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Sample records for 2d ultrasound images

  1. 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation from 2D transversal ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jin, Changzhu; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-12-01

    Visualizing and analyzing the morphological structure of carotid bifurcations are important for understanding the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis, which is a major cause of stroke and transient ischemic attack. For delineation of vasculatures in the carotid artery, ultrasound examinations have been widely employed because of a noninvasive procedure without ionizing radiation. However, conventional 2D ultrasound imaging has technical limitations in observing the complicated 3D shapes and asymmetric vasodilation of bifurcations. This study aims to propose image-processing techniques for better 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation in a rat by using 2D cross-sectional ultrasound images. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging system with a probe centered at 40MHz was employed to obtain 2D transversal images. The lumen boundaries in each transverse ultrasound image were detected by using three different techniques; an ellipse-fitting, a correlation mapping to visualize the decorrelation of blood flow, and the ellipse-fitting on the correlation map. When the results are compared, the third technique provides relatively good boundary extraction. The incomplete boundaries of arterial lumen caused by acoustic artifacts are somewhat resolved by adopting the correlation mapping and the distortion in the boundary detection near the bifurcation apex was largely reduced by using the ellipse-fitting technique. The 3D lumen geometry of a carotid artery was obtained by volumetric rendering of several 2D slices. For the 3D vasodilatation of the carotid bifurcation, lumen geometries at the contraction and expansion states were simultaneously depicted at various view angles. The present 3D reconstruction methods would be useful for efficient extraction and construction of the 3D lumen geometries of carotid bifurcations from 2D ultrasound images.

  2. Reconfigurable 2D cMUT-ASIC arrays for 3D ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jongkeun; Jung, Sungjin; Kim, Youngil; Cho, Kyungil; Kim, Baehyung; Lee, Seunghun; Na, Junseok; Yang, Ikseok; Kwon, Oh-kyong; Kim, Dongwook

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementations of the complete 2D capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer electronics and its analog front-end module for transmitting high voltage ultrasound pulses and receiving its echo signals to realize 3D ultrasound image. In order to minimize parasitic capacitances and ultimately improve signal-to- noise ratio (SNR), cMUT has to be integrate with Tx/Rx electronics. Additionally, in order to integrate 2D cMUT array module, significant optimized high voltage pulser circuitry, low voltage analog/digital circuit design and packaging challenges are required due to high density of elements and small pitch of each element. We designed 256(16x16)- element cMUT and reconfigurable driving ASIC composed of 120V high voltage pulser, T/R switch, low noise preamplifier and digital control block to set Tx frequency of ultrasound and pulse train in each element. Designed high voltage analog ASIC was successfully bonded with 2D cMUT array by flip-chip bonding process and it connected with analog front-end board to transmit pulse-echo signals. This implementation of reconfigurable cMUT-ASIC-AFE board enables us to produce large aperture 2D transducer array and acquire high quality of 3D ultrasound image.

  3. Preliminary work of real-time ultrasound imaging system for 2-D array transducer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has emerged as a non-invasive imaging modality that can provide anatomical structure information in real time. To enable the experimental analysis of new 2-D array ultrasound beamforming methods, a pre-beamformed parallel raw data acquisition system was developed for 3-D data capture of 2D array transducer. The transducer interconnection adopted the row-column addressing (RCA) scheme, where the columns and rows were active in sequential for transmit and receive events, respectively. The DAQ system captured the raw data in parallel and the digitized data were fed through the field programmable gate array (FPGA) to implement the pre-beamforming. Finally, 3-D images were reconstructed through the devised platform in real-time. PMID:26405923

  4. Non-rigid target tracking in 2D ultrasound images using hierarchical grid interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Lucas; Babel, Marie; Krupa, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new non-rigid target tracking method within 2D ultrasound (US) image sequence. Due to the poor quality of US images, the motion tracking of a tumor or cyst during needle insertion is considered as an open research issue. Our approach is based on well-known compression algorithm in order to make our method work in real-time which is a necessary condition for many clinical applications. Toward that end, we employed a dedicated hierarchical grid interpolation algorithm (HGI) which can represent a large variety of deformations compared to other motion estimation algorithms such as Overlapped Block Motion Compensation (OBMC), or Block Motion Algorithm (BMA). The sum of squared difference of image intensity is selected as similarity criterion because it provides a good trade-off between computation time and motion estimation quality. Contrary to the others methods proposed in the literature, our approach has the ability to distinguish both rigid and non-rigid motions which are observed in ultrasound image modality. Furthermore, this technique does not take into account any prior knowledge about the target, and limits the user interaction which usually complicates the medical validation process. Finally, a technique aiming at identifying the main phases of a periodic motion (e.g. breathing motion) is introduced. The new approach has been validated from 2D ultrasound images of real human tissues which undergo rigid and non-rigid deformations.

  5. Database-guided breast tumor detection and segmentation in 2D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingdan; Zhou, Shaohua K.; Brunke, Shelby; Lowery, Carol; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-03-01

    Ultrasonography is a valuable technique for diagnosing breast cancer. Computer-aided tumor detection and segmentation in ultrasound images can reduce labor cost and streamline clinic workflows. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic system to detect and segment breast tumors in 2D ultrasound images. Our system, based on database-guided techniques, learns the knowledge of breast tumor appearance exemplified by expert annotations. For tumor detection, we train a classifier to discriminate between tumors and their background. For tumor segmentation, we propose a discriminative graph cut approach, where both the data fidelity and compatibility functions are learned discriminatively. The performance of the proposed algorithms is demonstrated on a large set of 347 images, achieving a mean contour-to-contour error of 3.75 pixels with about 4.33 seconds.

  6. Dynamic 2D ultrasound and 3D CT image registration of the beating heart.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xishi; Moore, John; Guiraudon, Gerard; Jones, Douglas L; Bainbridge, Daniel; Ren, Jing; Peters, Terry M

    2009-08-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound (US) is widely used in minimally invasive cardiac procedures due to its convenience of use and noninvasive nature. However, the low quality of US images often limits their utility as a means for guiding procedures, since it is often difficult to relate the images to their anatomical context. To improve the interpretability of the US images while maintaining US as a flexible anatomical and functional real-time imaging modality, we describe a multimodality image navigation system that integrates 2D US images with their 3D context by registering them to high quality preoperative models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) images. The mapping from such a model to the patient is completed using spatial and temporal registrations. Spatial registration is performed by a two-step rapid registration method that first approximately aligns the two images as a starting point to an automatic registration procedure. Temporal alignment is performed with the aid of electrocardiograph (ECG) signals and a latency compensation method. Registration accuracy is measured by calculating the TRE. Results show that the error between the US and preoperative images of a beating heart phantom is 1.7 +/-0.4 mm, with a similar performance being observed in in vivo animal experiments.

  7. Craniosynostosis: prenatal diagnosis by 2D/3D ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Talita Micheletti; Peixoto, Alberto Borges; Tonni, Gabriele; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the process of premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It is a common condition that occurs in about 1 to 2,000 live births. Craniosynostosis may be classified in primary or secondary. It is also classified as nonsyndromic or syndromic. According to suture commitment, craniosynostosis may affect a single suture or multiple sutures. There is a wide range of syndromes involving craniosynostosis and the most common are Apert, Pffeifer, Crouzon, Shaethre-Chotzen and Muenke syndromes. The underlying etiology of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is unknown. Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling pathway play a crucial role in the etiology of craniosynostosis syndromes. Prenatal ultrasound`s detection rate of craniosynostosis is low. Nowadays, different methods can be applied for prenatal diagnosis of craniosynostosis, such as two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scan and, finally, molecular diagnosis. The presence of craniosynostosis may affect the birthing process. Fetuses with craniosynostosis also have higher rates of perinatal complications. In order to avoid the risks of untreated craniosynostosis, children are usually treated surgically soon after postnatal diagnosis. PMID:27622416

  8. A preliminary evaluation work on a 3D ultrasound imaging system for 2D array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoli; Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Li, Chunyu; Song, Junjie; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary evaluation work on a pre-designed 3-D ultrasound imaging system. The system mainly consists of four parts, a 7.5MHz, 24×24 2-D array transducer, the transmit/receive circuit, power supply, data acquisition and real-time imaging module. The row-column addressing scheme is adopted for the transducer fabrication, which greatly reduces the number of active channels . The element area of the transducer is 4.6mm by 4.6mm. Four kinds of tests were carried out to evaluate the imaging performance, including the penetration depth range, axial and lateral resolution, positioning accuracy and 3-D imaging frame rate. Several strong reflection metal objects , fixed in a water tank, were selected for the purpose of imaging due to a low signal-to-noise ratio of the transducer. The distance between the transducer and the tested objects , the thickness of aluminum, and the seam width of the aluminum sheet were measured by a calibrated micrometer to evaluate the penetration depth, the axial and lateral resolution, respectively. The experiment al results showed that the imaging penetration depth range was from 1.0cm to 6.2cm, the axial and lateral resolution were 0.32mm and 1.37mm respectively, the imaging speed was up to 27 frames per second and the positioning accuracy was 9.2%.

  9. 2-D array for 3-D Ultrasound Imaging Using Synthetic Aperture Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Nadim M.; Yen, Jesse T.

    2010-01-01

    A 2-D array of 256 × 256 = 65,536 elements, with total area 4 × 4 = 16 cm2, serves as a flexible platform for developing acquisition schemes for 3-D rectilinear ultrasound imaging at 10 MHz using synthetic aperture techniques. This innovative system combines a simplified interconnect scheme and synthetic aperture techniques with a 2-D array for 3-D imaging. A row-column addressing scheme is used to access different elements for different transmit events. This addressing scheme is achieved through a simple interconnect, consisting of one top, one bottom single layer flex circuits, which, compared to multi-layer flex circuits, are simpler to design, cheaper to manufacture and thinner so their effect on the acoustic response is minimized. We present three designs that prioritize different design objectives: volume acquisiton time, resolution, and sensitivity, while maintaining acceptable figures for the other design objectives. For example, one design overlooks time acquisition requirements, assumes good noise conditions, and optimizes for resolution, achieving −6 dB and −20 dB beamwidths of less than 0.2 and 0.5 millimeters, respectively, for an F/2 aperture. Another design can acquire an entire volume in 256 transmit events, with −6dB and −20 dB beamwidths in the order of 0.4 and 0.8 millimeters, respectively. PMID:16764446

  10. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Sabonghy, Eric P; Han, Arum; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Ferrari, Mauro; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 microm to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  11. Automatic ultrasound image enhancement for 2D semi-automatic breast-lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Hall, Christopher S.

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer is the fastest growing cancer, accounting for 29%, of new cases in 2012, and second leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States and worldwide. Ultrasound (US) has been used as an indispensable tool for breast cancer detection/diagnosis and treatment. In computer-aided assistance, lesion segmentation is a preliminary but vital step, but the task is quite challenging in US images, due to imaging artifacts that complicate detection and measurement of the suspect lesions. The lesions usually present with poor boundary features and vary significantly in size, shape, and intensity distribution between cases. Automatic methods are highly application dependent while manual tracing methods are extremely time consuming and have a great deal of intra- and inter- observer variability. Semi-automatic approaches are designed to counterbalance the advantage and drawbacks of the automatic and manual methods. However, considerable user interaction might be necessary to ensure reasonable segmentation for a wide range of lesions. This work proposes an automatic enhancement approach to improve the boundary searching ability of the live wire method to reduce necessary user interaction while keeping the segmentation performance. Based on the results of segmentation of 50 2D breast lesions in US images, less user interaction is required to achieve desired accuracy, i.e. < 80%, when auto-enhancement is applied for live-wire segmentation.

  12. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases. PMID:26855466

  13. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases.

  14. 2-D arterial wall motion imaging using ultrafast ultrasound and transverse oscillations.

    PubMed

    Salles, Sebastien; Chee, Adrian J Y; Garcia, Damien; Yu, Alfred C H; Vray, Didier; Liebgott, Herve

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound is a promising imaging modality that enabled, inter alia, the development of pulse wave imaging and the local velocity estimation of the so-called pulse wave for a quantitative evaluation of arterial stiffness. However, this technique only focuses on the propagation of the axial displacement of the artery wall, and most techniques are not specific to the intima-media complex and do not take into account the longitudinal motion of this complex. Within this perspective, this paper presents a study of two-dimensional tissue motion estimation in ultrafast imaging combining transverse oscillations, which can improve motion estimation in the transverse direction, i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis, and a phase-based motion estimation. First, the method was validated in simulation. Two-dimensional motion, inspired from a real data set acquired on a human carotid artery, was applied to a numerical phantom to produce a simulation data set. The estimated motion showed axial and lateral mean errors of 4.2 ± 3.4 μm and 9.9 ± 7.9 μm, respectively. Afterward, experimental results were obtained on three artery phantoms with different wall stiffnesses. In this study, the vessel phantoms did not contain a pure longitudinal displacement. The longitudinal displacements were induced by the axial force produced by the wall's axial dilatation. This paper shows that the approach presented is able to perform 2-D tissue motion estimation very accurately even if the displacement values are very small and even in the lateral direction, making it possible to estimate the pulse wave velocity in both the axial and longitudinal directions. This demonstrates the method's potential to estimate the velocity of purely longitudinal waves propagating in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the stiffnesses of the three vessel phantom walls investigated were estimated with an average relative error of 2.2%. PMID:26067039

  15. 2-D arterial wall motion imaging using ultrafast ultrasound and transverse oscillations.

    PubMed

    Salles, Sebastien; Chee, Adrian J Y; Garcia, Damien; Yu, Alfred C H; Vray, Didier; Liebgott, Herve

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound is a promising imaging modality that enabled, inter alia, the development of pulse wave imaging and the local velocity estimation of the so-called pulse wave for a quantitative evaluation of arterial stiffness. However, this technique only focuses on the propagation of the axial displacement of the artery wall, and most techniques are not specific to the intima-media complex and do not take into account the longitudinal motion of this complex. Within this perspective, this paper presents a study of two-dimensional tissue motion estimation in ultrafast imaging combining transverse oscillations, which can improve motion estimation in the transverse direction, i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis, and a phase-based motion estimation. First, the method was validated in simulation. Two-dimensional motion, inspired from a real data set acquired on a human carotid artery, was applied to a numerical phantom to produce a simulation data set. The estimated motion showed axial and lateral mean errors of 4.2 ± 3.4 μm and 9.9 ± 7.9 μm, respectively. Afterward, experimental results were obtained on three artery phantoms with different wall stiffnesses. In this study, the vessel phantoms did not contain a pure longitudinal displacement. The longitudinal displacements were induced by the axial force produced by the wall's axial dilatation. This paper shows that the approach presented is able to perform 2-D tissue motion estimation very accurately even if the displacement values are very small and even in the lateral direction, making it possible to estimate the pulse wave velocity in both the axial and longitudinal directions. This demonstrates the method's potential to estimate the velocity of purely longitudinal waves propagating in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the stiffnesses of the three vessel phantom walls investigated were estimated with an average relative error of 2.2%.

  16. Estimating elastic properties of tissues from standard 2D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kybic, Jan; Smutek, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    We propose a way of measuring elastic properties of tissues in-vivo, using standard medical image ultrasound machine without any special hardware. Images are acquired while the tissue is being deformed by a varying pressure applied by the operator on the hand-held ultrasound probe. The local elastic shear modulus is either estimated from a local displacement field reconstructed by an elastic registration algorithm, or both the modulus and the displacement are estimated simultaneously. The relation between modulus and displacement is calculated using a finite element method (FEM). The estimation algorithms were tested on both synthetic, phantom and real subject data.

  17. Transverse Strains in Muscle Fascicles during Voluntary Contraction: A 2D Frequency Decomposition of B-Mode Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibres shorten, they must increase in their transverse dimensions in order to maintain a constant volume. In pennate muscle, this transverse expansion results in the fibres rotating to greater pennation angle, with a consequent reduction in their contractile velocity in a process known as gearing. Understanding the nature and extent of this transverse expansion is necessary to understand the mechanisms driving the changes in internal geometry of whole muscles during contraction. Current methodologies allow the fascicle lengths, orientations, and curvatures to be quantified, but not the transverse expansion. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate techniques for quantifying transverse strain in skeletal muscle fascicles during contraction from B-mode ultrasound images. Images were acquired from the medial and lateral gastrocnemii during cyclic contractions, enhanced using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering and the spatial frequencies resolved using 2D discrete Fourier transforms. The frequency information was resolved into the fascicle orientations that were validated against manually digitized values. The transverse fascicle strains were calculated from their wavelengths within the images. These methods showed that the transverse strain increases while the longitudinal fascicle length decreases; however, the extent of these strains was smaller than expected. PMID:25328509

  18. Registration of dynamic multiview 2D ultrasound and late gadolinium enhanced images of the heart: Application to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterization.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Julián; Simon, Antoine; Halbert, Edgar; Tavard, François; Carré, François; Hernández, Alfredo; Donal, Erwan; Schnell, Frédéric; Garreau, Mireille

    2016-02-01

    Describing and analyzing heart multiphysics requires the acquisition and fusion of multisensor cardiac images. Multisensor image fusion enables a combined analysis of these heterogeneous modalities. We propose to register intra-patient multiview 2D+t ultrasound (US) images with multiview late gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images acquired during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in order to fuse mechanical and tissue state information. The proposed procedure registers both US and LGE to cine MRI. The correction of slice misalignment and the rigid registration of multiview LGE and cine MRI are studied, to select the most appropriate similarity measure. It showed that mutual information performs the best for LGE slice misalignment correction and for LGE and cine registration. Concerning US registration, dynamic endocardial contours resulting from speckle tracking echocardiography were exploited in a geometry-based dynamic registration. We propose the use of an adapted dynamic time warping procedure to synchronize cardiac dynamics in multiview US and cine MRI. The registration of US and LGE MRI was evaluated on a dataset of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A visual assessment of 330 left ventricular regions from US images of 28 patients resulted in 92.7% of regions successfully aligned with cardiac structures in LGE. Successfully-aligned regions were then used to evaluate the abilities of strain indicators to predict the presence of fibrosis. Longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay of aligned left ventricular regions were computed from corresponding regional strain curves from US. The Mann-Withney test proved that the expected values of these indicators change between the populations of regions with and without fibrosis (p < 0.01). ROC curves otherwise proved that the presence of fibrosis is one factor amongst others which modifies longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay. PMID:26619189

  19. Sparse matrix beamforming and image reconstruction for 2-D HIFU monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) with in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Provost, Jean; Grondin, Julien; Wang, Shutao; Marquet, Fabrice; Bunting, Ethan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-11-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) utilizes an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam to induce a localized focal oscillatory motion simultaneously estimated. The objective of this study is to develop and show the feasibility of a novel fast beamforming algorithm for image reconstruction using GPU-based sparse-matrix operation with real-time feedback. In this study, the algorithm was implemented onto a fully integrated, clinically relevant HMIFU system. A single divergent transmit beam was used while fast beamforming was implemented using a GPU-based delay-and-sum method and a sparse-matrix operation. Axial HMI displacements were then estimated from the RF signals using a 1-D normalized cross-correlation method and streamed to a graphic user interface with frame rates up to 15 Hz, a 100-fold increase compared to conventional CPU-based processing. The real-time feedback rate does not require interrupting the HIFU treatment. Results in phantom experiments showed reproducible HMI images and monitoring of 22 in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2-D system demonstrated reproducible displacement imaging, and monitoring of 22 in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2-D system showed a consistent average focal displacement decrease of 46.7 ±14.6% during lesion formation. Complementary focal temperature monitoring also indicated an average rate of displacement increase and decrease with focal temperature at 0.84±1.15%/(°)C, and 2.03±0.93%/(°)C , respectively. These results reinforce the HMIFU capability of estimating and monitoring stiffness related changes in real time. Current ongoing studies include clinical translation of the presented system for monitoring of HIFU treatment for breast and pancreatic tumor applications.

