transporting an array of geophones; b) an hydraulically controlled mechanism for decoupling the geophones from the steel frames during seismic data recording; and c) a 2-D array of seventy-two 100 Hz Mark Products geophones with 20.32 cm long spikes, spaced 20 cm apart in the inline (12 geophones) and crossline (6 rows) orientation. Seismic noise testing (walkaways) conducted at The University of Kansas employing automatically planted 2-D geophone arrays next to conventional hand-planted geophones resulted in equivalent seismic imaging of the subsurface. The geophone planting instrumentation did not degrade the quality of the recorded wavefield. The efficiency of automatically placing a dense 2-D array of geophones on the ground and the ease of moving the array quickly to adjacent positions, along with the ability to acquire comparable quality data to conventional hand-planted geophones, indicate that the 3-D Autojuggie is a viable approach to ultra-shallow 3-D seismic acquisition. Conceptually, the design could accommodate an array of hundreds of

  13. Structure and seismic stratigraphy of deep Tertiary basins in the northern Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniest, Anouk; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Smit, Jeroen; Deschamps, Rémy; Hamon, Youri; Crombez, Vincent; Gorini, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Whereas active basin formation in the Aegean Sea is illustrated by seafloor bathymetry, the sedimentary and tectonic history of Tertiary basins is poorly known as existing offshore industrial seismic and well-log data are not easily accessible. We studied the evolution of the northern Aegean Sea with a focus on the North Aegean Trough and the Northern Skyros Basin, which are amongst the deepest basins of the northern Aegean domain. Structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of a 2D seismic dataset retrieved in the 1970's is combined with the well-investigated records of the onshore deep basins of northern Greece and Western Turkey. A general seismic signature chart was established using onshore basin stratigraphy and poorly-constrained well data. The studied domain shows two sharp unconformities that correspond to the Eocene-Oligocene transition and the Miocene-Pliocene shift, respectively. These transitions were then used as pillars for a more detailed structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation. A NW-SE trending seismic line that cross-cuts the southern part of the NE-SW-trending North Aegean Through displays the main features that are observed in the area: 1) an overall basin geometry that is rather symmetrical; 2) pre-Pliocene units affected by steep normal faults; 3) a rather constant thickness of Oligocene sediments that define a depocenter with an apparent NW-SE orientation; 4) an ablation of Miocene sediments by erosion, likely related to the Messinian Salinity Crises (MSC); (5) thick deltaic/turbiditic deposits in the NE-SW oriented central through of Neogene age; 6) trans-tensional growth patterns in Pliocene and Quaternary sediments that combine NE-SW steeply dipping fault zones, more likely corresponding to strike-slip corridors, and E-W-trending normal faults. The evidence listed above suggest that, in the northern Aegean Sea, (1) extension started at the latest during the Late Eocene/Early Oligocene (data quality does not allow for a

  14. High Resolution Seismic Reflection Survey for Coal Mine: fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khukhuudei, M.; Khukhuudei, U.

    2014-12-01

    High Resolution Seismic Reflection (HRSR) methods will become a more important tool to help unravel structures hosting mineral deposits at great depth for mine planning and exploration. Modern coal mining requires certainly about geological faults and structural features. This paper focuses on 2D Seismic section mapping results from an "Zeegt" lignite coal mine in the "Mongol Altai" coal basin, which required the establishment of major structure for faults and basement. HRSR method was able to detect subsurface faults associated with the major fault system. We have used numerical modeling in an ideal, noise free environment with homogenous layering to detect of faults. In a coal mining setting where the seismic velocity of the high ranges from 3000m/s to 3600m/s and the dominant seismic frequency is 100Hz, available to locate faults with a throw of 4-5m. Faults with displacements as seam thickness detected down to several hundred meter beneath the surface.

  15. Targeted infill drilling at Stratton field using 3-D seismic

    SciTech Connect

    Suydam, J.R.; Reitz, D.T.

    1994-12-31

    Stratton field is located on the Vicksburg flexure trend in Nueces and Kleberg Counties, South Texas. It has produced more than 2.8 Tcf of gas since 1937 from Frio fluvial/deltaic sandstones and Vicksburg shallow-marine sandstones. The field is a combination stratigraphic and faulted structural trap, and contains numerous highly compartmentalized sandstone reservoirs. Continuous infield drilling is required to keep the field producing, and 3-D seismic data have been used to select the best locations for these wells. In 1992, an 8-mi{sup 2} seismic survey was completed in the southern end of the field, and the resulting structural interpretation presented many more fault traps than were apparent in the 2-D seismic interpretation. So far, all of the new wells drilled within the survey have encountered untapped compartments enclosed by fault traps. Furthermore, fault cuts in the new wells have always been within 20 ft of the position predicted by seismic data.

