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Sample records for 2d shallow water

  1. Conservation laws and LETKF with 2D Shallow Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yuefei; Janjic, Tijana

    2016-04-01

    Numerous approaches have been proposed to maintain physical conservation laws in the numerical weather prediction models. However, to achieve a reliable prediction, adequate initial conditions are also necessary, which are produced by a data assimilation algorithm. If an ensemble Kalman filters (EnKF) is used for this purpose, it has been shown that it could yield unphysical analysis ensemble that for example violates principles of mass conservation and positivity preservation (e.g. Janjic et al 2014) . In this presentation, we discuss the selection of conservation criteria for the analysis step, and start with testing the conservation of mass, energy and enstrophy. The simple experiments deal with nonlinear shallow water equations and simulated observations that are assimilated with LETKF (Localized Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter, Hunt et al. 2007). The model is discretized in a specific way to conserve mass, angular momentum, energy and enstrophy. The effects of the data assimilation on the conserved quantities (of mass, energy and enstrophy) depend on observation covarage, localization radius, observed variable and observation operator. Having in mind that Arakawa (1966) and Arakawa and Lamb (1977) showed that the conservation of both kinetic energy and enstrophy by momentum advection schemes in the case of nondivergent flow prevents systematic and unrealistic energy cascade towards high wave numbers, a cause of excessive numerical noise and possible eventual nonlinear instability, we test the effects on prediction depending on the type of errors in the initial condition. The performance with respect to nonlinear energy cascade is assessed as well.

  2. Evaluation of 2D shallow-water model for spillway flow with a complex geometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the two-dimensional (2D) shallow water model is formulated based on several assumptions such as hydrostatic pressure distribution and vertical velocity is negligible, as a simple alternative to the complex 3D model, it has been used to compute water flows in which these assumptions may be ...

  3. A multispeed Discrete Boltzmann Model for transcritical 2D shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rocca, Michele; Montessori, Andrea; Prestininzi, Pietro; Succi, Sauro

    2015-03-01

    In this work a Discrete Boltzmann Model for the solution of transcritical 2D shallow water flows is presented and validated. In order to provide the model with transcritical capabilities, a particular multispeed velocity set has been employed for the discretization of the Boltzmann equation. It is shown that this particular set naturally yields a simple and closed procedure to determine higher order equilibrium distribution functions needed to simulate transcritical flow. The model is validated through several classical benchmarks and is proven to correctly and accurately simulate both 1D and 2D transitions between the two flow regimes.

  4. On Classical Solutions to 2D Shallow Water Equations with Degenerate Viscosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yachun; Pan, Ronghua; Zhu, Shengguo

    2016-07-01

    2D shallow water equations have degenerate viscosities proportional to surface height, which vanishes in many physical considerations, say, when the initial total mass, or energy are finite. Such a degeneracy is a highly challenging obstacle for development of well-posedness theory, even local-in-time theory remains open for a long time. In this paper, we will address this open problem with some new perspectives, independent of the celebrated BD-entropy (Bresch et al in Commun Math Phys 238:211-223, 2003, Commun Part Differ Eqs 28:843-868, 2003, Analysis and Simulation of Fluid Dynamics, 2007). After exploring some interesting structures of most models of 2D shallow water equations, we introduced a proper notion of solution class, called regular solutions, and identified a class of initial data with finite total mass and energy, and established the local-in-time well-posedness of this class of smooth solutions. The theory is applicable to most relatively physical shallow water models, broader than those with BD-entropy structures. We remark that our theory is on the local strong solutions, while the BD entropy is an essential tool for the global weak solutions. Later, a Beale-Kato-Majda type blow-up criterion is also established. This paper is mainly based on our early preprint (Li et al. in 2D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with degenerate viscosities and far field vacuum, preprint. arXiv:1407.8471, 2014).

  5. On the assimilation of flood extension images into 2D shallow-water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Couderc, F.; Dartus, D.; Madec, R.; Vila, J.

    2012-12-01

    In river hydraulics, assimilation of water level measurements at gauging stations is well controlled, while assimilation of images (e.g. from satellite) is still delicate. In the present talk, we address the richness of satellite information to constraint a 2D shallow-water model, and present also related difficulties. A preliminary study done on Mosel river is presented in [LaMo] [HoLaMoPu]. On selected parts of the image, an 0th order model flow allows to obtain some reliable water levels with quantified uncertainties (C. Puech et al.). Next, variationnal sensitivities (based on a gradient computation and adjoint equations) reveal some difficulties that a model designer have to tackle (e.g. roughness parameters at open boundaries), and allow to better understand both the model and the flow. Next, a variational data assimilation algorithm (4D-var) shows that such data lead to a better calibration of the model (e.g. roughness coefficients) and potentially allows to identify the incoming and/or outgoing flow at open boundaries, [LaMo] [HoLaMoPu]. On the other side, the flood dynamic extension is difficult to represent accurately using a 2D SW model since the wet-dry front dynamics is difficult to compute. We compare some 2nd order finite volume solvers and obtain an accurate and stable scheme at wet-dry front. Then, we present some basic rules of compatibility between data and mesh resolution in order to be reliable enough to constraint the model with flood extension data, [CoMaMoViDa]. All the algorithms are implemented into DassFlow software (Fortran, MPI, adjoint) [Da]. [CoMaMoViDa] F. Couderc, R. Madec, J. Monnier, J.-P. Vila, D. Dartus. "Sensitivity analysis and variational data assimilation for geophysical shallow water flows". Submitted. [Da] DassFlow - Data Assimilation for Free Surface Flows. Open-source computational software http://www-gmm.insa-toulouse.fr/~monnier/DassFlow/ [HoLaMoPu] R. Hostache, X. Lai, J. Monnier, C. Puech. "Assimilation of spatial

  6. Modeling floods in a dense urban area using 2D shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignot, E.; Paquier, A.; Haider, S.

    2006-07-01

    SummaryA code solving the 2D shallow water equations by an explicit second-order scheme is used to simulate the severe October 1988 flood in the Richelieu urban locality of the French city of Nîmes. A reference calculation using a detailed description of the street network and of the cross-sections of the streets, considering impervious residence blocks and neglecting the flow interaction with the sewer network provides a mean peak water elevation 0.13 m lower than the measured flood marks with a standard deviation between the measured and computed water depths of 0.53 m. Sensitivity analysis of various topographical and numerical parameters shows that globally, the results keep the same level of accuracy, which reflects both the stability of the calculation method and the smoothening of results. However, the local flow modifications due to change of parameter values can drastically modify the local water depths, especially when the local flow regime is modified. Furthermore, the flow distribution to the downstream parts of the city can be altered depending on the set of parameters used. Finally, a second event, the 2002 flood, was simulated with the calibrated model providing results similar to 1988 flood calculation. Thus, the article shows that, after calibration, a 2D model can be used to help planning mitigation measures in a dense urban area.

  7. On the assimilation of SWOT type data into 2D shallow-water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frédéric, Couderc; Denis, Dartus; Pierre-André, Garambois; Ronan, Madec; Jérôme, Monnier; Jean-Paul, Villa

    2013-04-01

    In river hydraulics, assimilation of water level measurements at gauging stations is well controlled, while assimilation of images is still delicate. In the present talk, we address the richness of satellite mapped information to constrain a 2D shallow-water model, but also related difficulties. 2D shallow models may be necessary for small scale modelling in particular for low-water and flood plain flows. Since in both cases, the dynamics of the wet-dry front is essential, one has to elaborate robust and accurate solvers. In this contribution we introduce robust second order, stable finite volume scheme [CoMaMoViDaLa]. Comparisons of real like tests cases with more classical solvers highlight the importance of an accurate flood plain modelling. A preliminary inverse study is presented in a flood plain flow case, [LaMo] [HoLaMoPu]. As a first step, a 0th order data processing model improves observation operator and produces more reliable water level derived from rough measurements [PuRa]. Then, both model and flow behaviours can be better understood thanks to variational sensitivities based on a gradient computation and adjoint equations. It can reveal several difficulties that a model designer has to tackle. Next, a 4D-Var data assimilation algorithm used with spatialized data leads to improved model calibration and potentially leads to identify river discharges. All the algorithms are implemented into DassFlow software (Fortran, MPI, adjoint) [Da]. All these results and experiments (accurate wet-dry front dynamics, sensitivities analysis, identification of discharges and calibration of model) are currently performed in view to use data from the future SWOT mission. [CoMaMoViDaLa] F. Couderc, R. Madec, J. Monnier, J.-P. Vila, D. Dartus, K. Larnier. "Sensitivity analysis and variational data assimilation for geophysical shallow water flows". Submitted. [Da] DassFlow - Data Assimilation for Free Surface Flows. Computational software http

  8. Application of 2D-Nonlinear Shallow Water Model of Tsunami by using Adomian Decomposition Method

    SciTech Connect

    Waewcharoen, Sribudh; Boonyapibanwong, Supachai; Koonprasert, Sanoe

    2008-09-01

    One of the most important questions in tsunami modeling is the estimation of tsunami run-up heights at different points along a coastline. Methods for numerical simulation of tsunami wave propagation in deep and shallow seas are well developed and have been widely used by many scientists (2001-2008). In this paper, we consider a two-dimensional nonlinear shallow water model of tsunami given by Tivon Jacobson is work [1]. u{sub t}+uu{sub x}+{nu}u{sub y} -c{sup 2}(h{sub x}+(h{sub b}){sub x}) {nu}{sub t}+u{nu}{sub x}+{nu}{nu}{sub y} = -c{sup 2}(h{sub y}+(h{sub b}){sub y}) h{sub t}+(hu){sub x}+(h{nu}){sub y} = 0 g-shore, h is surface elevation and s, t is time, u is velocity of cross-shore, {nu} is velocity of along-shore, h is surface elevation and h{sub b} is function of shore. This is a nondimensionalized model with the gravity g and constant reference depth H factored into c = {radical}(gH). We apply the Adomian Decompostion Method (ADM) to solve the tsunami model. This powerful method has been used to obtain explicit and numerical solutions of three types of diffusion-convection-reaction (DECR) equations. The ADM results for the tsunami model yield analytical solutions in terms of a rapidly convergent infinite power series. Symbolic computation, numerical results and graphs of solutions are obtained by Maple program.

  9. Rainfall/runoff simulation with 2D full shallow water equations: Sensitivity analysis and calibration of infiltration parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pato, Javier; Caviedes-Voullième, Daniel; García-Navarro, Pilar

    2016-05-01

    One of the most difficult issues in the development of hydrologic models is to find a rigorous source of data and specific parameters to a given problem, on a given location that enable reliable calibration. In this paper, a distributed and physically based model (2D Shallow Water Equations) is used for surface flow and runoff calculations in combination with two infiltration laws (Horton and Green-Ampt) for estimating infiltration in a watershed. This technique offers the capability of assigning a local and time-dependent infiltration rate to each computational cell depending on the available surface water, soil type or vegetation. We investigate how the calibration of parameters is affected by transient distributed Shallow Water model and the complexity of the problem. In the first part of this work, we calibrate the infiltration parameters for both Horton and Green-Ampt models under flat ponded soil conditions. Then, by means of synthetic test cases, we perform a space-distributed sensitivity analysis in order to show that this calibration can be significantly affected by the introduction of topography or rainfall. In the second part, parameter calibration for a real catchment is addressed by comparing the numerical simulations with two different sets of experimental data, corresponding to very different events in terms of the rainfall volume. We show that the initial conditions of the catchment and the rainfall pattern have a special relevance in the quality of the adjustment. Hence, it is shown that the topography of the catchment and the storm characteristics affect the calibration of infiltration parameters.

  10. A marching in space and time (MAST) solver of the shallow water equations. Part II: The 2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, C.; Nasello, C.; Tucciarelli, T.

    2007-05-01

    A novel methodology for the solution of the 2D shallow water equations is proposed. The algorithm is based on a fractional step decomposition of the original system in (1) a convective prediction, (2) a convective correction, and (3) a diffusive correction step. The convective components are solved using a Marching in Space and Time (MAST) procedure, that solves a sequence of small ODEs systems, one for each computational cell, ordered according to the cell value of a scalar approximated potential. The scalar potential is sought after computing first the minimum of a functional via the solution of a large linear system and then refining locally the optimum search. Model results are compared with the experimental data of two laboratory tests and with the results of other simulations carried out for the same tests by different authors. A comparison with the analytical solution of the oblique jump test has been also considered. Numerical results of the proposed scheme are in good agreement with measured data, as well as with analytical and higher order approximation methods results. The growth of the CPU time versus the cell number is investigated successively refining the elements of an initially coarse mesh. The CPU specific time, per element and per time step, is found out to be almost constant and no evidence of Courant-Friedrichs-Levi (CFL) number limitation has been detected in all the numerical experiments.

  11. A Well-Balanced Central-Upwind Scheme for the 2D Shallow Water Equations on Triangular Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron

    2004-01-01

    We are interested in approximating solutions of the two-dimensional shallow water equations with a bottom topography on triangular meshes. We show that there is a certain flexibility in choosing the numerical fluxes in the design of semi-discrete Godunov-type central schemes. We take advantage of this fact to generate a new second-order, central-upwind method for the two-dimensional shallow water equations that is well-balanced. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method as well as its balance properties in a variety of examples.

  12. Effects of mesh resolution and topographic representation in 2D finite volume models of shallow water fluvial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horritt, M. S.; Bates, P. D.; Mattinson, M. J.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryThe effects of mesh resolution and topographic data quality on the predictions of a 2D finite volume model of channel flow are investigated. 25 cm resolution side scan sonar swath bathymetry of a 7 km reach of the river Thames, UK, provides topography for a series of finite volume models with resolutions ranging from 2.5 to 50 m. Results from the coarser meshes are compared with the 2.5 m simulation which is used as a benchmark. The model shows greater sensitivity to mesh resolution than topographic sampling. Sensitivity to mesh resolution is attributed to two effects of roughly equal magnitude. Small elements are able to represent hydraulic features such as recirculation zones, and a more accurate representation of the domain boundary helps to drive these flow features. In practical terms, a models at a resolution of 20 and 50 m require 50 m cross-sections, whereas the 10 m model predictions are improved by using all the bathymetry data.

  13. A depth-averaged 2-D shallow water model for breaking and non-breaking long waves affected by rigid vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a depth-averaged two-dimensional shallow water model for simulating long waves in vegetated water bodies under breaking and non-breaking conditions. The effects of rigid vegetation are modelled in the form of drag and inertia forces as sink terms in the momentum equations. The dr...

  14. Accelerated shallow water modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandham, Rajesh; Medina, David; Warburton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    ln this talk we will describe our ongoing developments in accelerated numerical methods for modeling tsunamis, and oceanic fluid flows using two dimensional shallow water model and/or three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes model discretized with high order discontinuous Galerkin methods. High order discontinuous Galerkin methods can be computationally demanding, requiring extensive computational time to simulate real time events on traditional CPU architectures. However, recent advances in computing architectures and hardware aware algorithms make it possible to reduce simulation time and provide accurate predictions in a timely manner. Hence we tailor these algorithms to take advantage of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architecture that is seen in modern many core compute devices such as GPUs. We will discuss our unified and extensive many-core programming library OCCA that alleviates the need to completely re-design the solvers to keep up with constantly evolving parallel programming models and hardware architectures. We will present performance results for the flow simulations demonstrating performance leveraging multiple different multi-threading APIs on GPU and CPU targets.

  15. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  16. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  17. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  18. Multigrid shallow water equations on an FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffress, Stephen; Duben, Peter; Palmer, Tim

    2015-04-01

    A novel computing technology for multigrid shallow water equations is investigated. As power consumption begins to constrain traditional supercomputing advances, weather and climate simulators are exploring alternative technologies that achieve efficiency gains through massively parallel and low power architectures. In recent years FPGA implementations of reduced complexity atmospheric models have shown accelerated speeds and reduced power consumption compared to multi-core CPU integrations. We continue this line of research by designing an FPGA dataflow engine for a mulitgrid version of the 2D shallow water equations. The multigrid algorithm couples grids of variable resolution to improve accuracy. We show that a significant reduction of precision in the floating point representation of the fine grid variables allows greater parallelism and thus improved overall peformance while maintaining accurate integrations. Preliminary designs have been constructed by software emulation. Results of the hardware implementation will be presented at the conference.

  19. Shallow-water conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapenko, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    The derivation of basic conservation laws in the shallow-water theory from the multidimensional integral laws of conservation of mass and total momentum describing the plane-parallel flow of an ideal incompressible fluid above a horizontal bottom is proposed. The restrictions on flow parameters arising in this case have the integral form and are much weaker in comparison with the requirement of flow potentiality and the condition of long-wavelength approximation. The last fact substantiates the use of the shallow-water model for the mathematical modeling of a much wider class of wave flows, the parameters of which are not related directly to the restrictions of the long-wavelength approximation.

  20. 2D nanostructures for water purification: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Saoirse; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pillai, Suresh C

    2016-08-18

    Owing to their atomically thin structure, large surface area and mechanical strength, 2D nanoporous materials are considered to be suitable alternatives for existing desalination and water purification membrane materials. Recent progress in the development of nanoporous graphene based materials has generated enormous potential for water purification technologies. Progress in the development of nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide (GO) membranes, the mechanism of graphene molecular sieve action, structural design, hydrophilic nature, mechanical strength and antifouling properties and the principal challenges associated with nanopore generation are discussed in detail. Subsequently, the recent applications and performance of newly developed 2D materials such as 2D boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, graphyne, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), tungsten chalcogenides (WS2) and titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) are highlighted. In addition, the challenges affecting 2D nanostructures for water purification are highlighted and their applications in the water purification industry are discussed. Though only a few 2D materials have been explored so far for water treatment applications, this emerging field of research is set to attract a great deal of attention in the near future. PMID:27506268

  1. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  2. Shallow Water Optical Water Quality Buoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostater, Charles

    1998-01-01

    This NASA grant was funded as a result of an unsolicited proposal submission to Kennedy Space Center. The proposal proposed the development and testing of a shallow water optical water quality buoy. The buoy is meant to work in shallow aquatic systems (ponds, rivers, lagoons, and semi-enclosed water areas where strong wind wave action is not a major environmental During the project period of three years, a demonstration of the buoy was conducted. The last demonstration during the project period was held in November, 1996 when the buoy was demonstrated as being totally operational with no tethered communications line. During the last year of the project the buoy was made to be solar operated by large gel cell batteries. Fund limitations did not permit the batteries in metal enclosures as hoped for higher wind conditions, however the system used to date has worked continuously for in- situ operation of over 18 months continuous deployment. The system needs to have maintenance and somewhat continuous operational attention since various components have limited lifetime ages. For example, within the last six months the onboard computer has had to be repaired as it did approximately 6 months after deployment. The spectrograph had to be repaired and costs for repairs was covered by KB Science since no ftmds were available for this purpose after the grant expired. Most recently the computer web page server failed and it is currently being repaired by KB Science. In addition, the cell phone operation is currently being ftmded by Dr. Bostater in order to maintain the system's operation. The above points need to be made to allow NASA to understand that like any sophisticated measuring system in a lab or in the field, necessary funding and maintenance is needed to insure the system's operational state and to obtain quality factor. The proposal stated that the project was based upon the integration of a proprietary and confidential sensor and probe design that was developed by

  3. SIMULATION REAL SCALE EXPERIMENT ON LEVEE BREACH USING 2D SHALLOW FLOW MODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenno, Hiroki; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Ichiro

    Flood in rivers is a common disaster all over the world. If a levee breach happens, it sometimes causes a fatal disaster. In addition, many buildings, urban facilities, lifelines, etc. are seriously damaged. Detailed mechanism of a levee breach has not been clarified yet. Therefore, it is important to predict the collapsing process of riverbank and behavior of overtop flow for reducing damage. We applied a two-dimensional shallow flow computational model to levee breach phenomena caused by overflow and the performance of the model was elucidated. A calibration of the numerical model is made through the comparison with field experimental data. Recently, a real-scale experiment on a levee breach was carried out at the Chiyoda Experimental Channel in Hokkaido, Japan. We performed the computation under the same conditions in the experiment. The computational results showed the excellent performance for simulating levee breach phenomena.

  4. A modified siphon sampler for shallow water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diehl, Timothy H.

    2008-01-01

    A modified siphon sampler (or 'single-stage sampler') was developed to sample shallow water at closely spaced vertical intervals. The modified design uses horizontal rather than vertical sample bottles. Previous siphon samplers are limited to water about 20 centimeters (cm) or more in depth; the modified design can sample water 10 cm deep. Several mounting options were used to deploy the modified siphon sampler in shallow bedrock streams of Middle Tennessee, while minimizing alteration of the stream bed. Sampling characteristics and limitations of the modified design are similar to those of the original design. Testing showed that the modified sampler collects unbiased samples of suspended silt and clay. Similarity of the intake to the original siphon sampler suggests that the modified sampler would probably take downward-biased samples of suspended sand. Like other siphon samplers, it does not sample isokinetically, and the efficiency of sand sampling can be expected to change with flow velocity. The sampler needs to be located in the main flow of the stream, and is subject to damage from rapid flow and floating debris. Water traps were added to the air vents to detect the flow of water through the sampler, which can cause a strong upward bias in sampled suspended-sediment concentration. Water did flow through the sampler, in some cases even when the top of the air vent remained above water. Air vents need to be extended well above maximum water level to prevent flow through the sampler.

  5. Polarization lidar for shallow water depth measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Steven; Thayer, Jeffrey P; Hayman, Matthew

    2010-12-20

    A bathymetric, polarization lidar system transmitting at 532 nm and using a single photomultiplier tube is employed for applications of shallow water depth measurement. The technique exploits polarization attributes of the probed water body to isolate surface and floor returns, enabling constant fraction detection schemes to determine depth. The minimum resolvable water depth is no longer dictated by the system's laser or detector pulse width and can achieve better than 1 order of magnitude improvement over current water depth determination techniques. In laboratory tests, an Nd:YAG microchip laser coupled with polarization optics, a photomultiplier tube, a constant fraction discriminator, and a time-to-digital converter are used to target various water depths with an ice floor to simulate a glacial meltpond. Measurement of 1 cm water depths with an uncertainty of ±3 mm are demonstrated using the technique. This novel approach enables new approaches to designing laser bathymetry systems for shallow depth determination from remote platforms while not compromising deep water depth measurement. PMID:21173834

  6. Wave turbulence in shallow water models.

    PubMed

    Clark di Leoni, P; Cobelli, P J; Mininni, P D

    2014-06-01

    We study wave turbulence in shallow water flows in numerical simulations using two different approximations: the shallow water model and the Boussinesq model with weak dispersion. The equations for both models were solved using periodic grids with up to 2048{2} points. In all simulations, the Froude number varies between 0.015 and 0.05, while the Reynolds number and level of dispersion are varied in a broader range to span different regimes. In all cases, most of the energy in the system remains in the waves, even after integrating the system for very long times. For shallow flows, nonlinear waves are nondispersive and the spectrum of potential energy is compatible with ∼k{-2} scaling. For deeper (Boussinesq) flows, the nonlinear dispersion relation as directly measured from the wave and frequency spectrum (calculated independently) shows signatures of dispersion, and the spectrum of potential energy is compatible with predictions of weak turbulence theory, ∼k{-4/3}. In this latter case, the nonlinear dispersion relation differs from the linear one and has two branches, which we explain with a simple qualitative argument. Finally, we study probability density functions of the surface height and find that in all cases the distributions are asymmetric. The probability density function can be approximated by a skewed normal distribution as well as by a Tayfun distribution. PMID:25019897

  7. Deep Water, Shallow Water: Marine Animal Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Examines the diversity of life in the oceans and ways in which teachers can explore ocean habitats with their students without leaving the classroom. Topic areas considered include: restricted habitats, people and marine habitats, pollution, incidental kills, and the commercial and recreational uses of marine waters. (JN)

  8. Soil Water and Shallow Groundwater Relations in an Agricultural Hillslope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shallow water tables contribute to soil water variations under rolling topography, and soil properties contribute to shallow water table fluctutations. Preferential flow through large soil pores can cause a rise in the water table with little increase in soil water except near the soil surface. Late...

  9. Non-classical shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Carina M.; Howison, S. D.; Ockendon, H.; Ockendon, J. R.

    2008-02-01

    This paper deals with violent discontinuities in shallow water flows with large Froude number F. On a horizontal base, the paradigm problem is that of the impact of two fluid layers in situations where the flow can be modelled as two smooth regions joined by a singularity in the flow field. Within the framework of shallow water theory, we show that, over a certain time-scale, this discontinuity may be described by a delta shock, which is a weak solution of the underlying conservation laws in which the depth and mass and momentum fluxes have both delta function and step function components. We also make some conjectures about how this model evolves from the traditional model for jet impacts in which a spout is emitted. For flows on a sloping base, we show that for flow with an aspect ratio of O(F-2) on a base with an O(1) or larger slope, the governing equations admit a new type of discontinuous solution that is also modelled as a delta shock. The physical manifestation of this discontinuity is a small tube' of fluid bounding the flow. The delta-shock conditions for this flow are derived and solved for a point source on an inclined plane. This latter delta-shock framework also sheds light on the evolution of the layer impact on a horizontal base

  10. Polarization of light in shallow waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilerson, Alexander; Ibrahim, Amir; Stepinski, Jan; Ahmed, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of the upwelling polarized radiance in relatively shallow waters of varying depths and benthic conditions are compared to simulationsrevealing the depolarizing nature of the seafloor. Significant correlations between simulations and measurements are attained when the appropriate unpolarized, Lambertian bottoms are included in the radiative transfer model. The bottoms used in this study produce realistic upwelling radiance distributions as well as ranges of the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) that peak between 10 and 30%. This study specifically finds that polarization in upwelling radiance is best preserved at long wavelengths in clear waters and also at short wavelengths in phytoplankton- and CDOM-rich waters. These results can thus facilitate the detection of benthic materials as well as future studies of camouflage by benthic biota.The DoLPwas found to be highly sensitive to benthic reflectance, but the angle of polarization (AoLP), which quantifies the orientation of polarization, is independent of it. The AoLP could therefore be used to communicate and sense direction underwater.

  11. Shallow-water models for gravity currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Patrick James

    Gravity currents, produced by the instantaneous release of a finite volume of dense fluid beneath a layer of lighter fluid and overlying a spatially-varying rigid bottom boundary, are modelled as discontinuous solutions to the systems of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws arising from a shallow-water model. Equations of motion for two stably-stratified fluids of constant density are derived for the incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations for small aspect ratio flow in an Eulerian fluid, and the equations are nondimensionalized using a gravity current scaling so that they may be stated as a first order system of partial differential equations. The model equations neglect the effects of turbulence, entrainment, density stratification, and viscosity, but include the Coriolis force, variable topography, and bottom friction. Special cases are stated for one-layer three-dimensional axisymmetric flow, and in the two-dimensional case for flow with a free surface, rigid lid, thin upper or lower layer, or small density differences. These equations are then stated as a nonlinear system of conservation laws. The model equations are classified as hyperbolic, with defined regions of hyperbolicity stated where possible. When in conservation form, discontinuous solutions are considered, and the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions derived for solutions which are trivial on one side of the shock. The initial release problem is shown to be well-posed by the method of localization. By approximating a gravity current front as a vertical discontinuity, the initial release problem is solved numerically by use of a relaxation method designed for systems of hyperbolic conservation laws and adapted to include boundary conditions and forcing terms. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated by several diagrams which show the effects of bottom slope and friction in the two-dimensional case, and of bottom slope and rotation in the three-dimensional one. Since the relaxation method is

  12. Operation of linear and ring arrays in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukovskaya, V. G.; Petukhov, Yu. V.; Khil'ko, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    With the aim of unambiguously determining the direction to a tonal emission source, comparative analysis of the directed properties of sufficiently extended linear and ring horizontal arrays in shallow water was performed. An isovelocity waveguide with a homogeneous fluid bottom was used as the shallow water model, in which a multimode regime of acoustic signal propagation was achieved.

  13. Detector analysis for shallow water active sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Thomas J.; Phillips, Michael E.

    2002-11-01

    SPAWAR Systems Center-San Diego, in concert with the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has designed and built a proof-of-concept broadband biomimetic sonar. This proof-of-concept sonar emulates a dolphin biosonar system; emitted broadband signals approximate the frequency and time domain characteristics of signals produced by echolocating dolphins, the receive system is spatially modeled after the binaural geometry of the dolphin, and signal processing algorithms incorporate sequential integration of aspect varying returns. As with any sonar, object detection in shallow water while maintaining an acceptable false alarm rate is an important problem. A comprehensive parametric analysis of detection algorithms is presented, focusing primarily on two detector strategies: a matched filter and a spectral detector. The spectral detector compares the ratio of in-band to out-of-band power, and thus functions something like a phase-incoherent matched filter. This computationally efficient detector is shown to perform well with high proportional bandwidth signals. The detector (either matched filter or spectral) is coupled with an alpha-beta tracker which maintains a running noise estimate and calculates signal excess above the estimated noise level which is compared to a fixed threshold.

  14. Soil water and shallow groundwater relations in an agricultural hillslope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shallow water tables can contribute water for plant use; therefore, plant-available water includes not only the water stored in the root zone, but also the water moving up from below the root zone. The purpose of this study was to quantify the amount of water moving upward to the root zone. Automate...

  15. 2D-3D GPR signature of shallow faulting in the Castelluccio di Norcia basin (Central Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercoli, M.; Pauselli, C.; Frigeri, A.; Forte, E.; Federico, C.

    2012-04-01

    Paleoseismology usually provides seismological data through direct analysis, and uses trenching as the principal investigation technique. Over the last years, the use of non-invasive geophysical methods acquired an important role in paleoseismologic studies. The use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) provided many documented examples of shallow fault zones imaging. In particular, the acquisition of three dimensional GPR data using very dense grids, produces high-resolution data volumes, with high spatial continuity, mandatory for a correct interpretation of the geological features in their actual geometry. We acquired a 3D GPR volume across a fault zone in Central Apennines (Italy). This fault strand shows both geomorphological and trench-derived evidences of Late-Quaternary activity. The GPR volume covers a 20x20 m area providing an high-resolution imaging of the fault zone and its auxilliary structures . Using a free open source software to manage the entire 3D dataset, some horizons and fault features were detected and interpreted. Interpretation was improved using attribute analysis, especially based on amplitude, phase and frequency characteristics. The results of our study provides a detailed 3D geological model of the subsurface extended to more than 4 m below the topographic surface, and a localized area interested by faulting is clearly recognizable. By the use of depth-slices we estimated a width of about 4-2 m, with an average strike of the fault of 170° N. The dip of the W-SW-dipping E-side of the structure was estimated in about 70°, with a total average displacement of about 1 m ± 0.20 m; clinoforms structures, colluvial wedges and sedimentary units showing thickening and rotation close to the fault zone in the hanging-wall were also recognized. Finally some long 2D GPR profiles were acquired and interpreted to extend the observations over a wider area. We successfully detected the continuity of the fault zone towards North, locating also some

  16. Estimation of freak wave occurrence in shallow water regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashima, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    In the last two decades, freak waves have become an important topic in engineering and science and are sometimes featured by a single and steep crest causing severe damage to offshore structures and vessels. An accurate estimation of maximum wave height and prediction of freak wave occurrence frequency is important for marine safety and ocean developments. According to several studies on freak waves, the deep-water third-order nonlinearity (quasi-resonant four-wave interactions) can lead to a significant enhancement of freak wave occurrence from normality. However, it is not clear the behavior of offshore generated freak waves shoaling to shallow water regions. In general, a numerical simulation based on Boussinesq model has been frequently and widely used to estimate wave transformation in shallow water regions and has high-level performance in the design of coast and harbor structures in Japan. However, it is difficult to describe the freak wave occurrence from deep to shallow water regions by the Boussinesq model because it can express only up to the second-order nonlinear interactions. There is a gap of governing equation between deep and shallow water regions from the extreme wave modeling point of view. It is necessary to investigate the aftereffects of generated freak waves by the third-order nonlinear interactions in deep water regions and their propagation to shallow water regions using the Boussinesq model. In this study, the model experiments in a wave tank and numerical simulations based on the Boussinesq model were conducted to estimate the freak wave occurrence from deep to shallow water regions. In the model experiments, the maximum wave height increases with an increase in kurtosis by the third-order nonlinear interactions in deep water regions. The dependence of kurtosis on freak wave occurrence weakens by the second-order nonlinear interactions associated with wave shoaling if dimensionless water depth kph becomes shallower than 1.363, which kp

  17. An integrable shallow water equation with peaked solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Camassa, R.; Holm, D.D. )

    1993-09-13

    We derive a new completely integrable dispersive shallow water equation that is bi-Hamiltonian and thus possesses an infinite number of conservation laws in involution. The equation is obtained by using an asymptotic expansion directly in the Hamiltonian for Euler's equations in the shallow water regime. The soliton solution for this equation has a limiting form that has a discontinuity in the first derivative at its peak.

  18. Flow separation of currents in shallow water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Flow separation of currents in shallow coastal areas is investigated using a boundary layer model for two-dimensional (depth-averaged) tidal flow past an elliptic headland. If the shoaling region near the coast is narrow compared to the scale of the headland, bottom friction causes the flow to separate just downstream of the point where the pressure gradient switches from favoring to adverse. As long as the shoaling region at the coast is well resolved, the inclusion of eddy viscosity and a no-slip boundary condition have no effect on this result. An approximate analytic solution for the pressure gradient along the boundary is obtained by assuming the flow away from the immediate vicinity of the boundary is irrotational. On the basis of the pressure gradient obtained from the irrotational flow solution, flow separation is a strong function of the headland aspect ratio, an equivalent Reynolds number, and a Keulegan-Carpenter number.

  19. Shallow water table depth algorithm in SWAT: Recent developments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the shallow water table depth (wtd) is crucial in many studies including determination of optimum irrigation and drainage management systems for agricultural production, farm machine trafficability, and water quality due to agricultural chemical transport and soil salinity. Therefore, i...

  20. Computing nonhydrostatic shallow-water flow over steep terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denlinger, R.P.; O'Connell, D. R. H.

    2008-01-01

    Flood and dambreak hazards are not limited to moderate terrain, yet most shallow-water models assume that flow occurs over gentle slopes. Shallow-water flow over rugged or steep terrain often generates significant nonhydrostatic pressures, violating the assumption of hydrostatic pressure made in most shallow-water codes. In this paper, we adapt a previously published nonhydrostatic granular flow model to simulate shallow-water flow, and we solve conservation equations using a finite volume approach and an Harten, Lax, Van Leer, and Einfeldt approximate Riemann solver that is modified for a sloping bed and transient wetting and drying conditions. To simulate bed friction, we use the law of the wall. We test the model by comparison with an analytical solution and with results of experiments in flumes that have steep (31??) or shallow (0.3??) slopes. The law of the wall provides an accurate prediction of the effect of bed roughness on mean flow velocity over two orders of magnitude of bed roughness. Our nonhydrostatic, law-of-the-wall flow simulation accurately reproduces flume measurements of front propagation speed, flow depth, and bed-shear stress for conditions of large bed roughness. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  1. Airborne source localization in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhaohui; Wang, Guangxu

    2012-11-01

    Owing to the great difference of acoustic characteristic impedance between air and water, the sound transmission loss from an airborne source into water is very high. So, it is very difficult to do experimental research on air-to-water sound propagation. An experiment was conducted for air-to-water sound propagation in the South China Sea in 2010. A HLA placed on the sea bottom was used to receive signals sent by a high-power loudspeaker hung on a research ship floating 1km to 4km away from the HLA. The locations of airborne sources are estimated from the signals measured by the HLA. The estimated DOA and ranges are in agreement with the GPS records.

  2. Two-dimensional shallow water equations by composite schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, Richard; Wendroff, Burton

    1999-06-01

    Composite schemes are formed by global composition of several Lax-Wendroff steps followed by a diffusive Lax-Friedrichs or WENO step, which filters out the oscillations around shocks typical for the Lax-Wendroff scheme. These schemes are applied to the shallow water equations in two dimensions. The Lax-Friedrichs composite is also formulated for a trapezoidal mesh, which is necessary in several example problems. The suitability of the composite schemes for the shallow water equations is demonstrated on several examples, including the circular dam break problem, the shock focusing problem and supercritical channel flow problems. Copyright

  3. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Warneford, Emma S. Dellar, Paul J.

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  4. Propagation of Exploration Seismic Sources in Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, J. B.; Tolstoy, M.; Barton, P. J.; Gulick, S. P.

    2006-05-01

    The choice of safety radii to mitigation the impact of exploration seismic sources upon marine mammals is typically based on measurement or modeling in deep water. In shallow water environments, rule-of-thumb spreading laws are often used to predict the falloff of amplitude with offset from the source, but actual measurements (or ideally, near-perfect modeling) are still needed to account for the effects of bathymetric changes and subseafloor characteristics. In addition, the question: "how shallow is 'shallow?'" needs an answer. In a cooperative effort by NSF, MMS, NRL, IAGC and L-DEO, a series of seismic source calibration studies was carried out in the Northern Gulf of Mexico during 2003. The sources used were the two-, six-, ten-, twelve-, and twenty-airgun arrays of R/V Ewing, and a 31-element, 3-string "G" gun array, deployed by M/V Kondor, an exploration industry source ship. The results of the Ewing calibrations have been published, documenting results in deep (3200m) and shallow (60m) water. Lengthy analysis of the Kondor results, presented here, suggests an approach to answering the "how shallow is shallow" question. After initially falling off steadily with source-receiver offset, the Kondor levels suddenly increased at a 4km offset. Ray-based modeling with a complex, realistic source, but with a simple homogeneous water column-over-elastic halfspace ocean shows that the observed pattern is chiefly due to geophysical effects, and not focusing within the water column. The same kind of modeling can be used to predict how the amplitudes will change with decreasing water depth, and when deep-water safety radii may need to be increased. Another set of data (see Barton, et al., this session) recorded in 20 meters of water during early 2005, however, shows that simple modeling may be insufficient when the geophysics becomes more complex. In this particular case, the fact that the seafloor was within the near field of the R/V Ewing source array seems to have

  5. 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy: A sensitive test of polarizable water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In a recent paper, the experimental 2D-Raman-THz response of liquid water at ambient conditions has been presented [J. Savolainen, S. Ahmed, and P. Hamm, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110, 20402 (2013)]. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are performed with the goal to reproduce the experimental results. To that end, the molecular response functions are calculated in a first step, and are then convoluted with the laser pulses in order to enable a direct comparison with the experimental results. The molecular dynamics simulation are performed with several different water models: TIP4P/2005, SWM4-NDP, and TL4P. As polarizability is essential to describe the 2D-Raman-THz response, the TIP4P/2005 water molecules are amended with either an isotropic or a anisotropic polarizability a posteriori after the molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast, SWM4-NDP and TL4P are intrinsically polarizable, and hence the 2D-Raman-THz response can be calculated in a self-consistent way, using the same force field as during the molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the 2D-Raman-THz response depends extremely sensitively on details of the water model, and in particular on details of the description of polarizability. Despite the limited time resolution of the experiment, it could easily distinguish between various water models. Albeit not perfect, the overall best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for the TL4P water model.

  6. 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy: A sensitive test of polarizable water models

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Peter

    2014-11-14

    In a recent paper, the experimental 2D-Raman-THz response of liquid water at ambient conditions has been presented [J. Savolainen, S. Ahmed, and P. Hamm, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110, 20402 (2013)]. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are performed with the goal to reproduce the experimental results. To that end, the molecular response functions are calculated in a first step, and are then convoluted with the laser pulses in order to enable a direct comparison with the experimental results. The molecular dynamics simulation are performed with several different water models: TIP4P/2005, SWM4-NDP, and TL4P. As polarizability is essential to describe the 2D-Raman-THz response, the TIP4P/2005 water molecules are amended with either an isotropic or a anisotropic polarizability a posteriori after the molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast, SWM4-NDP and TL4P are intrinsically polarizable, and hence the 2D-Raman-THz response can be calculated in a self-consistent way, using the same force field as during the molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the 2D-Raman-THz response depends extremely sensitively on details of the water model, and in particular on details of the description of polarizability. Despite the limited time resolution of the experiment, it could easily distinguish between various water models. Albeit not perfect, the overall best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for the TL4P water model.

  7. Comparison of unstable water infiltration in porous media in 2D and 3D experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, C.; Neuweiler, I.; Lehmann, P.; Papafotiou, A.; Vontobel, P.; Hartmann, S.

    2010-05-01

    Water infiltration into unsaturated soil is an important process for groundwater recharge and thus for water balance of natural hydrosystems. The characteristics of infiltration patterns depend on porous media properties and initial moisture content. Infiltration fronts into soil can be unstable in layered media with fine over dry coarse material. To predict arrival times of infiltration fronts and average water content in upscaled models, it is necessary to understand occurrence of instabilities. The unstable flow behavior is not captured by standard models and finger characteristics have mostly been investigated experimentally. Most experiments in the past were carried out in 2D setups and it is not clear how the results of such studies relate to real 3D systems. The aim of this study is to compare development and finger characteristics of unstable infiltration in 2D and 3D setups. We carried out laboratory experiments on fast infiltration in 2D and 3D setups and measured water content in porous media with neutron transmission technology at the NEUTRA beam line at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The 2D experiments were carried out in a glass sandbox (260 mm high, 75 mm wide and 11 mm deep). For the 3D experiments aluminum cylindrical column (150 mm in height and 100 mm in diameter) were used. Both columns were filled homogeneously with coarse quartz sand (grain size 0.7 - 1.2 mm) below fine sand layer (0.1 - 0.3 mm) of 20 - 30 mm thickness. Two dimensional projection images of water content with spatial resolution of 125 microns were deduced from neutron images every 2 second. For the 3D setup water content distribution was reconstructed in 3D to monitor water content inside the fingers over time. Water content and finger-width (15 - 23 mm) were similar for 2D and 3D setups. In both cases water content was maximum when the front passes and was decreasing afterwards (indicating "overshoot" behavior). Also the water content difference between values after

  8. Behavior of a shallow water table under periodic flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Nick; Nielsen, Peter; Perrochet, Pierre

    2009-03-01

    A new laboratory data set on the behavior of a shallow water table in a sand column aquifer subject to simple harmonic periodic forcing at its base is presented and discussed. The data are analyzed using the dynamic effective porosity, which is defined as the ratio of the rate of change in total moisture to the rate of change in water table elevation; thus, a reduction in this parameter means that the extent of moisture exchange has been reduced relative to a given water table fluctuation. The data show a clear decrease in the dynamic effective porosity with increasing proximity of the water table to the sand surface, which is consistent with previous research under a steadily rising or falling shallow water table. The observed reduction in moisture exchange due to shallowness of the water table has implications for periodic flow scenarios such as the propagation of water table waves in coastal and beach groundwater systems. That is, as moisture exchange is reduced, less work is being done by the flow, and thus, energy dissipation rates for shallow water tables will be reduced relative to the case of a deeper water table. At present no account of the influence of water table shallowness has been included in theories describing water table wave dispersion. The present experiments, in conjunction with the dynamic effective porosity concept, provide a framework in which this gap in knowledge can be further investigated. Additional experiments were designed such that the free surface transgressed the sand surface for part of the oscillation period to investigate the influence of meniscus formation and deformation at the sand surface on periodic flow dynamics. The observed behavior is consistent with previous observations of steady infiltration above shallow water tables, namely, a rapid drop (rise) in pore pressure with the onset of meniscus formation (deformation). A simple "wetting and drying" model is derived, accounting for the variation in effective porosity

  9. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  10. Geoacoustic inversion of noise coherence in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David J.; Desharnais, Francine; Drover, Matthew L.; Gillard, Chris A.

    2002-11-01

    It is known that the geoacoustic properties of a shallow-water sea-bed can be inferred from relatively simple measurements of the ambient noise coherence between a pair of vertically separated hydrophones [D. M. F. Chapman, ''Surface-generated noise in shallow water: A model,'' Proc. Inst. Acoust. 9, 1-11 (1987)]. The design of an autonomous buoy package for acquiring geoacoustic information by this method is currently being considered by DRDC-Atlantic in support of matched-field localization efforts that are being developed for use with rapidly deployable arrays. Initially, vertical coherence estimates from a simple shallow water noise model were fit to measured coherences by adjusting geoacoustic parameters by a trial and error procedure. A more systematic approach involves combining noise coherence models with nonlinear global optimization methods based on matched-coherence processing concepts to search the space of possible sea-bed parameters more efficiently. In this paper, we report on recent efforts to use a hybrid simplex simulated annealing scheme [M. R. Fallat and S. E. Dosso, ''Geoacoustic inversion via local, global, and hybrid algorithms,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 3219-3230 (1999)] to match an increasingly realistic suite of candidate geoacoustic parametrizations to some acoustic noise coherent data measured with modified sonobuoys deployed at several shallow water locations on the Scotian Shelf.

  11. Acoustic MIMO communications in a very shallow water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuehai; Cao, Xiuling; Tong, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Underwater acoustic channels pose significant difficulty for the development of high speed communication due to highly limited band-width as well as hostile multipath interference. Enlightened by rapid progress of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) technologies in wireless communication scenarios, MIMO systems offer a potential solution by enabling multiple spatially parallel communication channels to improve communication performance as well as capacity. For MIMO acoustic communications, deep sea channels offer substantial spatial diversity among multiple channels that can be exploited to address simultaneous multipath and co-channel interference. At the same time, there are increasing requirements for high speed underwater communication in very shallow water area (for example, a depth less than 10 m). In this paper, a space-time multichannel adaptive receiver consisting of multiple decision feedback equalizers (DFE) is adopted as the receiver for a very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication system. The performance of multichannel DFE receivers with relatively small number of receiving elements are analyzed and compared with that of the multichannel time reversal receiver to evaluate the impact of limited spatial diversity on multi-channel equalization and time reversal processing. The results of sea trials in a very shallow water channel are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication.

  12. Molecular Dynamics implementation of BN2D or 'Mercedes Benz' water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, Arturs; Bardik, Vitaliy; Pavlov, Evgen; Nerukh, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional 'Mercedes Benz' (MB) or BN2D water model (Naim, 1971) is implemented in Molecular Dynamics. It is known that the MB model can capture abnormal properties of real water (high heat capacity, minima of pressure and isothermal compressibility, negative thermal expansion coefficient) (Silverstein et al., 1998). In this work formulas for calculating the thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties in microcanonical (NVE) and isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensembles for the model from Molecular Dynamics simulation are derived and verified against known Monte Carlo results. The convergence of the thermodynamic properties and the system's numerical stability are investigated. The results qualitatively reproduce the peculiarities of real water making the model a visually convenient tool that also requires less computational resources, thus allowing simulations of large (hydrodynamic scale) molecular systems. We provide the open source code written in C/C++ for the BN2D water model implementation using Molecular Dynamics.

  13. Polarimetric imaging and radiometry in shallow waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonizzo, Alberto; Gilerson, Alexander; Carrizo, Carlos; Israel, Jean-Paul; Ahmed, Sam

    2012-06-01

    Imaging in scattering media with the purpose of object identification has always been a challenging task. In the ocean, and especially in coastal areas, the situation is one of the worst: absorption and scattering by suspended and dissolved particles take away most of the information and blur the image of the target to be identified. In addition, one has also to take into account the variability of the bottom which, being close to the surface, plays an important role in the resulting integrated light field. Our goal in this study is to gain insight into the effects of the variable environments on the complex polarized underwater realm. We analyze the polarized tridimensional underwater environment. The instruments deployed were an underwater hyperspectral and multi-angular polarimeter, whose accuracy and exactness of results have been previously validated by the means of different radiative transfer calculations; and a green band full-Stokes polarimetric video camera, enclosed in a custom made underwater housing. The results presented here were collected during the first field deployment of the imaging camera. An in-situ validation of the camera with the polarimeter has been obtained and the results have been used to validate the values of the Stokes elements in the images, both for the water column itself and for the underlying bottom.

  14. Water of Hydration Dynamics in Minerals Gypsum and Bassanite: Ultrafast 2D IR Spectroscopy of Rocks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chang; Nishida, Jun; Yuan, Rongfeng; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Water of hydration plays an important role in minerals, determining their crystal structures and physical properties. Here ultrafast nonlinear infrared (IR) techniques, two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) spectroscopies, were used to measure the dynamics and disorder of water of hydration in two minerals, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O). 2D IR spectra revealed that water arrangement in freshly precipitated gypsum contained a small amount of inhomogeneity. Following annealing at 348 K, water molecules became highly ordered; the 2D IR spectrum became homogeneously broadened (motional narrowed). PSPP measurements observed only inertial orientational relaxation. In contrast, water in bassanite's tubular channels is dynamically disordered. 2D IR spectra showed a significant amount of inhomogeneous broadening caused by a range of water configurations. At 298 K, water dynamics cause spectral diffusion that sampled a portion of the inhomogeneous line width on the time scale of ∼30 ps, while the rest of inhomogeneity is static on the time scale of the measurements. At higher temperature, the dynamics become faster. Spectral diffusion accelerates, and a portion of the lower temperature spectral diffusion became motionally narrowed. At sufficiently high temperature, all of the dynamics that produced spectral diffusion at lower temperatures became motionally narrowed, and only homogeneous broadening and static inhomogeneity were observed. Water angular motions in bassanite exhibit temperature-dependent diffusive orientational relaxation in a restricted cone of angles. The experiments were made possible by eliminating the vast amount of scattered light produced by the granulated powder samples using phase cycling methods. PMID:27385320

  15. Interaction of water molecules with hexagonal 2D systems. A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Ángela; Rey, Rafael

    Over the years water sources have been contaminated with many chemical agents, becoming issues that affect health of the world population. The advances of the nanoscience and nanotechnology in the development new materials constitute an alternative for design molecular filters with great efficiencies and low cost for water treatment and purification. In the nanoscale, the process of filtration or separation of inorganic and organic pollutants from water requires to study interactions of these atoms or molecules with different nano-materials. Specifically, it is necessary to understand the role of these interactions in physical and chemical properties of the nano-materials. In this work, the main interest is to do a theoretical study of interaction between water molecules and 2D graphene-like systems, such as silicene (h-Si) or germanene (h-Ge). Using Density Functional Theory we calculate total energy curves as function of separation between of water molecules and 2D systems. Different spatial configurations of water molecules relative to 2D systems are considered. Structural relaxation effects and changes of electronic charge density also are reported. Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  16. Shallow Water Flow in the Deepwater Gulf of Mexico: 20-Year Overview of a Near-Surface Geologic Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A.; Ahmed, A.

    2005-05-01

    Since 1984, shallow water flow occurrences have been reported in about 100 Gulf of Mexico lease blocks covering 80 oil and gas fields or lease blocks. These sands were deposited as continental slope/fan sequences during upper Pleistocene progradation. They include prodelta debris flows with a chaotic seismic character and, in some cases, rotated slump blocks. High sedimentation rates and an impermeable mud or clay seal from a condensed section are critical factors contributing to overpressures in shallow water flow sands. With a few exceptions, water flow incidents occur at water depths exceeding 1500 ft with a mean value at about 3800 ft of water. Water flow problem sands typically occur from 750 to 2000 ft below the seafloor. In the Mississippi Canyon and southern Viosca Knoll area, some of the shallower channel sands can be identified as part of a particular distributary system such as the old Timbalier channel, Southwest Pass canyon, or Einstein levee/channel system. Integration of high-resolution multichannel and reprocessed conventional 2D and 3D seismic data for the top-hole section is widely used to identify sand bodies with moderate or high shallow water flow potential. With the development of new geophysical technology and a better understanding of the controlling geological factors, instances of shallow water flow in recent years have been less severe and mitigating approaches to this geologic hazard have been successful in most cases.

  17. Wind wave prediction in shallow water: Theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaleri, L.; Rizzoli, P.M.

    1981-11-20

    A wind wave forecasting model is described, based upon the ray technique, which is specifically designed for shallow water areas. The model explicitly includes wave generation, refraction, and shoaling, while nonlinear dissipative processes (breaking and bottom fricton) are introduced through a suitable parametrization. The forecast is provided at a specified time and target position, in terms of a directional spectrum, from which the one-dimensional spectrum and the significant wave height are derived. The model has been used to hindcast storms both in shallow water (Northern Adriatic Sea) and in deep water conditions (Tyrrhenian Sea). The results have been compared with local measurements, and the rms error for the significant wave height is between 10 and 20%. A major problems has been found in the correct evaluation of the wind field.

  18. On shallow water rogue wave formation in strongly inhomogeneous channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-05-01

    Rogue wave formation in shallow water is often governed by dispersive focusing and wave-bottom interaction. In this study we try to combine these mechanisms by considering dispersive nonreflecting wave propagation in shallow strongly inhomogeneous channels. Nonreflecting wave propagation provides extreme wave amplification and the transfer of wave energy over large distances, while dispersive effects allow formation of a short-lived wave of extreme height (rogue wave). We found several types of water channels, where this mechanism can be realized, including (i) channels with a monotonically decreasing cross-section (normal dispersion), (ii) an inland basin described by a half of elliptic paraboloid (abnormal dispersion) and (iii) an underwater hill described by a half of hyperbolic paraboloid (normal dispersion). Conditions for variations of local frequency in the wave train providing optimal focusing of the wave train are also found.

  19. Validation of Numerical Shallow Water Models for Tidal Lagoons

    SciTech Connect

    Eliason, D.; Bourgeois, A.

    1999-11-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the case of a stratified, tidally forced lagoon. This solution, especially its energetics, is useful for the validation of numerical shallow water models under stratified, tidally forced conditions. The utility of the analytical solution for validation is demonstrated for a simple finite difference numerical model. A comparison is presented of the energetics of the numerical and analytical solutions in terms of the convergence of model results to the analytical solution with increasing spatial and temporal resolution.

  20. Model-Based Detection in a Shallow Water Ocean Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2001-07-30

    A model-based detector is developed to process shallow water ocean acoustic data. The function of the detector is to adaptively monitor the environment and decide whether or not a change from normal has occurred. Here we develop a processor incorporating both a normal-mode ocean acoustic model and a vertical hydrophone array. The detector is applied to data acquired from the Hudson Canyon experiments at various ranges and its performance is evaluated.

  1. Mixing and shocks in geophysical shallow water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Tivon

    In the first section, a reduced two-layer shallow water model for fluid mixing is described. The model is a nonlinear hyperbolic quasilinear system of partial differential equations, derived by taking the limit as the upper layer becomes infinitely deep. It resembles the shallow water equations, but with an active buoyancy. Fluid entrainment is supposed to occur from the upper layer to the lower. Several physically motivated closures are proposed, including a robust closure based on maximizing a mixing entropy (also defined and derived) at shocks. The structure of shock solutions is examined. The Riemann problem is solved by setting the shock speed to maximize the production of mixing entropy. Shock-resolving finite-volume numerical models are presented with and without topographic forcing. Explicit shock tracking is required for strong shocks. The constraint that turbulent energy production be positive is considered. The model has geophysical applications in studying the dynamics of dense sill overflows in the ocean. The second section discusses stationary shocks of the shallow water equations in a reentrant rotating channel with wind stress and topography. Asymptotic predictions for the shock location, strength, and associated energy dissipation are developed by taking the topographic perturbation to be small. The scaling arguments for the asymptotics are developed by demanding integrated energy and momentum balance, with the result that the free surface perturbation is of the order of the square root of the topographic perturbation. Shock formation requires that linear waves be nondispersive, which sets a solvability condition on the mean flow and which leads to a class of generalized Kelvin waves. Two-dimensional shock-resolving numerical simulations validate the asymptotic expressions and demonstrate the presence of stationary separated flow shocks in some cases. Geophysical applications are considered. Overview sections on shock-resolving numerical methods

  2. Shallow water equations: viscous solutions and inviscid limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gui-Qiang; Perepelitsa, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    We establish the inviscid limit of the viscous shallow water equations to the Saint-Venant system. For the viscous equations, the viscosity terms are more degenerate when the shallow water is close to the bottom, in comparison with the classical Navier-Stokes equations for barotropic gases; thus, the analysis in our earlier work for the classical Navier-Stokes equations does not apply directly, which require new estimates to deal with the additional degeneracy. We first introduce a notion of entropy solutions to the viscous shallow water equations and develop an approach to establish the global existence of such solutions and their uniform energy-type estimates with respect to the viscosity coefficient. These uniform estimates yield the existence of measure-valued solutions to the Saint-Venant system generated by the viscous solutions. Based on the uniform energy-type estimates and the features of the Saint-Venant system, we further establish that the entropy dissipation measures of the viscous solutions for weak entropy-entropy flux pairs, generated by compactly supported C 2 test-functions, are confined in a compact set in H -1, which yields that the measure-valued solutions are confined by the Tartar-Murat commutator relation. Then, the reduction theorem established in Chen and Perepelitsa [5] for the measure-valued solutions with unbounded support leads to the convergence of the viscous solutions to a finite-energy entropy solution of the Saint-Venant system with finite-energy initial data, which is relative with respect to the different end-states of the bottom topography of the shallow water at infinity. The analysis also applies to the inviscid limit problem for the Saint-Venant system in the presence of friction.

  3. A semi-Lagrangian approach to the shallow water equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. R.; Mccormick, Stephen F.; Ruge, John; Sholl, David S.; Yavneh, Irad

    1993-01-01

    We present a formulation of the shallow water equations that emphasizes the conservation of potential vorticity. A locally conservative semi-Lagrangian time-stepping scheme is developed, which leads to a system of three coupled PDE's to be solved at each time level. We describe a smoothing analysis of these equations, on which an effective multigrid solver is constructed. Some results from applying this solver to the static version of these equations are presented.

  4. Formation and properties of a terpyridine-based 2D MOF on the surface of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koitz, Ralph; Hutter, Jürg; Iannuzzi, Marcella

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional networks inspired by graphene are of prime importance in nanoscience. We present a computational study of an infinite molecular sheet confined on a water surface to assess its properties and formation mechanism. Terpyridine-based ligand molecules are interlinked by Zn ions to form an extended 2D metal-organic framework. We show that the network is stable on the water surface, and that the substrate affects the dynamic properties of the sheet, exhibiting a confining effect and flattening the sheet by 30%. We use metadynamics to characterize the process of network formation and breaking and determine an intra-network binding energy of 143 kJ mol‑1. Based on this mechanistic insight we propose that the 2D network strength can be tuned by varying the rigidity of the ligand through its chemical structure.

  5. Liquid Water in the Extremely Shallow Martian Subsurface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, A.; Shivak, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Availability of liquid water is one of the major constraints for the potential Martian biosphere. Although liquid water is unstable on the surface of Mars due to low atmospheric pressures, it has been suggested that liquid films of water could be present in the Martian soil. Here we explored a possibility of the liquid water formation in the extremely shallow (1-3 cm) subsurface layer under low atmospheric pressures (0.1-10 mbar) and low ("Martian") surface temperatures (approx.-50 C-0 C). We used a new Goddard Martian simulation chamber to demonstrate that even in the clean frozen soil with temperatures as low as -25C the amount of mobile water can reach several percents. We also showed that during brief periods of simulated daylight warming the shallow subsurface ice sublimates, the water vapor diffuses through porous surface layer of soil temporarily producing supersaturated conditions in the soil, which leads to the formation of additional liquid water. Our results suggest that despite cold temperatures and low atmospheric pressures, Martian soil just several cm below the surface can be habitable.

  6. Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediments and Shallow Coastal Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rong-Rong; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Davis, Curtiss O.

    2002-01-01

    Ocean color sensors were designed mainly for remote sensing of chlorophyll concentrations over the clear open oceanic areas (case 1 water) using channels between 0.4 and 0.86 micrometers. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) launched on the NASA Terra and Aqua Spacecrafts is equipped with narrow channels located within a wider wavelength range between 0.4 and 2.5 micrometers for a variety of remote sensing applications. The wide spectral range can provide improved capabilities for remote sensing of the more complex and turbid coastal waters (case 2 water) and for improved atmospheric corrections for Ocean scenes. In this article, we describe an empirical algorithm that uses this wide spectral range to identifying areas with suspended sediments in turbid waters and shallow waters with bottom reflections. The algorithm takes advantage of the strong water absorption at wavelengths longer than 1 micrometer that does not allow illumination of sediments in the water or a shallow ocean floor. MODIS data acquired over the east coast of China, west coast of Africa, Arabian Sea, Mississippi Delta, and west coast of Florida are used in this study.

  7. Soil Water and Shallow Groundwater Relations in an Agricultural Hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logsdon, S. D.; Schilling, K. E.

    2007-12-01

    Shallow water tables contribute to soil water variations under rolling topography, and soil properties contribute to shallow water table fluctutations. Preferential flow through large soil pores can cause a rise in the water table with little increase in soil water except near the soil surface. Lateral groundwater flow can cause a large rise in water table at toeslope and depressional landscape positions. As plants transpire, water can move up into the root zone from the water table and wet soil below the root zone. Roots can utilize water in the capillary fringe. The purpose of this study was to interface automated measurements of soil water content and water table depth for determining the importance of drainage and upward movement. In 2006 soil water and water table depth were monitored at three positions: shoulder, backslope, and toeslope. Neutron access tubes were manually monitored to 2.3 m depth, and automated soil moisture was measured using CS616 probes installed at 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9 m depth. Water table depths were monitored manually and automated, but the automated measurements failed during the season at two sites. In 2007, similar measurements were made at one toeslope position, but the CS616 probes were installed at nine depths and better quality automated well depth equipment was used. The 2006 data revealed little landscape position effect on daytime soil water loss on a wetter date; however, on a dry day just before a rain, daytime water loss was greatest for the toeslope positon and least for the shoulder position. After a period of intense rain, a rapid and significant water table rise occurred at the toeslope position but little water table rise occurred at the other landscape positions. The rapid toeslope water table rise was likely caused by lateral groundwater flow whereas minor water table rise at the other positions was likely due to preferential flow since the soil had not wet up below 0.6 m. Use of automated equipment has improved

  8. Three dimensional water quality modeling of a shallow subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yongshan; Ji, Zhen-Gang; Shen, Jian; Hu, Guangdou; Sun, Detong

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of estuarine hydrodynamics and water quality comes mostly from studies of large estuarine systems. The processes affecting algae, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in small and shallow subtropical estuaries are relatively less studied. This paper documents the development, calibration, and verification of a three dimensional (3D) water quality model for the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE), a small and shallow estuary located on the east coast of south Florida. The water quality model is calibrated and verified using two years of measured data. Statistical analyses indicate that the model is capable of reproducing key water quality characteristics of the estuary within an acceptable range of accuracy. The calibrated model is further applied to study hydrodynamic and eutrophication processes in the estuary. Modeling results reveal that high algae concentrations in the estuary are likely caused by excessive nutrient and algae supplies in freshwater inflows. While algal blooms may lead to reduced DO concentrations near the bottom of the waterbody, this study indicates that stratification and circulation induced by freshwater inflows may also contribute significantly to bottom water hypoxia in the estuary. It is also found that high freshwater inflows from one of the tributaries can change the circulation pattern and nutrient loading, thereby impacting water quality conditions of the entire estuary. Restoration plans for the SLE ecosystem need to consider both a reduction of nutrient loading and regulation of the freshwater discharge pattern. PMID:23122270

  9. Subsurface Characterization of Shallow Water Regions using Airborne Bathymetric Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, B.; Neuenschwander, A. L.; Magruder, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the complex interactions between air, land, and water in shallow water regions is becoming increasingly critical in the age of climate change. To effectively monitor and manage these zones, scientific data focused on changing water levels, quality, and subsurface topography are needed. Airborne remote sensing using light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is naturally suited to address this need as it can simultaneously provide detailed three-dimensional spatial data for both topographic and bathymetric applications in an efficient and effective manner. The key to useful data, however, is the correct interpretation of the incoming laser returns to distinguish between land, water, and objects. The full waveform lidar receiver captures the complete returning signal reflected from the Earth, which contains detailed information about the structure of the objects and surfaces illuminated by the beam. This study examines the characterization of this full waveform with respect to water surface depth penetration and subsurface classification, including sand, rock, and vegetation. Three assessments are performed to help characterize the laser interaction within the shallow water zone: evaluation of water surface backscatter as a function of depth and location, effects from water bottom surface roughness and reflectivity, and detection and classification of subsurface structure. Using the Chiroptera dual-laser lidar mapping system from Airborne Hydrography AB (AHAB), both bathymetric and topographic mapping are possible. The Chiroptera system combines a 1064nm near infrared topographic laser with a 515nm green bathymetric laser to seamlessly map the land/water interface in coastal areas. Two survey sites are examined: Lake Travis in Austin, Texas, USA, and Lake Vättern in Jönköping, Sweden. Water quality conditions were found to impact depth penetration of the lidar, as a maximum depth of 5.5m was recorded at Lake Travis and 11m at Lake Vättern.