  20. Mapping and characterizing endometrial implants by registering 2D transvaginal ultrasound to 3D pelvic magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Yavariabdi, Amir; Bartoli, Adrien; Samir, Chafik; Artigues, Maxime; Canis, Michel

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new deformable slice-to-volume registration method to register a 2D Transvaginal Ultrasound (TVUS) to a 3D Magnetic Resonance (MR) volume. Our main goal is to find a cross-section of the MR volume such that the endometrial implants and their depth of infiltration can be mapped from TVUS to MR. The proposed TVUS-MR registration method uses contour to surface correspondences through a novel variational one-step deformable Iterative Closest Point (ICP) method. Specifically, we find a smooth deformation field while establishing point correspondences automatically. We demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method by quantitative and qualitative tests on both semi-synthetic and clinical data. To generate semi-synthetic data sets, 3D surfaces are deformed with 4-40% degrees of deformation and then various intersection curves are obtained at 0-20° cutting angles. Results show an average mean square error of 5.7934±0.4615mm, average Hausdorff distance of 2.493±0.14mm, and average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.9750±0.0030.

  1. Automatic Characterization of the Physiological Condition of the Carotid Artery in 2D Ultrasound Image Sequences Using Spatiotemporal and Spatiospectral 2D Maps

    PubMed Central

    Hamid Muhammed, Hamed; Azar, Jimmy C.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for characterizing and visualizing the progression of waves along the walls of the carotid artery is presented. The new approach is noninvasive and able to simultaneously capture the spatial and the temporal propagation of wavy patterns along the walls of the carotid artery in a completely automated manner. Spatiotemporal and spatiospectral 2D maps describing these patterns (in both the spatial and the frequency domains, resp.) were generated and analyzed by visual inspection as well as automatic feature extraction and classification. Three categories of cases were considered: pathological elderly, healthy elderly, and healthy young cases. Automatic differentiation, between cases of these three categories, was achieved with a sensitivity of 97.1% and a specificity of 74.5%. Two features were proposed and computed to measure the homogeneity of the spatiospectral 2D map which presents the spectral characteristics of the carotid artery wall's wavy motion pattern which are related to the physical, mechanical (e.g., elasticity), and physiological properties and conditions along the artery. These results are promising and confirm the potential of the proposed method in providing useful information which can help in revealing the physiological condition of the cardiovascular system. PMID:24971088

  2. Position tracking of moving liver lesion based on real-time registration between 2D ultrasound and 3D preoperative images

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, Chijun; Hyun Nam, Woo; Lee, Duhgoon; Ra, Jong Beom; Lee, Jae Young

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Registration between 2D ultrasound (US) and 3D preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) (or computed tomography, CT) images has been studied recently for US-guided intervention. However, the existing techniques have some limits, either in the registration speed or the performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a real-time and fully automatic registration system between two intermodal images of the liver, and subsequently an indirect lesion positioning/tracking algorithm based on the registration result, for image-guided interventions. Methods: The proposed position tracking system consists of three stages. In the preoperative stage, the authors acquire several 3D preoperative MR (or CT) images at different respiratory phases. Based on the transformations obtained from nonrigid registration of the acquired 3D images, they then generate a 4D preoperative image along the respiratory phase. In the intraoperative preparatory stage, they properly attach a 3D US transducer to the patient’s body and fix its pose using a holding mechanism. They then acquire a couple of respiratory-controlled 3D US images. Via the rigid registration of these US images to the 3D preoperative images in the 4D image, the pose information of the fixed-pose 3D US transducer is determined with respect to the preoperative image coordinates. As feature(s) to use for the rigid registration, they may choose either internal liver vessels or the inferior vena cava. Since the latter is especially useful in patients with a diffuse liver disease, the authors newly propose using it. In the intraoperative real-time stage, they acquire 2D US images in real-time from the fixed-pose transducer. For each US image, they select candidates for its corresponding 2D preoperative slice from the 4D preoperative MR (or CT) image, based on the predetermined pose information of the transducer. The correct corresponding image is then found among those candidates via real-time 2D registration based on a

  3. Phase-rotation based receive-beamformer for miniaturized volumetric ultrasound imaging scanners using 2-D CMUT-on-ASIC arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bae-Hyung; Lee, Seunghun; Song, Jongkeun; Kim, Youngil; Jeon, Taeho; Cho, Kyungil

    2013-03-01

    Up-to-date capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technologies provide us unique opportunities to minimize the size and cost of ultrasound scanners by integrating front-end circuits into CMUT arrays. We describe a design prototype of a portable ultrasound scan-head probe using 2-D phased CMUT-on-ASIC arrays of 3-MHz 250 micrometer-pitch by fabricating and integrating front-end electronics with 2-D CMUT array elements. One of the objectives of our work is to design a receive beamformer architecture for the smart probe with compact size and comparable performance. In this work, a phase-rotation based receive beamformer using the sampling frequency of 4 times the center frequency and a hybrid beamforming to reduce the channel counts of the system-side are introduced. Parallel beamforming is considered for the purpose of saving power consumption of battery (by firing fewer times per image frame). This architecture has the advantage of directly obtaining I and Q components. By using the architecture, the interleaved I/Q data from the storage is acquired and I/Q demodulation for baseband processing is directly achieved without demodulators including sin and cosine lookup tables and mixers. Currently, we are extending the presented architecture to develop a true smart probe by including lower power devices and cooling systems, and bringing wireless data transmission into consideration.

  4. Image fusion of Ultrasound Computer Tomography volumes with X-ray mammograms using a biomechanical model based 2D/3D registration.

    PubMed

    Hopp, T; Duric, N; Ruiter, N V

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising breast imaging modality under development. Comparison to a standard method like mammography is essential for further development. Due to significant differences in image dimensionality and compression state of the breast, correlating USCT images and X-ray mammograms is challenging. In this paper we present a 2D/3D registration method to improve the spatial correspondence and allow direct comparison of the images. It is based on biomechanical modeling of the breast and simulation of the mammographic compression. We investigate the effect of including patient-specific material parameters estimated automatically from USCT images. The method was systematically evaluated using numerical phantoms and in-vivo data. The average registration accuracy using the automated registration was 11.9mm. Based on the registered images a method for analysis of the diagnostic value of the USCT images was developed and initially applied to analyze sound speed and attenuation images based on X-ray mammograms as ground truth. Combining sound speed and attenuation allows differentiating lesions from surrounding tissue. Overlaying this information on mammograms, combines quantitative and morphological information for multimodal diagnosis. PMID:25456144

  5. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  6. An analog-digital hybrid RX beamformer chip with non-uniform sampling for ultrasound medical imaging with 2D CMUT array.

    PubMed

    Um, Ji-Yong; Kim, Yoon-Jee; Cho, Seong-Eun; Chae, Min-Kyun; Song, Jongkeun; Kim, Baehyung; Lee, Seunghun; Bang, Jihoon; Kim, Youngil; Cho, Kyungil; Kim, Byungsub; Sim, Jae-Yoon; Park, Hong-June

    2014-12-01

    To reduce the memory area, a two-stage RX beamformer (BF) chip with 64 channels is proposed for the ultrasound medical imaging with a 2D CMUT array. The chip retrieved successfully two B-mode phantom images with a steering angle from -45 (°) to +45 (°), the maximum delay range of 8 μs, and the delay resolution of 6.25 ns. An analog-digital hybrid BF (HBF) is chosen for the proposed chip to utilize the easy beamforming operation in the digital domain and also to reduce chip area by minimizing the number of ADCs. The chip consists of eight analog beamformers (ABF) for the 1st-stage and a digital beamformer (DBF) for the 2nd-stage. The two-stage architecture reduces the memory area of both ABF and DBF by around four times. The DBF circuit is divided into three steps to further reduce the digital FIFO memory area by around twice. Coupled with the non-uniform sampling scheme, the proposed two-stage HBF chip reduces the total memory area by around 40 times compared to the uniform-sampling single-stage BF chip. The chip fabricated in a 0.13- μm CMOS process occupies the area of 19.4 mm(2), and dissipates 1.14 W with the analog supply of 3.3 V and the digital supply of 1.2 V.

  7. Imaging transverse isotropic properties of muscle by monitoring acoustic radiation force induced shear waves using a 2-D matrix ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael; Byram, Brett; Palmeri, Mark; Rouze, Ned; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    A 2-D matrix ultrasound array is used to monitor acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) induced shear wave propagation in 3-D in excised canine muscle. From a single acquisition, both the shear wave phase and group velocity can be calculated to estimate the shear wave speed (SWS) along and across the fibers, as well as the fiber orientation in 3-D. The true fiber orientation found using the 3-D radon transform on B-mode volumes of the muscle was used to verify the fiber direction estimated from shear wave data. For the simplified imaging case when the ARFI push can be oriented perpendicular to the fibers, the error in estimating the fiber orientation using phase and group velocity measurements was 3.5 ± 2.6° and 3.4 ± 1.4° (mean ± standard deviation), respectively, over six acquisitions in different muscle samples. For the more general case when the push is oblique to the fibers, the angle between the push and the fibers is found using the dominant orientation of the shear wave displacement magnitude. In 30 acquisitions on six different muscle samples with oblique push angles up to 40°, the error in the estimated fiber orientation using phase and group velocity measurements was 5.4 ± 2.9° and 5.3 ± 3.2°, respectively, after estimating and accounting for the additional unknown push angle. Either the phase or group velocity measurements can be used to estimate fiber orientation and SWS along and across the fibers. Although it is possible to perform these measurements when the push is not perpendicular to the fibers, highly oblique push angles induce lower shear wave amplitudes which can cause inaccurate SWS measurements.

  8. Cardiological Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Johan M; de Korte, Chris L

    2014-01-01

    This review paper is intended for the interested outsider of the field of echocardiography and it presents a short introduction into the numerous ultrasound (US) methods and techniques for anatomical and functional diagnosis of the heart. The basic techniques are generally used for some times already, as there are one dimensional (1D) M(otion) mode, the real time 2D B(rightness) mode technique and the various Doppler measurement techniques and imaging modes. The M-mode technique shows the movements of the tissue in a 1D B-mode display vs. time. The 2D B-mode images are showing the heart contractions and dilations in real time, thus making this technique the basic tool for detecting anatomical disturbances and myocardial (localized) abnormal functioning. Improved image quality is achieved by Second Harmonic Imaging and myocardial perfusion can be quantified using Contrast Agent Imaging. Doppler techniques were introduced in the fifties of last century and used for blood flow velocity measurement. Continuous wave (CW) Doppler has the advantage of allowing measurement of high velocities, as may occur in vascular or valvular stenosis and insufficiency. The exact location of the major Doppler signal received cannot be estimated making this technique ambiguous in some clinical problems. Single gated Pulse Wave (PW) Doppler velocity measurement delivers exact location of the measurement position by using an interactively positioned time (=depth) gate in which the velocity is being measured. The disadvantage of this technique is the relatively low maximum velocity that can be measured. Multigate PW Doppler techniques can be used for the assessment of a velocity profile over the vessel cross section. A more sophisticated use of this technique is the combination with 2D B-mode imaging in the color Doppler mode, called "color flow mapping", in which the multigate Doppler signal is color coded and shown in 2D format overlayed in the conventional 2D B mode image. In the past

  9. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  10. Automatic multimodal 2D/3D image fusion of ultrasound computer tomography and x-ray mammography for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Torsten; Duric, Neb; Ruiter, Nicole V.

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. The established screening method to detect breast cancer in an early state is X-ray mammography. However, X-ray frequently provides limited contrast of tumors located within glandular tissue. A new imaging approach is Ultrasound Computer Tomography generating threedimensional volumes of the breast. Three different images are available: reflectivity, attenuation and speed of sound. The correlation of USCT volumes with X-ray mammograms is of interest for evaluation of the new imaging modality as well as for a multimodal diagnosis. Yet, both modalities differ in image dimensionality, patient positioning and deformation state of the breast. In earlier work we proposed a methodology based on Finite Element Method to register speed of sound images with the according mammogram. In this work, we enhanced the methodology to register all three image types provided by USCT. Furthermore, the methodology is now completely automated using image similarity measures to estimate rotations in datasets. A fusion methodology is proposed which combines the information of the three USCT image types with the X-ray mammogram via semitransparent overlay images. The evaluation was done using 13 datasets from a clinical study. The registration accuracy was measured by the displacement of the center of a lesion marked in both modalities. Using the automated rotation estimation, a mean displacement of 10.4 mm was achieved. Due to the clinically relevant registration accuracy, the methodology provides a basis for evaluation of the new imaging device USCT as well as for multimodal diagnosis.

  11. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  12. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  13. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  14. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  15. A supervised texton based approach for automatic segmentation and measurement of the fetal head and femur in 2D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Ye, Xujiong; Lambrou, Tryphon; Duan, Wenting; Allinson, Nigel; Dudley, Nicholas J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a supervised texton based approach for the accurate segmentation and measurement of ultrasound fetal head (BPD, OFD, HC) and femur (FL). The method consists of several steps. First, a non-linear diffusion technique is utilized to reduce the speckle noise. Then, based on the assumption that cross sectional intensity profiles of skull and femur can be approximated by Gaussian-like curves, a multi-scale and multi-orientation filter bank is designed to extract texton features specific to ultrasound fetal anatomic structure. The extracted texton cues, together with multi-scale local brightness, are then built into a unified framework for boundary detection of ultrasound fetal head and femur. Finally, for fetal head, a direct least square ellipse fitting method is used to construct a closed head contour, whilst, for fetal femur a closed contour is produced by connecting the detected femur boundaries. The presented method is demonstrated to be promising for clinical applications. Overall the evaluation results of fetal head segmentation and measurement from our method are comparable with the inter-observer difference of experts, with the best average precision of 96.85%, the maximum symmetric contour distance (MSD) of 1.46 mm, average symmetric contour distance (ASD) of 0.53 mm while for fetal femur, the overall performance of our method is better than the inter-observer difference of experts, with the average precision of 84.37%, MSD of 2.72 mm and ASD of 0.31 mm.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  17. [Ultrasound imaging in laryngology].

    PubMed

    Zajkowski, Piotr; Białek, Ewa J

    2007-01-01

    Modern ultrasound with high resolution transducers, and sensitive power Doppler and color Doppler modes, and other options, such as panoramic and 3D imaging, allows for detailed imaging of many anatomical structures and pathologic lesions of the head and neck. Only the structures situated in the sonographic acoustic shadow: behind bones, calcified cartilages, stones, and behind organs containing gas (f.e. trachea and larynx) can not be visualized. Ultrasound is widely regarded as the first imaging method in the diseases of the thyroid, salivary glands (parotid gland, submandibular gland and sublingual gland), lymph nodes, muscles, soft tissues of the head and neck, and as an valuable adjunct in some laryngeal pathologies. Real time ultrasound examination allows for dynamic assessment of organs and lesions, lets the examiner check the susceptibility of tumors for pressure, which is inaccessible in other imaging methods. Tumors and congenital lesions, inflammation, abscesses, abnormal lymph nodes, cysts, muscle hypertrophy and posttraumatic conditions may be well evaluated with ultrasound. However, most neck tumors (f.e. in the thyroid, salivary glands, and soft tisses) as well as equivocal lymph nodes demand fine needle aspiration biopsy to determine their benign or malignant nature. This paper presents application of ultrasound examination in the head and neck area including limitations of ultrasound diagnostics in many clinical cases. Data taken from Polish and foreign literature and author's experience are included in this paper.

  18. Ultrasound imaging during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gold, R B

    1984-01-01

    Review by a panel of experts convened by the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) resulted in a recommendation for diagnostic ultrasound imaging in about 1/3 of pregnancies only when medically indicated but not routinely. Ultrasound technology, 1st developed for use in submarine warfare sonar devices, is widely used by physicians because of its clinical significance and because it allows seeing intrauterine structures without exposing the fetus to dangerous radiation. Its most important uses include estimating the gestational age for patients with uncertain clinical dates, evaluating fetal growth, determining the cause of vaginal bleeding, determining fetal presentation, identifying multiple gestation, supplementing amniocentesis or other special procedures, diagnosing, confirming fetal death and locating intrauterine devices. Recently, many physicians have been advocating routine ultrasound screening of all pregnancies but this is an issue of concern among leading physicians and the NIH. The panel stressed the urgent need for additional research on the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Many studies that found adverse reactions associated with ultrasound use in humans suffer from sever methodological flaws. The panel recommended ultrasound not to be used for routine screening. Some studies indicate that no clear benefit from routine screening results. The panel's recommendations were criticized for unnecessarily restricting ultrasound use and for inappropriately sanctioning widespread use of the technology. Human Life International, an anti-abortion organization, opposed using ultrasound to detect fetal abnormalities, contending that this would promote abortion. Some abortion opponents, however, believe ultrasound would cause bonding between the mother and the fetus and discourage abortion. The panel underscored the importance of the skill and training of ultrasound examiners. In regard to informed consent, the

  19. 2D optoacoustic array for high resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazi, S.; Witte, R. S.; Kim, K.; Huang, S.-W.; Hou, Y.; O'Donnell, M.