  16. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): Status Report on U.S. Geological Survey Program Providing Access to Proprietary Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2005-05-01

    During the last four decades, hundreds of thousands of line kilometers of 2D marine seismic reflection data have been collected by the hydrocarbon exploration industry within the United States Exclusive Economic Zone. The commercial value of much of these data has decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and new technology such as 3D acquisition. However, these data still have tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes. The U.S. Geological Survey has recently made agreements with two commercial owners of large data holdings to transfer to the public domain over 250,000 line kilometers of marine data from off the eastern, western, and Alaskan coasts of the United States. In order to provide access to the data, the USGS has developed the National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) program. For a small fraction of the money that would be required to collect new data, work is underway to organize and recover digital data currently stored on tens of thousands of 9-track tapes. Even where new data collection efforts could be funded, current environmental restrictions on marine seismic exploration could preclude operations. The NAMSS web site at http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/NAMSS/ has trackline maps of surveys that are now or will soon be available for downloading in SEG-Y format. As more owners and users become aware of this new data resource, it is hoped that additional partners in will join this data rescue effort.

  17. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Sekino, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Tsukahara, H.; Shimura, T.

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology(MEXT) started the survey system development for Hydrothermal deposit. We proposed the Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS), the reflection seismic survey with vertical cable above seabottom. VCS has the following advantages for hydrothermal deposit survey. (1) VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey in limited area. (2) It achieves high-resolution image because the sensors are closely located to the target. (3) It avoids the coupling problems between sensor and seabottom that cause serious damage of seismic data quality. (4) Because of autonomous recording system on sea floor, various types of marine source are applicable with VCS such as sea-surface source (GI gun etc.) , deep-towed or ocean bottom source. Our first experiment of 2D/3D VCS surveys has been carried out in Lake Biwa, JAPAN, in November 2009. The 2D VCS data processing follows the walk-away VSP, including wave field separation and depth migration. Seismic Interferometry technique is also applied. The results give much clearer image than the conventional surface seismic. Prestack depth migration is applied to 3D data to obtain good quality 3D depth volume. Seismic Interferometry technique is applied to obtain the high resolution image in the very shallow zone. Based on the feasibility study, we have developed the autonomous recording VCS system and carried out the trial experiment in actual ocean at the water depth of about 400m to establish the procedures of deployment/recovery and to examine the VC position or fluctuation at seabottom. The result shows that the VC position is estimated with sufficient accuracy and very little fluctuation is observed. Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo took the research cruise NT11-02 on JAMSTEC R/V Natsushima in February, 2011. In the cruise NT11-02, JGI carried out the second VCS survey using the autonomous VCS recording system with the deep towed source provided by

  18. Development of ultra-fast 2D ion Doppler tomography using image intensified CMOS fast camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; Kuwahata, Akihiro; Yamanaka, Haruki; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; TS-group Team

    2015-11-01

    The world fastest novel time-resolved 2D ion Doppler tomography diagnostics has been developed using fast camera with high-speed gated image intensifier (frame rate: 200kfps. phosphor decay time: ~ 1 μ s). Time evolution of line-integrated spectra are diffracted from a f=1m, F/8.3 and g=2400L/mm Czerny-Turner polychromator, whose output is intensified and recorded to a high-speed camera with spectral resolution of ~0.005nm/pixel. The system can accommodate up to 36 (9 ×4) spatial points recorded at 5 μs time resolution, tomographic reconstruction is applied for the line-integrated spectra, time-resolved (5 μs/frame) local 2D ion temperature measurement has been achieved without any assumption of shot repeatability. Ion heating during intermittent reconnection event which tends to happen during high guide field merging tokamak was measured around diffusion region in UTST. The measured 2D profile shows ion heating inside the acceleration channel of reconnection outflow jet, stagnation point and downstream region where reconnected field forms thick closed flux surface as in MAST. Achieved maximum ion temperature increases as a function of Brec2 and shows good fit with MAST experiment, demonstrating promising CS-less startup scenario for spherical tokamak. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H05750 and 15K20921.