  10. Algebraic instability in shallow water flows with horizontally nonuniform density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. P.; Pavlov, V. I.

    2015-04-01

    The regimes and mechanisms of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability have been studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic shallow water model with horizontally nonuniform density. As analysis shows, the nonhydrostaticity has a crucial influence on the instability. It is for this reason that at the final stage a collapse tendency predicted on the base of the hydrostatic scenario slows down and turns into the regime of algebraic instability. The numerical testing has shown that in spite of its simplicity, the model is quite able to describe realistically a number of effects. For example, the model captures the shallowing effect, which manifests itself as profile concavities on either side of the jet coming out of the boundary layer.

  11. LAS VEGAS VALLEY WATER BUDGET: RELATIONSHIP OF DISTRIBUTION, CONSUMPTIVE USE, AND RECHARGE TO SHALLOW GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of quantity and geographic distribution of recharge to the shallow ground-water zone from water use return flows in Las Vegas Valley were made for the years 1973, 1965, 1958, 1950, and 1943 as part of a broader study on the impact of water and land use on ground-water q...

  12. Assessing Tsunami Vulnerabilities of Geographies with Shallow Water Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2012-01-01

    Tsunami preparedness is crucial for saving human lives in case of disasters that involve massive water movement. In this work, we develop a framework for visual assessment of tsunami preparedness of geographies. Shallow water equations (also called Saint Venant equations) are a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations that are derived by depth-integrating the Navier-Stokes equations and provide a great abstraction of water masses that have lower depths compared to their free surface area. Our specific contribution in this study is to use Microsoft's XNA Game Studio to import underwater and shore line geographies, create different tsunami scenarios, and visualize the propagation of the waves and their impact on the shore line geography. Most importantly, we utilized the computational power of graphical processing units (GPUs) as HLSL based shader files and delegated all of the heavy computations to the GPU. Finally, we also conducted a validation study, in which we have tested our model against a controlled shallow water experiment. We believe that such a framework with an easy to use interface that is based on readily available software libraries, which are widely available and easily distributable, would encourage not only researchers, but also educators to showcase ideas.

  13. A depth-dependent formula for shallow water propagation.

    PubMed

    Sertlek, Hüseyin Özkan; Ainslie, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    In shallow water propagation, the sound field depends on the proximity of the receiver to the sea surface, the seabed, the source depth, and the complementary source depth. While normal mode theory can predict this depth dependence, it can be computationally intensive. In this work, an analytical solution is derived in terms of the Faddeeva function by converting a normal mode sum into an integral based on a hypothetical continuum of modes. For a Pekeris waveguide, this approach provides accurate depth dependent propagation results (especially for the surface decoupling) without requiring complex calculation methods for eigenvalues and corresponding eigenfunctions. PMID:25096092

  14. Modulational Instability and Rogue Waves in Shallow Water Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimshaw, R.; Chow, K. W.; Chan, H. N.

    It is now well known that the focussing nonlinear Schrödinger equation allows plane waves to be modulationally unstable, and at the same time supports breather solutions which are often invoked as models for rogue waves. This suggests a direct connection between modulation instability and the existence of rogue waves. In this chapter we review this connection for a suite of long wave models, such as the Korteweg-de Vries equation, the extended Korteweg-de Vries (Gardner) equation, often used to describe surface and internal waves in shallow water, a Boussinesq equation and, also a coupled set of Korteweg-de Vries equations.

  15. Jupiter's Great Red Spot as a shallow water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Timothy E.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1989-01-01

    Voyager cloud-top velocity data for Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is used to derive the bottom topography up to a constant that depends on the unknown radius of deformation. The bottom topography is inferred from the Bernoulli streamfunction, kinetic energy per unit mass, and absolute vorticity values derived from the velocity data. The results are used to calculate potential vorticity versus latitude far from the vortex. It is found that the deep atmosphere is in differential motion and that the far-field potential vorticity gradient changes sign at several latitudes. Numerical experiments are conducted to study the time-dependent behavior of the shallow water analog of Jupiter's analog.

  16. Compressed sensing for wideband wavenumber tracking in dispersive shallow water.

    PubMed

    Le Courtois, Florent; Bonnel, Julien

    2015-08-01

    In shallow water zones and at low frequency, seabed and water column properties can be estimated from the acoustic wavenumbers using inversion algorithms. When considering horizontal line arrays (HLA) and narrowband sources, the wavenumbers can be evaluated with classic spectral analysis methods. In this paper, a compressed sensing (CS) method for sparse recovery of the wavenumbers is proposed. This takes advantage of the few propagating modes and allows for spectral estimation when short HLA are used. The CS representation improves the wavenumber estimation, compared to the Fourier transform. However, for small arrays and several propagating modes, the CS generates interferences and does not allow proper wavenumber estimation. When considering broadband sources, it is possible to combine the wavenumbers estimated at several frequencies in order to build a frequency-wavenumber (f - k) representation. In this case, a post-processing tracking operation which improves the f - k resolution is presented. This relies on a general approach of waveguide physics and uses a particle filtering (PF) algorithm to track the wavenumbers. The consecutive use of CS and PF leads to a better wavenumber estimation. This methodology can be used for sources that are not at an end-fire position. It is illustrated by simulations and successfully applied on the Shallow Water 2006 data using the 32 sensor SHARK array. PMID:26328676

  17. Shallow water imaging sonar system for environmental surveying. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The scope of this research is to develop a shallow water sonar system designed to detect and map the location of objects such as hazardous wastes or discarded ordnance in coastal waters. The system will use high frequency wide-bandwidth imaging sonar, mounted on a moving platform towed behind a boat, to detect and identify objects on the sea bottom. Resolved images can be obtained even if the targets are buried in an overlayer of silt. The specific technical objective of this research was to develop and test a prototype system that is capable of (1) scan at high speeds (up to 10m/s), even in shallow water (depth to ten meters), without motion blurring or loss of resolution; (2) produce images of the bottom structure that are detailed enough for unambiguous detection of objects as small as 15cm, even if they are buried up to 30cm deep in silt or sand. The critical technology involved uses an linear FM (LFM) or similar complex waveform, which has a high bandwidth for good range resolution, with a long pulse length for similar Dopper resolution. The lone duration signal deposits more energy on target than a narrower pulse, which increases the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-clutter ratio. This in turn allows the use of cheap, lightweight, low power, piezoelectric transducers at the 30--500 kHz range.

  18. Surface Towed CSEM Systems for Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J.; Constable, S.; Kannberg, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a low-power, surface towed electric dipole-dipole system suitable for mapping seafloor geology in shallow water and deployable from small boats. The transmitter is capable of up to 50 amps output using 12 VDC from a 110/240 VAC power supply, and can generate an arbitrary GPS stabilized ternary waveform. Transmitter antennas are typically 50 to 100 m long. Receivers are built around the standard Scripps seafloor electrode, amplifier, and logging systems but housed in floating PVC cases and equipped with GPS timing and positioning, pitch/roll/heading sensors, and accelerometers. Receiver dipoles are 1.5 m long rigid booms held 1 m below the surface. As with the Scripps deep-towed Vulcan system, rigid antennas are used to avoid noise associated with flexible antennas moving across Earth's magnetic field. The tow cable is a simple floating rope up to 1000 m long. Water depth and conductivity are sampled continuously in order to provide constraints for apparent resistivity calculations and inversion, and moored seafloor recorders can be used to extend transmitter/receiver offsets. The entire system can be air freighted and transported in one utility vehicle. We will present results from a study to map permafrost in shallow water off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

  19. Optimizing water hyperpolarization and dissolution for sensitivity-enhanced 2D biomolecular NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Greg; Markhasin, Evgeny; Szekely, Or; Bretschneider, Christian; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    A recent study explored the use of hyperpolarized water, to enhance the sensitivity of nuclei in biomolecules thanks to rapid proton exchanges with labile amide backbone and sidechain groups. Further optimizations of this approach have now allowed us to achieve proton polarizations approaching 25% in the water transferred into the NMR spectrometer, effective water T1 times approaching 40 s, and a reduction in the dilution demanded for the cryogenic dissolution process. Further hardware developments have allowed us to perform these experiments, repeatedly and reliably, in 5 mm NMR tubes. All these ingredients - particularly the ⩾3000× 1H polarization enhancements over 11.7 T thermal counterparts, long T1 times and a compatibility with high-resolution biomolecular NMR setups - augur well for hyperpolarized 2D NMR studies of peptides, unfolded proteins and intrinsically disordered systems undergoing fast exchanges of their protons with the solvent. This hypothesis is here explored by detailing the provisions that lead to these significant improvements over previous reports, and demonstrating 1D coherence transfer experiments and 2D biomolecular HMQC acquisitions delivering NMR spectral enhancements of 100-500× over their optimized, thermally-polarized, counterparts.

  20. Optimizing water hyperpolarization and dissolution for sensitivity-enhanced 2D biomolecular NMR.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Greg; Markhasin, Evgeny; Szekely, Or; Bretschneider, Christian; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    A recent study explored the use of hyperpolarized water, to enhance the sensitivity of nuclei in biomolecules thanks to rapid proton exchanges with labile amide backbone and sidechain groups. Further optimizations of this approach have now allowed us to achieve proton polarizations approaching 25% in the water transferred into the NMR spectrometer, effective water T1 times approaching 40s, and a reduction in the dilution demanded for the cryogenic dissolution process. Further hardware developments have allowed us to perform these experiments, repeatedly and reliably, in 5mm NMR tubes. All these ingredients--particularly the ⩾ 3000× (1)H polarization enhancements over 11.7T thermal counterparts, long T1 times and a compatibility with high-resolution biomolecular NMR setups - augur well for hyperpolarized 2D NMR studies of peptides, unfolded proteins and intrinsically disordered systems undergoing fast exchanges of their protons with the solvent. This hypothesis is here explored by detailing the provisions that lead to these significant improvements over previous reports, and demonstrating 1D coherence transfer experiments and 2D biomolecular HMQC acquisitions delivering NMR spectral enhancements of 100-500× over their optimized, thermally-polarized, counterparts. PMID:26920830

  1. Shallow-angle water entry of ballistic projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Gomez, Jason T.; Beal, David N.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2008-11-01

    The water-entry of ballistic projectiles is investigated using high-speed digital imaging. Projectiles enter the water at shallow angles to the free surface, 5^o-15^o, without ricochet at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 2.0. Projectile dynamics, critical entry angle, and cavity growth are discussed. Geometric modifications to a projectile allow it to travel large distances underwater assuming a sufficiently large air-cavity is formed after impact, which dramatically decreases drag on the projectile. Results show that successful water-entry occurs for projectiles with modified tip geometries at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 2; these projectile modifications include tip geometry and material properties. A theoretical cavity model compares well with the experimental data and will be discussed for a range of experimental conditions.

  2. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  3. Shallow ground-water flow, water levels, and quality of water, 1980-84, Cowles Unit, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.A.; Shedlock, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Since the settling ponds were sealed, the concentration of boron has decreased while concentrations of cadmium, arsenic, zinc, and molybdenum in shallow ground water downgradient of the ponds show no definite trends in time. Arsenic, boron and molybdenum have remained at concentrations above those of shallow ground water in areas unaffected by settling-pond seepage.

  4. Mid frequency shallow water fine-grained sediment attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Dosso, Stan E

    2013-07-01

    Attenuation is perhaps the most difficult sediment acoustic property to measure, but arguably one of the most important for predicting passive and active sonar performance. Measurement techniques can be separated into "direct" measurements (e.g., via sediment probes, sediment cores, and laboratory studies on "ideal" sediments) which are typically at high frequencies, O(10(4)-10(5)) Hz, and "indirect" measurements where attenuation is inferred from long-range propagation or reflection data, generally O(10(2)-10(3)) Hz. A frequency gap in measurements exists in the 600-4000 Hz band and also a general acknowledgement that much of the historical measurements on fine-grained sediments have been biased due to a non-negligible silt and sand component. A shallow water measurement technique using long range reverberation is critically explored. An approximate solution derived using energy flux theory shows that the reverberation is very sensitive to depth-integrated attenuation in a fine-grained sediment layer and separable from most other unknown geoacoustic parameters. Simulation using Bayesian methods confirms the theory. Reverberation measurements across a 10 m fine-grained sediment layer yield an attenuation of 0.009 dB/m/kHz with 95% confidence bounds of 0.006-0.013 dB/m/kHz. This is among the lowest values for sediment attenuation reported in shallow water. PMID:23862792

  5. Solitary wave dynamics in shallow water over periodic topography.

    PubMed

    Nakoulima, Ousseynou; Zahibo, Narcisse; Pelinovsky, Efim; Talipova, Tatiana; Kurkin, Andrey

    2005-09-01

    The problem of long-wave scattering by piecewise-constant periodic topography is studied both for a linear solitary-like wave pulse, and for a weakly nonlinear solitary wave [Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) soliton]. If the characteristic length of the topographic irregularities is larger than the pulse length, the solution of the scattering problem is obtained analytically for a leading wave in the framework of linear shallow-water theory. The wave decrement in the case of the small height of the topographic irregularities is proportional to delta2, where delta is the relative height of the topographic obstacles. An analytical approximate solution is also obtained for the weakly nonlinear problem when the length of the irregularities is larger than the characteristic nonlinear length scale. In this case, the Korteweg-de Vries equation is solved for each piece of constant depth by using the inverse scattering technique; the solutions are matched at each step by using linear shallow-water theory. The weakly nonlinear solitary wave decays more significantly than the linear solitary pulse. Solitary wave dynamics above a random seabed is also discussed, and the results obtained for random topography (including experimental data) are in reasonable agreement with the calculations for piecewise topography. PMID:16253002

  6. Global dynamical behaviors in a physical shallow water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchakoutio Nguetcho, Aurélien Serge; Li, Jibin; Bilbault, Jean-Marie

    2016-07-01

    The theory of bifurcations of dynamical systems is used to investigate the behavior of travelling wave solutions in an entire family of shallow water wave equations. This family is obtained by a perturbative asymptotic expansion for unidirectional shallow water waves. According to the parameters of the system, this family can lead to different sets of known equations such as Camassa-Holm, Korteweg-de Vries, Degasperis and Procesi and several other dispersive equations of the third order. Looking for possible travelling wave solutions, we show that different phase orbits in some regions of parametric planes are similar to those obtained with the model of the pressure waves studied by Li and Chen. Many other exact explicit travelling waves solutions are derived as well, some of them being in perfect agreement with solutions obtained in previous works by researchers using different methods. When parameters are varied, the conditions under which the above solutions appear are also shown. The dynamics of singular nonlinear travelling system is completely determined for each of the above mentioned equations. Moreover, we define sufficient conditions leading to the existence of propagating wave solutions and demonstrate how and why travelling waves lose their smoothness and develop into solutions with compact support or breaking waves.

  7. Shallow-water sparsity-cognizant source-location mapping.

    PubMed

    Forero, Pedro A; Baxley, Paul A

    2014-06-01

    Using passive sonar for underwater acoustic source localization in a shallow-water environment is challenging due to the complexities of underwater acoustic propagation. Matched-field processing (MFP) exploits both measured and model-predicted acoustic pressures to localize acoustic sources. However, the ambiguity surface obtained through MFP contains artifacts that limit its ability to reveal the location of the acoustic sources. This work introduces a robust scheme for shallow-water source localization that exploits the inherent sparse structure of the localization problem and the use of a model characterizing the acoustic propagation environment. To this end, the underwater acoustic source-localization problem is cast as a sparsity-inducing stochastic optimization problem that is robust to model mismatch. The resulting source-location map (SLM) yields reduced ambiguities and improved resolution, even at low signal-to-noise ratios, when compared to those obtained via classical MFP approaches. An iterative solver based on block-coordinate descent is developed whose computational complexity per iteration is linear with respect to the number of locations considered for the SLM. Numerical tests illustrate the performance of the algorithm. PMID:24907812

  8. Modeling rapid mass movements using the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, S.; Robl, J.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new method to model rapid mass movements on complex topography using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates. These equations are the widely used standard approximation for the flow of water in rivers and shallow lakes, but the main prerequisite for their application - an almost horizontal fluid table - is in general not satisfied for avalanches and debris flows in steep terrain. Therefore, we have developed appropriate correction terms for large topographic gradients. In this study we present the mathematical formulation of these correction terms and their implementation in the open source flow solver GERRIS. This novel approach is evaluated by simulating avalanches on synthetic and finally natural topographies and the widely used Voellmy flow resistance law. The results are tested against analytical solutions and the commercial avalanche model RAMMS. The overall results are in excellent agreement with the reference system RAMMS, and the deviations between the different models are far below the uncertainties in the determination of the relevant fluid parameters and involved avalanche volumes in reality. As this code is freely available and open source, it can be easily extended by additional fluid models or source areas, making this model suitable for simulating several types of rapid mass movements. It therefore provides a valuable tool assisting regional scale natural hazard studies.

  9. Simulations of time spreading in shallow water propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsos, Eric I.; Elam, W. T.; Tang, Dajun; Henyey, Frank S.; Williams, Kevin L.; Reynolds, Stephen A.

    2002-11-01

    Pulse propagation in a shallow water wave guide leads to time spreading due to multipath effects. Results of PE simulations will be described for pulse propagation in shallow water with a rough sea surface and a flat sandy sea floor. The simulations illustrate that such time spreading may be significantly less at longer ranges than for the flat surface case. Pressure fields are simulated in two space dimensions and have been obtained using a wide-angle PE code developed by Rosenberg [A. D. Rosenberg, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 144-153 (1999)]. The effect of rough surface scattering is to cause acoustic energy initially propagating at relatively high angles but still below the critical angle at the sea floor to be eventually shifted to grazing angles above the critical angle. This energy is then lost into the bottom, effectively stripping higher propagating modes. The surviving energy at longer ranges is concentrated in the lowest modes and shows little effect of time spreading. Thus, the effect of rough surface scattering is found to produce a simpler temporal field structure than if the surface were treated as flat. [Work supported by ONR.

  10. Inversion Method for Evapotranspiration from 2D Measurements of Water Vapor Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, W. E.; Barnhart, B. L.; Plenner, S.; Thompson, A.; Winsky, B.

    2011-12-01

    A method has been developed to use 2D measurements of water vapor concentration to make spatial estimates of evapotranspiration. The method is based on theoretical solutions to the conservation of water vapor equation (similar to Sutton, Sienfeld) and is related to methods used to generate footprints. The method uses a diffusion coefficient to close the conservation equation and assumes uniformity of the surface with respect to turbulent processes. This solution allows the development of a transfer coefficient between each location at the surface and each of the water vapor measurements. The problem has been constrained to two dimensions for development, but is easily expanded to three. The method assumes water vapor concentration measurements in a plane at arbitrary positions above the field. Evapotranspiration is allowed to vary in increments across the field. This geometry and the transfer coefficients allow the water vapor concentration at each of the measured locations to be expressed as the sum of the contributions from the entire surface. A least squares solution is found that estimates the evapotranspiration across the field as a function of position. To evaluate the accuracy of the approach in solving for evaporation rates two artificial data sets of water vapor concentration (with varying amounts of artificial noise added) for known evaporation rates were generated and used to estimate the surface evaporation. The method is sensitive to the assumptions made near the edges of field. Results and details of the methods used to resolve edge effects will be shown.

  11. 2D-photochemical modeling of Saturn’s stratosphere: hydrocarbon and water distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Vincent; Cavalié, Thibault; Hersant, Franck; Dobrijevic, Michel; Greathouse, Thomas; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Hartogh, Paul; Cassidy, Timothy; Spiga, Aymeric; Guerlet, Sandrine; Sylvestre, Melody

    2014-11-01

    Saturn’s axial tilt of 27° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. The seasonal forcing over Saturn’s 30 years period influences the production/loss of the major atmospheric absorbers and coolants through photochemistry, and influences therefore Saturn’s stratospheric temperatures. We have developed a 2D time-dependent photochemical model of Saturn’s atmosphere [Hue et al., in prep.], coupled to a radiative-climate model [Greathouse et al., 2008] to study seasonal effects on its atmospheric composition. Cassini spacecraft has revealed that the distribution of hydrocarbons in Saturn’s stratosphere [Guerlet et al., 2009] differs from pure photochemical predictions, i.e. without meridional transport [Moses et al., 2005]. Differences between the observed distribution of hydrocarbons and 2D-photochemical predictions are likely to be an indicator of dynamical forcing.Disentangling the origin of water in the stratosphere of this planet has been a long-term issue. Due to Saturn’s cold tropopause trap, which acts as a transport barrier, the water vapor observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) [Feuchtgruber et al., 1997] has an external origin. Three external sources have been identified: (i) permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles, (ii) local sources form planetary environments (rings, satellites), (iii) large cometary impacts, similar to Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter. Previous observations of Saturn with Herschel’s Hsso program [Hartogh et al., 2009] led to the detection of a water torus around Saturn [Hartogh et al., 2011], fed by Enceladus’ geysers. A substantial fraction of this torus is predicted to be a local source of water for Saturn’s and its satellites, as it will spread in this system [Cassidy et al., 2010]. Using the new 2D-photochemical model, we test here the validity of Enceladus’ torus as the source of Saturn’s stratospheric water.References : Hue et al., in prep. Greathouse et al., 2008. AGU Fall Meeting

  12. Blue-winged teals swim in shallow water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A pair of blue-winged teals glide through the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Inhabiting marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, the teal winters as far south as South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  13. Joint forces and torques when walking in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Orselli, Maria Isabel Veras; Duarte, Marcos

    2011-04-01

    This study reports for the first time an estimation of the internal net joint forces and torques on adults' lower limbs and pelvis when walking in shallow water, taking into account the drag forces generated by the movement of their bodies in the water and the equivalent data when they walk on land. A force plate and a video camera were used to perform a two-dimensional gait analysis at the sagittal plane of 10 healthy young adults walking at comfortable speeds on land and in water at a chest-high level. We estimated the drag force on each body segment and the joint forces and torques at the ankle, knee, and hip of the right side of their bodies using inverse dynamics. The observed subjects' apparent weight in water was about 35% of their weight on land and they were about 2.7 times slower when walking in water. When the subjects walked in water compared with walking on land, there were no differences in the angular displacements but there was a significant reduction in the joint torques which was related to the water's depth. The greatest reduction was observed for the ankle and then the knee and no reduction was observed for the hip. All joint powers were significantly reduced in water. The compressive and shear joint forces were on average about three times lower during walking in water than on land. These quantitative results substantiate the use of water as a safe environment for practicing low-impact exercises, particularly walking. PMID:21334630

  14. The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event: a shallow-water perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Stephane; Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Kabiri, Lahcen; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    The Toarcian ocean anoxic event (T-OAE, ca. 183 Ma) corresponds to a major perturbation of the carbon cycle as reflected by a marked decrease (2 to 7 per mil) in carbon-isotope ratios of various carbonate and organic matter phases. Severe environmental perturbations and biotic turnovers are accompanying the unfolding of the T-OAE, which is thought to be initiated by the activity of the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province. Most of the studies dedicated to the T-OAE were however undertaken in mud-rich, deep-water setting, leaving vast uncertainties about its shallow-water expression and accompanying sea-level fluctuations. Here we present an extensive sedimentological dataset of the shallow-water record of the T-OAE within the Central High Atlas Basin of Morocco. The combination of ammonite and brachiopod biostratigraphy, together with carbon-isotope chemostratigraphy (on both carbonate and organic matter) allows a precise location of the T-OAE in the studied shallow-water sections. Thanks to well-exposed and thick successions, relative sea-level variations were reconstructed on a high-resolution scale, highlighting several important facts. Firstly, the T-OAE interval is preceded by a 50 meters-deep incised valley, observed within the uppermost Polymorphum ammonite zone. Similar observations have been reported from Euro-boreal basins and, together with published evidences of coeval occurrence of relatively cool seawater temperature and low atmospheric pCO2, we postulate that this forced regression is driven by glacio-eustasy. This points at the occurrence of a "cold snap" event just prior to the onset of the T-OAE. Secondly, the inception of the T-OAE is marked by the demise of the Lithiotid-dominated neritic carbonate factory, replaced by siliciclastic-dominated sedimentation during the T-OAE negative carbon isotope shift. Thirdly, an important progradation of oo-biodetritic shoal occurs during the negative carbon isotope plateau, underlying that the renewal of

  15. A shallow water model for magnetohydrodynamic flows with turbulent Hartmann layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothérat, Alban; Schweitzer, Jean-Philippe

    2011-05-01

    We establish a shallow water model for flows of electrically conducting fluids in homogeneous static magnetic fields that are confined between two parallel planes where turbulent Hartmann layers are present. This is achieved by modelling the wall shear stress in these layers using Prandtl's mixing length model, as did by Alboussière and Lingwood [Phys. Fluids 12(6), 1535 (2000)]. The idea for this new model arose from the failure of previous shallow water models that assumed a laminar Hartmann layer to recover the correct amount of dissipation found in some regimes of the MATUR experiment. This experiment, conducted by Messadek and Moreau [J. Fluid Mech. 456, 137 (2002)], consisted of a thin layer of mercury electrically driven in differential rotation in a transverse magnetic field. Numerical simulations of our new model in the configuration of this experiment allowed us to recover experimental values of both the global angular momentum and the local velocity up to a few percent when the Hartmann layer was in a sufficiently well developed turbulent state. We thus provide an evidence that the unexplained level of dissipation observed in MATUR in these specific regimes was caused by turbulence in the Hartmann layers. A parametric analysis of the flow, made possible by the simplicity of our model, also revealed that turbulent friction in the Hartmann layer prevented quasi-2D turbulence from becoming more intense and limited the size of the large scales.

  16. A second-order treatment to the wet-dry interface of shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haifei; Zhang, Jie; Shafiai, Siti Habibah

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a second-order lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for treating the wet-dry interface of shallow water flows. This approach is improved according to the Chapman-Enskog analysis and the Taylor expansion, which are used to set up the relation of the dry cell and its adjacent wet cell. The external forces, such as bed friction and wind stress, are directly included in the wetting and drying boundary treatment. However, the viscous effect cannot be absolutely removed, as the single relaxation time, τ > 0.5 , should be retained for the reason of stability. In order to verify the scheme, two one-dimensional (1D) and one two-dimensional (2D) numerical cases are carried out. The results indicate that the approach is superior to the first-order scheme, comparing with the other numerical solutions and the experimental data. It can be concluded that the proposed scheme is more accurate and effective in simulating shallow water fronts.

  17. Competition for water between deep- and shallow-rooted grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, J.L.; Black, R.A. ); Link, S.O. )

    1994-06-01

    Competition between root systems of neighboring plants may be altered by seasonal variation in precipitation and soil moisture. Competitive effects of a deep-rooted, perennial grass, Pseudoroegneria spicata, on a shallow-rooted, perennial grass, Poa sandbergii, were monitored over two growing seasons by isolating the root system of P. sandbergii individuals within PVC tubes and comparing plant and soil characteristics to controls. When isolated for the entire growing season, P. sandbergii continued vegetative growth three weeks longer and later season soil water content was significantly greater than controls. Differences in soil water content were greatest between 30 and 50cm, below P. sandbergii's typical rooting depth. Flowering phenology was unchanged. When plants were isolated late in the season, treated plants showed more negative predown xylem pressure potential the morning after isolatron. Compared to controls, soil water content was reduced the day after tube insertion. These immediate effects on plant and soil water status may be due to removal of water supplied nightly by hydraulic lift.

  18. Ecological succession of a Jurassic shallow-water ichthyosaur fall.

    PubMed

    Danise, Silvia; Twitchett, Richard J; Matts, Katie

    2014-01-01

    After the discovery of whale fall communities in modern oceans, it has been hypothesized that during the Mesozoic the carcasses of marine reptiles created similar habitats supporting long-lived and specialized animal communities. Here, we report a fully documented ichthyosaur fall community, from a Late Jurassic shelf setting, and reconstruct the ecological succession of its micro- and macrofauna. The early 'mobile-scavenger' and 'enrichment-opportunist' stages were not succeeded by a 'sulphophilic stage' characterized by chemosynthetic molluscs, but instead the bones were colonized by microbial mats that attracted echinoids and other mat-grazing invertebrates. Abundant cemented suspension feeders indicate a well-developed 'reef stage' with prolonged exposure and colonization of the bones prior to final burial, unlike in modern whale falls where organisms such as the ubiquitous bone-eating worm Osedax rapidly destroy the skeleton. Shallow-water ichthyosaur falls thus fulfilled similar ecological roles to shallow whale falls, and did not support specialized chemosynthetic communities. PMID:25205249

  19. Polar Vortices in Shallow Water Simulations of Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Morgan E.; Emanuel, Kerry

    2014-11-01

    Jupiter, Saturn and Neptune each exhibit unique polar atmospheric behavior. Assuming these flows are due to shallow dynamics, we explore the parameter space potentially responsible for the difference between each planet's polar features. The best observations have come from the Cassini misson to Saturn. Among many discoveries, a massive, warm and cyclonic vortex has been observed on each pole. The South Polar Vortex (SPV), specifically, has the highest measured temperatures on Saturn, a double eyewall, deep eye and a rapid cyclonic jet with the second highest windspeeds observed on the planet. Numerous small, vortical, and potentially convective systems are embedded within the large-scale flow of the SPV. Given these observations, we explore one potential mechanism of polar vortex maintenance: up-scale, poleward vorticity flux due to vortical hot towers (VHTs). Large GCMs cannot yet resolve local deep convection in the weather layer. Using a reduced gravity shallow water model on a polar beta plane, we represent convective towers with mass-flux driven vortex pairs and allow them to move freely. We show that there exist multiple regimes of polar flow, and that small and/or quickly rotating planets with sufficient total energy favor a polar cyclone in our simulations.

  20. Ecological succession of a Jurassic shallow-water ichthyosaur fall

    PubMed Central

    Danise, Silvia; Twitchett, Richard J.; Matts, Katie

    2014-01-01

    After the discovery of whale fall communities in modern oceans, it has been hypothesized that during the Mesozoic the carcasses of marine reptiles created similar habitats supporting long-lived and specialized animal communities. Here, we report a fully documented ichthyosaur fall community, from a Late Jurassic shelf setting, and reconstruct the ecological succession of its micro- and macrofauna. The early ‘mobile-scavenger’ and ‘enrichment-opportunist’ stages were not succeeded by a ‘sulphophilic stage’ characterized by chemosynthetic molluscs, but instead the bones were colonized by microbial mats that attracted echinoids and other mat-grazing invertebrates. Abundant cemented suspension feeders indicate a well-developed ‘reef stage’ with prolonged exposure and colonization of the bones prior to final burial, unlike in modern whale falls where organisms such as the ubiquitous bone-eating worm Osedax rapidly destroy the skeleton. Shallow-water ichthyosaur falls thus fulfilled similar ecological roles to shallow whale falls, and did not support specialized chemosynthetic communities. PMID:25205249

  1. Caribbean Shallow-water Black Corals (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Antipatharia)

    SciTech Connect

    Opresko, Dennis M; Sanchez, Juan Armando

    2005-01-01

    Our aim is to provide a complete key and guide to the species of black corals from the Caribbean reefs at depths shallower than about 100 m. The key to the species is mostly based on colonial features that are recognized in the field, although some closely related species can only be differentiated by microscopic skeletal features. Each species is illustrated with one or more photos showing the size and shape of the colony; many photos were taken in the natural environment to facilitate underwater identification. Additionally, a short description is provided of each species and their microscopic diagnostic characters are illustrated with the aid of the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Fifteen black coral species are found in relatively shallow-water in the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and other parts of the tropical western Atlantic; these belong to the families Myriopathidae [Tanacetipathes hirta (Gray), T. tanacetum (Pourtales), T. barbadensis (Brook), T. thamnea (Warner), and Plumapathes pennacea (Pallas)]; Antipathidae [Antipathes lenta Pourtales, A. rubusifonnis Warner and Opresko, A. furcata Gray, A. umbratica Opresko, A. atlantica Gray, A. gracilis Gray, A. caribbeana Opresko, Stichopathes lutkeni Brook, and S. accidentalis (Gray)]; and Aphanipathidae [Rhipidipathes colombiana (Opresko and Sinchez)]. We hope that this guide will facilitate research on black corals on Caribbean reefs, where population surveys are urgently needed to evaluate or modify conservation policies.

  2. Calculations of Asteroid Impacts into Deep and Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisler, Galen; Weaver, Robert; Gittings, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Contrary to received opinion, ocean impacts of small (<500 m) asteroids do not produce tsunamis that lead to world-wide devastation. In fact the most dangerous features of ocean impacts, just as for land impacts, are the atmospheric effects. We present illustrative hydrodynamic calculations of impacts into both deep and shallow seas, and draw conclusions from a parameter study in which the size of the impactor and the depth of the sea are varied independently. For vertical impacts at 20 km/s, craters in the seafloor are produced when the water depth is less than about 5-7 times the asteroid diameter. Both the depth and the diameter of the transient crater scale with the asteroid diameter, so the volume of water excavated scales with the asteroid volume. About a third of the crater volume is vaporised, because the kinetic energy per unit mass of the asteroid is much larger than the latent heat of vaporisation of water. The vaporised water carries away a considerable fraction of the impact energy in an explosively expanding blast wave which is responsible for devastating local effects and may affect worldwide climate. Of the remaining energy, a substantial portion is used in the crown splash and the rebound jet that forms as the transient crater collapses. The collapse and rebound cycle leads to a propagating wave with a wavelength considerably shorter than classical tsunamis, being only about twice the diameter of the transient crater. Propagation of this wave is hindered somewhat because its amplitude is so large that it breaks in deep water and is strongly affected by the blast wave's perturbation of the atmosphere. Even if propagation were perfect, however, the volume of water delivered per metre of shoreline is less than was delivered by the Boxing Day 2004 tsunami for any impactor smaller than 500 m diameter in an ocean of 5 km depth or less. Near-field effects are dangerous for impactors of diameter 200 m or greater; hurricane-force winds can extend tens of

  3. A spectral element shallow water model on spherical geodesic grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldo, Francis X.

    2001-04-01

    The spectral element method for the two-dimensional shallow water equations on the sphere is presented. The equations are written in conservation form and the domains are discretized using quadrilateral elements obtained from the generalized icosahedral grid introduced previously (Giraldo FX. Lagrange-Galerkin methods on spherical geodesic grids: the shallow water equations. Journal of Computational Physics 2000; 160: 336-368). The equations are written in Cartesian co-ordinates that introduce an additional momentum equation, but the pole singularities disappear. This paper represents a departure from previously published work on solving the shallow water equations on the sphere in that the equations are all written, discretized, and solved in three-dimensional Cartesian space. Because the equations are written in a three-dimensional Cartesian co-ordinate system, the algorithm simplifies into the integration of surface elements on the sphere from the fully three-dimensional equations. A mapping (Song Ch, Wolf JP. The scaled boundary finite element method - alias consistent infinitesimal finite element cell method - for diffusion. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 1999; 45: 1403-1431) which simplifies these computations is described and is shown to contain the Eulerian version of the method introduced previously by Giraldo (Journal of Computational Physics 2000; 160: 336-368) for the special case of triangular elements. The significance of this mapping is that although the equations are written in Cartesian co-ordinates, the mapping takes into account the curvature of the high-order spectral elements, thereby allowing the elements to lie entirely on the surface of the sphere. In addition, using this mapping simplifies all of the three-dimensional spectral-type finite element surface integrals because any of the typical two-dimensional planar finite element or spectral element basis functions found in any textbook (for example, Huebner et al

  4. Reverberation clutter induced by nonlinear internal waves in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Henyey, Frank S; Tang, Dajun

    2013-10-01

    Clutter is related to false alarms for active sonar. It is demonstrated that, in shallow water, target-like clutter in reverberation signals can be caused by nonlinear internal waves. A nonlinear internal wave is modeled using measured stratification on the New Jersey shelf. Reverberation in the presence of the internal wave is modeled numerically. Calculations show that acoustic energy propagating near a sound speed minimum is deflected as a high intensity, higher angle beam into the bottom, where it is backscattered along the reciprocal path. The interaction of sound with the internal wave is isolated in space, hence resulting in a target-like clutter, which is found to be greater than 10 dB above the mean reverberation level. PMID:24116532

  5. Modeling of SAR signatures of shallow water ocean topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kozma, A.; Kasischke, E. S.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic/electromagnetic model was developed to explain and quantify the relationship between the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observed signatures and the bottom topography of the ocean in the English Channel region of the North Sea. The model uses environmental data and radar system parameters as inputs and predicts SAR-observed backscatter changes over topographic changes in the ocean floor. The model results compare favorably with the actual SEASAT SAR observed backscatter values. The developed model is valid for only relatively shallow water areas (i.e., less than 50 meters in depth) and suggests that for bottom features to be visible on SAR imagery, a moderate to high velocity current and a moderate wind must be present.

  6. Development of Modular Shallow Water AUV: Issues & Trial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shome, S. N.; Nandy, S.; Pal, D.; Das, S. K.; Vadali, S. R. K.; Basu, Jhankar; Ghosh, Sukamal

    2012-07-01

    In view of their operational ease, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) find wide applications in different sub-sea operations, and the range encompasses bathymetry, seabed mapping, collection of marine data as well as strategic and commercial applications like underwater surveillance and reconnaissance, recovery and monitoring of submerged installations. A modular shallow water AUV having five degrees of freedom—christened AUV-150—has been designed and developed by CSIR-CMERI, Durgapur, India for operating up to a depth of 150 m. A fully functional AUV has been tested at various conditions in accordance to test protocols. This paper relates to the developmental issues, the hurdles faced during various phases of development of the AUV-150 and discusses the experimental results obtained during trials of the AUV in lake and sea.

  7. Observable parameters from multipath bottom reverberation in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A

    2007-06-01

    Multipath ocean reverberation originating from the seabed in shallow isovelocity water, with particular attention to its information content in the cylindrical spreading and mode stripping regions, is considered. The reverberation is evaluated using Weston's flux integral method, both analytically with various simplifying approximations and numerically with all but one of these approximations rescinded. The functional form of the analytical solution is used to infer which physical seabed parameters can be extracted from measurements of reverberation. Coarse- and fine-grained sediments (sand and clay) are both considered. The main purpose of the numerical solutions is to check the accuracy of the analytical approximations; they also serve as a convenient surrogate for measured reverberation. PMID:17552688

  8. Water formation through O2 + D pathway on cold silicate and amorphous water ice surfaces of interstellar interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaabouni, H.; Minissale, M.; Manicò, G.; Congiu, E.; Noble, J. A.; Baouche, S.; Accolla, M.; Lemaire, J. L.; Pirronello, V.; Dulieu, F.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of the first monolayer of water molecules on bare dust grains is of primary importance to understand the growth of the icy mantles that cover dust in the interstellar medium. In this work, we explore experimentally the formation of water molecules from O2 + D reaction on bare silicate surfaces that simulates the grains present in the diffuse interstellar clouds at visual extinctions (AV < 3 mag). For comparison, we also study the formation of water molecules on surfaces covered with amorphous water ice representing the dense clouds (AV ⩾ 3 mag). Our studies focus on the formation of water molecules in the sub-monolayer and monolayer regimes using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption techniques. We provide the fractions of the products, such as D2O and D2O2 molecules formed on three astrophysically relevant surfaces held at 10 K (amorphous olivine-type silicate, porous amorphous water ice, and nonporous amorphous water ice). Our results showed that the formation of D2O molecules occurs with an efficiency of about 55%-60% on nonporous amorphous water ice and about 18% on bare silicate grains surfaces. We explain the low efficiency of D2O water formation on the silicate surfaces by the desorption upon formation of certain products once the reaction occurs between O2 and D atoms on the surface. A kinetic model taking into account the chemical desorption of newly formed water supports our conclusions.

  9. Full 2D observation of water surface elevation from SWOT under different flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Schumann, Guy; Rui, Wei; Durand, Michael; Pavelsky, Tamlin

    2016-04-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is a joint project of NASA, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES, France), the Canadian Space Agency, and the Space Agency of the UK that will provide a first global, high-resolution observation of ocean and terrestrial water surface heights. Characterized by an observation swath of 120 km and an orbit repeat interval of about 21 days, SWOT will provide unprecedented bi-dimensional observations of rivers wider than 50-100 m. Despite many research activities that have investigated potential uses of remotely sensed data from SWOT, potentials and limitations of the spatial observations provided by the satellite mission for flood modeling still remain poorly understood and investigated. In this study we present a first analysis of the spatial observation of water surface elevation that is expected from SWOT for a 140 km reach of the middle-lower portion of the Po River, in Northern Italy. The river stretch is characterized by a main channel varying from 200-500 m in width and a floodplain that can be as wide as 5 km and that is delimited by a system of major embankments. The reconstruction of the hydraulic behavior of the Po River is performed by means of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic and bathymetric information (LiDAR, 2 m resolution), while the simulation of the spatial observation sensed by SWOT is performed with a SWOT simulator that mimics the satellite sensor characteristics. Referring to water surface elevations associated with different flow conditions (maximum, minimum and average flow reproduced by means of the quasi-2d numerical model) this work provides a first characterization of the spatial observations provided by SWOT and highlights the strengths and limitations of the expected products. By referring to a real river reach the analysis provides a credible example of the type of spatial observations that will be available after launch of SWOT and offers a first

  10. Broadband performance of time-reversing arrays in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim Ghazi

    Active acoustic time reversal is the process of recording the signal from a remote source with a transducer array, and then replaying the signal in a time-reversed fashion to retro-direct the replayed sound back to the remote source to form a retrofocus, in an unknown environment. Time-Reversing Arrays (TRAs) perform well in the absence of acoustic absorption losses and temporal changes in the environment when there is sufficient array aperture and high signal-to-noise ratio. Future active sonar and underwater communication systems for use in unknown shallow ocean waters may be developed from the automatic spatial and temporal focusing properties of TRAs. The performance of TRAs can be determined by four criteria: the size, the longevity and the field amplitude of the array's retrofocus, as well as the correlation of the retrofocus signal with a time-reversed version of the original signal. Four issues related to TRAs performance are investigated in this thesis: (i) the impact of noise, (ii) the influence of array and source motion, (iii) the effects of oceanic currents, and (iv) the effectiveness of blind deconvolution of the original signal via artificial time-reversal. Noise influences TRA performance twice because the array both listens and transmits. Degradation of TRA's performance caused by noise in the acoustic environment is investigated through an analytical formulation that can be reduced to an algebraic relationship for a simple noise model. Numerical experiments that illustrate this effort are also shown. Another limitation of TRA performance is the Doppler effect induced by the dynamic source-array configuration or the moving medium. Normal modes and parabolic equation simulations illustrate these influences for various oceanic waveguides and array geometry. Finally a novel blind deconvolution technique, artificial time-reversal (ATR), is developed for providing an estimate of an unknown source signal propagating in an unknown shallow oceanic

  11. 2D IR spectra of cyanide in water investigated by molecular dynamics simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung Won; Carr, Joshua K.; Göllner, Michael; Hamm, Peter; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the 2D infrared (IR) spectroscopy of CN− solvated in D2O is investigated. Depending on the force field parametrizations, most of which are based on multipolar interactions for the CN− molecule, the frequency-frequency correlation function and observables computed from it differ. Most notably, models based on multipoles for CN− and TIP3P for water yield quantitatively correct results when compared with experiments. Furthermore, the recent finding that T 1 times are sensitive to the van der Waals ranges on the CN− is confirmed in the present study. For the linear IR spectrum, the best model reproduces the full widths at half maximum almost quantitatively (13.0 cm−1 vs. 14.9 cm−1) if the rotational contribution to the linewidth is included. Without the rotational contribution, the lines are too narrow by about a factor of two, which agrees with Raman and IR experiments. The computed and experimental tilt angles (or nodal slopes) α as a function of the 2D IR waiting time compare favorably with the measured ones and the frequency fluctuation correlation function is invariably found to contain three time scales: a sub-ps, 1 ps, and one on the 10-ps time scale. These time scales are discussed in terms of the structural dynamics of the surrounding solvent and it is found that the longest time scale (≈10 ps) most likely corresponds to solvent exchange between the first and second solvation shell, in agreement with interpretations from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements.

  12. 2D IR spectra of cyanide in water investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Won; Carr, Joshua K; Göllner, Michael; Hamm, Peter; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-08-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the 2D infrared (IR) spectroscopy of CN(-) solvated in D2O is investigated. Depending on the force field parametrizations, most of which are based on multipolar interactions for the CN(-) molecule, the frequency-frequency correlation function and observables computed from it differ. Most notably, models based on multipoles for CN(-) and TIP3P for water yield quantitatively correct results when compared with experiments. Furthermore, the recent finding that T1 times are sensitive to the van der Waals ranges on the CN(-) is confirmed in the present study. For the linear IR spectrum, the best model reproduces the full widths at half maximum almost quantitatively (13.0 cm(-1) vs. 14.9 cm(-1)) if the rotational contribution to the linewidth is included. Without the rotational contribution, the lines are too narrow by about a factor of two, which agrees with Raman and IR experiments. The computed and experimental tilt angles (or nodal slopes) α as a function of the 2D IR waiting time compare favorably with the measured ones and the frequency fluctuation correlation function is invariably found to contain three time scales: a sub-ps, 1 ps, and one on the 10-ps time scale. These time scales are discussed in terms of the structural dynamics of the surrounding solvent and it is found that the longest time scale (≈10 ps) most likely corresponds to solvent exchange between the first and second solvation shell, in agreement with interpretations from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. PMID:23927269

  13. 2D IR spectra of cyanide in water investigated by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Won; Carr, Joshua K.; Göllner, Michael; Hamm, Peter; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-08-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the 2D infrared (IR) spectroscopy of CN- solvated in D2O is investigated. Depending on the force field parametrizations, most of which are based on multipolar interactions for the CN- molecule, the frequency-frequency correlation function and observables computed from it differ. Most notably, models based on multipoles for CN- and TIP3P for water yield quantitatively correct results when compared with experiments. Furthermore, the recent finding that T1 times are sensitive to the van der Waals ranges on the CN- is confirmed in the present study. For the linear IR spectrum, the best model reproduces the full widths at half maximum almost quantitatively (13.0 cm-1 vs. 14.9 cm-1) if the rotational contribution to the linewidth is included. Without the rotational contribution, the lines are too narrow by about a factor of two, which agrees with Raman and IR experiments. The computed and experimental tilt angles (or nodal slopes) α as a function of the 2D IR waiting time compare favorably with the measured ones and the frequency fluctuation correlation function is invariably found to contain three time scales: a sub-ps, 1 ps, and one on the 10-ps time scale. These time scales are discussed in terms of the structural dynamics of the surrounding solvent and it is found that the longest time scale (≈10 ps) most likely corresponds to solvent exchange between the first and second solvation shell, in agreement with interpretations from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements.

  14. Obtaining instantaneous water levels relative to a geoid with a 2D storm surge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobbe, D. C.; Verlaan, M.; Klees, R.; Gerritsen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Current and new applications of 2D storm surge models such as the Dutch Continental Shelf Model (DCSM) require that the models provide proper estimates of the instantaneous water levels expressed relative to a particular geoid, rather than only the tide and surge components expressed relative to the ill-defined model's zero height surface. For DCSM, this is realized by adding the depth-averaged horizontal baroclinic pressure gradients to the model equations, which are derived from 4D salinity and temperature fields provided by the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory hydrodynamic model (POL's hindcast). The vertical datum of the extended model is fixed to that of the European Gravimetric Geoid model 2008 (EGG08). This is done by an adjustment of the model parameters that depend on the choice of the reference surface (e.g., bathymetry) and by referring the water levels along the open boundaries to this reference surface. Using different numerical experiments we investigate the effects on the water levels of several approximations we have made during the implementation. The ability of the model to reproduce both the mean sea level (MSL) and instantaneous water levels is assessed by a comparison with the MSL derived from POL's hindcast as well as with instantaneous water levels acquired by various radar altimeter satellites. From this comparison we conclude that our modeled MSL is in good agreement with the MSL derived from POL's hindcast; the standard deviation of the differences is below 2 cm. However, larger differences in MSL are observed when comparing the model output with the MSL derived from radar altimeter data. They are attributed to either geoid errors or errors in the used salinity and temperature fields. The root mean squared (rms) differences between observed and modeled instantaneous water levels over the entire model domain varies from 9 cm for data acquired by the TOPEX satellite to 11 cm for data acquired by the GFO-1 satellite. These numbers improve to

  15. Assimilation of spatially distributed water levels into a shallow-water flood model. Part II: Use of a remote sensing image of Mosel River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostache, Renaud; Lai, Xijun; Monnier, Jérôme; Puech, Christian

    2010-09-01

    SummaryWith rapid flood extent mapping capabilities, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of river inundation prove to be very relevant to operational flood management. In this context, a recently developed method provides distributed water levels from SAR images. Furthermore, in view of improving numerical flood prediction, a variational data assimilation method (4D-var) using such distributed water level has been developed in Part I of this study. This method combines an optimal sense remote sensing data (distributed water levels extracted from spatial images) and a 2D shallow water model. In the present article (Part II of the study), we also derive water levels with a ±40 cm average vertical uncertainty from a RADARSAT-1 image of a Mosel River flood event (1997, France). Assimilated in a 2D shallow water hydraulic model using the 4D-var developed method, these SAR derived spatially distributed water levels prove to be capable of enhancing model calibration. Indeed, the assimilation process can identify optimal Manning friction coefficients, at least in the river channel. Moreover, used as a guide for sensitivity analysis, remote sensing water levels allow also identifying some areas in the floodplain and the channel where Manning friction coefficients are homogeneous. This allows basing the spatial segmentation of roughness coefficient on floodplain hydraulic functioning.

  16. Numerical simulation of 2D buoyant jets in ice-covered and temperature-stratified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ruochuan

    A two-dimensional (2D) unsteady simulation model is applied to the problem of a submerged warm water discharge into a stratified lake or reservoir with an ice cover. Numerical simulations and analyses are conducted to gain insight into large-scale convective recirculation and flow processes in a cold waterbody induced by a buoyant jet. Jet behaviors under various discharge temperatures are captured by directly modeling flow and thermal fields. Flow structures and processes are described by the simulated spatial and temporal distributions of velocity and temperature in various regions: deflection, recirculation, attachment, and impingement. Some peculiar hydrothermal and dynamic features, e.g. reversal of buoyancy due to the dilution of a warm jet by entraining cold ambient water, are identified and examined. Simulation results show that buoyancy is the most important factor controlling jet behavior and mixing processes. The inflow boundary is treated as a liquid wall from which the jet is offset. Similarity and difference in effects of boundaries perpendicular and parallel to flow, and of buoyancy on jet attachment and impingement, are discussed. Symmetric flow configuration is used to de-emphasize the Coanda effect caused by offset.

  17. Multipath pulse shapes in shallow water: theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Chris H; Nielsen, Peter L

    2007-03-01

    In shallow water propagation the steeper ray angles are weakened most by boundary losses. Regarding the sound intensity as a continuous function of angle it can be converted into a function of travel time to reveal the multipath pulse shape received from a remote source (one-way path) or a target (two-way path). The closed-form isovelocity pulse shape is extended here to the case of upward or downward refraction. The envelope of the earliest arrivals is roughly trapezoidal with a delayed peak corresponding to the slowest, near horizontal refracted paths. The tail of the pulse falls off exponentially (linearly in decibels) with a decay constant that depends only on the bottom reflection properties and water depth, irrespective of travel time, a useful property for geoacoustic inversion and for sonar design. The nontrivial analytical problem of inverting explicit functions of angle into explicit functions of time is solved by numerical interpolation. Thus exact solutions can be calculated numerically. Explicit closed-form approximations are given for one-way paths. Two-way paths are calculated by numerical convolution. Using the wave model C-SNAP in several broadband cases of interest it is demonstrated that these solutions correspond roughly to a depth average of multipath arrivals. PMID:17407872

  18. A new Shallow Water Cabled OBS System off California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Horst; Pearcey, Chris; Mangano, Giorgio; Guralp, Cansun; Pearce, Nathan

    2014-05-01

    During the summer and fall of 2013 we installed a turnkey cabled network of four combination broadband velocity/acceleration ocean bottom sensors (OBS) on the sea floor near Point Buchon in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of Central California. We implemented a novel network design by daisy-chaining the instruments to one single multistranded cable. The signals of each station are digitized in-situ and then transmitted via dedicated optical fiber links inside the cable to a shore station. From there they are fed in real time via a cell phone modem into several seismic networks in California. The goal of this dense network is to monitor the microseismicity of two offshore faults running parallel to the strike of the San Andreas Fault. However, because the network is installed in rather shallow water near the coast, the action of waves and swell at the sea surface affect the sensor registrations much stronger as compared to the typical deep water installation of OBS equipment. We will report about the challenges of installing and maintaining the network and present some initial results.

  19. High Resolution Marine Magnetic Survey of Shallow Water Littoral Area

    PubMed Central

    Ginzburg, Boris; Cohen, Tsuriel Ram; Zafrir, Hovav; Alimi, Roger; Salomonski, Nizan; Sharvit, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a system developed for detection and accurate mapping of ferro-metallic objects buried below the seabed in shallow waters. The system comprises a precise magnetic gradiometer and navigation subsystem, both installed on a non-magnetic catamaran towed by a low-magnetic interfering boat. In addition we present the results of a marine survey of a near-shore area in the vicinity of Atlit, a town situated on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about 15 km south of Haifa. The primary purpose of the survey was to search for a Harvard airplane that crashed into the sea in 1960. A magnetic map of the survey area (3.5 km2 on a 0.5 m grid) was created revealing the anomalies at sub-meter accuracy. For each investigated target location a corresponding ferro-metallic item was dug out, one of which turned to be very similar to a part of the crashed airplane. The accuracy of location was confirmed by matching the position of the actual dug artifacts with the magnetic map within a range of ± 1 m, in a water depth of 9 m.

  20. Statistical Mechanics of the Shallow Water and Primitive Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potters, M.; Bouchet, F.

    2012-04-01

    Geophysical flows are highly turbulent, yet embody large-scale coherent structures, such as ocean rings, jets, and large-scale circulations. Understanding how these structures appear and predicting their shape are major theoretical challenges. The statistical mechanics approach to geophysical flows is a powerful complement to more conventional theoretical and numerical methods [1]. In the inertial limit, it allows to describe, with only a few thermodynamical parameters, the long-time behavior of the largest scales of the flow. Recent studies in quasi-geostrophic models provide encouraging results: a model of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter [2], an explanation of the drift properties of ocean rings [3], the inertial structure of mid-basin eastward jets [3], bistability phenomena in complex turbulent flows [4], and so on. Generalization to more comprehensive hydrodynamical models, which include gravity wave dynamics and allow for the possibility of energy transfer through wave motion, would be extremely interesting. Namely, both are essential in understanding the geophysical flow energy balance. However, due to difficulties in essential theoretical parts of the statistical mechanics approach, previous methods describing statistical equilibria were up to now limited to the use of quasi-geostrophic models. The current study fills this gap. The new theory we propose describes geophysical phenomena using statistical mechanics applied to the shallow water model, and is easily generalizable to the primitive equations. Invariant measures of the shallow water model are built based on the Hamiltonian structure and the Liouville theorem. In parallel with the development of the theory, we devised an algorithm based on the Creutz algorithm [5] (a generalization of Metropolis-Hastings algorithm) in order to sample microcanonical measures. Numerical simulations are compared with the theoretical predictions [6]. We apply these new tools in order to describe vortex solutions similar

  1. Statistical Mechanics of the Shallow Water and Primitive Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potters, M.; Bouchet, F.

    2011-12-01

    Geophysical flows are highly turbulent, yet embody large-scale coherent structures, such as ocean rings, jets, and large-scale circulations. Understanding how these structures appear and predicting their shape are major theoretical challenges. The statistical mechanics approach to geophysical flows is a powerful complement to more conventional theoretical and numerical methods [1]. In the inertial limit, it allows to describe, with only a few thermodynamical parameters, the long-time behavior of the largest scales of the flow. Recent studies with quasi-geostrophic models provide encouraging results: a model of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter [2], an explanation of the drift properties of ocean rings [3], the inertial structure of mid-basin eastward jets [3], bistability phenomena in complex turbulent flows [4], and so on. Generalization to more comprehensive hydrodynamical models, which include gravity wave dynamics and the possibility of energy transfer through wave motion, would be extremely interesting. Namely, both are essential in understanding the geophysical flow energy balance. However, due to difficulties in essential theoretical parts of the statistical mechanics approach, previous methods describing statistical equilibria were up to now limited to the use of quasi-geostrophic models. The current study fills this gap. The new theory we propose describes geophysical phenomena using statistical mechanics applied to the shallow water model, and is easily generalizable to the primitive equations. Invariant measures of the shallow water model are built based on the Hamiltonian structure and the Liouville theorem. In parallel with the development of the theory, we devised an algorithm based on the Creutz algorithm [5] (a generalization of Metropolis-Hastings algorithm) in order to sample microcanonical measures. Numerical simulations are compared with the theoretical predictions [6]. We apply these new tools in order to describe vortex solutions similar to the

  2. Shallow water processes govern system-wide phytoplankton bloom dynamics: A field study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.K.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Lucas, L.V.

    2008-01-01

    Prior studies of the phytoplankton dynamics in South San Francisco Bay, California, USA have hypothesized that bivalve filter-feeders are responsible for the limited phytoplankton blooms in the system. This study was designed to examine the effects of benthic grazing and light attenuation on this shallow, turbid, and nutrient replete system. We found that grazing by shallow water bivalves was important in determining phytoplankton bloom occurrence throughout the system and that above a shallow water bivalve grazing threshold, phytoplankton biomass did not exceed bloom levels. Wind speed, used as a proxy for light attenuation in the shallow water, was similarly important in determining bloom development in the shallow water. Environmental conditions and benthic grazing in the deep water channel had a less discernible effect on system-wide phytoplankton blooms although persistent water column stratification did increase bloom magnitude. The shallow water bivalves, believed to be preyed upon by birds and fish that migrate through the system in fall and winter, disappear each year prior to the spring phytoplankton bloom. Because growth of the phytoplankton depends so strongly on shallow water processes, any change in the shallow-water benthic filter-feeders or their predators has great potential to change the phytoplankton bloom dynamics in this system. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Solving the shallow water equations on the Cray X-MP/48 and the connection machine 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swarztrauber, Paul N.; Sato, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    The shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates and 2-D are solved on the Connection Machine 2 (CM-2) using both the spectral and finite difference methods. A description of these implementations is presented together with a brief discussion of the CM-2 as it relates to these specific computations. The finite difference code was written both in C* and *LISP and the spectral code was written in *LISP. The performance of the codes is compared with a FORTRAN version that was optimized for the Cray X-MP/48.

  4. A multilayer shallow water system for polydisperse sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Nieto, E. D.; Koné, E. H.; Morales de Luna, T.; Bürger, R.

    2013-04-01

    This work considers the flow of a fluid containing one disperse substance consisting of small particles that belong to different species differing in size and density. The flow is modelled by combining a multilayer shallow water approach with a polydisperse sedimentation process. This technique allows one to keep information on the vertical distribution of the solid particles in the mixture, and thereby to model the segregation of the particle species from each other, and from the fluid, taking place in the vertical direction of the gravity body force only. This polydisperse sedimentation process is described by the well-known Masliyah-Lockett-Bassoon (MLB) velocity functions. The resulting multilayer sedimentation-flow model can be written as a hyperbolic system with nonconservative products. The definitions of the nonconservative products are related to the hydrostatic pressure and to the mass and momentum hydrodynamic transfer terms between the layers. For the numerical discretization a strategy of two steps is proposed, where the first one is also divided into two parts. In the first step, instead of approximating the complete model, we approximate a reduced model with a smaller number of unknowns. Then, taking advantage of the fact that the concentrations are passive scalars in the system, we approximate the concentrations of the different species by an upwind scheme related to the numerical flux of the total concentration. In the second step, the effect of the transference terms defined in terms of the MLB model is introduced. These transfer terms are approximated by using a numerical flux function used to discretize the 1D vertical polydisperse model, see Bürger et al. [ R. Bürger, A. García, K.H. Karlsen, J.D. Towers, A family of numerical schemes for kinematic flows with discontinuous flux, J. Eng. Math. 60 (2008) 387-425]. Finally, some numerical examples are presented. Numerical results suggest that the multilayer shallow water model could be adequate

  5. POD/DEIM nonlinear model order reduction of an ADI implicit shallow water equations model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ştefănescu, R.; Navon, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    In the present paper we consider a 2-D shallow-water equations (SWE) model on a β-plane solved using an alternating direction fully implicit (ADI) finite-difference scheme on a rectangular domain. The scheme was shown to be unconditionally stable for the linearized equations. The discretization yields a number of nonlinear systems of algebraic equations. We then use a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to reduce the dimension of the SWE model. Due to the model nonlinearities, the computational complexity of the reduced model still depends on the number of variables of the full shallow - water equations model. By employing the discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) we reduce the computational complexity of the reduced order model due to its depending on the nonlinear full dimension model and regain the full model reduction expected from the POD model. To emphasize the CPU gain in performance due to use of POD/DEIM, we also propose testing an explicit Euler finite difference scheme (EE) as an alternative to the ADI implicit scheme for solving the swallow water equations model. We then proceed to assess the efficiency of POD/DEIM as a function of number of spatial discretization points, time steps, and POD basis functions. As was expected, our numerical experiments showed that the CPU time performances of POD/DEIM schemes are proportional to the number of mesh points. Once the number of spatial discretization points exceeded 10000 and for 90 DEIM interpolation points, the CPU time decreased by a factor of 10 in case of POD/DEIM implicit SWE scheme and by a factor of 15 for the POD/DEIM explicit SWE scheme in comparison with the corresponding POD SWE schemes. Moreover, our numerical tests revealed that if the number of points selected by DEIM algorithm reached 50, the approximation errors due to POD/DEIM and POD reduced systems have the same orders of magnitude, thus supporting the theoretical results existing in the literature.

  6. Water cycling beneath subduction zones in 2D and 3D numerical models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupke, L.; Iyer, K. H.; Hasenclever, J.; Morgan, J.