    2006-02-01

    An optoacoustic detector denotes the detection of acoustic signals by optical devices. Recent advances in fabrication techniques and the availability of high power tunable laser sources have greatly accelerated the development of efficient optoacoustic detectors. The unique advantages of optoacoustic technology are of special interest in applications that require high resolution imaging. For these applications optoacoustic technology enables high frequency transducer arrays with element size on the order of 10 μm. Laser generated ultrasound (photoacoustic effect) has been studied since the early observations of A.G. Bell (1880) of audible sound generated by light absorption . Modern studies have demonstrated the use of the photoacoustic effect to form a versatile imaging modality for medical and biological applications. A short laser pulse illuminates a tissue creating rapid thermal expansion and acoustic emission. Detection of the resulting acoustic field by an array enables the imaging of the tissue optical absorption using ultrasonic imaging methods. We present an integrated imaging system that employs photoacoustic sound generation and 2D optoacoustic reception. The optoacoustic receiver consists of a thin polymer Fabry-Perot etalon. The etalon is an optical resonator of a high quality factor (Q = 750). The relatively low elasticity modulus of the polymer and the high Q-factor of the resonator combine to yield high ultrasound sensitivity. The etalon thickness (10 μm) was optimized for wide bandwidth (typically above 50 MHz). An optical scanning and focusing system is used to create a large aperture and high density 2D ultrasonic receiver array. High resolution 3D images of phantom targets and biological tissue samples were obtained.

  20. Imaging By Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kidney, Maria R.

    1986-01-01

    Imaging by ultrasound has dramatically changed the investigation and management of many clinical problems. It is useful in many different parts of the body. In this brief discussion, the following topics are considered: hepatic lesions, bleeding in early pregnancy, gynecological pathology (adnexal lesions), aortic aneurysms, thyroid nodules and scrotal masses. The usefulness of duplex carotid sonography, which combines ultrasonic imaging and Doppler studies, is also discussed. Other topics (gallstones, biliary obstruction, renal calculi, hydronephrosis) are discussed in the appropriate sections. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21267202

  1. A 3D Freehand Ultrasound System for Multi-view Reconstructions from Sparse 2D Scanning Planes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A significant limitation of existing 3D ultrasound systems comes from the fact that the majority of them work with fixed acquisition geometries. As a result, the users have very limited control over the geometry of the 2D scanning planes. Methods We present a low-cost and flexible ultrasound imaging system that integrates several image processing components to allow for 3D reconstructions from limited numbers of 2D image planes and multiple acoustic views. Our approach is based on a 3D freehand ultrasound system that allows users to control the 2D acquisition imaging using conventional 2D probes. For reliable performance, we develop new methods for image segmentation and robust multi-view registration. We first present a new hybrid geometric level-set approach that provides reliable segmentation performance with relatively simple initializations and minimum edge leakage. Optimization of the segmentation model parameters and its effect on performance is carefully discussed. Second, using the segmented images, a new coarse to fine automatic multi-view registration method is introduced. The approach uses a 3D Hotelling transform to initialize an optimization search. Then, the fine scale feature-based registration is performed using a robust, non-linear least squares algorithm. The robustness of the multi-view registration system allows for accurate 3D reconstructions from sparse 2D image planes. Results Volume measurements from multi-view 3D reconstructions are found to be consistently and significantly more accurate than measurements from single view reconstructions. The volume error of multi-view reconstruction is measured to be less than 5% of the true volume. We show that volume reconstruction accuracy is a function of the total number of 2D image planes and the number of views for calibrated phantom. In clinical in-vivo cardiac experiments, we show that volume estimates of the left ventricle from multi-view reconstructions are found to be in better

  2. Two-dimensional ultrasound image matching system for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaim, Amjad; Keck, Rick W.; Selman, Steven H.; Jankun, Jerzy

    2001-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound imaging is commonly used for diagnosis in a variety of medical fields. However, there are several drawbacks of conventional 2D-ultrasound imaging. These include prostate or transducer movement that produces sets of different images that are difficult to interpret. Also during patient's reexamination correspondence between sets of images before reexamination and after is difficult to establish. This can be described as a problem of correlation between two sets of images: the first created before distortion or examination, the second one after. We propose a method to register 2D ultrasound volumes based on external markers introduced in the prostate. The metal balls are inserted in the prostate at three distinct locations in the prostate. These appear as bright dots in the ultrasound field, serve as reference points, are then outlined through a user-interactive program from two sets of images. Then, the computer program rotates and translates till they match respectively, and displays the mapped points with their corresponding location. Based on this idea we developed an image-guided system for PDT that require high-precision placement of implants. In the planning stage, the system performs an automatic acquisition of 2D transrectal ultrasound images that will ultimately be used to construct the treatment plan. At the time of the therapy, new sets of ultrasound images are acquired and a match is established between the virtual world and the patient's real world with the aid of manually introduced markers and image matching algorithms.

  3. Improved beamforming using curved sparse 2D arrays in ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kirkebø, Jan Egil; Austeng, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    In this work we have investigated the effect of curving phase-steered sparse periodic two-dimensional arrays in one direction, and relate this effect to the geometry of the arrays. We have shown that curving is equivalent to removing some of the element periodicity, thus adding some "randomness" to the layout. Compared to flat phase-steered periodically sparse two-dimensional arrays, curving offers an even greater suppression of grating lobes located at directions along the curvature. The class of arrays yielding improved performance due to this suppression of grating lobes has been characterized. The point spread functions of some previously proposed array layouts, shown to be promising for ultrasonic imaging, have been simulated. The arrays have been simulated with various number of elements as well as various focal points, with array and field parameters typical to those in volumetric cardiac imaging. On a 48 x 48 element grid with a transducer center frequency of 3 MHz and the target at 40 mm, reductions in the peak sidelobe level of up to 12dB were recorded for some critical steering directions, without significant differences in the beamwidth. The integrated sidelobe ratio was also examined, showing an almost equivalent performance as the flat array. This study shows that, without adding any complexity to the system, the overall image quality of a volumetric imaging system can be improved significantly by curving the array in one direction. PMID:17313966

  4. Reflections on ultrasound image analysis.

    PubMed

    Alison Noble, J

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) image analysis has advanced considerably in twenty years. Progress in ultrasound image analysis has always been fundamental to the advancement of image-guided interventions research due to the real-time acquisition capability of ultrasound and this has remained true over the two decades. But in quantitative ultrasound image analysis - which takes US images and turns them into more meaningful clinical information - thinking has perhaps more fundamentally changed. From roots as a poor cousin to Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) image analysis, both of which have richer anatomical definition and thus were better suited to the earlier eras of medical image analysis which were dominated by model-based methods, ultrasound image analysis has now entered an exciting new era, assisted by advances in machine learning and the growing clinical and commercial interest in employing low-cost portable ultrasound devices outside traditional hospital-based clinical settings. This short article provides a perspective on this change, and highlights some challenges ahead and potential opportunities in ultrasound image analysis which may both have high impact on healthcare delivery worldwide in the future but may also, perhaps, take the subject further away from CT and MR image analysis research with time. PMID:27503078

  5. Reflections on ultrasound image analysis.

    PubMed

    Alison Noble, J

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) image analysis has advanced considerably in twenty years. Progress in ultrasound image analysis has always been fundamental to the advancement of image-guided interventions research due to the real-time acquisition capability of ultrasound and this has remained true over the two decades. But in quantitative ultrasound image analysis - which takes US images and turns them into more meaningful clinical information - thinking has perhaps more fundamentally changed. From roots as a poor cousin to Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) image analysis, both of which have richer anatomical definition and thus were better suited to the earlier eras of medical image analysis which were dominated by model-based methods, ultrasound image analysis has now entered an exciting new era, assisted by advances in machine learning and the growing clinical and commercial interest in employing low-cost portable ultrasound devices outside traditional hospital-based clinical settings. This short article provides a perspective on this change, and highlights some challenges ahead and potential opportunities in ultrasound image analysis which may both have high impact on healthcare delivery worldwide in the future but may also, perhaps, take the subject further away from CT and MR image analysis research with time.

  6. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  7. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  8. [Ultrasound imaging of coronary artery].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Shigeto

    2014-09-01

    Coronary arterial anatomy and the terminology were reviewed. There is a specific portion of coronary artery aneurysm in Kawasaki disease. To investigate coronary arterial lesion, ultrasound imaging is useful because of non-invasive, high special and time resolu tion method. I explained the patient posture, the approaching method to the coronary arter ies, ultrasound setting, measurement of coronary arterial diameter and diastolic measurement.

  9. Novel 3D ultrasound image-based biomarkers based on a feature selection from a 2D standardized vessel wall thickness map: a tool for sensitive assessment of therapies for carotid atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Li, Bing; Chow, Tommy W. S.

    2013-09-01

    With the advent of new therapies and management strategies for carotid atherosclerosis, there is a parallel need for measurement tools or biomarkers to evaluate the efficacy of these new strategies. 3D ultrasound has been shown to provide reproducible measurements of plaque area/volume and vessel wall volume. However, since carotid atherosclerosis is a focal disease that predominantly occurs at bifurcations, biomarkers based on local plaque change may be more sensitive than global volumetric measurements in demonstrating efficacy of new therapies. The ultimate goal of this paper is to develop a biomarker that is based on the local distribution of vessel-wall-plus-plaque thickness change (VWT-Change) that has occurred during the course of a clinical study. To allow comparison between different treatment groups, the VWT-Change distribution of each subject must first be mapped to a standardized domain. In this study, we developed a technique to map the 3D VWT-Change distribution to a 2D standardized template. We then applied a feature selection technique to identify regions on the 2D standardized map on which subjects in different treatment groups exhibit greater difference in VWT-Change. The proposed algorithm was applied to analyse the VWT-Change of 20 subjects in a placebo-controlled study of the effect of atorvastatin (Lipitor). The average VWT-Change for each subject was computed (i) over all points in the 2D map and (ii) over feature points only. For the average computed over all points, 97 subjects per group would be required to detect an effect size of 25% that of atorvastatin in a six-month study. The sample size is reduced to 25 subjects if the average were computed over feature points only. The introduction of this sensitive quantification technique for carotid atherosclerosis progression/regression would allow many proof-of-principle studies to be performed before a more costly and longer study involving a larger population is held to confirm the treatment

  10. A new sensor technology for 2D ultrasound-guided needle tracking.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huanxiang; Li, Junbo; Lu, Qiang; Bharat, Shyam; Erkamp, Ramon; Chen, Bin; Drysdale, Jeremy; Vignon, Francois; Jain, Ameet

    2014-01-01

    2D Ultrasound (US) is becoming the preferred modality for image-guided interventions due to its low cost and portability. However, the main limitation is the limited visibility of surgical tools. We present a new sensor technology that can easily be embedded on needles that are used for US-guided interventions. Two different types of materials are proposed to be used as sensor--co-polymer and PZT. The co-polymer technology is particularly attractive due to its plasticity, allowing very thin depositions (10-20 μm) on a variety of needle shapes. Both sensors receive acoustic energy and convert it to an electrical signal. The precise location of the needle can then be estimated from this signal, to provide real-time feedback to the clinician. We evaluated the feasibility of this new technology using (i) a 4DOF robot in a water tank; (ii) extensive ex vivo experiments; and (iii) in vivo studies. Quantitative robotic studies indicated that the co-polymer is more robust and stable when compared to PZT. In quantitative experiments, the technology achieved a tracking accuracy of 0.14 ± 0.03mm, significantly superior to competing technologies. The technology also proved success in near-real clinical studies on tissue data. This sensor technology is non-disruptive of existing clinical workflows, highly accurate, and is cost-effective. Initial clinician feedback shows great potential for large scale clinical impact.

  11. Photorealistic image synthesis and camera validation from 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Ferrer, Juan C.; González Chévere, David; Manian, Vidya

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a new 3D scene reconstruction technique using the Unity 3D game engine. The method presented here allow us to reconstruct the shape of simple objects and more complex ones from multiple 2D images, including infrared and digital images from indoor scenes and only digital images from outdoor scenes and then add the reconstructed object to the simulated scene created in Unity 3D, these scenes are then validated with real world scenes. The method used different cameras settings and explores different properties in the reconstructions of the scenes including light, color, texture, shapes and different views. To achieve the highest possible resolution, it was necessary the extraction of partial textures from visible surfaces. To recover the 3D shapes and the depth of simple objects that can be represented by the geometric bodies, there geometric characteristics were used. To estimate the depth of more complex objects the triangulation method was used, for this the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters were calculated using geometric camera calibration. To implement the methods mentioned above the Matlab tool was used. The technique presented here also let's us to simulate small simple videos, by reconstructing a sequence of multiple scenes of the video separated by small margins of time. To measure the quality of the reconstructed images and video scenes the Fast Low Band Model (FLBM) metric from the Video Quality Measurement (VQM) software was used. Low bandwidth perception based features include edges and motion.

  12. Ultrasound in pregnancy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ultrasound has become a standard procedure used during pregnancy. It can demonstrate fetal growth and can detect increasing ... abnormalities, hydrocephalus, anencephaly, club feet, and other ... does not produce ionizing radiation and is considered ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of ...

  14. OSPACS: Ultrasound image management system

    PubMed Central

    Stott, Will; Ryan, Andy; Jacobs, Ian J; Menon, Usha; Bessant, Conrad; Jones, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Background Ultrasound scanning uses the medical imaging format, DICOM, for electronically storing the images and data associated with a particular scan. Large health care facilities typically use a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) for storing and retrieving such images. However, these systems are usually not suitable for managing large collections of anonymized ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. Results We have developed a system enabling the accurate archiving and management of ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. It is based upon a Windows application utilizing an open-source DICOM image viewer and a relational database. The system automates the bulk import of DICOM files from removable media by cross-validating the patient information against an external database, anonymizing the data as well as the image, and then storing the contents of the file as a field in a database record. These image records may then be retrieved from the database and presented in a tree-view control so that the user can select particular images for display in a DICOM viewer or export them to external media. Conclusion This system provides error-free automation of ultrasound image archiving and management, suitable for use in a clinical trial. An open-source project has been established to promote continued development of the system. PMID:18570637

  15. 2D hexagonal quaternion Fourier transform in color image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel concept of the quaternion discrete Fourier transform on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, which we call the two-dimensional hexagonal quaternion discrete Fourier transform (2-D HQDFT). The concept of the right-side 2D HQDFT is described and the left-side 2-D HQDFT is similarly considered. To calculate the transform, the image on the hexagonal lattice is described in the tensor representation when the image is presented by a set of 1-D signals, or splitting-signals which can be separately processed in the frequency domain. The 2-D HQDFT can be calculated by a set of 1-D quaternion discrete Fourier transforms (QDFT) of the splitting-signals.

  16. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  17. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  18. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  19. Vascular ultrasound for atherosclerosis imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Korte, Chris L.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; van der Steen, Anton F. W.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in the Western world. Therefore, detection and quantification of atherosclerotic disease is of paramount importance to monitor treatment and possible prevention of acute events. Vascular ultrasound is an excellent technique to assess the geometry of vessel walls and plaques. The high temporal as well as spatial resolution allows quantification of luminal area and plaque size and volume. While carotid arteries can be imaged non-invasively, scanning of coronary arteries requires invasive intravascular catheters. Both techniques have already demonstrated their clinical applicability. Using linear array technology, detection of disease as well as monitoring of pharmaceutical treatment in carotid arteries are feasible. Data acquired with intravascular ultrasound catheters have proved to be especially beneficial in understanding the development of atherosclerotic disease in coronary arteries. With the introduction of vascular elastography not only the geometry of plaques but also the risk for rupture of plaques might be identified. These so-called vulnerable plaques are frequently not flow-limiting and rupture of these plaques is responsible for the majority of cerebral and cardiac ischaemic events. Intravascular ultrasound elastography studies have demonstrated a high correlation between high strain and vulnerable plaque features, both ex vivo and in vivo. Additionally, pharmaceutical intervention could be monitored using this technique. Non-invasive vascular elastography has recently been developed for carotid applications by using compound scanning. Validation and initial clinical evaluation is currently being performed. Since abundance of vasa vasorum (VV) is correlated with vulnerable plaque development, quantification of VV might be a unique tool to even prevent this from happening. Using ultrasound contrast agents, it has been demonstrated that VV can be identified and quantified. Although far from routine

  20. Focusing surface wave imaging with flexible 2D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyuan; Fu, Junqiang; Li, Zhe; Xu, Chunguang; Xiao, Dingguo; Wang, Shaohan

    2016-04-01

    Curved surface is widely exist in key parts of energy and power equipment, such as, turbine blade cylinder block and so on. Cycling loading and harsh working condition of enable fatigue cracks appear on the surface. The crack should be found in time to avoid catastrophic damage to the equipment. A flexible 2D array transducer was developed. 2D Phased Array focusing method (2DPA), Mode-Spatial Double Phased focusing method (MSDPF) and the imaging method using the flexible 2D array probe are studied. Experiments using these focusing and imaging method are carried out. Surface crack image is obtained with both 2DPA and MSDPF focusing method. It have been proved that MSDPF can be more adaptable for curved surface and more calculate efficient than 2DPA.

  1. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenster, Aaron; Downey, Donal B.

    1999-05-01

    Ultrasonography, a widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of many diseases, is an important cost- effective technique, however, technical improvements are necessary to realize its full potential. Two-dimensional viewing of 3D anatomy, using conventional ultrasonography, limits our ability to quantify and visualize most diseases, causing, in part, the reported variability in diagnosis and ultrasound guided therapy and surgery. This occurs because conventional ultrasound images are 2D, yet the anatomy is 3D; hence the diagnostician must integrate multiple images in his mind. This practice is inefficient, and may lead to operator variability and incorrect diagnoses. In addition, the 2D ultrasound image represents a single thin plane at some arbitrary angle in the body. It is difficult to localize and reproduce the image plane subsequently, making conventional ultrasonography unsatisfactory for follow-up studies and for monitoring therapy. Our efforts have focused on overcoming these deficiencies by developing 3D ultrasound imaging techniques that can acquire B-mode, color Doppler and power Doppler images. An inexpensive desktop computer is used to reconstruct the information in 3D, and then is also used for interactive viewing of the 3D images. We have used 3D ultrasound images for the diagnosis of prostate cancer, carotid disease, breast cancer and liver disease and for applications in obstetrics and gynecology. In addition, we have also used 3D ultrasonography for image-guided minimally invasive therapeutic applications of the prostate such as cryotherapy and brachytherapy.

  2. 2D capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer using novel tiling based on silicon frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngil; Cho, Kyungil; Kim, Baehyung; Lee, Seungheun; Jeon, Taeho; Song, Jongkeun

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we showed the new transducer and probe integration of 2D ultrasound probe using cMUT. cMUT ultrasound probe having 8192 elements is assembled with tiling frame. Flip chip bonded cMUT-ASIC tiles were arrayed along 2×8 directions to enlarge lateral aperture. Tiling gap between two tiles was under 100μm. RTV layer that has 1mm thick is used in 2-D probe system as a lens and protection layer. Thermal module is also analyzed by using the thermal network analysis, which is realized with the air fans and the fins. Designed PCB circuit for tiling module which is considered with cooling spread concept is 5cm × 5cm dimension. Uniformity and performance of tiled ultrasound transducer were tested under soybean oil at 3MHz frequency successfully. The measured 256 elements distribution has only 4.45% deviation. If we can remove the side edge error, the deviation will be under 3%. The performance after RTV lensing showed 35% attenuation in Tx and 35~45% attenuation in Rx.