  19. 2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

    2007-10-17

    A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral

  20. Seismic Images of the Crust across D-E Seismic Profile (TS04-Tsujal Project): Results of Reflection and Wide-Angle Seismic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, D.; Lopez Ortiz, J. Y.; Bartolome, R.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Danobeitia, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Escudero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    As a part of TSUJAL Project (Crustal characterization of the Rivera Plate-Jalisco Block boundary and its implications for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment), a geophysical study has been carried out during February and March 2014 in western continental margin of Jalisco where seismic reflection, wide-angle seismic, bathymetry and potential fields (gravity and magnetism) data have been obtained. Eight land seismic stations vertical component and 4.5 Hz model TEXAN 125A (REFTEK), were deployed along an offshore-onshore seismic profile of 140 km length in SW-NE orientation. These stations registered, in continuous model, the airgun shots provided by RRS James Cook used for Multichannel Seismic Reflection data acquisition every 50 m of distance interval and total capacity of 5800 ci along seismic profile D-E (TS04). In the onshore region, these stations were deployed every 20 km from Pérula to Nacastillo (Jalisco, Mexico). The study region corresponds to onshore-offshore line limited by (18o 54'N, 105o 59'W) (19o 26'N, 105o7'W) coordinates. In this work, seismic images of the crust along a deep seismic profile of 140 km length are presented. These images provide new cortical information about the southern part of Rivera Plate, continental accretionary wedge and first kilometers of Jalisco Block continental zone.

  1. Angola Seismicity MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  2. Seismic vulnerability assessments in risk analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolova, Nina; Larionov, Valery; Bonnin, Jean; Ugarov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of seismic vulnerability is a critical issue within natural and technological risk analysis. In general, there are three common types of methods used for development of vulnerability functions of different elements at risk: empirical, analytical and expert estimations. The paper addresses the empirical methods for seismic vulnerability estimation for residential buildings and industrial facilities. The results of engineering analysis of past earthquake consequences, as well as the statistical data on buildings behavior during strong earthquakes presented in the different seismic intensity scales, are used to verify the regional parameters of mathematical models in order to simulate physical and economic vulnerability for different building types classified according to seismic scale MMSK-86. Verified procedure has been used to estimate the physical and economic vulnerability of buildings and constructions against earthquakes for the Northern Caucasus Federal region of the Russian Federation and Krasnodar area, which are characterized by rather high level of seismic activity and high population density. In order to estimate expected damage states to buildings and constructions in the case of the earthquakes according to the OSR-97B (return period T=1,000 years) within big cities and towns, they were divided into unit sites and their coordinates were presented as dots located in the centers of unit sites. Then the indexes obtained for each unit site were summed up. The maps of physical vulnerability zoning for Northern Caucasus Federal region of the Russian Federation and Krasnodar area includes two elements: percent of different damage states for settlements with number of inhabitants less than 1,000 and vulnerability for cities and towns with number of inhabitants more than 1,000. The hypsometric scale is used to represent both elements on the maps. Taking into account the size of oil pipe line systems located in the highly active seismic zones in

  3. New constraints on the magmatic system beneath Newberry Volcano from the analysis of active and passive source seismic data, and ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, B.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic systems beneath arc-volcanoes are often poorly resolved by seismic imaging due to the small spatial scale and large magnitude of crustal heterogeneity in combination with field experiments that sparsely sample the wavefield. Here we report on our continued analysis of seismic data from a line of densely-spaced (~300 m), three-component seismometers installed on Newberry Volcano in central Oregon for ~3 weeks; the array recorded an explosive shot, ~20 teleseismic events, and ambient noise. By jointly inverting both active and passive-source travel time data, the resulting tomographic image reveals a more detailed view of the presumed rhyolitic magma chamber at ~3-5 km depth, previously imaged by Achauer et al. (1988) and Beachly et al. (2012). The magma chamber is elongated perpendicular to the trend of extensional faulting and encircled by hypocenters of small (M < 2) earthquakes located by PNSN. We also model teleseismic waveforms using a 2-D synthetic seismogram code to recreate anomalous amplitudes observed in the P-wave coda for sites within the caldera. Autocorrelation of ambient noise data also reveals large amplitude waveforms for a small but spatially grouped set of stations, also located within the caldera. On the basis of these noise observations and 2-D synthetic models, which both require slow seismic speeds at depth, we conclude that our tomographic model underestimates low-velocity anomalies associated with the inferred crustal magma chamber; this is due in large part to wavefront healing, which reduces observed travel time anomalies, and regularization constraints, which minimize model perturbations. Only by using various methods that interrogate different aspects of the seismic data are we able to more realistically constrain the complicated, heterogeneous volcanic system. In particular, modeling of waveform characteristics provides a better measure of the spatial scale and magnitude of crustal velocities near magmatic systems.

  4. The first astrophysical detection, terahertz spectrum, and database for the monodeuterated species of methyl formate HCOOCH{sub 2}D

    SciTech Connect

    Coudert, L. H.; Drouin, B. J.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.

    2013-12-20

    Based on new measurements carried out in the laboratory from 0.77 to 1.2 THz and on a line-frequency analysis of these new data, along with previously published data, we build a line list for HCOOCH{sub 2}D that leads to its first detection in the Orion KL nebula. The observed lines, both in space and in the laboratory, involve the cis D-in-plane and trans D-out-of-plane conformations of HCOOCH{sub 2}D and the two tunneling states arising from the large-amplitude motion connecting the two trans configurations. The model used in the line position calculation accounts for both cis and trans conformations, as well as the large-amplitude motion.