    2013-12-01

    Tracing the cycling of fluids and volatiles through subduction zones continues to be a challenging task with budgets still having large error bars attached to them. In this contribution we show how numerical models can help to integrate various geological, geophysical, and geochemical datasets and how they can be used to put better bounds on the likely amounts of water being subducted, released into the arc and back-arc melting regions, and recycled to the deeper mantle. To achieve this task we use a suite of numerical models. Bending related faulting and hydration of the incoming lithosphere is resolved using a reactive flow model that solves for crustal scale fluid flow and mantle serpentinization using reaction kinetics. Seismic tomography studies from offshore Chile and Central America are used to evaluate and constrain the effective reaction rate. These rates are then used to assess the contribution of serpentinization to the water budget at subduction zones. The pattern of hydration is controlled by the reaction kinetics and serpentinization is most intense around the 270°C isotherm. The depth of this isotherm correlates well with the dominant spacing of double seismic zones observed globally. Comparison of the results with heat flow data suggests that observed seafloor temperature gradients in the bend-fault region are too low to be caused by ';one-pass' downward water flow into the serpentinizing lithosphere, but rather suggest that bend-faults are areas of active hydrothermal circulation. This implies that serpentine-sourced vents and chemosynthetic vent communities should be found in this deep-sea environment as well. Dehydration reactions are resolved with a 2D kinematic subduction zone model that computes the temperature field and the likely locations and volumes of slab fluid release due to metamorphic dehydration reactions. Here we find that up to 1/3 of the subducted water may be transported into the deeper mantle for the coldest subduction zones

  7. Nitrate removal in shallow, open-water treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Justin T; Jones, Zackary L; Sharp, Jonathan O; Sedlak, David L

    2014-10-01

    The diffuse biomat formed on the bottom of shallow, open-water unit process wetland cells contains suboxic zones that provide conditions conducive to NO3(-) removal via microbial denitrification, as well as anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). To assess these processes, nitrogen cycling was evaluated over a 3-year period in a pilot-scale wetland cell receiving nitrified municipal wastewater effluent. NO3(-) removal varied seasonally, with approximately two-thirds of the NO3(-) entering the cell removed on an annual basis. Microcosm studies indicated that NO3(-) removal was mainly attributable to denitrification within the diffuse biomat (i.e., 80 ± 20%), with accretion of assimilated nitrogen accounting for less than 3% of the NO3(-) removed. The importance of denitrification to NO3(-) removal was supported by the presence of denitrifying genes (nirS and nirK) within the biomat. While modest when compared to the presence of denitrifying genes, a higher abundance of the anammox-specific gene hydrazine synthase (hzs) at the biomat bottom than at the biomat surface, the simultaneous presence of NH4(+) and NO3(-) within the biomat, and NH4(+) removal coupled to NO2(-) and NO3(-) removal in microcosm studies, suggested that anammox may have been responsible for some NO3(-) removal, following reduction of NO3(-) to NO2(-) within the biomat. The annual temperature-corrected areal first-order NO3(-) removal rate (k20 = 59.4 ± 6.2 m yr(-1)) was higher than values reported for more than 75% of vegetated wetlands that treated water in which NO3(-) was the primary nitrogen species (e.g., nitrified secondary wastewater effluent and agricultural runoff). The inclusion of open-water cells, originally designed for the removal of trace organic contaminants and pathogens, in unit-process wetlands may enhance NO3(-) removal as compared to existing vegetated wetland systems. PMID:25208126

  8. Growth rates and water stability of 2D boronate ester covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Hwang, Nicky; Chavez, Anton D; Novotney, Jennifer L; Dichtel, William R

    2015-05-01

    We examine the growth rates, activation energies, and hydrolytic stability of multiple 2D boronate ester covalent organic frameworks by turbidity measurements, observing a 200-fold range in stability. The rate-determining step in boronate ester 2D COF growth is not in-solution condensation, but rather interlayer polymer stacking through a nucleation-elongation process. PMID:25848654

  9. 2D-Ising critical behavior in mixtures of water and 3-methylpyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Sadakane, Koichiro; Iguchi, Kazuya; Nagao, Michihiro; Seto, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    The effect of an antagonistic salt on the phase behavior and nanoscale structure of a mixture of D{sub 2}O and 3-methylpyridine was investigated by visual inspection and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The addition of the antagonistic salt, namely sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh{sub 4}), induces the shrinking of the two-phase region in contrast to the case in which a normal (hydrophilic) salt is added. Below the phase separation point, the SANS profiles cannot be described by the Ornstein-Zernike function owing to the existence of a long-range periodic structure. With increasing salt concentration, the critical exponents change from the values of 3D-Ising and approach those of 2D-Ising. These results suggest that the concentration fluctuation of the mixture of solvents is limited to a quasi two-dimensional space by the periodic structure induced by the adding the salt. The same behaviors were also observed in mixtures composed of water, 3-methylpyridine, and ionic surfactant.

  10. Nonlinear wave interactions in shallow water magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimachkov, D. A.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The rotating magnetohydrodynamic flows of a thin layer of astrophysical and space plasmas with a free surface in a vertical external magnetic field are considered in the shallow water approximation. The presence of a vertical external magnetic field changes significantly the dynamics of wave processes in an astrophysical plasma, in contrast to a neutral fluid and a plasma layer in an external toroidal magnetic field. There are three-wave nonlinear interactions in the case under consideration. Using the asymptotic method of multiscale expansions, we have derived nonlinear equations for the interaction of wave packets: three magneto- Poincare waves, three magnetostrophic waves, two magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and two magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. The existence of decay instabilities and parametric amplification is predicted. We show that a magneto-Poincare wave decays into two magneto-Poincare waves, a magnetostrophic wave decays into two magnetostrophic waves, a magneto-Poincare wave decays into one magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and a magnetostrophic wave decays into one magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. There are the following parametric amplification mechanisms: the parametric amplification of magneto-Poincare waves, the parametric amplification of magnetostrophic waves, the amplification of a magneto-Poincare wave in the field of a magnetostrophic wave, and the amplification of a magnetostrophic wave in the field of a magneto-Poincare wave. The instability growth rates and parametric amplification factors have been found for the corresponding processes.

  11. Soliton turbulence in shallow water ocean surface waves.

    PubMed

    Costa, Andrea; Osborne, Alfred R; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-09-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of soliton turbulence in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a dense soliton gas, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries equation, a completely integrable soliton system: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic-quasiperiodic boundary conditions the ergodic solutions of Korteweg-deVries are exactly solvable by finite gap theory (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as ∼ω-1. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter densely packed soliton wave trains from the data. We apply FGT to determine the soliton spectrum and find that the low frequency ∼ω-1 region is soliton dominated. The solitons have random FGT phases, a soliton random phase approximation, which supports our interpretation of the data as soliton turbulence. From the probability density of the solitons we are able to demonstrate that the solitons are dense in time and highly non-Gaussian. PMID:25238388

  12. Water quality of shallow pump wells, southern Rock County, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    Rock County is located in south central Wisconsin; bordering the Illinois counties of Boone and Winnebago. Five county parks in the southern portion of the county were tested primarily for metal content, such as Pb, Cd, Ni, Mn, Fe, and others, using an ICAP spectrometer. Four of the five wells were tapping water from glacial outwash aquifers, and one from a carbonate source. Acceptable levels of contaminates were found in all of the wells. The well at Airport Park, north of the Rock county airport, was significantly higher in elements such as Na, Fe, K, and Zn, than the other wells in the study. Na values for example, reached 36.87 ppm, which is four times higher than at any other well in the survey. Thus far this has been interpreted as being due to its location north of the county airport and next to highway 51. Runoff from these two sources may be contributing to the high values due to the shallowness of the well. The pH values for the wells ranged from 7.3 to 7.9 which is not uncommon for the area due to massive amounts of carbonates in the area.

  13. Statistical moments of soliton field in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurgalina, Ekaterina; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2013-04-01

    The ensemble of solitons plays an important role in the long-term dynamics of a wave field which can be interpreted as soliton turbulence. Dynamics of a soliton field in shallow water in the framework of Korteweg - de Vries equation is studied. The statistical ensemble is generated from the isolated solitons with random phases and amplitudes. Main interest is paid to the first four statistical moments (mean, variance, skewness and kurtosis) playing an important role in the turbulence theory. They are computed analytically for initial random soliton field presenting the linear superposition of the solitary pulses. It is demonstrated that the random soliton field is not Gaussian. Then the time evolution of the statistical moments is studied numerically. It is confirmed that first two moments being the invariants of the Korteweg - de Vries equation remain to be constant. The skewness and kurtosis vary in time in each realization but tends to the constants in the average. The averaged magnitude of these moments is decreased to compare with initial values with increase of the soliton density. This effect is related with features of the two-soliton interaction described in (E.N.Pelinovsky et al., Physics Letters A (2012) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physleta.2012.11.037). As a result, the nonlinear soliton interaction leads to tendency of normalization of the random process. This study was supported by the Federal Targeted Program "Research and educational personnel of innovation Russia" for 2009-2013 and Dynasty Foundation.

  14. Benthic effects on the polarization of light in shallow waters.

    PubMed

    Gilerson, Alexander A; Stepinski, Jan; Ibrahim, Amir I; You, Yu; Sullivan, James M; Twardowski, Michael S; Dierssen, Heidi M; Russell, Brandon; Cummings, Molly E; Brady, Parrish; Ahmed, Samir A; Kattawar, George W

    2013-12-20

    Measurements of the upwelling polarized radiance in relatively shallow waters of varying depths and benthic conditions are compared to simulations, revealing the depolarizing nature of the seafloor. The simulations, executed with the software package RayXP, are solutions to the vector radiative transfer equation, which depends on the incident light field and three types of parameters: inherent optical properties, the scattering matrix, and the benthic reflectance. These were measured directly or calculated from measurements with additional assumptions. Specifically, the Lambertian model used to simulate benthic reflectances is something of a simplification of reality, but the bottoms used in this study are found to be crucial for accurate simulations of polarization. Comparisons of simulations with and without bottom contributions show that only the former corroborate measurements of the Stokes components and the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) collected by the polarimeter developed at the City College of New York. Because this polarimeter is multiangular and hyperspectral, errors can be computed point-wise over a large range of scattering angles and wavelengths. Trends also become apparent. DoLP is highly sensitive to the benthic reflectance and to the incident wavelength, peaking in the red band, but the angle of linear polarization is almost spectrally constant and independent of the bottom. These results can thus facilitate the detection of benthic materials as well as future studies of camouflage by benthic biota; to hide underwater successfully, animals must reflect light just as depolarized as that reflected by benthic materials. PMID:24513934

  15. Multiple time-reversed guide-sources in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaumond, Charles F.; Fromm, David M.; Lingevitch, Joseph F.; Gauss, Roger C.; Menis, Richard

    2003-10-01

    Detection in a monostatic, broadband, active sonar system in shallow water is degraded by propagation-induced spreading. The detection improvement from multiple spatially separated guide sources (GSs) is presented as a method to mitigate this degradation. The improvement of detection by using information in a set of one-way transmissions from a variety of positions is shown using sea data. The experimental area is south of the Hudson Canyon off the coast of New Jersey. The data were taken using five elements of a time-reversing VLA. The five elements were contiguous and at midwater depth. The target and guide source was an echo repeater positioned at various ranges and at middepth. The transmitted signals were 3.0- to 3.5-kHz LFMs. The data are analyzed to show the amount of information present in the collection, a baseline probability of detection (PD) not using the collection of GS signals, the improvement in PD from the use of various sets of GS signals. The dependence of the improvement as a function of range is also shown. [The authors acknowledge support from Dr. Jeffrey Simmen, ONR321OS, and the chief scientist Dr. Charles Holland. Work supported by ONR.

  16. Soliton Turbulence in Shallow Water Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Andrea; Osborne, Alfred R.; Resio, Donald T.; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivı, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E.

    2014-09-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of soliton turbulence in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a dense soliton gas, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries equation, a completely integrable soliton system: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic-quasiperiodic boundary conditions the ergodic solutions of Korteweg-deVries are exactly solvable by finite gap theory (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as ˜ω-1. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter densely packed soliton wave trains from the data. We apply FGT to determine the soliton spectrum and find that the low frequency ˜ω-1 region is soliton dominated. The solitons have random FGT phases, a soliton random phase approximation, which supports our interpretation of the data as soliton turbulence. From the probability density of the solitons we are able to demonstrate that the solitons are dense in time and highly non-Gaussian.

  17. Determining ice water content from 2D crystal images in convective cloud systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Coutris, Pierre; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2016-04-01

    Cloud microphysical in-situ instrumentation measures bulk parameters like total water content (TWC) and/or derives particle size distributions (PSD) (utilizing optical spectrometers and optical array probes (OAP)). The goal of this work is to introduce a comprehensive methodology to compute TWC from OAP measurements, based on the dataset collected during recent HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals)/HIWC (High Ice Water Content) field campaigns. Indeed, the HAIC/HIWC field campaigns in Darwin (2014) and Cayenne (2015) provide a unique opportunity to explore the complex relationship between cloud particle mass and size in ice crystal environments. Numerous mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were sampled with the French Falcon 20 research aircraft at different temperature levels from -10°C up to 50°C. The aircraft instrumentation included an IKP-2 (isokinetic probe) to get reliable measurements of TWC and the optical array probes 2D-S and PIP recording images over the entire ice crystal size range. Based on the known principle relating crystal mass and size with a power law (m=α•Dβ), Fontaine et al. (2014) performed extended 3D crystal simulations and thereby demonstrated that it is possible to estimate the value of the exponent β from OAP data, by analyzing the surface-size relationship for the 2D images as a function of time. Leroy et al. (2015) proposed an extended version of this method that produces estimates of β from the analysis of both the surface-size and perimeter-size relationships. Knowing the value of β, α then is deduced from the simultaneous IKP-2 TWC measurements for the entire HAIC/HIWC dataset. The statistical analysis of α and β values for the HAIC/HIWC dataset firstly shows that α is closely linked to β and that this link changes with temperature. From these trends, a generalized parameterization for α is proposed. Finally, the comparison with the initial IKP-2 measurements demonstrates that the method is able to predict TWC values

  18. Coordinating perception and action with an underwater robot in a shallow water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonasso, R. P.

    1992-04-01

    It is usually difficult to use underwater robots for mapping, reconnaissance, and mine-clearing tasks in shallow water (10 to 80 foot depth) ocean environments. The shallow water environment is characterized by strong, intermittent wave surge which requires robot behaviors that are capable of riding out the surge and then repositioning the platform and re- acquiring the objects being sensed. The shallow water area is also characterized by water that is murky, making optical sensors useless for long range search, and which produces multiple paths for sonar returns, giving errant range readings. Teleoperation from a remote surface platform is not effective due to the rapid changes in the environment. A more promising approach would place reactive intelligence on-board the robot. This paper describes such an approach which uses high frequency acoustic and vision sensing and a situated reasoning software architecture to provide task-achieving capability to an underwater robot in a shallow water environment. The approach is demonstrated in the context of a shallow water marking task wherein a robot must locate and navigate to a moored object in shallow water depths, attach a buoyant marker, and then return to a destination location. The approach seeks to integrate selective perception with robust transit and hovering behaviors to overcome the natural problems associated with shallow water environments.

  19. Active exchange of water and nutrients between seawater and shallow pore water in intertidal sandflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dong-Woon; Kim, Guebuem; Yang, Han Soeb

    2008-12-01

    In order to determine the temporal and spatial variations of nutrient profiles in the shallow pore water columns (upper 30 cm depth) of intertidal sandflats, we measured the salinity and nutrient concentrations in pore water and seawater at various coastal environments along the southern coast of Korea. In the intertidal zone, salinity and nutrient concentrations in pore water showed marked vertical changes with depth, owing to the active exchange between the pore water and overlying seawater, while they are temporally more stable and vertically constant in the sublittoral zone. In some cases, the advective flow of fresh groundwater caused strong vertical gradients of salinity and nutrients in the upper 10 cm depth of surface sediments, indicating the active mixing of the fresher groundwater with overlying seawater. Such upper pore water column profiles clearly signified the temporal fluctuation of lower-salinity and higher-Si seawater intrusion into pore water in an intertidal sandflat near the mouth of an estuary. We also observed a semimonthly fluctuation of pore water nutrients due to spring-neap tide associated recirculation of seawater through the upper sediments. Our study shows that the exchange of water and nutrients between shallow pore water and overlying seawater is most active in the upper 20 cm layer of intertidal sandflats, due to physical forces such as tides, wave set-up, and density-thermal gradient.

  20. Flood simulation using an open source quadtree grid shallow water flow solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, H.; Yu, S.

    2012-12-01

    We carry out performance testing of Gerris for flood simulation. Gerris Flow Solver is open source software and has the capability of adaptive quadtree grid generation. In particular, the shallow water flow solver within Gerris Flow Solver implements second-order accurate Gudunov type numerical schemes, with preserving the balance of source and flux terms on quadtree cut cell grids. The combination of quadtree grids with the cut cell method improves the flexibility of quadtree grids for grid generation. In addition, the model has the capacity of adaptive meshing in an easy and effective way, which can improve computational efficiency in 2D modeling. Pre- and post-processors are already well equipped for users. Finally, an extension such as bed erosion or sediment transport can be added if needed. Two flood events, Malpasset dam break in France and Baeksan levee failure in Korea, are simulated using Gerris, with adaptively refining meshes near water fronts and the river boundary. Simulation results are compared with survey data, experimental data as well as simulation results by other researchers. The simulation results demonstrate that the adaptive quadtree model can save approximately 95% of the computational cost while preserving the accuracy. Gerris is a very attractive alternative for flood managers given the favorable features demonstrated in this paper.

  1. Shallow Water Simulations of the Three Last Saturn's Giant Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Melendo, Enrique; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin

    2015-11-01

    Shallow Water (SW) simulations are used to present a unified study of the polar (1960), equatorial (1990), and mid-latitude (2010) major storms in Saturn nicknamed as Great White Spots (GWS). The 2010 GWS appeared at +40, moved at -30 m s-1 where the Coriolis force is predominant producing an open anticyclone with a high speed peripheral circulation and a cloud front around the convective source; a long-lived anticyclone; and strong zonal advection on the south part of the storm forming a turbulent region. The 1990 GWS onset took place near the equator, between +12 and +5, on the broad prograde equatorial jet (450 m s-1) where equatorial dynamics dominated producing a storm nucleus, with rapid expansion to the west of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the north side of the perturbation due to advection, and trapped equatorial waves which also expanded the storm to the east around the equator. The 1960 GWS appeared at high latitudes (+56) where Coriolis force is predominant in a region where zonal wind velocity is 0 m s-1. SW simulations predict a strong injection of relative vorticity which may produce large anticyclones on the anticyclonic side of the zonal profile, and a quick turbulent expansion on the background cyclonic regions at mid and high latitudes. In general, simulations indicate that negative relative vorticity injected by the storms also defines the natural interaction with the zonal winds at latitudes where the Coriolis force is dominant dictating its large scale dynamical behavior. Numerical experiments on the 1990 storm indicate that the onset of the storm can only be reproduced if the Voyager era background zonal flow is used, which suggests that it dominated the circulation dynamics at the storm’s outbreak region at that time. They also reproduce its most important morphological features, and show the production of planetary waves and turbulence. We discuss possible mechanism for the observed equatorial jet alterations during the storm

  2. Point based hydrodynamics applied to shallow water equations

    SciTech Connect

    Eltgroth, P.

    1994-05-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) has proven useful for many problems of scientific interest. This report is concerned with a generalization to the SPH method which may be of value for problems such as climate modeling. The main objective of the work is to carry out the new formulation, called Point Interactive Physics and to compare results for PIP and standard finite difference techniques on a simple test problem. The basic SPH approach describes a system using a set of points. These points are not associated with a grid or mesh, as in most approaches. The individual points are each assigned a mass and move with the material velocity. Thus the original SPH method is Lagrangian. Properties of the system are expressed as sums over the sample points using a weighting function called a kernel function. For most problems, tile weighting function extends over a relatively short range, called the smoothing length. The Point Interacting Physics (PIP) approach also samples information at a set of points, and then uses kernel functions to infer physical properties everywhere. The points are not assigned fixed values of miss and they are allowed to undergo arbitrary physically reasonable motion. In this report, results will be presented for fixed points arranged irregularly over a spherical surface. Thus, this version of PIP will be applied in an Eulerian fashion. The basic reason for the Eulerian treatment is enhanced efficiency arising from the fixed geometric relationships among the points. After a brief description of the SPH and PIP methods, the PIP formulation will be compared to a normal finite difference approach for a simple shallow water advection test problem. It appears that accurate simulations can be accomplished, but that computational speed is comparable to that observed for other techniques.

  3. Vortex formation from a cylinder in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akilli, H.; Rockwell, D.

    2002-09-01

    The near wake of a vertical, circular cylinder in shallow water is investigated using a combination of visualization marker and a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry. The formation of a large-scale Karman vortex involves upward ejection of fluid through its center, which eventual leads to a horizontal vortex that induces significant distortion of the free surface. The strength of this secondary vortex is, however, an order of magnitude smaller than that of the large-scale Karman vortex. Using global, instantaneous imaging, the relationship between patterns of streamline topology and vorticity is established for successive phases of the oscillation cycle, and in horizontal planes at and above the bed. The sequence of phase-referenced states shows that it is possible to identify topological characteristics, including the location of a specific critical (saddle) point that are consistent at elevations on and above the bed. In turn, the sequential development of topological streamline and vorticity patterns is related to time-averaged representations. At the bed, the time-averaged streamline topology downstream of the base of the cylinder takes on a form known as an owl face of the first kind, which was originally defined for a completely different exterior flow. Immediately adjacent to the base of the cylinder, an additional system of saddle points is located at either end of a nodal line. At locations above the bed, one of the two principal saddle points of the owl face of the first kind disappears and the principal foci are transformed from a stable to an unstable state. Furthermore, at progressive elevations above the bed, the degree of concentration of vorticity of the major, large-scale vortex successively decreases. In turn, the foregoing features are related to the patterns of Reynolds stress and velocity fluctuation at and above the bed.

  4. Vortex formation from a cylinder in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akilli, H.; Rockwell, D.

    2002-09-01

    The near wake of a vertical, circular cylinder in shallow water is investigated using a combination of visualization marker and a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry. The formation of a large-scale Kármán vortex involves upward ejection of fluid through its center, which eventual leads to a horizontal vortex that induces significant distortion of the free surface. The strength of this secondary vortex is, however, an order of magnitude smaller than that of the large-scale Kármán vortex. Using global, instantaneous imaging, the relationship between patterns of streamline topology and vorticity is established for successive phases of the oscillation cycle, and in horizontal planes at and above the bed. The sequence of phase-referenced states shows that it is possible to identify topological characteristics, including the location of a specific critical (saddle) point that are consistent at elevations on and above the bed. In turn, the sequential development of topological streamline and vorticity patterns is related to time-averaged representations. At the bed, the time-averaged streamline topology downstream of the base of the cylinder takes on a form known as an owl face of the first kind, which was originally defined for a completely different exterior flow. Immediately adjacent to the base of the cylinder, an additional system of saddle points is located at either end of a nodal line. At locations above the bed, one of the two principal saddle points of the owl face of the first kind disappears and the principal foci are transformed from a stable to an unstable state. Furthermore, at progressive elevations above the bed, the degree of concentration of vorticity of the major, large-scale vortex successively decreases. In turn, the foregoing features are related to the patterns of Reynolds stress and velocity fluctuation at and above the bed.

  5. A middle Devonian temperate water limestone-isotopes, stromatoporoids and shallow water facies

    SciTech Connect

    Wolosz, T.H.

    1995-09-01

    The Edgecliff Member of the Middle Devonian Onondaga Formation has long been of interest to exploration geologists because its pinnacle reefs and bioherms are potential natural gas reservoirs. Current evidence indicates that the Edgecliff was deposited in a shallow, temperate water environment suggesting that application of standard tropical carbonate models will be misleading. Three lines of evidence support the temperate water model for the Edgecliff. Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses performed on 29 samples from the non-luminescent portions of 15 brachiopods with prismatic ultrastructure yield {delta}{sup 18}O values which are isotopically heavier than accepted values for Devonian sea-water, suggesting cool water conditions. The distribution of stromatoporoids (assumed warm water organisms) ranges from rare and small in the eastern part of New York State, to more common in Ontario, Canada. This trend in stromatoporoids appears to represent an increase in size and abundance as the distance from the paleo-equator decreases. Finally, previously unrecognized shallow water facies in the Edgecliff including thin, dolomitized and bioturbated carbonate muds, solitary rugosan biostromes and ridge-like fringing coral bioherms negate any possibility that the isotopic and paleobiologic data reflect deposition in deep, cooler waters as opposed to an overall temperate water environment.

  6. 76 FR 57679 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species by Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... FR 55726, September 7, 2011). As of September 12, 2011, NMFS has determined that approximately 149... comprise the shallow-water species fishery are pollock, Pacific cod, shallow-water flatfish, flathead...

  7. Design of underwater video attached to buoy for observing shallow water substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingtian, Y.; Wenxi, C.; Delu, P.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of shallow water substrate is very important for protection and management of coastal ecosystem. Traditional methods for observing shallow water substrate was by sending diver to photography and recorded with eye, which was laborious and money taking. In order to obtain the easier way to study the shallow water substrate, an underwater video system was designed. Underwater video sensor, optical sensor, sonar sensor, tiltometer, GPS system, and ascending and descending system were all attached to the buoy system, and data was gathered and processed by the computer on the ship. The obtained data could be used for analyzing substrate type, activity of benthos and ground truth data for satellite remote sensing.

  8. Adaptation to deep-sea methane seeps from Cretaceous shallow-water black shale environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Steffen; Wiese, Frank; Titus, Alan

    2013-04-01

    Sulfide-enriched environments in shallow water were considered as sites where animals acquire pre-adaptations enabling them to colonize deep-sea hydrothermal vents and seeps or where they survived extinction events in their deep-sea habitats. Here we present upper Cenomanian (early Late Cretaceous) shallow-water seep communities from the Tropic Shale in the Western Interior Seaway, USA, that lived during a time of extremely warm deep-water temperatures, which supposedly facilitates adaptations to the deep sea, and time-equivalent with a period of widespread oceanic and photic zone anoxia (OAE 2) that supposedly extinguished deep-water vent and seep faunas. Contrary to the expectation, the taxa inhabiting the Tropic Shale seeps were not found at any coeval or younger deep-water seep or vent deposit. This suggests that (i) pre-adaptations for living at deep-sea vents and seeps do not evolve at shallow-water methane seeps, and probably also not in sulfide-rich shallow-water environments in general; (ii) a low temperature gradient from shallow to deep water does not facilitate onshore-offshore adaptations to deep-sea vents and seeps; and (iii) shallow-water seeps did not act as refuges for deep-sea vent and seep animals. We hypothesize that the vast majority of adaptations to successfully colonize deep-sea vents and seeps are acquired below the photic zone.

  9. DNAPL MAPPING AND WATER SATURATION MEASUREMENTS IN 2-D MODELS USING LIGHT TRANSMISSION VISUALIZATION (LTV) TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    • LTV can be used to characterize free phase PCE architecture in 2-D flow chambers without using a dye. • Results to date suggest that error in PCE detection using LTV can be less than 10% if the imaging system is optimized. • Mass balance calculations show a maximum error of 9...

  10. Investigation on the conformations of AOT in water-in-oil microemulsions using 2D-ATR-FTIR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zuliang; Wu, Peiyi

    2008-07-01

    The carbonyl groups of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in the water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions of AOT/tetrachloromethane/water were investigated by using two-dimensional attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (2D-ATR-FTIR) correlation spectroscopy under a perturbation of temperature. The results of a traditional curve fitting method were compared with the 2D correlation spectra results. The peaks at 1718 and 1736 cm -1 were assigned to different carbonyl groups in trans conformation and gauche conformation of AOT molecules, respectively. With the increase of temperature, the trans conformation increased quickly at the lower temperature below 35 °C and decreased slowly at the higher temperature. The special phenomenon owed to the composition and decomposition of the hydrogen bonding between water of the inner polar core and carbonyl groups of AOT molecules. Two new peaks at 1707 and 1747 cm -1 in the 2D correlation spectra implied the process of the transition of AOT molecule conformation and the deviation of correlation coefficients of curve fitting method. 2D-ATR-FTIR correlation spectroscopy exhibited the superiority over the traditional curve fitting method.

  11. Modeling shallow-water hydrodynamics: Rotations, rips, and rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Joseph W.

    Hydrodynamic models are used as a diagnostic tool to understand the temporal variability of shallow-water processes that are difficult to completely resolve with traditional field measurements. For all simulations, modeled quantities are qualitatively or quantitatively compared with available measurements to gain confidence in conclusions derived from the modeled results. In this work we consider both vorticity motions and rip currents, which arise from alongshore inhomogeneities in the wave momentum flux but occur at much different time scales (O(min) vs. O(hours-weeks)). They each have an effect on sediment transport processes and dispersion of sediments or pollutants in the surf zone, which makes understanding their structure and persistence essential. The vorticity motions of interest here are associated with spatial and temporal wave height variations caused by wave grouping and can exist with either normally or obliquely incident wave conditions. We find that these flows persist for O(1000s) but their lifespan is controlled by the sequence of wave forcing rather than bottom friction as previously hypothesized. These motions can also be observed in combination with either stable or unstable alongshore currents. Our results suggest that, at times, these alongshore propagating wave group forced vortices are misinterpreted as instabilities of the alongshore current. Alternately, the rip currents considered in this research are controlled by strong wave height gradients in the surf zone generated by the refraction of incident waves over variable offshore depth contours. Thus, this type of circulation is governed by timescales associated with changing offshore wave conditions (O(hours - days)). We consider a four- week time period when variable offshore wave spectra were observed during a large-scale field experiment. The model and data are in good agreement for all wave conditions during the month and estimated model errors are similar to those found previously

  12. GROUND-WATER SAMPLING BIAS OBSERVED IN SHALLOW, CONVENTIONAL WELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A previous field demonstration project on nitrate-based bioremediation of a fuel-contaminated aquifer used short-screened clustered well points in addition to shallow (10 foot), conventional monitoring wells to monitor the progress of remediation during surface application of rec...

  13. Airborne mapping of shallow water bathymetry in the optically complex waters of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahtmäe, Ele; Kutser, Tiit

    2016-04-01

    Accurate determination of the water depth is important for marine spatial planning, producing maritime charts for navigation, seabed morphology studies, and carrying out different activities in the coastal waters. Bathymetric data are lacking foremost in the shallow water regions as those areas are often inaccessible to the hydrographic ships carrying out echo sounding measurements. Remote sensing technology can be used as an alternative for shallow water bathymetry mapping. Varieties of empirical methods have been proposed for bathymetry retrieval, where the relationship between remotely sensed radiance of the water body and the water depth at sampled locations was established empirically. Two most widely used depth derivation methods, the linear band model proposed by Lyzenga (1978, 1985, 2006), and the log-transformed band ratio model proposed by Stumpf et al. (2003), were applied to the different preprocessing level airborne Hyspex hyperspectral images from the optically complex Baltic Sea area and evaluated for accuracy. Results showed that the Lyzenga linear band model outperformed the Stumpf log-transformed band ratio model. The best results were achieved with the atmospherically corrected images. The application of glint correction did not improve, but even reduced the accuracy of bathymetric maps.

  14. Remote sensing retrieval of water constituents in shallow coastal waters with applications to the Venice lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Marani, M.; Albertson, J. D.; Silvestri, S.

    2013-12-01

    Lagoons and estuaries worldwide are experiencing accelerated ecosystem degradation due to increased direct and indirect anthropogenic pressure. Monitoring the environmental state and trends in such environment would benefit from the use of remote sensing techniques, which can access a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. However, most remote sensors are not suitable for monitoring shallow and optically-complex waters, because of their low spatial and spectral-resolution and of the uncertainties associated with the contribution of the bottom sediment to the observed remote sensing signal. We apply here a remote sensing-based approach to mapping suspended sediment and chlorophyll concentrations in the shallow Venice lagoon, which integrates hyperspectral remote sensing data, a simplified radiative transfer model, and in-situ water quality measurements. First, we calibrate and validate the key parameters of the model, such as bottom albedo and absorption/backscattering coefficients of sediment, by comparing remote sensing derived water constituent concentrations with in-situ data. We then determine the statistics of those parameters, and the associated estimation uncertainty, by applying a bootstrapping technique. Finally, the lagoon-wide distribution of water constituent concentrations, and of the estimation uncertainty, is derived by inverting the model. The estimates are consistent with measured concentrations and their known optical properties, particularly for the suspended sediment concentrations, while chlorophyll concentration estimates remain more uncertain. Our analyses show that remote sensing methods can provide reliable water constituent concentrations at the system scale and that uncertainties become overwhelming only in particularly shallow areas (water depths indicatively lower than 1 m in the present application). Importantly, the joint use of radiative transfer models, in situ observations, and statistical techniques allows the production of

  15. Aragonite precipitation induced by anaerobic oxidation of methane in shallow-water seeps, Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedling, Johanna; Kuhfuß, Hanna; Lott, Christian; Böttcher, Michael E.; Lichtschlag, Anna; Wegener, Gunter; Deusner, Christian; Bach, Wolfgang; Weber, Miriam

    2014-05-01

    In the shallow-water organic-poor silicate sands off the West coast of Elba, Italy, we found aragonite precipitates within a radius of 10 cm to methane seeps in 20 - 40 cm sediment depth. The shallow seep site was mapped by SCUBA diving and in an area of 100 m2 nine gas emission spots were observed. The gas emission, containing 73 Vol. % methane, was measured to be 0.72 L m-2 d-1. Findings of anaerobic methane oxidizing archea (ANME 1, 2, 2a, 2b) and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) as well as in vitro rate measurements of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with a maximum of 67 ± 7 nmol CH4 cm-3 d-1 led to the hypothesis that carbonate precipitation is coupled to these microbial processes. Porewater analysis showed elevated concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (up to 15.5 mmol L-1) and hydrogen sulfide (up to 6.6 mmol L-1). The presence of bicarbonate and the ambient temperature (14 - 25 ° C) facilitate the precipitation of needle-shaped aragonite. Oxygen isotope compositions of the mineral are consistent with the ambient temperatures and may indicate a recent diagenetic formation of this mineral. Although precipitation should not be preserved in these sandy permeable sediments, influenced by seasonality, wave action, and fluid flow, we found up to 10-50 cm3 irregular pieces of cemented sand grains, very often encrusting dead seagrass rhizomes. Commonly known carbonate structures, especially from the deep sea, are chimneys, mounds, hardgrounds and nodules. These structures are well known from seep and vent sites, usually showing the same range of stable carbon isotope fractionation as the escaping methane. The permeable sediment at the Elba site possibly allows the gas to frequently change its pathway to the sediment surface and thus precipitation can occure at several spots and more irregular than in the reported sites. Preservation of precipitates, however, requires sufficient authigenic aragonite to be formed before fluid dynamics changed the

  16. SWIM: A Semi-Analytical Ocean Color Inversion Algorithm for Optically Shallow Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinna, Lachlan I. W.; Werdell, P. Jeremy; Fearns, Peter R. C. S.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Reichstetter, Martina; Franz, Bryan A.; Shea, Donald M.; Feldman, Gene C.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean color remote sensing provides synoptic-scale, near-daily observations of marine inherent optical properties (IOPs). Whilst contemporary ocean color algorithms are known to perform well in deep oceanic waters, they have difficulty operating in optically clear, shallow marine environments where light reflected from the seafloor contributes to the water-leaving radiance. The effect of benthic reflectance in optically shallow waters is known to adversely affect algorithms developed for optically deep waters [1, 2]. Whilst adapted versions of optically deep ocean color algorithms have been applied to optically shallow regions with reasonable success [3], there is presently no approach that directly corrects for bottom reflectance using existing knowledge of bathymetry and benthic albedo.To address the issue of optically shallow waters, we have developed a semi-analytical ocean color inversion algorithm: the Shallow Water Inversion Model (SWIM). SWIM uses existing bathymetry and a derived benthic albedo map to correct for bottom reflectance using the semi-analytical model of Lee et al [4]. The algorithm was incorporated into the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Groups L2GEN program and tested in optically shallow waters of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. In-lieu of readily available in situ matchup data, we present a comparison between SWIM and two contemporary ocean color algorithms, the Generalized Inherent Optical Property Algorithm (GIOP) and the Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (QAA).

  17. Remote sensing of optically shallow, vertically inhomogeneous waters: A mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpot, W. D.; Ackleson, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple-layer radiative transfer model of a vertically inhomogeneous, optically shallow water mass is briefly described. This model is directed toward use in remote sensing properties. Some preliminary results and qualitative predictions are presented.

  18. Accounting for water-column variability in shallow-water waveguide characterizations based on modal eigenvalues

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Kyle M.; Ballard, Megan S.

    2010-09-06

    The influence of water-column variability on the characterization of shallow-water waveguides using modal eigenvalue information is considered. This work is based on the relationship between the acoustic pressure field in shallow water and the depth-dependent Green's function through the Hankel transform. In many practical situations, the Hankel transform can be approximated by a Fourier transform, in which case the Green's function is approximated by a horizontal wave number spectrum with discrete peaks corresponding with individual modal eigenvalues. In turn, the wave number data can be used in inverse algorithms to determine geoacoustic properties of the waveguide. Wave number spectra are estimated from measurements of a point-source acoustic field on a horizontal aperture array in the water column. For range-dependent waveguides, techniques analogous to using a short-time Fourier transform are employed to estimate range-dependent wave number spectra. In this work, water-column variability due to linear internal waves and mesoscale features are considered. It will be shown that these two types of variability impact the estimation of range-dependent modal eigenvalues in different ways. Approaches for accounting for these different types of variability will be discussed as they apply to waveguide characterization.

  19. Localized vortices in a nonlinear shallow water model: examples and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisel, S. A.; Tolchennikov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Exact solutions of the system of nonlinear shallow water equations on paraboloid are constructed by the method of group analysis. These solutions describe fast wave motion of the fluid layer and slow evolution of symmetric localized vortices. Explicit formulae are obtained for asymptotic solution related to the linear shallow water approximation. Numerical methods are used by the modeling the trajectory of the vortex center in the case of asymmetric vortices.

  20. Conservation laws and symmetries of the shallow water system above rough bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. V.; Druzhkov, K. P.

    2016-06-01

    The system of one-dimensional shallow water equations above the rough bottom is considered. All its hydrodynamic conservation laws are found, and a group classification is performed. A new conservation law additional to the two basic conservation laws is found. It is shown that the system of shallow water equations can be linearized by a point change of variables only in cases of constant and linear bottom profiles.

  1. Variational asymptotics for rotating shallow water near geostrophy: a transformational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Marcel

    2006-03-01

    We introduce a unified variational framework in which the classical balance models for nearly geostrophic shallow water as well as several new models can be derived. Our approach is based on consistently truncating an asymptotic expansion of a near-identity transformation of the rotating shallow-water Lagrangian. Model reduction is achieved by imposing either degeneracy (for models in a semi-geostrophic scaling) or incompressibility (for models in a quasi-geostrophic scaling) with respect to the new coordinates.

  2. Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, M, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Chittick, S.D.; Harrison, William B.; Tayjor, W. Quinlan

    2001-08-07

    In this project a consortium consisting of Cronus Exploration (Traverse City, MI), Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) proposed to develop and execute an economical and environmentally sensitive plan for recovery of hydrocarbons from an abandoned shallow-shelf carbonate field that is typical of many fields in the U.S. Midwest. This is a 5-year project that will use surface geochemistry as a tool to reduce risk in locating and producing hydrocarbons in Class II fields. The project will develop new techniques for measuring hydrocarbon gases in the soil horizon to locate new and bypassed oil in the shallow-shelf carbonate environments typified by the Dundee and Trenton Formations of the Michigan Basin (Fisher et. al., 1988). In Phase I of the project, the consortium proposes to re-develop the Vernon Oil field located in Vernon Twp, Isabella County, Michigan and produce both bypassed hydrocarbons from the original field and to locate and produce extensions of the original field.

  3. Water dynamics in salt solutions studied with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Michael D; Moilanen, David E; Wong, Daryl; Rosenfeld, Daniel E; Fenn, Emily E; Park, Sungnam

    2009-09-15

    Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species. Many of these species are charged. In the ocean, water interacts with dissolved salts. In biological systems, water interacts with dissolved salts as well as charged amino acids, the zwitterionic head groups of membranes, and other biological groups that carry charges. Water plays a central role in a vast number of chemical processes because of its dynamic hydrogen-bond network. A water molecule can form up to four hydrogen bonds in an approximately tetrahedral arrangement. These hydrogen bonds are continually being broken, and new bonds are being formed on a picosecond time scale. The ability of the hydrogen-bond network of water to rapidly reconfigure enables water to accommodate and facilitate chemical processes. Therefore, the influence of charged species on water hydrogen-bond dynamics is important. Recent advances in ultrafast coherent infrared spectroscopy have greatly expanded our understanding of water dynamics. Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is providing new observables that yield direct information on the fast dynamics of molecules in their ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions. The 2D IR vibrational echoes are akin to 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) but operate on time scales that are many orders of magnitude shorter. In a 2D IR vibrational echo experiment (see the Conspectus figure), three IR pulses are tuned to the vibrational frequency of interest, which in this case is the frequency of the hydroxyl stretching mode of water. The first two pulses "label" the initial molecular structures by their vibrational frequencies. The system evolves between pulses two and three, and the third pulse stimulates the emission of the vibrational echo pulse, which is the signal. The vibrational echo pulse is heterodyne, detected by combining it

  4. Water quality in shallow alluvial aquifers, Upper Colorado River Basin, Colorado, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.; Bails, J.B.; Smith, C.M.

    2002-01-01

    Shallow ground water in areas of increasing urban development within the Upper Colorado River Basin was sampled for inorganic and organic constituents to characterize water-quality conditions and to identify potential anthropogenic effects resulting from development. In 1997, 25 shallow monitoring wells were installed and sampled in five areas of urban development in Eagle, Grand, Gunnison, and Summit Counties, Colorado. The results of this study indicate that the shallow ground water in the study area is suitable for most uses. Nonparametric statistical methods showed that constituents and parameters measured in the shallow wells were often significantly different between the five developing urban areas. Radon concentrations exceeded the proposed USEPA maximum contaminant level at all sites. The presence of nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds indicate anthropogenic activities are affecting the shallow ground-water quality in the study area. Nitrate as N concentrations greater than 2.0 mg/L were observed in ground water recharged between the 1980s and 1990s. Low concentrations of methylene blue active substances were detected at a few sites. Total coliform bacteria were detected at ten sites; however, E. coli was not detected. Continued monitoring is needed to assess the effects of increasing urban development on the shallow ground-water quality in the study area.

  5. Effects of shallow water table, salinity and frequency of irrigation water on the date palm water use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askri, Brahim; Ahmed, Abdelkader T.; Abichou, Tarek; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2014-05-01

    In southern Tunisia oases, waterlogging, salinity, and water shortage represent serious threats to the sustainability of irrigated agriculture. Understanding the interaction between these problems and their effects on root water uptake is fundamental for suggesting possible options of improving land and water productivity. In this study, HYDRUS-1D model was used in a plot of farmland located in the Fatnassa oasis to investigate the effects of waterlogging, salinity, and water shortage on the date palm water use. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data of sap flow density of a date palm, soil hydraulic properties, water table depth, and amount of irrigation water. The comparison between predicted and observed data for date palm transpiration rates was acceptable indicating that the model could well estimate water consumption of this tree crop. Scenario simulations were performed with different water table depths, and salinities and frequencies of irrigation water. The results show that the impacts of water table depth and irrigation frequency vary according to the season. In summer, high irrigation frequency and shallow groundwater are needed to maintain high water content and low salinity of the root-zone and therefore to increase the date palm transpiration rates. However, these factors have no significant effect in winter. The results also reveal that irrigation water salinity has no significant effect under shallow saline groundwater.

  6. Availability and quality of water from shallow aquifers in Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causey, Lawson V.; Phelps, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    The shallow-aquifer system in Duval County, Fla., overlies the Florida aquifer and is composed chiefly of sand, clay, sandy clay, and limestone. Thickness of the system ranges from about 300 to 600 feet. The upper 150 feet of deposits, consisting of the water-table and shallow-rock zones, are the most dependable and economical source of supplemental water supply. The principal shallow water-bearing zone is a limestone bed 40 to 100 feet below land surface. Aquifer tests conducted at 13 sites in Duval County show that yields from the shallow aquifer vary from place to place within the county owing chiefly to variations in lithology of the saturated rocks and sediments. The limestone of the shallow-rock zone will yield as much as 200 gallons per minute to wells; the maximum yield at most of the sites tested was between 30 and 100 gallons per minute. The water-table zone generally yields 10 gallons per minute or less but at one site, where a water-table well tapped a shell bed near land surface, the well yielded more than 40 gallons per minute. The quality of water in the shallow aquifer system in Duval County is generally acceptable for most domestic, commercial, and industrial uses. In some places, however, it has a high iron concentration and is hard. The iron concentration exceeds 0.3 milligrams per liter in water from the water-table or shallow-rock zones at 7 of the 13 aquifer test sites. The hardness of water from the aquifer ranges from about 60 to about 180 milligrams per liter. (Kosco-USGS)

  7. The 2-D Ion Chromatography Development and Application: Determination of Sulfate in Formation Water at Pre-Salt Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonietto, G. B.; Godoy, J. M.; Almeida, A. C.; Mendes, D.; Soluri, D.; Leite, R. S.; Chalom, M. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Formation water is the naturally-occurring water which is contained within the geological formation itself. The quantity and quality of the formation water can both be problematic. Over time, the water volume should decrease as the gas volumes increase. Formation water has been found to contain high levels of Cl, As, Fe, Ba, Mn, PAHs and may even contain naturally occurring radioactive materials. Chlorides in some cases have been found to be in excess of four-five times the level of concentrations found in the ocean. Within the management of well operation, there is sulfate between the analytes of greatest importance due to the potential for hydrogen sulphide formation and consequent corrosion of pipelines. As the concentration of sulfate in these waters can be less than n times that of chloride, a quantitative determination, using the technique of ion chromatography, constitutes an analytical challenge. This work aimed to develop and validate a method for the determination of sulphate ions in hyper-saline waters coming from the oil wells of the pre-salt, using 2D IC. In 2D IC the first column can be understood as a separating column, in which the species with retention times outside a preset range are discarded, while those belonging to this range are retained in a pre-concentrator column to further injecting a second column, the second dimension in which occurs the separation and quantification of the analytes of interest. As the chloride ions have a retention time lower than that of sulfate, a method was developed a for determining sulfate in very low range (mg L-1) by 2D IC, applicable to hypersaline waters, wherein the first dimension is used to the elimination of the matrix, ie, chloride ions, and the second dimension utilized in determining sulfate. For sulphate in a concentration range from 1.00 mg L-1 was obtained an accuracy of 1.0%. The accuracy of the method was tested by the standard addition method different samples of formation water in the pre

  8. Questions Student Ask: Why Is It Harder to Paddle a Canoe in Shallow Water?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Explains the effect that depth of water has on the speed of Olympic-style racing canoes and kayaks. Indicates that canoes are harder to paddle in shallow water because the skin friction drag increases appreciable when the water depth decreases. (DH)

  9. Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents in the Gulf of California: Natural Laboratories for Multidisciplinary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, M.; Hilton, D. R.; Price, R. E.; Kulongoski, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Modern and fossil examples of shallow water submarine hydrothermal vents occur throughout the Gulf of California. These sites offer important information about the processes involved in the extensional tectonics that created the Gulf of California and continue to shape the region to this day. Due to their accessibility, shallow water marine hydrothermal vents are far easier to access and study than their deeper analogs, and these settings can provide natural laboratories to study biogeochemical processes. Certain biogeochemical and biomineralizing processes occurring at shallow vents are very similar to those observed around deep-sea hydrothermal vents. In some cases, authigenic carbonates form around shallow vents. However, the hydrothermal precipitates are generally composed of Fe-oxyhydroxides, Mn-oxides, opal, calcite, pyrite and cinnabar, and their textural and morphological characteristics suggest microbial mediation for mineral deposition. Modern shallow-water hydrothermal vents also support complex biotic communities, characterized by the coexistence of chemosynthetic and photosynthetic organisms. These shallow vents are highly productive and provide valuable resources to local fishermen. Extant shallow water hydrothermal activity has been studied in Bahía Concepción, San Felipe, Punta Estrella, El Coloradito, Puertecitos, and around the Islas Encantadas. Discrete streams of gas bubbles are often discharged along with hot liquids at shallow water vents. The vent liquids generally exhibit lower salinities than seawater, and their isotopic compositions indicate that they contain meteoric water mixed with seawater. The composition of the shallow vent gas is primarily made up of CO2, but may also be enriched in N2, H2S, CH4, and other higher hydrocarbons. The geochemistry of these gases can be informative in determining the sources and processes involved in their generation. In particular, 3He/4He ratios may provide valuable information about the origin of

  10. Modeling water flow and nitrate dynamics in a plastic mulch vegetable cultivation system using HYDRUS-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipović, Vilim; Romić, Davor; Romić, Marija; Matijević, Lana; Mallmann, Fábio J. K.; Robinson, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Growing vegetables commercially requires intensive management and involves high irrigation demands and input of agrochemicals. Plastic mulch application in combination with drip irrigation is a common agricultural management technique practiced due to variety of benefits to the crop, mostly vegetable biomass production. However, the use of these techniques can result in various impacts on water and nutrient distribution in underlying soil and consequently affect nutrient leaching towards groundwater resources. The aim of this work is to estimate the effect of plastic mulch cover in combination with drip irrigation on water and nitrate dynamics in soil using HYDRUS-2D model. The field site was located in Croatian costal karst area on a Gleysol (WRB). The experiment was designed according to the split-plot design in three repetitions and was divided into plots with plastic mulch cover (MULCH) and control plots with bare soil (CONT). Each of these plots received applications of three levels of nitrogen fertilizer: 70, 140, and 210 kg per ha. All plots were equipped with drip irrigation and cropped with bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Bianca F1). Lysimeters were installed at 90 cm depth in all plots and were used for monitoring the water and nitrate outflow. HYDRUS-2D was used for modeling the water and nitrogen outflow in the MULCH and CONT plots, implementing the proper boundary conditions. HYDRUS-2D simulated results showed good fitting to the field site observed data in both cumulative water and nitrate outflow, with high level of agreement. Water flow simulations produced model efficiency of 0.84 for CONT and 0.56 for MULCH plots, while nitrate simulations showed model efficiency ranging from 0.67 to 0.83 and from 0.70 to 0.93, respectively. Additional simulations were performed with the absence of the lysimeter, revealing faster transport of nitrates below drip line in the CONT plots, mostly because of the increased surface area subjected to precipitation

  11. Ecological Turnover of Shallow Water Carbonate Producers Following the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, A.; Martindale, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Modern coral reef ecosystems are under threat from global climate change (and associated, synergistic stresses) and local environmental degradation. Therefore, it is important for ecologists to understand how ecosystems adapt and recover from climate change. The fossil record provides excellent case studies of similar events, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Although Paleocene and Eocene shallow water carbonates have not received the same degree of attention as the deep-water record, the PETM provides an opportunity to study the role of alternative stable states in maintaining the health and diversity of shallow water carbonate environments. It is generally accepted that during the PETM there is a transition from reef systems to foraminiferal shoals as the dominant shallow water carbonate producers. In fact, previous work has documented this interval as one of the major metazoan reef collapses of the Phanerozoic. This study fills an important gap in the shallow-water PETM record by quantitatively measuring the changes in carbonate production and ecology of 15 localities as they shift from coral reefs to foraminiferal shoal. The quantitative and semi-quantitative analysis is accomplished by using data from the PaleoReefs database and a simple carbonate production calculation to estimate the productivity of the shallow water system. Ecological data are gathered through a literature review of the localities. The results of this study will enable a better understanding of how modern reefs may react to global climate and environmental change.

  12. Interplay of Ion-Water and Water-Water Interactions within the Hydration Shells of Nitrate and Carbonate Directly Probed with 2D IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Joseph A; Carpenter, William; De Marco, Luigi; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-08-01

    The long-range influence of ions in solution on the water hydrogen-bond (H-bond) network remains a topic of vigorous debate. Recent spectroscopic and theoretical studies have, for the most part, reached the consensus that weakly coordinating ions only affect water molecules in the first hydration shell. Here, we apply ultrafast broadband two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy to aqueous nitrate and carbonate in neat H2O to study the solvation structure and dynamics of ions on opposite ends of the Hofmeister series. By exciting both the water OH stretches and ion stretches and probing the associated cross-peaks between them, we are afforded a comprehensive view into the complex nature of ion hydration. We show in aqueous nitrate that weak ion-water H-bonding leads to water-water interactions in the ion solvation shells dominating the dynamics. In contrast, the carbonate CO stretches show significant mixing with the water OH stretches due to strong ion-water H-bonding such that the water and ion modes are intimately correlated. Further, the excitonic nature of vibrations in neat H2O, which spans multiple water molecules, is an important factor in describing ion hydration. We attribute these complex dynamics to the likely presence of intermediate-range effects influenced by waters beyond the first solvation shell. PMID:27404015

  13. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  14. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-10-01

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

  15. Nutrient Enrichment in Estuaries from Discharge of Shallow Ground Water, Mt. Desert Island, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, Charles W.; Huntington, Thomas G.; Caldwell, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment from atmospheric deposition, agricultural activities, wildlife, and domestic sources is a concern at Acadia National Park because of the potential problem of water-quality degradation and eutrophication in its estuaries. Water-quality degradation has been observed at the Park?s Bass Harbor Marsh estuary but not in Northeast Creek estuary. Previous studies at Acadia National Park have estimated nutrient inputs to estuaries from atmospheric deposition and surface-water runoff, but the importance of shallow ground water that may contain nutrients derived from domestic or other sources is unknown. Northeast Creek and Bass Harbor Marsh estuaries were studied to (1) identify shallow ground-water seeps, (2) assess the chemistry of the water discharged from selected seeps, and (3) assess the chemistry of ground water in shallow ground-water hyporheic zones. The hyporheic zone is defined here as the region beneath and lateral to a stream bed, where there is mixing of shallow ground water and surface water. This study also provides baseline chemical data for ground water in selected bedrock monitoring wells and domestic wells on Mt. Desert Island. Water samples were analyzed for concentrations of nutrients, wastewater compounds, dissolved organic carbon, pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature and specific conductance. Samples from bedrock monitoring wells also were analyzed for alkalinity, major cations and anions, and trace metals. Shallow ground-water seeps to Northeast Creek and Bass Harbor Marsh estuaries at Acadia National Park were identified and georeferenced using aerial infrared digital imagery. Monitoring included the deployment of continuously recording temperature and specific conductance sensors in the seep discharge zone to access marine or freshwater signatures related to tidal flooding, gradient-driven shallow ground-water flow, or shallow subsurface flow related to precipitation events. Many potential shallow ground-water discharge zones were

  16. Simulating root water uptake from a shallow saline groundwater resource

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disposal of saline drainage water is a significant problem for irrigated agriculture. One proposal to deal with this problem is sequential biological concentration (SBC), which is the process of recycling drainage water on increasingly more salt tolerant crops until the volume of drainage water has ...

  17. Discrete hexamer water clusters and 2D water layer trapped in three luminescent Ag/tetramethylpyrazine/benzene-dicarboxylate hosts: 1D chain, 2D layer and 3D network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Hong-Xin; Zhang, Ting; Huang, Hua-Qi; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2016-03-01

    Three mix-ligand Ag(I) coordination compounds, namely, {[Ag10(tpyz) 5(L1) 5(H2 O)2].(H2 O)4}n (1, tpyz = 2,3,4,5-tetramethylpyrazine, H2 L1 = phthalic acid), [Ag4(tpyz) 2(L2) 2(H2 O)].(H2 O)5}n (2, H2 L2 = isophthalic acid) {[Ag2(tpyz) 2(L3) (H2 O)4].(H2 O)8}n (3, H2 L3 = terephthalic acid), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, PXRD and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. 1 exhibits a 2D layer which can be simplified as a (4,4) net. 2 is a 3D network which can be simplified as a (3,3)-connected 2-nodal net with a point symbol of {102.12}{102}. 3 consists of linear [Ag(tpyz) (H2 O)2]n chain. Of particular interest, discrete hexamer water clusters were observed in 1 and 2, while a 2D L10(6) water layer exists in 3. The results suggest that the benzene dicarboxylates play pivotal roles in the formation of the different host architectures as well as different water aggregations. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and emissive behaviors of these compounds were investigated.

  18. Variational data assimilation with a semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit global shallow-water equation model and its adjoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y.; Navon, I. M.; Courtier, P.; Gauthier, P.

    1993-01-01

    An adjoint model is developed for variational data assimilation using the 2D semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit (SLSI) shallow-water equation global model of Bates et al. with special attention being paid to the linearization of the interpolation routines. It is demonstrated that with larger time steps the limit of the validity of the tangent linear model will be curtailed due to the interpolations, especially in regions where sharp gradients in the interpolated variables coupled with strong advective wind occur, a synoptic situation common in the high latitudes. This effect is particularly evident near the pole in the Northern Hemisphere during the winter season. Variational data assimilation experiments of 'identical twin' type with observations available only at the end of the assimilation period perform well with this adjoint model. It is confirmed that the computational efficiency of the semi-Lagrangian scheme is preserved during the minimization process, related to the variational data assimilation procedure.

  19. A moist Boussinesq shallow water equations set for testing atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerroukat, M.; Allen, T.

    2015-06-01

    The shallow water equations have long been used as an initial test for numerical methods applied to atmospheric models with the test suite of Williamson et al. [1] being used extensively for validating new schemes and assessing their accuracy. However the lack of physics forcing within this simplified framework often requires numerical techniques to be reworked when applied to fully three dimensional models. In this paper a novel two-dimensional shallow water equations system that retains moist processes is derived. This system is derived from three-dimensional Boussinesq approximation of the hydrostatic Euler equations where, unlike the classical shallow water set, we allow the density to vary slightly with temperature. This results in extra (or buoyancy) terms for the momentum equations, through which a two-way moist-physics dynamics feedback is achieved. The temperature and moisture variables are advected as separate tracers with sources that interact with the mean-flow through a simplified yet realistic bulk moist-thermodynamic phase-change model. This moist shallow water system provides a unique tool to assess the usually complex and highly non-linear dynamics-physics interactions in atmospheric models in a simple yet realistic way. The full non-linear shallow water equations are solved numerically on several case studies and the results suggest quite realistic interaction between the dynamics and physics and in particular the generation of cloud and rain.

  20. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burris, Paul C.; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-05-20

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this Paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is usedmore » to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. Lastly, the simulated spectra indicate that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.« less

  1. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores.

    PubMed

    Burris, Paul C; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H

    2016-05-21

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is used to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. The simulated spectra indicates that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra. PMID:27208967

  2. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris, Paul C.; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-05-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is used to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. The simulated spectra indicates that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.

  3. Micro-PIV measurements of multiphase flow of water and supercritical CO2 in 2D heterogeneous porous micromodels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Christensen, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow of water and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) in porous media is central to geological sequestration of CO2 into saline aquifers. However, our fundamental understanding of the coupled flow dynamics of CO2 and water in complex geologic media still remains limited, especially at the pore scale. Recently, studies have been carried out in 2D homogeneous models with the micro-PIV technique, yielding very interesting observations of pore-scale flow transport. The primary aim of this work is to leverage this experimental protocol to quantify the pore-scale flow of water and liquid/supercritical CO2 in 2D heterogeneous porous micromodels under reservoir-relevant conditions. The goal is to capture the dynamics of this multi-phase flow in a porous matrix that mimics the heterogeneity of natural rock. Fluorescent microscopy and the micro-PIV technique are employed to simultaneously measure the spatially-resolved instantaneous velocity field in the water and quantify the instantaneous spatial configuration of both phases. The results for heterogeneous micromodels will be presented and compared with those for homogeneous micromodels, yielding valuable insight into flow processes at the pore scale in natural rock.

  4. Modeling Meandering Channel by Two-Dimensional Shallow Water Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Duan, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    This research is to simulate the process of channel meandering using a two-dimensional depth-averaged hydrodynamic model. The multiple interactions between unsteady flow, turbulence, secondary flow, nonequilibrium sediment transport and bank erosion are considered by the model. The governing equations are the 2D depth-averaged Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (2D-RANS) equations and the Exner equation for bed elevation evolution. The Reynolds stresses are calculated by the k-ɛ turbulence model. The secondary flow, is modeled by the dispersion terms in momentum equations. The spatial lag between the instantaneous flow properties and the rate of sediment transport is simulated by the nonequilibrium sediment transport model. During the process of adaptation, the sediment transport rate gradually develops into the transport capacity of a given flow condition. The evolution of channel bed and bank is modeled by the general Exner equation that accounts for both vertical deformation of bed elevation as well as lateral migration of bank. The system of governing equations is solved by a semi-implicit finite volume method over the Cartesian mesh. The advective fluxes across each cell interface are simultaneously calculated by the extended HLL Riemann solver. At each time step, the diffusion terms in the governing equations are solved by the implicit Euler scheme. The source terms are discretized in a well-balanced way to retain the C-property of the proposed model. Application of the model to different test cases indicates that the model can correctly simulate different phases of meandering channel evolution which include streamwise migration, transverse migration and rotation of channel bends.

  5. New shallow water table depth algorithm in SWAT2005: recent modifications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proximity of the shallow water table depth (wtd) to the soil surface impacts agricultural production, farm machine trafficability, and water quality due to agricultural chemical transport and soil salinity. Therefore, it is essential for hydrologic models to accurately simulate wtd. Recently, an...

  6. Denitrification in the shallow ground water of a tile-drained, agricultural watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehnert, E.; Hwang, H.-H.; Johnson, T.M.; Sanford, R.A.; Beaumont, W.C.; Holm, T.R.

    2007-01-01

    Nonpoint-source pollution of surface water by N is considered a major cause of hypoxia. Because Corn Belt watersheds have been identified as major sources of N in the Mississippi River basin, the fate and transport of N from midwestern agricultural watersheds have received considerable interest. The fate and transport of N in the shallow ground water of these watersheds still needs additional research. Our purpose was to estimate denitrification in the shallow ground water of a tile-drained, Corn Belt watershed with fine-grained soils. Over a 3-yr period, N was monitored in the surface and ground water of an agricultural watershed in central Illinois. A significant amount of N was transported past the tile drains and into shallow ground water. The ground water nitrate was isotopically heavier than tile drain nitrate, which can be explained by denitrification in the subsurface. Denitrifying bacteria were found at depths to 10 m throughout the watershed. Laboratory and push-pull tests showed that a significant fraction of nitrate could be denitrified rapidly. We estimated that the N denitrified in shallow ground water was equivalent to 0.3 to 6.4% of the applied N or 9 to 27% of N exported via surface water. These estimates varied by water year and peaked in a year of normal precipitation after 2 yr of below average precipitation. Three years of monitoring data indicate that shallow ground water in watersheds with fine-grained soils may be a significant N sink compared with N exported via surface water. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  7. Tsunami Simulator Integrating the Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Method and the Nonlinear Shallow Water Wave Model with High Performance Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, T.; Imamura, F.; Sugawara, D.; Ogasawara, K.; Watanabe, M.; Hirahara, T.

    2014-12-01

    A tsunami simulator integrating a 3-D fluid simulation technology that runs on large-scale parallel computers using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been developed together with a 2-D tsunami propagation simulation technique using a nonlinear shallow water wave model. We use the 2-D simulation to calculate tsunami propagation of scale of about 1000km from epicenter to near shore. The 3-D SPH method can be used to calculate the water surface and hydraulic force that a tsunami can exert on a building, and to simulate flooding patterns at urban area of at most km scale. With our simulator we can also see three dimensional fluid feature such as complex changes a tsunami undergoes as it interacts with coastal topography or structures. As a result it is hoped that, e.g. , effect of the structures to dissipate waves energy passing over it can be elucidated. The authors utilize the simulator in the third of five fields of the Strategic Programs for Innovative Research, "Advanced Prediction Researches for Natural Disaster Prevention and Reduction," or the theme "Improvement of the tsunami forecasting system on the HPCI computer." The results of tsunami simulation using the K computer will be reported. We are going to apply it to a real problem of the disaster prevention in future.

  8. Multi-Elements in Waters and Sediments of Shallow Lakes: Relationships with Water, Sediment, and Watershed Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Donna L.; Hanson, Mark A.; Herwig, Brian R.; Bowe, Shane E.; Otte, Marinus L.