  3. An algorithm to correct 2D near-infrared fluorescence signals using 3D intravascular ultrasound architectural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallas, Georgios; Brooks, Dana H.; Rosenthal, Amir; Vinegoni, Claudio; Calfon, Marcella A.; Razansky, R. Nika; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-03-01

    Intravascular Near-Infrared Fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is a promising imaging modality to image vessel biology and high-risk plaques in vivo. We have developed a NIRF fiber optic catheter and have presented the ability to image atherosclerotic plaques in vivo, using appropriate NIR fluorescent probes. Our catheter consists of a 100/140 μm core/clad diameter housed in polyethylene tubing, emitting NIR laser light at a 90 degree angle compared to the fiber's axis. The system utilizes a rotational and a translational motor for true 2D imaging and operates in conjunction with a coaxial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) device. IVUS datasets provide 3D images of the internal structure of arteries and are used in our system for anatomical mapping. Using the IVUS images, we are building an accurate hybrid fluorescence-IVUS data inversion scheme that takes into account photon propagation through the blood filled lumen. This hybrid imaging approach can then correct for the non-linear dependence of light intensity on the distance of the fluorescence region from the fiber tip, leading to quantitative imaging. The experimental and algorithmic developments will be presented and the effectiveness of the algorithm showcased with experimental results in both saline and blood-like preparations. The combined structural and molecular information obtained from these two imaging modalities are positioned to enable the accurate diagnosis of biologically high-risk atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries that are responsible for heart attacks.

  4. Accurate Diagnosis of Severe Hypospadias Using 2D and 3D Ultrasounds

    PubMed Central

    López Ramón y Cajal, Carlos; Marín Ortiz, Elena; Sarmiento Carrera, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    The hypospadias is the most common urogenital anomaly of male neonates but the prenatal diagnosis of this is often missed before birth. We present the prenatal diagnosis of a severe penoscrotal hypospadias using 2D and 3D ultrasounds. 3D sonography allowed us the best evaluation of the genitals and their anatomical relations. This ample detailed study allowed us to show the findings to the parents and the pediatric surgeon and to configure the best information about the prognosis and surgical treatment. PMID:27774326

  5. Improving VERITAS sensitivity by fitting 2D Gaussian image parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jodi; VERITAS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Our goal is to improve the acceptance and angular resolution of VERITAS by implementing a camera image-fitting algorithm. Elliptical image parameters are extracted from 2D Gaussian distribution fits using a χ2 minimization instead of the standard technique based on the principle moments of an island of pixels above threshold. We optimize the analysis cuts and then characterize the improvements using simulations. We find an improvement of 20% less observing time to reach 5-sigma for weak point sources.

  6. Topology-Preserving Rigid Transformation of 2D Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phuc; Passat, Nicolas; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Talbot, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    We provide conditions under which 2D digital images preserve their topological properties under rigid transformations. We consider the two most common digital topology models, namely dual adjacency and well-composedness. This paper leads to the proposal of optimal preprocessing strategies that ensure the topological invariance of images under arbitrary rigid transformations. These results and methods are proved to be valid for various kinds of images (binary, gray-level, label), thus providing generic and efficient tools, which can be used in particular in the context of image registration and warping.

  7. Topology-Preserving Rigid Transformation of 2D Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phuc; Passat, Nicolas; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Talbot, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    We provide conditions under which 2D digital images preserve their topological properties under rigid transformations. We consider the two most common digital topology models, namely dual adjacency and well-composedness. This paper leads to the proposal of optimal preprocessing strategies that ensure the topological invariance of images under arbitrary rigid transformations. These results and methods are proved to be valid for various kinds of images (binary, gray-level, label), thus providing generic and efficient tools, which can be used in particular in the context of image registration and warping. PMID:26270925

  8. A 2-D ECE Imaging Diagnostic for TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Deng, B. H.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, H. Lu, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    A true 2-D extension to the UC Davis ECE Imaging (ECEI) concept is under development for installation on the TEXTOR tokamak in 2003. This combines the use of linear arrays with multichannel conventional wideband heterodyne ECE radiometers to provide a true 2-D imaging system. This is in contrast to current 1-D ECEI systems in which 2-D images are obtained through the use of multiple plasma discharges (varying the scanned emission frequency each discharge). Here, each array element of the 20 channel mixer array measures plasma emission at 16 simultaneous frequencies to form a 16x20 image of the plasma electron temperature Te. Correlation techniques can then be applied to any pair of the 320 image elements to study both radial and poloidal characteristics of turbulent Te fluctuations. The system relies strongly on the development of low cost, wideband (2-18 GHz) IF detection electronics for use in both ECE Imaging as well as conventional heterodyne ECE radiometry. System details, with a strong focus on the wideband IF electronics development, will be presented. *Supported by U.S. DoE Contracts DE-FG03-95ER54295 and DE-FG03-99ER54531.

  9. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  10. Linear tracking for 3-D medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing-Hua; Yang, Zhao; Hu, Wei; Jin, Lian-Wen; Wei, Gang; Li, Xuelong

    2013-12-01

    As the clinical application grows, there is a rapid technical development of 3-D ultrasound imaging. Compared with 2-D ultrasound imaging, 3-D ultrasound imaging can provide improved qualitative and quantitative information for various clinical applications. In this paper, we proposed a novel tracking method for a freehand 3-D ultrasound imaging system with improved portability, reduced degree of freedom, and cost. We designed a sliding track with a linear position sensor attached, and it transmitted positional data via a wireless communication module based on Bluetooth, resulting in a wireless spatial tracking modality. A traditional 2-D ultrasound probe fixed to the position sensor on the sliding track was used to obtain real-time B-scans, and the positions of the B-scans were simultaneously acquired when moving the probe along the track in a freehand manner. In the experiments, the proposed method was applied to ultrasound phantoms and real human tissues. The results demonstrated that the new system outperformed a previously developed freehand system based on a traditional six-degree-of-freedom spatial sensor in phantom and in vivo studies, indicating its merit in clinical applications for human tissues and organs. PMID:23757592

  11. Interactive 2D to 3D stereoscopic image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Mark H.; Lipton, Lenny

    2005-03-01

    Advances in stereoscopic display technologies, graphic card devices, and digital imaging algorithms have opened up new possibilities in synthesizing stereoscopic images. The power of today"s DirectX/OpenGL optimized graphics cards together with adapting new and creative imaging tools found in software products such as Adobe Photoshop, provide a powerful environment for converting planar drawings and photographs into stereoscopic images. The basis for such a creative process is the focus of this paper. This article presents a novel technique, which uses advanced imaging features and custom Windows-based software that utilizes the Direct X 9 API to provide the user with an interactive stereo image synthesizer. By creating an accurate and interactive world scene with moveable and flexible depth map altered textured surfaces, perspective stereoscopic cameras with both visible frustums and zero parallax planes, a user can precisely model a virtual three-dimensional representation of a real-world scene. Current versions of Adobe Photoshop provide a creative user with a rich assortment of tools needed to highlight elements of a 2D image, simulate hidden areas, and creatively shape them for a 3D scene representation. The technique described has been implemented as a Photoshop plug-in and thus allows for a seamless transition of these 2D image elements into 3D surfaces, which are subsequently rendered to create stereoscopic views.

  12. Low-voltage coded excitation utilizing a miniaturized integrated ultrasound system employing piezoelectric 2-D arrays.

    PubMed

    Triger, Simon; Saillant, Jean-Francois; Demore, Christine E M; Cochran, Sandy; Cumming, David R S

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development of an integrated, miniaturized ultrasound system designed for use with low-voltage piezoelectric transducer arrays. The technology targets low-frequency NDT and medium- to high-frequency sonar applications, at 1.2 MHz frequency. We have constructed a flexible, reconfigurable, low cost building block capable of 3-D beam forming. The tessellation of multiple building blocks permits formation of scalable 2-D macro-arrays of increased size and varying shape. This differs from conventional ultrasound solutions by integrating the entire system in a single module. No long RF cables are required to link the array elements to the electronics. The close coupling of the array and electronics assists in achieving adequate receive signal amplitudes with differential transmission voltages as low as +/- 3.3 V, although the system can be used at higher voltages. The system has been characterized by identifying flat-bottomed holes as small as 1 mm in diameter located at depths up to 190 mm in aluminum, and holes as small as 3 mm in diameter at a depth of 160 mm in cast iron. The results confirm the ability of the highly integrated system to obtain reflections from the targets despite the +/- 3.3 V excitation voltage by exploiting coding in low-voltage ultrasound.

  13. Quantifying Therapeutic and Diagnostic Efficacy in 2D Microvascular Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Vickerman, Mary B.; Keith, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    VESGEN is a newly automated, user-interactive program that maps and quantifies the effects of vascular therapeutics and regulators on microvascular form and function. VESGEN analyzes two-dimensional, black and white vascular images by measuring important vessel morphology parameters. This software guides the user through each required step of the analysis process via a concise graphical user interface (GUI). Primary applications of the VESGEN code are 2D vascular images acquired as clinical diagnostic images of the human retina and as experimental studies of the effects of vascular regulators and therapeutics on vessel remodeling.

  14. Complex wavelet based speckle reduction using multiple ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Muhammad Shahin; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a dominant tool for diagnosis and evaluation in medical imaging systems. However, as its major limitation is that the images it produces suffer from low quality due to the presence of speckle noise, to provide better clinical diagnoses, reducing this noise is essential. The key purpose of a speckle reduction algorithm is to obtain a speckle-free high-quality image whilst preserving important anatomical features, such as sharp edges. As this can be better achieved using multiple ultrasound images rather than a single image, we introduce a complex wavelet-based algorithm for the speckle reduction and sharp edge preservation of two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound images using multiple ultrasound images. The proposed algorithm does not rely on straightforward averaging of multiple images but, rather, in each scale, overlapped wavelet detail coefficients are weighted using dynamic threshold values and then reconstructed by averaging. Validation of the proposed algorithm is carried out using simulated and real images with synthetic speckle noise and phantom data consisting of multiple ultrasound images, with the experimental results demonstrating that speckle noise is significantly reduced whilst sharp edges without discernible distortions are preserved. The proposed approach performs better both qualitatively and quantitatively than previous existing approaches.

  15. Ultrasound Research Interface - Cancer Imaging Program

    Cancer.gov

    The ultrasound research interface permits extensive instrument parameter control of a commercially available scanner that allows access to, and export of, the beam-formed signal data while simultaneously displaying the ultrasound system-processed data as a clinical image.

  16. SAR imaging via modern 2-D spectral estimation methods.

    PubMed

    DeGraaf, S R

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of modern 2D spectral estimation algorithms for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. The motivation for applying power spectrum estimation methods to SAR imaging is to improve resolution, remove sidelobe artifacts, and reduce speckle compared to what is possible with conventional Fourier transform SAR imaging techniques. This paper makes two principal contributions to the field of adaptive SAR imaging. First, it is a comprehensive comparison of 2D spectral estimation methods for SAR imaging. It provides a synopsis of the algorithms available, discusses their relative merits for SAR imaging, and illustrates their performance on simulated and collected SAR imagery. Some of the algorithms presented or their derivations are new, as are some of the insights into or analyses of the algorithms. Second, this work develops multichannel variants of four related algorithms, minimum variance method (MVM), reduced-rank MVM (RRMVM), adaptive sidelobe reduction (ASR) and space variant apodization (SVA) to estimate both reflectivity intensity and interferometric height from polarimetric displaced-aperture interferometric data. All of these interferometric variants are new. In the interferometric contest, adaptive spectral estimation can improve the height estimates through a combination of adaptive nulling and averaging. Examples illustrate that MVM, ASR, and SVA offer significant advantages over Fourier methods for estimating both scattering intensity and interferometric height, and allow empirical comparison of the accuracies of Fourier, MVM, ASR, and SVA interferometric height estimates.

  17. 2D/3D image (facial) comparison using camera matching.

    PubMed

    Goos, Mirelle I M; Alberink, Ivo B; Ruifrok, Arnout C C

    2006-11-10

    A problem in forensic facial comparison of images of perpetrators and suspects is that distances between fixed anatomical points in the face, which form a good starting point for objective, anthropometric comparison, vary strongly according to the position and orientation of the camera. In case of a cooperating suspect, a 3D image may be taken using e.g. a laser scanning device. By projecting the 3D image onto a 2D image with the suspect's head in the same pose as that of the perpetrator, using the same focal length and pixel aspect ratio, numerical comparison of (ratios of) distances between fixed points becomes feasible. An experiment was performed in which, starting from two 3D scans and one 2D image of two colleagues, male and female, and using seven fixed anatomical locations in the face, comparisons were made for the matching and non-matching case. Using this method, the non-matching pair cannot be distinguished from the matching pair of faces. Facial expression and resolution of images were all more or less optimal, and the results of the study are not encouraging for the use of anthropometric arguments in the identification process. More research needs to be done though on larger sets of facial comparisons. PMID:16337353

  18. Methods for segmenting curved needles in ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Okazawa, Stephen H; Ebrahimi, Richelle; Chuang, Jason; Rohling, Robert N; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2006-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle insertions are widely used techniques in current clinical practice. Some of these procedures have a high degree of difficulty because of poor observability of the needle in the ultrasound image. There have been recent efforts to improve guidance by computer assisted needle detection. These software techniques are often limited by not representing needle curvature. We present two methods to detect the needle in 2D ultrasound that specifically address needle curvature. Firstly, we demonstrate a real-time needle segmentation algorithm based on the Hough transform which detects the needle and represents its curved shape. Secondly, we demonstrate how a new coordinate transformation can transform detection of a curved needle to a linear fit. These methods are demonstrated on ultrasound and photographic images.

  19. Ultrasound technologies for biomaterials fabrication and imaging.

    PubMed

    Dalecki, Diane; Hocking, Denise C

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound is emerging as a powerful tool for developing biomaterials for regenerative medicine. Ultrasound technologies are finding wide-ranging, innovative applications for controlling the fabrication of bioengineered scaffolds, as well as for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the properties of engineered constructs both during fabrication processes and post-implantation. This review provides an overview of the biomedical applications of ultrasound for imaging and therapy, a tutorial of the physical mechanisms through which ultrasound can interact with biomaterials, and examples of how ultrasound technologies are being developed and applied for biomaterials fabrication processes, non-invasive imaging, and quantitative characterization of bioengineered scaffolds in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Iterative 2D deconvolution of portal imaging radiographs.

    PubMed

    Looe, Hui Khee; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay C; Poppe, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Portal imaging has become an integral part of modern radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and IGRT. It serves to verify the accuracy of day-to-day patient positioning, a prerequisite for treatment success. However, image blurring attributable to different physical and geometrical effects, analysed in this work, impairs the image quality of the portal images, and anatomical structures cannot always be clearly outlined. A 2D iterative deconvolution method was developed to reduce this image blurring. The affiliated data basis was generated by the separate measurement of the components contributing to image blurring. Secondary electron transport and pixel size within the EPID, as well as geometrical penumbra due to the finite photon source size were found to be the major contributors, whereas photon scattering in the patient is less important. The underlying line-spread kernels of these components were shown to be Lorentz functions. This implies that each of these convolution kernels and also their combination can be characterized by a single characteristic, the width parameter λ of the Lorentz function. The overall resulting λ values were 0.5mm for 6 MV and 0.65 mm for 15 MV. Portal images were deconvolved using the point-spread function derived from the Lorentz function together with the experimentally determined λ values. The improvement of the portal images was quantified in terms of the modulation transfer function of a bar pattern. The resulting clinical images show a clear enhancement of sharpness and contrast.

  1. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  2. 2-D Drift Velocities from the IMAGE EUV Plasmaspheric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D.; Adrian, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IMAGE Mission extreme ultraviolet imager (EUY) observes He+ plasmaspheric ions throughout the inner magnetosphere. Limited by ionizing radiation and viewing close to the Sun, images of the He+ distribution are available every 10 minutes for many hours as the spacecraft passes through apogee in its highly elliptical orbit. As a consistent constituent at about 15%, He+ is an excellent surrogate for monitoring all of the processes that control the dynamics of plasmaspheric plasma. In particular, the motion ofHe+ transverse to the ambient magnetic field is a direct indication of convective electric fields. The analysis of boundary motions has already achieved new insights into the electrodynamic coupling processes taking place between energetic magnetospheric plasmas and the ionosphere. Yet to be fulfilled, however, is the original promise that global EUY images of the plasmasphere might yield two-dimensional pictures of meso-scale to macro-scale electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. This work details the technique and initial application of an IMAGE EUY analysis that appears capable of following thermal plasma motion on a global basis.

  3. 2-D Drift Velocities from the IMAGE EUV Plasmaspheric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The IMAGE Mission extreme ultraviolet imager (EW) observes He(+) plasmaspheric ions throughout the inner magnetosphere. Limited by ionizing radiation and viewing close to the Sun, images of the He(+) distribution are available every 10 minutes for many hours as the spacecraft passes through apogee in its highly elliptical orbit. As a consistent constituent at about 15%, He(+) is an excellent surrogate for monitoring all of the processes that control the dynamics of plasmaspheric plasma. In particular, the motion of He' transverse to the ambient magnetic field is a direct indication of convective electric fields. The analysis of boundary motions has already achieved new insights into the electrodynamic coupling processes taking place between energetic magnetospheric plasmas and the ionosphere. Yet to be fulfilled, however, is the original promise that global E W images of the plasmasphere might yield two-dimensional pictures of mesoscale to macro-scale electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. This work details the technique and initial application of an IMAGE EUV analysis that appears capable of following thermal plasma motion on a global basis.

  4. Automatic Contour Tracking in Ultrasound Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Min; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Stone, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new automatic contour tracking system, EdgeTrak, for the ultrasound image sequences of human tongue is presented. The images are produced by a head and transducer support system (HATS). The noise and unrelated high-contrast edges in ultrasound images make it very difficult to automatically detect the correct tongue surfaces. In…

  5. Ultrasound imaging in research and clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Schellpfeffer, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging in clinical obstetrics continues to grow at an almost exponential rate. Ultrasound imaging in developmental biology has only begun to be used to enhance the traditional methodologies to study the developing embryo/fetus. The various modalities of ultrasound imaging are reviewed as they apply to current uses in clinical obstetrics and developmental biologic research. New modalities are also discussed in both clinical obstetrics and developmental biologic research as well as the current limitations of ultrasound imaging faced in both of these fields. PMID:23897593

  6. Handheld ultrasound array imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Juin-Jet; Quistgaard, Jens

    1999-06-01

    A handheld ultrasound imaging device, one that weighs less than five pounds, has been developed for diagnosing trauma in the combat battlefield as well as a variety of commercial mobile diagnostic applications. This handheld device consists of four component ASICs, each is designed using the state of the art microelectronics technologies. These ASICs are integrated with a convex array transducer to allow high quality imaging of soft tissues and blood flow in real time. The device is designed to be battery driven or ac powered with built-in image storage and cineloop playback capability. Design methodologies of a handheld device are fundamentally different to those of a cart-based system. As system architecture, signal and image processing algorithm as well as image control circuit and software in this device is deigned suitably for large-scale integration, the image performance of this device is designed to be adequate to the intent applications. To elongate the battery life, low power design rules and power management circuits are incorporated in the design of each component ASIC. The performance of the prototype device is currently being evaluated for various applications such as a primary image screening tool, fetal imaging in Obstetrics, foreign object detection and wound assessment for emergency care, etc.