  5. Breakthroughs in Seismic and Borehole Characterization of Basalt Sequestration Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E. C.; Hardage, Bob A.; McGrail, B. Peter; Davis, Klarissa N.

    2011-04-01

    Mafic continental flood basalts form a globally important, but under-characterized CO2 sequestration target. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the northwestern U.S. is up to 5 km thick and covers over 168,000 km2. In India, flood basalts are 3 km thick and cover greater than 500,000 km2. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the CRBG and other basalts react with formation water and super critical (sc) CO2 to precipitate carbonates, thus adding a potential mineral trapping mechanism to the standard trapping mechanisms of most other types of CO2 sequestration reservoirs. Brecciated tops of individual basalt flows in the CRBG form regional aquifers that locally have greater than 30% porosity and three Darcies of permeability. Porous flow tops are potential sites for sequestration of gigatons of scCO2 in areas where the basalts contain unpotable water and are at depths greater than 800 m. In this paper we report on the U.S. DOE Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership surface seismic and borehole geophysical characterization that supports a field test of capacity, integrity, and geochemical reactivity of CRBG reservoirs in eastern Washington, U.S.A. Traditional surface seismic methods have had little success in imaging basalt features in on-shore areas where the basalt is thinly covered by sediment. Processing of the experimental 6.5 km, 5 line 3C seismic swath included constructing an elastic wavefield model, identifying and separating seismic wave modes, and processing the swath as a single 2D line. Important findings include: (1) a wide variety of shear wave energy modes swamp the P-wave seismic records; (2) except at very short geophone offsets, ground roll overprints P-wave signal; and (3) because of extreme velocity contrasts, P-wave events are refracted at incidence angles greater than 7-15 degrees. Subsequent removal of S-wave and other noise during processing resulted in tremendous improvement in image quality. The application of wireline

  6. Seismic structure at the Kairei Hydrothermal vent field near the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, H.; Sato, T.; Imai, Y.; Mori, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Kono, A.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.

    2014-12-01

    Central Indian Ridge is located at the north of the Rodriguez Triple Junction and shows slow-intermediate spreading rate. The Kairei hydrothermal Field (KHF) was discovered in the first segment of Central Indian Ridge near the Rodriguez Triple Junction. The vent fluid which is extruding at the KHF has higher H2 content compared with other hydrothermal vent fluid in the world. Although The KHF itself exists above a basaltic rock massif, gabbro and mafic rocks were discovered on the seafloor around the KHF. These deep-seated rocks may contribute to the high H2concentration of the Kairei vent fluid .To understand how gabbro and mafic rocks are uplifted and exhumed on the seafloor, we conducted a seismic refraction/reflection survey using ocean bottom seismograms (OBSs). We conducted the seismic refraction/reflection survey from January 27 to March 19 in 2013 using S/V Yokosuka of Jamstec. In the experiment, we used 21 OBSs, an air gun (G.I.gun) and a single channel steamer cable. We obtained 5 survey lines NNW-SSE direction parallel to the ridge axis, 5 lines E-W direction and 5 lines NNE-SSW direction. In addition to these lines, we acquired other 5 lines passing through the point above the KHF or Yokoniwa Rise, which is the north of the KHF. In analysis of refraction data, firstly, we estimated 2D velocity model under survey lines, which are parallel to the ridge axis, using the progressive model development method developed by Sato and Kennett (2000). Then, we constructed a 3D initial model and run the 3D tomographic method developed by Zelt and Barton (1998). The 1D velocity profile of the KHF seems to be similar to that of mid ocean ridges such as Mid Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise. Seismic velocities under the KHF and Yokoniwa Rise reach about 6km/s at depth of 1~2 km below seafloor, probably indicating uplift of deep-seated rocks. In this presentation we will show 3D seismic structure of this area.

  7. Whole‐exome sequencing defines the mutational landscape of pheochromocytoma and identifies KMT2D as a recurrently mutated gene