    2015-01-01

    We measured concentrations of multiple elements, including rare earth elements, in waters and sediments of 38 shallow lakes of varying turbidity and macrophyte cover in the Prairie Parkland (PP) and Laurentian Mixed Forest (LMF) provinces of Minnesota. PP shallow lakes had higher element concentrations in waters and sediments compared to LMF sites. Redundancy analysis indicated that a combination of site- and watershed-scale features explained a large proportion of among-lake variability in element concentrations in lake water and sediments. Percent woodland cover in watersheds, turbidity, open water area, and macrophyte cover collectively explained 65.2 % of variation in element concentrations in lake waters. Sediment fraction smaller than 63 µm, percent woodland in watersheds, open water area, and sediment organic matter collectively explained 64.2 % of variation in element concentrations in lake sediments. In contrast to earlier work on shallow lakes, our results showed the extent to which multiple elements in shallow lake waters and sediments were influenced by a combination of variables including sediment characteristics, lake morphology, and percent land cover in watersheds. These results are informative because they help illustrate the extent of functional connectivity between shallow lakes and adjacent lands within these lake watersheds. PMID:26074657

  9. Shallow Aquifer Connectivity and Early Season Water Supply of Seasonal Wetlands and Drainages Leading to Regional Drainage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarten, N. F.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers in the Central Valley, California are recognized being seasonally supplied by early season direct surface water runoff and later season snow melt runoff from their tributaries. In addition, early season water supply to these rivers is derived from precipitation (PPT) that has infiltrated into soils underlain by a near surface aquitard, typically at less than 2 m depth. These shallow perched groundwater systems contribute a potentially substantial amount of water from more than 500,000 hectares of landforms associated with geomorphic terraces underlain by these aquitards. Early season water input to seasonal and perennial drainages is regulated by the hydraulic conductivity of the (clay-) loamy soils and by surface and aquitard slope of the local catchments associated with these old alluvial landforms. Research on these landforms and shallow aquifers has identified a complex PPT and evapotranspiration (ET) sensitive system that includes shallow depressions that seasonally produce water table derived wetlands (“vernal pools”). These wetlands have been recognized for a very high level of plant and invertebrate species diversity including endangered species. In addition, these seasonal wetlands provide migratory feeding areas of birds. Our work on these seasonal perched systems shows that as much as 80 percent of the soil column above the aquitard is saturated, during average to high rainfall years, for up to 90 to 120 days. Where the water table of this perched system intercepts the land surface, vernal pools develop. The perched groundwater drains into seasonal surface drainages that ultimately supply the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. At the end of the rainy season, both the vernal pools and the perched aquifer rapidly and synchronously disappear. Once the soil is unsaturated, water flow is vertically upward due to ET. Variably saturated modeling of this system was conducted using HYDRUS 2D/3D. Climate inputs were from

  10. Geostatistical investigation into the temporal evolution of spatial structure in a shallow water table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, S. W.; Seibert, J.; Lembo, A. J.; Walter, M. T.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2006-02-01

    Shallow water tables near-streams often lead to saturated, overland flow generating areas in catchments in humid climates. While these saturated areas are assumed to be principal biogeochemical hot-spots and important for issues such as non-point pollution sources, the spatial and temporal behavior of shallow water tables, and associated saturated areas, is not completely understood. This study demonstrates how geostatistical methods can be used to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of the shallow water table for the near-stream region. Event-based and seasonal changes in the spatial structure of the shallow water table, which influences the spatial pattern of surface saturation and related runoff generation, can be identified and used in conjunction to characterize the hydrology of an area. This is accomplished through semivariogram analysis and indicator kriging to produce maps combining soft data (i.e., proxy information to the variable of interest) representing general shallow water table patterns with hard data (i.e., actual measurements) that represent variation in the spatial structure of the shallow water table per rainfall event. The area used was a hillslope in the Catskill Mountains region of New York State. The shallow water table was monitored for a 120 m×180 m near-stream region at 44 sampling locations on 15-min intervals. Outflow of the area was measured at the same time interval. These data were analyzed at a short time interval (15 min) and at a long time interval (months) to characterize the changes in the hydrologic behavior of the hillslope. Indicator semivariograms based on binary-transformed ground water table data (i.e., 1 if exceeding the time-variable median depth to water table and 0 if not) were created for both short and long time intervals. For the short time interval, the indicator semivariograms showed a high degree of spatial structure in the shallow water table for the spring, with increased range during many rain

  11. Remote sensing of water depths in shallow waters via artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyhun, Özçelik; Yalçın, Arısoy

    2010-09-01

    Determination of the water depths in coastal zones is a common requirement for the majority of coastal engineering and coastal science applications. However, production of high quality bathymetric maps requires expensive field survey, high technology equipment and expert personnel. Remotely sensed images can be conveniently used to reduce the cost and labor needed for bathymetric measurements and to overcome the difficulties in spatial and temporal depth provision. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methodology is introduced in this study to derive bathymetric maps in shallow waters via remote sensing images and sample depth measurements. This methodology provides fast and practical solution for depth estimation in shallow waters, coupling temporal and spatial capabilities of remote sensing imagery with modeling flexibility of ANN. Its main advantage in practice is that it enables to directly use image reflectance values in depth estimations, without refining depth-caused scatterings from other environmental factors (e.g. bottom material and vegetation). Its function-free structure allows evaluating nonlinear relationships between multi-band images and in-situ depth measurements, therefore leads more reliable depth estimations than classical regressive approaches. The west coast of the Foca, Izmir/Turkey was used as a test bed. Aster first three band images and Quickbird pan-sharpened images were used to derive ANN based bathymetric maps of this study area. In-situ depth measurements were supplied from the General Command of Mapping, Turkey (HGK). Two models were set, one for Aster and one for Quickbird image inputs. Bathymetric maps relying solely on in-situ depth measurements were used to evaluate resultant derived bathymetric maps. The efficiency of the methodology was discussed at the end of the paper. It is concluded that the proposed methodology could decrease spatial and repetitive depth measurement requirements in bathymetric mapping especially for

  12. Enhanced job control language procedures for the SIMSYS2D two-dimensional water-quality simulation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karavitis, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The SIMSYS2D two-dimensional water-quality simulation system is a large-scale digital modeling software system used to simulate flow and transport of solutes in freshwater and estuarine environments. Due to the size, processing requirements, and complexity of the system, there is a need to easily move the system and its associated files between computer sites when required. A series of job control language (JCL) procedures was written to allow transferability between IBM and IBM-compatible computers. (USGS)

  13. Time lapse inversion of 2D ERT data for monitoring river water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, E. L.; Johnson, T. C.; Greenwood, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    Uranium transport in the 300 area is driven by both the chemical and physical effects of stage fluctuations in the Columbia River and resulting river water, ground water interaction. Because river water is less conductive than groundwater, it serves as a natural tracer that can be imaged using surface ERT. We've monitored 4 lines for 4 months over the high stage spring runoff interval to identify preferred flowpaths for river water intrusion. The four lines overlay former waste disposal sites including the processing ponds and sanitary leach trenches. We have used this ERT data set to investigate two methods of time lapse inversion, sequential and all-at-once. Each technique is a model difference approach as opposed to a data difference inversion approach. Both use a regularized inversion with model constraints that regularize spatially and temporally. For the sequential inversion, the starting and reference models are taken from the previous inversion. Both starting and reference models are taken from the first inversion for the all-at-once method. In either case an inversion is triggered if data misfit from the starting model exceeds the chi-squared convergence criteria. It was found that starting with a relatively smooth model provided better visualization of temporal conductivity changes when inverting all data sets with the same initial model, while an initial model exhibiting smaller data misfit may be used successfully as the starting point for sequential inversion. Inland conductivity changes within model cells were found to be highly correlated with river stage, and when paired with the characterization model, provide evidence of waste trenches, the processing pond, as well as the existence of a paleo-channel incised into the Ringold Formation and dipping structures on the Hanford-Ringold contact that provide preferred pathways for river water intrusion.

  14. Preservation of forcing signals in shallow water carbonate sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Jon; Wood, Rachel; Curtis, Andrew; Tetzlaff, Daniel M.

    2012-11-01

    No consensus has been reached on whether the metre-scale cycles that commonly occur in peritidal carbonates are predominately a product of external relative sea-level variations (allocycles) or an intrinsic property of carbonate production generated via the interaction of non-linear processes (autocycles). For any forcing signal such as eustatic sea-level change, to be detectable in stratigraphy its effects must be preserved. Here, a deterministic, three-dimensional geological process model is used to explore how such cycles are preserved in the geological record in the presence of autocyclic processes. Each simulation produced cycle thickness distributions that are statistically indistinguishable from a theoretical Poisson process, regardless of whether auto- or allo-cycles dominated. Spectral analysis of depositional time series constructed from idealised geological sections showed that all detectable signals occurred within the Milankovitch forcing frequency bands, even when no Milankovitch forcing was present. Thus, it is deduced that from any geological section alone, external forcing signals are detectable but are not distinguishable from autocyclically produced signals. Interestingly, there is no correlation between the percentage of sediment preserved and the accuracy with which signals are detectable in the preserved sediment: in some model realisations, even with preservation as low as 40%, the correct forcing signal can be detected accurately while, conversely, sections with preservation as high as 90% can have poor signal preservation. The reverse can also be true in other models. It is therefore concluded that distinguishing allocyclic and autocyclic forcing in shallow marine or peritidal carbonate successions is likely to be extremely difficult except in cases of extraordinary sedimentary preservation and dating accuracy.

  15. Combined effects of climate change and bank stabilization on shallow water habitats of chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Jeffrey C; McClure, Michelle M; Sheer, Mindi B; Munn, Nancy L

    2013-12-01

    Significant challenges remain in the ability to estimate habitat change under the combined effects of natural variability, climate change, and human activity. We examined anticipated effects on shallow water over low-sloped beaches to these combined effects in the lower Willamette River, Oregon, an area highly altered by development. A proposal to stabilize some shoreline with large rocks (riprap) would alter shallow water areas, an important habitat for threatened Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), and would be subject to U.S. Endangered Species Act-mandated oversight. In the mainstem, subyearling Chinook salmon appear to preferentially occupy these areas, which fluctuate with river stages. We estimated effects with a geospatial model and projections of future river flows. Recent (1999-2009) median river stages during peak subyearling occupancy (April-June) maximized beach shallow water area in the lower mainstem. Upstream shallow water area was maximized at lower river stages than have occurred recently. Higher river stages in April-June, resulting from increased flows predicted for the 2080s, decreased beach shallow water area 17-32%. On the basis of projected 2080s flows, more than 15% of beach shallow water area was displaced by the riprap. Beach shallow water area lost to riprap represented up to 1.6% of the total from the mouth to 12.9 km upstream. Reductions in shallow water area could restrict salmon feeding, resting, and refuge from predators and potentially reduce opportunities for the expression of the full range of life-history strategies. Although climate change analyses provided useful information, detailed analyses are prohibitive at the project scale for the multitude of small projects reviewed annually. The benefits of our approach to resource managers include a wider geographic context for reviewing similar small projects in concert with climate change, an approach to analyze cumulative effects of similar actions, and estimation of the

  16. On the relevance of a variational iteration method for solving the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungkasi, Sudi; Wiryanto, Leo Hari

    2016-02-01

    We solve the shallow water equations using a variational iteration method due to Ji-Huan He. Advantages and disadvantages of the method are investigated. Some reference solutions are used to assess the performance of the variational iteration method. Variational iteration solutions are mesh-free, which makes the computation easy at any point at any time. However, we must understand the validity of these solutions for large time values. The goal of this paper is to verify the validity of variational iteration solutions, when the method is used to solve the shallow water equations.

  17. Three-dimensional mapping of evolving internal waves during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Wan, Lin; Song, Aijun

    2013-07-01

    Detailed knowledge of sound speed profiles and the sound speed profile's spatial and temporal variability resulting from internal waves (IWs) are indispensable to investigating significant acoustic field fluctuations in shallow water. A strategy to obtain a time-varying, three-dimensional (3D) IW temperature field is presented. It uses two types of simultaneous measurements: dense observations from a farm of thermistor strings and IW surface expressions from a ship-based radar. Using data from the Shallow Water 2006 experiment, the temperature field, over multiple kilometers in range, was reconstructed and, fed to a 3D acoustic model to demonstrate IW impacts on acoustic propagation. PMID:23862909

  18. A moist Boussinesq shallow water equations set for testing atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Zerroukat, M. Allen, T.

    2015-06-01

    The shallow water equations have long been used as an initial test for numerical methods applied to atmospheric models with the test suite of Williamson et al. being used extensively for validating new schemes and assessing their accuracy. However the lack of physics forcing within this simplified framework often requires numerical techniques to be reworked when applied to fully three dimensional models. In this paper a novel two-dimensional shallow water equations system that retains moist processes is derived. This system is derived from three-dimensional Boussinesq approximation of the hydrostatic Euler equations where, unlike the classical shallow water set, we allow the density to vary slightly with temperature. This results in extra (or buoyancy) terms for the momentum equations, through which a two-way moist-physics dynamics feedback is achieved. The temperature and moisture variables are advected as separate tracers with sources that interact with the mean-flow through a simplified yet realistic bulk moist-thermodynamic phase-change model. This moist shallow water system provides a unique tool to assess the usually complex and highly non-linear dynamics–physics interactions in atmospheric models in a simple yet realistic way. The full non-linear shallow water equations are solved numerically on several case studies and the results suggest quite realistic interaction between the dynamics and physics and in particular the generation of cloud and rain. - Highlights: • Novel shallow water equations which retains moist processes are derived from the three-dimensional hydrostatic Boussinesq equations. • The new shallow water set can be seen as a more general one, where the classical equations are a special case of these equations. • This moist shallow water system naturally allows a feedback mechanism from the moist physics increments to the momentum via buoyancy. • Like full models, temperature and moistures are advected as tracers that interact

  19. An investigation of shallow ground-water quality near East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmichael, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    Alluvial soils of the flood plain of East Fork Poplar Creek in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are contaminated with mercury and other metals, organic compounds, and radio-nuclides originating from the Y-12 Plant, a nuclear-processing facility located within the U.S. Department of Energy 's Oak Ridge Reservation. Observation wells were installed in the shallow aquifer of the flood plain, and water quality samples were collected to determine if contaminants are present in the shallow groundwater. Groundwater in the shallow aquifer occurs under water-table conditions. Recharge is primarily from precipitation and discharge is to East Fork Poplar Creek. Groundwater levels fluctuate seasonally in response to variations in recharge and evapotranspiration. During extremely dry periods, the water table drops below the base of the shallow aquifer in some flood-plain areas. Contaminants found in water samples from several of the wells in concentrations which equaled or exceeded drinking-water standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are antimony, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, phenols, and strontium-90. Total and dissolved uranium concentrations exceeded the analytical detection limit in nearly 70% of the wells in the flood plain. The results of water quality determinations demonstrate that elevated concentrations of most trace metals (and possibly organic compounds and radionuclides) were caused by contaminated sediments in the samples. The presence of contaminated sediment in samples is suspected to be the result of borehole contamination during well installation. (USGS)

  20. Shallow water radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) measurements in urban environment: A case study from Stockholm city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Suman; Bastani, Mehrdad; Malehmir, Alireza; Wang, Shunguo; Pedersen, Laust

    2014-05-01

    of the impedance tensor were obtained by the parametric representation combined with a Truncated Singular Value Decomposition (TSVD) regularization of Bastani and Pedersen (2001). The processed data were then inverted to obtain 2D resistivity models. The resulting models along 23 lines correlate well and image variation of water depth, thickness of subaqueous sediments as well as the depth to crystalline bedrock. Low resistivity zones observed in the bedrock coincide well with the low velocity zones identified in refraction seismic surveys available along the RMT lines, indicating the presence of possible fracture zones in the bedrock. The experiment illustrates that the RMT methods can be well adapted to this type of environment; it is fast and cost-effective in shallow water especially in urban settings. Acknowledgments: Formas, SGU, BeFo, SBUF, Skanska, Boliden, FQM and NGI References: Bastani, M., 2001, EnviroMT - a new Controlled Source/Radio Magnetotelluric System: Ph.D. thesis, ISBN 91-554-5051-2, Uppsala University. Bastani, M. and Pedersen, L. B., 2001, Estimation of magnetotelluric transfer functions from radio transmitters. GEOPHYSICS, 66, 1038-1051.

  1. Shallow ground-water flow, water levels, and quality of water, 1980-84, Cowles Unit, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, D.A.; Shedlock, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Cowles Unit of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in Porter County, northwest Indiana, contains a broad dune-beach complex along the southern shoreline of Lake Michigan and a large wetland, called the Great Marsh, that occupies the lowland between the shoreline dunes and an older dune-beach complex farther inland. Water levels and water quality in the surficial aquifer were monitored from 1977 to 1984 near settling ponds on adjacent industrial property at the western end of the Cowles Unit. Since 1980, when the settling pond bottoms were sealed, these intradunal lowlands contained standing water only during periods of high snowmelt or rainfall. Water level declines following the cessation of seepage ranged from 6 feet at the eastern-most settling pond to nearly 14 feet at the western-most pond. No general pattern of water table decline was observed in the Great Marsh or in the shoreline dune complex at distances > 3,000 ft east or north of the settling ponds. Since the settling ponds were sealed, the concentration of boron has decreased while concentrations of cadmium, arsenic, zinc, and molybdenum in shallow ground-water downgradient of the ponds show no definite trends in time. Arsenic, boron and molybdenum have remained at concentrations above those of shallow groundwater in areas unaffected by settling pond seepage. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Shallow-water System Dynamics in Chesapeake Bay, with Physical-Biological Modeling Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, R.; Wang, P.; Linker, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States. The total surface area is 9920 square kilometers of which 7540 square kilometers are shallower than 10 m. These shallow systems provide vital habitats and nursery grounds for numerous species of fish, shellfish, and wildlife. In the Chesapeake the shallow water systems have deteriorated in terms of healthy ecosystem levels and submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). Restoration of the shallow water systems requires an understanding of their dynamics including wave-current interactions, shoreline erosion, sediment suspension, biological and biogeochemical processes, sediment diagenesis, sediment-water exchange, and diel cycles of temperature, salinity, turbidity, alkalinity, chlorophyll, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen (DO). To this end, an extensive shallow water monitoring program has been implemented in the Chesapeake since 2003. The program includes bi-weekly cruises of nutrient sampling, a continuous monitoring network with electronic sensors collecting data at a 15 minute interval, and a unique data flow survey from moving boats that collect underway observations with a datum frequency of seconds. The data reveal large diel cycles, with chlorophyll varying between a few mg/l to hundreds of mg/l, DO between 0 to 20 mg/l (with saturation from 0 to 250%), turbidity between 0 to 1500 NTUs, and pH from 6.0 to 9.5, which demonstrate the highly dynamic nature in physical and biological process of the shallow water systems . In order to better understand the key mechanisms and processes of these shallow-water systems and to explore the monitoring data, we applied a coupled physical and water quality model to the Chester and Corsica tributaries. The physical model is the Unstructured Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) and the water quality model is the Integrated Compartment Model (ICM) which has 36 state variables such as phytoplankton, zooplankton, DO, nutrients, and various organic matter and sediment-water

  3. Geostatistical investigation into the temporal evolution of spatial structure in a shallow water table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, S. W.; Seibert, J.; Lembo, A. J.; Walter, M. T.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2005-08-01

    Shallow water tables in the near-stream region often lead to saturated areas in catchments in humid climates. While these saturated areas are assumed to be of importance for issues such as non-point pollution sources, little is known about the spatial and temporal behavior of shallow water tables and the resulting saturated areas. In this study, geostatistical methods are employed demonstrating their utility in investigating the spatial and temporal variation of the shallow water table for the near-stream region. Event-based and seasonal changes in the spatial structure of the shallow water table, which directly influences surface saturation and runoff generation, can be identified and used in conjunction to characterize the hydrology of an area. This is accomplished through semivariogram analysis and indicator kriging to produce maps combining supplemental soft data (i.e., proxy information to the variable of interest) representing seasonal trends in the shallow water table with hard data (i.e., the actual measurements) that represent variation in the spatial structure of the shallow water table per rainfall event. The area used was a hillslope located in the Catskill Mountains region of New York State. The shallow water table was monitored for a 120 m×180 m near-stream region at 44 sampling locations on 15-min intervals. Outflow of the area was measured at the same time interval. These data were analyzed at a short time interval (15 min) and at a long time interval (months) to characterize the changes in the hydrology of the region. Indicator semivariograms based on transforming the depth to ground water table data into binary values (i.e., 1 if exceeding the time-variable median depth to water table and 0 if not) were created for both time interval lengths. When considering only the short time interval, the indicator semivariograms for spring when there is excess rainfall show high spatial structure with increased ranges during rain events with surface

  4. Understanding 2D atomic resolution imaging of the calcite surface in water by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tracey, John; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Spijker, Peter; Miyata, Kazuki; Reischl, Bernhard; Canova, Filippo Federici; Rohl, Andrew L; Fukuma, Takeshi; Foster, Adam S

    2016-10-14

    Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) experiments were performed on the calcite (10[Formula: see text]4) surface in pure water, and a detailed analysis was made of the 2D images at a variety of frequency setpoints. We observed eight different contrast patterns that reproducibly appeared in different experiments and with different measurement parameters. We then performed systematic free energy calculations of the same system using atomistic molecular dynamics to obtain an effective force field for the tip-surface interaction. By using this force field in a virtual AFM simulation we found that each experimental contrast could be reproduced in our simulations by changing the setpoint, regardless of the experimental parameters. This approach offers a generic method for understanding the wide variety of contrast patterns seen on the calcite surface in water, and is generally applicable to AFM imaging in liquids. PMID:27609045

  5. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan; E. Taylor

    2001-07-31

    A principal goal of the Budget Period I was to demonstrate that surface geochemistry could be used to locate bypassed hydrocarbons in old fields. This part of the program was successful. A surface geochemical survey, employing 5 different techniques, was carried out in the Spring and Summer of 2000 and a demonstration well, the State Vernon & Smock 13-23 HD1 (permit number: PN 53945) was drilled in Vernon Township, Isabella County, Michigan in the late fall of 2000. A demonstration well was selected and drilled based on geologic considerations and surface geochemistry. Over 460 soil samples were collected and analyzed over the drill site. A good anomaly was detected near the proposed well site and the demonstration well, the Smock 13-23, was drilled to a depth of 3157 feet by November 17, 2000. Two laterals were drilled, and hydrocarbons were located in a zone approximately 175 feet in length. However, it was determined that the pay zone was too small and difficult reservoir conditions (water production) prevented putting the well in production. The Smock 13-23 was shut in and abandoned January 15, 2001. A post-mortem determined that the main reason the well was not economic was because the zone was nearly completely flushed by earlier recovery operations. The post mortem also revealed the presence of an unmapped shale plug crossing the first lateral. It appears that this shale was detected by the geochemical survey, but its significance was not appreciated at the time. It is possible that sections of the well were faulty, ''porposing'' up and down so as to create water blockages. We are continuing to use the Vernon Field and the demonstration well to calibrate the geochemical data. Eventually, this study may provide a standard site that can be used to test and calibrate geochemical anomalies, something that does not presently exist. A postmortem report on the well, including the geology and geochemistry used to site the well, is presented in Appendix I. Five

  6. Shallow Alluvial Aquifer Ground Water System and Surface Water/Ground Water Interaction, Boulder Creek, Boulder, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, K. P.; Ge, S.; Crifasi, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    Water chemistry in Boulder Creek, Colorado, shows significant variation as the Creek flows through the City of Boulder [Barber et al., 2006]. This variation is partially due to ground water inputs, which are not quantitatively understood. The purpose of this study is (1) to understand ground water movement in a shallow alluvial aquifer system and (2) to assess surface water/ground water interaction. The study area, encompassing an area of 1 mi2, is located at the Sawhill and Walden Ponds area in Boulder. This area was reclaimed by the City of Boulder and Boulder County after gravel mining operations ceased in the 1970's. Consequently, ground water has filled in the numerous gravel pits allowing riparian vegetation regrowth and replanting. An integrated approach is used to examine the shallow ground water and surface water of the study area through field measurements, water table mapping, graphical data analysis, and numerical modeling. Collected field data suggest that lateral heterogeneity exists throughout the unconsolidated sediment. Alluvial hydraulic conductivities range from 1 to 24 ft/day and flow rates range from 0.01 to 2 ft/day. Preliminary data analysis suggests that ground water movement parallels surface topography and does not noticeably vary with season. Recharge via infiltrating precipitation is dependent on evapotranspiration (ET) demands and is influenced by preferential flow paths. During the growing season when ET demand exceeds precipitation rates, there is little recharge; however recharge occurs during cooler months when ET demand is insignificant. Preliminary data suggest that the Boulder Creek is gaining ground water as it traverses the study area. Stream flow influences the water table for distances up to 400 feet. The influence of stream flow is reflected in the zones relatively low total dissolved solids concentration. A modeling study is being conducted to synthesize aquifer test data, ground water levels, and stream flow data. The

  7. Water Through Life, A New Technique for Mapping Shallow Water Tables in Arid and Semi-Arid Climates using Color Infrared Aerial Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, G.

    2003-04-01

    usefulness of the technique becomes greatly enhanced. By extending the analysis from 2D to 3D, the technique evolves from being a powerful descriptive tool for mapping the lateral extent of shallow groundwater into a very powerful predictive tool that can aid in unlocking the dynamics of shallow aquifers and groundwater flow regimes within basins in arid and semi-arid climates.

  8. Applications of isotopes to tracing sources of solutes and water in shallow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, Carol; Krabbenhoft, David P.

    1995-01-01

    New awareness of the potential danger to water supplies posed by the use of agricultural chemicals has focused attention on the nature of groundwater recharge and the mobility of various solutes, especially nitrate and pesticides, in shallow systems. A better understanding of hydrologic flowpaths and solute sources is required to determine the potential impact of sources of contamination on water supplies, to develop management practices for preserving water quality, and to develop remediation plans for sites that are already contaminated. In many cases, environmental isotopes can be employed as 'surgical tools' for answering very specific questions about water and solute sources. Isotopic data can often provide more accurate information about the system than hydrologic measurements or complicated hydrologic models. This note focuses on practical and cost-effective examples of how naturally-occurring isotopes can be used to track water and solutes as they move through shallow systems.

  9. Herbicides in ground water of the Midwest: A regional study of shallow aquifers, 1991-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Stamer, J.K.; Goolsby, D.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    The intensive herbicide use associated with the 'Corn Belt' marks the Midwestern United States as a region where herbicide contamination of ground water could be a problem. To better understand the regional occurrence of herbicides in shallow aquifers of the Midwest, a sampling network of 303 wells across 12 States was developed. The results documented relatively widespread, low-level concentrations of herbicides in the shallow aquifers sampled. The most frequently detected compounds, however, were the transformation products of these herbicides. A relation was determined between herbicide occurrence and the general age of the ground water sampled. Water that recharged ground water within the past 40 years was much more likely to contain herbicides than water recharged earlier.

  10. The shallow water equations as a hybrid flow model for the numerical and experimental analysis of hydro power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Ostermann, Lars; Seidel, Christian

    2015-03-10

    The numerical analysis of hydro power stations is an important method of the hydraulic design and is used for the development and optimisation of hydro power stations in addition to the experiments with the physical submodel of a full model in the hydraulic laboratory. For the numerical analysis, 2D and 3D models are appropriate and commonly used.The 2D models refer mainly to the shallow water equations (SWE), since for this flow model a large experience on a wide field of applications for the flow analysis of numerous problems in hydraulic engineering already exists. Often, the flow model is verified by in situ measurements. In order to consider 3D flow phenomena close to singularities like weirs, hydro power stations etc. the development of a hybrid fluid model is advantageous to improve the quality and significance of the global model. Here, an extended hybrid flow model based on the principle of the SWE is presented. The hybrid flow model directly links the numerical model with the experimental data, which may originate from physical full models, physical submodels and in-situ measurements. Hence a wide field of application of the hybrid model emerges including the improvement of numerical models and the strong coupling of numerical and experimental analysis.

  11. Sugarcane Response to Nitrogen Fertilization on a Histosol with shallow Water Table and Periodic Flooding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is routinely exposed to periodic floods and shallow water tables on Histosols in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) of Florida. Through microbial oxidation, these soils provide excess N for sugarcane, but it is not known if supplemental N would improve yields when micr...

  12. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Response to Shallow Water Exercise in Young and Older Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jennifer A.; D'Acquisto, Leo J.; D'Acquisto, Debra M.; Cline, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Compared the metabolic and cardiovascular responses of young and older women while performing shallow water exercise (SWE). Overall, SWE elicited metabolic and cardiovascular responses that met American College of Sports Medicine's guidelines for establishing health benefits. Older females self-selected a greater relative exercise intensity during…

  13. Higher Order Corrections for Shallow-Water Solitary Waves: Elementary Derivation and Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halasz, Gabor B.

    2009-01-01

    We present an elementary method to obtain the equations of the shallow-water solitary waves in different orders of approximation. The first two of these equations are solved to get the shapes and propagation velocities of the corresponding solitary waves. The first-order equation is shown to be equivalent to the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation,…

  14. Comparison of shallow water table depth algorithms used in SWAT2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fluctuation of the shallow water table depth (WTD) is important for planning drainage systems at the plot-, field-, and watershed-scale because its proximity to the ground surface impacts farm machine trafficability, crop development, agricultural chemical transport, soil salinity, and drainage....

  15. Incorporation of a new shallow water table depth algorithm into SWAT 2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fluctuation of the shallow water table depth (WTD) is important for planning drainage systems at the plot-, field-, and watershed-scale because its proximity to the surface impacts farm machine trafficability, crop development, agricultural chemical transport, soil salinity, and drainage. Theref...

  16. Multiple origins of deep-sea Asellota (Crustacea: Isopoda) from shallow waters revealed by molecular data

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Michael J.; Mayer, Christoph; Malyutina, Marina; Wägele, Johann-Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The Asellota are a highly variable group of Isopoda with many species in freshwater and marine shallow-water environments. However, in the deep sea, they show their most impressive radiation with a broad range of astonishing morphological adaptations and bizarre body forms. Nevertheless, the evolution and phylogeny of the deep-sea Asellota are poorly known because of difficulties in scoring morphological characters. In this study, the molecular phylogeny of the Asellota is evaluated for 15 marine shallow-water species and 101 deep-sea species, using complete 18S and partial 28S rDNA gene sequences. Our molecular data support the monophyly of most deep-sea families and give evidence for a multiple colonization of the deep sea by at least four major lineages of asellote isopods. According to our molecular data, one of these lineages indicates an impressive radiation in the deep sea. Furthermore, the present study rejects the monophyly of the family Janiridae, a group of plesiomorphic shallow-water Asellota, and several shallow-water and deep-sea genera (Acanthaspidia, Ianthopsis, Haploniscus, Echinozone, Eurycope, Munnopsurus and Syneurycope). PMID:19033145

  17. Preliminary Evidence for the Amplification of Global Warming in Shallow, Intertidal Estuarine Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 50 years, mean annual water temperature in northeastern U.S. estuaries has increased by approximately 1.2°C, with most of the warming recorded in the winter and early spring. We hypothesize that this warming may be amplified in the shallow (<2m), nearshore portions ...

  18. NEKTON HABITAT QUALITY AT SHALLOW-WATER SITES IN TWO RHODE ISLAND COASTAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated nekton habitat quality at five shallow-water sites in two Rhode Island systems by comparing nekton densities and biomass, number of species, prey availability and feeding, and abundance of winter flounder Pseudopleuronectes americanus. Nekton density and biomass wer...

  19. An integrable shallow water equation with linear and nonlinear dispersion.

    PubMed

    Dullin, H R; Gottwald, G A; Holm, D D

    2001-11-01

    We use asymptotic analysis and a near-identity normal form transformation from water wave theory to derive a 1+1 unidirectional nonlinear wave equation that combines the linear dispersion of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation with the nonlinear/nonlocal dispersion of the Camassa-Holm (CH) equation. This equation is one order more accurate in asymptotic approximation beyond KdV, yet it still preserves complete integrability via the inverse scattering transform method. Its traveling wave solutions contain both the KdV solitons and the CH peakons as limiting cases. PMID:11690414

  20. Clumped Signatures of Shallow Water Corals in Tobago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atasoy, D.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    The island of Tobago is seasonally bathed by the waters from the Orinoco and the Amazon and the δ18O of the coral skeleton responds annually to a change in temperature of approximately 4 °C as well as changes in the magnitude of outflow of the Orinoco, Amazon, and precipitation associated with the ITCZ. The clumped isotope makes it possible to distinguish the temperature induced δ18O signal from that exerted by the freshwater. We have utilized a specimen of Diploria strigosa collected in 1991 which has an extension rate of about 2 cm/yr allows between 4-5 samples to be collected within a yearly growth increment. Our data reveals temperature between 24 and 28 °C consistent with actual measurements and not offset towards lower values as in some previous studies. Once the temperature has been calculated it is possible to extract the δ18O of the water using one of the paleotemperature equations established for corals.

  1. A method for measuring vertical accretion, elevation, and compaction of soft, shallow-water sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Marin, P.E.; Black, B.K.; Lynch, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution measures of vertical accretion, elevation, and compaction of shallow-water sediments are fundamental to understanding the processes that control elevation change and the mechanisms of progradation (e.g., development of mudflats and intertidal wetlands) in coastal systems. Yet, measurements of elevation by traditional survey methods often are of low accuracy because of the compressible nature of the substrates. Nor do they provide measures of vertical accretion or sediment compaction. This paper evaluates the use in shallow-water systems of an approach designed to measure these variables in vegetated wetlands. The approach employs simultaneous measures of elevation from temporary benchmarks using a sedimentation-erosion table (SET) and vertical accretion from marker horizons with sediment cores collected with a cryogenic coring apparatus. The measures are made with a level of resolution sufficient to distinguish between the influence of surface and subsurface processes on elevation, thus providing quantitative estimates of shallow subsidence. The SET-marker horizon approach was evaluated on a developing splay created by an artificial crevasse of a distributary in the Mississippi River delta. The approach provided high-resolution measures of vertical accretion (48.3 ' 2.0 cm.) and elevation (36.7 ' 1.6 cm) over a 4-year period, with the difference between the two indicating the amount of shallow subsidence. In addition, by laying new marker horizons in later years, the approach provided rates not only of shallow subsidence (3.9 ' 0.5 cm y-1) but also compaction of newly deposited seiments (2.1 ' 0.6 cm y-1) and compaction of underlying sediments (1.8 ' 2.0 cm y-1 ) over a two-year period. Hence, the SET-marker horizon approach has widespread applicability in both emergent wetland and shallow water environments for providing high resolution measures of the processes controlling elevation change.

  2. Response of the Rio Grande and shallow ground water in the Mesilla Bolson to irrigation, climate stress, and pumping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walton, J.; Ohlmacher, G.; Utz, D.; Kutianawala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The El Paso-Ciudad Juarez metropolitan area obtains its water from the Rio Grande and intermontane-basin aquifers. Shallow ground water in this region is in close communications with the surface water system. A major problem with both systems is salinity. Upstream usage of the water in the Rio Grande for irrigation and municipalities has led to concentration of soluble salts to the point where the surface water commonly exceeds drinking water standards. Shallow ground water is recharged by surface water (primarily irrigation canals and agricultural fields) and discharges to surface water (agricultural drains) and deeper ground water. The source of water entering the Rio Grande varies seasonally. During the irrigation season, water is released from reservoirs and mixes with the return flow from irrigation drains. During the non-irrigation season (winter), flow is from irrigation drains and river water quality is indicative of shallow ground water. The annual cycle can be ascertained from the inverse correlation between ion concentrations and discharge in the river. Water-quality data indicate that the salinity of shallow ground water increases each year during a drought. Water-management strategies in the region can affect water quality. Increasing the pumping rate of water-supply wells will cause shallow ground water to flow into the deeper aquifers and degrade the water quality. Lining the canals in the irrigation system to stop water leakage will lead to water quality degradation in shallow ground water and, eventually, deep ground water by removing a major source of high quality recharge that currently lowers the salinity of the shallow ground water.

  3. Analysis of shallow-groundwater dynamic responses to water supply change in the Haihe River plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z.; Lin, W.; Pengfei, L.

    2015-05-01

    When the middle route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project is completed, the water supply pattern of the Haihe River plain in North China will change significantly due to the replenishment of water sources and groundwater-exploitation control. The water-cycle-simulation model - MODCYCLE, has been used in simulating the groundwater dynamic balance for 2001-2010. Then different schemes of water supply in 2020 and 2030 were set up to quantitatively simulate the shallow-groundwater dynamic responses in the future. The results show that the total shallow-groundwater recharge is mainly raised by the increases in precipitation infiltration and surface-water irrigation infiltration. Meanwhile, the decrease of groundwater withdrawal contributes to reduce the total discharge. The recharge-discharge structure of local groundwater was still in a negative balance but improved gradually. The shallow-groundwater level in most parts was still falling before 2030, but more slowly. This study can benefit the rational exploitation of water resources in the Haihe River plain.

  4. Chemical character of ground water in the shallow water-table aquifer at selected localities in the Memphis area, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parks, William Scott; Graham, D.D.; Lowery, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Eight deep wells are being monitored in the Memphis, Tenn., area to detect any changes in the chemical character of water moving through the Memphis Sand towards major pumping centers. These wells are strategically located so as to intercept groundwater enroute through the Memphis Sand from the outcrop-recharge area. Although water quality analyses are available for many wells in the shallow water-table aquifer, no specific investigation has been made to characterize the quality of the water in this aquifer from which the Memphis Sand also receives part of its recharge. This investigation is to determine the chemical character of groundwater in the shallow water-table aquifer at selected localities in the Memphis area. Methods used to install eight shallow wells at abandoned dump sites containing chemical and/or industrial waste are described. Water samples from the eight shallow wells and two deep wells in the Memphis Sand were collected and analyzed. Results of the analysis are presented and the locations of the wells and dumps are shown on maps. (USGS)

  5. Exploring a multi-resolution modeling approach within the shallow-water equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ringler, Todd; Jacobsen, Doug; Gunzburger, Max; Ju, Lili; Duda, Michael; Skamarock, William

    2011-01-01

    The ability to solve the global shallow-water equations with a conforming, variable-resolution mesh is evaluated using standard shallow-water test cases. While the long-term motivation for this study is the creation of a global climate modeling framework capable of resolving different spatial and temporal scales in different regions, the process begins with an analysis of the shallow-water system in order to better understand the strengths and weaknesses of the approach developed herein. The multiresolution meshes are spherical centroidal Voronoi tessellations where a single, user-supplied density function determines the region(s) of fine- and coarsemesh resolution. The shallow-water system is explored with a suite of meshes ranging from quasi-uniform resolution meshes, where the grid spacing is globally uniform, to highly variable resolution meshes, where the grid spacing varies by a factor of 16 between the fine and coarse regions. The potential vorticity is found to be conserved to within machine precision and the total available energy is conserved to within a time-truncation error. This result holds for the full suite of meshes, ranging from quasi-uniform resolution and highly variable resolution meshes. Based on shallow-water test cases 2 and 5, the primary conclusion of this study is that solution error is controlled primarily by the grid resolution in the coarsest part of the model domain. This conclusion is consistent with results obtained by others.When these variable-resolution meshes are used for the simulation of an unstable zonal jet, the core features of the growing instability are found to be largely unchanged as the variation in the mesh resolution increases. The main differences between the simulations occur outside the region of mesh refinement and these differences are attributed to the additional truncation error that accompanies increases in grid spacing. Overall, the results demonstrate support for this approach as a path toward

  6. Analysis on oscillating actuator frequency influence of the fluid flow characterization for 2D contractile water jet thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaari, M. F.; Abu Bakar, H.; Nordin, N.; Saw, S. K.; Samad, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Contractile body is an alternative mechanism instead of rotating blade propeller to generate water jet for locomotion. The oscillating motion of the actuator at different frequencies varies the pressure and volume of the pressure chamber in time to draw in and jet out the water at a certain mass flow rate. The aim of this research was to analyze the influence of the actuating frequency of the fluid flow in the pressure chamber of the thruster during this inflation-deflation process. A 70mm × 70mm × 18mm (L × W × T) 2D water jet thruster was fabricated for this purpose. The contractile function was driven using two lateral pneumatic actuators where the fluid flow analysis was focused on the X-Y plane vector. Observation was carried out using a video camera and Matlab image measurement technique to determine the volume of the flowing mass. The result demonstrated that the greater actuating frequency decreases the fluid flow rate and the Reynolds number. This observation shows that the higher frequency would give a higher mass flow rate during water jet generation.

  7. Regularized shallow water equations for numerical simulation of flows with a moving shoreline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatov, O. V.; Elizarova, T. G.

    2016-04-01

    A numerical algorithm for simulating free-surface flows based on regularized shallow water equations is adapted to flows involving moving dry-bed areas. Well-balanced versions of the algorithm are constructed. Test computations of flows with dry-bed areas in the cases of water runup onto a plane beach and a constant-slope beach are presented. An example of tsunami simulation is given.

  8. Numerical model of water flow and solute accumulation in vertisols using HYDRUS 2D/3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Tomáš; Dahan, Ofer; Turkeltub, Tuvia

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: dessication-crack-induced-salinization, preferential flow, conceptual model, numerical model, vadose zone, vertisols, soil water retention function, HYDRUS 2D/3D Vertisols cover a hydrologically very significant area of semi-arid regions often through which water infiltrates to groundwater aquifers. Understanding of water flow and solute accumulation is thus very relevant to agricultural activity and water resources management. Previous works suggest a conceptual model of dessication-crack-induced-salinization where salinization of sediment in the deep section of the vadose zone (up to 4 m) is induced by subsurface evaporation due to convective air flow in the dessication cracks. It suggests that the salinization is induced by the hydraulic gradient between the dry sediment in the vicinity of cracks (low potential) and the relatively wet sediment further from the main cracks (high potential). This paper presents a modified previously suggested conceptual model and a numerical model. The model uses a simple uniform flow approach but unconventionally prescribes the boundary conditions and the hydraulic parameters of soil. The numerical model is bound to one location close to a dairy farm waste lagoon, but the application of the suggested conceptual model could be possibly extended to all semi-arid regions with vertisols. Simulations were conducted using several modeling approaches with an ultimate goal of fitting the simulation results to the controlling variables measured in the field: temporal variation in water content across thick layer of unsaturated clay sediment (>10 m), sediment salinity and salinity the water draining down the vadose zone to the water table. The development of the model was engineered in several steps; all computed as forward solutions by try-and-error approach. The model suggests very deep instant infiltration of fresh water up to 12 m, which is also supported by the field data. The paper suggests prescribing a special atmospheric

  9. Shallow ground-water resources in the Grand Strand of South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speiran, G.K.; Lichtler, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The shallow aquifers that underlie the Grand Strand of South Carolina average approximately 60 to 400 ft thick and have variable productivity with some wells producing little water and others producing several hundred gal/min. These aquifers are separated from the underlying Black Creek aquifer by a 200 ft to 300 ft thick clay confining unit. The shallow aquifers are recharged by local rainfall and discharge primarily into the Atlantic Ocean, the Intracoastal Waterway, and other surface waters. In the North Myrtle Beach area a vertical difference in potentiometric levels of < 1 ft was observed within the shallow aquifers in 1983. However, the difference in potentiometric levels between the shallow aquifers and the Black Creek aquifer was probably from 25 ft to > 50 ft. The quality of groundwater is also variable. Calcium and bicarbonate are generally the predominant ions in solution as a result of the dissolution of calcite in the aquifer sediments. Concentrations of chloride may be high in the vicinity of the salty surface waters. Concentrations of iron range from 5 to 35,000 micrograms/L, but generally < 2,000 micrograms/L. (Author 's abstract)

  10. Biomechanical characteristics of adults walking in shallow water and on land.

    PubMed

    Barela, Ana M F; Stolf, Sandro F; Duarte, Marcos

    2006-06-01

    Although water environment has been employed for different physical activities, there is little available information regarding the biomechanical characteristics of walking in shallow water. In the present study, we investigated the kinematics, ground reaction forces (GRF), and electromyographic (EMG) activation patterns of eight selected muscles of adults walking in shallow water and on land. Ten healthy adults were videotaped while walking at self-selected comfortable speeds on land and in water (at the Xiphoid process level). In both conditions there was a force plate embedded in the middle of each walkway to register the GRF components. Reflective markers were placed over main anatomical landmarks and they were digitalized later to obtain stride characteristics and joint angle information. In general, walking in water was different to walking on land in many aspects and these differences were attributed to the drag force, the apparent body weight reduction, and the lower comfortable speed during walking in shallow water. The joint range of motions (ROM) were not different, the segment ROM, magnitudes of GRF components, impact force, and impulse were different between the two conditions. The present results will contribute to a better understanding of this activity in the context of training and rehabilitation. PMID:16111894

  11. Anthropogenic stable cesium in water and sediment of a shallow estuary, St. Louis Bay, Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Gopal; Yeager, Kevin M.; Shim, MooJoon; Shiller, Alan M.

    2015-05-01

    St. Louis Bay (SLB), Mississippi, is a small, shallow estuary with moderate local residential and industrial development. Dissolved, stable Cs (i.e., 133Cs) was significantly enriched in bay waters (up to 1570 nM) as compared to river (<1 nM) and ocean waters (2.3 nM). A TiO2 refinery, located on the north shore of the bay, is the likely source of the Cs, given that the highest Cs concentrations were found in waters and in surface sediments (up to 49 μg/g) near the refinery outfall. This setting presented a unique opportunity to study remobilization of Cs in a shallow estuarine system, where sediment resuspension is frequent. Remobilization (up to ∼3 fold increase) of dissolved Cs was observed during sediment resuspension events. A weak correlation between Cs and clay %; strong correlations among Cs, silt % and particulate organic carbon (POC); and simple numerical approaches indicate that desorption from resuspended particulate matter is the likely mechanism of Cs remobilization. Cs-enriched SLB waters can be traced to nearshore Mississippi Sound waters, but not into Mississippi Bight waters further offshore. The findings from this study also suggest that caution needs to be taken when interpreting the radio-cesium distribution in shallow estuarine and coastal systems.

  12. Local feedback mechanisms of the shallow water region around the Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Pengfei; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola; Wei, Jun

    2014-10-01

    The focus of this study is the local-scale air-sea feedback mechanisms over the shallow shelf water region (water depth <200 m) of the Maritime Continent (MC). MC was selected as a pilot study site for its extensive shallow water coverage, geographic complexity, and importance in the global climate system. To identify the local-scale air-sea feedback processes, we ran numerical experiments with perturbed surface layer water temperature using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model and an uncoupled ocean model. By examining the responses of the coupled and uncoupled models to the water temperature perturbation, we identify that, at a local-scale, a negative feedback process through the coupled dynamics that tends to restore the SST from its perturbation could dominate the shallow water region of the MC at a short time scale of several days. The energy budget shows that 38% of initial perturbation-induced heat energy was adjusted through the air-sea feedback mechanisms within 2 weeks, of which 58% is directly transferred into the atmosphere by the adjustment of latent heat flux due to the evaporative cooling mechanism. The increased inputs of heat and moisture into the lower atmosphere then modifies its thermal structure and increases the formation of low-level clouds, which act as a shield preventing incoming solar radiation from reaching the sea surface, accounts for 38% of the total adjustment of surface heat fluxes, serving as the second mechanism for the negative feedback process. The adjustment of sensible heat flux and net longwave radiation play a secondary role. The response of the coupled system to the SST perturbation suggests a response time scale of the coupled feedback process of about 3-5 days. The two-way air-sea feedback tightly links the surface heat fluxes, clouds and SST, and can play an important role in regulating the short-term variability of the SST over the shallow shelf water regions.

  13. Tritium/Helium-3 Apparent Ages of Shallow Ground Water, Portland Basin, Oregon, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Water samples for tritium/helium-3 age dating were collected from 12 shallow monitoring wells in the Portland basin, Oregon, in 1997, and again in 1998. Robust tritium/helium-3 apparent (piston-flow) ages were obtained for water samples from 10 of the 12 wells; apparent ages ranged from 1.1 to 21.2 years. Method precision was demonstrated by close agreement between data collected in 1997 and 1998. Tritium/helium-3 apparent ages generally increase with increasing depth below the water table, and agree well with age/depth relations based on assumptions of effects of recharge rate on vertical ground-water movement.

  14. Mid-frequency acoustic propagation in shallow water on the New Jersey shelf: mean intensity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dajun; Henyey, Frank S; Wang, Zhongkang; Williams, Kevin L; Rouseff, Daniel; Dahl, Peter H; Quijano, Jorge; Choi, Jee Woong

    2008-09-01

    Mid-frequency (1-10 kHz) sound propagation was measured at ranges 1-9 km in shallow water in order to investigate intensity statistics. Warm water near the bottom results in a sound speed minimum. Environmental measurements include sediment sound speed and water sound speed and density from a towed conductivity-temperature-depth chain. Ambient internal waves contribute to acoustic fluctuations. A simple model involving modes with random phases predicts the mean transmission loss to within a few dB. Quantitative ray theory fails due to near axial focusing. Fluctuations of the intensity field are dominated by water column variability. PMID:19045567

  15. Surface water and shallow groundwater interactions in semiarid agro-ecosystems of the western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Carlos; Guldan, Steve; Fernald, Alexander; Tidwell, Vince; Elias, Emile; Gutierrez, Karina; Borman, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Surface water and groundwater interactions in agro-ecosystems of semiarid regions can translate into multiple hydrological benefits including aquifer recharge, temporary storage, and delayed return flow. Our ongoing research effort aimed to better understand surface water and shallow groundwater interactions and their contribution to aquifer recharge and stream flow is being conducted in five relatively narrow floodplains in the semiarid western United States. Over the last several years, we have monitored multiple hydrologic parameters in three flood-irrigated valleys of northern New Mexico. This year we are monitoring two sprinkler-irrigated floodplain valleys in semiarid landscapes of eastern Oregon. At all locations, we measure multiple hydrologic parameters including irrigation diversions, soil moisture, shallow groundwater fluctuations, and weather variables. Data collected are being used to quantify different water budget components such as deep percolation, waterway seepage, evapotranspiration, and aquifer recharge. Results from one of our study sites in New Mexico showed that on average, canal seepage was 12%, and deep percolation ranged from 9 to 32% out of total canal inflow during the irrigation season. Also, shallow aquifer recharge ranged from 1044 to 1350 mm yr-1 during a 3-year evaluation period. At a second study site, canal seepage was 59% and deep percolation averaged 30% of total water diverted. Timing and magnitude of surface water and shallow groundwater interactions is also being evaluated. Results show that replenishment of the shallow aquifer follows a seasonal pattern, driven primarily by canal seepage and irrigation percolation contributions. At one of our study sites, each year the water table reaches a peak of up to 0.8 m within three to five weeks after the onset of irrigation; this increase in water table levels is maintained throughout most of the irrigation season that ends in October. After the end of irrigation season, in the

  16. Probing the effects of 2D confinement on hydrogen dynamics in water and ice adsorbed in graphene oxide sponges.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Giovanni; Senesi, Roberto; Zhang, Xuan; Loh, Kian Ping; Andreani, Carla

    2015-12-21

    We studied the single particle dynamics of water and ice adsorbed in graphene oxide (GO) sponges at T = 293 K and T = 20 K. We used Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) at the ISIS neutron and muon spallation source to derive the hydrogen mean kinetic energy, 〈EK〉, and momentum distribution, n(p). The goal of this work was to study the hydrogen dynamics under 2D confinement and the potential energy surface, fingerprinting the hydrogen interaction with the layered structure of the GO sponge. The observed scattering is interpreted within the framework of the impulse approximation. Samples of both water and ice adsorbed in GO show n(p) functions with almost harmonic and anisotropic line shapes and 〈EK〉 values in excess of the values found at the corresponding temperatures in the bulk. The hydrogen dynamics are discussed in the context of the interaction between the interfacial water and ice and the confining hydrophilic surface of the GO sponge. PMID:26556604

  17. High Resolution 2-D Fluoresd3nce Imaging of the Mass Boundary Layer Thickness at Free Water Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuter, C.; Trofimova, D.; Kiefhaber, D.; Krah, N.; Jähne, B.

    2014-03-01

    A novel 2-D fluorescence imaging technique has been developed to visualize the thickness of the aqueous mass boundary layer at a free water surface. Fluorescence is stimulated by high-power LEDs and is observed from above with a low noise, high resolution and high-speed camera. The invasion of ammonia into water leads to an increase in pH (from a starting value of 4), which is visualized with the fluorescent dye pyranine. The flux of ammonia can be controlled by controlling its air side concentration. A higher flux leads to basic pH values (pH > 7) in a thicker layer at the water surface from which fluorescent light is emitted. This allows the investigation of processes affecting the transport of gases in different depths in the aqueous mass boundary layer. In this paper, the chemical system and optical components of the measurement method are presented and its applicability to a wind-wave tank experiment is demonstrated.

  18. Observation and simulation of heterogeneous 2D water and solute flow processes in ditch beds for subsequent catchment modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dages, Cecile; Samouelian, Anatja; Lanoix, Marthe; Dollinger, Jeanne; Chakkour, Sara; Chovelon, Gabrielle; Trabelsi, Khouloud; Voltz, Marc

    2015-04-01

    , equivalent 1D simulation parameters were seeked for mimicking the 2D infiltration intensities and patterns. The results obtained are presented and discussed based on the consistency of the simulated hydrograms, chemograms and seasonal solute losses during a series of intense infiltration events representing a typical Mediterranean climatic sequence in autumn. Mottes C., Lesueur-Jannoyer M., Le Bail M., Malézieux E., 2014. Pesticide transfer models in crop and watershed systems: a review. Agron. Sustain. Dev 34:229-250. Louchart, X., Voltz, M., Andrieux, P. and Moussa, R., 2001. Herbicide Transport to Surface Waters at Field and Watershed Scales in a Mediterranean Vineyard Area. J Environ Qual 30 (3): 982-991. Vaughan RE, Needelman BA, Kleinman PJA, Rabenhorst MC (2008) Morphology and Characterization of Ditch Soils at an Atlantic Coastal Plain Farm. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 72:660. doi:10.2136/sssaj2006.0102 Simlnek, J., Šejna, M., van Genuchten, M.Th., 1998. The HYDRUS-1D software package for simulating the one-dimensional movement of water, heat, and multiple solutes in variably-saturated media. Version 2.0, IGWMC-TPS-70. International Ground Water Modeling Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado. 202 pp Toride, N., Leij, F.J., van Genuchten, M.T., 1999. The CXTFIT code for estimating transport parameters from laboratory or field tracer experiments. Version 2.1. US Salinity Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service US Department of Agriculture, Riverside, California, Research Report, vol. 137. Voltz M., et Albergel, J. 2002. OMERE : Observatoire Méditerranéen de l'Environnement Rural et de l'Eau - Impact des actions anthropiques sur les transferts de masse dans les hydrosystémes méditerranéens ruraux. Proposition d'Observatoire de Recherche en Environnement

  19. Flows caused by rise of a rectangular bar partially immersed in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsovaa, V. V.; Ostapenko, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The wave flows caused by the vertical rise of a rectangular bar partially immersed in shallow water filling a rectangular prismatic channel with a horizontal bottom are investigated. Such flows are modeled within the framework of the first approximation of the theory of shallow water disregarding the effect of drag, the viscosity of the fluid, and its surface tension. The case is considered when at the second stage of flow at which the edges of the lower surface of the bar start to come out from the water, the pressure in the region of contact of the bar with the fluid is less than atmospheric one. For this case, an explicit formula setting the law of motion of this boundary is obtained.

  20. A modified Rusanov scheme for shallow water equations with topography and two phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Kamel; Benkhaldoun, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we introduce a finite volume method for numerical simulation of shallow water equations with source terms in one and two space dimensions, and one-pressure model of two-phase flows in one space dimension. The proposed method is composed of two steps. The first, called predictor step, depends on a local parameter allowing to control the numerical diffusion. A strategy based on limiters theory enables to control this parameter. The second step recovers the conservation equation. The scheme can thus be turned to order 1 in the regions where the flow has a strong variation, and order 2 in the regions where the flow is regular. The numerical scheme is applied to several test cases in one and two space dimensions. This scheme demonstrates its well-balanced property, and that it is an efficient and accurate approach for solving shallow water equations with and without source terms, and water faucet problem.

  1. Inversion for Sound Speed Profile by Using a Bottom Mounted Horizontal Line Array in Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Ren-He

    2010-08-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography is an appealing technique for remote monitoring of the ocean environment. In shallow water, matched field processing (MFP) with a vertical line array is one of the widely used methods for inverting the sound speed profile (SSP) of water column. The approach adopted is to invert the SSP with a bottom mounted horizontal line array (HLA) based on MFP. Empirical orthonormal functions are used to express the SSP, and perturbation theory is used in the forward sound field calculation. This inversion method is applied to the data measured in a shallow water acoustic experiment performed in 2003. Successful results show that the bottom mounted HLA is able to estimate the SSP. One of the most important advantages of the inversion method with bottom mounted HLA is that the bottom mounted HLA can keep a stable array shape and is safe in a relatively long period.

  2. Thermal regime of shallow water bodies in the coastal tundra zone of the Hudson Bay Lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, C. R.; Soliman, A. S.; Macrae, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Many shallow lakes and ponds of the Arctic/sub-Arctic contain thick, organic-rich sediments, which have the potential to release significant amounts of CO2 or CH4 to the atmosphere if sediment decomposition rates increase in response to warmer temperatures caused by global warming. This may be exacerbated by a deepening of the seasonal sediment thaw depth in small water bodies that are underlain by permafrost. An important step in linking climatic conditions to rates of organic matter decomposition and gas production from shallow water bodies is an improved understanding of the thermal properties of lake sediments and how sediment temperatures fluctuate in response to changing air temperatures. This knowledge is also important if the ratio of terrestrial to aquatic landscape units in cold regions changes under a warmer climate. One approach that has been used in terrestrial permafrost environments is the examination of how mean annual permafrost surface temperature deviates from mean annual 2-m screen height air temperature (MAAT). The offset between MAAT and the mean annual sediment surface temperature (MASST) has been found to be much larger in deep aquatic systems (greater than 10 m) than in terrestrial permafrost systems due to the presence of the water column that can efficiently transfer heat through mixing. However, the efficiency of heat transfer in shallow water bodies is expected to larger in summer (thawed) than in winter (frozen) conditions, when thermal energy must move by conduction alone. The present study examined the efficiency of sediment heat transfer in shallow water bodies (less than 3 m) during summer and winter periods. Air, sediment and water temperatures of three shallow water bodies in the coastal tundra zone of the Hudson Bay Lowlands near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada were monitored (December 2009-August 2011). Arrays of thermistors and heat pulse probes were placed at 10 cm increments between 20 cm above the water/sediment interface and

  3. Reliance on shallow soil water in a mixed-hardwood forest in central Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Katie P.; Stanley, Jane W.; Meinzer, Frederick C.; McCulloh, Katherine A.; Woodruff, David R.; Chen, Weile; Adams, Thomas S.; Lin, Henry; Eissenstat, David M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated depth of water uptake of trees on shale-derived soils in order to assess the importance of roots over a meter deep as a driver of water use in a central Pennsylvania catchment. This information is not only needed to improve basic understanding of water use in these forests but also to improve descriptions of root function at depth in hydrologic process models. The study took place at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory in central Pennsylvania. We asked two main questions: (i) Do trees in a mixed-hardwood, humid temperate forest in a central Pennsylvania catchment rely on deep roots for water during dry portions of the growing season? (ii) What is the role of tree genus, size, soil depth and hillslope position on the depth of water extraction by trees? Based on multiple lines of evidence, including stable isotope natural abundance, sap flux and soil moisture depletion patterns with depth, the majority of water uptake during the dry part of the growing season occurred, on average, at less than ∼60 cm soil depth throughout the catchment. While there were some trends in depth of water uptake related to genus, tree size and soil depth, water uptake was more uniformly shallow than we expected. Our results suggest that these types of forests may rely considerably on water sources that are quite shallow, even in the drier parts of the growing season. PMID:26546366

  4. Reliance on shallow soil water in a mixed-hardwood forest in central Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Katie P; Stanley, Jane W; Meinzer, Frederick C; McCulloh, Katherine A; Woodruff, David R; Chen, Weile; Adams, Thomas S; Lin, Henry; Eissenstat, David M

    2016-04-01

    We investigated depth of water uptake of trees on shale-derived soils in order to assess the importance of roots over a meter deep as a driver of water use in a central Pennsylvania catchment. This information is not only needed to improve basic understanding of water use in these forests but also to improve descriptions of root function at depth in hydrologic process models. The study took place at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory in central Pennsylvania. We asked two main questions: (i) Do trees in a mixed-hardwood, humid temperate forest in a central Pennsylvania catchment rely on deep roots for water during dry portions of the growing season? (ii) What is the role of tree genus, size, soil depth and hillslope position on the depth of water extraction by trees? Based on multiple lines of evidence, including stable isotope natural abundance, sap flux and soil moisture depletion patterns with depth, the majority of water uptake during the dry part of the growing season occurred, on average, at less than ∼60 cm soil depth throughout the catchment. While there were some trends in depth of water uptake related to genus, tree size and soil depth, water uptake was more uniformly shallow than we expected. Our results suggest that these types of forests may rely considerably on water sources that are quite shallow, even in the drier parts of the growing season. PMID:26546366

  5. Simulation using HYDRUS-2D for Soil Water and Heat Transfer under Drip Irrigation with 95oC Hot Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Noborio, K.

    2015-12-01

    In Japan, soil disinfection with hot water has been popular since the use of methyl bromide was restricted in 2005. Decreasing the amount of hot water applied may make farmers reduce the operation cost. To determine the appropriate amount of hot water needed for soil disinfection, HYDRUS-2D was evaluated. A field experiment was conducted and soil water content and soil temperature were measured at 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 cm deep when 95oC hot water was applied. Irrigation tubing equipped with drippers every 30 cm were laid at the soil surface, z=0 cm. An irrigation rate for each dripper was 0.83 cm min-1 between t=0 and 120 min, and thereafter it was zero. Temperature of irrigation water was 95oC. Total simulation time with HYDRUS-2D was 720 min for a homogeneous soil. A simulating domain was selected as x=60 cm and z=100 cm. A potential evaporation rate was assumed to be 0 cm min-1 because the soil surface was covered with a plastic sheet. The boundary condition at the bottom was free drainage and those of both sides were no-flux conditions. Hydraulic properties and bulk densities measured at each depth were used for simulation. It was assumed that there was no organic matter contained. Soil thermal properties were adopted from previous study and HYDRUS 2D. Simulated temperatures at 5, 10, 20 and 40 cm deep agreed well with those measured although simulated temperatures at 60, 80, and 100 cm deep were overly estimated. Estimates of volumetric water content at 5 cm deep agreed well with measured values. Simulated values at 10 to 100 cm deep were overly estimated by 0.1 to 0.3 (m3 m-3). The deeper the soil became, the more the simulated wetting front lagged behind the measured one. It was speculated that water viscosity estimated smaller at high temperature might attributed to the slower advances of wetting front simulated with HYDRUS 2-D.

  6. MODIS-derived spatiotemporal water clarity patterns in optically shallow FloridaKeys waters: A new approach to remove bottom contamination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retrievals of water quality parameters from satellite measurements over optically shallow waters have been problematic due to bottom contamination of the signals. As a result, large errors are associated with derived water column properties. These deficiencies greatly reduce the ...

  7. Hybrid Approaches for Simulation of Coastal Hydrodynamics --- Coupling of FVCOM/CFD and FVCOM/Shallow Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Wu, X.; Cheng, W.; Skraatz, S.

    2010-12-01

    As a consequence of many emerging issues such as the catastrophic Gulf of Mexico oil spill and potential coastline flooding due to sea level rise, there is an urgent need to develop our capabilities to predict small-scale and really 3D phenomena. In order to meet the need, we propose hybrid approaches and domain decomposition to couple different models designed for different physics and scales. In this presentation, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and FVCOM are coupled to simulate small-scale flow problems in coastal settings. The former is used to capture local flows, and the latter is employed to compute the large-scale background currents. In addition, a 2D shallow water model is coupled with FVCOM. In this situation, the 2D model is utilized to predict coastline flows and FVCOM is applied to simulate the deep water currents. The hybrid approaches are realized using two-way coupling and Chimera overset grids. Two numerical examples, which correspond to the two types of coupling, will be discussed. The first example is a thermal discharge from a multiport diffuser at the seabed, each of the ports is 10 cm in diameters, into estuary with sizes in hundreds of kilometers (Fig. 1a and b). The second example is flooding into lands and urban areas. The results clearly illustrate the feasibility and potential of the proposed approaches in prediction of multi-physics/multi-scale coastal ocean flows. Difficulty and unresolved issues will be discussed also. Fig. 1a FVCOM mesh. The discharge is located at mouth of Hudson next to NYC Fig. 1b Simulated 3D thermal plume of the discharge

  8. Biological implications of the hydrodynamics of swimming at or near the surface and in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Blake, R W

    2009-03-01

    The origins and effects of wave drag at and near the surface and in shallow water are discussed in terms of the dispersive waves generated by streamlined technical bodies of revolution and by semi-aquatic and aquatic animals with a view to bearing on issues regarding the design and function of autonomous surface and underwater vehicles. A simple two-dimensional model based on energy flux, allowing assessment of drag and its associated wave amplitude, is applied to surface swimming in Lesser Scaup ducks and is in good agreement with measured values. It is argued that hydrodynamic limitations to swimming at speeds associated with the critical Froude number ( approximately 0.5) and hull speed do not necessarily set biological limitations as most behaviours occur well below the hull speed. From a comparative standpoint, the need for studies on the hull displacement of different forms is emphasized. For forms in surface proximity, drag is a function of both Froude and Reynolds numbers. Whilst the depth dependence of wave drag is not particularly sensitive to Reynolds number, its magnitude is, with smaller and slower forms subject to relatively less drag augmentation than larger, faster forms that generate additional resistance due to ventilation and spray. A quasi-steady approach to the hydrodynamics of swimming in shallow water identifies substantial drag increases relative to the deeply submerged case at Froude numbers of about 0.9 that could limit the performance of semi-aquatic and aquatic animals and autonomous vehicles. A comparative assessment of fast-starting trout and upside down catfish shows that the energy losses of fast-starting fish are likely to be less for fish in surface proximity in deep water than for those in shallow water. Further work on unsteady swimming in both circumstances is encouraged. Finally, perspectives are offered as to how autonomous surface and underwater vehicles in surface proximity and shallow water could function to avoid

  9. Analysis of nonlinear shallow water waves in a tank by concentrated mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kondou, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro; Yamamura, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    The sloshing of liquid in a tank is an important engineering problem. For example, liquid storage tanks in industrial facilities can be damaged by earthquakes, and conversely liquid tanks, called tuned liquid damper, are often used as passive mechanical dampers. The water depth is less often than the horizontal length of the tank. In this case, shallow water wave theory can be applied, and the results indicate that the surface waveform in a shallow excited tank exhibits complex behavior caused by nonlinearity and dispersion of the liquid. This study aims to establish a practical analytical model for this phenomenon. A model is proposed that consists of masses, connecting nonlinear springs, connecting dampers, base support dampers, and base support springs. The characteristics of the connecting nonlinear springs are derived from the static and dynamic pressures. The advantages of the proposed model are that nonlinear dispersion is considered and that the problem of non-uniform water depth can be addressed. To confirm the validity of the model, numerical results obtained from the model are compared with theoretical values of the natural frequencies of rectangular and triangular tanks. Numerical results are also compared with experimental results for a rectangular tank. All computational results agree well with the theoretical and experimental results. Therefore, it is concluded that the proposed model is valid for the numerical analysis of nonlinear shallow water wave problems.