  7. The newly developed three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) thyroid ultrasound are strongly correlated, but 2D overestimates thyroid volume in the presence of nodules.

    PubMed

    Rago, T; Bencivelli, W; Scutari, M; Di Cosmo, C; Rizzo, C; Berti, P; Miccoli, P; Pinchera, A; Vitti, P

    2006-05-01

    The newly developed three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) thyroid ultrasound (US) were compared in assessing thyroid volume (TV) in 104 patients: 53 had an isolated thyroid nodule, 32 toxic diffuse goiter, 17 non-toxic multinodular goiter, 1 toxic multinodular goiter and 1 a toxic adenoma. A real-time Technos apparatus (Esaote SpA, Italy) with a 7,5 MHz linear transducer was used. The volume of thyroid lobes by 2D was calculated according to the ellipsoid formula. In the same session, TV by 3D US was calculated using a probe tracking system (in vivo ScanNT Esaote 3.4 MedCom. Darmasdt) and software to reconstruct 3D images, directly giving the lobe volume. There was a very good agreement between 2D and 3D, but in 94/208 lobes with nodular lesions 2D showed a 10% systematic overestimation compared to 3D, the percentage error being higher in lobes with lower volumes. A possible explanation for this result is the inadequacy of the ellipsoid formula in forecasting the correct lobe profile in the presence of nodules. This intrinsic defect of 2D US should be taken into account when evaluating TV in patients with nodular goiter.

  8. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  9. Thermal Field Imaging Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andereck, D.; Rahal, S.; Fife, S.

    2000-01-01

    is then possible to find the average temperature at different locations along the chamber, thereby determining the temperature profile along the system. (In the future we will construct an array of transducers. This will give us the capability to determine the temperature profile much more rapidly than at present, an important consideration if time-dependent phenomena are to be studied.) To validate our procedure we introduced encapsulated liquid crystal particles into glycerol. The liquid crystal particles' color varies depending on the temperature of the fluid. A photograph of the fluid through transparent sidewalls therefore gives a picture of the temperature field of the convecting fluid, independent of our ultrasound imaging. A representative result is shown in the Figure 1, which reveals a very satisfying correspondence between the two techniques. Therefore we have a great deal of confidence that the ultrasound imaging approach is indeed measuring the actual temperature profile of the fluid. The technique has also been applied to convecting liquid metal flows, and representative data will be presented from those experiments as well.

  10. Passive imaging with pulsed ultrasound insonations.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Mast, T Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Burgess, Mark T; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2012-07-01

    Previously, passive cavitation imaging has been described in the context of continuous-wave high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation. However, the technique has potential use as a feedback mechanism for pulsed-wave therapies, such as ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. In this paper, results of experiments and simulations are reported to demonstrate the feasibility of passive cavitation imaging using pulsed ultrasound insonations and how the images depend on pulsed ultrasound parameters. The passive cavitation images were formed from channel data that was beamformed in the frequency domain. Experiments were performed in an invitro flow phantom with an experimental echo contrast agent, echogenic liposomes, as cavitation nuclei. It was found that the pulse duration and envelope have minimal impact on the image resolution achieved. The passive cavitation image amplitude scales linearly with the cavitation emission energy. Cavitation images for both stable and inertial cavitation can be obtained from the same received data set.

  11. Image-guided endobronchial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, William E.; Zang, Xiaonan; Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Byrnes, Patrick; Kuhlengel, Trevor; Bascom, Rebecca; Toth, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now recommended as a standard procedure for in vivo verification of extraluminal diagnostic sites during cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Yet, physicians vary considerably in their skills at using EBUS effectively. Regarding existing bronchoscopy guidance systems, studies have shown their effectiveness in the lung-cancer management process. With such a system, a patient's X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan is used to plan a procedure to regions of interest (ROIs). This plan is then used during follow-on guided bronchoscopy. Recent clinical guidelines for lung cancer, however, also dictate using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying suspicious ROIs and aiding in the cancer-staging process. While researchers have attempted to use guided bronchoscopy systems in tandem with PET imaging and EBUS, no true EBUS-centric guidance system exists. We now propose a full multimodal image-based methodology for guiding EBUS. The complete methodology involves two components: 1) a procedure planning protocol that gives bronchoscope movements appropriate for live EBUS positioning; and 2) a guidance strategy and associated system graphical user interface (GUI) designed for image-guided EBUS. We present results demonstrating the operation of the system.

  12. Ultrasound elastography: enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Ioana N.; Rivaz, Hassan; Macura, Katarzyna; Su, Li-Ming; Hamper, Ulrike; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L., II; Lotan, Tamara; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2009-02-01

    Radical prostatectomy using the laparoscopic and robot-assisted approach lacks tactile feedback. Without palpation, the surgeon needs an affordable imaging technology which can be easily incorporated into the laparoscopic surgical procedure, allowing for precise real time intraoperative tumor localization that will guide the extent of surgical resection. Ultrasound elastography (USE) is a novel ultrasound imaging technology that can detect differences in tissue density or stiffness based on tissue deformation. USE was evaluated here as an enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy. USE using a 2D Dynamic Programming (DP) algorithm was applied on data from ex vivo human prostate specimens. It proved consistent in identification of lesions; hard and soft, malignant and benign, located in the prostate's central gland or in the peripheral zone. We noticed the 2D DP method was able to generate low-noise elastograms using two frames belonging to the same compression or relaxation part of the palpation excitation, even at compression rates up to 10%. Good preliminary results were validated by pathology findings, and also by in vivo and ex vivo MR imaging. We also evaluated the use of ultrasound elastography for imaging cavernous nerves; here we present data from animal model experiments.

  13. Dynamic tracking of a deformable tissue based on 3D-2D MR-US image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marami, Bahram; Sirouspour, Shahin; Fenster, Aaron; Capson, David W.

    2014-03-01

    Real-time registration of pre-operative magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images with intra-operative Ultrasound (US) images can be a valuable tool in image-guided therapies and interventions. This paper presents an automatic method for dynamically tracking the deformation of a soft tissue based on registering pre-operative three-dimensional (3D) MR images to intra-operative two-dimensional (2D) US images. The registration algorithm is based on concepts in state estimation where a dynamic finite element (FE)- based linear elastic deformation model correlates the imaging data in the spatial and temporal domains. A Kalman-like filtering process estimates the unknown deformation states of the soft tissue using the deformation model and a measure of error between the predicted and the observed intra-operative imaging data. The error is computed based on an intensity-based distance metric, namely, modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND), and no segmentation or feature extraction from images is required. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by dynamically deforming 3D pre-operative MR images of a breast phantom tissue based on real-time 2D images obtained from an US probe. Experimental results on different registration scenarios showed that deformation tracking converges in a few iterations. The average target registration error on the plane of 2D US images for manually selected fiducial points was between 0.3 and 1.5 mm depending on the size of deformation.

  14. Plane-wave transverse oscillation for high-frame-rate 2-D vector flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Lenge, Matteo; Ramalli, Alessandro; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian; Liebgott, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    Transverse oscillation (TO) methods introduce oscillations in the pulse-echo field (PEF) along the direction transverse to the ultrasound propagation direction. This may be exploited to extend flow investigations toward multidimensional estimates. In this paper, the TOs are coupled with the transmission of plane waves (PWs) to reconstruct high-framerate RF images with bidirectional oscillations in the pulse-echo field. Such RF images are then processed by a 2-D phase-based displacement estimator to produce 2-D vector flow maps at thousands of frames per second. First, the capability of generating TOs after PW transmissions was thoroughly investigated by varying the lateral wavelength, the burst length, and the transmission frequency. Over the entire region of interest, the generated lateral wavelengths, compared with the designed ones, presented bias and standard deviation of -3.3 ± 5.7% and 10.6 ± 7.4% in simulations and experiments, respectively. The performance of the ultrafast vector flow mapping method was also assessed by evaluating the differences between the estimated velocities and the expected ones. Both simulations and experiments show overall biases lower than 20% when varying the beam-to-flow angle, the peak velocity, and the depth of interest. In vivo applications of the method on the common carotid and the brachial arteries are also presented. PMID:26670852

  15. Plane-wave transverse oscillation for high-frame-rate 2-D vector flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Lenge, Matteo; Ramalli, Alessandro; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian; Liebgott, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    Transverse oscillation (TO) methods introduce oscillations in the pulse-echo field (PEF) along the direction transverse to the ultrasound propagation direction. This may be exploited to extend flow investigations toward multidimensional estimates. In this paper, the TOs are coupled with the transmission of plane waves (PWs) to reconstruct high-framerate RF images with bidirectional oscillations in the pulse-echo field. Such RF images are then processed by a 2-D phase-based displacement estimator to produce 2-D vector flow maps at thousands of frames per second. First, the capability of generating TOs after PW transmissions was thoroughly investigated by varying the lateral wavelength, the burst length, and the transmission frequency. Over the entire region of interest, the generated lateral wavelengths, compared with the designed ones, presented bias and standard deviation of -3.3 ± 5.7% and 10.6 ± 7.4% in simulations and experiments, respectively. The performance of the ultrafast vector flow mapping method was also assessed by evaluating the differences between the estimated velocities and the expected ones. Both simulations and experiments show overall biases lower than 20% when varying the beam-to-flow angle, the peak velocity, and the depth of interest. In vivo applications of the method on the common carotid and the brachial arteries are also presented.

  16. Ultrasound strain imaging for quantification of tissue function: cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.

    2013-03-01

    With ultrasound imaging, the motion and deformation of tissue can be measured. Tissue can be deformed by applying a force on it and the resulting deformation is a function of its mechanical properties. Quantification of this resulting tissue deformation to assess the mechanical properties of tissue is called elastography. If the tissue under interrogation is actively deforming, the deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as `strain imaging'. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaques characterization, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. We developed radio frequency (RF) based ultrasound methods to assess the deformation at higher resolution and with higher accuracy than commercial methods using conventional image data (Tissue Doppler Imaging and 2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so 1D. We further extended this method to multiple directions and further improved precision by using compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. In arteries, the presence of vulnerable plaques may lead to acute events like stroke and myocardial infarction. Consequently, timely detection of these plaques is of great diagnostic value. Non-invasive ultrasound strain compounding is currently being evaluated as a diagnostic tool to identify the vulnerability of plaques. In the heart, we determined the strain locally and at high resolution resulting in a local assessment in contrary to conventional global functional parameters like cardiac output or shortening fraction.

  17. Sub-Nyquist Sampling and Fourier Domain Beamforming in Volumetric Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Burshtein, Amir; Birk, Michael; Chernyakova, Tanya; Eilam, Alon; Kempinski, Arcady; Eldar, Yonina C

    2016-05-01

    A key step in ultrasound image formation is digital beamforming of signals sampled by several transducer elements placed upon an array. High-resolution digital beamforming introduces the demand for sampling rates significantly higher than the signals' Nyquist rate, which greatly increases the volume of data that must be transmitted from the system's front end. In 3-D ultrasound imaging, 2-D transducer arrays rather than 1-D arrays are used, and more scan lines are needed. This implies that the amount of sampled data is vastly increased with respect to 2-D imaging. In this work, we show that a considerable reduction in data rate can be achieved by applying the ideas of Xampling and frequency domain beamforming (FDBF), leading to a sub-Nyquist sampling rate, which uses only a portion of the bandwidth of the ultrasound signals to reconstruct the image. We extend previous work on FDBF for 2-D ultrasound imaging to accommodate the geometry imposed by volumetric scanning and a 2-D grid of transducer elements. High image quality from low-rate samples is demonstrated by simulation of a phantom image composed of several small reflectors. Our technique is then applied to raw data of a heart ventricle phantom obtained by a commercial 3-D ultrasound system. We show that by performing 3-D beamforming in the frequency domain, sub-Nyquist sampling and low processing rate are achievable, while maintaining adequate image quality.

  18. Simulating cardiac ultrasound image based on MR diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Lu, Guolan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiac ultrasound simulation can have important applications in the design of ultrasound systems, understanding the interaction effect between ultrasound and tissue and setting the ground truth for validating quantification methods. Current ultrasound simulation methods fail to simulate the myocardial intensity anisotropies. New simulation methods are needed in order to simulate realistic ultrasound images of the heart. Methods: The proposed cardiac ultrasound image simulation method is based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data of the heart. The method utilizes both the cardiac geometry and the fiber orientation information to simulate the anisotropic intensities in B-mode ultrasound images. Before the simulation procedure, the geometry and fiber orientations of the heart are obtained from high-resolution structural MRI and DTI data, respectively. The simulation includes two important steps. First, the backscatter coefficients of the point scatterers inside the myocardium are processed according to the fiber orientations using an anisotropic model. Second, the cardiac ultrasound images are simulated with anisotropic myocardial intensities. The proposed method was also compared with two other nonanisotropic intensity methods using 50 B-mode ultrasound image volumes of five different rat hearts. The simulated images were also compared with the ultrasound images of a diseased rat heart in vivo. A new segmental evaluation method is proposed to validate the simulation results. The average relative errors (AREs) of five parameters, i.e., mean intensity, Rayleigh distribution parameter σ, and first, second, and third quartiles, were utilized as the evaluation metrics. The simulated images were quantitatively compared with real ultrasound images in both ex vivo and in vivo experiments. Results: The proposed ultrasound image simulation method can realistically simulate cardiac ultrasound images of the heart using high-resolution MR-DTI data. The AREs of their

  19. Ultrasound, normal fetus- ventricles of brain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of brain ventricles. Ventricles are spaces in the brain that are filled with fluid. In this early ultrasound, the ventricles can be seen as light lines extending through the skull, seen in the upper right side of the image.

  20. In vivo real-time volumetric synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten F.; Brandt, Andreas H.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological. This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° × 90° field-of-view was achieved. data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 × 32 elements 2-D phased array transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak-temporal-average intensity for parallel beam-forming (PB) are 0.83 and 377.5mW/cm2, and for SA are 0.48 and 329.5mW/cm2. A human kidney was volumetrically imaged with SA and PB techniques simultaneously. Two radiologists for evaluation of the volumetric SA were consulted by means of a questionnaire on the level of details perceivable in the beam-formed images. The comparison was against PB based on the in vivo data. The feedback from the domain experts indicates that volumetric SA images internal body structures with a better contrast resolution compared to PB at all positions in the entire imaged volume. Furthermore, the autocovariance of a homogeneous area in the in vivo SA data, had 23.5% smaller width at the half of its maximum value compared to PB.

  1. Feasibility of vibro-acoustography with a quasi-2D ultrasound array transducer for detection and localizing of permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds: A pilot ex vivo study

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Kinnick, Randall R.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra; Davis, Brian J.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Effective permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) requires precise placement of radioactive seeds in and around the prostate. The impetus for this research is to examine a new ultrasound-based imaging modality, vibro-acoustography (VA), which may serve to provide a high rate of PPB seed detection while also effecting enhanced prostate imaging. The authors investigate the ability of VA, implemented on a clinical ultrasound (US) scanner and equipped with a quasi-2D (Q2D) array US transducer, to detect and localize PPB seeds in excised prostate specimens. Methods: Nonradioactive brachytherapy seeds were implanted into four excised cadaver prostates. A clinical US scanner equipped with a Q2D array US transducer was customized to acquire both US and C-scan VA images at various depths. The VA images were then used to detect and localize the implanted seeds in prostate tissue. To validate the VA results, computed tomography (CT) images of the same tissue samples were obtained to serve as the reference by which to evaluate the performance of VA in PPB seed detection. Results: The results indicate that VA is capable of accurately identifying the presence and distribution of PPB seeds with a high imaging contrast. Moreover, a large ratio of the PPB seeds implanted into prostate tissue samples could be detected through acquired VA images. Using CT-based seed identification as the standard, VA was capable of detecting 74%–92% of the implanted seeds. Additionally, the angular independency of VA in detecting PPB seeds was demonstrated through a well-controlled phantom experiment. Conclusions: Q2DVA detected a substantial portion of the seeds by using a 2D array US transducer in excised prostate tissue specimens. While VA has inherent advantages associated with conventional US imaging, it has the additional advantage of permitting detection of PPB seeds independent of their orientation. These results suggest the potential of VA as a method for PPB imaging that

  2. Composite ultrasound imaging apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Morimoto, Alan K.; Bow, Jr., Wallace J.; Strong, David Scott; Dickey, Fred M.

    1998-01-01

    An imaging apparatus and method for use in presenting composite two dimensional and three dimensional images from individual ultrasonic frames. A cross-sectional reconstruction is applied by using digital ultrasound frames, transducer orientation and a known center. Motion compensation, rank value filtering, noise suppression and tissue classification are utilized to optimize the composite image.

  3. Composite ultrasound imaging apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J. Jr.; Strong, D.S.; Dickey, F.M.

    1998-09-15

    An imaging apparatus and method for use in presenting composite two dimensional and three dimensional images from individual ultrasonic frames. A cross-sectional reconstruction is applied by using digital ultrasound frames, transducer orientation and a known center. Motion compensation, rank value filtering, noise suppression and tissue classification are utilized to optimize the composite image. 37 figs.

  4. A fast and conformal heating scheme for producing large thermal lesions using a 2D ultrasound phased array.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Lin, Win-Li; Chen, Yung-Yaw

    2007-02-01

    The treatment conformability and the total treatment time of large tumors are both important issues in ultrasound thermal therapy. Previous heating strategies all show their restrictions in achieving these two issues to satisfactory levels simultaneously. This work theoretically presents a new heating strategy which is capable of both increasing the treatment conformability and shortening the treatment time, when using a 2D ultrasound phased array transducer. To perform this, a set of the multiple-foci patterns (considered the basic heating units) were temporally switched to steer the beam at different focal planes with the lesion length being well-controlled. Then, to conformally cover an irregular target volume, the 2D phased array was laterally shifted by a positioning system to deposit a suitable heating unit to cover a subvolume part. Results demonstrated that the totally treatment time can be largely reduced. The heating rate can be increased up to 0.96 cm3/min compared to the previously reported 0.26 cm3/min. Also, the proposed scheme showed that the tumor regions can be completely treated with the normal tissue damage at satisfactory level. The feasibility of the proposed strategy for irregular tumor treatment was also demonstrated. This study offers useful information in large tumor treatment in ultrasound thermal therapy.