    PubMed Central

    Stenman, Adam; Haglund, Felix; Clark, Victoria E.; Brown, Taylor C.; Baranoski, Jacob; Bilguvar, Kaya; Goh, Gerald; Welander, Jenny; Svahn, Fredrika; Rubinstein, Jill C.; Caramuta, Stefano; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat; Bäckdahl, Martin; Gimm, Oliver; Söderkvist, Peter; Prasad, Manju L.; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    As subsets of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) lack a defined molecular etiology, we sought to characterize the mutational landscape of PCCs to identify novel gene candidates involved in disease development. A discovery cohort of 15 PCCs wild type for mutations in PCC susceptibility genes underwent whole‐exome sequencing, and an additional 83 PCCs served as a verification cohort for targeted sequencing of candidate mutations. A low rate of nonsilent single nucleotide variants (SNVs) was detected (6.1/sample). Somatic HRAS and EPAS1 mutations were observed in one case each, whereas the remaining 13 cases did not exhibit variants in established PCC genes. SNVs aggregated in apoptosis‐related pathways, and mutations in COSMIC genes not previously reported in PCCs included ZAN, MITF, WDTC1, and CAMTA1. Two somatic mutations and one constitutional variant in the well‐established cancer gene lysine (K)‐specific methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D, MLL2) were discovered in one sample each, prompting KMT2D screening using focused exome‐sequencing in the verification cohort. An additional 11 PCCs displayed KMT2D variants, of which two were recurrent. In total, missense KMT2D variants were found in 14 (11 somatic, two constitutional, one undetermined) of 99 PCCs (14%). Five cases displayed somatic mutations in the functional FYR/SET domains of KMT2D, constituting 36% of all KMT2D‐mutated PCCs. KMT2D expression was upregulated in PCCs compared to normal adrenals, and KMT2D overexpression positively affected cell migration in a PCC cell line. We conclude that KMT2D represents a recurrently mutated gene with potential implication for PCC development. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26032282

  8. Seismic Waves, 4th order accurate

    2013-08-16

    SW4 is a program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel computers. SW4 colves the seismic wave equations in Cartesian corrdinates. It is therefore appropriate for regional simulations, where the curvature of the earth can be neglected. SW4 implements a free surface boundary condition on a realistic topography, absorbing super-grid conditions on the far-field boundaries, and a kinematic source model consisting of point force and/or point moment tensor source terms. SW4 supports a fully 3-Dmore » heterogeneous material model that can be specified in several formats. SW4 can output synthetic seismograms in an ASCII test format, or in the SAC finary format. It can also present simulation information as GMT scripts, whixh can be used to create annotated maps. Furthermore, SW4 can output the solution as well as the material model along 2-D grid planes.« less

  9. Seismic Waves, 4th order accurate

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-16

    SW4 is a program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel computers. SW4 colves the seismic wave equations in Cartesian corrdinates. It is therefore appropriate for regional simulations, where the curvature of the earth can be neglected. SW4 implements a free surface boundary condition on a realistic topography, absorbing super-grid conditions on the far-field boundaries, and a kinematic source model consisting of point force and/or point moment tensor source terms. SW4 supports a fully 3-D heterogeneous material model that can be specified in several formats. SW4 can output synthetic seismograms in an ASCII test format, or in the SAC finary format. It can also present simulation information as GMT scripts, whixh can be used to create annotated maps. Furthermore, SW4 can output the solution as well as the material model along 2-D grid planes.

  10. Automatic computation of 2D cardiac measurements from B-mode echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, JinHyeong; Feng, Shaolei; Zhou, S. Kevin

    2012-03-01

    We propose a robust and fully automatic algorithm which computes the 2D echocardiography measurements recommended by America Society of Echocardiography. The algorithm employs knowledge-based imaging technologies which can learn the expert's knowledge from the training images and expert's annotation. Based on the models constructed from the learning stage, the algorithm searches initial location of the landmark points for the measurements by utilizing heart structure of left ventricle including mitral valve aortic valve. It employs the pseudo anatomic M-mode image generated by accumulating the line images in 2D parasternal long axis view along the time to refine the measurement landmark points. The experiment results with large volume of data show that the algorithm runs fast and is robust comparable to expert.

  11. Submillimeter laboratory identification of CH{sup +} and CH{sub 2}D{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, T.

    2015-01-22

    Laboratory identification of two basic and important interstellar molecular ions is presented. The J = 1 - 0 rotational transition of {sup 12}CH{sup +} together with those of {sup 13}CH{sup +} and {sup 12}CD{sup +} was observed in the laboratory. The newly obtained frequencies were found to be different from those reported previously. Various experimental evidences firmly support the new measurements. In addition, the Zeeman effect and the spin-rotation hyperfine interaction enforce the laboratory identification with no ambiguity. Rotational lines of CH{sub 2}D{sup +} were observed in the submillimeter-wave region. This laboratory observation is consistent with a recent tentative identification of CH{sub 2}D{sup +} toward Ori IRc2.