  10. Pressure gradient sensors for bearing determination in shallow water tracking ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Peter J.; Euerle, Steven E.; Menoche, Richard K.; Janiesch, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    Underwater acoustic tracking has traditionally used only the arrival time of tracking pings to localize targets. This implies that the ping transmitted from a target must be received at a minimum of three separate nodes (receiver locations) in order to determine the position. For deep water ranges this was acceptable. In shallow water, where propagation ranges are limited, this requires a large number of nodes. This makes shallow water ranges very costly. An effort is underway to use pressure gradient hydrophones as receivers and measure the bearing of the ping arrival along with arrival time, thereby locating the target using only one tracking node. This allows for increased node spacing and greatly reduced cost. However, the accuracy required for training ranges is on the order of 1 degree. Further, the directional receiver must be housed so as to withstand impacts from fishing operations. Research including design, fabrication, and testing of conventional and unconventional pressure gradient hydrophones, the housing, and signal processing methods are discussed. Extensive testing has already been conducted using a 1″ diameter by 5″ long multimode hydrophone. A shallow water tracking test was conducted at the NUWC Lake Seneca test facility. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tracking using a single pressure gradient hydrophone with an accuracy of 50 yds out to 2 kyds. The effects of multiple paths and scattering are also discussed.

  11. Microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal sediments of Kueishan Island, Taiwan as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cheung, Man Kit; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wong, Chong Kim

    2015-11-01

    Kueishan Island is a young volcanic island in the southernmost edge of the Okinawa Trough in the northeastern part of Taiwan. A cluster of hydrothermal vents is located off the southeastern tip of the Island at water depths between 10 and 80 m. This paper presents the results of the first study on the microbial communities in bottom sediments collected from the shallow-water hydrothermal vents of Kueishan Island. Small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene-based high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing was used to characterize the assemblages of bacteria, archaea, and small eukaryotes in sediment samples collected at various distances from the hydrothermal vents. Sediment from the vent area contained the highest diversity of archaea and the lowest diversity of bacteria and small eukaryotes. Epsilonproteobacteria were the most abundant group in the vent sediment, but their abundance decreased with increasing distance from the vent area. Most Epsilonproteobacteria belonged to the mesophilic chemolithoautotrophic genera Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas. Recent reports on these two genera have come from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Conversely, the relative contribution of Gammaproteobacteria to the bacterial community increased with increasing distance from the vent area. Our study revealed the contrasting effects of venting on the benthic bacterial and archaeal communities, and showed that the sediments of the shallow-waters hydrothermal vents were dominated by chemoautotrophic bacteria. The present work broadens our knowledge on microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal vent habitats. PMID:26132902

  12. Pressure gradient sensors for bearing determination in shallow water tracking ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, P.J.; Euerle, S.E.; Menoche, R.K.; Janiesch, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Underwater acoustic tracking has traditionally used only the arrival time of tracking pings to localize targets. This implies that the ping transmitted from a target must be received at a minimum of three separate nodes (receiver locations) in order to determine the position. For deep water ranges this was acceptable. In shallow water, where propagation ranges are limited, this requires a large number of nodes. This makes shallow water ranges very costly. An effort is underway to use pressure gradient hydrophones as receivers and measure the bearing of the ping arrival along with arrival time, thereby locating the target using only one tracking node. This allows for increased node spacing and greatly reduced cost. However, the accuracy required for training ranges is on the order of 1 degree. Further, the directional receiver must be housed so as to withstand impacts from fishing operations. Research including design, fabrication, and testing of conventional and unconventional pressure gradient hydrophones, the housing, and signal processing methods are discussed. Extensive testing has already been conducted using a 1{double_prime} diameter by 5{double_prime} long multimode hydrophone. A shallow water tracking test was conducted at the NUWC Lake Seneca test facility. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tracking using a single pressure gradient hydrophone with an accuracy of 50 yds out to 2 kyds. The effects of multiple paths and scattering are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Impulsive plunging wave breaking downstream of a bump in a shallow water flume—Part I: Experimental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Donghoon; Ghosh, Surajeet; Reins, George; Koo, Bonguk; Wang, Zhaoyuan; Stern, Frederick

    2012-07-01

    The plunging wave-breaking process for impulsive flow over a bump in a shallow water flume is described, which is relevant to ship hydrodynamics albeit for an idealized geometry since it includes the effects of wave-body interactions and the wave breaking direction is opposite to the mean flow. This paper consists of two parts, which deal with experimental measurements and numerical simulations, respectively. In Part I, ensemble-averaged measurements are conducted, including the overall flume flow, 2-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) center-plane velocities, turbulence inside the breaking wave, and bottom pressures under the breaking wave. A series of individual plunging wave-breaking tests were conducted, which all followed a similar time line consisting of startup, steep wave formation, plunging wave breaking, and chaotic wave breaking swept downstream time phases. The plunging wave breaking process consists of four repeated plunging events each with three [jet impact (plunge), oblique splash and vertical jet] sub-events, which were identified first using a complementary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study. Video images with red dye display the plunging wave breaking events and sub-events. The wave profile at maximum height, first plunge, bump and wave breaking vortex and entrapped air tube trajectories, entrapped air tube diameters, kinetic, potential, and total energy are analyzed. Similarities and differences are discussed with the previous deep water or sloping beach experimental and computational studies. The numerical simulations using the exact experimental initial and boundary conditions are presented in Part II of this paper.

  14. A Global Semi-Lagrangian Spectral Model of the Shallow-Water Equations with Variable Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, John B; Guo, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    A time-dependent focusing grid works together with the formulation of a semi-implicit, semi-Lagrangian spectral method for the shallow-water equations in a rotated and stretched spherical geometry. The conformal mapping of the underlying discrete grid based on the Schmidt transformation, focuses grid on a particular region or path with variable resolution. A new advective form of the vorticity-divergence equations allows for the conformal map to be incorporated while maintaining an efficient spectral transform algorithm. A shallow water model on the sphere is used to test the spectral model with variable resolution. We are able to focus on a specified location resolving local details of the flow. More importantly, we could follow the features of the flow at all time.

  15. Energy and Potential Enstrophy Conserving Scheme for the Rotating Shallow Water Equations on an Arbitrary Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, C.; Randall, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The shallow water equations provide a useful analogue of fully compressible Euler equations since they have similar conservation laws, many of the same types of waves and a similar (quasi-) balanced state. With regards to conservation properties, there have been two major thrusts of research: Hamiltonian methods (work done by Salmon and Dubos, primarily) and Discrete Exterior Calculus (DEC; Thuburn, Cotter, Ringler, etc.). In particular, recent work done by Thuburn and Cotter (2011) introduced a generalized framework for energy-conservative C-grid discretizations of the rotating shallow water equation using ideas from Discrete Exterior Calculus. The current research elucidates the connections between the Hamiltonian and DEC approaches, and looks at potential enstrophy conservation in addition to total energy conservation. As an illustration of this approach, an extension of the Arakawa and Lamb 1981 total energy and potential enstrophy conserving scheme to arbitrary, non-orthogonal polygonal grids is made.

  16. Algorithmically scalable block preconditioner for fully implicit shallow-water equations in CAM-SE

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lott, P. Aaron; Woodward, Carol S.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2014-10-19

    Performing accurate and efficient numerical simulation of global atmospheric climate models is challenging due to the disparate length and time scales over which physical processes interact. Implicit solvers enable the physical system to be integrated with a time step commensurate with processes being studied. The dominant cost of an implicit time step is the ancillary linear system solves, so we have developed a preconditioner aimed at improving the efficiency of these linear system solves. Our preconditioner is based on an approximate block factorization of the linearized shallow-water equations and has been implemented within the spectral element dynamical core within themore » Community Atmospheric Model (CAM-SE). Furthermore, in this paper we discuss the development and scalability of the preconditioner for a suite of test cases with the implicit shallow-water solver within CAM-SE.« less

  17. Initial Value Problem Solution of Nonlinear Shallow Water-Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kanoglu, Utku; Synolakis, Costas

    2006-10-06

    The initial value problem solution of the nonlinear shallow water-wave equations is developed under initial waveforms with and without velocity. We present a solution method based on a hodograph-type transformation to reduce the nonlinear shallow water-wave equations into a second-order linear partial differential equation and we solve its initial value problem. The proposed solution method overcomes earlier limitation of small waveheights when the initial velocity is nonzero, and the definition of the initial conditions in the physical and transform spaces is consistent. Our solution not only allows for evaluation of differences in predictions when specifying an exact initial velocity based on nonlinear theory and its linear approximation, which has been controversial in geophysical practice, but also helps clarify the differences in runup observed during the 2004 and 2005 Sumatran tsunamigenic earthquakes.

  18. Iterative Receiver in Time-Frequency Domain for Shallow Water Acoustic Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Ge, Jianhua

    2012-03-01

    Inter-symbol interference (ISI) caused by multi-path propagation, especially in shallow water channel, degrades the performance of underwater acoustic (UWA) communication systems. In this paper, we combine soft minimum mean squared error (MMSE) equalization and the serially concatenated trellis coded modulation (SCTCM) decoding to develop an iterative receiver in time-frequency domain (TFD) for underwater acoustic point to point communications. Based on sound speed profile (SSP) measured in the lake and finite-element ray (FER) tracing method (Bellhop), the shallow water channel is constructed to evaluate the performance of the proposed iterative receiver. The results suggest that the proposed iterative receiver can reduce the calculation complexity of the equalizer and obtain better performance using less receiving elements.

  19. Double criticality and the two-way Boussinesq equation in stratified shallow water hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Thomas J.; Ratliff, Daniel J.

    2016-06-01

    Double criticality and its nonlinear implications are considered for stratified N-layer shallow water flows with N = 1, 2, 3. Double criticality arises when the linearization of the steady problem about a uniform flow has a double zero eigenvalue. We find that there are two types of double criticality: non-semisimple (one eigenvector and one generalized eigenvector) and semi-simple (two independent eigenvectors). Using a multiple scales argument, dictated by the type of singularity, it is shown that the weakly nonlinear problem near double criticality is governed by a two-way Boussinesq equation (non-semisimple case) and a coupled Korteweg-de Vries equation (semisimple case). Parameter values and reduced equations are constructed for the examples of two-layer and three-layer stratified shallow water hydrodynamics.

  20. Algorithmically scalable block preconditioner for fully implicit shallow-water equations in CAM-SE

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, P. Aaron; Woodward, Carol S.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2014-10-19

    Performing accurate and efficient numerical simulation of global atmospheric climate models is challenging due to the disparate length and time scales over which physical processes interact. Implicit solvers enable the physical system to be integrated with a time step commensurate with processes being studied. The dominant cost of an implicit time step is the ancillary linear system solves, so we have developed a preconditioner aimed at improving the efficiency of these linear system solves. Our preconditioner is based on an approximate block factorization of the linearized shallow-water equations and has been implemented within the spectral element dynamical core within the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM-SE). Furthermore, in this paper we discuss the development and scalability of the preconditioner for a suite of test cases with the implicit shallow-water solver within CAM-SE.

  1. Multiwavelet Discontinuous Galerkin Accelerated ELP Method for the Shallow Water Equations on the Cubed Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    White III, James B; Archibald, Richard K; Evans, Katherine J; Drake, John

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a new approach to increase the time-step size for an explicit discontinuous Galerkin numerical method. The attributes of this approach are demonstrated on standard tests for the shallow-water equations on the sphere. The addition of multiwavelets to discontinuous Galerkin method, which has the benefit of being scalable, flexible, and conservative, provides a hierarchical scale structure that can be exploited to improve computational efficiency in both the spatial and temporal dimensions. This paper explains how combining a multiwavelet discontinuous Galerkin method with exact linear part time-evolution schemes, which can remain stable for implicit-sized time steps, can help increase the time-step size for shallow water equations on the sphere.

  2. Rhodotorula portillonensis sp. nov., a basidiomycetous yeast isolated from Antarctic shallow-water marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Laich, Federico; Vaca, Inmaculada; Chávez, Renato

    2013-10-01

    During the characterization of the mycobiota associated with shallow-water marine environments from Antarctic sea, a novel pink yeast species was isolated. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA gene and 5.8S-ITS regions revealed that the isolated yeast was closely related to Rhodotorula pallida CBS 320(T) and Rhodotorula benthica CBS 9124(T). On the basis of morphological, biochemical and physiological characterization and phylogenetic analyses, a novel basidiomycetous yeast species, Rhodotorula portillonensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is Pi2(T) ( = CBS 12733(T)  = CECT 13081(T)) which was isolated from shallow-water marine sediment in Fildes Bay, King George Island, Antarctica. PMID:23934251

  3. Shock capturing data assimilation algorithm for 1D shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirupathi, Seshu; T. Tchrakian, Tigran; Zhuk, Sergiy; McKenna, Sean

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new data assimilation algorithm for shallow water equations in one dimension. The algorithm is based upon Discontinuous Galerkin spatial discretization of shallow water equations (DG-SW model) and the continuous formulation of the minimax filter. The latter allows for construction of a robust estimation of the state of the DG-SW model and computes worst-case bounds for the estimation error, provided the uncertain parameters belong to a given bounding set. Numerical studies show that, given sparse observations from numerical or physical experiments, the proposed algorithm quickly reconstructs the true solution even in the presence of shocks, rarefaction waves and unknown values of model parameters. The minimax filter is compared against the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for a benchmark dam-break problem and the results show that the minimax filter converges faster to the true solution for sparse observations.

  4. Sound speed profile inversion using a horizontal line array in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, ZhengLin; He, Li; Zhang, RenHe; Li, FengHua; Yu, YanXin; Lin, Peng

    2015-01-01

    It is better to use a simple configuration to enhance the applicability of ocean environment inversion in shallow water. A matched-field inversion method based on a horizontal line array (HLA) is used to retrieve the variation of sound speed profile. The performance of the inversion method is verified in the South China Sea in June, 2010. An HLA laid at bottom was used to receive signals from a bottom-mounted transducer. Inverted mean sound speed profiles from 9-hour long acoustic signals are in good agreement with measurements from two temperature chains at the sites of the source and receiver. The results show that an HLA can be used to monitor the variability of shallow-water sound speed profile.

  5. Shallow water seismic surveys for site investigation in the Haifa Port Extension area, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtivelman, Vladimir

    2001-02-01

    A shallow water seismic study was recently carried out as a part of a site investigation project in the Haifa Port Extension area near the Mediterranean coast of Israel. The objectives of the study were estimating P- and S-wave velocity distribution below the seabed and detecting recent faulting at the site. An additional target was testing the presence of a hard rock with P-wave velocity of more than 3000 m/s within the depth range down to 700 m. To achieve the objectives, specially designed refraction and high resolution reflection surveys were carried out at the site. The data acquisition was performed using bay cables and hydrophones placed at the seabed. The source of seismic energy was a single air gun for the reflection survey and explosives for the refraction survey. The P-wave velocities estimated from the shallow refraction data vary in a narrow range of 1800-2200 m/s, hampering the depth interpretation of the data. No indication of the presence of a high-velocity (hard rock) layer within the depth range of 700 m was found. The S-wave velocities were estimated on the basis of the dispersion analysis of Scholte waves contained in the refraction records. The resulting S-wave velocity distribution correlates well with the result of the land refraction survey carried out in the vicinity of the investigated site. The reflection time sections display a sequence of reflections from various stratigraphic units down to the depths of about 800 m. Although some evidence of deformation may be found in the deep part of the sections, there is no indication of the existence of faults in the shallow part of the sections (upper 250-300 m). The results of the surveys show that acquiring shallow water seismic data at the sea bottom may be a relatively simple and effective way to derive information regarding the structure and properties of the shallow subsurface below the seabed.

  6. The patterns and implications of diurnal variations in d-excess of plant water, shallow soil water and air moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Wang, L.; Xiao, H.; Cheng, G.; Ruan, Y.; Zhou, M.; Wang, F.

    2014-04-01

    Deuterium excess (d-excess) of air moisture is traditionally considered as a conservative tracer of oceanic evaporation conditions. Recent studies challenge this view and emphasize the importance of vegetation activity in controlling the dynamics of air moisture d-excess. However direct field observations supporting the role of vegetation in d-excess variations is not well documented. In this study, we quantified d-excess of air moisture, leaf and xylem water of multiple dominant species as well as shallow soil water (5 and 10 cm) at hourly interval during three extensive field campaigns at two climatically different locations within the Heihe River Basin. The results showed that with the increase of temperature (T) and decrease of relative humidity (RH), the δD-δ18O plots of leaf water, xylem water and shallow soil water deviated gradually from their corresponding local meteoric water line. There were significant differences in d-excess values among different water pools at all the study sites. The most positive d-excess values were found in air moisture (9.3‰) and the most negative d-excess values (-85.6‰) were found in leaf water. The d-excess values of air moisture (dmoisture) and leaf water (dleaf) during the sunny days, and shallow soil water (dsoil) during the first sunny day after rain event showed strong diurnal patterns. There were significantly positive relationships between dleaf and RH and negative relationships between dmoisture and RH. The correlations of dleaf and dmoisture with T were opposite to their relationships with RH. In addition, we found the opposite diurnal variations for dleaf and dmoisture during the sunny day, and for dleaf during the sunny days, and shallow soil water dsoil and dmoisture during the first sunny day after rain event. Significant negative relationships were found between dleaf and dmoisture in all the sites during the sunny day. Our results provide direct evidence that dmoisture of the surface air at continental

  7. Potential of using plant extracts for purification of shallow well water in Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M.; Mkandawire, T.; Edmondson, A.; O'Neill, J. G.; Kululanga, G.

    There has been very little scientific research work into the use of plant extracts to purify groundwater. Research studies on the purification of groundwater have mainly been carried out in developed countries and have focused on water purification systems using aluminium sulphate (a coagulant) and chlorine (a disinfectant). Such systems are expensive and not viable for rural communities due to abject poverty. Shallow well water, which is commonly available throughout Africa, is often grossly contaminated and usually consumed untreated. As a result, water-related diseases kill more than 5 million people every year worldwide. This research was aimed at examining natural plant extracts in order to develop inexpensive ways for rural communities to purify their groundwater. The study involved creating an inventory of plant extracts that have been used for water and wastewater purification. A prioritisation system was derived to select the most suitable extracts, which took into account criteria such as availability, purification potential, yield and cost of extraction. Laboratory trials were undertaken on the most promising plant extracts, namely: Moringa oleifera, Jatropha curcas and Guar gum. The extracts were added to water samples obtained from five shallow wells in Malawi. The trials consisted of jar tests to assess the coagulation potential and the resulting effect on physico-chemical and microbiological parameters such as temperature, pH, turbidity and coliforms. The results showed that the addition of M. oleifera, J. curcas and Guar gum can considerably improve the quality of shallow well water. Turbidity reduction was higher for more turbid water. A reduction efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved by all three extracts on shallow well water that had a turbidity of 49 NTU. A reduction in coliforms was about 80% for all extracts. The pH of the water samples increased with dosage, but remained within acceptable levels for drinking water for all the extracts

  8. Fracturing and flow: Investigations on the formation of shallow water sills on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Kathleen L.; Patterson, G. Wes; Lowell, Robert P.; Germanovich, Leonid

    2016-08-01

    Double ridge tectonic features appear prominently and ubiquitously across the surface of Jupiter's icy moon Europa. Previous studies have interpreted flanking fractures observed along some of the ridges as indicators of stress resulting from the ridge loading and flexing of the ice shell above a shallow water body. Here, we investigate a shallow water sill emplacement process at a time when the shell is cooling and thickening and explore the conditions that would make such a system feasible on timescales of ridge formation. Results show that fracture initiation and transport of ocean water to shallow depths can realistically occur, although horizontal fracturing and sill lifetimes prove challenging. Finite element models demonstrate that mechanical layering or a fractured shell do not provide enough stress change to promote horizontal fracturing, but tidal forcing does result in a small amount of turn. Assuming it is possible for a shallow sill to form, a sill would convect internally and conduct heat out quickly, resulting in a short lifetime in comparison to an estimated flexure timeframe of 100 kyr suggested required for double ridge formation. Consideration of heat transfer and residence in the overlying ice, however, extends the flexure timeframe and multiple sill intrusions or replenishment with warm ocean water could prolong the effective sill lifetime. Though challenges still remain for sill formation at Europa, these analyses constrain the potential mechanisms for emplacement and indicate sills can act as viable options for supplying the heat needed for surface flexure. Further analyses and future missions to Europa will help to increase our understanding of these enigmatic processes.

  9. Generalized energy and potential enstrophy conserving finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramopoulos, Frank

    1988-01-01

    The conditions under which finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations can conserve both total energy and potential enstrophy are considered. A method of deriving such schemes using operator formalism is developed. Several such schemes are derived for the A-, B- and C-grids. The derived schemes include second-order schemes and pseudo-fourth-order schemes. The simplest B-grid pseudo-fourth-order schemes are presented.

  10. New records for the shallow-water chiton fauna (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) of the Azores (NE Atlantic)

    PubMed Central

    Ávila, Sérgio P.; Sigwart, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Published records, original data from recent field work on all of the islands of the Azores (NE Atlantic), and a revision of the entire mollusc collection deposited in the Department of Biology of the University of the Azores (DBUA) were used to compile a checklist of the shallow-water Polyplacophora of the Azores. Lepidochitona cf. canariensis and Tonicella rubra are reported for the first time for this archipelago, increasing the recorded Azorean fauna to seven species. PMID:23825446

  11. New species and new records of bryozoans from shallow waters of Madeira Island.

    PubMed

    Souto, Javier; Kaufmann, Manfred J; Canning-Clode, João

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of bryozoans encrusting subtidal rocks are described from the shallow waters of Madeira Island. We describe one cyclostome, Favosipora purpurea sp. nov., which represents the first record of this genus in the Atlantic Ocean, and one cheilostome, Rhynchozoon papuliferum sp. nov. In addition, one species, Beania maxilladentata, is recorded for the first time outside of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Six other species previously recorded in Madeira are redescribed to provide new data and SEM images. PMID:25781763

  12. On the advantage of well-balanced schemes for moving-water equilibria of the shallow water equations

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yulong; Shu, Chi-wang; Noelle, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    This note aims at demonstrating the advantage of moving-water well-balanced schemes over still-water well-balanced schemes for the shallow water equations. We concentrate on numerical examples with solutions near a moving-water equilibrium. For such examples, still-water well-balanced methods are not capable of capturing the small perturbations of the moving-water equilibrium and may generate significant spurious oscillations, unless an extremely refined mesh is used. On the other hand, moving-water well-balanced methods perform well in these tests. The numerical examples in this note clearly demonstrate the importance of utilizing moving-water well-balanced methods for solutions near a moving-water equilibrium.

  13. Developmental plasticity of shell morphology of quagga mussels from shallow and deep-water habitats of the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Peyer, Suzanne M; Hermanson, John C; Lee, Carol Eunmi

    2010-08-01

    The invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) has quickly colonized shallow-water habitats in the North American Great Lakes since the 1980s but the quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) is becoming dominant in both shallow and deep-water habitats. While quagga mussel shell morphology differs between shallow and deep habitats, functional causes and consequences of such difference are unknown. We examined whether quagga mussel shell morphology could be induced by three environmental variables through developmental plasticity. We predicted that shallow-water conditions (high temperature, food quantity, water motion) would yield a morphotype typical of wild quagga mussels from shallow habitats, while deep-water conditions (low temperature, food quantity, water motion) would yield a morphotype present in deep habitats. We tested this prediction by examining shell morphology and growth rate of quagga mussels collected from shallow and deep habitats and reared under common-garden treatments that manipulated the three variables. Shell morphology was quantified using the polar moment of inertia. Of the variables tested, temperature had the greatest effect on shell morphology. Higher temperature (approximately 18-20 degrees C) yielded a morphotype typical of wild shallow mussels regardless of the levels of food quantity or water motion. In contrast, lower temperature (approximately 6-8 degrees C) yielded a morphotype approaching that of wild deep mussels. If shell morphology has functional consequences in particular habitats, a plastic response might confer quagga mussels with a greater ability than zebra mussels to colonize a wider range of habitats within the Great Lakes. PMID:20639421

  14. A Gegenbauer-based Shallow Water solver for a thick "ocean" over a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Ofer; Paldor, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Gegenbauer Harmonics which are the eigenfunctions of the Linearized Shallow Water Equations in spherical coordinates for a thick layer of ocean are examined as alternative basis functions for global-scale spectral models. The performance of this basis is compared to that of the traditional Spherical Harmonics basis by testing the accuracy and stability with which the two bases simulate a single, analytic, wave mode of the Linearized Shallow Water Equations. For the linear equations our results show that for low initial wavenumbers the Spherical Harmonics are able to conserve the single wave mode with comparable accuracy to that of the proposed Gegenbauer Harmonics basis while at high initial wavenumbers the simulation with the Spherical Harmonics is significantly less accurate than the simulation with the Gegenbauer Harmonics. By considering a range of ocean thicknesses it is found that, for thin oceans, the Spherical Harmonics become numerically unstable after about 150 days, whereas the proposed Gegenbauer Harmonics remain stable even though they too are not the eigenfunctions of the Linearized Shallow Water Equations in thin oceans. This numerical instability of the Spherical Harmonics is independent of the wave's period and was not observed in thick oceans where the simulation remained stable for at least 200 days. Our results suggest that the numerical instability of the Spherical Harmonics originates at the poles. For the non-linear equations our results show that the Spherical Harmonics solutions are less accurate than the Gegenbauer Harmonics even in a thick ocean.

  15. Diversity and Distribution of Prokaryotes within a Shallow-Water Pockmark Field.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Donato; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Fiorentino, Federica; Fattorini, Daniele; Regoli, Francesco; Angeletti, Lorenzo; Bakran-Petricioli, Tatjana; Vetriani, Costantino; Yücel, Mustafa; Taviani, Marco; Manini, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Pockmarks are crater-like depression on the seafloor associated with hydrocarbon ascent through muddy sediments in continental shelves around the world. In this study, we examine the diversity and distribution of benthic microbial communities at shallow-water pockmarks adjacent to the Middle Adriatic Ridge. We integrate microbial diversity data with characterization of local hydrocarbons concentrations and sediment geochemistry. Our results suggest these pockmarks are enriched in sedimentary hydrocarbons, and host a microbial community dominated by Bacteria, even in deeper sediment layers. Pockmark sediments showed higher prokaryotic abundance and biomass than surrounding sediments, potentially due to the increased availability of organic matter and higher concentrations of hydrocarbons linked to pockmark activity. Prokaryotic diversity analyses showed that the microbial communities of these shallow-water pockmarks are unique, and comprised phylotypes associated with the cycling of sulfur and nitrate compounds, as well as numerous know hydrocarbon degraders. Altogether, this study suggests that shallow-water pockmark habitats enhance the diversity of the benthic prokaryotic biosphere by providing specialized environmental niches. PMID:27379070

  16. Investigation of Interference Phenomena of Broadband Acoustic Vector Signals in Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Shengchun; Ren, Qunyan

    2010-09-01

    Although the ocean environment in shallow water is very complex, there still exists stable interference pattern for broadband low frequency sound propagation. The waveguide invariant concept is introduced to describe the broadband interference structure of the acoustic pressure field in a waveguide and now it is widely used in underwater acoustic signal processing. Acoustic vector sensor can measure the particle velocity in the ocean and provides more information for the underwater sound field. In this paper, the interference phenomena of broadband vector acoustic signals in shallow water are investigated by numerical simulation. Energy spatial-frequency distributions are shown for energy flux density vector obtained by combination of pressure and particle velocity signals and they are analyzed according to normal mode theory. Comparisons of the interference structure between the scale acoustic field and vector acoustic field also have been made. The waveguide invariant concept is extended to describe the interference structure of vector acoustic field in shallow water. A method for extraction of the waveguide invariant from interference patterns in vector acoustic field spectrograms is presented, which can be used in matched-field processing and geoacoustic inversion. It is shown that this method may have more advantages than the traditional methods which calculate the waveguide invariant using measured sound pressure in the ocean.

  17. Model-based processor design for a shallow water ocean acoustic experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V. ); Sullivan, E.J. )

    1994-04-01

    Model-based signal processing is a well-defined methodology enabling the inclusion of environmental (propagation) models, measurement (sensor arrays) models, and noise (shipping, measurement) models into a sophisticated processing algorithm. Depending on the class of model developed from the mathematical representation of the physical phenomenology, various processors can evolve. Here the design of a space-varying, nonstationary, model-based processor (MBP) is investigated and applied to the data from a well-controlled shallow water experiment performed at Hudson Canyon. This particular experiment is very attractive for the inaugural application of the MBP because it was performed in shallow water at low frequency requiring a small number of modes. In essence, the Hudson Canyon represents a well-known ocean environment, making it ideal for this investigation. In this shallow water application, a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model is used. The processor is designed such that it allows [ital in] [ital situ] recursive estimation of both the pressure-field and modal functions. It is shown that the MBP can be effectively utilized to validate'' the performance of the model on noisy ocean acoustic data. In fact, a set of processors is designed, one for each source range and the results are quite good---implying that the propagation model with measured parameters adequately represents the data.

  18. A high-order element-based Galerkin Method for the global shallow water equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Ramachandran D.; Tufo, Henry M.; Levy, Michael Nathan

    2010-08-01

    The shallow water equations are used as a test for many atmospheric models because the solution mimics the horizontal aspects of atmospheric dynamics while the simplicity of the equations make them useful for numerical experiments. This study describes a high-order element-based Galerkin method for the global shallow water equations using absolute vorticity, divergence, and fluid depth (atmospheric thickness) as the prognostic variables, while the wind field is a diagnostic variable that can be calculated from the stream function and velocity potential (the Laplacians of which are the vorticity and divergence, respectively). The numerical method employed to solve the shallow water system is based on the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods. The discontinuous Galerkin method, which is inherently conservative, is used to solve the equations governing two conservative variables - absolute vorticity and atmospheric thickness (mass). The spectral element method is used to solve the divergence equation and the Poisson equations for the velocity potential and the stream function. Time integration is done with an explicit strong stability-preserving second-order Runge-Kutta scheme and the wind field is updated directly from the vorticity and divergence at each stage, and the computational domain is the cubed sphere. A stable steady-state test is run and convergence results are provided, showing that the method is high-order accurate. Additionally, two tests without analytic solutions are run with comparable results to previous high-resolution runs found in the literature.

  19. Diversity and Distribution of Prokaryotes within a Shallow-Water Pockmark Field

    PubMed Central

    Giovannelli, Donato; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Fiorentino, Federica; Fattorini, Daniele; Regoli, Francesco; Angeletti, Lorenzo; Bakran-Petricioli, Tatjana; Vetriani, Costantino; Yücel, Mustafa; Taviani, Marco; Manini, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Pockmarks are crater-like depression on the seafloor associated with hydrocarbon ascent through muddy sediments in continental shelves around the world. In this study, we examine the diversity and distribution of benthic microbial communities at shallow-water pockmarks adjacent to the Middle Adriatic Ridge. We integrate microbial diversity data with characterization of local hydrocarbons concentrations and sediment geochemistry. Our results suggest these pockmarks are enriched in sedimentary hydrocarbons, and host a microbial community dominated by Bacteria, even in deeper sediment layers. Pockmark sediments showed higher prokaryotic abundance and biomass than surrounding sediments, potentially due to the increased availability of organic matter and higher concentrations of hydrocarbons linked to pockmark activity. Prokaryotic diversity analyses showed that the microbial communities of these shallow-water pockmarks are unique, and comprised phylotypes associated with the cycling of sulfur and nitrate compounds, as well as numerous know hydrocarbon degraders. Altogether, this study suggests that shallow-water pockmark habitats enhance the diversity of the benthic prokaryotic biosphere by providing specialized environmental niches. PMID:27379070

  20. Successes and failures of shallow-water interpretations of Voyager wind data.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Timothy E.

    1994-06-01

    Studying the dynamics of Jupiter's atmosphere is a rewarding experience, in part because the planet's cloud-top circulations are easy to track from space, the jet streams flow in straight lines eastward or westward, and there is enough room for the vortices to usually keep out of each other's way. Earth, in contrast, is a planet with global circulations that are not easy to track from space, with jet streams that make wide, fluctuating arcs as they negotiate mountain ranges, and with vortices that are constantly jostling against each other in a cramped environment. But we know a great deal more about the vertical structure of Earth's atmosphere than of Jupiter's. In order to make headway on the Jovian problem, researchers have turned to the shallow-water model as a guide to interpreting the Voyager wind data. The shallow-water model matches the character of the data because it combines high-resolution horizontal dynamics with low-resolution vertical structure, but there is no guarantee that it captures the character of Jupiter's atmosphere itself. Remarkably, the model does well at reproducing the Great Red Spot, and it has revealed that Jupiter is clever about how it manages its vorticity by arranging its zonal winds to be neutrally stable with respect to Arnol'd's second stability theorem. We discuss reasons why the shallow-water model works for Jupiter and point out the limitations that are motivating researchers to develop more realistic models. PMID:12780101

  1. Detection improvement using multiple time-reversal guide-sources in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaumond, Charles F.; Fromm, David M.

    2002-11-01

    Detection in a monostatic broadband, active sonar system in shallow water is degraded by propagation induced spreading. The method of multiple guide sources has been presented as a method to mitigate this degradation. This paper shows the detection improvement from the use of the separable kernel receiver (SKR) that is based on a statistical behavior of the ensemble of multiple guide-source signals, which provide several one-way propagation signals from guide sources at various ranges at a single depth. A measure of information is derived to quantify the variability of these guide-source signals. The improvement of detection is shown as a function of range and depth for several sets of system and environmental parameters. In particular, two environments are shown. One is the case of farther ranges and lower frequencies in shallow water where the propagation causes dispersion. The other is the case of shorter ranges and higher frequencies in shallow water where the propagation effects are predominantly multipath. [Work supported by ONR.

  2. Underwater partial polarization signatures from the shallow water real-time imaging polarimeter (SHRIMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, James S., Jr.; Davis, P. S.; Wolff, Lawrence B.

    2003-09-01

    Research has shown that naturally occurring light outdoors and underwater is partially linearly polarized. The polarized components can be combined to form an image that describes the polarization of the light in the scene. This image is known as the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) image or partial polarization image. These naturally occurring polarization signatures can provide a diver or an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) with more information to detect, classify, and identify threats such as obstacles and/or mines in the shallow water environment. The SHallow water Real-time IMaging Polarimeter (SHRIMP), recently developed under sponsorship of Dr. Tom Swean at the Office of Naval Research (Code 321OE), can measure underwater partial polarization imagery. This sensor is a passive, three-channel device that simultaneously measures the three components of the Stokes vector needed to determine the partial linear polarization of the scene. The testing of this sensor has been completed and the data has been analyzed. This paper presents performance results from the field-testing and quantifies the gain provided by the partial polarization signature of targets in the Very Shallow Water (VSW) and Surf Zone (SZ) regions.

  3. Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics and Energy Partition for the Shallow Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, A.; Venaille, A.; Bouchet, F.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to use large deviation theory in order to compute the entropy of macrostates for the microcanonical measure of the shallow water system. The main prediction of this full statistical mechanics computation is the energy partition between a large scale vortical flow and small scale fluctuations related to inertia-gravity waves. We introduce for that purpose a semi-Lagrangian discrete model of the continuous shallow water system, and compute the corresponding statistical equilibria. We argue that microcanonical equilibrium states of the discrete model in the continuous limit are equilibrium states of the actual shallow water system. We show that the presence of small scale fluctuations selects a subclass of equilibria among the states that were previously computed by phenomenological approaches that were neglecting such fluctuations. In the limit of weak height fluctuations, the equilibrium state can be interpreted as two subsystems in thermal contact: one subsystem corresponds to the large scale vortical flow, the other subsystem corresponds to small scale height and velocity fluctuations. It is shown that either a non-zero circulation or rotation and bottom topography are required to sustain a non-zero large scale flow at equilibrium. Explicit computation of the equilibria and their energy partition is presented in the quasi-geostrophic limit for the energy-enstrophy ensemble. The possible role of small scale dissipation and shocks is discussed. A geophysical application to the Zapiola anticyclone is presented.

  4. Airborne Laser Bathymetry for Documentation of Submerged Archaeological Sites in Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doneus, M.; Miholjek, I.; Mandlburger, G.; Doneus, N.; Verhoeven, G.; Briese, Ch.; Pregesbauer, M.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of underwater topography is essential to the understanding of the organisation and distribution of archaeological sites along and in water bodies. Special attention has to be paid to intertidal and inshore zones where, due to sea-level rise, coastlines have changed and many former coastal sites are now submerged in shallow water. Mapping the detailed inshore topography is therefore important to reconstruct former coastlines, identify sunken archaeological structures and locate potential former harbour sites. However, until recently archaeology has lacked suitable methods to provide the required topographical data of shallow underwater bodies. Our research shows that airborne topo-bathymetric laser scanner systems are able to measure surfaces above and below the water table over large areas in high detail using very short and narrow green laser pulses, even revealing sunken archaeological structures in shallow water. Using an airborne laser scanner operating at a wavelength in the green visible spectrum (532 nm) two case study areas in different environmental settings (Kolone, Croatia, with clear sea water; Lake Keutschach, Austria, with turbid water) were scanned. In both cases, a digital model of the underwater topography with a planimetric resolution of a few decimeters was measured. While in the clear waters of Kolone penetration depth was up to 11 meters, turbid Lake Keutschach allowed only to document the upper 1.6 meters of its underwater topography. Our results demonstrate the potential of this technique to map submerged archaeological structures over large areas in high detail providing the possibility for systematic, large scale archaeological investigation of this environment.

  5. Correlating Mediterranean shallow water deposits with global Oligocene–Miocene stratigraphy and oceanic events☆

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.; Brandano, Marco; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Shallow-marine sediment records have the strong potential to display sensitive environmental changes in sedimentary geometries and skeletal content. However, the time resolution of most neritic carbonate records is not high enough to be compared with climatic events as recorded in the deep-sea sediment archives. In order to resolve the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes during the Oligocene–Miocene transition in the Mediterranean shallow water carbonate systems with the best possible time resolution, we re-evaluated the Decontra section on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy), which acts as a reference for the correlation of Oligocene–Miocene shallow water deposits in the Mediterranean region. The 120-m-thick late Oligocene–late Miocene carbonate succession is composed of larger foraminiferal, bryozoan and corallinacean limestones interlayered with distinct planktonic foraminiferal carbonates representing a mostly outer neritic setting. Integrated multi-proxy and facies analyses indicate that CaCO3 and total organic carbon contents as well as gamma-ray display only local to regional processes on the carbonate platform and are not suited for stratigraphic correlation on a wider scale. In contrast, new biostratigraphic data correlate the Decontra stable carbon isotope record to the global deep-sea carbon isotope record. This links relative sea level fluctuations, which are reflected by facies and magnetic susceptibility changes, to third-order eustatic cycles. The new integrated bio-, chemo-, and sequence stratigraphic framework enables a more precise timing of environmental changes within the studied time interval and identifies Decontra as an important locality for correlating not only shallow and deep water sediments of the Mediterranean region but also on a global scale. PMID:25844021

  6. Shallow-water limestones within the Paleogene forearc basin of California: Unique paleogeographic indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Whidden, K.J.; Bottjer, D.J.; Lund, S.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    A number of shallow-water limestones have recently been documented in late Mesozoic/Paleogene forearc strata of the Cordilleran continental arc. These limestones occur on two different tectonic blocks which were both developed within the forearc basin and subsequently moved relative to one another due to oblique convergence since Late Cretaceous time. Faunal evidence suggests that these limestones were deposited within the photic zone, at shelfal depths. Each limestone represents part or all of the basal Paleogene sequence; they are intercalated with or overlain by deeper-water strata. One region of outcrops in the western Santa Monica Mountains is latest Paleocene in age, while the other region, in the eastern Santa Ynez Mountains and Wheeler Gorge area, is early Eocene in age. These shallow-water limestones may be used as paleogeographic indicators, as they represent relative topographic highs within the basin. The microplate tectonic reconstruction of Hornafius (1985) suggests that the limestones occur on opposite sides of a north-south trending trough within the overall forearc basin. The Paleocene limestones, which occur along the eastern margin of the trough, are intercalated with marine shales and may represent small fluctuations in relative sea level and/or sediment supply on a topographic high. The Eocene limestones, which occur along the western side of the trough, are always the basal Paleogene unit deposited on tilted Cretaceous strata or Franciscan rocks and overlain by deeper-water shales. The occurrence of Franciscan as basement for limestone deposition implies localized tectonic uplift within the forearc. Each of these limestones probably represents initiation of a single period of relative sea level rise, as the basal shallow-water carbonates were eventually overwhelmed by deeper-water shales. Thus two episodes of carbonate deposition allow for the delineation of two topographic highs within the Paleogene forearc basin.

  7. Task-specificity vs. ceiling effect: step-training in shallow water after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kuerzi, J; Brown, E H; Shum-Siu, A; Siu, A; Burke, D; Morehouse, J; Smith, R R; Magnuson, D S K

    2010-07-01

    While activity-based rehabilitation is one of the most promising therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury, the necessary components for optimal locomotor retraining have not yet been determined. Currently, a number of different activity-based approaches are being investigated including body weight-supported treadmill training (with and without manual assistance), robotically-assisted treadmill training, bicycling and swimming, among others. We recently showed, in the adult rat, that intensive rehabilitation based on swimming brought about significant improvements in hindlimb performance during swimming but did not alter the normal course of recovery of over-ground walking (Smith et al., 2006a,b, 2009). However, swimming lacks the phasic limb-loading and plantar cutaneous feedback thought to be important for weight-supported step training. So, we are investigating an innovative approach based on walking in shallow water where buoyancy provides some body weight support and balance while still allowing for limb-loading and appropriate cutaneous afferent feedback during retraining. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine if spinal cord injured animals show improved overground locomotion following intensive body weight-supported locomotor training in shallow water. The results show that training in shallow water successfully improved stepping in shallow water, but was not able to bring about significant improvements in overground locomotion despite the fact that the shallow water provides sufficient body weight support to allow acutely injured rats to generate frequent plantar stepping. These observations support previous suggestions that incompletely injured animals retrain themselves while moving about in their cages and that daily training regimes are not able to improve upon this already substantial functional improvement due to a ceiling effect, rather than task-specificity, per se. These results also support the concept that moderately-severe thoracic

  8. Passive range estimation using ship-radiated noise in range-dependent shallow water environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Alexander W.

    The motivation for this work is a desire to exploit ship-radiated noise in shallow water environments for the purpose of passive range estimation. The method presented utilizes range-frequency intensity striations, arising from multi-path interference in shallow water waveguides and measured across a horizontal line array, to estimate range between a source and a receiver array. This method is based upon the premise that the effects of waveguide geometry on multi-path interference may be represented by a single parameter, beta, called the waveguide invariant, which relates striation slope to source range. Much of the literature on striation-based passive range estimation is focused on range-independent environments or relies on the assumption that beta ≈ 1 in shallow water waveguides in order to eliminate the requirement of knowing the specific values of propagation parameters a priori. However, prior work has shown that range-dependent effects from bathymetry or sound speed profiles can cause the value of beta to vary from its canonical shallow water value and introduce significant bias to range estimates. This work specifically focuses on the effects of range-dependent bathymetry in shallow water waveguides and discusses issues surrounding normal mode propagation and mode coupling. Beyond discussing range-dependent modal propagation, several signal, array, and image processing techniques are presented, which enable estimation of range-frequency intensity images from acoustic data and permit the images to be characterized in terms of striation angle and slope distributions. Using these techniques, a method for estimating range from striation patterns is developed and applied to simulated striation patterns and acoustic data from a 2007 experiment performed off the coast of Port Everglades, Florida. To improve range estimates obtained from the application of this method, an analytical formulation of a waveguide invariant distribution is derived, which takes into

  9. Shallow-water carbonate records of hyperthermals: do Pacific Ocean guyots hold the key? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~55.8 Ma) is associated with a rapid and large carbon cycle perturbation, transient warming and deep-sea acidification, and is the best-known example of a hyperthermal event. Although this event is widely known from pelagic, hemipelagic and continental records, the lack of in situ, shallow-water, carbonate-platform sections inhibits interpretations of whether the PETM had a significant effect on shallow-water carbonate ecosystems. Guyots in the Pacific Ocean are submerged seamounts that comprise a volcanic pedestal, topped with shallow-water carbonates (that accumulated at or close to sea-level) and a pelagic cap that formed after the platform ‘drowned’ (sunk below the photic zone). The isolated carbonate platforms on these guyots formed far from terrigenous input and runoff, both detrimental effects for calcifying organisms. The isolation and thickness of the carbonate platforms on guyots makes them ideal localities at which to investigate the response of shallow-water carbonate ecosystems to changes in surface ocean temperature and chemistry, free from the complications that can affect continental margin settings. Limalok Guyot (ODP Site 871) in the Pacific Ocean comprises a volcanic pedestal topped by a Paleogene carbonate platform that drowned in the middle Eocene. Carbon-isotope stratigraphy of the platform carbonate sediments will be presented, in conjunction with existing biostratigraphy, to refine the stratigraphic framework of the carbonate platform. Although core recovery was poor, the major Late Paleocene-Middle Eocene stratigraphic trends in carbon-isotopes can be recognized, including a prominent ~3‰ negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE), recording the onset of the PETM. The lithological and paleontological record of the PETM on Limalok Guyot shows no major evidence for a carbonate production crisis, suggesting that the effects of any changes in temperatures or surface ocean pH were relatively short

  10. Estimating the effective sound speed in the bottom in shallow water areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunkov, A. A.; Petnikov, V. G.; Chernousov, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    Techniques are proposed for estimating the effective sound speed in sediments in shallow water areas with a soft bottom. The techniques are oriented toward determining this physical quantity for relatively small range intervals on the order of ten depths. The estimates are based on comparison of the experimental results and calculations of the characteristics of low-frequency sound fields propagating in these water areas. It is proposed to find this sound speed quantity by calculating its value for which the best agreement between experiment and calculation occurs. We present the results of testing the proposed techniques in experiments in the Klyaz'ma reservoir.

  11. The effect of water oxygen content on the production of greenhouse gases from shallow pond sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Adam; Quinton, John; Surridge, Ben; McNamara, Niall

    2014-05-01

    Shallow lakes and ponds, including those commonly found in agricultural landscapes are often only a few metres deep, with surface areas <1ha. Despite this, landscapes may contain a high number of these ponds, amounting to a considerable cumulative surface area. Many of these features, both naturally formed and man-made, receive and trap runoff with high nutrient and sediment loadings. As such, the potential for the production of greenhouse gases (GHGs) through biogeochemical cycling in the pond sediments may be significant. Furthermore, the abundance of available nutrients coupled with the shallow physical characteristics of these systems, mean that short, irregular eutrophic episodes during the summer are common, causing large fluctuations in the oxygen content of the overlying water column. The oxygen content of the water column is often cited as key factor in the production of GHGs in large lake and reservoir systems. Given the limited research focusing on shallow ponds/lakes, and potential for these systems to be important sources of GHGs, the impacts of variable water oxygen content should be investigated. Here we present the results from a sediment microcosm experiment utilising sediment cores from an agricultural pond system in Cumbria, UK. Intact sediment cores were incubated in the dark at in-situ temperature and continuously fed with filtered pond water for 2 weeks. During this time the oxygen content of the water was manipulated between fully oxygenated and anaerobic. Measurements of GHG release were based on calculated dissolved gas concentrations present in the water columns of these cores. Results indicated that during times of water column anoxia, production of methane and carbon dioxide increased significantly, despite the presence of substantial quantities of nitrate in the water columns. No change in N2O production was detected. These results indicate that while representing a significant cumulative carbon store in agricultural landscapes, shallow

  12. Preliminary Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulation of EIIB Push Barge in Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneš, Petr; Kollárik, Róbert

    2011-12-01

    This study presents preliminary CFD simulation of EIIb push barge in inland conditions using CFD software Ansys Fluent. The RANSE (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equation) methods are used for the viscosity solution of turbulent flow around the ship hull. Different RANSE methods are used for the comparison of their results in ship resistance calculations, for selecting the appropriate and removing inappropriate methods. This study further familiarizes on the creation of geometrical model which considers exact water depth to vessel draft ratio in shallow water conditions, grid generation, setting mathematical model in Fluent and evaluation of the simulations results.

  13. Effect of urbanisation on the water balance of a catchment with shallow groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, O. V.; Barr, A. D.; Donn, M. J.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryThe impact of urbanisation on the water balance of a catchment dominated by surface water and groundwater interactions was investigated by using a process-based coupled surface water and groundwater model called MODHMS. The modelling estimated the likely changes in river discharge as a result of the land use change in the Southern River catchment in Western Australia. The catchment has both permeable soils and a shallow watertable. There was a significant increase in total annual discharge from the urbanised area where the runoff coefficient rose from 0.01 to more than 0.40. However in contrast with urban areas elsewhere these changes were mainly due to a shift in the subsurface water balance, including both groundwater and the unsaturated zone due to specifics of local hydrogeological conditions and adopted practice of storm runoff management. Due to the highly permeable soils, it is also common practice in the local building industry to direct runoff from roofs and roads into the soil and thereby the unconfined aquifer. Urbanisation results in particularly large changes in evapotranspiration from the soil profile and shallow watertable. The total subsurface evaporative flux reduced from 90% of infiltration (or 63-68% rainfall) to less than 29% (or 20% of rainfall) after urbanisation. Up to 83% (or 443 mm) of the pre-development evapotranspiration flux was from the shallow watertable. The requirement to control groundwater levels with drains in the shallow unconfined aquifer as well as the introduction of impervious surfaces caused a significant reduction of this component of evapotranspiration to less than 154 mm. These combined with an increase in infiltration rates, due to the direct infiltration of roof and road runoff, lead to higher groundwater recharge rates and subsequently groundwater discharge to the urban drainage network. The magnitude of urbanisation on catchment fluxes is most strongly influenced by urban density and the rate of local

  14. Assessment of shallow ground-water quality in recently urbanized areas of Sacramento, California, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence for anthropogenic impact on shallow ground-water quality beneath recently developed urban areas of Sacramento, California, has been observed in the sampling results from 19 monitoring wells in 1998. Eight volatile organic compounds (VOCs), four pesticides, and one pesticide transformation product were detected in low concentrations, and nitrate, as nitrogen, was detected in elevated concentrations; all of these concentrations were below National and State primary and secondary maximum contaminant levels. VOC results from this study are more consistent with the results from urban areas nationwide than from agricultural areas in the Central Valley, indicating that shallow ground-water quality has been impacted by urbanization. VOCs detected may be attributed to either the chlorination of drinking water, such as trichloromethane (chloroform) detected in 16 samples, or to the use of gasoline additives, such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), detected in 2 samples. Pesticides detected may be attributed to use on household lawns and gardens and rights-of-way, such as atrazine detected in three samples, or to past agricultural practices, and potentially to ground-water/surface-water interactions, such as bentazon detected in one sample from a well adjacent to the Sacramento River and downstream from where bentazon historically was used on rice. Concentrations of nitrate may be attributed to natural sources, animal waste, old septic tanks, and fertilizers used on lawns and gardens or previously used on agricultural crops. Seven sample concentrations of nitrate, as nitrogen, exceeded 3.0 milligrams per liter, a level that may indicate impact from human activities. Ground-water recharge from rainfall or surface-water runoff also may contribute to the concentrations of VOCs and pesticides observed in ground water. Most VOCs and pesticides detected in ground-water samples also were detected in air and surface-water samples collected at sites within or adjacent to the

  15. Hydraulic conductivity and water quality of the shallow aquifer, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Subsurface geophysical logs were correlated with logs of drill cuttings to determine the permeability of selected zones of the shallow aquifer, Palm Beach County, Fla. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is estimated to range from 1 to 130 feet per day, based on lithology and physical properties. The yield of wells penetrating this aquifer ranges from 100 to more than 1,000 gallons per minute. Water samples were collected from different depths throughout the county and analyzed for chemical constituents. Stiff diagrams illustrate the changes in types of water by depth and area. Water of suitable quality is in the eastern parts of the county. In this area the aquifer is the thickest and most permeable. The concentration of chemical constituents in the water increase in a westerly direction. The water in the western parts of the county is unsuitable for most purposes. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Nitrate pollution of ground waters from shallow basaltic aquifers, Deccan Trap Hydrologic Province, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, N. J.; Shaikh, I. J.

    1995-04-01

    Analyses of groundwater samples collected from several locations in a small watershed of the Deccan Trap Hydrologic Province, indicated anomalously higher values of nitrate than the background. However, the NO3 concentrations in water from dug wells under pastureland where the subsurface material consisted of stony waste were minimum. The maximum values were reported for water from dug wells where the principal land use was agricultural. Lowering of NO3 values under shallow water-table conditions suggests denitrification. Higher concentrations of nitrate determined for samples collected from the wells with a deeper water-table indicate that denitrification process is inactive. The high values of nitrate coinciding with agricultural land use indicate fertilizers as the main source of nitrate pollution of ground-water. Decrease in Cl/NO3 ratio for agricultural land use confirms this inference.

  17. Ground-water flow in the shallow aquifer system at the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Barry S.

    2001-01-01

    The Environmental Directorate of the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Virginia, is concerned about possible contamination of ground water at the Station. Ground water at the Station flows through a shallow system of layered aquifers and leaky confining units. The units of the shallow aquifer system are the Columbia aquifer, the Cornwallis Cave confining unit, the Cornwallis Cave aquifer, the Yorktown confining unit, and the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer. The Eastover-Calvert confining unit separates the shallow aquifer system from deeper confined aquifers beneath the Station. A three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model was used to simulate steady-state ground-water flow of the shallow aquifer system in and around the Station. The model simulated ground-water flow from the peninsular drainage divide that runs across the Lackey Plain near the southern end of the Station north to King Creek and the York River and south to Skiffes Creek and the James River. The model was calibrated by minimizing the root mean square error between 4 7 measured and corresponding simulated water levels. The calibrated model was used to determine the ground-water budget and general directions of ground-water flow. A particle-tracking routine was used with the calibrated model to estimate groundwater flow paths, flow rates, and traveltimes from selected sites at the Station. Simulated ground-water flow velocities of the Station-area model were small beneath the interstream areas of the Lackey Plain and Croaker Flat, but increased outward toward the streams and rivers where the hydraulic gradients are larger. If contaminants from the land surface entered the water table at or near the interstream areas of the Station, where hydraulic gradients are smaller, they would migrate more slowly than if they entered closer to the streams or the shores of the rivers where gradients commonly are larger. The ground-water flow simulations indicate that some ground water leaks downward from

  18. An unstructured grid, three-dimensional model based on the shallow water equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, V.; Walters, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite difference model based on the three-dimensional shallow water equations is modified to use unstructured grids. There are obvious advantages in using unstructured grids in problems with a complicated geometry. In this development, the concept of unstructured orthogonal grids is introduced and applied to this model. The governing differential equations are discretized by means of a semi-implicit algorithm that is robust, stable and very efficient. The resulting model is relatively simple, conserves mass, can fit complicated boundaries and yet is sufficiently flexible to permit local mesh refinements in areas of interest. Moreover, the simulation of the flooding and drying is included in a natural and straightforward manner. These features are illustrated by a test case for studies of convergence rates and by examples of flooding on a river plain and flow in a shallow estuary. Copyright ?? 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Water quality parameters response to temperature change in small shallow lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Hua; Liang, Xinqiang; Yao, Yuxin; Zhou, Li; Cui, Xinyi

    Effects of temperature (T) on water quality of three small shallow lakes in Taihu Lake region of China were investigated. The annual temperature was classified into three levels: low temperature (LT, 4 °C < T ⩽ 10 °C), middle temperature (MT, 10 °C < T ⩽ 20 °C), and high temperature (HT, 20 °C < T ⩽ 30 °C). Results showed that total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations might go to a fixed value (or range) in small shallow lakes receiving domestic sewage and farm drainage water. Nitrogen concentrations in the lakes were mainly in the form of nitrate (NO3-) at above concerned three temperature levels, and nitrogen concentrations in the forms of TN, TIN, and NO3- were increased with the increase of nutrient input. At the LT and MT levels, there was a series of good cubic curve relationships between temperatures and three N forms (TN, NO3- and NH4+). The temperatural inflexion change points in the curves were nearly at 7 °C and 14 °C, respectively. However, no significant relationship between temperature and any water quality parameter was observed at the HT level. The significant relationship of TIN to TN, NO3- to TN and NH4+ to dissolve oxygen (DO) was exist in three temperature portions, and TP to Chemical oxygen demand (COD, determined by potassium permanganate oxidation methods) in LT and MT, TP to pH or DO in HT also exist. COD were less than 6 mg L-1 at each temperature level, and pH values were the largest in HT than it in LT or MT. Thus, changes between temperature and water quality parameters (TN, NO3-, NH4+ and TP) obviously nearly in 7 °C or 14 °C in lakes show that water self-purification of natural small shallow lakes were obviously with temperature changed.

  20. High-order nite volume WENO schemes for the shallow water equations with dry states

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yulong; Shu, Chi-wang

    2011-01-01

    The shallow water equations are used to model flows in rivers and coastal areas, and have wide applications in ocean, hydraulic engineering, and atmospheric modeling. These equations have still water steady state solutions in which the flux gradients are balanced by the source term. It is desirable to develop numerical methods which preserve exactly these steady state solutions. Another main difficulty usually arising from the simulation of dam breaks and flood waves flows is the appearance of dry areas where no water is present. If no special attention is paid, standard numerical methods may fail near dry/wet front and produce non-physical negative water height. A high-order accurate finite volume weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is proposed in this paper to address these difficulties and to provide an efficient and robust method for solving the shallow water equations. A simple, easy-to-implement positivity-preserving limiter is introduced. One- and two-dimensional numerical examples are provided to verify the positivity-preserving property, well-balanced property, high-order accuracy, and good resolution for smooth and discontinuous solutions.

  1. Petrogenesis of Cenozoic temperate water carbonates, south Australia: model for shallow-burial or meteoric diagenesis of Phanerozoic shallow water calcite sediments

    SciTech Connect

    James, N.P.; Bone, Y.

    1988-02-01

    The Gambier Limestone is one of several extensive, shallow water, shelf carbonates of Eocene to Miocene age exposed along the southern margin of Australia. It is a muddy to grainy bryozoan calcarenite, with accessory benthonic foraminifers and echinoids. The sediments, originally composed almost entirely of calcite or Mg-calcite, have been in vadose and phreatic environments for over 10 m.y., yet are virtually unlithified. The only cements of any consequence are epitaxial on echinoids. Numerous karst features, dolines, caves, speleothems, and surface karren attest to prolonged residence in the meteoric zone. The Gambier is presently one of the best freshwater aquifers in Australia, with most flow intergranular and through sediments with over 30% porosity. Cementation is by minor intergranular pressure solution, which has developed under overburden of less than 100 m. The overlying Naracoorte Limestone (Miocene), a calcarenite of warmer water aspect, contains numerous aragonite molds and is cemented marble-hard. The authors propose that such temperate-water calcite limestones are a better model for the meteoric diagenesis of calcite sediments of all ages than aragonite-rich tropical sediments. It is probable that many similar early and middle Paleozoic calcite limestones may have been in the meteoric zone for prolonged periods, yet contain little or no petrographic or geochemical record of such exposure.

  2. Quality of shallow ground water in recently developed residential and commercial areas, Memphis vicinity, Tennessee, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard J.

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-four monitor wells screened in the shallow water-table aquifer and eight monitor wells screened in the upper part of the Memphis aquifer in the Memphis vicinity, Tennessee, were sampled as part of the Mississippi Embayment National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These samples were collected during April and May 1997, and were analyzed for turbidity, water temperature, pH, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen concentration, alkalinity, major ions, nutrients, 18 trace elements, 85 pesticides, 87 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radioisotopes, and stable isotopes. The Memphis study area consists of 76 square miles of residential-commercial areas ranging in age from 5 to 25 years. Atrazine was the only compound in this study detected at a concentration that exceeded a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking-water standard. Manganese, iron, and dissolved solids concentrations in water from some wells exceeded secondary standards. At least one pesticide was detected in water from 24 of 32 wells. The most frequently detected pesticides in water from the monitor wells were atrazine, simazine, and metolachlor. At least one VOC was detected in water from 31 of 32 wells. The most frequently detected VOCs in water from the wells were carbon disulfide, chloroform, m- and pxylenes, tetrachloroethene, and toluene. Water from 17 wells was a sodium bicarbonate type water; water from 12 wells was a calciummagnesium bicarbonate type water; water from 2 wells was a sodium chloride type water; water from 1 well was a sodium mixed anion type water. Based on both tritium and chlorofluorocarbon data, the average age of water from the monitor wells in the Memphis study area was estimated to range from 10 to more than 43 years old. Occurrence of VOCs increased with increasing urban land use.

  3. Analysis of the Turkel-Zwas scheme for the two-dimensional shallow water equations in spherical coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, B.; Giraldo, F.X.; Navon, I.M.

    1997-05-01

    A linear analysis of the shallow water equations in spherical coordinates for the Turkel-Zwas (T-Z) explicit large time-step scheme is presented. This paper complements the results of Schoenstadt, Neta and Navon, and others in 1-D, and of Neta and DeVito in 2-D, but applied to the spherical coordinate case of the T-Z scheme. This coordinate system is more realistic in meteorology and more complicated to analyze, since the coefficients are no longer constant. The analysis suggests that the T-Z scheme must be staggered in a certain way in order to get eigenvalues and eigenfunctions approaching those of the continuous case. The importance of such an analysis is the fact that it is also valid for nonconstant coefficients and thereby applicable to any numerical scheme. Numerical experiments comparing the original (unstaggered) and staggered versions of the T-Z scheme are presented. These experiments corroborate the analysis by showing the improvements in accuracy gained by staggering the Turkel-Zwas scheme. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas: Shallow ground-water quality and land use in the Albuquerque Area, Central New Mexico, 1993. National water quality assessment program. Water-resources investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderholm, S.K.

    1997-12-31

    This report describes the quality of shallow ground water and the relations between land use and the quality of that shallow ground water in an urban area in and adjacent to Albuquerque, New Mexico. Water samples were collected from 24 shallow wells for analysis of selected common constituents, nutrients, trace elements, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds (VOC`s), and pesticides. The results of the chemical analyses are presented in appendices.