  5. A comparison of needle tip localization accuracy using 2D and 3D trans-rectal ultrasound for high-dose-rate prostate cancer brachytherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Hoover, Douglas A.; Surry, Kathleen; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Montreuil, Jacques; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Background: High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is a prostate cancer treatment option involving the insertion of hollow needles into the gland through the perineum to deliver a radioactive source. Conventional needle imaging involves indexing a trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe in the superior/inferior (S/I) direction, using the axial transducer to produce an image set for organ segmentation. These images have limited resolution in the needle insertion direction (S/I), so the sagittal transducer is used to identify needle tips, requiring a manual registration with the axial view. This registration introduces a source of uncertainty in the final segmentations and subsequent treatment plan. Our lab has developed a device enabling 3D-TRUS guided insertions with high S/I spatial resolution, eliminating the need to align axial and sagittal views. Purpose: To compare HDR-BT needle tip localization accuracy between 2D and 3D-TRUS. Methods: 5 prostate cancer patients underwent conventional 2D TRUS guided HDR-BT, during which 3D images were also acquired for post-operative registration and segmentation. Needle end-length measurements were taken, providing a gold standard for insertion depths. Results: 73 needles were analyzed from all 5 patients. Needle tip position differences between imaging techniques was found to be largest in the S/I direction with mean+/-SD of -2.5+/-4.0 mm. End-length measurements indicated that 3D TRUS provided statistically significantly lower mean+/-SD insertion depth error of -0.2+/-3.4 mm versus 2.3+/-3.7 mm with 2D guidance (p < .001). Conclusions: 3D TRUS may provide more accurate HDR-BT needle localization than conventional 2D TRUS guidance for the majority of HDR-BT needles.

  6. Image-based RSA: Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis based on 2D-3D image registration.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, P W; Kaptein, B L; Stoel, B C; Reiber, J H C; Rozing, P M; Valstar, E R

    2008-01-01

    Image-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (IBRSA) integrates 2D-3D image registration and conventional RSA. Instead of radiopaque RSA bone markers, IBRSA uses 3D CT data, from which digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are generated. Using 2D-3D image registration, the 3D pose of the CT is iteratively adjusted such that the generated DRRs resemble the 2D RSA images as closely as possible, according to an image matching metric. Effectively, by registering all 2D follow-up moments to the same 3D CT, the CT volume functions as common ground. In two experiments, using RSA and using a micromanipulator as gold standard, IBRSA has been validated on cadaveric and sawbone scapula radiographs, and good matching results have been achieved. The accuracy was: |mu |< 0.083 mm for translations and |mu| < 0.023 degrees for rotations. The precision sigma in x-, y-, and z-direction was 0.090, 0.077, and 0.220 mm for translations and 0.155 degrees , 0.243 degrees , and 0.074 degrees for rotations. Our results show that the accuracy and precision of in vitro IBRSA, performed under ideal laboratory conditions, are lower than in vitro standard RSA but higher than in vivo standard RSA. Because IBRSA does not require radiopaque markers, it adds functionality to the RSA method by opening new directions and possibilities for research, such as dynamic analyses using fluoroscopy on subjects without markers and computer navigation applications.

  7. 2-D finite difference time domain model of ultrasound reflection from normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage surface.

    PubMed

    Kaleva, Erna; Liukkonen, Jukka; Toyras, Juha; Saarakkala, Simo; Kiviranta, Panu; Jurvelin, Jukka

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative high-frequency ultrasonic evaluation of articular cartilage has shown a potential for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, where the roughness of the surface, collagen and proteoglycan contents, and the density and mechanical properties of cartilage change concurrently. Experimentally, these factors are difficult to investigate individually and thus a numerical model is needed. The present study is the first one to use finite difference time domain modeling of pulse-echo measurements of articular cartilage. Ultrasound reflection from the surface was investigated with varying surface roughness, material parameters (Young's modulus, density, longitudinal, and transversal velocities) and inclination of the samples. The 2-D simulation results were compared with the results from experimental measurements of the same samples in an identical geometry. Both the roughness and the material parameters contributed significantly to the ultrasound reflection. The angular dependence of the ultrasound reflection was strong for a smooth cartilage surface but disappeared for the samples with a rougher surface. These results support the findings of previous experimental studies and indicate that ultrasound detects changes in the cartilage that are characteristic of osteoarthritis. In the present study there are differences between the results of the simulations and the experimental measurements. However, the systematic patterns in the experimental behavior are correctly reproduced by the model. In the future, our goal is to develop more realistic acoustic models incorporating inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the cartilage. PMID:20378451

  8. Advances in Molecular Imaging with Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has long demonstrated utility in the study and measurement of anatomic features and noninvasive observation of blood flow. Within the last decade, advances in molecular biology and contrast agents have allowed researchers to use ultrasound to detect changes in the expression of molecular markers on the vascular endothelium and other intravascular targets. This new technology, referred to as ultrasonic molecular imaging, is still in its infancy. However, in preclinical studies, ultrasonic molecular imaging has shown promise in assessing angiogenesis, inflammation, and thrombus. In this review, we discuss recent advances in microbubble-type contrast agent development, ultrasound technology, and signal processing strategies that have the potential to substantially improve the capabilities and utility of ultrasonic molecular imaging. PMID:20487678

  9. Multi-modal Ultrasound Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Valdés, L.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Camacho, J.; Udías, J. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; González-Salido, N.

    This work describes preliminary results of a two-modality imaging system aimed at the early detection of breast cancer. The first technique is based on compounding conventional echographic images taken at regular angular intervals around the imaged breast. The other modality obtains tomographic images of propagation velocity using the same circular geometry. For this study, a low-cost prototype has been built. It is based on a pair of opposed 128-element, 3.2 MHz array transducers that are mechanically moved around tissue mimicking phantoms. Compounded images around 360° provide improved resolution, clutter reduction, artifact suppression and reinforce the visualization of internal structures. However, refraction at the skin interface must be corrected for an accurate image compounding process. This is achieved by estimation of the interface geometry followed by computing the internal ray paths. On the other hand, sound velocity tomographic images from time of flight projections have been also obtained. Two reconstruction methods, Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and 2D Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (2D OSEM), were used as a first attempt towards tomographic reconstruction. These methods yield useable images in short computational times that can be considered as initial estimates in subsequent more complex methods of ultrasound image reconstruction. These images may be effective to differentiate malignant and benign masses and are very promising for breast cancer screening.

  10. Ultrasound image guidance of cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terry M.; Pace, Danielle F.; Lang, Pencilla; Guiraudon, Gérard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2011-03-01

    Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. Heart disease has traditionally been treated surgically using open chest techniques with the patient being placed "on pump" - i.e. their circulation being maintained by a cardio-pulmonary bypass or "heart-lung" machine. Recently, techniques have been developed for performing minimally invasive interventions on the heart, obviating the formerly invasive procedures. These new approaches rely on pre-operative images, combined with real-time images acquired during the procedure. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient, and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall. This paper illustrates the problems associated with traditional ultrasound guidance, and reviews the state of the art in real-time 3D cardiac ultrasound technology. In addition, it discusses the implementation of an image-guided intervention platform that integrates real-time ultrasound with a virtual reality environment, bringing together the pre-operative anatomy derived from MRI or CT, representations of tracked instrumentation inside the heart chamber, and the intra-operatively acquired ultrasound images.

  11. All-Optical Ultrasound Transducers for High Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheaff, Clay Smith

    High frequency ultrasound (HFUS) has increasingly been used within the past few decades to provide high resolution (< 200 mum) imaging in medical applications such as endoluminal imaging, intravascular imaging, ophthalmology, and dermatology. The optical detection and generation of HFUS using thin films offers numerous advantages over traditional piezoelectric technology. Circumvention of an electronic interface with the device head is one of the most significant given the RF noise, crosstalk, and reduced capacitance that encumbers small-scale electronic transducers. Thin film Fabry-Perot interferometers - also known as etalons - are well suited for HFUS receivers on account of their high sensitivity, wide bandwidth, and ease of fabrication. In addition, thin films can be used to generate HFUS when irradiated with optical pulses - a method referred to as Thermoelastic Ultrasound Generation (TUG). By integrating a polyimide (PI) film for TUG into an etalon receiver, we have created for the first time an all-optical ultrasound transducer that is both thermally stable and capable of forming fully sampled 2-D imaging arrays of arbitrary configuration. Here we report (1) the design and fabrication of PI-etalon transducers; (2) an evaluation of their optical and acoustic performance parameters; (3) the ability to conduct high-resolution imaging with synthetic 2-D arrays of PI-etalon elements; and (4) work towards a fiber optic PI-etalon for in vivo use. Successful development of a fiber optic imager would provide a unique field-of-view thereby exposing an abundance of prospects for minimally-invasive analysis, diagnosis, and treatment of disease.

  12. Respiration correction by clustering in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kaizhi; Chen, Xi; Ding, Mingyue; Sang, Nong

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory motion is a challenging factor for image acquisition, image-guided procedures and perfusion quantification using contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the abdominal and thoracic region. In order to reduce the influence of respiratory motion, respiratory correction methods were investigated. In this paper we propose a novel, cluster-based respiratory correction method. In the proposed method, we assign the image frames of the corresponding respiratory phase using spectral clustering firstly. And then, we achieve the images correction automatically by finding a cluster in which points are close to each other. Unlike the traditional gating method, we don't need to estimate the breathing cycle accurate. It is because images are similar at the corresponding respiratory phase, and they are close in high-dimensional space. The proposed method is tested on simulation image sequence and real ultrasound image sequence. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our proposed method in quantitative and qualitative.

  13. Ultrasound image-based respiratory motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Youngkyoo; Kim, Jung-Bae; Kim, Yong Sun; Bang, Won-Chul; Kim, James D. K.; Kim, ChangYeong

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory motion tracking has been issues for MR/CT imaging and noninvasive surgery such as HIFU and radiotherapy treatment when we apply these imaging or therapy technologies to moving organs such as liver, kidney or pancreas. Currently, some bulky and burdensome devices are placed externally on skin to estimate respiratory motion of an organ. It estimates organ motion indirectly using skin motion, not directly using organ itself. In this paper, we propose a system that measures directly the motion of organ itself only using ultrasound image. Our system has automatically selected a window in image sequences, called feature window, which is able to measure respiratory motion robustly even to noisy ultrasound images. The organ's displacement on each ultrasound image has been directly calculated through the feature window. It is very convenient to use since it exploits a conventional ultrasound probe. In this paper, we show that our proposed method can robustly extract respiratory motion signal with regardless of reference frame. It is superior to other image based method such as Mutual Information (MI) or Correlation Coefficient (CC). They are sensitive to what the reference frame is selected. Furthermore, our proposed method gives us clear information of the phase of respiratory cycle such as during inspiration or expiration and so on since it calculate not similarity measurement like MI or CC but actual organ's displacement.

  14. Obtaining a palatal trace for ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Melissa A.; Stone, Maureen; Pouplier, Marianne; Parthasarathy, Vijay

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents methods for collection and display of the palate with ultrasound, for use as a reference for tongue movements. Ultrasound does not usually capture structures other than the tongue, because the air above the tongue in the vocal tract reflects the ultrasound beam back to the transducer. However, when the tongue touches the palate, the ultrasound beam is transmitted through the soft tissue until it reaches and is reflected by the palatine bone. The tongue touches the palate during swallowing and some speech sounds. The palate contour can be traced from these images. The paper presents a corpus of speech and swallowing tasks that can be used to create a full palatal trace. The corpus is tested on a subject for whom it is easy to collect palatal images and a subject for whom it is difficult to collect palatal images. The availability of a palate will enhance our ability for data quantification from ultrasound images. In combination with tongue contours, the palate contour allows the computation of linguistically important measures, such as the constriction degree, area functions, and L2 norms. [Work supported by NIH RO1-DC01758 and T32-DE07309.

  15. A Targeting Microbubble for Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, James Shue-Min; Sennoga, Charles A.; McConnell, Ellen; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing; Nourshargh, Sussan; Seddon, John M.; Haskard, Dorian O.; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Microbubbles conjugated with targeting ligands are used as contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging. However, they often contain immunogenic (strept)avidin, which impedes application in humans. Although targeting bubbles not employing the biotin-(strept)avidin conjugation chemistry have been explored, only a few reached the stage of ultrasound imaging in vivo, none were reported/evaluated to show all three of the following properties desired for clinical applications: (i) low degree of non-specific bubble retention in more than one non-reticuloendothelial tissue; (ii) effective for real-time imaging; and (iii) effective for acoustic quantification of molecular targets to a high degree of quantification. Furthermore, disclosures of the compositions and methodologies enabling reproduction of the bubbles are often withheld. Objective To develop and evaluate a targeting microbubble based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry for ultrasound molecular imaging. Methods and Results Microbubbles with a previously unreported generic (non-targeting components) composition were grafted with anti-E-selectin F(ab’)2 using maleimide-thiol conjugation, to produce E-selectin targeting microbubbles. The resulting targeting bubbles showed high specificity to E-selectin in vitro and in vivo. Non-specific bubble retention was minimal in at least three non-reticuloendothelial tissues with inflammation (mouse heart, kidneys, cremaster). The bubbles were effective for real-time ultrasound imaging of E-selectin expression in the inflamed mouse heart and kidneys, using a clinical ultrasound scanner. The acoustic signal intensity of the targeted bubbles retained in the heart correlated strongly with the level of E-selectin expression (|r|≥0.8), demonstrating a high degree of non-invasive molecular quantification. Conclusions Targeting microbubbles for ultrasound molecular imaging, based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry and the generic composition described

  16. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  17. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  18. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  19. Real-time two-dimensional temperature imaging using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2009-01-01

    We present a system for real-time 2D imaging of temperature change in tissue media using pulse-echo ultrasound. The frontend of the system is a SonixRP ultrasound scanner with a research interface giving us the capability of controlling the beam sequence and accessing radio frequency (RF) data in real-time. The beamformed RF data is streamlined to the backend of the system, where the data is processed using a two-dimensional temperature estimation algorithm running in the graphics processing unit (GPU). The estimated temperature is displayed in real-time providing feedback that can be used for real-time control of the heating source. Currently we have verified our system with elastography tissue mimicking phantom and in vitro porcine heart tissue, excellent repeatability and sensitivity were demonstrated.

  20. 2D array transducers for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of interventional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Edward D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe catheter ring arrays for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and vena cava filters. We have constructed several prototypes operating at 5 MHz and consisting of 54 elements using the W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. micro-miniature ribbon cables. We have recently constructed a new transducer using a braided wiring technology from Precision Interconnect. This transducer consists of 54 elements at 4.8 MHz with pitch of 0.20 mm and typical -6 dB bandwidth of 22%. In all cases, the transducer and wiring assembly were integrated with an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical deployment device for vena cava filters. Preliminary in vivo and in vitro testing is ongoing including simultaneous 3D ultrasound and x-ray fluoroscopy.

  1. An image registration based ultrasound probe calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Kumar, Dinesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Narayanan, Ram

    2012-02-01

    Reconstructed 3D ultrasound of prostate gland finds application in several medical areas such as image guided biopsy, therapy planning and dose delivery. In our application, we use an end-fire probe rotated about its axis to acquire a sequence of rotational slices to reconstruct 3D TRUS (Transrectal Ultrasound) image. The image acquisition system consists of an ultrasound transducer situated on a cradle directly attached to a rotational sensor. However, due to system tolerances, axis of probe does not align exactly with the designed axis of rotation resulting in artifacts in the 3D reconstructed ultrasound volume. We present a rigid registration based automatic probe calibration approach. The method uses a sequence of phantom images, each pair acquired at angular separation of 180 degrees and registers corresponding image pairs to compute the deviation from designed axis. A modified shadow removal algorithm is applied for preprocessing. An attribute vector is constructed from image intensity and a speckle-insensitive information-theoretic feature. We compare registration between the presented method and expert-corrected images in 16 prostate phantom scans. Images were acquired at multiple resolutions, and different misalignment settings from two ultrasound machines. Screenshots from 3D reconstruction are shown before and after misalignment correction. Registration parameters from automatic and manual correction were found to be in good agreement. Average absolute differences of translation and rotation between automatic and manual methods were 0.27 mm and 0.65 degree, respectively. The registration parameters also showed lower variability for automatic registration (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.50 mm, σrotation = 0.52 degree) compared to the manual approach (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.62 mm, σrotation = 0.78 degree).

  2. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  3. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve the

  4. [Ultrasound imaging of Dupuytren's contracture].

    PubMed

    Créteur, V; Madani, A; Gosset, N

    2010-06-01

    Dupuytren's contracture is characterized by two underlying lesions, nodules and cords. These involve the palmar fascia at the distal palmar crease, especially at the level of the third and fourth rays with progressive disabling finger contracture. The superficial palmar aponeurosis appears as a thin echogenic lamellar structure overlying the flexor tendons. The demonstration of hypoechoic bands adhering to the marging of the flexor tendons and deep surface of the dermis appears to be pathognomonic of the disease. Compared to tendons, early nodules are hypoechoic and typically hypervascular whereas older nodules are iso- to hyperechoic, without hypervascular Doppler signal. Ultrasound can sometimes demonstrate arterial encasement by fibrous or scarring tissue. Ultrasound therefore is very useful for the differential diagnosis of pathologies involving the palmar surface of the hand, for the early detection of Dupuytren's contracture, and for the detection of complication, especially vascular. These data may have an impact on management. PMID:20808269

  5. Ultra-slim 2D- and depth-imaging camera modules for mobile imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, Andreas; Oberdörster, Alexander; Dunkel, Jens; Reimann, Andreas; Wippermann, Frank

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution, a microoptical imaging system is demonstrated that is inspired by the insect compound eye. The array camera module achieves HD resolution with a z-height of 2.0 mm, which is about 50% compared to traditional cameras with comparable parameters. The FOV is segmented by multiple optical channels imaging in parallel. The partial images are stitched together to form a final image of the whole FOV by image processing software. The system is able to acquire depth maps along with the 2D video and it includes light field imaging features such as software refocusing. The microlens arrays are realized by microoptical technologies on wafer-level which are suitable for a potential fabrication in high volume.