  12. Growth and Characterization of Silicon at the 2D Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannix, Andrew; Kiraly, Brian; Hersam, Mark; Guisinger, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Because bulk silicon has dominated the development of microelectronics over the past 50 years, the recent interest in two-dimensional (2D) materials (e.g., graphene, MoS2, phosphorene, etc.) naturally raises questions regarding the growth and properties of silicon at the 2D limit. Utilizing atomic-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we have investigated the 2D limits of silicon growth on Ag(111). In agreement with previous reports of sp2-bonded silicene phases, we observe the temperature-dependent evolution of ordered 2D phases. However, we attribute these to apparent Ag-Si surface alloys. At sufficiently high silicon coverage, we observe the precipitation of crystalline, sp3-bonded Si(111) domains. These domains are capped with a √3 honeycomb phase that is indistinguishable from the silver-induced √3 honeycomb-chained-trimer reconstruction on bulk Si(111). Further ex-situcharacterization with Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that these sheets are ultrathin sheets of bulk-like, (111) oriented, sp3 silicon. Even at the 2D limit, scanning tunneling spectroscopy shows that these silicon nanosheets exhibit semiconducting electronic characteristics.

  13. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future. PMID:27506268

  14. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  15. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  16. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.

  17. Phosphorene: A New High-Mobility 2D Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Neal, Adam; Zhu, Zhen; Tomanek, David; Ye, Peide

    2014-03-01

    The rise of 2D crystals has opened various possibilities for future electrical and optical applications. MoS2 n-type transistors are showing great potential in ultra-scaled and low-power electronics. Here, we introduce phosphorene, a name we coined for 2D few-layer black phosphorus, a new 2D material with layered structure. We perform ab initio band structure calculations and show that the fundamental band gap depends sensitively on the number of layers. We observe transport behavior, which shows a mobility variation in the 2D plane. High on-current of 194 mA/mm, high hole mobility up to 286 cm2/V .s and on/off ratio up to 104 was achieved with phosphorene transistors at room temperature. Schottky barrier height at the metal/phosphorene interface was also measured as a function of temperature. We demonstrate a CMOS inverter with combination to MoS2 NMOS transistors, which shows great potential for semiconducting 2D crystals in future electronic, optoelectronic and flexible electronic devices.

  18. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  19. Seismic signal of avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, Damiano; Ravanat, Xavier; Thibert, Emmanuel

    2010-05-01

    The characterization of avalanches with seismic signals is an important task. For risk mitigation, estimating remotely avalanche activity by means of seismic signals is a good alternative to direct observations that are often limited by visual conditions and observer's availability. In seismology, the main challenge is to discriminate avalanche signals within the natural earth seismic activity and background noise. Some anthropogenic low frequency (infra-sound) sources like helicopters also generate seismic signals. In order to characterize an avalanche seismic signal, a 3-axis broad band seismometer (Guralp 3T) has been set-up on a real scale avalanche test site in Lautaret (France). The sensor is located in proximity of 2 avalanche paths where avalanches can be artificially released. Preliminary results of seismic records are presented, correlated with avalanche physical parameters (volume released, velocity, energy).

  20. Unique seismic controlled sources: Using the demolition of smelter tower stacks and the City Hall in El Paso,TX for a seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montana, C. J.; Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Kaip, G.; Velasco, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    On April 13, 2013 the city of El Paso, TX demolished two old smelter smoke stacks leftover from the smelting days of ASARCO and the following day, demolished the City Hall building. These two events provided a unique opportunity to utilize two complex (demolition of two smoke stack towers plus a sequence of explosions at source site 1 and a sequence of explosions and the demolition of a building at source site 2) seismic sources to provide information about the uppermost subsurface of the surrounding areas of the City of El Paso. We deployed an array of 46 seismographs (Reftek Texans) connected to 4 Hz geophones along 3 survey lines: a NW to SE line extending from the ASARCO smokestacks site through City Hall and extending to a station location near the border (providing a revered profile); a W to E line extending from the ASARCO smoke stack location towards an end point in central El Paso; and a SSW to NNE line from City Hall towards a station location adjacent to the Franklin Mountains Mountain Range. The maximum source to receiver offset is over 5 km. The seismographs where deployed in an urban setting resulting in a challenging deployment in terms of security and integrity of the instruments. The recording mode was set to continuous from several hours before the stacks demolition to several hours after the City Hall building demolition. The data acquired is rich with many phases recorded. The main towers impact is clearly recorded along the length of all lines even though it was at the longest offset. The City Hall demolition site is located at a more central position that made it easier to be recorded. The complexity of the sources will require extensive signal processing to separate and determine specific phases. We will be using the line to develop a preliminary 2-D velocity model, which will be used to identify any faults and other geological structures buried beneath the deep river sediments near downtown El Paso.