  5. Bicarbonate, sulfate, and chloride water in a shallow, clastic-dominated coastal flow system, Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, W.S.; Auge, M.P.; Panarello, H.O.

    1999-03-01

    Most of the cities southeast of Buenos Aires, Argentina, depend heavily on ground water for water supply. Whereas ground water quality is generally good in the region, economic development along the coastal plain has been constrained by high salinities. Fifty-four wells were sampled for major ions in zones of recharge, transport and discharge in an area near La Plata, 50 km southeast of Buenos Aires. The shallow, southwest to northeast coastal flow system is >30 km long but is only 50 to 80 m thick. It consists of Plio-Pleistocene fluvial sand overlain by Pleistocene eolian and fluvial silt and Holocene estuarine silty clay. Hydrochemical endmembers include HCO{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}, and Cl water. Bicarbonate-type water includes high plain recharge water that evolves through cation exchange and calcite dissolution to a high pH, pure Na-HCO{sub 3} endmember at the southwest edge of the coastal plain. Similar Na-HCO{sub 3} water is also found underlying recharge areas of the central coastal plain, and a lens of Ca-HCO{sub 3} water is associated with a ridge of shell debris parallel to the coast. Mixed cation-Cl water near the coastline represents intruded sea water that has undergone cation exchange. Chemically similar water underlying the southwest coastal plain, however, can be shown isotopically to have formed from fairly dilute solutions concentrated many times by evapotranspiration.

  6. 75 FR 54290 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., September 1, 2010, through... pollock, Pacific cod, shallow-water flatfish, flathead sole, Atka mackerel, skates, and ``other...

  7. 76 FR 55276 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... of the GOA (76 FR 11111, March 11, 2011), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., September 1, 2011, through... pollock, Pacific cod, shallow-water flatfish, flathead sole, Atka mackerel, skates, and ``other...

  8. 77 FR 42193 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... specifications for groundfish of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., July 1... pollock, Pacific cod, shallow-water flatfish, flathead sole, Atka mackerel, skates, squids,...

  9. 76 FR 39794 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11111, March 1, 2011), and as posted as the Catcher/Processor... species fishery for the sideboard limit are shallow-water flatfish and flathead sole. After the...

  10. 75 FR 38938 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010), and as posted as the Catcher/Processor... species fishery for the sideboard limit are shallow-water flatfish and flathead sole. After the...

  11. 77 FR 54837 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., September 1, 2012, through... pollock, Pacific cod, shallow-water flatfish, flathead sole, Atka mackerel, skates, squids,...

  12. Factors controlling As and U in shallow ground water, southern Carson Desert, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, A.H.; Lico, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Unusually high As and U concentrations (> 100 ??g/L) are widespread in shallow ground water beneath the southern Carson Desert. The high concentrations, which locally exceed 1000 ??g/L, are of concern from a human health standpoint because the shallow ground water is used for domestic supply. Possible affects on wildlife are also of concern because the ground water flows into shallow lakes and marshes within wildlife refuges. Arsenic and U concentrations in ground water of the southern Carson Desert appear to be affected by evaporative concentration, redox reactions, and adsorption. The relation of these elements with Cl suggest that most of the high concentrations can be attributed to evaporative concentration of Carson River water, the primary source of recharge. Some ground water contains higher As and U concentrations that cannot be explained by evaporative concentration alone. Oxidation-reduction reactions, involving metal oxides and sedimentary-organic matter, appear to contribute As, U, inorganic C, Fe and Mn to the ground water. Arsenic in Fe-oxide was confirmed by chemical extraction and is consistent with laboratory adsorption studies. Uranium in both sedimentary-organic C and Fe-oxide coatings has been confirmed by fission tracks and petrographic examination. Arsenic concentrations in the ground water and chemical extracts of aquifer sediments are broadly consistent with adsorption as a control on some dissolved As concentrations. An apparent loss of As from some ground water as evaporative concentration proceeds is consistent with adsorption as a control on As. However, evidence for adsorption should be viewed with caution, because the adsorption model used values for the adsorbent that have not been shown to be valid for the aquifer sediments throughout the southern Carson Desert. Hydrologic and geochemical conditions in the Carson Desert are similar to other areas with high As and U concentrations in ground water, including the Salton Sea basin and

  13. Consistent nonlinear deterministic and stochastic evolution equations for deep to shallow water wave shoaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrecica, Teodor; Toledo, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    oscillating terms, but as the water depth becomes shallow they change to an exponential growth (or decay) behavior. Hence, the formerly used localization technique cannot be justified for the shallow water region. A new formulation is devised for the localization in shallow water, it approximates the nonlinear non-local shoaling coefficient in shallow water and matches it to the one fitting to the intermediate water region. This allows the model behavior to be consistent from deep water to intermediate depths and up to the shallow water regime. Various simulations of the model were performed for the cases of intermediate, and shallow water, overall the model was found to give good results in both shallow and intermediate water depths. The essential difference between the shallow and intermediate nonlinear shoaling physics is explained via the dominating class III Bragg resonances phenomenon. By inspecting the resonance conditions and the nature of the dispersion relation, it is shown that unlike in the intermediate water regime, in shallow water depths the formation of resonant interactions is possible without taking into account bottom components. References Agnon, Y. & Sheremet, A. 1997 Stochastic nonlinear shoaling of directional spectra. J. Fluid Mech. 345, 79-99. Benney, D. J. & Saffman, P. G. 1966 Nonlinear interactions of random waves. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 289, 301-321. Bredmose, H., Agnon, Y., Madsen, P.A. & Schaffer, H.A. 2005 Wave transformation models with exact second-order transfer. European J. of Mech. - B/Fluids 24 (6), 659-682. Eldeberky, Y. & Madsen, P. A. 1999 Deterministic and stochastic evolution equations for fully dispersive and weakly nonlinear waves. Coastal Engineering 38, 1-24. Kaihatu, J. M. & Kirby, J. T. 1995 Nonlinear transformation of waves in infinite water depth. Phys. Fluids 8, 175-188. Holloway, G. 1980 Oceanic internal waves are not weak waves. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 10, 906-914. Stiassnie, M. & Drimer, N. 2006 Prediction of long forcing waves

  14. Removal of water from a shallow bath under laser pulse irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, L I; Gladush, G G; Glova, A F; Drobyazko, S V; Krasyukov, A G; Mainashev, V S; Rerikh, V L; Taran, M D

    2011-05-31

    An experimental investigation was made of water removal from a shallow bath under the action of a CO{sub 2}-laser radiation pulse focused to a spot of size substantially smaller than the bath length. We showed that the specific expenditure of energy is determined by the intensity of laser radiation at the water surface for different values of the focal spot area and pulse duration. The removal dynamics was studied by single-frame photography technique. It was determined that the water is removed layerwise only from the walls of the cavern, which expands in the horizontal direction upon cessation of the radiation pulse. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were made of the water removal, and a mechanism was proposed to explain the experimentally observed removal pattern. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  15. Modeling wind waves from deep to shallow waters in Lake Michigan using unstructured SWAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Miaohua; van der Westhuysen, André J.; Xia, Meng; Schwab, David J.; Chawla, Arun

    2016-06-01

    Accurate wind-wave simulations are vital for evaluating the impact of waves on coastal dynamics, especially when wave observations are sparse. It has been demonstrated that structured-grid models have the ability to capture the wave dynamics of large-scale offshore domains, and the recent emergence of unstructured meshes provides an opportunity to better simulate shallow-water waves by resolving the complex geometry along islands and coastlines. For this study, wind waves in Lake Michigan were simulated using the unstructured-grid version of Simulating Waves Nearshore (un-SWAN) model with various types of wind forcing, and the model was calibrated using in situ wave observations. Sensitivity experiments were conducted to investigate the key factors that impact wave growth and dissipation processes. In particular, we considered (1) three wind field sources, (2) three formulations for wind input and whitecapping, (3) alternative formulations and coefficients for depth-induced breaking, and (4) various mesh types. We find that un-SWAN driven by Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) wind data reproduces significant wave heights reasonably well using previously proposed formulations for wind input, recalibrated whitecapping parameters, and alternative formulations for depth-induced breaking. The results indicate that using GEM wind field data as input captures large waves in the midlake most accurately, while using the Natural Neighbor Method wind field reproduces shallow-water waves more accurately. Wind input affects the simulated wave evolution across the whole lake, whereas whitecapping primarily affects wave dynamics in deep water. In shallow water, the process of depth-induced breaking is dominant and highly dependent upon breaker indices and mesh types.

  16. Community Structure of Macrobiota and Environmental Parameters in Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents off Kueishan Island, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chan, Benny Kwok Kan; Wang, Teng-Wei; Chen, Pin-Chen; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chan, Tin-Yam; Tsang, Ling Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a unique habitat in the marine ecosystem characterized with high water temperature and toxic acidic chemistry. Vents are distributed at depths ranging from a few meters to several thousand meters. The biological communities of shallow-water vents have, however, been insufficiently studied in most biogeographic areas. We attempted to characterize the macrofauna and macroflora community inhabiting the shallow-water vents off Kueishan Island, Taiwan, to identify the main abiotic factors shaping the community structure and the species distribution. We determined that positively buoyant vent fluid exhibits a more pronounced negative impact to species on the surface water than on the bottom layer. Species richness increased with horizontal distance from the vent, and continuing for a distance of 2000 m, indicating that the vent fluid may exert a negative impact over several kilometers. The community structure off Kueishan Island displayed numerous transitions along the horizontal gradient, which were broadly congruent with changes in environmental conditions. Combination of variation in Ca2+, Cl-, temperature, pH and depth were revealed to show the strongest correlation with the change in benthic community structure, suggesting multiple factors of vent fluid were influencing the associated fauna. Only the vent crabs of Kueishan Island may have an obligated relationship with vents and inhabit the vent mouths because other fauna found nearby are opportunistic taxa that are more tolerant to acidic and toxic environments. PMID:26849440

  17. Community Structure of Macrobiota and Environmental Parameters in Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents off Kueishan Island, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Benny Kwok Kan; Wang, Teng-Wei; Chen, Pin-Chen; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chan, Tin-Yam; Tsang, Ling Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a unique habitat in the marine ecosystem characterized with high water temperature and toxic acidic chemistry. Vents are distributed at depths ranging from a few meters to several thousand meters. The biological communities of shallow-water vents have, however, been insufficiently studied in most biogeographic areas. We attempted to characterize the macrofauna and macroflora community inhabiting the shallow-water vents off Kueishan Island, Taiwan, to identify the main abiotic factors shaping the community structure and the species distribution. We determined that positively buoyant vent fluid exhibits a more pronounced negative impact to species on the surface water than on the bottom layer. Species richness increased with horizontal distance from the vent, and continuing for a distance of 2000 m, indicating that the vent fluid may exert a negative impact over several kilometers. The community structure off Kueishan Island displayed numerous transitions along the horizontal gradient, which were broadly congruent with changes in environmental conditions. Combination of variation in Ca2+, Cl-, temperature, pH and depth were revealed to show the strongest correlation with the change in benthic community structure, suggesting multiple factors of vent fluid were influencing the associated fauna. Only the vent crabs of Kueishan Island may have an obligated relationship with vents and inhabit the vent mouths because other fauna found nearby are opportunistic taxa that are more tolerant to acidic and toxic environments. PMID:26849440

  18. Snorkelling and trampling in shallow-water fringing reefs: Risk assessment and proposed management strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hannak, Judith S.; Kompatscher, Sarah; Stachowitsch, Michael; Herler, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Shallow reefs (reef flats <1.5 m) in the northern Red Sea are impacted by growing tourism that includes swimmers, snorkellers and reef walkers but have largely been neglected in past studies. We selected a fringing reef along the lagoon of Dahab (Sinai, Egypt) as a model for a management strategy. Point-intercept line transects were used to determine substrate composition, coral community and condition, and the coral damage index (CDI) was applied. Approximately 84% of the coral colonies showed signs of damage such as breakage, partial mortality or algal overgrowth, especially affecting the most frequent coral genus Acropora. Questionnaires were used to determine the visitors’ socio-economic background and personal attitudes regarding snorkelling, SCUBA-diving and interest in visiting a prospective snorkelling trail. Experiencing nature (97%) was by far the strongest motivation, and interest in further education about reef ecology and skill training was high. Less experienced snorkellers and divers – the target group for further education and skill training – were those most prepared to financially support such a trail. We therefore recommend a guided underwater snorkelling trail and restricting recreational use to a less sensitive ‘ecotourism zone’ while protecting the shallow reef flat. Artificial structures can complete the trail and offer the opportunity to snorkel over deeper areas at unfavourable tide or wind conditions. This approach provides a strategy for the management and conservation of shallow-water reefs, which are facing increasing human impact here and elsewhere. PMID:21708420

  19. Snorkelling and trampling in shallow-water fringing reefs: risk assessment and proposed management strategy.

    PubMed

    Hannak, Judith S; Kompatscher, Sarah; Stachowitsch, Michael; Herler, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    Shallow reefs (reef flats <1.5 m) in the northern Red Sea are impacted by growing tourism that includes swimmers, snorkellers and reef walkers but have largely been neglected in past studies. We selected a fringing reef along the lagoon of Dahab (Sinai, Egypt) as a model for a management strategy. Point-intercept line transects were used to determine substrate composition, coral community and condition, and the coral damage index (CDI) was applied. Approximately 84% of the coral colonies showed signs of damage such as breakage, partial mortality or algal overgrowth, especially affecting the most frequent coral genus Acropora. Questionnaires were used to determine the visitors' socio-economic background and personal attitudes regarding snorkelling, SCUBA-diving and interest in visiting a prospective snorkelling trail. Experiencing nature (97%) was by far the strongest motivation, and interest in further education about reef ecology and skill training was high. Less experienced snorkellers and divers--the target group for further education and skill training--were those most prepared to financially support such a trail. We therefore recommend a guided underwater snorkelling trail and restricting recreational use to a less sensitive 'ecotourism zone' while protecting the shallow reef flat. Artificial structures can complete the trail and offer the opportunity to snorkel over deeper areas at unfavourable tide or wind conditions. This approach provides a strategy for the management and conservation of shallow-water reefs, which are facing increasing human impact here and elsewhere. PMID:21708420

  20. Caprellid assemblages (Crustacea: Amphipoda) in shallow waters invaded by Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea from southeastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Luis, M.; Guerra-García, J. M.; Sanchez-Jerez, P.; Bayle-Sempere, J. T.

    2009-06-01

    Growth of the invasive algae Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea in shallow habitats may influence the faunal assemblage composition. We studied its effects on caprellid assemblages associated with shallow-water habitats of hard and soft bottoms from the SE Iberian Peninsula (native rocky-bottom algae, C. racemosa from hard and soft bottoms, and Caulerpa prolifera, Cymodocea nodosa and Posidonia oceanica from soft bottoms). Samples were taken in two different sampling periods (September 2004 and March 2005). A total of seven caprellid species were identified, with important differences in their distribution in different habitats. Total abundance of caprellids was very high in March on native algae on hard bottoms, and on C. racemosa on both soft and hard bottoms. On both hard and soft bottoms, abundances of Caprella hirsuta recorded from C. racemosa were low. On the other hand, a higher abundance of other species, namely C. acanthifera, C. santosrosai, Phtisica marina and Pseudoprotella phasma, was recorded from C. racemosa. The results indicate that C. racemosa may have a positive influence on some caprellid species, while seasonal changes are also evident. It is concluded that introduced C. racemosa may serve as a new habitat, promoting and maintaining caprellid populations in shallow Mediterranean habitats.

  1. Balancing the source terms in a SPH model for solving the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xilin; Liang, Qiuhua; Pastor, Manuel; Zou, Weilie; Zhuang, Yan-Feng

    2013-09-01

    A shallow flow generally features complex hydrodynamics induced by complicated domain topography and geometry. A numerical scheme with well-balanced flux and source term gradients is therefore essential before a shallow flow model can be applied to simulate real-world problems. The issue of source term balancing has been exhaustively investigated in grid-based numerical approaches, e.g. discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods and finite volume Godunov-type methods. In recent years, a relatively new computational method, smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), has started to gain popularity in solving the shallow water equations (SWEs). However, the well-balanced problem has not been fully investigated and resolved in the context of SPH. This work aims to discuss the well-balanced problem caused by a standard SPH discretization to the SWEs with slope source terms and derive a corrected SPH algorithm that is able to preserve the solution of lake at rest. In order to enhance the shock capturing capability of the resulting SPH model, the Monotone Upwind-centered Scheme for Conservation Laws (MUSCL) is also explored and applied to enable Riemann solver based artificial viscosity. The new SPH model is validated against several idealized benchmark tests and a real-world dam-break case and promising results are obtained.

  2. 2D heterodyne-detected sum frequency generation study on the ultrafast vibrational dynamics of H{sub 2}O and HOD water at charged interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichi; Singh, Prashant C.; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Yamaguchi, Shoichi

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectroscopy is applied to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics of water at positively charged aqueous interfaces, and 2D HD-VSFG spectra of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/water interfaces in the whole hydrogen-bonded OH stretch region (3000 cm{sup −1} ≤ ω{sub pump} ≤ 3600 cm{sup −1}) are measured. 2D HD-VSFG spectrum of the CTAB/isotopically diluted water (HOD-D{sub 2}O) interface exhibits a diagonally elongated bleaching lobe immediately after excitation, which becomes round with a time constant of ∼0.3 ps due to spectral diffusion. In contrast, 2D HD-VSFG spectrum of the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface at 0.0 ps clearly shows two diagonal peaks and their cross peaks in the bleaching region, corresponding to the double peaks observed at 3230 cm{sup −1} and 3420 cm{sup −1} in the steady-state HD-VSFG spectrum. Horizontal slices of the 2D spectrum show that the relative intensity of the two peaks of the bleaching at the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface gradually change with the change of the pump frequency. We simulate the pump-frequency dependence of the bleaching feature using a model that takes account of the Fermi resonance and inhomogeneity of the OH stretch vibration, and the simulated spectra reproduce the essential features of the 2D HD-VSFG spectra of the CTAB/H{sub 2}O interface. The present study demonstrates that heterodyne detection of the time-resolved VSFG is critically important for studying the ultrafast dynamics of water interfaces and for unveiling the underlying mechanism.

  3. Environmental occurrence and shallow ground water detection of the antibiotic monensin from dairy farms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watanabe, N.; Harter, T.H.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals used in animal feeding operations have been detected in various environmental settings. There is a growing concern about the impact on terrestrial and aquatic organisms and the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of microorganisms. Pharmaceutical use in milking cows is relatively limited compared with other livestock operations, except for the ionophore monensin, which is given to lactating cows as a feed. By weight, monensin can be the most significant antibiotic used in a dairy farm. This study investigates the potential of monensin to move from dairy operations into the surrounding ground water. Using two dairy farms in California as study sites, we twice collected samples along the environmental pathway - from flush lanes, lagoon waters, and shallow ground water beneath the dairies and beneath its associated manured fields. Monensin concentrations were determined using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with positive electrospray ionization. Monensin was detected in all of the flush lane and lagoon water samples. Theoretical maximum concentration estimated from the actual dosing rate and the theoretical excretion rate assuming no attenuation was one order of magnitude greater than observed concentrations, suggesting significant attenuation in the manure collection and storage system. Monensin was also detected, at levels ranging from 0.04 to 0.39 ??g L-1, in some of the ground water samples underneath the production area of the dairy but not from the adjacent manured fields. Concentrations in ground water immediately downgradient of the lagoons were one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations detected in lagoons, suggesting attenuation in the subsurface. The data suggest the possibility of monensin transport into shallow (2-5 m) alluvial ground water from dairy management units, including manure storage lagoons and freestalls occupied by heifers, lactating cows, and dry cows

  4. Environmental Occurrence and Shallow Ground Water Detection of the Antibiotic Monensin from Dairy Farms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Watanabe, N.; Harter, T.H.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals used in animal feeding operations have been detected in various environmental settings. There is a growing concern about the impact on terrestrial and aquatic organisms and the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of microorganisms. Pharmaceutical use in milking cows is relatively limited compared with other livestock operations, except for the ionophore monensin, which is given to lactating cows as a feed. By weight, monensin can be the most significant antibiotic used in a dairy farm. This study investigates the potential of monensin to move from dairy operations into the surrounding ground water. Using two dairy farms in California as study sites, we twice collected samples along the environmental pathway-from flush lanes, lagoon waters, and shallow ground water beneath the dairies and beneath its associated manured fields. Monensin concentrations were determined using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with positive electrospray ionization. Monensin was detected in all of the flush lane and lagoon water samples. Theoretical maximum concentration estimated from the actual dosing rate and the theoretical excretion rate assuming no attenuation was one order of magnitude greater than observed concentrations, suggesting significant attenuation in the manure collection and storage system. Monensin was also detected, at levels ranging from 0.04 to 0.39 microg L(-1), in some of the ground water samples underneath the production area of the dairy but not from the adjacent manured fields. Concentrations in ground water immediately downgradient of the lagoons were one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations detected in lagoons, suggesting attenuation in the subsurface. The data suggest the possibility of monensin transport into shallow (2-5 m) alluvial ground water from dairy management units, including manure storage lagoons and freestalls occupied by heifers, lactating cows, and dry cows.

  5. Improving Multi-Objective Management of Water Quality Tipping Points: Revisiting the Classical Shallow Lake Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J. D.; Reed, P. M.; Keller, K.

    2015-12-01

    Recent multi-objective extensions of the classical shallow lake problem are useful for exploring the conceptual and computational challenges that emerge when managing irreversible water quality tipping points. Building on this work, we explore a four objective version of the lake problem where a hypothetical town derives economic benefits from polluting a nearby lake, but at the risk of irreversibly tipping the lake into a permanently polluted state. The trophic state of the lake exhibits non-linear threshold dynamics; below some critical phosphorus (P) threshold it is healthy and oligotrophic, but above this threshold it is irreversibly eutrophic. The town must decide how much P to discharge each year, a decision complicated by uncertainty in the natural P inflow to the lake. The shallow lake problem provides a conceptually rich set of dynamics, low computational demands, and a high level of mathematical difficulty. These properties maximize its value for benchmarking the relative merits and limitations of emerging decision support frameworks, such as Direct Policy Search (DPS). Here, we explore the use of DPS as a formal means of developing robust environmental pollution control rules that effectively account for deeply uncertain system states and conflicting objectives. The DPS reformulation of the shallow lake problem shows promise in formalizing pollution control triggers and signposts, while dramatically reducing the computational complexity of the multi-objective pollution control problem. More broadly, the insights from the DPS variant of the shallow lake problem formulated in this study bridge emerging work related to socio-ecological systems management, tipping points, robust decision making, and robust control.

  6. Carbonate clumped isotope variability in shallow water corals: Temperature dependence and growth-related vital effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenger, Casey; Affek, Hagit P.; Felis, Thomas; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Lough, Janice M.; Holcomb, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Geochemical variations in shallow water corals provide a valuable archive of paleoclimatic information. However, biological effects can complicate the interpretation of these proxies, forcing their application to rely on empirical calibrations. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry (Δ47) is a novel paleotemperature proxy based on the temperature dependent "clumping" of 13C-18O bonds. Similar Δ47-temperature relationships in inorganically precipitated calcite and a suite of biogenic carbonates provide evidence that carbonate clumped isotope variability may record absolute temperature without a biological influence. However, large departures from expected values in the winter growth of a hermatypic coral provided early evidence for possible Δ47 vital effects. Here, we present the first systematic survey of Δ47 in shallow water corals. Sub-annual Red Sea Δ47 in two Porites corals shows a temperature dependence similar to inorganic precipitation experiments, but with a systematic offset toward higher Δ47 values that consistently underestimate temperature by ˜8 °C. Additional analyses of Porites, Siderastrea, Astrangia and Caryophyllia corals argue against a number of potential mechanisms as the leading cause for this apparent Δ47 vital effect including: salinity, organic matter contamination, alteration during sampling, the presence or absence of symbionts, and interlaboratory differences in analytical protocols. However, intra- and inter-coral comparisons suggest that the deviation from expected Δ47 increases with calcification rate. Theoretical calculations suggest this apparent link with calcification rate is inconsistent with pH-dependent changes in dissolved inorganic carbon speciation and with kinetic effects associated with CO2 diffusion into the calcifying space. However, the link with calcification rate may be related to fractionation during the hydration/hydroxylation of CO2 within the calcifying space. Although the vital effects we describe will

  7. Shallow-water habitats as sources of fallback foods for hominins.

    PubMed

    Wrangham, Richard; Cheney, Dorothy; Seyfarth, Robert; Sarmiento, Esteban

    2009-12-01

    Underground storage organs (USOs) have been proposed as critical fallback foods for early hominins in savanna, but there has been little discussion as to which habitats would have been important sources of USOs. USOs consumed by hominins could have included both underwater and underground storage organs, i.e., from both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Shallow aquatic habitats tend to offer high plant growth rates, high USO densities, and relatively continuous USO availability throughout the year. Baboons in the Okavango delta use aquatic USOs as a fallback food, and aquatic or semiaquatic USOs support high-density human populations in various parts of the world. As expected given fossilization requisites, the African early- to mid-Pleistocene shows an association of Homo and Paranthropus fossils with shallow-water and flooded habitats where high densities of plant-bearing USOs are likely to have occurred. Given that early hominins in the tropics lived in relatively dry habitats, while others occupied temperate latitudes, ripe, fleshy fruits of the type preferred by African apes would not normally have been available year round. We therefore suggest that water-associated USOs were likely to have been key fallback foods, and that dry-season access to aquatic habitats would have been an important predictor of hominin home range quality. This study differs from traditional savanna chimpanzee models of hominin origins by proposing that access to aquatic habitats was a necessary condition for adaptation to savanna habitats. It also raises the possibility that harvesting efficiency in shallow water promoted adaptations for habitual bipedality in early hominins. PMID:19890871

  8. Gravity currents flowing upslope: Laboratory experiments and shallow-water simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, V.; Adduce, C.; Sciortino, G.; La Rocca, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics of lock-release gravity currents propagating upslope by laboratory experiments and shallow-water simulations. Both the interface between the dense and the ambient fluid and the instantaneous velocity field were measured by image analysis. Different runs were carried out by varying the initial density of the lock fluid and the bed upslope. As a gravity current moves upslope, the dense layer becomes thinner, and an accumulation region of dense fluid in the initial part of the tank occurs. The current speed decreases as the bed upslope increases, and for the highest up sloping angles, the gravity current stops before reaching the end of the tank. A new two-layer shallow-water model is developed and benchmarked against laboratory experiments. The present model accounts for the mixing between the two layers, the free surface, and the space-time variations of the density. The effect of the horizontal density gradient in the simulation of gravity currents is investigated by comparing the numerical results of both the present model and the model proposed by Adduce et al. ["Gravity currents produced by lock-exchange: Experiments and simulations with a two layer shallow-water model with entrainment," J. Hydraul. Eng. 138, 111-121 (2012)] with laboratory measurements. The comparison shows that the present model reproduces both the current shape and the front position better than the Adduce et al. model, in particular, for gravity currents flowing up a slope. For these currents, the presence of a backflow near the lock is shown by the analysis of the streamwise depth-averaged velocity predicted by the present model and the velocity measured by particle image velocimetry as well.

  9. Simulation of the evolution of root water foraging strategies in dry and shallow soils

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Michael; Poot, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The dynamic structural development of plants can be seen as a strategy for exploiting the limited resources available within their environment, and we would expect that evolution would lead to efficient strategies that reduce costs while maximizing resource acquisition. In particular, perennial species endemic to habitats with shallow soils in seasonally dry environments have been shown to have a specialized root system morphology that may enhance access to water resources in the underlying rock. This study aimed to explore these hypotheses by applying evolutionary algorithms to a functional–structural root growth model. Methods A simulation model of a plant's root system was developed, which represents the dynamics of water uptake and structural growth. The model is simple enough for evolutionary optimization to be computationally feasible, yet flexible enough to allow a range of structural development strategies to be explored. The model was combined with an evolutionary algorithm in order to investigate a case study habitat with a highly heterogeneous distribution of resources, both spatially and temporally – the situation of perennial plants occurring on shallow soils in seasonally dry environments. Evolution was simulated under two contrasting fitness criteria: (1) the ability to find wet cracks in underlying rock, and (2) maximizing above-ground biomass. Key Results The novel approach successfully resulted in the evolution of more efficient structural development strategies for both fitness criteria. Different rooting strategies evolved when different criteria were applied, and each evolved strategy made ecological sense in terms of the corresponding fitness criterion. Evolution selected for root system morphologies which matched those of real species from corresponding habitats. Conclusions Specialized root morphology with deeper rather than shallower lateral branching enhances access to water resources in underlying rock. More

  10. Heat and dissolved oxygen exchanges between the sediment and water column in a shallow salty lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) and heat exchanges across the water-sediment interface (WSI) of a shallow lagoon are controlled by processes occurring on both sides of the WSI, particularly volumetric source and sink on the sediment side and turbulent transport on the waterside. This article presents and analyzes measurements of DO (Js) and heat (Hg) fluxes across the WSI in the extremely shallow lagoon of Salar del Huasco (20.274°S, 68.883°W, 3800 m above sea level), where volumetric source of DO and heat exists in the sediment layer, related to benthic primary production and absorption of solar radiation, respectively. Microprofiles of temperature and DO were measured, and they were used for measuring Js and Hg, and volumetric source/sink terms in the sediments. This information was used to propose and validate the simple theoretical framework to predict both the magnitude and direction of Js and Hg. On the one hand, Js can be predicted with a simple algebraic expression, where the diffusional mass transfer coefficient defines the magnitude of Js while the direction is controlled by the balance between DO production and consumption in the sediments. On the other hand, solar radiation is absorbed in the upper sediments, and this heat diffuses toward the water column and the sediments. The heat flux toward the water column also induces unstable convection that promotes vertical transport across the WSI. The theoretical framework proposed here will help to understand DO and heat budgets of shallow aquatic systems in which solar radiation reaches the WSI.

  11. Travelling wave solutions for some two-component shallow water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutykh, Denys; Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we perform a unified analysis of travelling wave solutions to three different two-component systems which appear in shallow water theory. Namely, we analyze the celebrated Green-Naghdi equations, the integrable two-component Camassa-Holm equations and a new two-component system of Green-Naghdi type. In particular, we are interested in solitary and cnoidal-type solutions, as two most important classes of travelling waves that we encounter in applications. We provide a complete phase-plane analysis of all possible travelling wave solutions which may arise in these models. In particular, we show the existence of new type of solutions.

  12. 8-kHz bottom backscattering measurements at low grazing angles in shallow water.

    PubMed

    La, Hyoungsul; Choi, Jee Woong

    2010-04-01

    8-kHz bottom backscattering measurements at low grazing angles (6 degrees -31 degrees ) are presented. The experiment was performed at a very shallow water site with a silty bottom on the south coast of Korea. Backscattering strengths between -42 and -30 dB were obtained and were compared to a theoretical backscattering model and Lambert's law. The fit of the theoretical model to the measurements suggests that sediment volume scattering is dominant over scattering from bottom interface roughness. Combining these results with previous measurements found in the published literature implies that backscattering strengths from silty sediment increase slightly as the frequency increases. PMID:20369984

  13. Documentation of the Goddard Laboratory for atmospheres fourth-order two-layer shallow water model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, L. L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The theory and numerical treatment used in the 2-level GLA fourth-order shallow water model are described. This model was designed to emulate the horizontal finite differences used by the GLA Fourth-Order General Circulation Model (Kalnay et al., 1983) in addition to its grid structure, form of high-latitude and global filtering, and time-integration schemes. A user's guide is also provided instructing the user on how to create initial conditions, execute the model, and post-process the data history.

  14. Unique laminar-flow stability limit based shallow-water theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1993-01-01

    Two approaches are generally taken in deriving the stability limit for the Froude member (Fs) for laminar sheet flow. The first approach used the Orr-Sommerfeld equation, while the second uses the cross-section-averaged equations of continuity and motion. Because both approaches are based on shallow-water theory, the values of Fs obtained from both approaches should be identical, yet in the literature they are not. This suggests that a defect exists in at least one of the two approaches. After examining the governing equations used in both approaches, one finds that the existing cross-section -averaged equation of motion is dependent on the frame of reference.

  15. Energy conserving and potential-enstrophy dissipating schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Hsu, Yueh-Jiuan G.

    1990-01-01

    To incorporate potential enstrophy dissipation into discrete shallow water equations with no or arbitrarily small energy dissipation, a family of finite-difference schemes have been derived with which potential enstrophy is guaranteed to decrease while energy is conserved (when the mass flux is nondivergent and time is continuous). Among this family of schemes, there is a member that minimizes the spurious impact of infinite potential vorticities associated with infinitesimal fluid depth. The scheme is, therefore, useful for problems in which the free surface may intersect with the lower boundary.

  16. A discontinuous Galerkin method for the shallow water equations in spherical triangular coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läuter, Matthias; Giraldo, Francis X.; Handorf, Dörthe; Dethloff, Klaus

    2008-12-01

    A global model of the atmosphere is presented governed by the shallow water equations and discretized by a Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin method on an unstructured triangular grid. The shallow water equations on the sphere, a two-dimensional surface in R3, are locally represented in terms of spherical triangular coordinates, the appropriate local coordinate mappings on triangles. On every triangular grid element, this leads to a two-dimensional representation of tangential momentum and therefore only two discrete momentum equations. The discontinuous Galerkin method consists of an integral formulation which requires both area (elements) and line (element faces) integrals. Here, we use a Rusanov numerical flux to resolve the discontinuous fluxes at the element faces. A strong stability-preserving third-order Runge-Kutta method is applied for the time discretization. The polynomial space of order k on each curved triangle of the grid is characterized by a Lagrange basis and requires high-order quadature rules for the integration over elements and element faces. For the presented method no mass matrix inversion is necessary, except in a preprocessing step. The validation of the atmospheric model has been done considering standard tests from Williamson et al. [D.L. Williamson, J.B. Drake, J.J. Hack, R. Jakob, P.N. Swarztrauber, A standard test set for numerical approximations to the shallow water equations in spherical geometry, J. Comput. Phys. 102 (1992) 211-224], unsteady analytical solutions of the nonlinear shallow water equations and a barotropic instability caused by an initial perturbation of a jet stream. A convergence rate of O(Δx) was observed in the model experiments. Furthermore, a numerical experiment is presented, for which the third-order time-integration method limits the model error. Thus, the time step Δt is restricted by both the CFL-condition and accuracy demands. Conservation of mass was shown up to machine precision and energy conservation

  17. Comparison of horizontal difference schemes for the shallow water equations on a sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Gary L.; Takano, Kenji; Abramopoulos, Frank

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of horizontal difference schemes used in the hydrodynamics parts of General Circulation Models are compared by means of numerical experiments for the shallow water equations on a sphere. As expected, the phase lag of moving waves decreases as the order of accuracy of a scheme increases or as the grid resolution increases. Overall, Takano and Wurtele's partial fourth order energy and potential enstrophy conserving scheme on the C grid is most accurate. It is clearly superior to the other schemes for the Rossby-Haurwitz wave number 6 initial conditions for coarse grid resolution.

  18. A multigrid solver for semi-implicit global shallow-water models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barros, Saulo R. M.; Dee, Dick P.; Dickstein, Flavio

    1990-01-01

    A multigrid solver is developed for the discretized two-dimensional elliptic equation on the sphere that arises from a semiimplicit time discretization of the global shallow-water equations. Different formulations of the semiimplicit scheme result in variable-coefficient Helmholtz-type equations for which no fast direct solvers are available. The efficiency of the multigrid solver is optimal, in the sense that the total operation count is proportional to the number of unknowns. Numerical experiments using initial data derived from actual 300-mb height and wind velocity fields indicate that the present model has very good accuracy and stability properties.

  19. Using Hough harmonics to validate and assess nonlinear shallow-water models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, Dick P.; Moraes Da Silva, Arlindo

    1986-01-01

    The implementation of a technique for locating programming errors in shallow-water codes, establishing the correctness of the code, and assessing the performance of the numerical model under various flow conditions is described. The right-hand side of the differential equations is modified in such a way that the exact solution of the nonlinear initial-value problem is known, so that the truncation errors of the numerical scheme can be studied in detail. The exact solution is prescribed to be any linear combination of Hough harmonics which propagate in time according to their natural frequencies.

  20. Assessment of Shallow-Water Habitat Availability in Modified Dike Structures, Lower Missouri River, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Johnson, Harold E., III

    2004-01-01

    This study documented the effects of wing-dike notching on the availabilit of shallow water habitat in the Lower Missouri River. Five wing dikes were surveyed in late May 2004 after they were notched in early May as part of shallow-water habitat (SWH) rehabilitation activities undertaken by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Surveys included high-resolution hydroacoustic depth, velocity, and substrate mapping. Relations of bottom elevations within the wing dike fields to index discharges and water-surface elevations indicate that little habitat meeting the SWH definition was created immediately following notching. This result is not unexpected, as significant geomorphic adjustment may require large flow events. Depth, velocity, and substrate measurements in the post-rehabilitation time period provide baseline data for monitoring ongoing changes. Differences in elevation and substrate were noted at all sites. Most dike fields showed substantial aggradation and replacement of mud substrate with sandier sediment, although the changes did not result in increased availability of SWH at the index discharge. It is not known how much of the elevation and substrate changes can be attributed directly to notching and how much would result from normal sediment transport variation.

  1. Exchange of nitrogen and phosphorus between a shallow lagoon and coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayn, Melanie; Howarth, Robert W.; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Berg, Peter; Foreman, Kenneth H.; Giblin, Anne E.; McGlathery, Karen

    2014-01-01

    West Falmouth Harbor, a shallow lagoon on Cape Cod, has experienced a threefold increase in nitrogen load since the mid- to late 1990s due to input from a groundwater plume contaminated by a municipal wastewater treatment plant. We measured the exchange of nitrogen and phosphorus between the harbor and the coastal waters of Buzzards Bay over several years when the harbor was experiencing this elevated nitrogen load. During summer months, the harbor not only retained the entire watershed nitrogen load but also had a net import of nitrogen from Buzzards Bay. During the spring and fall, the harbor had a net export of nitrogen to Buzzards Bay. We did not measure the export in winter, but assuming the winter net export was less than 112 % of the load, the harbor exported less than half of the watershed nitrogen load on an annual basis. For phosphorus, the harbor had a net import from coastal waters in the spring and summer months and a net export in the fall. Despite the large increase in nitrogen load to the harbor, the summertime import of phosphorus from Buzzards Bay was sufficient to maintain nitrogen limitation of primary productivity during the summer. Our findings illustrate that shallow systems dominated by benthic producers have the potential to retain large terrestrial nitrogen loads when there is sufficient supply of phosphorus from exchange with coastal waters.

  2. Microcosm procedure for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities, using laboratory microcosms as test subjects. The safe level is considered to be the maximum exposure that causes no persistent, ecologically significant changes in the ecosystem. In experiments completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, microcosm-derived estimates of safe exposure levels were confirmed using outdoor artificial ponds, which suggests that the microcosm procedure can be an efficient and economical means of determining safe levels for shallow-water communities. Details of microcosm construction, techniques for monitoring ecological variables in microcosms, and an experimental design for determining safe exposure levels are provided here. The microcosms are assembled by transferring components of natural ecosystems to 80-litre aquaria in a controlled laboratory environment. The communities that develop in these systems are typically dominated by common, cosmopolitan littoral species of macrophytes, algae, and invertebrates. Methods are described for measuring changes in water chemistry, phytoplankton, periphyton, macrophytes, zooplankton, and ecosystem production and respiration. By monitoring these variables over a gradient of pollutant exposure levels, the safe level can be determined accurately and precisely. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Unknown object localization and identification in shallow water environment at Lake Balaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Balint; Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Vajda, Ferenc; Vajta, Laszlo; Vogel, Miklos

    2004-11-01

    This paper addresses a particular detection problem related to the largest freshwater lake of Central and Western Europe, namely the Lake Balaton. The bed-silt of this shallow water lake (its average depth is 3.3 meters) contains several type of objects: industrial debris, historical vestiges, and in particular, an unknown quantity of unexploded ordnance from the second World War. It is important to localize and classify these objects for precise risk assessment and eventual later removal (not addressed in the paper). The bed-silt of the lake can be characterized as a mud having a light and constantly changing structure. It follows that the shallow water is almost always mixed with the mud. This admixture is constantly maintained by winds and navigating boats, hence the underwater visibility is close to zero during the most part of the year, especially in the depth range close to the bottom. Since the climate makes it possible, the authors propose a special way to explore the bed-silt of the lake, namely the use an autonomous vehicle on the frozen lake. Note that the ice prevents the wind and navigating boats to generate water movement and thus the mud is sedimented. This autonomous vehicle is equipped with a GPS based onboard localization system, with multiple sensor and recording equipment, and with a radio link to its command post. More details about the nature of objects to be detected as well as about the architecture of the detection and localization system are presented in the paper.

  4. Preliminary Evidence for the Amplification of Global Warming in Shallow, Intertidal Estuarine Waters

    PubMed Central

    Oczkowski, Autumn; McKinney, Richard; Ayvazian, Suzanne; Hanson, Alana; Wigand, Cathleen; Markham, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, mean annual water temperature in northeastern U.S. estuaries has increased by approximately 1.2°C, with most of the warming recorded in the winter and early spring. A recent survey and synthesis of data from four locations in Southern Rhode Island has led us to hypothesize that this warming may be amplified in the shallow (<1 m), nearshore portions of these estuaries. While intertidal areas are not typically selected as locations for long-term monitoring, we compiled data from published literature, theses, and reports that suggest that enhanced warming may be occurring, perhaps at rates three times higher than deeper estuarine waters. Warmer spring waters may be one of the factors influencing biota residing in intertidal regions both in general as well as at our specific sites. We observed greater abundance of fish, and size of Menidia sp., in recent (2010–2012) seine surveys compared to similar collections in 1962. While any linkages are speculative and data are preliminary, taken together they suggest that shallow intertidal portions of estuaries may be important places to look for the effects of climate change. PMID:26510009

  5. The impact of a shallow biobarrier on water recharge patterns in a semi-arid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Laundre, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    This study attempted to measure the effect of a shallow biobarrier of gravel and cobble on water flow patterns during spring snow melt and recharge. The design consisted of 30 metal culverts 3 m in diameter and 1.6 m long, positioned on end. Test culverts contained 50-cm biobarrier of gravel or cobble and then an additional 50 cm of soil placed above the barrier layer. A neutron probe was used to measure soil moisture above and below the barrier. Measurements were made in the fall and again immediately after snow melt in the spring. During recharge, the biobarriers provided a capillary break which resulted in a pooling of water above the barrier layer. With sufficient snowmelt, the water can penetrate the break and possibly penetrate deeper than in the absence of the barrier layer.

  6. Shallow Groundwater and Stream Water Interactions during High Intensity Rain Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    The study was conducted from early May through late July of 2013 in a small suburban watershed, called the Dry Run Creek (DRC), in northeast Iowa. Flooding is considered one of the largest hazards in the United States, causing economic damage in billions of dollars. Investigations across the country have documented dramatic changes in river discharge over the past decades due to an increase in rainfall events. Consequently, many areas in the U.S. have been experiencing flash flood occurrences. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of flash flooding on shallow aquifers and the associated changes in water quality. On May 29, 2.81 inches of rain fell on the watershed from 4:30 to 8 p.m. causing the water level at the selected site to rise from 1.99 ft at 4:15 p.m. to 9.38 ft at 8:45 p.m. The event produced a severe flash flood condition in the creek by releasing discharge that is 562% higher than the average flow rate at the site for that time of the season. The water level eventually exceeded the bankfull stage. A considerable impact of the flood on the shallow aquifer was observed. The hydraulic gradient in the hyporheic zone reversed, resulting in the adjacent shallow groundwater table to rise by 4 ft. Several water quality parameters rapidly changed in values. The water temperature dropped from 11.26 degrees to 10.95 degrees C, and the total dissolved solids went down from 432 ppm to 426 ppm. On the other hand, turbidity went up from 72.4 NTU to 80.4 NTU and the dissolved oxygen (DO) increased from 7.54 ppm to 8.43 ppm. The changes took place within a 4-hour time period. The dramatic rise in water level as well as the increase in DO indicate rapid influx of stream water into the aquifers. The groundwater measurements were taken in a well that was 45 feet away from the creek. The aquifer response of this nature indicates that the hyporheic zone alongside the creek is much wider than expected for this small watershed. Wide and active hyporheic zones

  7. A 3-D implicit finite-volume model of shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiming; Lin, Qianru

    2015-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) model has been developed to simulate shallow water flows in large water bodies, such as coastal and estuarine waters. The eddy viscosity is determined using a newly modified mixing length model that uses different mixing length functions for the horizontal and vertical shear strain rates. The 3-D shallow water flow equations with the hydrostatic pressure assumption are solved using an implicit finite-volume method based on a quadtree (telescoping) rectangular mesh on the horizontal plane and the sigma coordinate in the vertical direction. The quadtree technique can locally refine the mesh around structures or in high-gradient regions by splitting a coarse cell into four child cells. The grid nodes are numbered with a one-dimensional index system that has unstructured grid feature for better grid flexibility. All the primary variables are arranged in a non-staggered grid system. Fluxes at cell faces are determined using a Rhie and Chow-type momentum interpolation, to avoid the possible spurious checkerboard oscillations caused by linear interpolation. Each of the discretized governing equations is solved iteratively using the flexible GMRES method with ILUT preconditioning, and coupling of water level and velocity among these equations is achieved by using the SIMPLEC algorithm with under-relaxation. The model has been tested in four cases, including steady flow near a spur-dyke, tidal flows in San Francisco Bay and Gironde Estuary, and wind-induced current in a flume. The calculated water levels and velocities are in good agreement with the measured values.

  8. Antecedent conditions control carbon loss and downstream water quality from shallow, damaged peatlands.

    PubMed

    Grand-Clement, E; Luscombe, D J; Anderson, K; Gatis, N; Benaud, P; Brazier, R E

    2014-09-15

    Losses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from drained peatlands are of concern, due to the effects this has on the delivery of ecosystem services, and especially on the long-term store of carbon and the provision of drinking water. Most studies have looked at the effect of drainage in deep peat; comparatively, little is known about the behaviour of shallow, climatically marginal peatlands. This study examines water quality (DOC, Abs(400), pH, E4/E6 and C/C) during rainfall events from such environments in the south west UK, in order to both quantify DOC losses, and understand their potential for restoration. Water samples were taken over a 19 month period from a range of drains within two different experimental catchments in Exmoor National Park; data were analysed on an event basis. DOC concentrations ranging between 4 and 21 mg L(-1) are substantially lower than measurements in deep peat, but remain problematic for the water treatment process. Dryness plays a critical role in controlling DOC concentrations and water quality, as observed through spatial and seasonal differences. Long-term changes in depth to water table (30 days before the event) are likely to impact on DOC production, whereas discharge becomes the main control over DOC transport at the time scale of the rainfall/runoff event. The role of temperature during events is attributed to an increase in the diffusion of DOC, and therefore its transport. Humification ratios (E4/E6) consistently below 5 indicate a predominance of complex humic acids, but increased decomposition during warmer summer months leads to a comparatively higher losses of fulvic acids. This work represents a significant contribution to the scientific understanding of the behaviour and functioning of shallow damaged peatlands in climatically marginal locations. The findings also provide a sound baseline knowledge to support research into the effects of landscape restoration in the future. PMID:25010944

  9. Study of dilution, height, and lateral spread of vertical dense jets in marine shallow water.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nadeem; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    This study provides information for the design of sea outfalls to dispose of brine from desalination plants into shallow lagoons of the sea. The behavior of vertical dense jets was studied experimentally by discharging cold saline water vertically upward into a tank filled with hot freshwater under stagnant ambient conditions. The minimum return point dilution, μmin, was determined using thermocouples, and the maximum height, Z(m), and the lateral spread, R(sp), of the fountains were determined by observing shadowgraph pictures. The flow was turbulent and the densimetric Froude number Fr(0) varied from 9 to 18.8. Three mixing regimes were identified: deep, intermediate, and impinging mixing regimes. In the intermediate mixing regime, μ(min) and Z(m) were analyzed and compared with the results of deep water studies. The μ(min) and Z(m) values of fountains at an intermediate water depth were found to be higher than those of fountains at deep water depths. In the impinging regime, μ(min) decreases rapidly when a fountain starts to continuously impinge on the water surface, showing a noticeable disturbance in the water surface. Therefore, a good rule of thumb is to reduce the flow through multiport diffusers from desalination plants when the noticeable disturbance is observed from the top water surface. PMID:27332845

  10. Impacts of ocean acidification on sediment processes in shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gazeau, Frédéric; van Rijswijk, Pieter; Pozzato, Lara; Middelburg, Jack J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer waters, acidification rates in these areas are faster than those in sub-tropical regions. The present study investigates the effects of ocean acidification on sediment composition, processes and sediment-water fluxes in an Arctic coastal system. Undisturbed sediment cores, exempt of large dwelling organisms, were collected, incubated for a period of 14 days, and subject to a gradient of pCO2 covering the range of values projected for the end of the century. On five occasions during the experimental period, the sediment cores were isolated for flux measurements (oxygen, alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate and silicate). At the end of the experimental period, denitrification rates were measured and sediment samples were taken at several depth intervals for solid-phase analyses. Most of the parameters and processes (i.e. mineralization, denitrification) investigated showed no relationship with the overlying seawater pH, suggesting that ocean acidification will have limited impacts on the microbial activity and associated sediment-water fluxes on Arctic shelves, in the absence of active bio-irrigating organisms. Only following a pH decrease of 1 pH unit, not foreseen in the coming 300 years, significant enhancements of calcium carbonate dissolution and anammox rates were observed. Longer-term experiments on different sediment types are still required to confirm the limited impact of ocean acidification on shallow Arctic sediment processes as observed in this study. PMID:24718610

  11. Shallow-water habitat use by Bering Sea flatfishes along the central Alaska Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Thomas P.

    2016-05-01

    Flatfishes support a number of important fisheries in Alaskan waters and represent major pathways of energy flow through the ecosystem. Despite their economic and ecological importance, little is known about the use of habitat by juvenile flatfishes in the eastern Bering Sea. This study describes the habitat characteristics of juvenile flatfishes in coastal waters along the Alaska Peninsula and within the Port Moller-Herendeen Bay system, the largest marine embayment in the southern Bering Sea. The two most abundant species, northern rock sole and yellowfin sole, differed slightly in habitat use with the latter occupying slightly muddier substrates. Both were more common along the open coastline than they were within the bay, whereas juvenile Alaska plaice were more abundant within the bay than along the coast and used shallow waters with muddy, high organic content sediments. Juvenile Pacific halibut showed the greatest shift in distribution between age classes: age-0 fish were found in deeper waters (~ 30 m) along the coast, whereas older juveniles were found in the warmer, shallow waters within the bay, possibly due to increased thermal opportunities for growth in this temperature-sensitive species. Three other species, starry flounder, flathead sole, and arrowtooth flounder, were also present, but at much lower densities. In addition, the habitat use patterns of spring-spawning flatfishes (northern rock sole, Pacific halibut, and Alaska plaice) in this region appear to be strongly influenced by oceanographic processes that influence delivery of larvae to coastal habitats. Overall, use of the coastal embayment habitats appears to be less important to juvenile flatfishes in the Bering Sea than in the Gulf of Alaska.

  12. Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Sediment Processes in Shallow Waters of the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Gazeau, Frédéric; van Rijswijk, Pieter; Pozzato, Lara; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer waters, acidification rates in these areas are faster than those in sub-tropical regions. The present study investigates the effects of ocean acidification on sediment composition, processes and sediment-water fluxes in an Arctic coastal system. Undisturbed sediment cores, exempt of large dwelling organisms, were collected, incubated for a period of 14 days, and subject to a gradient of pCO2 covering the range of values projected for the end of the century. On five occasions during the experimental period, the sediment cores were isolated for flux measurements (oxygen, alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate and silicate). At the end of the experimental period, denitrification rates were measured and sediment samples were taken at several depth intervals for solid-phase analyses. Most of the parameters and processes (i.e. mineralization, denitrification) investigated showed no relationship with the overlying seawater pH, suggesting that ocean acidification will have limited impacts on the microbial activity and associated sediment-water fluxes on Arctic shelves, in the absence of active bio-irrigating organisms. Only following a pH decrease of 1 pH unit, not foreseen in the coming 300 years, significant enhancements of calcium carbonate dissolution and anammox rates were observed. Longer-term experiments on different sediment types are still required to confirm the limited impact of ocean acidification on shallow Arctic sediment processes as observed in this study. PMID:24718610

  13. The Potential for Lithoautotrophic Life on Mars: Application to Shallow Interfacial Water Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Steven M.; Priscu, John C.; Grimm, Robert E.; Bullock, Mark A.

    2007-05-01

    We developed a numerical model to assess the lithoautotrophic habitability of Mars based on metabolic energy, nutrients, water availability, and temperature. Available metabolic energy and nutrient sources were based on a laboratory-produced Mars-analog inorganic chemistry. For this specific reference chemistry, the most efficient lithoautotrophic microorganisms would use Fe2+ as a primary metabolic electron donor and NO3- or gaseous O2 as a terminal electron acceptor. In a closed model system, biomass production was limited by the electron donor Fe2+ and metabolically required P, and typically amounted to ~800 pg of dry biomass/ml (~8,500 cells/ml). Continued growth requires propagation of microbes to new fecund environments, delivery of fresh pore fluid, or continued reaction with the host material. Within the shallow cryosphere-where oxygen can be accessed by microbes and microbes can be accessed by exploration-lithoautotrophs can function within as little as three monolayers of interfacial water formed either by adsorption from the atmosphere or in regions of ice stability where temperatures are within some tens of degrees of the ice melting point. For the selected reference host material (shergottite analog) and associated inorganic fluid chemistry, complete local reaction of the host material potentially yields a time-integrated biomass of ~0.1 mg of dry biomass/g of host material (~109 cells/g). Biomass could also be sustained where solutes can be delivered by advection (cryosuction) or diffusion in interfacial water; however, both of these processes are relatively inefficient. Lithoautotrophs in near-surface thin films of water, therefore, would optimize their metabolism by deriving energy and nutrients locally. Although the selected chemistry and associated model output indicate that lithoautotrophic microbial biomass could accrue within shallow interfacial water on Mars, it is likely that these organisms would spend long periods in maintenance or survival

  14. A high-order conservative collocation scheme and its application to global shallow-water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Li, X.; Shen, X.; Xiao, F.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, an efficient and conservative collocation method is proposed and used to develop a global shallow-water model. Being a nodal type high-order scheme, the present method solves the pointwise values of dependent variables as the unknowns within each control volume. The solution points are arranged as Gauss-Legendre points to achieve high-order accuracy. The time evolution equations to update the unknowns are derived under the flux reconstruction (FR) framework (Huynh, 2007). Constraint conditions used to build the spatial reconstruction for the flux function include the pointwise values of flux function at the solution points, which are computed directly from the dependent variables, as well as the numerical fluxes at the boundaries of the computational element, which are obtained as Riemann solutions between the adjacent elements. Given the reconstructed flux function, the time tendencies of the unknowns can be obtained directly from the governing equations of differential form. The resulting schemes have super convergence and rigorous numerical conservativeness. A three-point scheme of fifth-order accuracy is presented and analyzed in this paper. The proposed scheme is adopted to develop the global shallow-water model on the cubed-sphere grid, where the local high-order reconstruction is very beneficial for the data communications between adjacent patches. We have used the standard benchmark tests to verify the numerical model, which reveals its great potential as a candidate formulation for developing high-performance general circulation models.

  15. Occurrence of Pharmaceuticals in Shallow Ground-Water of Suffolk County, New York, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benotti, Mark J.; Fisher, Shawn; Terracciano, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Seventy (70) water samples were collected from 61 wells in the upper glacial and Magothy aquifers (9 wells were sampled twice) during 2002-05 and analyzed for 24 pharmaceuticals. Wells were selected for their proximity to known wastewater-treatment facilities that discharge to the shallow upper glacial aquifer. Pharmaceuticals were detected in 28 of the 70 samples, 19 of which contained one compound, and 9 of which contained two or more compounds. Concentrations of detected compounds were extremely low; most ranged from 0.001 to 0.1 microgram per liter (part per billion). The two most commonly detected compounds were carbamazepine (an antiepileptic drug) and sulfamethoxazole (an antibiotic). Occurrence of pharmaceutical compounds in Suffolk County ground-water is less prevalent than in susceptible streams of the United States that were tested in 1998-2000, but the similarity of median concentrations of the detected compounds of the two data sets indicates that current wastewater practices can serve to introduce pharmaceuticals to this shallow aquifer.

  16. Shallow water acoustic response and platform motion modeling via a hierarchical Gaussian mixture model.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    A hierarchical Gaussian mixture model is proposed to characterize shallow water acoustic response functions that are time-varying and sparse. The mixture model is based on the assumption that acoustic paths can be partitioned into two sets. The first is a relatively coherent set of arrivals that on average exhibit Doppler spreading about a mean Doppler and the remaining set is of multiple surface scattered paths that exhibit a spectrally flat Doppler. The hierarchy establishes constraints on the parameters of each of these Gaussian models such that coherent components of the response are both sparse and in the ensemble obey the Doppler spread profile. This is accomplished with a Bernoulli model that indicates the ensonification state of each element in the bi-frequency representation of the acoustic response function. Estimators of the time-varying acoustic response for the full duration of a broadband transmission are developed and employed to compensate for the shared time-varying dilation process among the coherent arrivals. The approach ameliorates response coherence degradation and can be employed to enhance coherent multi-path combining and is a useful alternative to time recursive estimation. The model is tested with acoustic communication recordings taken in shallow water at low signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:27106339

  17. Coherent reverberation model based on adiabatic normal mode theory in a range dependent shallow water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenglin; Zhang, Renhe; Li, Fenghua

    2010-09-01

    Ocean reverberation in shallow water is often the predominant background interference in active sonar applications. It is still an open problem in underwater acoustics. In recent years, an oscillation phenomenon of the reverberation intensity, due to the interference of the normal modes, has been observed in many experiments. A coherent reverberation theory has been developed and used to explain this oscillation phenomenon [F. Li et al., Journal of Sound and Vibration, 252(3), 457-468, 2002]. However, the published coherent reverberation theory is for the range independent environment. Following the derivations by F. Li and Ellis [D. D. Ellis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 97(5), 2804-2814, 1995], a general reverberation model based on the adiabatic normal mode theory in a range dependent shallow water environment is presented. From this theory the coherent or incoherent reverberation field caused by sediment inhomogeneity and surface roughness can be predicted. Observations of reverberation from the 2001 Asian Sea International Acoustic Experiment (ASIAEX) in the East China Sea are used to test the model. Model/data comparison shows that the coherent reverberation model can predict the experimental oscillation phenomenon of reverberation intensity and the vertical correlation of reverberation very well.

  18. Effect of tidal internal wave fields on shallow water acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ju; Wang, Huan; Sun, Junping

    2010-09-01

    Internal waves are one of the most pronounced oceanic phenomenons to the oceanographer. During past decades much effort has been made to investigate the effect of internal waves on shallow water acoustic propagation. Even though many field observations, such as SWARM '95, have provided fruitful information about the relation between internal waves and acoustic propagation, it is necessary to conduct more numerical simulations due to their extensive feasibility. In this study, the shallow water internal wave environment is constructed by using a non-hydrostatic ocean model, the open boundary forcing is set by considering single or several internal wave modes at the M2 tidal frequency. In order to show the mode coupling caused by the internal wave field more clearly, the acoustic starting field with different single normal modes is adopted. The acoustic simulation can be used to check whether a specific combination of internal wave modes is related to the mode coupling, and which mode pair will be affected. The combination of internal wave modes can be separated into several groups. Even though the internal wave fields are different among every case in each group, the acoustic field structure and the mode coupling are similar. Different acoustic normal mode coupling occurs due to the different combinations of internal wave mode forcing. When the parameters of internal wave mode are modified gently, the acoustic mode coupling becomes quite different. It is interesting and important to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic fields to the variability of the internal mode combination.

  19. Modeling of the Water Surface Variation Driven By Local Winds at an Shallow Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Yun, S. L.; Oh, H. C.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, J.

    2014-12-01

    A three-dimensional ocean circulation model was applied to a shallow estuary, Mobile Bay, to study local wind setup and setdown. Tides started from the northern Gulf of Mexico propagates up to the Mobile River system which is located in the north of the Mobile Bay. However, the tides started in the south of Mobile Bay were distorted when travelling upstream while affected by river discharge and local winds. The water surface elevation was less/over predicted responding north/south winds, respectively, when winds only at the Dauphin Island station (DPI) were used. However, the model predicted water surface elevation better when using two local winds from DPI and Mobile Downtown Airport (MDA). Wind speeds were greatly reduced (~ 88 %) in about 43 km distance between DPI and MDA, and the canopy effects may be the reason for this. For this reason, the local winds are greatly responsible for local surface elevation setup and setdown especially at the shallow estuary like Mobile Bay.

  20. Shallow water processes govern system-wide phytoplankton bloom dynamics: A modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, L.V.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Thompson, J.K.

    2009-01-01

    A pseudo-two-dimensional numerical model of estuarine phytoplankton growth and consumption, vertical turbulent mixing, and idealized cross-estuary transport was developed and applied to South San Francisco Bay. This estuary has two bathymetrically distinct habitat types (deep channel, shallow shoal) and associated differences in local net rates of phytoplankton growth and consumption, as well as differences in the water column's tendency to stratify. Because many physical and biological time scales relevant to algal population dynamics decrease with decreasing depth, process rates can be especially fast in the shallow water. We used the model to explore the potential significance of hydrodynamic connectivity between a channel and shoal and whether lateral transport can allow physical or biological processes (e.g. stratification, benthic grazing, light attenuation) in one sub-region to control phytoplankton biomass and bloom development in the adjacent sub-region. Model results for South San Francisco Bay suggest that lateral transport from a productive shoal can result in phytoplankton biomass accumulation in an adjacent deep, unproductive channel. The model further suggests that turbidity and benthic grazing in the shoal can control the occurrence of a bloom system-wide; whereas, turbidity, benthic grazing, and vertical density stratification in the channel are likely to only control local bloom occurrence or modify system-wide bloom magnitude. Measurements from a related field program are generally consistent with model-derived conclusions. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  1. A standard test set for numerical approximations to the shallow water equations in spherical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, D.L.; Hack, J.J.; Jakob, R.; Swarztrauber, P.N. ); Drake, J.B. )

    1991-08-01

    A suite of seven test cases is proposed for the evaluation of numerical methods intended for the solution of the shallow water equations in spherical geometry. The shallow water equations exhibit the major difficulties associated with the horizontal dynamical aspects of atmospheric modeling on the spherical earth. These cases are designed for use in the evaluation of numerical methods proposed for climate modeling and to identify the potential trade-offs which must always be made in numerical modeling. Before a proposed scheme is applied to a full baroclinic atmospheric model it must perform well on these problems in comparison with other currently accepted numerical methods. The cases are presented in order of complexity. They consist of advection across the poles, steady state geostrophically balanced flow of both global and local scales, forced nonlinear advection of an isolated low, zonal flow impinging on an isolated mountain, Rossby-Haurwitz waves and observed atmospheric states. One of the cases is also identified as a computer performance/algorithm efficiency benchmark for assessing the performance of algorithms adapted to massively parallel computers. 31 refs.