  6. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  7. Pencil beam all-optical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alles, Erwin J.; Noimark, Sacha; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    A miniature, directional fibre-optic acoustic source is presented that employs geometrical focussing to generate a nearly-collimated acoustic pencil beam. When paired with a fibre-optic acoustic detector, an all-optical ultrasound probe with an outer diameter of 2.5 mm is obtained that acquires a pulse-echo image line at each probe position without the need for image reconstruction. B-mode images can be acquired by translating the probe and concatenating the image lines, and artefacts resulting from probe positioning uncertainty are shown to be significantly lower than those observed for conventional synthetic aperture scanning of a non-directional acoustic source. The high image quality obtained for excised vascular tissue suggests that the all-optical ultrasound probe is ideally suited for in vivo, interventional applications. PMID:27699130

  8. Pencil beam all-optical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alles, Erwin J.; Noimark, Sacha; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    A miniature, directional fibre-optic acoustic source is presented that employs geometrical focussing to generate a nearly-collimated acoustic pencil beam. When paired with a fibre-optic acoustic detector, an all-optical ultrasound probe with an outer diameter of 2.5 mm is obtained that acquires a pulse-echo image line at each probe position without the need for image reconstruction. B-mode images can be acquired by translating the probe and concatenating the image lines, and artefacts resulting from probe positioning uncertainty are shown to be significantly lower than those observed for conventional synthetic aperture scanning of a non-directional acoustic source. The high image quality obtained for excised vascular tissue suggests that the all-optical ultrasound probe is ideally suited for in vivo, interventional applications.

  9. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed. PMID:27277901

  10. High definition ultrasound imaging for battlefield medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.; Morimoto, A.K.; Kozlowski, D.M.; Krumm, J.C.; Dickey, F.M.; Rogers, B; Walsh, N.

    1996-06-23

    A team has developed an improved resolution ultrasound system for low cost diagnostics. This paper describes the development of an ultrasound based imaging system capable of generating 3D images showing surface and subsurface tissue and bone structures. We include results of a comparative study between images obtained from X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and ultrasound. We found that the quality of ultrasound images compares favorably with those from CT. Volumetric and surface data extracted from these images were within 7% of the range between ultrasound and CT scans. We also include images of porcine abdominal scans from two different sets of animal trials.

  11. The agreement between 3D, standard 2D and triplane 2D speckle tracking: effects of image quality and 3D volume rate

    PubMed Central

    Stöbe, Stephan; Tarr, Adrienn; Pfeiffer, Dietrich; Hagendorff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of 3D and 2D speckle tracking performed on standard 2D and triplane 2D datasets of normal and pathological left ventricular (LV) wall-motion patterns with a focus on the effect that 3D volume rate (3DVR), image quality and tracking artifacts have on the agreement between 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 37 patients with normal LV function and 18 patients with ischaemic wall-motion abnormalities underwent 2D and 3D echocardiography, followed by offline speckle tracking measurements. The values of 3D global, regional and segmental strain were compared with the standard 2D and triplane 2D strain values. Correlation analysis with the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was also performed. The 3D and 2D global strain values correlated good in both normally and abnormally contracting hearts, though systematic differences between the two methods were observed. Of the 3D strain parameters, the area strain showed the best correlation with the LVEF. The numerical agreement of 3D and 2D analyses varied significantly with the volume rate and image quality of the 3D datasets. The highest correlation between 2D and 3D peak systolic strain values was found between 3D area and standard 2D longitudinal strain. Regional wall-motion abnormalities were similarly detected by 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 2DST of triplane datasets showed similar results to those of conventional 2D datasets. 2D and 3D speckle tracking similarly detect normal and pathological wall-motion patterns. Limited image quality has a significant impact on the agreement between 3D and 2D numerical strain values. PMID:26693303

  12. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  13. Real-time texture analysis for identifying optimum microbubble concentration in 2-D ultrasonic particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lili; Qian, Ming; Yan, Liang; Yu, Wentao; Jiang, Bo; Jin, Qiaofeng; Wang, Yanping; Shandas, Robin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2011-08-01

    Many recent studies on ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (Echo PIV) showed that the accuracy of two-dimensional (2-D) flow velocity measured depends largely on the concentration of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) during imaging. This article presents a texture-based method for identifying the optimum microbubble concentration for Echo PIV measurements in real-time. The texture features, standard deviation of gray level, and contrast, energy and homogeneity of gray level co-occurrence matrix were extracted from ultrasound contrast images of rotational and pulsatile flow (10 MHz) in vitro and in vivo mouse common carotid arterial flow (40 MHz) with UCAs at various concentrations. The results showed that, at concentration of 0.8∼2 × 10³ bubbles/mL in vitro and 1∼5 × 10⁵ bubbles/mL in vivo, image texture features had a peak value or trough value, and velocity vectors with high accuracy can be obtained. Otherwise, poor quality velocity vectors were obtained. When the texture features were used as a feature set, the accuracy of K-nearest neighbor classifier can reach 86.4% in vitro and 87.5% in vivo, respectively. The texture-based method is shown to be able to quickly identify the optimum microbubble concentration and improve the accuracy for Echo PIV imaging.

  14. All-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Noimark, Sacha; Mosse, Charles A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-02-01

    High frequency ultrasound probes such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters can be invaluable for guiding minimally invasive medical procedures in cardiology such as coronary stent placement and ablation. With current-generation ultrasound probes, ultrasound is generated and received electrically. The complexities involved with fabricating these electrical probes can result in high costs that limit their clinical applicability. Additionally, it can be challenging to achieve wide transmission bandwidths and adequate wideband reception sensitivity with small piezoelectric elements. Optical methods for transmitting and receiving ultrasound are emerging as alternatives to their electrical counterparts. They offer several distinguishing advantages, including the potential to generate and detect the broadband ultrasound fields (tens of MHz) required for high resolution imaging. In this study, we developed a miniature, side-looking, pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging, with fibre-optic transmission and reception. The axial resolution was better than 70 microns, and the imaging depth in tissue was greater than 1 cm. Ultrasound transmission was performed by photoacoustic excitation of a carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite material; ultrasound reception, with a fibre-optic Fabry-Perot cavity. Ex vivo tissue studies, which included healthy swine tissue and diseased human tissue, demonstrated the strong potential of this technique. To our knowledge, this is the first study to achieve an all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging. The potential for performing all-optical B-mode imaging (2D and 3D) with virtual arrays of transmit/receive elements, and hybrid imaging with pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic sensing are discussed.

  15. Multiple 2D video/3D medical image registration algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Matthew J.; Rueckert, Daniel; Hill, Derek L.; Hawkes, David J.

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we propose a novel method to register at least two vide images to a 3D surface model. The potential applications of such a registration method could be in image guided surgery, high precision radiotherapy, robotics or computer vision. Registration is performed by optimizing a similarity measure with respect to the pose parameters. The similarity measure is based on 'photo-consistency' and computes for each surface point, how consistent the corresponding video image information in each view is with a lighting model. We took four video views of a volunteer's face, and used an independent method to reconstruct a surface that was intrinsically registered to the four views. In addition, we extracted a skin surface from the volunteer's MR scan. The surfaces were misregistered from a gold standard pose and our algorithm was used to register both types of surfaces to the video images. For the reconstructed surface, the mean 3D error was 1.53 mm. For the MR surface, the standard deviation of the pose parameters after registration ranged from 0.12 to 0.70 mm and degrees. The performance of the algorithm is accurate, precise and robust.

  16. Multifractal analysis of 2D gray soil images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Torres, Ivan; Losada, Juan Carlos; Heck, Richard; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure, understood as the spatial arrangement of soil pores, is one of the key factors in soil modelling processes. Geometric properties of individual and interpretation of the morphological parameters of pores can be estimated from thin sections or 3D Computed Tomography images (Tarquis et al., 2003), but there is no satisfactory method to binarized these images and quantify the complexity of their spatial arrangement (Tarquis et al., 2008, Tarquis et al., 2009; Baveye et al., 2010). The objective of this work was to apply a multifractal technique, their singularities (α) and f(α) spectra, to quantify it without applying any threshold (Gónzalez-Torres, 2014). Intact soil samples were collected from four horizons of an Argisol, formed on the Tertiary Barreiras group of formations in Pernambuco state, Brazil (Itapirema Experimental Station). The natural vegetation of the region is tropical, coastal rainforest. From each horizon, showing different porosities and spatial arrangements, three adjacent samples were taken having a set of twelve samples. The intact soil samples were imaged using an EVS (now GE Medical. London, Canada) MS-8 MicroCT scanner with 45 μm pixel-1 resolution (256x256 pixels). Though some samples required paring to fit the 64 mm diameter imaging tubes, field orientation was maintained. References Baveye, P.C., M. Laba, W. Otten, L. Bouckaert, P. Dello, R.R. Goswami, D. Grinev, A. Houston, Yaoping Hu, Jianli Liu, S. Mooney, R. Pajor, S. Sleutel, A. Tarquis, Wei Wang, Qiao Wei, Mehmet Sezgin. Observer-dependent variability of the thresholding step in the quantitative analysis of soil images and X-ray microtomography data. Geoderma, 157, 51-63, 2010. González-Torres, Iván. Theory and application of multifractal analysis methods in images for the study of soil structure. Master thesis, UPM, 2014. Tarquis, A.M., R.J. Heck, J.B. Grau; J. Fabregat, M.E. Sanchez and J.M. Antón. Influence of Thresholding in Mass and Entropy Dimension of 3-D

  17. Geometric reconstruction using tracked ultrasound strain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Ondrake, Janet E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2013-03-01

    The accurate identification of tumor margins during neurosurgery is a primary concern for the surgeon in order to maximize resection of malignant tissue while preserving normal function. The use of preoperative imaging for guidance is standard of care, but tumor margins are not always clear even when contrast agents are used, and so margins are often determined intraoperatively by visual and tactile feedback. Ultrasound strain imaging creates a quantitative representation of tissue stiffness which can be used in real-time. The information offered by strain imaging can be placed within a conventional image-guidance workflow by tracking the ultrasound probe and calibrating the image plane, which facilitates interpretation of the data by placing it within a common coordinate space with preoperative imaging. Tumor geometry in strain imaging is then directly comparable to the geometry in preoperative imaging. This paper presents a tracked ultrasound strain imaging system capable of co-registering with preoperative tomograms and also of reconstructing a 3D surface using the border of the strain lesion. In a preliminary study using four phantoms with subsurface tumors, tracked strain imaging was registered to preoperative image volumes and then tumor surfaces were reconstructed using contours extracted from strain image slices. The volumes of the phantom tumors reconstructed from tracked strain imaging were approximately between 1.5 to 2.4 cm3, which was similar to the CT volumes of 1.0 to 2.3 cm3. Future work will be done to robustly characterize the reconstruction accuracy of the system.

  18. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier; Sérusclat, André; Moulin, Philippe

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  19. A 2-D imaging heat-flux gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M. ); Beshears, D.L.; Sartory, W.K.; Tobin, K.W.; Williams, R.K. ); Turley, W.D. . Santa Barbara Operations)

    1991-07-01

    This report describes a new leadless two-dimensional imaging optical heat-flux gauge. The gauge is made by depositing arrays of thermorgraphic-phosphor (TP) spots onto the faces of a polymethylpentene is insulator. In the first section of the report, we describe several gauge configurations and their prototype realizations. A satisfactory configuration is an array of right triangles on each face that overlay to form squares when the gauge is viewed normal to the surface. The next section of the report treats the thermal conductivity of TPs. We set up an experiment using a comparative longitudinal heat-flow apparatus to measure the previously unknown thermal conductivity of these materials. The thermal conductivity of one TP, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu, is 0.0137 W/cm{center dot}K over the temperature range from about 300 to 360 K. The theories underlying the time response of TP gauges and the imaging characteristics are discussed in the next section. Then we discuss several laboratory experiments to (1) demonstrate that the TP heat-flux gauge can be used in imaging applications; (2) obtain a quantum yield that enumerates what typical optical output signal amplitudes can be obtained from TP heat-flux gauges; and (3) determine whether LANL-designed intensified video cameras have sufficient sensitivity to acquire images from the heat-flux gauges. We obtained positive results from all the measurements. Throughout the text, we note limitations, areas where improvements are needed, and where further research is necessary. 12 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. 3D/2D convertible projection-type integral imaging using concave half mirror array.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jisoo; Kim, Youngmin; Park, Soon-gi; Hong, Jong-Ho; Min, Sung-Wook; Lee, Sin-Doo; Lee, Byoungho

    2010-09-27

    We propose a new method for implementing 3D/2D convertible feature in the projection-type integral imaging by using concave half mirror array. The concave half mirror array has the partially reflective characteristic to the incident light. And the reflected term is modulated by the concave mirror array structure, while the transmitted term is unaffected. With such unique characteristic, 3D/2D conversion or even the simultaneous display of 3D and 2D images is also possible. The prototype was fabricated by the aluminum coating and the polydimethylsiloxane molding process. We could experimentally verify the 3D/2D conversion and the display of 3D image on 2D background with the fabricated prototype.

  1. Microsecond time-resolved 2D X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvestani, A.; Sauer, N.; Strietzel, C.; Besch, H. J.; Orthen, A.; Pavel, N.; Walenta, A. H.; Menk, R. H.

    2001-06-01

    A method is presented which allows to take two-dimensional X-ray images of repetitive processes with recording times in the sub-microsecond range. Various measurements have been performed with a recently introduced novel two-dimensional single photon counter which has been slightly modified in order to determine the exact arrival time of each detected photon. For this purpose a special clock signal is synchronized with the process and is digitized contemporaneously with each event. This technique can be applied even with rate limited detectors and low flux sources, since—unlike in conventional methods, where chopped beams or gated read out electronics are used—all photons are used for the image formation. For the measurements, rapidly moving mechanical systems and conventional X-ray sources have been used, reaching time resolutions of some 10 μs. The technique presented here opens a variety of new biological, medical and industrial applications which will be discussed. As a first application example, three dimensional tomographic reconstructions of rapidly rotating objects (4000 turns/min) are presented.

  2. A Molecular Image-directed, 3D Ultrasound-guided Biopsy System for the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Baowei; Schuster, David M.; Master, Viraj; Akbari, Hamed; Fenster, Aaron; Nieh, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this biopsy approach uses two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound images to guide biopsy and can miss up to 30% of prostate cancers. We are developing a molecular image-directed, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image-guided biopsy system for improved detection of prostate cancer. The system consists of a 3D mechanical localization system and software workstation for image segmentation, registration, and biopsy planning. In order to plan biopsy in a 3D prostate, we developed an automatic segmentation method based wavelet transform. In order to incorporate PET/CT images into ultrasound-guided biopsy, we developed image registration methods to fuse TRUS and PET/CT images. The segmentation method was tested in ten patients with a DICE overlap ratio of 92.4% ± 1.1 %. The registration method has been tested in phantoms. The biopsy system was tested in prostate phantoms and 3D ultrasound images were acquired from two human patients. We are integrating the system for PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound-guided, targeted biopsy in human patients. PMID:22708023

  3. New ultrasound image display with extended field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirumalai, Arun P.; Weng, Lee; Grassmann, Alexander; Li, Ming; Marquis, Steve; Sutcliffe, Pat; Gustafson, David; Kim, Jin; Basoglu, Chris; Winter, Thomas C.; Kim, Yongmin

    1997-05-01

    The narrow fields of view obtained from real-time ultrasound transducers, especially with linear array transducers, allow focused evaluation of a specific site but often without any anatomic reference. To allow medical ultrasound imaging to be used in more diverse clinical settings, we have created a new acquisition and display process that allows extended field of view (XFOV) imaging. To produce an XFOV image, extended acoustic slices are obtained by maneuvering the transducer along the body surface or inside. As the images are acquired, they are correlated, aligned, and spliced together into a long composite view, all without the use of a position sensor. This computationally intensive process involves image registration, geometric image transformation, panoramic image construction, and image display. The XFOV process executes in real-time on our programmable ultrasound processing subsystem, the programmable ultrasound image processor, which fits within an existing ultrasound system and supports native ultrasound signal and image processing.

  4. Method and system to synchronize acoustic therapy with ultrasound imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Neil (Inventor); Bailey, Michael R. (Inventor); Hossack, James (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Interference in ultrasound imaging when used in connection with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is avoided by employing a synchronization signal to control the HIFU signal. Unless the timing of the HIFU transducer is controlled, its output will substantially overwhelm the signal produced by ultrasound imaging system and obscure the image it produces. The synchronization signal employed to control the HIFU transducer is obtained without requiring modification of the ultrasound imaging system. Signals corresponding to scattered ultrasound imaging waves are collected using either the HIFU transducer or a dedicated receiver. A synchronization processor manipulates the scattered ultrasound imaging signals to achieve the synchronization signal, which is then used to control the HIFU bursts so as to substantially reduce or eliminate HIFU interference in the ultrasound image. The synchronization processor can alternatively be implemented using a computing device or an application-specific circuit.

  5. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Nirupama; Needles, Andrew; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionizing irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of preclinical and clinical ultrasound systems , the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic. PMID:20541656

  6. 3D ultrasound imaging for prosthesis fabrication and diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J.; Strong, D.S.

    1995-06-01

    The fabrication of a prosthetic socket for a below-the-knee amputee requires knowledge of the underlying bone structure in order to provide pressure relief for sensitive areas and support for load bearing areas. The goal is to enable the residual limb to bear pressure with greater ease and utility. Conventional methods of prosthesis fabrication are based on limited knowledge about the patient`s underlying bone structure. A 3D ultrasound imaging system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The imaging system provides information about the location of the bones in the residual limb along with the shape of the skin surface. Computer assisted design (CAD) software can use this data to design prosthetic sockets for amputees. Ultrasound was selected as the imaging modality. A computer model was developed to analyze the effect of the various scanning parameters and to assist in the design of the overall system. The 3D ultrasound imaging system combines off-the-shelf technology for image capturing, custom hardware, and control and image processing software to generate two types of image data -- volumetric and planar. Both volumetric and planar images reveal definition of skin and bone geometry with planar images providing details on muscle fascial planes, muscle/fat interfaces, and blood vessel definition. The 3D ultrasound imaging system was tested on 9 unilateral below-the- knee amputees. Image data was acquired from both the sound limb and the residual limb. The imaging system was operated in both volumetric and planar formats. An x-ray CT (Computed Tomography) scan was performed on each amputee for comparison. Results of the test indicate beneficial use of ultrasound to generate databases for fabrication of prostheses at a lower cost and with better initial fit as compared to manually fabricated prostheses.

  7. A novel de-noising method for B ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Da-Yong; Mo, Jia-qing; Yu, Yin-Feng; Lv, Xiao-Yi; Yu, Xiao; Jia, Zhen-Hong

    2015-12-01

    B ultrasound as a kind of ultrasonic imaging, which has become the indispensable diagnosis method in clinical medicine. However, the presence of speckle noise in ultrasound image greatly reduces the image quality and interferes with the accuracy of the diagnosis. Therefore, how to construct a method which can eliminate the speckle noise effectively, and at the same time keep the image details effectively is the research target of the current ultrasonic image de-noising. This paper is intended to remove the inherent speckle noise of B ultrasound image. The novel algorithm proposed is based on both wavelet transformation of B ultrasound images and data fusion of B ultrasound images, with a smaller mean squared error (MSE) and greater signal to noise ratio (SNR) compared with other algorithms. The results of this study can effectively remove speckle noise from B ultrasound images, and can well preserved the details and edge information which will produce better visual effects.