  1. 2D and 3D Histioid Disclination Networks in Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Miao; Guo, Yubing; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Wei, Qi-Huo

    Topological defects and disclination lines are of both fundamental interest and practical importance. In this paper, we will show that periodic/non-periodic 2D/3D networks of disclination lines can be created in nematic liquid crystal cells by setting well-designed alignment patterns at the top and bottom substrate surfaces. The desired complex patterns of liquid crystal molecular alignments at the substrates are obtained using a projection photoalignment technique based on plasmonic metamasks. The designs of alignment patterns and their resulting disclination line networks will be presented. These designable topological networks represent a new kind of artificial materials which could be of useful for directing colloidal and molecular assembly. National Science Foundation CMMI-1436565.

  2. High-resolution seismic array imaging using teleseismic scattered waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, P.; Liu, Q.; Chen, C.; Basini, P.; Komatitsch, D.

    2013-12-01

    The advent of dense seismic networks, new modeling and imaging techniques, and increased HPC capacity makes it feasible to resolve subsurface interfaces and structural anomalies beneath seismic arrays at unprecedented details based on teleseismic scattered records. To accurately and efficiently simulate the full propagation of teleseismic waves beneath receiver arrays at the frequencies relevant to scattering imaging, we develop a hybrid method that interfaces a frequency-wavenumber (FK) calculation, which provides semi-analytical solutions to one-dimensional layered background models, with a 2D/3D spectral-element (SEM) numerical solver to calculate synthetic responses of local media to plane-wave incidence. This hybrid method accurately deals with local heterogeneities and discontinuity undulations, and represents an efficient tool for the forward modelling of teleseismic coda (including converted and scattered) waves. Meanwhile, adjoint tomography is a powerful tool for high-resolution imaging in heterogeneous media, which can resolve large velocity contrasts through the use of 2D/3D initial models and full numerical simulations for forward wavefields and sensitivity kernels. In the framework of adjont tomography and hybrid method, we compute sensitivity kernels for teleseismic coda waves, which provide the basis for mapping variations in subsurface discontinuities, density and velocity structures through nonlinear conjugate-gradient methods. Various 2D synthetic imaging examples show that inversion of teleseismic coda phases based on the 2D SEM-FK hybrid method and adjoint techniques is a promising tool for structural imaging beneath dense seismic arrays. 3D synthetic experiments will be performed to test the feasibility of seismic array imaging using adjoint method and 3D SEM-FK hybrid method. We will also apply this hybrid imaging techniques to realistic seismic data, such as the recorded SsPmP phases in central Tibet, to explore high-resolution subsurface

  3. Mapping Europe's Seismic Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardini, Domenico; Wössner, Jochen; Danciu, Laurentiu

    2014-07-01

    From the rift that cuts through the heart of Iceland to the complex tectonic convergence that causes frequent and often deadly earthquakes in Italy, Greece, and Turkey to the volcanic tremors that rattle the Mediterranean, seismic activity is a prevalent and often life-threatening reality across Europe. Any attempt to mitigate the seismic risk faced by society requires an accurate estimate of the seismic hazard.

  4. 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulates miRNA expression in human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingyu; Hu, Qiang; Luo, Wei; Pratt, Rachel N; Glenn, Sean T; Liu, Song; Trump, Donald L; Johnson, Candace S

    2015-04-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and eighth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Epidemiological and experimental studies strongly suggest a role for 1α,25(OH)2D3 in cancer prevention and treatment. The antitumor activities of 1α,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and the inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis. miRNAs play important regulatory roles in cancer development and progression. However, the role of 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the regulation of miRNA expression and the potential impact in bladder cancer has not been investigated. Therefore, we studied 1α,25(OH)2D3-regulated miRNA expression profiles in human bladder cancer cell line 253J and the highly tumorigenic and metastatic derivative line 253J-BV by miRNA qPCR panels. 253J and 253J-BV cells express endogenous vitamin D receptor (VDR), which can be further induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. VDR target gene 24-hydroxylase was induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3 in both cell lines, indicating functional 1α,25(OH)2D3 signaling. The miRNA qPCR panel assay results showed that 253J and 253J-BV cells have distinct miRNA expression profiles. Further, 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulated miRNA expression profiles in 253J and 253J-BV cells in a dynamic manner. Pathway analysis of the miRNA target genes revealed distinct patterns of contribution to the molecular functions and biological processes in the two cell lines. In conclusion, 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulates the expression of miRNAs, which may contribute to distinct biological functions, in human bladder 253J and 253J-BV cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:25263658

  5. A 2D simulation model for urban flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Roland; van der Wielen, Jonathan; Velickov, Slavco; Galvao, Diogo