  2. Tools to Perform Local Dense 3D Reconstruction of Shallow Water Seabed.

    PubMed

    Avanthey, Loïca; Beaudoin, Laurent; Gademer, Antoine; Roux, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Tasks such as distinguishing or identifying individual objects of interest require the production of dense local clouds at the scale of these individual objects of interest. Due to the physical and dynamic properties of an underwater environment, the usual dense matching algorithms must be rethought in order to be adaptive. These properties also imply that the scene must be observed at close range. Classic robotized acquisition systems are oversized for local studies in shallow water while the systematic acquisition of data is not guaranteed with divers. We address these two major issues through a multidisciplinary approach. To efficiently acquire on-demand stereoscopic pairs using simple logistics in small areas of shallow water, we devised an agile light-weight dedicated system which is easy to reproduce. To densely match two views in a reliable way, we devised a reconstruction algorithm that automatically accounts for the dynamics, variability and light absorption of the underwater environment. Field experiments in the Mediterranean Sea were used to assess the results. PMID:27196913

  3. Water content and nature of solutes in shallow-mantle fluids from fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria Luce; Ferrando, Simona; Tecce, Francesca; Castelli, Daniele

    2012-10-01

    This study discusses new and published data on the composition of fluid inclusions contained in mantle minerals of spinel and garnet peridotite xenoliths, in samples from geodynamically distinct settings (Ethiopian plateau, Hawaii, Canary Islands, and western Mediterranean region). Based on spectroscopic Raman and FTIR analyses we show that, contrary to a commonly held view, fluid inclusions either contain relevant amounts of unsuspected H2O, or represent a "dehydrated" composition from multicomponent aqueo-carbonic fluids. We identify water loss from fluid inclusions through decrepitation, stretching and hydrogen diffusion. We also show that talc, magnesite, chlorides, and sulfates represent common phases in fluid inclusions. Talc and magnesite form through reactions of fluids with the surrounding minerals. Thermodynamic modeling in the MFSHC system of observed reactions between fluid inclusions and surrounding mantle minerals provides the basis for predicting water amounts in shallow-mantle fluids, and suggests X in the range of 10-50 mol%. Model hydrous fluids are relatively enriched solutions, dominated by Si, Cl, and alkalies, with significant amounts of Ca, and S, and low levels of Mg and Fe. This study argues that multicomponent hydrous fluids may be widespread in the shallow mantle, not only in subduction zones but also in intraplate and extensional settings.

  4. Integral formulation of shallow-water equations with anisotropic porosity for urban flood modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Brett F.; Schubert, Jochen E.; Gallegos, Humberto A.

    2008-11-01

    SummaryAn integral form of the shallow-water equations suitable for urban flood modeling is derived by applying Reynolds transport theorem to a finite control volume encompassing buildings on a flood plain. The effect of buildings on storage and conveyance is modeled with a binary density function i(x,y) that equals unity when (x,y) corresponds to a void, and nil otherwise, and can be measured using remote sensing data such as classified aerial imagery; the effect of buildings on flow resistance is modeled with a drag formulation. Discrete equations are obtained by applying the integral equations to a computational cell and adopting a Godunov-type, piecewise linear distribution of flow variables. The discrete equations include a volumetric porosity ϕ that represents the integral of i over the cell, normalized by the cell area, and an areal porosity ψ that represents the integral of i over an edge of the mesh, normalized by the edge length. The latter is directionally dependent which introduces anisotropy to the shallow-water equations and captures sub-grid preferential flow directions which occur in urban settings due to asymmetric building shapes and spacings and the alignment of buildings along streets. A important implication is that model predictions are necessarily grid dependent; therefore, a mesh design strategy is proposed. First- and second-order accurate numerical methods are presented to solve the discrete equations, and applications are shown for verification and validation purposes including the ability of the model to resolve preferential flow directions.

  5. Analysis of spurious oscillation modes for the shallow water and Navier-Stokes equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Carey, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    The origin and nature of spurious oscillation modes that appear in mixed finite element methods are examined. In particular, the shallow water equations are considered and a modal analysis for the one-dimensional problem is developed. From the resulting dispersion relations we find that the spurious modes in elevation are associated with zero frequency and large wave number (wavelengths of the order of the nodal spacing) and consequently are zero-velocity modes. The spurious modal behavior is the result of the finite spatial discretization. By means of an artificial compressibility and limiting argument we are able to resolve the similar problem for the Navier-Stokes equations. The relationship of this simpler analysis to alternative consistency arguments is explained. This modal approach provides an explanation of the phenomenon in question and permits us to deduce the cause of the very complex behavior of spurious modes observed in numerical experiments with the shallow water equations and Navier-Stokes equations. Furthermore, this analysis is not limited to finite element formulations, but is also applicable to finite difference formulations. ?? 1983.

  6. Parallel iterative solution for h and p approximations of the shallow water equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barragy, E.J.; Walters, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    A p finite element scheme and parallel iterative solver are introduced for a modified form of the shallow water equations. The governing equations are the three-dimensional shallow water equations. After a harmonic decomposition in time and rearrangement, the resulting equations are a complex Helmholz problem for surface elevation, and a complex momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. Both equations are nonlinear and the resulting system is solved using the Picard iteration combined with a preconditioned biconjugate gradient (PBCG) method for the linearized subproblems. A subdomain-based parallel preconditioner is developed which uses incomplete LU factorization with thresholding (ILUT) methods within subdomains, overlapping ILUT factorizations for subdomain boundaries and under-relaxed iteration for the resulting block system. The method builds on techniques successfully applied to linear elements by introducing ordering and condensation techniques to handle uniform p refinement. The combined methods show good performance for a range of p (element order), h (element size), and N (number of processors). Performance and scalability results are presented for a field scale problem where up to 512 processors are used. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A finite element method for solving the shallow water equations on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comblen, Richard; Legrand, Sébastien; Deleersnijder, Eric; Legat, Vincent

    Within the framework of ocean general circulation modeling, the present paper describes an efficient way to discretize partial differential equations on curved surfaces by means of the finite element method on triangular meshes. Our approach benefits from the inherent flexibility of the finite element method. The key idea consists in a dialog between a local coordinate system defined for each element in which integration takes place, and a nodal coordinate system in which all local contributions related to a vectorial degree of freedom are assembled. Since each element of the mesh and each degree of freedom are treated in the same way, the so-called pole singularity issue is fully circumvented. Applied to the shallow water equations expressed in primitive variables, this new approach has been validated against the standard test set defined by [Williamson, D.L., Drake, J.B., Hack, J.J., Jakob, R., Swarztrauber, P.N., 1992. A standard test set for numerical approximations to the shallow water equations in spherical geometry. Journal of Computational Physics 102, 211-224]. Optimal rates of convergence for the P1NC-P1 finite element pair are obtained, for both global and local quantities of interest. Finally, the approach can be extended to three-dimensional thin-layer flows in a straightforward manner.

  8. Modelling rapid mass movements using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, S.; Robl, J.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new method to model rapid mass movements on complex topography using the shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates. These equations are the widely used standard approximation for the flow of water in rivers and shallow lakes, but the main prerequisite for their application - an almost horizontal fluid table - is in general not satisfied for avalanches and debris flows in steep terrain. Therefore, we have developed appropriate correction terms for large topographic gradients. In this study we present the mathematical formulation of these correction terms and their implementation in the open-source flow solver GERRIS. This novel approach is evaluated by simulating avalanches on synthetic and finally natural topographies and the widely used Voellmy flow resistance law. Testing the results against analytical solutions and the proprietary avalanche model RAMMS, we found a very good agreement. As the GERRIS flow solver is freely available and open source, it can be easily extended by additional fluid models or source areas, making this model suitable for simulating several types of rapid mass movements. It therefore provides a valuable tool for assisting regional-scale natural hazard studies.

  9. Numerical simulations of dynamic coupling between shallow-water sloshing and horizontal vessel motion with baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemi Ardakani, H.; Turner, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The coupled motion between shallow water sloshing in a moving vessel with baffles and the vessel dynamics is considered. Here the vessel dynamics is restricted to horizontal motion such as in tuned liquid dampers. It was shown by (Turner et al 2013 Phys. Fluids 25 112102) that partitioning a moving vessel into n separate compartments leads to an interesting dynamical behaviour of the system. Also, under particular input parameter values an internal (n+1)-fold 1:\\cdots :1 resonance can be generated, where the frequency of the sloshing fluid in each compartment is equal, and equal to the frequency of the vessel itself. Here the form of the sloshing eigenmodes at this resonance are derived in the shallow-water limit. Using the Lagrangian formulation of the problem, an efficient numerical algorithm is implemented to solve the fully nonlinear system of equations based on the implicit midpoint rule. This algorithm is simple, fast and maintains the energy partition between the vessel and the fluid over long times. In this work numerical results are presented for dynamical vessel/sloshing motion attached to a nonlinear spring.

  10. Semi-implicit finite difference methods for three-dimensional shallow water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, Vincenzo; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1992-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite difference method for the numerical solution of three-dimensional shallow water flows is presented and discussed. The governing equations are the primitive three-dimensional turbulent mean flow equations where the pressure distribution in the vertical has been assumed to be hydrostatic. In the method of solution a minimal degree of implicitness has been adopted in such a fashion that the resulting algorithm is stable and gives a maximal computational efficiency at a minimal computational cost. At each time step the numerical method requires the solution of one large linear system which can be formally decomposed into a set of small three-diagonal systems coupled with one five-diagonal system. All these linear systems are symmetric and positive definite. Thus the existence and uniquencess of the numerical solution are assured. When only one vertical layer is specified, this method reduces as a special case to a semi-implicit scheme for solving the corresponding two-dimensional shallow water equations. The resulting two- and three-dimensional algorithm has been shown to be fast, accurate and mass-conservative and can also be applied to simulate flooding and drying of tidal mud-flats in conjunction with three-dimensional flows. Furthermore, the resulting algorithm is fully vectorizable for an efficient implementation on modern vector computers.

  11. Parallel iterative solution for h and p approximations of the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragy, E. J.; Walters, R. A.

    A p finite element scheme and parallel iterative solver are introduced for a modified form of the shallow water equations. The governing equations are the three-dimensional shallow water equations. After a harmonic decomposition in time and rearrangement, the resulting equations are a complex Helmholz problem for surface elevation, and a complex momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. Both equations are nonlinear and the resulting system is solved using the Picard iteration combined with a preconditioned biconjugate gradient (PBCG) method for the linearized subproblems. A subdomain-based parallel preconditioner is developed which uses incomplete LU factorization with thresholding (ILUT) methods within subdomains, overlapping ILUT factorizations for subdomain boundaries and under-relaxed iteration for the resulting block system. The method builds on techniques successfully applied to linear elements by introducing ordering and condensation techniques to handle uniform p refinement. The combined methods show good performance for a range of p (element order), h (element size), and N (number of processors). Performance and scalability results are presented for a field scale problem where up to 512 processors are used.

  12. Tools to Perform Local Dense 3D Reconstruction of Shallow Water Seabed ‡

    PubMed Central

    Avanthey, Loïca; Beaudoin, Laurent; Gademer, Antoine; Roux, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Tasks such as distinguishing or identifying individual objects of interest require the production of dense local clouds at the scale of these individual objects of interest. Due to the physical and dynamic properties of an underwater environment, the usual dense matching algorithms must be rethought in order to be adaptive. These properties also imply that the scene must be observed at close range. Classic robotized acquisition systems are oversized for local studies in shallow water while the systematic acquisition of data is not guaranteed with divers. We address these two major issues through a multidisciplinary approach. To efficiently acquire on-demand stereoscopic pairs using simple logistics in small areas of shallow water, we devised an agile light-weight dedicated system which is easy to reproduce. To densely match two views in a reliable way, we devised a reconstruction algorithm that automatically accounts for the dynamics, variability and light absorption of the underwater environment. Field experiments in the Mediterranean Sea were used to assess the results. PMID:27196913

  13. Seafloor bathymetry in deep and shallow water marine CSEM responses of Nigerian Niger Delta oil field: Effects and corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folorunso, Adetayo Femi; Li, Yuguo

    2015-12-01

    Topography distortions in bathymetrically acquired marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic (mCSEM) responses are capable of misleading interpretation to the presence or absence of the target if not corrected for. For this reason, the effects and correction of bathymetry distortions on the deep and shallow seafloor mCSEM responses of the Niger Delta Oil province were examined in this paper. Marine CSEM response of the Niger Delta geological structure was modelled by using a 2.5D adaptive finite element forward modelling code. In both the deep water and shallow water cases, the bathymetry distortions in the electric field amplitude and phase were found to get smaller with increasing Tx-Rx offsets and contain short-wavelength components in the amplitude curves which persist at all Tx-Rx offsets. In the deep water, topographic effects on the reservoir signatures are not significant, but as water depth reduces, bathymetric distortions become more significant as a result of the airwave effects, masking the target signatures. The correction technique produces a good agreement between the flat-seafloor reservoir model and its equivalent bathymetric model in deep water at 0.25 Hz, while in shallow water, the corrected response only shows good agreement at shorter offsets but becomes complicated at longer offsets due to airwave effects. Transmission frequency was extended above and below 0.25 Hz in the frequency spectrum and the correction method applied. The bathymetry correction at higher frequency (1.75 Hz) is not effective in removing the topographic effects in either deep or shallow water. At 0.05 Hz for both seafloor scenarios, we obtained the best corrected amplitude profiles, removing completely the distortions from both topographic undulation and airwave effects in the shallow water model. Overall, the work shows that the correction technique is effective in reducing bathymetric effects in deep water at medium frequency and in both deep and shallow waters at a low

  14. Potential of a novel airborne hydrographic laser scanner for capturing shallow water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandlburger, G.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Steinbacher, F.; Pfeifer, N.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we present the general design of a hydrographic laser scanner (prototype instrument) manufactured by the company Riegl Laser Measurement Systems in cooperation with the University of Innsbruck, Unit of Hydraulic Engineering. The instrument utilizes very short laser pulses (1 ns) in the green wavelength domain (λ=532 nm) capable of penetrating the water column. The backscattered signal is digitized in a waveform recorder at high frequency enabling sophisticated waveform processing, both, online during the flight and in post processing. In combination with a traditional topographic airborne laser scanner (λ=1500 nm) mounted on the same platform a complete hydrographic and topographic survey of the riparian foreland, the water surface and river bed can be carried out in a single campaign. In contrast to existing bathymetric LiDAR systems, the presented system uses only medium pulse energy but a high pulse repetition rate of up to 250 kHz and, thus, focuses on a detailed description of shallow water bodies under clear water conditions. Different potential fields of applications of the instrument (hydraulic modelling, hydro-morphology, hydro-biology, ecology, river restoration and monitoring) are discussed and the results of first real-world test flights in Austria and Germany are presented. It is shown that: (i) the high pulse repetition rate enables a point density on the ground of the water body of 10-20 pts/m2, (ii) the short laser pulses together with waveform processing enable a discrimination between water and ground reflections at a water depth of less than 25 cm, (iii) the combination of a topographic and hydrographic laser scanner enable the acquisition of the geometry data for hydraulic modeling in a single survey, thus, providing a much more homogeneous data basis compared to traditional techniques, and (iv) the high point density and the ranging accuracy of less than 10 cm enable a detailed and precise description of the river bed

  15. CO2-induced small water solubility in olivine and implications for properties of the shallow mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhi; Liu, Dingding; Xia, Qunke

    2014-10-01

    H2O and CO2 are important components of fluids in the mantle at ∼30-150 km depth, and may affect strongly water dissolution in nominally anhydrous olivine; however, available experimental hydrogenation of olivine has been nearly exclusively carried out in coexistence with H2O (CO2-free). In this study, the effect of CO2 on water solubility in olivine has been investigated by H-annealing natural olivine under peridotite- and fluid-saturated conditions. Experiments were conducted at 1.5-5 GPa and 1100-1300 °C, with oxygen fugacity controlled by Ni-NiO and with either H2O or H2O-CO2 as buffering fluid. The olivine shows no change in composition during the experiments. The infrared spectra of the hydrated olivine are characterized by prominent OH bands from ∼3650 to 3000 cm in all the runs, at both high frequency (>3450 cm) and low frequency (<3450 cm), and the H2O solubility is ∼120-370 ppm for the olivine in coexisting with H2O, and ∼65-180 ppm for the olivine in coexisting with H2O-CO2. When CO2 is present in the buffering fluid, the H2O solubility of olivine is reduced by a factor of ∼2, due to effect on the partitioning of water between minerals and coexisting fluid, and the measured H2O solubility shows independence on fluid composition (the molar ratio of CO2 to CO2 + H2O at ∼0.2-0.5) given pressure, temperature and oxygen fugacity. Olivine equilibrated in the shallow mantle is probably dominated by OH groups in the wavenumber ∼3650-3000 cm, and the intensity of OH bands at low frequency may be higher than or comparable to those at higher frequencies. The storage capacity of water in the shallow mantle in previous estimates may have been overestimated by a factor of at least ∼4 if the observed effect of CO2 on water solubility is correct. Our results have profound influence on understanding partial melting, electrical conductivity anomalies and metasomatism in the shallow mantle.

  16. A Vorticity-Divergence Global Semi-Lagrangian Spectral Model for the Shallow Water Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, JB

    2001-11-30

    The shallow water equations modeling flow on a sphere are useful for the development and testing of numerical algorithms for atmospheric climate and weather models. A new formulation of the shallow water equations is derived which exhibits an advective form for the vorticity and divergence. This form is particularly well suited for numerical computations using a semi-Lagrangian spectral discretization. A set of test problems, standard for the shallow water equations on a sphere, are solved and results compared with an Eulerian spectral model. The semi-Lagrangian transport method was introduced into atmospheric modeling by Robert, Henderson, and Turnbull. A formulation based on a three time level integration scheme in conjunction with a finite difference spatial discretization was studied by Ritchie. Two time level grid point schemes were derived by Bates et al. Staniforth and Cote survey developments of the application of semi-Lagrangian transport (SLT) methods for shallow water models and for numerical weather prediction. The spectral (or spherical harmonic transform) method when combined with a SLT method is particularly effective because it allows for long time steps avoiding the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) restriction of Eulerian methods, while retaining accurate (spectral) treatment of the spatial derivatives. A semi-implicit, semi-Lagrangian formulation with spectral spatial discretization is very effective because the Helmholz problem arising from the semi-implicit time integration can be solved cheaply in the course of the spherical harmonic transform. The combination of spectral, semi-Lagrangian transport with a semi-implicit time integration schemes was first proposed by Ritchie. A advective formulation using vorticity and divergence was introduced by Williamson and Olson. They introduce the vorticity and divergence after the application of the semi-Lagrangian discretization. The semi-Lagrangian formulation of Williamson and Olson and Bates et al. has

  17. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Gawad, Hamdy I.; Osman, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg–de Vries (vcKdV) equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE’s. PMID:26199750

  18. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Hamdy I; Osman, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg-de Vries (vcKdV) equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE's. PMID:26199750

  19. Parameterization and simulation of near bed orbital velocities under irregular waves in shallow water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elfrink, B.; Hanes, D.M.; Ruessink, B.G.

    2006-01-01

    A set of empirical formulations is derived that describe important wave properties in shallow water as functions of commonly used parameters such as wave height, wave period, local water depth and local bed slope. These wave properties include time varying near-bed orbital velocities and statistical properties such as the distribution of wave height and wave period. Empirical expressions of characteristic wave parameters are derived on the basis of extensive analysis of field data using recently developed evolutionary algorithms. The field data covered a wide range of wave conditions, though there were few conditions with wave periods greater than 15 s. Comparison with field measurements showed good agreement both on a time scale of a single wave period as well as time averaged velocity moments.

  20. A model for sonar interrogation of complex bottom and surface targets in shallow-water waveguides.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Thomas E; Shirron, Joseph J

    2008-04-01

    Many problems of current interest in underwater acoustics involve low-frequency broadband sonar interrogation of objects near the sea surface or sea floor of a shallow-water environment. When the target is situated near the upper or lower boundary of the water column the acoustic interactions with the target objects are complicated by interactions with the nearby free surface or fluid-sediment interface, respectively. A practical numerical method to address such situations is presented. The model provides high levels of accuracy with the flexibility to handle complex, three-dimensional targets in range-independent environments. The model is demonstrated using several bottom target scenarios, with and without locally undulating seabeds. The impact of interface and boundary interactions is considered with an eye toward using the sonar return signal as the basis for acoustic imaging or spectral classification. PMID:18397010

  1. Sound of shallow and deep water lobsters: Measurements, analysis, and characterization (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha, G.; Senthilvadivu, S.; Venkatesan, R.; Rajendran, V.

    2005-05-01

    Study of sound made by marine species aid in ambient noise studies and characterization. This letter presents the work carried out on measurement of sound made by lobsters in a controlled environment and the data processing and the spectral analysis to identify the frequency contents. Lobsters collected in the shallow waters as well as deep waters in the ocean have been used for the sound measurement. The Panulirus Homarus and Palinustur Waguersis species were kept in a tank in a laboratory and measurements were made. Their fundamental frequencies, harmonics, and peaks are analyzed in the band 3 to 100 kHz under different conditions such as molting and nonmolting states. Analysis with respect to diurnal variations is also carried out. The results show that lobsters produce sound like musical instruments, which agree with the observations of Patek [Nature (London) 411, 153-154 (2001)]. .

  2. Chemistry of calcium carbonate-rich shallow water sediments in the Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.W.; Zullig, J.J.; Bernstein, L.D.; Millero, F.J.; Milne, P.; Mucci, A.; Choppin, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The geochemistry of calcium carbonate-rich sediments from a variety of environments throughout the Bahamas was investigated with particular emphasis on the factors that control the pore water chemistry. Most sediments are supersaturated with respect to aragonite, the most abundant carbonate component. Experimental studies indicate that the observed in situ calcium carbonate ion activity products can often be produced as reversible metastable equilibria between the sediments and seawater. This is interpreted as being the result of interactions between the solutions and the minor high Mg-calcite component present in these sediments. Although the overlying waters are more supersaturated than the pore waters, carbonate dissolution, not precipitation, dominates in these sediments as a result of organic matter oxidation and the resulting increase in P/sub CO/sub 2//. The carbonate sediments of the Bahamas are remarkable for their purity, with the exception of special environments such as mangrove swamps and tidal flats with algal mats. Organic matter and heavy metal content is extremely low. Only minor sulfate reduction is occurring in most sediments. Phosphate is undetectable in all pore waters, probably as a result of adsorption on carbonate mineral surfaces. Other dissolved pore water components such as ammonia and DOC are much lower than typically found in shallow water fine-grained terrigeneous sediments.

  3. Functioning of a Shallow-Water Sediment System during Experimental Warming and Nutrient Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Alsterberg, Christian; Sundbäck, Kristina; Hulth, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Effects of warming and nutrient enrichment on intact unvegetated shallow-water sediment were investigated for 5 weeks in the autumn under simulated natural field conditions, with a main focus on trophic state and benthic nitrogen cycling. In a flow-through system, sediment was exposed to either seawater at ambient temperature or seawater heated 4°C above ambient, with either natural or nutrient enriched water. Sediment–water fluxes of oxygen and inorganic nutrients, nitrogen mineralization, and denitrification were measured. Warming resulted in an earlier shift to net heterotrophy due to increased community respiration; primary production was not affected by temperature but (slightly) by nutrient enrichment. The heterotrophic state was, however, not further strengthened by warming, but was rather weakened, probably because increased mineralization induced a shortage of labile organic matter. Climate-related warming of seawater during autumn could therefore, in contrast to previous predictions, induce shorter but more intensive heterotrophic periods in shallow-water sediments, followed by longer autotrophic periods. Increased nitrogen mineralization and subsequent effluxes of ammonium during warming suggested a preferential response of organisms driving nitrogen mineralization when compared to sinks of ammonium such as nitrification and algal assimilation. Warming and nutrient enrichment resulted in non-additive effects on nitrogen mineralization and denitrification (synergism), as well as on benthic fluxes of phosphate (antagonism). The mode of interaction appears to be related to the trophic level of the organisms that are the main drivers of the affected processes. Despite the weak response of benthic microalgae to both warming and nutrient enrichment, the assimilation of nitrogen by microalgae was similar in magnitude to rates of nitrogen mineralization. This implies a sustained filter function and retention capacity of nutrients by the sediment. PMID

  4. Functioning of a shallow-water sediment system during experimental warming and nutrient enrichment.

    PubMed

    Alsterberg, Christian; Sundbäck, Kristina; Hulth, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Effects of warming and nutrient enrichment on intact unvegetated shallow-water sediment were investigated for 5 weeks in the autumn under simulated natural field conditions, with a main focus on trophic state and benthic nitrogen cycling. In a flow-through system, sediment was exposed to either seawater at ambient temperature or seawater heated 4°C above ambient, with either natural or nutrient enriched water. Sediment-water fluxes of oxygen and inorganic nutrients, nitrogen mineralization, and denitrification were measured. Warming resulted in an earlier shift to net heterotrophy due to increased community respiration; primary production was not affected by temperature but (slightly) by nutrient enrichment. The heterotrophic state was, however, not further strengthened by warming, but was rather weakened, probably because increased mineralization induced a shortage of labile organic matter. Climate-related warming of seawater during autumn could therefore, in contrast to previous predictions, induce shorter but more intensive heterotrophic periods in shallow-water sediments, followed by longer autotrophic periods. Increased nitrogen mineralization and subsequent effluxes of ammonium during warming suggested a preferential response of organisms driving nitrogen mineralization when compared to sinks of ammonium such as nitrification and algal assimilation. Warming and nutrient enrichment resulted in non-additive effects on nitrogen mineralization and denitrification (synergism), as well as on benthic fluxes of phosphate (antagonism). The mode of interaction appears to be related to the trophic level of the organisms that are the main drivers of the affected processes. Despite the weak response of benthic microalgae to both warming and nutrient enrichment, the assimilation of nitrogen by microalgae was similar in magnitude to rates of nitrogen mineralization. This implies a sustained filter function and retention capacity of nutrients by the sediment. PMID:23240032

  5. A new approach to macroalgal bloom control in eutrophic, shallow-water, coastal areas.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Mauro; Salvaterra, Giulia; Gennaro, Paola; Mercatali, Isabel; Persia, Emma; Porrello, Salvatore; Sorce, Carlo

    2015-03-01

    In summer 2012, an experiment was conducted in a shallow eutrophic lagoon with poor water exchange to determine the consequences of harvesting algae on the algal mat itself, which was traversed and repeatedly disturbed by large harvester boats. Four areas with high macroalgal density, measuring half a hectare each, were selected. Two were subjected to frequent disturbance of the algal mat and sediment (12 two-hour operations over a 38-day period) and the other two were left undisturbed as control. The following variables were determined: 1) water column physical chemistry and nutrients; 2) redox potential, nutrients and organic load in sediments; 3) C, N and P content of algal thalli; 4) macroalgal biomass. In 2013, a further experiment was conducted on a larger scale. Biomass was estimated in a high-density mat measuring 235 ha, where macroalgae were harvested and stirred up by four harvesting boats, and in two high-density mats measuring 150 and 120 ha, left undisturbed as control (9.15, 9.92 and 3.68 kg/m(2), respectively). In the first experiment, no significant changes were observed in the water column. In sediment the main variation was a significant reduction in labile organic matter in the disturbed areas and a significant increase mainly in refractory organic matter in the undisturbed areas. Biomass showed a significant drastic reduction in disturbed areas and substantial stability in undisturbed areas. In the large-scale experiment, the biomass of the disturbed mat declined by about 63%, only 6.5% of which was due to harvesting. On the other hand, the undisturbed mat with higher density underwent a natural decline in biomass of about 23% and the other increased by about 50%. These results demonstrate that disturbance of high-density mat in shallow water by boats can cause decay of the mat. PMID:25556869

  6. Bottom Roughness and Bathymetry Estimation of 1-D Shallow Water Equations Model Using Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooshyar, M.; Hagen, S. C.; Wang, D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic models are widely applied to coastal areas in order to predict water levels and flood inundation and typically involve solving a form of the Shallow Water Equations (SWE). The SWE are routinely discretized by applying numerical methods, such as the finite element method. Like other numerical models, hydrodynamic models include uncertainty. Uncertainties are generated due to errors in the discrete approximation of coastal geometry, bathymetry, bottom friction and forcing functions such as tides and wind fields. Methods to counteract these uncertainties should always begin with improvements to physical characterization of: the geometric description through increased resolution, parameters that describe land cover variations in the natural and urban environment, parameters that enhance transfer of surface forcings to the water surface, open boundary forcings, and the wetting/drying brought upon by flood and ebb cycles. When the best possible physical representation is achieved, we are left with calibration and data assimilation to reduce model uncertainty. Data assimilation has been applied to coastal hydrodynamic models to better estimate system states and/or system parameters by incorporating observed data into the model. Kalman Filter is one of the most studied data assimilation methods that minimizes the mean square errors between model state estimations and the observed data in linear systems (Kalman , 1960). For nonlinear systems, as with hydrodynamic models, a variation of Kalman filter called Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), is applied to update the system state according to error statistics in the context of Monte Carlo simulations (Evensen , 2003) & (Hitoshi et. al, 2014). In this research, Kalman Filter is incorporated to simultaneously estimate an influential parameter used in the shallow water equations, bottom roughness, and to adjust the physical feature of bathymetry. Starting from an initial estimate of bottom roughness and bathymetry, and

  7. Evidence for direct water absorption by shallow-rooted desert plants in desert-oasis ecotone, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jing

    2014-05-01

    Besides the absorption by roots from the soil substrate, it has long been known that plants exhibit alternative water-absorption strategies, particularly in drought-prone environments. For many tropical epiphytic orchids, air moisture can be absorbed directly by aerial roots. Some conifers are also found to utilize air moisture by foliar absorption during the summer fog season. However, few studies have been carried out on the atmospheric water vapor absorption by shallow-rooted desert plants. We conducted experiments in desert-oasis ecotone and investigated the effects of dew absorbed by three kinds of shallow-rooted seedlings on net photosynthesis rate, as well as on other water relations variables. Three kinds of typical shallow-rooted desert species (Bassia dasyphylla, Salsola collina and Corispermum declinatum) have been chosen and potted. Each species were subjected to contrasting watering regimes (normal and deficient) and different air moisture conditions (having dew and having no dew) for 10 weeks. Net photosynthesis rate was measured on six occasions during the study. Other water relations variables (midday shoot water potential, relative water content, stomatal conductance) were also measured. Under the dew conditions, average net photosynthesis rate, shoot water potential, leaf relative water content and stomatal conductance increased, with greater responses observed for plants subjected to a deficient watering regime than for well-watered plants. These results indicated dew occurred in arid region could be utilized through foliar absorption by some shallow-rooted plants, and for the shallow-rooted plants, the presence of dew could significantly relieve the deficit of water in water-stressed regime.

  8. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a "small plain, big front" character. PMID

  9. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a “small plain, big front” character. PMID

  10. Larval fish distribution in shallow coastal waters off North Western Iberia (NE Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeiteiro, Ulisses Miranda; Bacelar-Nicolau, Leonor; Resende, Paula; Gonçalves, Fernando; Pereira, Mário Jorge

    2006-09-01

    Monthly sampling for ichthyoplankton was conducted at three stations very near to the coast (near to shore shallow stations before the surf zone in direction to the shoreline) of Atlantic northwestern Portugal within contrasting localities: rocky shore, in front of a sandy beach receiving an estuary and a fishing port with heavy anthropogenic impact. Sampling was conducted from August 2002 to October 2003, always at full moon, at low tide and high tide in daylight hours, at the water column using a 48 cm diameter plankton net with 335 μm mesh. Analysis of the physico-chemical parameters pointed out the spatial (horizontal) homogeneity of the sampling area. Fish larvae from 41 taxa belonging to 17 families were identified; Blenniidae, Labridae, Ammodytidae, Clupeidae, Gobiidae, Soleidae and Gobiesocidae were the most representative during the study period. Parablennius gattorugine, Ammodytes tobianus, Symphodus melops, Sardina pilchardus, Lipophrys pholis and Coryphoblennius galerita were the most representative species (percentage contribution to total abundance). Peak abundance of fish eggs occurred during May, June and August 2003 and fish larvae occurred during May and July 2003 and August 2002 and 2003; there was a pronounced winter/early spring (March 2003) peak in larval abundance dominated by the small sandeel A. tobianus. This study identifies the occurrence of a conspicuous assemblage of larval fishes at very nearshore shallow environments of a variety of species with different adult habitats: the fish larvae assemblage was dominated by intertidal species. The present study has shown that temporal and spatial variations in the larval fish assemblage are related to environmental conditions and biological dynamics: the results suggest that abiotic conditions mediate biotic parameters, and that both abiotic and biotic characteristics regulated the larval fishes at very nearshore shallow environments.

  11. Nursery use of shallow habitats by epibenthic fishes in Maine nearshore waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzari, M. A.; Sherman, S.; Kanwit, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    Species richness and abundance of epibenthic fishes were quantified with daytime beam trawl tows in shallow water habitats during April-November 2000 of three mid-coast Maine estuaries: Casco Bay, Muscongus Bay and the Weskeag River. Five shallow (<10 m) habitats were sampled, Zostera marina, Laminaria longicruris, Phyllophora sp., Microciona prolifera and unvegetated sandy areas. Thirty-two species of fishes were collected. Species richness per tow was greater in Casco Bay followed by the Weskeag River and Muscongus Bay. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) of fishes was greater in Casco Bay than in the Weskeag River or Muscongus Bay. Species richness and faunal abundances were positively associated with vegetation, particularly Zostera, at all sampling locations. CPUEs of fishes were higher in Zostera primarily due to the abundance of Gasterosteus aculeatus, Apeltes quadracus, Pungitius pungitius, Myoxocephalus aenaeus, and Cylcopterus lumpus. The fish community of mid-coast estuaries was dominated by young-of-the-year (YOY) and juvenile fishes and all of the habitat types function as nursery areas. Twelve species (38%) of commercial and recreational importance were collected in the three estuaries, but the percentage was higher in Casco Bay (44%) and the Weskeag River (46%). These species included Anguilla rostrata, Clupea harengus, Gadus morhua, Microgadus tomcod, Pollachius virens, Urophycis chuss, Urophycis regia, Urophycis tenuis, Osmerus mordax, Macrozoarces americanus, Tautogolabrus adspersus, and Pleuronectes americanus. Four species, G. morhua, M. tomcod, P. virens, and U. tenuis were more common in spring than summer or autumn. P. americanus was most abundant in summer followed by spring and autumn. This study documents the importance of shallow estuarine areas in Maine as nurseries for these species.

  12. A three-dimensional, longitudinally-invariant finite element model for acoustic propagation in shallow water waveguides.

    PubMed

    Isakson, Marcia J; Goldsberry, Benjamin; Chotiros, Nicholas P

    2014-09-01

    A three-dimensional, longitudinally-invariant finite element (FE) model for shallow water acoustic propagation is constructed through a cosine transform of a series of two-dimensional FE models at different values of the out-of-plane wavenumber. An innovative wavenumber sampling method is developed that efficiently captures the essential components of the integral as the out-of-plane wave number approaches the water wavenumber. The method is validated by comparison with benchmark solutions of two shallow water waveguide environments: a flat range independent case and a benchmark wedge. PMID:25190422

  13. Artificial sweeteners as waste water markers in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichler, Andrea; Muellegger, Christian; Hofmann, Thilo

    2013-04-01

    One key factor in groundwater quality management is the knowledge of flow paths and recharge. In coupled ground- and surface water systems the understanding of infiltration processes is therefore of paramount importance. Recent studies show that artificial sweeteners - which are used as sugar substitutes in food and beverages - are suitable tracers for domestic wastewater in the aquatic environment. As most rivers receive sewage discharges, artificial sweeteners might be used for tracking surface waters in groundwater. In this study artificial sweeteners are used in combination with conventional tracers (inert anions Cl-, SO42-, stable water isotopes δ18O, δ2H) to identify river water infiltration and the influence of waste water on a shallow unconfined aquifer used for drinking water production. The investigation area is situated in a mesoscale alpine head water catchment. The alluvial aquifer consists of quaternary gravel deposits and is characterized by high hydraulic permeability (kfmax 5 x 10-2 ms-1), high flow velocities (vmax 250 md-1) and a considerable productivity (2,5 m3s-1). A losing stream follows the aquifer in close proximity and is susceptible to infiltrate substantial volumes of water into the alluvial sediments. Water sampling campaigns in March and July 2012 confirmed the occurrence of artificial sweeteners (Acesulfam ACE, Sucralose SUC, Saccharin SAC and Cyclamat CYC) at the investigated site. The local sewage treatment plant was identified as point source of artificial sweeteners in the river water, with ACE concentrations up to 0,6 μgL-1. ACE concentrations in groundwater where approximately of one order of magnitude lower: ACE was present in 33 out of 40 sampled groundwater wells with concentrations up to 0,07 μgL-1, thus indicating considerable influence of sewage water loaded surface water throughout the aquifer. Elevated concentrations of ACE and SAC in single observation wells denote other sources of locally limited contamination

  14. How to react to shallow water hydrodynamics: The larger benthic foraminifera solution

    PubMed Central

    Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Symbiont-bearing larger benthic foraminifera inhabit the photic zone to provide their endosymbiotic algae with light. Because of the hydrodynamic conditions of shallow water environments, tests of larger foraminifera can be entrained and transported by water motion. To resist water motion, these foraminifera have to build a test able to avoid transport or have to develop special mechanisms to attach themselves to substrate or to hide their test below sediment grains. For those species which resist transport by the construction of hydrodynamic convenient shapes, the calculation of hydrodynamic parameters of their test defines the energetic input they can resist and therefore the scenario where they can live in. Measuring the density, size and shape of every test, combined with experimental data, helps to define the best mathematical approach for the settling velocity and Reynolds number of every shell. The comparison between water motion at the sediment-water interface and the specimen-specific settling velocity helps to calculate the water depths at which, for a certain test type, transport, deposition and accumulation may occur. The results obtained for the investigated taxa show that the mathematical approach gives reliable results and can discriminate the hydrodynamic behaviour of different shapes. Furthermore, the study of the settling velocities, calculated for all the investigated taxa, shows that several species are capable to resist water motion and therefore they appear to be functionally adapted to the hydrodynamic condition of its specific environment. The same study is not recommended on species which resist water motion by adopting hiding or anchoring strategies to avoid the effect of water motion.

  15. A subaqueous eruption model for shallow-water, small volume eruptions: Evidence from two Precambrian examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Wulf U.

    Ancient, shallow-water, pyroclastic deposits are identified in the Paleoproterozoic Ketilidian Mobile belt, southeast Greenland at Kangerluluk and in the Neoproterozoic Gariep belt of Namibia in the Schakalsberg Mountains. The 1-30 m-thick tuff and lapilli tuff deposits are interpreted as eruption-fed density current deposits emanating from tephra jets that collapsed under subaqueous conditions due to water ingress. The presence of 1-10 mm diameter armoured lapilli, with a central vesicular lapillus or shard, suggests the existence of high velocity, gas, water vapour, and particle-rich tephra jets. A transition from a gas-steam supported tephra jet to a cold water-laden density current without an intermediate stage of storage and remobilization is inferred. Interpretation of a 5-15 m-thick lapilli tuff breccia further supports explosive subaqueous mechanisms. Pyroclasts in the lapilli tuff breccia are interpreted as bombs emplaced ballistically. Multiple bomb sags produced by the impact of rounded juvenile crystal-rich pyroclasts required a water-exclusion zone formed either by a continuous magma uprush or multiple jet activity occurring concurrently, rather than as isolated tephra jets. Intercalated density current deposits indicate uprush events of limited duration and their recurrence with rapid collapse after each pulse. A new subaqueous Surtseyan-type eruption model is proposed based on observations from these two Precambrian study areas.

  16. The dynamics of cooling water discharge in a shallow, non-tidal embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Richard; Bolding, Karsten; Hetland, Robert D.; Schernewski, Gerald; Siegel, Herbert; Burchard, Hans

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of cooling water spreading in a non-tidal embayment is subject of a modelling-based study of Greifswald Bay, a shallow embayment at the south-western coast of the Baltic Sea. Potential cooling water spreading due to a possible power plant at Greifswald Bay is evaluated as differences between a realistic hind-cast simulation and a similar simulation but including the cooling water pumping. The model results are confirmed with satellite imagery of the embayment during operation of a nuclear power plant in the 1980s. The effect of cooling water pumping on the residual circulation, additional stratification and the heating of near-bed waters in the herring spawning areas is evaluated from the simulation. The model results for an idealised embayment and the realistic scenario, as well as the satellite images, show a clear dependence of the plume spreading on the wind direction. Although the surface plume affects a large area of the embayment, the results show a localised impact on residual circulation, bulk stratification and heating of the waterbody.

  17. Evaluation of Monensin Transport to Shallow Groundwater after Irrigation with Dairy Lagoon Water.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Sarah C; Harter, Thomas; Parikh, Sanjai J

    2016-03-01

    Animal waste products from concentrated animal feeding operations are a significant source of antibiotics to the environment. Monensin, an ionophore antibiotic commonly used to increase feed efficiency in livestock, is known to have varied toxicological effects on nontarget species. The current study builds on prior studies evaluating the impact of dairy management on groundwater quality by examining the transport of monensin in an agricultural field with coarse-textured soils during irrigation with lagoon wastewater. The dairy is located in California's San Joaquin Valley, where groundwater can be encountered <5 m below the surface. Groundwater samples were collected from a network of monitoring wells installed throughout the dairy and adjacent to irrigated fields before and after an irrigation event, which allowed for measurement of monensin potentially reaching the shallow groundwater as a direct result of irrigation with lagoon water. Monensin was extracted from water samples via hydrophilic-lipophilic balance solid-phase extraction and quantified with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Irrigation water was found to contain up to 1.6 μg L monensin, but monensin was only detected in monitoring wells surrounding the waste storage lagoon. Water chemistry changes in the wells bordering the irrigated field suggest that up to 7% of irrigation water reached groundwater within days of irrigation. The study suggests that contamination of groundwater with monensin can occur primarily by compromised waste storage systems and that rapid transport of monensin to groundwater is not likely to occur from a single irrigation event. PMID:27065394

  18. Water Optical Properties and Water Color Remote Sensing in Optically Deep and Shallow Waters of Lake Taihu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Hongyan

    In this study, Lake Taihu in Jiangsu Province of China, a typical large freshwater lake, is selected as the study area. Based on the field spectral measurements and laboratory analyses performed in October 2008, water optical properties and water color/quality remote sensing retrieval models in Lake Taihu were investigated. It was recognized that water quality varied a lot in different areas. Waters in Lake Taihu were classified as optically deep waters (ODWs) and optically shallow waters (OSWs). ODWs are the waters where the water depth is more than three times the measured Secchi Disk Depth (SDD), otherwise they are OSWs. Cyanobacteria blooms happen frequently in ODWs and the water is eutrophicated heavily. Whereas water is very clear with rare cyanobacteria blooms but many aquatic plants in OSWs. Focused on the two types of water areas respectively, the inherent optical properties (lOPs), apparent optical properties (lOPs) and reflectance spectra were analyzed, as well as their relationships to water quality parameters. Local optical parameters f and Q, which play significant roles in water quality parameters retrieval models, were also determined. Measured remote sensing reflectance data were used to establish two-band and three-band models for chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration estimation, results showed both models were suitable in ODWs. However, aquatic plants in OSWs had great influence on spectra, resulting in the inapplicability of the established models at these sites. Absorption and backscattering coefficients were used to remove those influences and simulate new set of remote sensing reflectance based on radiative transfer theory, which were proved reliable to establish Chl-a retrieval algorithms. Three-band model established by simulated spectra showed more satisfactory performance in whole ODWs, and performance of two-band model in OSWs was also enhanced much. Several models were established to estimate total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations

  19. 75 FR 56017 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species by Vessels Using Trawl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... under Sec. 679.21(d)(7)(i) on September 3, 2010 (75 FR 54290, September 7, 2010). NMFS has determined... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Shallow- Water Species by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY...-water species by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to...

  20. a Positive Well-Balanced Vfroe-Ncv Scheme for Non-Homogeneous Shallow-Water Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthon, Christophe; Marche, Fabien

    2010-05-01

    In the present work, we propose a new interpretation of the VFRoe—ncv scheme for the shallow-water equations. We propose suitable modifications to ensure that the scheme is always well defined (at the discrepancy with its initial derivation). We enforce relevant condition to preserve the positivity of the water depth and thus we ensure the robustness of the proposed numerical procedure.

  1. Acoustic projectors for AUV and UUV applications in shallow-water regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Thomas R.

    1999-07-01

    For acoustic identification of objects in a littoral environment, there are generally three frequency bands of interest; 1 kHz to 10 kHz, 10 kHz to 100 kHz and 100 kHz to >= 1 MHz, where the selection of these bands is dependent upon the specific Navy mission. This paper will discuss the progress of the Naval Research Laboratory in developing acoustic projector prototypes to address the lower two frequency bands for unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) and/or autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) applications. The band of 1 kHz to 10 kHz is currently being addressed sing cymbal flextensional vibrator elements sandwiched in to thin panels. In-air data has shown that high levels of acoustic displacement at low frequencies are possible with these devices while more recent in-water data has verified these expectations. This success has led to modeling and prototyping of similar devices for shallow water regions. The frequency range of 10 kHz to 100 kHz has been investigated for several years where the acoustic projector was originally reported during AeroSense 1998. The result of integrating the NRL broadband projector into the NSWC/Coastal Systems Station synthetic aperture sonar UUV will be presented. This system integration considers the projector as a constant source level over the 10 kHz to 100 kHz band by driving the 100 kHz resonant transducer with an inversely shaped transformed. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of the future development trends in shallow water transducers for AUV and UUV missions.

  2. Ancient Martian Deltas: Evidence for Shallow and Deep Standing Bodies of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jew, C. L.; Kim, W.; Lim, Y.; Piliouras, A.

    2015-12-01

    Ancient deltas on Mars are indicative of a geologic history composed of complex fluvio-deltaic deposits. We focus on two morphologically different deltas preserved on Mars, one located in the Jezero crater and the other in the Shalbatana Valles canyon. The Jezero delta, formed during the Noachian age, is a large fluvial delta with strong channelization and a rigid shoreline resembling a terrestrial delta. In contrast, the Shalbatana Delta is a smaller scaled more briefly lived delta system, developed during the Hesperian, that is characterized by its smooth and simple planform. Evidence from previous studies on these Martian deltas such as the base level, mechanism to build sediment cohesion, estimated discharge, and time of formation offer support to ultimately discover why one delta drastically differs from the other. Based upon the observations from these two locations, we investigate through our physical experiments the conditions required to create these prograding deltas. We use carbonate precipitation in our experiments as a mechanism to increase bank stability, an alternative for any chemically driven precipitated deposits that potentially improve cohesion as vegetation does for terrestrial deltas. We found that there are differences in floodplain thickness, channelization, shoreline rugosity, and delta shape in the carbonate verse non-carbonate runs. Additionally, we conducted runs for isolating the influence that shallow and deep standing bodies of water have on prograding deltas. The experimental results suggested that the highly channelized delta (e.g., Jezero delta) rapidly prograded into a shallow body of water, covering a broader surface area and is dependent on a cohesive force for channel organization. On the contrary, Gilbert-type delta (e.g., Shalbatana delta) was best replicated when prograding into a deep standing body of water. Investigation using the experimental carbonate deltas suggests that cohesion results in better channelization (more

  3. Brine contamination of shallow ground water and streams in the Brookhaven Oil Field, Lincoln County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    A hydrologic investigation to define areas of brine contamination in shallow freshwater aquifers commonly used for streams that drain the Brookhaven Oil Field, was conducted from October 1983 to September 1984. The Brookhaven Oil Field covers approximately 15 sq mi in northwestern Lincoln County, Mississippi. Since 1943, disposal of approximately 544.2 million barrels of brine pumped from the oil producing zone (lower part of the Tuscaloosa Formation) has contaminated the Citronelle aquifer, the Hattiesburg aquifers, and streams that drain the oil field. Approximately 5 sq mi of the shallow Citronelle aquifer contain water with chloride concentrations higher than normal for this area ( > 20 mg/L). Brine contamination has moved from the source laterally through the Citronelle aquifer to discharge into nearby streams and vertically into the underlying Hattiesburg aquifers. Contamination is most noticeable in Shaws Creek when streamflow originates primarily from groundwater inflow (approximately 87% of the time during the study). Additional study is required to define contaminant plumes, rates of groundwater movement and geohydrochemical reactions between the contaminant and aquifer materials. These data would allow accurate predictions of location, extent and degree of contamination in the study area. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Ecological values of shallow-water habitats: Implications for the restoration of disturbed ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez, C.B.; Cloern, J.E.; Schraga, T.S.; Little, A.J.; Lucas, L.V.; Thompson, J.K.; Burau, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    A presumed value of shallow-habitat enhanced pelagic productivity derives from the principle that in nutrient-rich aquatic systems phytoplankton growth rate is controlled by light availability, which varies inversely with habitat depth. We measured a set of biological indicators across the gradient of habitat depth within the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (California) to test the hypothesis that plankton biomass, production, and pelagic energy flow also vary systematically with habitat depth. Results showed that phytoplankton biomass and production were only weakly related to phytoplankton growth rates whereas other processes (transport, consumption) were important controls. Distribution of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea was patchy, and heavily colonized habitats all supported low phytoplankton biomass and production and functioned as food sinks. Surplus primary production in shallow, uncolonized habitats provided potential subsidies to neighboring recipient habitats. Zooplankton in deeper habitats, where grazing exceeded phytoplankton production, were likely supported by significant fluxes of phytoplankton biomass from connected donor habitats. Our results provide three important lessons for ecosystem science: (a) in the absence of process measurements, derived indices provide valuable information to improve our mechanistic understanding of ecosystem function and to benefit adaptive management strategies; (b) the benefits of some ecosystem functions are displaced by water movements, so the value of individual habitat types can only be revealed through a regional perspective that includes connectedness among habitats; and (c) invasive species can act as overriding controls of habitat function, adding to the uncertainty of management outcomes. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  5. Seasonal use of shallow water habitat in the Lower Snake River reservoirs by juvenile fall Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Connor, William P.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) is preparing a long term management plan for sediments that affect the authorized project purposes of the Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and Ice Harbor reservoirs (hereafter, the lower Snake River reservoirs), and the area from the mouth of the Snake River to Ice Harbor Dam. We conducted a study from spring 2010 through winter 2011 to describe the habitat use by juvenile Chinook salmon within a selected group of shallow water habitat complexes (< 6 m deep) in the lower Snake River reservoirs to help inform the long-term plan. Natural fry and parr were present within all four shallow water habitat complexes that we studied from early spring through early summer, and parr ( = 40,345 ± 18,800 [error bound]) were more abundant than fry ( = 24,615 ± 5,701). Water < 2 m deep was highly used for rearing by natural fall Chinook salmon subyearlings (fry and parr combined; hereafter natural subyearlings) based on duration of use and relative group abundances during spring and summer, whereas the 2–6 m depth interval was more highly used by migratory hatchery fall Chinook salmon subyearlings and spring, summer, and fall Chinook salmon yearlings. Overall mean spring-summer apparent density of natural subyearlings was 15.5 times higher within the < 2 m depth interval than within the 2–6 m depth interval. Density of natural subyearlings also decreased as the distance a given shallow water habitat complex was located from the riverine spawning areas increased. Reservoir-type juveniles (or fish likely destined to become reservoir-type juveniles) were present in the lower Snake River reservoirs from fall 2010 through winter 2011; however, use of shallow water habitat by reservoir-type juveniles was limited during our study. We only collected 38 reservoir-type juveniles in shallow water habitat sites in beach and lampara seines during the fall. Radiotelemetry data revealed that though many tagged fish passed shallow water

  6. Toward the Application of the Implicit Particle Filter to Real Data in a Shallow Water Model of the Nearshore Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R.

    2015-12-01

    Following the success of the implicit particle filter in twin experiments with a shallow water model of the nearshore environment, the planned next step is application to the intensive Sandy Duck data set, gathered at Duck, NC. Adaptation of the present system to the Sandy Duck data set will require construction and evaluation of error models for both the model and the data, as well as significant modification of the system to allow for the properties of the data set. Successful implementation of the particle filter promises to shed light on the details of the capabilities and limitations of shallow water models of the nearshore ocean relative to more detailed models. Since the shallow water model admits distinct dynamical regimes, reliable parameter estimation will be important. Previous work by other groups give cause for optimism. In this talk I will describe my progress toward implementation of the new system, including problems solved, pitfalls remaining and preliminary results

  7. Factors Affecting Nitrate Delivery to Streams from Shallow Ground Water in the North Carolina Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Stephen L.; Spruill, Timothy B.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of data collected at five flow-path study sites between 1997 and 2006 was performed to identify the factors needed to formulate a comprehensive program, with a focus on nitrogen, for protecting ground water and surface water in the North Carolina Coastal Plain. Water-quality protection in the Coastal Plain requires the identification of factors that affect the transport of nutrients from recharge areas to streams through the shallow ground-water system. Some basins process or retain nitrogen more readily than others, and the factors that affect nitrogen processing and retention were the focus of this investigation to improve nutrient management in Coastal Plain streams and to reduce nutrient loads to coastal waters. Nitrate reduction in ground water was observed at all five flow-path study sites in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, although the extent of reduction at each site was influenced by various environmental, hydrogeologic, and geochemical factors. Denitrification was the most common factor responsible for decreases in nitrate along the ground-water flow paths. Specific factors, some of which affect denitrification rates, that appeared to influence ground-water nitrate concentrations along the flow paths or in the streams include soil drainage, presence or absence of riparian buffers, evapotranspiration, fertilizer use, ground-water recharge rates and residence times, aquifer properties, subsurface tile drainage, sources and amounts of organic matter, and hyporheic processes. The study data indicate that the nitrate-reducing capacity of the buffer zone combined with that of the hyporheic zone can substantially lower the amount of ground-water nitrate discharged to streams in agricultural settings of the North Carolina Coastal Plain. At the watershed scale, the effects of ground-water discharge on surface-water quality appear to be greatly influenced by streamflow conditions and the presence of extensive riparian vegetation. Streamflow statistics

  8. Evolution of bubble size distribution from gas blowout in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C.; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Loney, Norman; Geng, Xiaolong

    2016-03-01

    Gas is often emanated from the sea bed during a subsea oil and gas blowout. The size of a gas bubble changes due to gas dissolution in the ambient water and expansion as a result of a decrease in water pressure during the rise. It is important to understand the fate and transport of gas bubbles for the purpose of environmental and safety concerns. In this paper, we used the numerical model, VDROP-J to simulate gas formation in jet/plume upon release, and dissolution and expansion while bubble rising during a relatively shallow subsea gas blowout. The model predictions were an excellent match to the experimental data. Then a gas dissolution and expansion module was included in the VDROP-J model to predict the fate and transport of methane bubbles rising due to a blowout through a 0.10 m vertical orifice. The numerical results indicated that gas bubbles would increase the mixing energy in released jets, especially at small distances and large distances from the orifice. This means that models that predict the bubble size distribution (BSD) should account for this additional mixing energy. It was also found that only bubbles of certain sizes would reach the water surfaces; small bubbles dissolve fast in the water column, while the size of the large bubbles decreases. This resulted in a BSD that was bimodal near the orifice, and then became unimodal.

  9. CD-CORMIX model for continuous dredge disposal mixing zone analysis in shallow water

    SciTech Connect

    Doneker, R.; Jirka, G.; Nash, J.; Pagenkopf, J.

    1995-12-31

    The rule-based expert system CD-CORMIX has been developed to predict the initial mixing of continuous dredge disposal operations in shallow water. CD-CORMIX extends the methodology of the CORMIX mixing zone model to include hydrodynamics of dredge disposal operations negatively buoyant discharges characterized by particle settling into ambients with bottom slope and density stratification. Discharge source scenarios include direct continuous pipeline disposal or discharge from a confined disposal facility; discharge ports can be located above or below the water surface with or without deflector plates. Five particle size fractions from clay size to large nonsuspended solids are allowed. A uniform downstream channel cross-section with uniform ambient velocity is assumed, although two near-discharge shore slopes are permitted with up to three arbitrary stable ambient density profiles. As a fully turbulent Newtonian fluid model, CD-CORMIX models water column concentrations of suspended sediment and a dissolved constituent, however the dynamics of the resulting fluid mud flow is not addressed because it displays viscous creep flow behavior. Program output include plume shape, trajectory, particle constituent concentration and dilution within the water column, total accretion rate of solids, and 1 hour accretion depth of solids on the bottom. CD-CORMIX has been compared to limited field data with good results.

  10. Processes Affecting Nutrients and Other Chemicals in Shallow Ground Waters of the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, B. T.

    2001-05-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) was performed with water-quality data from studies conducted during 1993-1995 to explore processes influencing concentrations of selected nutrients, major ions, and trace elements in shallow ground waters of the southeastern United States. Results indicate that nitrate reduction is an important attenuation process in selected areas of the Southeast. A "nitrate-reduction" component explains 23% of the total variance in the data and indicates that nitrate and dissolved oxygen are inversely related to ammonium, iron, manganese, and dissolved organic carbon. Additional components extracted by PCA include "calcite dissolution" (18% of variance explained) and "phosphate dissolution" (9% of variance explained). Reducing conditions in ground waters of the region influence nitrate behavior through bacterially mediated reduction in the presence of organic matter, and by inhibition of nitrate formation in anoxic ground water beneath forested areas. Component scores are consistent with observed water-quality conditions in the region. For example, median nitrate concentration in ground-water samples from the Albemarle-Pamlico Coastal Plain is <0.05 mg/L, median dissolved organic carbon concentration is 4.2 mg/L, and median dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration is 2.1 mg/L, consistent with denitrification. Nitrate reduction, however, does not occur uniformly throughout the Southeast. Median DO concentrations in ground-water samples from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin are 6.2-7.1 mg/L, and median nitrate concentrations are 0.61-2.2 mg/L, inconsistent with denitrification. Similarly, median DO concentration in samples from the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain is 6.0 mg/L and median nitrate concentration is 5.8 mg/L.

  11. The effect of sound speed profile on shallow water shipping sound maps.

    PubMed

    Sertlek, Hüseyin Özkan; Binnerts, Bas; Ainslie, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Sound mapping over large areas can be computationally expensive because of the large number of sources and large source-receiver separations involved. In order to facilitate computation, a simplifying assumption sometimes made is to neglect the sound speed gradient in shallow water. The accuracy of this assumption is investigated for ship generated sound in the Dutch North Sea, for realistic ship and wind distributions. Sound maps are generated for zero, negative and positive gradients for selected frequency bands (56 Hz to 3.6 kHz). The effect of sound speed profile for the decidecade centred at 125 Hz is less than 1.7 dB. PMID:27475218

  12. Interference structure of low-frequency reverberation signals in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunkov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Using numerical simulation, an analysis was conducted of the interference structure of a bottomscattered sound field generated by a wideband point source in shallow water under winter and summer conditions. The scattered signals were received from the place where the source was located and were subjected to Fourier transform with a sliding window. The paper demonstrates the possibility of estimating the waveguide invariant for backscattered signals when processing the sound intensity distributions in wide frequency and distance ranges up to the scattering area. A technique is proposed for reconstructing the twodimensional field of internal waves using variations of the interference pattern of reverberation signals. The influence of wind surface waves on the degree of interference band contrast is illustrated.

  13. Determining the depth of a sound source in shallow water against intense background noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besedina, T. N.; Kuznetsov, G. N.; Kuz'kin, V. M.; Pereselkov, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    We consider a method for estimating the depth of a sound source in a shallow water acoustic waveguide for a weak signal, based on information on the ratio of the amplitude of neighboring modes of the wave field. Results of a numerical experiment using a single receiver and a horizontal linear array in the lowfrequency region are given. We demonstrate the stability of the method to errors in measuring the amplitudes of filtered modes and variations of the waveguide model, as well as high noise immunity. It is established that the error in reconstructing the depth of a source with increasing noise tends to the established value. We give a qualitative and quantitative explanation of the simulation results.

  14. Discontinuous Galerkin Method with Numerical Roe Flux for Spherical Shallow Water Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, T.; Choi, S.; Kang, S.

    2013-12-01

    In developing the dynamic core of a numerical weather prediction model with discontinuous Galerkin method, a numerical flux at the boundaries of grid elements plays a vital role since it preserves the local conservation properties and has a significant impact on the accuracy and stability of numerical solutions. Due to these reasons, we developed the numerical Roe flux based on an approximate Riemann problem for spherical shallow water equations in Cartesian coordinates [1] to find out its stability and accuracy. In order to compare the performance with its counterpart flux, we used the Lax-Friedrichs flux, which has been used in many dynamic cores such as NUMA [1], CAM-DG [2] and MCore [3] because of its simplicity. The Lax-Friedrichs flux is implemented by a flux difference between left and right states plus the maximum characteristic wave speed across the boundaries of elements. It has been shown that the Lax-Friedrichs flux with the finite volume method is more dissipative and unstable than other numerical fluxes such as HLLC, AUSM+ and Roe. The Roe flux implemented in this study is based on the decomposition of flux difference over the element boundaries where the nonlinear equations are linearized. It is rarely used in dynamic cores due to its complexity and thus computational expensiveness. To compare the stability and accuracy of the Roe flux with the Lax-Friedrichs, two- and three-dimensional test cases are performed on a plane and cubed-sphere, respectively, with various numbers of element and polynomial order. For the two-dimensional case, the Gaussian bell is simulated on the plane with two different numbers of elements at the fixed polynomial orders. In three-dimensional cases on the cubed-sphere, we performed the test cases of a zonal flow over an isolated mountain and a Rossby-Haurwitz wave, of which initial conditions are the same as those of Williamson [4]. This study presented that the Roe flux with the discontinuous Galerkin method is less

  15. Accelerating Time Integration for the Shallow Water Equations on the Sphere Using GPUs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Archibald, R.; Evans, K. J.; Salinger, A.

    2015-06-01

    The push towards larger and larger computational platforms has made it possible for climate simulations to resolve climate dynamics across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This direction in climate simulation has created a strong need to develop scalable time-stepping methods capable of accelerating throughput on high performance computing. This work details the recent advances in the implementation of implicit time stepping on a spectral element cube-sphere grid using graphical processing units (GPU) based machines. We demonstrate how solvers in the Trilinos project are interfaced with ACME and GPU kernels can significantly increase computational speed of the residual calculations in themore » implicit time stepping method for the shallow water equations on the sphere. We show the optimization gains and data structure reorganization that facilitates the performance improvements.« less

  16. Accelerating Time Integration for the Shallow Water Equations on the Sphere Using GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, R.; Evans, K. J.; Salinger, A.

    2015-06-01

    The push towards larger and larger computational platforms has made it possible for climate simulations to resolve climate dynamics across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This direction in climate simulation has created a strong need to develop scalable time-stepping methods capable of accelerating throughput on high performance computing. This work details the recent advances in the implementation of implicit time stepping on a spectral element cube-sphere grid using graphical processing units (GPU) based machines. We demonstrate how solvers in the Trilinos project are interfaced with ACME and GPU kernels can significantly increase computational speed of the residual calculations in the implicit time stepping method for the shallow water equations on the sphere. We show the optimization gains and data structure reorganization that facilitates the performance improvements.

  17. Semi-Lagrangian integration of a grid-point shallow water model on the sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, A.; Bates, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a semi-Lagrangian technique for integrating the equations of motion on the global domain. The technique uses an auxiliary spherical coordinate system at each near-polar gridpoint of the latitude-longitude grid; the auxiliary system is obtained by a rotation such that the new equator passes through the gridpoint in question and the new coordinate directions coincide with those of the original system at that point. The technique was applied to the shallow water equations, incorporating a semiimplicit treatment of the adjustment terms on a C-grid, with two-time levels. A five day integration was successfully carried out for a situation involving strong cross-polar flow. No filtering or diffusion was required to maintain stability over a five day period.

  18. Solution of the stochastic generalized shallow-water wave equation using RVT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Abdallah; Selim, Mustafa M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, some exact solutions of the stochastic generalized nonlinear shallow-water wave (SGNSWW) equation are obtained. This equation is an important equation in fluid mechanics field. Opposite to what is usually assumed in the literature, the coefficients of the nonlinear terms in this stochastic nonlinear partial differential equation (SNLPDE) are considered to be random quantities. The random variable transformation (RVT) technique is combined with the modified extended-tanh function method (METFM) to get the stochastic solutions represented by the probability density functions (PDFs) of the solution processes in terms of the PDFs of the random coefficients. These solutions are illustrated graphically along the spacial and time dimensions at a certain wave speed.

  19. A Kalman filter for a two-dimensional shallow-water model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, D. F.; Cohn, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    A two-dimensional Kalman filter is described for data assimilation for making weather forecasts. The filter is regarded as superior to the optimal interpolation method because the filter determines the forecast error covariance matrix exactly instead of using an approximation. A generalized time step is defined which includes expressions for one time step of the forecast model, the error covariance matrix, the gain matrix, and the evolution of the covariance matrix. Subsequent time steps are achieved by quantifying the forecast variables or employing a linear extrapolation from a current variable set, assuming the forecast dynamics are linear. Calculations for the evolution of the error covariance matrix are banded, i.e., are performed only with the elements significantly different from zero. Experimental results are provided from an application of the filter to a shallow-water simulation covering a 6000 x 6000 km grid.