    2014-05-01

    The European Floods Directive, which came into force on 26 November 2007, requires member states to assess all their water courses and coast lines for risk of flooding, to map flood extents and assets and humans at risk, and to take adequate and coordinated measures to reduce the flood risk in consultation with the public. Flood Risk Management Plans are to be in place by 2015. There are a number of reasons for the promotion of this Directive, not least because there has been much urban and other infrastructural development in flood plains, which puts many at risk of flooding along with vital societal assets. In addition there is growing awareness that the changing climate appears to be inducing more frequent extremes of rainfall with a consequent increases in the frequency of flooding. Thirdly, the growing urban populations in Europe, and especially in the developing countries, means that more people are being put at risk from a greater frequency of urban flooding in particular. There are urgent needs therefore to assess flood risk accurately and consistently, to reduce this risk where it is important to do so or where the benefit is greater than the damage cost, to improve flood forecasting and warning, to provide where necessary (and possible) flood insurance cover, and to involve all stakeholders in decision making affecting flood protection and flood risk management plans. Key data for assessing risk are water levels achieved or forecasted during a flood. Such levels should of course be monitored, but they also need to be predicted, whether for design or simulation. A 2D simulation model (PriceXD) solving the shallow water wave equations is presented specifically for determining flood risk, assessing flood defense schemes and generating flood forecasts and warnings. The simulation model is required to have a number of important properties: -Solve the full shallow water wave equations using a range of possible solutions; -Automatically adjust the time step and

  6. 2D materials for photon conversion and nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.

    2015-09-01

    The field of two-dimensional (2D) materials has the potential to enable unique applications across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. While 2D-layered materials hold promise for next-generation photon-conversion intrinsic limitations and challenges exist that shall be overcome. Here we discuss the intrinsic limitations as well as application opportunities of this new class of materials, and is sponsored by the NSF program Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future (DMREF) program, which links to the President's Materials Genome Initiative. We present general material-related details for photon conversion, and show that taking advantage of the mechanical flexibility of 2D materials by rolling MoS2/graphene/hexagonal boron nitride stack to a spiral solar cell allows for solar absorption up to 90%.

  7. Perception-based reversible watermarking for 2D vector maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Chaoguang; Cao, Liujuan; Li, Xiang

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an effective and reversible watermarking approach for digital copyright protection of 2D-vector maps. To ensure that the embedded watermark is insensitive for human perception, we only select the noise non-sensitive regions for watermark embedding by estimating vertex density within each polyline. To ensure the exact recovery of original 2D-vector map after watermark extraction, we introduce a new reversible watermarking scheme based on reversible high-frequency wavelet coefficients modification. Within the former-selected non-sensitive regions, our watermarking operates on the lower-order vertex coordinate decimals with integer wavelet transform. Such operation further reduces the visual distortion caused by watermark embedding. We have validated the effectiveness of our scheme on our real-world city river/building 2D-vector maps. We give extensive experimental comparisons with state-of-the-art methods, including embedding capability, invisibility, and robustness over watermark attacking.

  8. Graphene based 2D-materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniselvam, Thangavelu; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-09-01

    Ever-increasing energy demands and the depletion of fossil fuels are compelling humanity toward the development of suitable electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices to attain a more sustainable society with adequate renewable energy and zero environmental pollution. In this regard, supercapacitors are being contemplated as potential energy storage devices to afford cleaner, environmentally friendly energy. Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, including 2D graphene and its inorganic analogues (transition metal double layer hydroxides, chalcogenides, etc), as potential electrodes for the development of supercapacitors with high electrochemical performance. This review provides an overview of the recent progress in using these graphene-based 2D materials as potential electrodes for supercapacitors. In addition, future research trends including notable challenges and opportunities are also discussed.

  9. Simultaneous 2D Strain Sensing Using Polymer Planar Bragg Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Manuel; Eisenbeil, Waltraud; Schmauss, Bernhard; Hellmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polymer planar Bragg gratings for multi-axial strain sensing and particularly highlight simultaneous 2D strain measurement. A polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) fabricated with a single writing step in bulk polymethylmethacrylate is used for measuring both tensile and compressive strain at various angles. It is shown that the sensitivity of the PPBG strongly depends on the angle between the optical waveguide into which the grating is inscribed and the direction along which the mechanical load is applied. Additionally, a 2D PPBG fabricated by writing two Bragg gratings angularly displaced from each other into a single polymer platelet is bonded to a stainless steel plate. The two reflected wavelengths exhibit different sensitivities while tested toward tensile and compressive strain. These characteristics make 2D PPBG suitable for measuring multi-axial tensile and compressive strain. PMID:25686313

  10. Simultaneous 2D strain sensing using polymer planar Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Manuel; Eisenbeil, Waltraud; Schmauss, Bernhard; Hellmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polymer planar Bragg gratings for multi-axial strain sensing and particularly highlight simultaneous 2D strain measurement. A polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) fabricated with a single writing step in bulk polymethylmethacrylate is used for measuring both tensile and compressive strain at various angles. It is shown that the sensitivity of th