  20. Nonlinear Solver Approaches for the Diffusive Wave Approximation to the Shallow Water Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N.; Knepley, M.

    2015-12-01

    The diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations (DSW) is a doubly-degenerate, nonlinear, parabolic partial differential equation used to model overland flows. Despite its challenges, the DSW equation has been extensively used to model the overland flow component of various integrated surface/subsurface models. The equation's complications become increasingly problematic when ponding occurs, a feature which becomes pervasive when solving on large domains with realistic terrain. In this talk I discuss the various forms and regularizations of the DSW equation and highlight their effect on the solvability of the nonlinear system. In addition to this analysis, I present results of a numerical study which tests the applicability of a class of composable nonlinear algebraic solvers recently added to the Portable, Extensible, Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc).

  1. On the derivation of variational integrators for the rotating shallow-water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Werner; Gay-Balmaz, François

    2016-04-01

    We present a structure-preserving discretization of the rotating shallow-water equations. This novel numerical scheme is based on a finite dimensional approximation of the group of diffeomorphisms and is derived via a discrete version of the Euler-Poincaré variational formulation of rotating compressible fluids. The resulting variational integrator, currently derived for regular triangular meshes, provides the first successful derivation and implementation of a compressible two-dimensional model by this discrete variational principle. We illustrate on various test cases that this variationally derived scheme exhibits excellent long term energy behavior, shows a second order convergence rate in space, and respects conservation laws such as geostrophic balance and mass conservation.

  2. A potential enstrophy and energy conserving scheme for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, A.; Lamb, V. R.

    1981-01-01

    To improve the simulation of nonlinear aspects of the flow over steep topography, a potential enstrophy and energy conserving scheme for the shallow water equations is derived. It is pointed out that a family of schemes can conserve total energy for general flow and potential enstrophy for flow with no mass flux divergence. The newly derived scheme is a unique member of this family, that conserves both potential enstrophy and energy for general flow. Comparison by means of numerical experiment with a scheme that conserves (potential) enstrophy for purely horizontal nondivergent flow demonstrated the considerable superiority of the newly derived potential enstrophy and energy conserving scheme, not only in suppressing a spurious energy cascade but also in determining the overall flow regime. The potential enstrophy and energy conserving scheme for a spherical grid is also presented.

  3. Matched-impulse-response processing for shallow-water localization and geoacoustic inversion

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, impulse response matching is proposed for source localization and environmental inversion. The ocean impulse response is estimated using a cross-correlation procedure applied to data from the propagation of a broadband pulse in a shallow-water environment. Source localization and geoacoustic parameter estimation are then performed through time-domain correlations between the estimated impulse responses at spatially separated phones and synthetic replica impulse responses. The method is both spatially and temporally coherent. Parameter space search uses a hierarchical scheme designed to exploit the sensitivity of the acoustic field to the unknown parameters. Tested on the SWellEX-96 and synthetic data, the proposed method is shown to be more robust than conventional (linear), incoherent, broadband matched field processing. PMID:11108345

  4. Multi-carrier synthetic aperture communication in shallow water: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taehyuk; Song, H C; Hodgkiss, W S

    2011-12-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) communications in the presence of motion is investigated using data collected from the Kauai Acomms MURI 2008 (KAM08) experiment, conducted off the western side of Kauai, Hawaii, in June-July 2008. The experiment involved a vertical array moored in 106 m deep shallow water and a source towed at a speed of 3 knots at ranges between 600 m and 6 km. In order to attain reliable communications with only a single receive element, a synthetic aperture approach is applied. After combining multiple transmissions, an error-free reception is achieved with a low-density parity-check code, confirming the feasibility of coherent synthetic aperture communications using OFDM. PMID:22225037

  5. Observations of the R reflector and sediment interface reflection at the Shallow Water '06 Central Site.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jee Woong; Dahl, Peter H; Goff, John A

    2008-09-01

    Acoustic bottom-interacting measurements from the Shallow Water '06 experiment experiment (frequency range 1-20 kHz) are presented. These are co-located with coring and stratigraphic studies showing a thin (approximately 20 cm) higher sound speed layer overlaying a thicker (approximately 20 m) lower sound speed layer ending at a high-impedance reflector (R reflector). Reflections from the R reflector and analysis of the bottom reflection coefficient magnitude for the upper two sediment layers confirm both these features. Geoacoustic parameters are estimated, dispersion effects addressed, and forward modeling using the parabolic wave equation undertaken. The reflection coefficient measurements suggest a nonlinear attenuation law for the thin layer of sandy sediments. PMID:19045554

  6. Numerical study of the Guderley and Vasilev reflections in steady two-dimensional shallow water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defina, Andrea; Susin, Francesca Maria; Viero, Daniele Pietro

    2008-09-01

    We present high-resolution numerical solutions of the depth-averaged two-dimensional inviscid shallow water equations which provide new information on shock reflection configuration within the von Neumann paradox conditions. The computed flow field and shock wave patterns close to the triple point for the Guderley and the Vasilev reflections confirm the four-wave theory. We suggest that the most likely Guderley reflection model is a four-wave pattern with a compression wave that originates along the downstream boundary of the supercritical patch. The compression wave, after being refracted by the slip stream, turns the flow behind the Guderley stem further toward the wall until critical condition is achieved.

  7. Delayed blood-brain barrier disruption after shallow-water diving demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hadanny, Amir; Tal, Sigal; Fishlev, Gregori; Bechor, Yair; Efrati, Shai

    2015-06-01

    A 22-year-old diver presented to our emergency room complaining of headaches and left side numbness three days after diving to a depth of 6 metres for 25 minutes. On examination, he had left-sided hypaesthesia, and a post-contrast FLAIR brain MRI sequence revealed significant diffuse meningeal enhancement, indicating blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption. The patient was treated with hyperbaric oxygen; the initial four sessions resulted in only partial symptom improvement correlating with partial improvement in the MRI findings. Ten additional hyperbaric treatments resulted in complete resolution of the symptoms and normalization of MRI findings. The main aim of this case report is to present a probable, atypical, delayed-onset case of shallow-water decompression sickness culminating in significant BBB damage, which was demonstrated by special MRI techniques. PMID:26165534

  8. Stability Analysis of Tachocline Latitudinal Differential Rotation and Coexisting Toroidal Band Using a Shallow-Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Gilman, Peter A.; Rempel, Matthias

    2003-10-01

    Recently global, quasi-two-dimensional instabilities of tachocline latitudinal differential rotation have been studied using a so-called shallow-water model. While purely hydrodynamic shallow-water type disturbances were found to destabilize only the overshoot tachocline, the MHD analysis showed that in the presence of a broad toroidal field, both the radiative and overshoot parts of the tachocline can be unstable. We explore here instability in the shallow-water solar tachocline with concentrated toroidal bands placed at a wide range of latitudes, emulating different phases of the solar cycle. In equilibrium, the poleward magnetic curvature stress of the band is balanced either by an equatorward hydrostatic pressure gradient or by the Coriolis force from a prograde jet inside the band. We find that toroidal bands placed almost at all latitudes make the system unstable to shallow-water disturbances. For bands without prograde jets, the instability persists well above 100 kG peak field, while a jet stabilizes the band at a field of ~40 kG. The jet imparts gyroscopic inertia to the toroidal band inhibiting it from unstably ``tipping'' its axis away from rotation axis. Like previously studied HD and MHD shallow-water instabilities in the tachocline, unstable shallow-water modes found here produce kinetic helicity and hence a tachocline α-effect these narrow kinetic helicity profiles should generate narrowly confined poloidal fields, which will help formation of the narrow toroidal field. Toroidal bands poleward of 15° latitude suppress midlatitude hydrodynamic α-effects. However, even strong toroidal bands equatorward of 15° allow this hydrodynamic α-effect. Such bands should occur during the late declining phase of a solar cycle and, thus, could help the onset of a new cycle by switching on the mid latitude α-effect.

  9. Shallow-water flow past isolated topography. Part I: Vorticity production and wake formation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaer, C.; Smith, R.B. )

    1993-05-15

    The flow of a single layer of shallow water past high three-dimensional topography is studies in a nonrotating environment and in the absence of surface friction. The dimensionless parameters for this problem are the upstream Froude number, the dimensionless mountain height, and a dimensionless measure of the dissipation rate. In part I of this study, high-resolution numerical simulations are utilized to construct a regime diagram for steady left-right symmetric flow and for the domain of parameter space with subcritical upstream conditions. Three distinct regimes occur. They are characterized, respectively, by fore-aft symmetry, essentially inviscid dynamics, and entirely subcritical conditions (regime I); by transition to supercritical flow and the occurrence of a hydraulic jump over the lee slope (regime II); and by the inability of the flow to climb the mountain top resulting in flow separation (regime III). Regimes II and III are associated with a wake that entails significant potential vorticity features and sometimes reversed flow. Potential vorticity is produced by two related mechanisms. First, internal dissipation in the shallow-water system is generally not possible without potential vorticity production, even in an initially fully irrotational state and in absence of surface friction. The proof of this follows from a new theorem, which states that the steady-state Bernoulli function is the streamfunction of the total (i.e., advective and dissipative) vorticity flux. Second, flow separation in regime III can lead to the formation of contact discontinuities that are connected to the separation point and represent the inviscid limit of shearlines. Here potential vorticity production at the separation point is related to the joining of two streams of fluid with different values of the Bernoulli function. 59 refs., 13 figs.

  10. Stability analysis of Eulerian-Lagrangian methods for the one-dimensional shallow-water equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, V.; Cheng, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper stability and error analyses are discussed for some finite difference methods when applied to the one-dimensional shallow-water equations. Two finite difference formulations, which are based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, are discussed. In the first part of this paper the results of numerical analyses for an explicit Eulerian-Lagrangian method (ELM) have shown that the method is unconditionally stable. This method, which is a generalized fixed grid method of characteristics, covers the Courant-Isaacson-Rees method as a special case. Some artificial viscosity is introduced by this scheme. However, because the method is unconditionally stable, the artificial viscosity can be brought under control either by reducing the spatial increment or by increasing the size of time step. The second part of the paper discusses a class of semi-implicit finite difference methods for the one-dimensional shallow-water equations. This method, when the Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is used for the convective terms, is also unconditionally stable and highly accurate for small space increments or large time steps. The semi-implicit methods seem to be more computationally efficient than the explicit ELM; at each time step a single tridiagonal system of linear equations is solved. The combined explicit and implicit ELM is best used in formulating a solution strategy for solving a network of interconnected channels. The explicit ELM is used at channel junctions for each time step. The semi-implicit method is then applied to the interior points in each channel segment. Following this solution strategy, the channel network problem can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional open-channel flow problems. Numerical results support properties given by the stability and error analyses. ?? 1990.

  11. Dispersal of Shallow-Water Benthic Foraminifera - a Key to Current and Potential Future Distribution Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, A. E.; Goldstein, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    In recent decades, climate-driven range expansions of various warm-adapted marine species have been observed, including benthic foraminifera. Distribution models predict further poleward extensions in the future, which might result in significant impacts on native faunas, habitats and entire ecosystems. The prolific expansion and colonization of benthic foraminifera is related to propagule dispersal. Foraminiferal propagules - tiny juveniles - are transported well beyond their biogeographic ranges and are able to grow and become established under suitable conditions. Here, we focus on propagule dispersal along the southeastern coast of the United States. Sediment samples containing propagules were collected from different shallow-water locations along a latitudinal gradient from Sapelo Island (GA), Fort Pierce (FL) and the Florida Keys. We hypothesize that propagules of warm-adapted species might be transported farther to the North than their biogeographic boundaries indicate, and that their current distribution is limited. Applying the propagule method, we are growing foraminifera from propagules collected at these three sites under constant normal and elevated temperatures (18°, 24°, 30°C) and normal and reduced salinities (15 and 35‰) with illumination on a 12-hr cycle. These set-ups cover a wide range of shallow-water habitats from intertidal to environments more proximal to the open marine realm. They also reflect the temperature gradient along the southeastern coast. The occurrence of species typically confined to warmer regions in assemblages grown at elevated temperatures would support distribution models that predicted the further range expansion of warm-adapted species within the next decades. Thus, results of this study could provide a glimpse into the future.

  12. Phase space analysis and classification of sonar echoes in shallow-water channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okopal, Greg

    A primary objective of active sonar systems is to detect, locate, and classify objects, such as mines, ships, and biologics, based on their sonar backscatter. A shallow-water ocean channel is a challenging environment in which to classify sonar echoes because interactions of the sonar signal with the ocean surface and bottom induce frequency-dependent changes (especially dispersion and damping) in the signal as it propagates, the effects of which typically grow with range. Accordingly, the observed signal depends not only on the initial target backscatter, but also the propagation channel and how far the signal has propagated. These propagation effects can increase the variability of observed target echoes and degrade classification performance. Furthermore, uncertainty of the exact propagation channel and random variations within a channel cause classification features extracted from the received sonar echo to behave as random variables. With the goal of improving sonar signal classification in shallow-water environments, this work develops a phase space framework for studying sound propagation in channels with dispersion and damping. This approach leads to new moment features for classification that are invariant to dispersion and damping, the utility of which is demonstrated via simulation. In addition, the accuracy of a previously developed phase space approximation method for range-independent pulse propagation is analyzed and shown to be greater than the accuracy of the standard stationary phase approximation for both large and small times/distances. The phase space approximation is also extended to range dependent propagation. Finally, the phase space approximation is used to investigate the random nature of moment features for classification by calculating the moments of the moment features under uncertain and random channel assumptions. These moments of the moment features are used to estimate probability distribution functions for the moment features, and

  13. Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels: Insights from a sedimenting shallow water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Emma E.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Lube, Gert; Mader, Heidy M.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    2007-10-01

    A two layer model for the collapse and spreading of a granular column is presented. This model builds upon that of Larrieu et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 554, 669 (2006)] where the free fall collapse of the column and subsequent flow of material onto a plane is represented by a "raining" mass source term into a thin flowing layer of constant density. These modified shallow water equations with Coulomb friction capture the free surface of the flows and key scaling laws for initial sand columns of aspect ratios up to a <10. However, unrealistically high coefficients of friction of μ =0.9 are required to reproduce run-outs observed. Key scaling laws for high aspect ratio columns are also not captured. We thus extend the model of Larrieu (2006) to include an estimation for the interface between the static and flowing regions observed within granular collapses in the laboratory by Lube et al. [Phys. Fluids 19, 043301 (2007)]. An empirical sedimentation term Ls and the instantaneous removal of a static deposit wedge, seen in the laboratory, are incorporated into the "raining" shallow water model. The growing static deposit surface provides a basal topography for the flowing layer. For a constant empirical sedimentation rate of Ls=0.20m/s, a coefficient of friction of μ =0.4 simulates comparable run-outs to laboratory observations. The correct run-out dependence of a2/3 for columns of aspect ratio a >3 is also captured. Simulating this behavior for values of a above 10 has not been possible with previous continuum models. In addition, this model captures the correct dependence of final run-out time upon a0.5. The application of this extends beyond observed and simulated collapses, to sedimenting highly concentrated debris flows, useful in the development of large mechanistic numerical models utilized in hazard assessment.

  14. Stability of the train of N solitary waves for the two-component Camassa-Holm shallow water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingxing

    2016-06-01

    Considered herein is the integrable two-component Camassa-Holm shallow water system derived in the context of shallow water theory, which admits blow-up solutions and the solitary waves interacting like solitons. Using modulation theory, and combining the almost monotonicity of a local version of energy with the argument on the stability of a single solitary wave, we prove that the train of N solitary waves, which are sufficiently decoupled, is orbitally stable in the energy space H1 (R) ×L2 (R).

  15. An adaptive multiblock high-order finite-volume method for solving the shallow-water equations on the sphere

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, Peter; Ullrich, Paul; Johansen, Hans; Colella, Phillip

    2015-09-04

    We present a high-order finite-volume approach for solving the shallow-water equations on the sphere, using multiblock grids on the cubed-sphere. This approach combines a Runge--Kutta time discretization with a fourth-order accurate spatial discretization, and includes adaptive mesh refinement and refinement in time. Results of tests show fourth-order convergence for the shallow-water equations as well as for advection in a highly deformational flow. Hierarchical adaptive mesh refinement allows solution error to be achieved that is comparable to that obtained with uniform resolution of the most refined level of the hierarchy, but with many fewer operations.

  16. Macrophytes in shallow lakes: relationships with water, sediment and watershed characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kissoon, La Toya T; Jacob, Donna L; Hanson, Mark A; Herwig, Brian R; Bowe, Shane E; Otte, Marinus L

    2013-01-01

    We examined macrophyte-environment relationships in shallow lakes located within the Prairie Parkland and Laurentian Mixed Forest provinces of Minnesota. Environmental variables included land cover within lake watersheds, and within-lake, water and sediment characteristics. CCA indicated that sediment fraction smaller than 63 μm (f<63), open water area, turbidity, and percent woodland and agricultural cover in watersheds were significant environmental variables explaining 36.6% of variation in macrophyte cover. When Province was added to the analysis as a spatial covariate, these environmental variables explained 30.8% of the variation in macrophyte cover. CCA also indicated that pH, f<63, percent woodland cover in watersheds, open water area, emergent vegetation area, and organic matter content were significant environmental variables explaining 43.5% of the variation in macrophyte biomass. When Province was added to the analysis as a spatial covariate, these environmental variables explained 39.1% of the variation in macrophyte biomass. The f<63 was the most important environmental variable explaining variation for both measures of macrophyte abundance (cover and biomass) when Province was added as a spatial covariate to the models. Percent woodland in watersheds, turbidity, open water area, and Ca+Mg explained 34.5% of the variation in macrophyte community composition. Most species showed a negative relationship with turbidity and open water area except for Potamogeton richardsonii, Stuckenia pectinata, and filamentous algae. Our study further demonstrates the extent to which macrophyte abundance and community composition are related to site- and watershed-scale variables including lake morphology, water and sediment characteristics, and percent land cover of adjacent uplands. PMID:23997402

  17. Methods for Quantifying Shallow-Water Habitat Availability in the Missouri River

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2012-04-09

    As part of regulatory requirements for shallow-water habitat (SWH) restoration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completes periodic estimates of the quantity of SWH available throughout the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. To date, these estimates have been made by various methods that consider only the water depth criterion for SWH. The USACE has completed estimates of SWH availability based on both depth and velocity criteria at four river bends (hereafter called reference bends), encompassing approximately 8 river miles within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. These estimates were made from the results of hydraulic modeling of water depth and velocity throughout each bend. Hydraulic modeling of additional river bends is not expected to be completed for deriving estimates of available SWH. Instead, future estimates of SWH will be based on the water depth criterion. The objective of this project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the USACE Omaha District, was to develop geographic information system methods for estimating the quantity of available SWH based on water depth only. Knowing that only a limited amount of water depth and channel geometry data would be available for all the remaining bends within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River, the intent was to determine what information, if any, from the four reference bends could be used to develop methods for estimating SWH at the remaining bends. Specifically, we examined the relationship between cross-section channel morphology and relative differences between SWH estimates based on combined depth and velocity criteria and the depth-only criterion to determine if a correction factor could be applied to estimates of SWH based on the depth-only criterion. In developing these methods, we also explored the applicability of two commonly used geographic information system interpolation methods (TIN and ANUDEM) for estimating SWH using four different elevation data

  18. Climate impacts on water balance of a shallow steppe lake in Eastern Austria (Lake Neusiedl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Gerhard; Züger, Johann; Knoflacher, Markus; Kinner, Paul; Soja, Anna-Maria

    2013-02-01

    SummaryLake Neusiedl, the largest lake in Austria, is especially sensitive to climate variations due to its extreme shallowness and a small catchment area. Historical records indicate that large variations of the lake area have occurred naturally (0% to >150% of present) but contemporary touristic uses of the lake require a largely constant water level. This dependence increases the regional economic vulnerability. Water balance of the lake as influenced by weather conditions was studied in detail. 79% of water input was due to precipitation, whereas more than 90% of water output was caused by evapotranspiration. Long-term observation of annual and seasonal precipitation sums, starting in 1865, revealed a slow downward trend of 15 years moving averages by 6 ± 1 mm/decade, masked by large interannual variations of the original data (s.d.: ±120 mm). Multidecadal oscillation indices (AMO, NAO, MOI) were tested against patterns of precipitation, air temperature and hydrological parameters of Lake Neusiedl. The clearest relation was observed between air temperature and North Atlantic oscillation index (p < 0.0001). Water level and volume of Lake Neusiedl are very sensitive to precipitation changes with after effects of individual years lasting up to 2 years. Summer precipitation is more important for lake water amount than the other seasons. The major surface water input to Lake Neusiedl is coming from River Wulka. Its annual discharge (15 years moving averages) showed a variable, moderately decreasing trend for the period 1961-2010 by -1.2 ± 0.6 × 106 m3/decade. Waste water treatment plants contributed up to 68% of monthly flow of River Wulka into the lake. Precipitation of the current and the previous year, and in some months also temperature influenced Wulka's flow significantly. Evaporative losses from the lake and its reed belt were shown to increase over the last 33 years (+48 ± 11 mm/decade); as main drivers decreasing relative air humidity and increasing

  19. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Hermannsen, Line; Tougaard, Jakob; Beedholm, Kristian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-01-01

    Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3) at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m) in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r) geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re µPa2s (sound exposure level) and 200 dB re 1 µPa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration), and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters. PMID:26214849

  20. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hermannsen, Line; Tougaard, Jakob; Beedholm, Kristian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-01-01

    Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3) at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m) in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r) geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re µPa2s (sound exposure level) and 200 dB re 1 µPa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration), and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters. PMID:26214849

  1. Shallow sea-floor reflectance and water depth derived by unmixing multispectral imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwirth, P.N.; Lee, T.J.; Burne, R.V. Michigan Environmental Research Inst., Ann Arbor )

    1993-03-01

    A major problem for mapping shallow water zones by the analysis of remotely sensed data is that contrast effects due to water depth obscure and distort the special nature of the substrate. This paper outlines a new method which unmixes the exponential influence of depth in each pixel by employing a mathematical constraint. This leaves a multispectral residual which represents relative substrate reflectance. Input to the process are the raw multispectral data and water attenuation coefficients derived by the co-analysis of known bathymetry and remotely sensed data. Outputs are substrate-reflectance images corresponding to the input bands and a greyscale depth image. The method has been applied in the analysis of Landsat TM data at Hamelin Pool in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Algorithm derived substrate reflectance images for Landsat TM bands 1, 2, and 3 combined in color represent the optimum enhancement for mapping or classifying substrate types. As a result, this color image successfully delineated features, which were obscured in the raw data, such as the distributions of sea-grasses, microbial mats, and sandy area. 19 refs.

  2. Inference of tidal elevation in shallow water using a vessel-towed acoustic Doppler current profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Atkinson, Larry P.; Royer, Tom C.

    2000-11-01

    Vessel-towed acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have been widely used to measure velocity profiles. Since the instrument is usually mounted on a catamaran floating on the surface, previous studies have used the water surface as the reference level from which the vertical coordinate for the velocity profile is defined. However, because of the tidal oscillation, the vertical coordinate thus defined is time-dependent in an Earth-coordinate system, which introduces an error to the estimated harmonic constants for the velocity. As a result, the total transport will also be in error. This is particularly a problem in shallow waters where the tidal elevation is relatively large. Therefore tidal elevation needs to be resolved to make a correct harmonic analysis for the velocity. The present study is aimed at resolving the tidal elevation change in shallow water using a vessel-towed ADCP. Semidiurnal and diurnal tidal elevations across the lower Chesapeake Bay have been determined using a vessel-towed ADCP. Data from four cruises ranging from 25 to 92 hours in 1996 and 1997 are used. Water depth averaged every 30 s by the ADCP is studied by harmonic and statistical analysis. By selecting only the data within a narrow band (˜320 m) over the planned transect, we are able to improve the reliability of the data. We then grid the depth data along the 16 km transect into 200 equal segments and use harmonic analysis to resolve the semidiurnal and diurnal tidal variations within each segment. We find that (1) the depth data from the ADCP contain both semidiurnal and diurnal signals that can be resolved, from which the surface elevation can be inferred, (2) the major error appears to come from spatial variation of the depth, (3) the semidiurnal and diurnal tidal variations of elevation inferred over flat bottom topography account for almost 100% of the total variability, while those measurements over large bottom slopes account for a much lower percentage of the total

  3. Shallow Water Euxinia and Density Stratification of the Cenomanian/Turonian Western Interior Seaway in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, M.; Pope, M. C.; Tice, M. M.; Gardner, R.; Donovan, A. D.; Staerker, S.; Lyon, T.; Maulana, I.; Pramudito, A.; Xu, G.; Zeng, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The Eagle Ford Group was deposited at the south and east side of the Western Interior Seaway (WIS). These sediments contain evidence of anoxia and shallow-water deposition (between storm-wave and fair weather wave-base) in the proximal deposits at Lozier Canyon and Antonio Creek (LC/AC). Shallow-water (above storm wave-base) depositional conditions are mostly based on the suite of primary sedimentary structures that includes: hummocky cross-stratification (HCS), swaley cross-stratification (SCS), symmetric ripples, gutter casts and shell lags. These occur in outcrop and support the interpretation that LC/AC is the most proximal location relative to other study locations. At Hot Springs in Brewster County, Texas, sedimentary structures are limited to shell lags, a few symmetric ripples and low-angle laminations. This is consistent with the distal expression of storm deposits. The primary sedimentary structures from the core from the subsurface in McMullen County, south Texas, are limited to those of low-energy currents, scouring, and reworking, which could indicate it is in the distally steepened portion of the carbonate ramp on which Eagle Ford Groups are deposited. Pelagic foraminifera are the most microfossil and benthic foraminifera only occur in the Upper Eagle Formation at LC/AC. Molybdenum was also used as a proxy for occurrence and persistence of a sulfer-reducing zone. The geochemical data from the subsurface core suggests persistence of anoxia throughout its depositional history. At LC/AC, molybdenum is elevated (up to 5-6 times average shale value) and bioturbation in these zones is limited to the surfaces of symmetric ripples, suggesting that oxygenation events were brief and occurred only immediately after storm events. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the HCS, SCS, and symmetric ripples were caused by storms and temporarily mixed the ocean in a normally stratified water column. At LC/AC, the water column became persistently oxic from the

  4. Shallow water submarine hydrothermal activity - A case study in the assessment of ocean acidification and fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yoshida, K.; Hagiwara, T.; Nagao, K.; Kusakabe, M.; Wang, B.; Chen, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Most natural Shallow Water submarine Hydrothermal activates (SWH) along coastlines are related to hydrothermal eruptions involving heating of groundwater with the volcanic gas. These SWHs supply nutrients such as phosphorus and micro nutrients like iron to the euphotic zone, contributing to the overall natural fertility and primary productivity of coastal waters. However, SWHs also have a negative effect, dispersing toxic materials such as mercury and arsenic, and affecting the acidification of the surrounding waters. In this study, we evaluate the impact of "iron supply" and "ocean acidification" on the primary production in a coastal marine environment, at a SWH area discovered off Gueshandao Island, northeast Taiwan. In the past three years, expeditions were conducted and observations made around this SWH site. Divers, small boats and a research vessel (R/V OR1, Ocean University National Taiwan) were used to survey successively larger areas around the site. Some of the results obtained are as follows. Hydrothermal vents are located in a hilly terrain rich with hot spring water with gas erupting intermittently. There are two types of vents, roughly divided by color, yellow hot spring water with higher temperature >110 degC ejected from sulfur chimneys of various sizes, and colorless water with lower temperature ~80 degC ejected directly from the crevices of the andesitic bedrock. Natural sulfur solidifying in the mouth of a small chimney was captured by a video camera, and explosions were also observed at intervals of a few minutes. Sediment, sand and particles of sulfur were deposited on the sides to a radius of about 50 m condensing around the chimney. The bottom type changes from sand/particles to outcrop/rock away from the vents. Moreover, gas samples were collected from the vents; the ratios of gas concentrations (N2/Ar) and isotopic composition of noble gas (3He/4He) suggest that these volcanic gases are mantle-derived. Hydrothermal fluid with high p

  5. A Field Test of Electromigration as a Method for Remediating Sulfate from Shallow Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, C.G.; Runnells, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    Electromigration offers a potential tool for remediating ground water contaminated with highly soluble components, such as Na+, Cl-, NO3-, and SO4-. A field experiment was designed to test the efficacy of electromigration for preconcentrating dissolved SO42- in ground water associated with a fossil-fuel power plant. Two shallow wells, 25 feet apart (one 25 feet deep, the other 47 feet deep), were constructed in the upper portion of an unconfined alluvial aquifer. The wells were constructed with a double-wall design, with an outer casing of 4-inch PVC and an inner tube of 2-inch PVC; both were fully slotted (0.01 inch). Electrodes were constructed by wrapping the inner tubing with a 100-foot length of rare-earth metal oxide/copper wire. An electrical potential of 10.65 volts DC was applied, and tests were run for periods of 12, 44, and 216 hours. Results showed large changes in the pH from the initial pH of ground water of about 7.5 to values of approximately 2 and 12 at the anode and cathode, respectively. Despite the fact that the test conditions were far from ideal, dissolved SO42- was significantly concentrated at the anode. Over a period of approximately nine days, the concentration of SO42- at the anode reached what appeared to be a steady-state value of 2200 mg/L, compared to the initial value in ground water of approximately 1150 mg/L. The results of this field test should encourage further investigation of electromigration as a tool in the remediation of contaminated ground water.

  6. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Wang, Jun; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin; DeGrado, William F.; Gai, Feng; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2014-06-01

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  7. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Gai, Feng E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin

    2014-06-21

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  8. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Wang, Jun; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin; DeGrado, William F.; Gai, Feng; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs. PMID:24952572

  9. Nitrate movement in shallow ground water from swine-lagoon-effluent spray fields managed under current application regulations.

    PubMed

    Israel, Daniel W; Showers, William J; Fountain, Matthew; Fountain, John

    2005-01-01

    Rapid increases in the swine (Sus scrofa domestica) population in the 1990s and associated potential for nitrate N pollution of surface waters led the state of North Carolina to adopt stringent waste management regulations in 1993. Our objectives were to characterize (i) nitrate N movement from waste application fields (WAFs) in shallow ground water, and (ii) soil, hydrologic, and biological factors influencing the amount of nitrate N in the adjacent stream. A ground water monitoring study was conducted for 36 mo on a swine farm managed under new regulations. Water table contours and lack of vertical gradients indicated horizontal flow over most of the site. Nitrate N concentrations in water from shallow wells in WAFs averaged 30 +/- 19 mg L(-1) and delta15N ratios for nitrate N were between +20 and +25 per mil. Nitrate N concentration decreased from field-edge to streamside wells by 22 to 99%. Measurement of delta18O and delta15N enrichment of nitrate in ground water throughout the WAF-riparian system indicated that denitrification has not caused significant 15N enrichment of nitrate. Over a 24-mo period, delta15N ratios for nitrate N in the stream approached delta15N ratios for nitrate N in ground water beneath WAFs indicating delivery of some waste-derived nitrate N to the stream in shallow ground water. Nitrate N concentrations in the stream were relatively low, averaging 1 mg L(-1). Dilution of high nitrate N water in shallow horizontal flow paths with low nitrate N water from deeper horizontal flow paths at or near the stream, some denitrification as ground water discharges through the stream bottom, and some denitrification in riparian zone contributed to this low nitrate N concentration. PMID:16151235

  10. Improving shallow-water carbonate chemostratigraphy by means of rudist bivalve sclerochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, S.; Heimhofer, U.

    2015-09-01

    Deep-time shallow-marine carbonate platforms record distinct biotic responses to climatic and environmental stressors. Unfortunately, precise temporal assignment of these biotic responses is often problematical due to poor biostratigraphic control and/or a significant diagenetic overprint of the neritic bulk carbonate chemostratigraphic inventory. An accurate stratigraphic framework is essential to better understand the causal relation between biotic events recorded by carbonate platforms and environmental changes that, for instance, culminated in mass extinction events or prolonged episodes of oceanic anoxia. Here we provide an integrated carbon and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of the Early Cretaceous subtropical Provence carbonate platform in SE France that is based solely on pristine low-Mg calcite from rudist bivalves. Carbon-isotope data of geochemically screened rudist fragments enabled reconstruction of a characteristic Barremian pattern including the Mid-Barremian Event (MBE) that allowed for a precise correlation with stratigraphically well-constrained Tethyan shallow-water and hemipelagic reference sections. In order to evaluate ontogenetic carbon-isotope changes and the overall variability of the shell-derived carbon-isotope data, numerous sclerochronological carbon-isotope profiles of individual large rudist shells are presented. Strontium-isotope stratigraphy supports the carbon-isotope-based age of the studied sections, but also provides unequivocal evidence for a major hiatus in the depositional record covering large parts of the Late Barremian. In contrast to biostratigraphic and bulk carbonate chemostratigraphic archives, the here established chronostratigraphy of carbonate platform evolution in the southern Provence region demonstrates a twofold resurgence of rudist-rich carbonate platform production during the Early Aptian and arguably the latest Early Aptian.

  11. Evidence for debris flow gully formation initiated by shallow subsurface water on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanza, N.L.; Meyer, G.A.; Okubo, C.H.; Newsom, Horton E.; Wiens, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    The morphologies of some martian gullies appear similar to terrestrial features associated with debris flow initiation, erosion, and deposition. On Earth, debris flows are often triggered by shallow subsurface throughflow of liquid water in slope-mantling colluvium. This flow causes increased levels of pore pressure and thus decreased shear strength, which can lead to slide failure of slope materials and subsequent debris flow. The threshold for pore pressure-induced failure creates a distinct relationship between the contributing area supplying the subsurface flow and the slope gradient. To provide initial tests of a similar debris flow initiation hypothesis for martian gullies, measurements of the contributing areas and slope gradients were made at the channel heads of martian gullies seen in three HiRISE stereo pairs. These gullies exhibit morphologies suggestive of debris flows such as leveed channels and lobate debris fans, and have well-defined channel heads and limited evidence for multiple flows. Our results show an area-slope relationship for these martian gullies that is consistent with that observed for terrestrial gullies formed by debris flow, supporting the hypothesis that these gullies formed as the result of saturation of near-surface regolith by a liquid. This model favors a source of liquid that is broadly distributed within the source area and shallow; we suggest that such liquid could be generated by melting of broadly distributed icy materials such as snow or permafrost. This interpretation is strengthened by observations of polygonal and mantled terrain in the study areas, which are both suggestive of near-surface ice. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  12. Landscape-Level Variation in Disease Susceptibility Related to Shallow-Water Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Breitburg, Denise L.; Hondorp, Darryl; Audemard, Corinne; Carnegie, Ryan B.; Burrell, Rebecca B.; Trice, Mark; Clark, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Diel-cycling hypoxia is widespread in shallow portions of estuaries and lagoons, especially in systems with high nutrient loads resulting from human activities. Far less is known about the effects of this form of hypoxia than deeper-water seasonal or persistent low dissolved oxygen. We examined field patterns of diel-cycling hypoxia and used field and laboratory experiments to test its effects on acquisition and progression of Perkinsus marinus infections in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, as well as on oyster growth and filtration. P. marinus infections cause the disease known as Dermo, have been responsible for declines in oyster populations, and have limited success of oyster restoration efforts. The severity of diel-cycling hypoxia varied among shallow monitored sites in Chesapeake Bay, and average daily minimum dissolved oxygen was positively correlated with average daily minimum pH. In both field and laboratory experiments, diel-cycling hypoxia increased acquisition and progression of infections, with stronger results found for younger (1-year-old) than older (2-3-year-old) oysters, and more pronounced effects on both infections and growth found in the field than in the laboratory. Filtration by oysters was reduced during brief periods of exposure to severe hypoxia. This should have reduced exposure to waterborne P. marinus, and contributed to the negative relationship found between hypoxia frequency and oyster growth. Negative effects of hypoxia on the host immune response is, therefore, the likely mechanism leading to elevated infections in oysters exposed to hypoxia relative to control treatments. Because there is considerable spatial variation in the frequency and severity of hypoxia, diel-cycling hypoxia may contribute to landscape-level spatial variation in disease dynamics within and among estuarine systems. PMID:25671595

  13. Landscape-level variation in disease susceptibility related to shallow-water hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Breitburg, Denise L; Hondorp, Darryl; Audemard, Corinne; Carnegie, Ryan B; Burrell, Rebecca B; Trice, Mark; Clark, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Diel-cycling hypoxia is widespread in shallow portions of estuaries and lagoons, especially in systems with high nutrient loads resulting from human activities. Far less is known about the effects of this form of hypoxia than deeper-water seasonal or persistent low dissolved oxygen. We examined field patterns of diel-cycling hypoxia and used field and laboratory experiments to test its effects on acquisition and progression of Perkinsus marinus infections in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, as well as on oyster growth and filtration. P. marinus infections cause the disease known as Dermo, have been responsible for declines in oyster populations, and have limited success of oyster restoration efforts. The severity of diel-cycling hypoxia varied among shallow monitored sites in Chesapeake Bay, and average daily minimum dissolved oxygen was positively correlated with average daily minimum pH. In both field and laboratory experiments, diel-cycling hypoxia increased acquisition and progression of infections, with stronger results found for younger (1-year-old) than older (2-3-year-old) oysters, and more pronounced effects on both infections and growth found in the field than in the laboratory. Filtration by oysters was reduced during brief periods of exposure to severe hypoxia. This should have reduced exposure to waterborne P. marinus, and contributed to the negative relationship found between hypoxia frequency and oyster growth. Negative effects of hypoxia on the host immune response is, therefore, the likely mechanism leading to elevated infections in oysters exposed to hypoxia relative to control treatments. Because there is considerable spatial variation in the frequency and severity of hypoxia, diel-cycling hypoxia may contribute to landscape-level spatial variation in disease dynamics within and among estuarine systems. PMID:25671595

  14. Shallow water mud-mounds of the Early Devonian Buchan Group, East Gippsland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosolini, A.-M. P.; Wallace, M. W.; Gallagher, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Lower Devonian Rocky Camp Member of the Murrindal Limestone, Buchan Group of southeastern Australia consists of a series of carbonate mud-mounds and smaller lagoonal bioherms. The Rocky Camp mound is the best exposed of the mud-mounds and has many characteristics in common with Waulsortian (Carboniferous) mounds. Detailed paleoecological and sedimentological studies indicate that the mound initially accumulated in the photic zone, in contrast to most of the previously recorded mud-mounds. Five facies are present in the mud-mound: a Dasycladacean Wackestone Facies at the base of the mound represents a moderate energy, shallow water bank environment within the photic zone. A Crinioidal Wackestone Facies was deposited in a laterally equivalent foreslope setting. A Poriferan-Crinoidal Mudstone Facies developed in a quiet, deeper water, lee-side mound setting associated with a minor relative sea-level rise. A Stromatoporoid-Coralline Packstone Facies in the upper part of the mound deposited in a high-energy, fair-weather wave base, mound-front environment. The crest of the mound is represented by a Crinoidal-Receptaculitid Packstone Facies indicative of a moderate-energy mound-top environment in the photic zone, sheltered by the mound-front stromatoporoid-coral communities. A mound flank facies is present on the southern side of the mound and this consists of high-energy crinoidal grainstones. Mud-mound deposition was terminated by a transgression that deposited dark gray, fossil-poor marl of the overlying Taravale Formation. The Rocky Camp mound appears to have originated in shallow water photic zone conditions and grew into a high-energy environment, with the mound being eventually colonized by corals and stromatoporoids. The indications of a high-energy environment during later mound growth (growth form of colonial metazoans and grainstones of the flanking facies) suggest that the micrite in the mound was autochthonous and implies the presence of an energy

  15. Advances in Shallow-Water, High-Resolution Seafloor Mapping: Integrating an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) Into Nearshore Geophysical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, J. F.; O'Brien, T. F.; Bergeron, E.; Twichell, D.; Worley, C. R.; Danforth, W. W.; Andrews, B. A.; Irwin, B.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been heavily involved in geological mapping of the seafloor since the 1970s. Early mapping efforts such as GLORIA provided broad-scale imagery of deep waters (depths > 400 meters) within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). In the early 1990's, the USGS research emphasis shifted from deep- to shallow-water environments (inner continental shelf, nearshore, estuaries) to address pertinent coastal issues such as erosion, sediment availability, sediment transport, vulnerability of coastal areas to natural and anthropogenic hazards, and resource management. Geologic framework mapping in these shallow- water environments has provided valuable data used to 1) define modern sediment distribution and thickness, 2) determine underlying stratigraphic and structural controls on shoreline behavior, and 3) enable onshore-to- offshore geologic mapping within the coastal zone when coupled with subaerial techniques such as GPR and topographic LIDAR. Research in nearshore areas presents technological challenges due to the dynamics of the environment, high volume of data collected, and the geophysical limitations of operating in very shallow water. In 2004, the USGS, in collaboration with NOAA's Coastal Services Center, began a multi-year seafloor mapping effort to better define oyster habitats within Apalachicola Bay, Florida, a shallow water estuary along the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bay poses a technological challenge due to its shallow depths (< 4-m) and high turbidity that prohibits the use of bathymetric LIDAR. To address this extreme shallow water setting, the USGS incorporated an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) into seafloor mapping operations, in June 2006. The ASV is configured with a chirp sub-bottom profiler (4 24 kHz), dual-frequency chirp sidescan-sonar (100/500 kHz), single-beam echosounder (235 kHz), and forward-looking digital camera, and will be used to delineate the distribution and thickness of surficial sediment, presence

  16. Subsurface detection of coral reefs in shallow waters using hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Luis O.; Velez-Reyes, Miguel; Gilbes, Fernando; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2003-09-01

    Hyperspectral Remote Sensing has the potential to be used as an effective coral monitoring system from either space or airborne sensors. The problems to be addressed in hyperspectral imagery of coastal waters are related to the medium, which presents high scattering and absorption, and the object to be detected. The object to be detected, in this case coral reefs or different types of ocean floor, has a weak signal as a consequence of its interaction with the medium. The retrieval of information about these targets requires the development of mathematical models and processing tools in the area of inversion, image reconstruction and detection. This paper presents the development of algorithms that does not use labeled samples to detect coral reefs under coastal shallow waters. Synthetic data was generated to simulate data gathered using a high resolution imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) sensor. A semi-analytic model that simplifies the radiative transfer equation was used to quantify the interaction between the object of interest, the medium and the sensor. Tikhonov method of regularization was used as a starting point in order to arrive at an inverse formulation that incorporates a priori information about the target. This expression will be used in an inversion process on a pixel by pixel basis to estimate the ocean floor signal. The a priori information is in the form of previously measured spectral signatures of objects of interest, such as sand, corals, and sea grass.

  17. Multiple tracers of shallow ground-water flow and recharge in hilly loess

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, R.; Keller, C.K.; Smith, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    Vertical profiles of tritium and nitrate pore-water concentrations were determined to {approximately}8 m depth across two loess hillslopes. Mean recharge fluxes, estimated from chloride mass balance, are 5--10 times larger at the mid- and toe-slope positions than at the top-slope; the magnitudes of the values compare reasonably with results from other methods. The tritium and nitrate profiles exhibit multiple peaks which indicate that piston flow is not the sole flow process in this system. Results of a simple 1-D mixing model suggest that infiltration-exfiltration cycles in zones of plant root activity explain the shallow tritium peaks. Deeper peaks result from preferential vertical and/or lateral flow. The importance of these dispersive processes is underlined by great dilution of observed tritium concentrations, relative to expected concentrations assuming piston flow. In this setting, chloride is useful as a recharge estimator while tritium and nitrate serve as tracers of landscape-scale water movement.

  18. Exact traveling wave solutions and L1 stability for the shallow water wave model of moderate amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Guo, Yunxi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we developed, for the first time, the exact expressions of several periodic travelling wave solutions and a solitary wave solution for a shallow water wave model of moderate amplitude. Then, we present the existence theorem of the global weak solutions. Finally, we prove the stability of solution in L1(R) space for the Cauchy problem of the equation.

  19. A new approach to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsang-Jung; Chang, Kao-Hua; Kao, Hong-Ming

    2014-11-01

    A new approach to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels is proposed by using a Lagrangian meshless method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The Lagrangian form of the Boussinesq equations is solved through SPH to merge the local and convective derivatives as the material derivative. In the numerical SPH procedure, the present study uses a predictor-corrector method, in which the pure space derivative terms (the hydrostatic and source terms) are explicitly solved and the mixed space and time derivatives term (the material term of B1 and B2) is computed with an implicit scheme. It is thus a convenient tool in the processes of the space discretization compared to other Eulerian approaches. Four typical benchmark problems in weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows, including solitary wave propagation, nonlinear interaction of two solitary waves, dambreak flow propagation, and undular bore development, are selected to employ model validation under the closed and open boundary conditions. Numerical results are compared with the analytical solutions or published laboratory and numerical results. It is found that the proposed approach is capable of resolving weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows. Thus, the proposed SPH approach can supplement the lack of the SPH-Boussinesq researches in the literatures, and provide an alternative to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels.

  20. A high-resolution finite volume model for shallow water flow on uneven bathymetry using quadrilateral meshes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-dimensional cell-centred finite volume model for quadrilateral grids is presented. The solution methodology of the depth-averaged shallow water equations is based upon a Godunov-type upwind finite volume formulation, whereby the inviscid fluxes of the system of equations are obtained using the...

  1. Meshless collocation methods for the numerical solution of elliptic boundary valued problems the rotational shallow water equations on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Christopher D.

    This dissertation thesis has three main goals: (1) To explore the anatomy of meshless collocation approximation methods that have recently gained attention in the numerical analysis community; (2) Numerically demonstrate why the meshless collocation method should clearly become an attractive alternative to standard finite-element methods due to the simplicity of its implementation and its high-order convergence properties; (3) Propose a meshless collocation method for large scale computational geophysical fluid dynamics models. We provide numerical verification and validation of the meshless collocation scheme applied to the rotational shallow-water equations on the sphere and demonstrate computationally that the proposed model can compete with existing high performance methods for approximating the shallow-water equations such as the SEAM (spectral-element atmospheric model) developed at NCAR. A detailed analysis of the parallel implementation of the model, along with the introduction of parallel algorithmic routines for the high-performance simulation of the model will be given. We analyze the programming and computational aspects of the model using Fortran 90 and the message passing interface (mpi) library along with software and hardware specifications and performance tests. Details from many aspects of the implementation in regards to performance, optimization, and stabilization will be given. In order to verify the mathematical correctness of the algorithms presented and to validate the performance of the meshless collocation shallow-water model, we conclude the thesis with numerical experiments on some standardized test cases for the shallow-water equations on the sphere using the proposed method.

  2. Appraisal of shallow ground-water resources and management alternatives in the Upper Peace and Eastern Alafia River Basins, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    In southwest Florida, the shallow aquifer system underlying the 1,250-square-mile upper Peace and eastern Alafia River basins is a relatively untapped source of supply. The aquifer system ranges between 50 and 300 feet thick and is composed of a surficial sand unit underlain by a limestone unit. Sand and clay confining beds separate the shallow aquifer system from the highly productive, extensively developed deep aquifer system. The hydrologic budget of the area indicates that annual leakage of water from the shallow to the deep aquifer system is 2.6 inches while annual pumpage from the deep aquifer system averages 5.5 inches. Management alternatives to be considered for efficient use of the shallow ground-water resources include development by withdrawal wells or connector wells for recharge. One solution for a gridded network of wells consists of 540 wells spaced 7,000 feet apart, each producing 453 gallons per minute. The network would derive water to meet demand by capturing water that would normally have run off evapotranspired. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Quality of shallow ground water in alluvial aquifers of the Williamette Basin, Oregon, 1993-95. National water-quality assessment program. Water-resources investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, S.R.

    1997-12-31

    The purposes of this report are to describe the quality of shallow ground water in alluvial aquifers of the Willamette Basin and to identify relationships between shallow ground-water quality and various natural and anthropogenic factors. Several natural and anthropogenic factors (soil characteristics, cumulative thickness of clay above open interval of well, surficial geology, and land use) were evaluated because of the potential for these factors to either control or be related to contaminant occurrence and spatial distribution. Spatial distributions of nitrite plus nitrate, phosphorous, pesticides and pesticide degradation products, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), trace elements (primarily arsenic, a trace element of local concern), and radon were evaluated for 1993-95. Ancillary chemical data--nitrite, chloride, tritium (H-3), and dissolved-oxygen (DO) concentrations--also are presented.

  4. An Ion’s Perspective on the Molecular Motions of Nano-confined Water: A 2D IR Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhat K; Kuroda, Daniel G.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    The vibrational population relaxation and the hydration shell dynamics of the symmetric tricyanomethanide (TCM) anion is investigated in AOT reverse micelle as a function of the water pool radius. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy in combination with linear absorption and ultrafast IR pump-probe spectroscopy is utilized in this study. Spectroscopic measurements show that the anion has two bands in the 2160 – 2175 cm−1 region, each with its own spectroscopic signatures. Analysis of the vibrational dynamics shows that the two vibrational bands are consistent with the anion located either at the interface or in the water pool. The sensitivity of the TCM anion to the environment allows us to unequivocally monitor the vibrational and hydration dynamics of the anion in those two different environments. TCM anion located at the interface does not show any significant variation of the vibrational dynamics with the water pool size. On the contrary, the TCM anion inside the water pool exhibits a large and non-linear variation of the vibrational lifetime and the frequency-frequency correlation time with the pool radius. Moreover for the solvated anion in water pools of 49 Å in radius (W0=30), the vibrational lifetime reaches the values observed for the anion in bulk water while the frequency-frequency correlation time shows a characteristic time higher than that observed in the bulk. In addition, for the first time a model is developed and used to explain the observed non-linear variation of the spectroscopic observables with the pool size. This model attributes the changes in the vibrational dynamics of the TCM anion in the water pool to the slow and radius dependent water dynamics present in the confined environment of a reverse micelle. PMID:23855349

  5. Landslides falling onto a shallow erodible substrate or water layer: an experimental and numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, G. B.; De Blasio, F. V.; Locatelli, M.; Imposimato, S.; Roddeman, D.

    2015-09-01

    Landslides often collapse in areas covered by alluvial deposits forming an erodible layer. This erodible substrate may deform plastically under the intense shear stress of the landslide mass. In other cases, the collapse occurs onto a water basin or tidal flat, creating impulse water waves whilst the landslide may be lubricated by a water layer underneath. In either cases the presence of a medium underneath the landslide will change its dynamics introducing complex processes. While frictional, dry masses and taluses generally hamper the landslide motion. In this work, we present some experiments mimicking the collapse of a landslide onto shallow erodible or water layers. The landslide is simulated with a granular material (sand or gravel) flowing on an incline (35-66°) followed by a horizontal sector covered with a granular bed 1 to 2 cm thick or with a 0.5-1 cm of water. Monitoring evolution in time allows us to describe in detail the process of fluidization of the material at impact, the generation of impact waves, and the erosion process. Concerning impact on a sand layer, the apparent friction coefficient (H/L) is found to increase with the chute slope angle and with the thickness of the erodible layer, and to decrease with the volume. At low slope angles, the material accumulates backwards in a shock wave mode, while at larger slope angles (>45°) it accumulates by prograding forward. A granular avalanche falling from the slope is partially reflected at the sharp slope break where erosion occurs and then propagates initially as a wave partially eroding the superficial material. Folding and thrusting occur within the dense shear flow and the erodible layer. Experiments with a water layer show that the dynamics depends much on the permeability of the granular avalanche. FEM numerical simulations replicate and allow to describe and understand both the spreading and the erosion, and internal deformation recorded in the erodible layer. Experimental findings are

  6. Pumping strategies for management of a shallow water table: The value of the simulation-optimization approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, P.M.; Wagner, B.J.; Belitz, K.

    1996-01-01

    The simulation-optimization approach is used to identify ground-water pumping strategies for control of the shallow water table in the western San Joaquin Valley, California, where shallow ground water threatens continued agricultural productivity. The approach combines the use of ground-water flow simulation with optimization techniques to build on and refine pumping strategies identified in previous research that used flow simulation alone. Use of the combined simulation-optimization model resulted in a 20 percent reduction in the area subject to a shallow water table over that identified by use of the simulation model alone. The simulation-optimization model identifies increasingly more effective pumping strategies for control of the water table as the complexity of the problem increases; that is, as the number of subareas in which pumping is to be managed increases, the simulation-optimization model is better able to discriminate areally among subareas to determine optimal pumping locations. The simulation-optimization approach provides an improved understanding of controls on the ground-water flow system and management alternatives that can be implemented in the valley. In particular, results of the simulation-optimization model indicate that optimal pumping strategies are constrained by the existing distribution of wells between the semiconfined and confined zones of the aquifer, by the distribution of sediment types (and associated hydraulic conductivities) in the western valley, and by the historical distribution of pumping throughout the western valley.

  7. A New Microbial Player on the Iron Redox Court of Shallow-Water Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Rodriguez, I. M.; Rawls, M.; Coykendall, D. K.; Foustoukos, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple is thought to have been a significant early energy metabolism involved in some of the first biogeochemical processes on Earth (Weber et al., 2006). The early evolving and metal-rich nature of modern hydrothermal systems remain particularly significant for Fe-based activities (Vargas et al., 1998). Documented evidence from such systems show a variety of yet unknown microbial lineages potentially linked to the history of Fe (i.e., Meyer-Dombard and Amend, 2014). Here we describe a novel microbe that reduces Fe(III) at shallow-water hydrothermal vents in Milos Island, Greece. Our laboratory experiments show this strain, MAG-PB1T, to reduce Fe(III) between 30 - 70 °C, 0 - 50 g NaCl l-1 and pH 5.5 - 8.0. Shortest generation time occurred under optimal conditions (60 °C, ~1.8 g NaCl l-1, pH 6.0) with H2 as the energy source, CO2 as the carbon source and Fe(III) as electron acceptor. Its metabolic characteristics are, however, not limited to this pathway. Strain MAG-PB1T can also reduce Mn(IV), arsenate and selenate. Its use of at least 9 organic substrates as energy or carbon sources also demonstrates its mixotrophy. Phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene analyses place strain MAG-PB1T within the Deltaproteobacteria, with the closest match (99%) being an uncultured microbe from hydrothermal springs in Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea (Meyer-Dombard and Amend, 2014). Its next closest match (97%) is Deferrisoma camini, isolated from a deep-sea vent in the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (Slobodkina et al. 2012). Our strain represents a novel species, which we named Deferrisoma paleochoriense. The occurrence of D. paleochoriense in the shallow-water vents of Milos and Ambitle islands coincides with high arsenic, iron and sulfide contents (Akerman et al., 2011; Price et al., 2013; Yücel et al., 2013). Consequently, our study provides important physiological and metabolic evidence of the feedback between metal chemistry and life in hydrothermal sytems rich in

  8. Dynamic drivers of a shallow-water hydrothermal vent ecogeochemical system (Milos, Eastern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Mustafa; Sievert, Stefan; Giovanelli, Donato; Foustoukos, Dionysis; DeForce, Emelia; Thomas, François; Vetriani, Constantino; Le Bris, Nadine

    2014-05-01

    Shallow-water hydrothermal vents share many characteristics with their deep-sea analogs. However, despite ease of access, much less is known about the dynamics of these systems. Here, we report on the spatial and temporal chemical variability of a shallow-water vent system at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece, and on the bacterial and archaeal diversity of associated sandy sediments. Our multi-analyte voltammetric profiles of dissolved O2 and hydrothermal tracers (e.g. Fe2+, FeSaq, Mn2+) on sediment cores taken along a transect in hydrothermally affected sediments indicate three different areas: the central vent area (highest temperature) with a deeper penetration of oxygen into the sediment, and a lack of dissolved Fe2+ and Mn2+; a middle area (0.5 m away) rich in dissolved Fe2+ and Mn2+ (exceeding 2 mM) and high free sulfide with potential for microbial sulfide oxidation as suggested by the presence of white mats at the sediment surface; and, finally, an outer rim area (1-1.5 m away) with lower concentrations of Fe2+ and Mn2+ and higher signals of FeSaq, indicating an aged hydrothermal fluid contribution. In addition, high-frequency temperature series and continuous in situ H2S measurements with voltammetric sensors over a 6-day time period at a distance 0.5 m away from the vent center showed substantial temporal variability in temperature (32 to 46 ºC ) and total sulfide (488 to 1329 µM) in the upper sediment layer. Analysis of these data suggests that tides, winds, and abrupt geodynamic events generate intermittent mixing conditions lasting for several hours to days. Despite substantial variability, the concentration of sulfide available for chemoautotrophic microbes remained high. These findings are consistent with the predominance of Epsilonproteobacteria in the hydrothermally influenced sediments Diversity and metagenomic analyses on sediments and biofilm collected along a transect from the center to the outer rim of the vent provide further insights on

  9. Linear and nonlinear properties of numerical methods for the rotating shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Chris

    The shallow water equations provide a useful analogue of the fully compressible Euler equations since they have similar conservation laws, many of the same types of waves and a similar (quasi-) balanced state. It is desirable that numerical models posses similar properties, and the prototypical example of such a scheme is the 1981 Arakawa and Lamb (AL81) staggered (C-grid) total energy and potential enstrophy conserving scheme, based on the vector invariant form of the continuous equations. However, this scheme is restricted to a subset of logically square, orthogonal grids. The current work extends the AL81 scheme to arbitrary non-orthogonal polygonal grids, by combining Hamiltonian methods (work done by Salmon, Gassmann, Dubos and others) and Discrete Exterior Calculus (Thuburn, Cotter, Dubos, Ringler, Skamarock, Klemp and others). It is also possible to obtain these properties (along with arguably superior wave dispersion properties) through the use of a collocated (Z-grid) scheme based on the vorticity-divergence form of the continuous equations. Unfortunately, existing examples of these schemes in the literature for general, spherical grids either contain computational modes; or do not conserve total energy and potential enstrophy. This dissertation extends an existing scheme for planar grids to spherical grids, through the use of Nambu brackets (as pioneered by Rick Salmon). To compare these two schemes, the linear modes (balanced states, stationary modes and propagating modes; with and without dissipation) are examined on both uniform planar grids (square, hexagonal) and quasi-uniform spherical grids (geodesic, cubed-sphere). In addition to evaluating the linear modes, the results of the two schemes applied to a set of standard shallow water test cases and a recently developed forced-dissipative turbulence test case from John Thuburn (intended to evaluate the ability the suitability of schemes as the basis for a climate model) on both hexagonal

  10. A variational implementation of the implicit particle filter for the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souopgui, I.; Morzfeld, M.; Hussaini, M.; Chorin, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The estimation of initial conditions for shallow water equations is a well known test problem for operational data assimilation techniques. The state-of-the-art approach to this problem is the variational method (4D-Var), i.e. the computation of the mode of the posterior probability density function (pdf) via the adjoint technique. We add a sampling step to the variational method, thus turning a computation of the conditional mode (a biased estimator) into a computation of the conditional mean (the minimum least square error estimator). Our implementation relies on implicit sampling, which is a Monte Carlo (MC) sampling scheme. The idea in implicit sampling is to first search for the high-probability region of the posterior pdf and then to find samples in this region. Because the samples are concentrated in the high-probability region, fewer samples are required than with competing MC schemes and, thus, implicit sampling can be more efficient than other MC schemes. The search for the high-probability region can be done via a numerical minimization that is very similar to the minimization in 4D-Var. Here, we use existing 4D-Var code to implement the implicit sampling scheme. Once the minimization problem is solved, we obtain samples by solving algebraic equations with a random right-hand-side. These equations can be solved efficiently, so that the additional cost of our approach, compared to 4D-Var, is small. We present numerical experiments to demonstrate the applicability and efficiency of our approach. These numerical experiments mimic physical experiments done with the CORIOLIS turntable in Grenoble (France), which are used to study the drift of a vortex. In particular we consider shallow water equations on a square domain (2.5m x 2.5m) with open boundary conditions and discretize the equations with finite differences on a staggered grid of size 256 x 256 and a fourth order Runge-Kutta time integrator. Our goal is to estimate the initial state (velocities and

  11. Community structure of age-0 fishes in paired mainstem and created shallow-water habitats in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starks, T. A.; Long, James M.; Dzialowski, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic alterations to aquatic ecosystems have greatly reduced and homogenized riverine habitat, especially those used by larval and juvenile fishes. Creation of shallow-water habitats is used as a restoration technique in response to altered conditions in several studies globally, but only recently in the USA. In the summer of 2012, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers sampled larval and juvenile fishes at six paired sites (mainstem and constructed chute shallow-water habitats) along a section of the Missouri River between Rulo, NE and St. Louis, MO, USA. From those samples, we enumerated and identified a total of 7622 fishes representing 12 families. Community responses of fishes to created shallow-water habitats were assessed by comparisons of species richness and diversity measures between paired sites and among sampling events. Shannon entropy measures were transformed, and gamma diversity (total diversity) was partitioned into two components, alpha (within community) and beta (between community) diversity using a multiplicative decomposition method. Mantel test results suggest site location, time of sampling event and habitat type were drivers of larval and juvenile community structure. Paired t-test results indicated little to no differences in beta diversity between habitat types; however, chute habitats had significantly higher alpha and gamma diversity as well as increased abundances of Asian carp larvae when compared with mainstem shallow-water habitat. Our results not only show the importance of created shallow-water habitat in promoting stream fish diversity but also highlight the role space and time may play in future restoration and management efforts. 

  12. Section 1. Simulation of surface-water integrated flow and transport in two-dimensions: SWIFT2D user's manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical model for simulation of surface-water integrated flow and transport in two (horizontal-space) dimensions is documented. The model solves vertically integrated forms of the equations of mass and momentum conservation and solute transport equations for heat, salt, and constituent fluxes. An equation of state for salt balance directly couples solution of the hydrodynamic and transport equations to account for the horizontal density gradient effects of salt concentrations on flow. The model can be used to simulate the hydrodynamics, transport, and water quality of well-mixed bodies of water, such as estuaries, coastal seas, harbors, lakes, rivers, and inland waterways. The finite-difference model can be applied to geographical areas bounded by any combination of closed land or open water boundaries. The simulation program accounts for sources of internal discharges (such as tributary rivers or hydraulic outfalls), tidal flats, islands, dams, and movable flow barriers or sluices. Water-quality computations can treat reactive and (or) conservative constituents simultaneously. Input requirements include bathymetric and topographic data defining land-surface elevations, time-varying water level or flow conditions at open boundaries, and hydraulic coefficients. Optional input includes the geometry of hydraulic barriers and constituent concentrations at open boundaries. Time-dependent water level, flow, and constituent-concentration data are required for model calibration and verification. Model output consists of printed reports and digital files of numerical results in forms suitable for postprocessing by graphical software programs and (or) scientific visualization packages. The model is compatible with most mainframe, workstation, mini- and micro-computer operating systems and FORTRAN compilers. This report defines the mathematical formulation and computational features of the model, explains the solution technique and related model constraints, describes the

  13. Point source pollution and variability of nitrate concentrations in water from shallow aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemčić-Jurec, Jasna; Jazbec, Anamarija

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the several major sources of nitrate pollution, and therefore the EU Nitrate Directive, designed to decrease pollution, has been implemented. Point sources like septic systems and broken sewage systems also contribute to water pollution. Pollution of groundwater by nitrate from 19 shallow wells was studied in a typical agricultural region, middle Podravina, in northwest Croatia. The concentration of nitrate ranged from <0.1 to 367 mg/l in water from wells, and 29.8 % of 253 total samples were above maximum acceptable value of 50 mg/l (MAV). Among regions R1-R6, there was no statistically significant difference in nitrate concentrations (F = 1.98; p = 0.15) during the years 2002-2007. Average concentrations of nitrate in all 19 wells for all the analyzed years were between recommended limit value of 25 mg/l (RLV) and MAV except in 2002 (concentration was under RLV). The results of the repeated measures ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between the wells at the point source distance (proximity) of <10 m, compared to the wells at the point source distance of >20 m (F = 10.6; p < 0.001). Average annual concentrations of nitrate during the years studied are not statistically different, but interaction between proximity and years is statistically signi