  8. Automatic dynamic range adjustment for ultrasound B-mode imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhwa; Kang, Jinbum; Yoo, Yangmo

    2015-02-01

    In medical ultrasound imaging, dynamic range (DR) is defined as the difference between the maximum and minimum values of the displayed signal to display and it is one of the most essential parameters that determine its image quality. Typically, DR is given with a fixed value and adjusted manually by operators, which leads to low clinical productivity and high user dependency. Furthermore, in 3D ultrasound imaging, DR values are unable to be adjusted during 3D data acquisition. A histogram matching method, which equalizes the histogram of an input image based on that from a reference image, can be applied to determine the DR value. However, it could be lead to an over contrasted image. In this paper, a new Automatic Dynamic Range Adjustment (ADRA) method is presented that adaptively adjusts the DR value by manipulating input images similar to a reference image. The proposed ADRA method uses the distance ratio between the log average and each extreme value of a reference image. To evaluate the performance of the ADRA method, the similarity between the reference and input images was measured by computing a correlation coefficient (CC). In in vivo experiments, the CC values were increased by applying the ADRA method from 0.6872 to 0.9870 and from 0.9274 to 0.9939 for kidney and liver data, respectively, compared to the fixed DR case. In addition, the proposed ADRA method showed to outperform the histogram matching method with in vivo liver and kidney data. When using 3D abdominal data with 70 frames, while the CC value from the ADRA method is slightly increased (i.e., 0.6%), the proposed method showed improved image quality in the c-plane compared to its fixed counterpart, which suffered from a shadow artifact. These results indicate that the proposed method can enhance image quality in 2D and 3D ultrasound B-mode imaging by improving the similarity between the reference and input images while eliminating unnecessary manual interaction by the user.

  9. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  10. Micro-ultrasound for preclinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Foster, F Stuart; Hossack, John; Adamson, S Lee

    2011-08-01

    Over the past decade, non-invasive preclinical imaging has emerged as an important tool to facilitate biomedical discovery. Not only have the markets for these tools accelerated, but the numbers of peer-reviewed papers in which imaging end points and biomarkers have been used have grown dramatically. High frequency 'micro-ultrasound' has steadily evolved in the post-genomic era as a rapid, comparatively inexpensive imaging tool for studying normal development and models of human disease in small animals. One of the fundamental barriers to this development was the technological hurdle associated with high-frequency array transducers. Recently, new approaches have enabled the upper limits of linear and phased arrays to be pushed from about 20 to over 50 MHz enabling a broad range of new applications. The innovations leading to the new transducer technology and scanner architecture are reviewed. Applications of preclinical micro-ultrasound are explored for developmental biology, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. With respect to the future, the latest developments in high-frequency ultrasound imaging are described.

  11. Advanced 2D-3D registration for endovascular aortic interventions: addressing dissimilarity in images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Kutter, Oliver; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Bauernschmitt, Robert; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    In the current clinical workflow of minimally invasive aortic procedures navigation tasks are performed under 2D or 3D angiographic imaging. Many solutions for navigation enhancement suggest an integration of the preoperatively acquired computed tomography angiography (CTA) in order to provide the physician with more image information and reduce contrast injection and radiation exposure. This requires exact registration algorithms that align the CTA volume to the intraoperative 2D or 3D images. Additional to the real-time constraint, the registration accuracy should be independent of image dissimilarities due to varying presence of medical instruments and contrast agent. In this paper, we propose efficient solutions for image-based 2D-3D and 3D-3D registration that reduce the dissimilarities by image preprocessing, e.g. implicit detection and segmentation, and adaptive weights introduced into the registration procedure. Experiments and evaluations are conducted on real patient data.

  12. Hot topics in biomedical ultrasound: ultrasound therapy and its integration with ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2005-09-01

    Since the development of biomedical ultrasound imaging from sonar after WWII, there has been a clear divide between ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound therapy. While imaging techniques are designed to cause as little change as possible in the tissues through which ultrasound propagates, ultrasound therapy typically relies upon heating or acoustic cavitation to produce a desirable therapeutic effect. Concerns over the increasingly high acoustic outputs of diagnostic ultrasound scanners prompted the adoption of the Mechanical Index (MI) and Thermal Index (TI) in the early 1990s. Therapeutic applications of ultrasound, meanwhile, have evolved from deep tissue heating in sports medicine to include targeted drug delivery, tumor and plaque ablation, cauterization via high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and accelerated dissolution of blood clots. The integration of ultrasonic imaging and therapy in one device is just beginning, but the promise of improved patient outcomes is balanced by regulatory and practical impediments.

  13. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  14. Automatic Masking for Robust 3D-2D Image Registration in Image-Guided Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    During spinal neurosurgery, patient-specific information, planning, and annotation such as vertebral labels can be mapped from preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative 2D radiographs via image-based 3D-2D registration. Such registration has been shown to provide a potentially valuable means of decision support in target localization as well as quality assurance of the surgical product. However, robust registration can be challenged by mismatch in image content between the preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs, arising, for example, from anatomical deformation or the presence of surgical tools within the radiograph. In this work, we develop and evaluate methods for automatically mitigating the effect of content mismatch by leveraging the surgical planning data to assign greater weight to anatomical regions known to be reliable for registration and vital to the surgical task while removing problematic regions that are highly deformable or often occluded by surgical tools. We investigated two approaches to assigning variable weight (i.e., "masking") to image content and/or the similarity metric: (1) masking the preoperative 3D CT ("volumetric masking"); and (2) masking within the 2D similarity metric calculation ("projection masking"). The accuracy of registration was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) in 61 cases selected from an IRB-approved clinical study. The best performing of the masking techniques was found to reduce the rate of gross failure (PDE > 20 mm) from 11.48% to 5.57% in this challenging retrospective data set. These approaches provided robustness to content mismatch and eliminated distinct failure modes of registration. Such improvement was gained without additional workflow and has motivated incorporation of the masking methods within a system under development for prospective clinical studies. PMID:27335531

  15. Automatic masking for robust 3D-2D image registration in image-guided spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    During spinal neurosurgery, patient-specific information, planning, and annotation such as vertebral labels can be mapped from preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative 2D radiographs via image-based 3D-2D registration. Such registration has been shown to provide a potentially valuable means of decision support in target localization as well as quality assurance of the surgical product. However, robust registration can be challenged by mismatch in image content between the preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs, arising, for example, from anatomical deformation or the presence of surgical tools within the radiograph. In this work, we develop and evaluate methods for automatically mitigating the effect of content mismatch by leveraging the surgical planning data to assign greater weight to anatomical regions known to be reliable for registration and vital to the surgical task while removing problematic regions that are highly deformable or often occluded by surgical tools. We investigated two approaches to assigning variable weight (i.e., "masking") to image content and/or the similarity metric: (1) masking the preoperative 3D CT ("volumetric masking"); and (2) masking within the 2D similarity metric calculation ("projection masking"). The accuracy of registration was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) in 61 cases selected from an IRB-approved clinical study. The best performing of the masking techniques was found to reduce the rate of gross failure (PDE > 20 mm) from 11.48% to 5.57% in this challenging retrospective data set. These approaches provided robustness to content mismatch and eliminated distinct failure modes of registration. Such improvement was gained without additional workflow and has motivated incorporation of the masking methods within a system under development for prospective clinical studies.

  16. An Open System for Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Weibao; Chen, Yan; Li, Xiang; Yu, Yanyan; Cheng, Wang Fai; Tsang, Fu Keung; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Visualization of the blood vessels can provide valuable morphological information for diagnosis and therapy strategies for cardiovascular disease. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is able to delineate internal structures of vessel wall with fine spatial resolution. However, the developed IVUS is insufficient to identify the fibrous cap thickness and tissue composition of atherosclerotic lesions. Novel imaging strategies have been proposed, such as increasing the center frequency of ultrasound or using a modulated excitation technique to improve the accuracy of diagnosis. Dual-mode tomography combining IVUS with optical tomography has also been developed to determine tissue morphology and characteristics. The implementation of these new imaging methods requires an open system that allows users to customize the system for various studies. This paper presents the development of an IVUS system that has open structures to support various imaging strategies. The system design is based on electronic components and printed circuit board, and provides reconfigurable hardware implementation, programmable image processing algorithms, flexible imaging control, and raw RF data acquisition. In addition, the proposed IVUS system utilized a miniaturized ultrasound transducer constructed using PMN-PT single crystal for better piezoelectric constant and electromechanical coupling coefficient than traditional lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics. Testing results showed that the IVUS system could offer a minimum detectable signal of 25 μV, allowing a 51 dB dynamic range at 47 dB gain, with a frequency range from 20 to 80 MHz. Finally, phantom imaging, in vitro IVUS vessel imaging, and multimodality imaging with photoacoustics were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the open system. PMID:23143570

  17. An open access thyroid ultrasound image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza, Lina; Vargas, Carlos; Narváez, Fabián.; Durán, Oscar; Muñoz, Emma; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Computer aided diagnosis systems (CAD) have been developed to assist radiologists in the detection and diagnosis of abnormalities and a large number of pattern recognition techniques have been proposed to obtain a second opinion. Most of these strategies have been evaluated using different datasets making their performance incomparable. In this work, an open access database of thyroid ultrasound images is presented. The dataset consists of a set of B-mode Ultrasound images, including a complete annotation and diagnostic description of suspicious thyroid lesions by expert radiologists. Several types of lesions as thyroiditis, cystic nodules, adenomas and thyroid cancers were included while an accurate lesion delineation is provided in XML format. The diagnostic description of malignant lesions was confirmed by biopsy. The proposed new database is expected to be a resource for the community to assess different CAD systems.

  18. Ultrasound imaging in teaching cardiac physiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher D; Montgomery, Laura E A; Quinn, Joe G; Roe, Sean M; Stewart, Michael T; Tansey, Etain A

    2016-09-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such as stroke volume, ejection fraction, and cardiac output. By repeating the measurements from a subject after a brief exercise period, an increase in stroke volume and ejection fraction are easily demonstrable, potentially with or without an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (which indicates preload). Thus, factors that affect cardiac performance can readily be discussed. This activity may be performed as a practical demonstration and visualized using an overhead projector or networked computers, concentrating on using the ultrasound images to teach basic physiological principles. This has proved to be highly popular with students, who reported a significant improvement in their understanding of Frank-Starling's law of the heart with ultrasound imaging. PMID:27445285

  19. Ultrasound image of the skin, apparatus and imaging basics

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska, Sylwia

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the skin is becoming more and more popular. Skin ultrasound examinations are used both in order to assess healthy skin and to evaluate pathological lesions. They are mainly performed in dermatology as well as in broadly understood aesthetic medicine and cosmetology. At present, skin imaging is enabled by high-frequency equipment and high-quality conventional devices. The introduction of high-frequency electronic transducers which are supported by conventional scanners may be a turning point in skin ultrasound equipment. Irrespective of the ultrasound scanner, three layers may be distinguished in the image of the healthy skin: epidermal echo, dermis and subcutaneous tissue. High-frequency equipment allows for detailed imaging of the epidermal echo, dermis and upper part of the subcutaneous tissue. It is also possible to visualize the skin appendages (hair with follicles and nails) as well as slight vessels that run in the dermis and upper subcutaneous tissue. Contrary to high-frequency equipment, conventional scanners do not allow for a detailed assessment of the epidermal and dermal echoes. Instead, they enable the visualization of the entire subcutaneous tissue. The following parameters are used for the assessment of skin ultrasound images: thickness of individual skin layers, caliber of blood vessels, echogenicity of the dermis or its individual layers, echogenicity of the subcutaneous tissue as well as the presence or absence of flow in slight venous vessels. Currently, the studies on the usage of sonoelastography for skin assessment are in progress. Considering the dynamic development of skin imaging equipment and its diagnostic possibilities, one might suspect that high-frequency examinations will become more common and will be fundamental for the evaluation of both healthy and pathologically altered skin. This paper is an introduction to a series of articles on the clinical application of high-frequency ultrasound. The next articles will

  20. Tissue harmonic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Rasmussen, Joachim Hee; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are combined to improve the image quality of medical ultrasound imaging. The technique is evaluated in a comparative study against dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The objective is to investigate if SASB combined with THI improves the image quality compared to DRF-THI. The major benefit of SASB is a reduced bandwidth between the probe and processing unit. A BK Medical 2202 Ultraview ultrasound scanner was used to acquire beamformed RF data for offline evaluation. The acquisition was made interleaved between methods, and data were recorded with and without pulse inversion for tissue harmonic imaging. Data were acquired using a Sound Technology 192 element convex array transducer from both a wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom to investigate spatial resolution and penetration. In vivo scans were also performed for a visual comparison. The spatial resolution for SASB-THI is on average 19% better than DRI-THI, and the investigation of penetration showed equally good signal-to-noise ratio. In vivo B-mode scans were made and compared. The comparison showed that SASB-THI reduces the artifact and noise interference and improves image contrast and spatial resolution.

  1. 3-D Reconstruction From 2-D Radiographic Images and Its Application to Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sato, Motoyoshi

    3D imaging technique is very important and indispensable in diagnosis. The main stream of the technique is one in which 3D image is reconstructed from a set of slice images, such as X-ray CT and MRI. However, these systems require large space and high costs. On the other hand, a low cost and small size 3D imaging system is needed in clinical veterinary medicine, for example, in the case of diagnosis in X-ray car or pasture area. We propose a novel 3D imaging technique using 2-D X-ray radiographic images. This system can be realized by cheaper system than X-ray CT and enables to get 3D image in X-ray car or portable X-ray equipment. In this paper, a 3D visualization technique from 2-D radiographic images is proposed and several reconstructions are shown. These reconstructions are evaluated by veterinarians.

  2. Recovering 3D tumor locations from 2D bioluminescence images and registration with CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaolei; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Menon, Lata G.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Bertino, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel and efficient algorithm for reconstructing the 3D locations of tumor sites from a set of 2D bioluminescence images which are taken by a same camera but after continually rotating the object by a small angle. Our approach requires a much simpler set up than those using multiple cameras, and the algorithmic steps in our framework are efficient and robust enough to facilitate its use in analyzing the repeated imaging of a same animal transplanted with gene marked cells. In order to visualize in 3D the structure of the tumor, we also co-register the BLI-reconstructed crude structure with detailed anatomical structure extracted from high-resolution microCT on a single platform. We present our method using both phantom studies and real studies on small animals.

  3. Real-Time Ellipsometry-Based Transmission Ultrasound Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Poco, J F; Ashby, A E

    2007-02-14

    Ultrasonic imaging is a valuable tool for non-destructive evaluation and medical diagnosis. Reflection mode is exclusively used for medical imaging, and is most frequently used for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) because of the relative speed of acquisition. Reflection mode imaging is qualitative, yielding little information about material properties, and usually only about material interfaces. Transmission imaging can be used in 3D reconstructions to yield quantitative information: sound speed and attenuation. Unfortunately, traditional scanning methods of acquiring transmission data are very slow, requiring on the order of 20 minutes per image. The sensing of acoustic pressure fields as optical images can significantly speed data acquisition. An entire 2D acoustic pressure field can be acquired in under a second. The speed of data acquisition for a 2D view makes it feasible to obtain multiple views of an object. With multiple views, 3D reconstruction becomes possible. A fast, compact (no big magnets or accelerators), inexpensive, 3D imaging technology that uses no ionizing radiation could be a boon to the NDE and medical communities. 2D transmission images could be examined in real time to give the ultrasonic equivalent of a fluoroscope, or accumulated in such a way as to acquire phase and amplitude data over multiple views for 3D reconstruction (for breast cancer imaging, for example). Composite panels produced for the aircraft and automobile industries could be inspected in near real time, and inspection of attenuating materials such as ceramics and high explosives would be possible. There are currently three optical-readout imaging transmission ultrasound technologies available. One is based on frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) [1,2], one on Fabry-Perot interferometry [3], and another on critical angle modulation [4]. Each of these techniques has its problems. The FTIR based system cannot currently be scaled to large aperture sizes, the Fabry

  4. Wireless image streaming in mobile ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Brett W; Pedersen, Peder C

    2010-03-01

    This work evaluates the feasibility of using 802.11 g ad hoc and 3G cellular broadband networks to wirelessly stream ultrasound video in real-time. Telemedicine ultrasound applications in events such as disaster relief and first-response triage can incorporate these technologies, enabling onsite medical personnel to receive assistance with diagnostic decisions by remote medical experts. The H.264 scalable video codec was used to encode echocardiographic video streams at various image resolutions (video graphics array [VGA] and quarter video graphics array [QVGA]) and frame rates (10, 15, 20, and 30 frames/s). The video stream was transmitted using 802.11 g and 3G cellular technologies, and pertinent transmission parameters such as data rate, packet loss, delay jitter, and latency were measured. 802.11 g permits high frame rate and VGA resolution and has low latency and jitter, but it is suitable only for short communication ranges, whereas the 3G cellular network allows medium to low frame rate streaming at QVGA image resolution with medium latency. However, video streaming can take place from any location with 3G service to any other site with Internet connectivity. The transmitted ultrasound video streams were subsequently recorded and evaluated by physicians with expertise in medical ultrasonography who evaluated the diagnostic value of the received video streams relative to the original videos. They expressed the opinion that image quality in the case of both 802.11 g and 3G was fully to adequately preserved, but missed frames could momentarily decrease the diagnostic value. This research demonstrates that 3G and 802.11 g wireless networks combined with efficient video compression make diagnostically valuable wireless streaming of ultrasound video feasible.

  5. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging of vessel wall for evaluating atherosclerosis risk and disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Viren R.; Wang, Bo; Sonka, Milan; Lauer, Ronald M.

    2002-04-01

    This research aims at developing a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system for carotid and brachial artery scanning for evaluating vessel wall characteristics. In the long term, we seek to test hypothesis that the artery wall measurements of carotid intima-media-thickness and brachial flow mediated dilatation using 3D ultrasound data provide better repeatability than those derived from conventional 2D ultrasound scans. The approach is to implement a free-hand data acquisition scheme using conventional 2D medical ultrasound scanner, develop data processing algorithms for appropriately registering and displaying the volumetric ultrasound vessel scans, and develop techniques for measuring vessel wall characteristics. The system uses electromagnetic sensor mounted on the transducer to acquire position and orientation of each image slice as the transducer is moved freely to scan the area of interest. These non-parallel images are registered into a 3D dataset for reconstruction, segmentation, and measurements of the vessel wall structure. A simple calibration object is developed using a small stainless-steel sphere in a fixed position to perform coordinate transformations and pixel registration. A commercial 3D ultrasound tissue-mimicking phantom is used for assessment of freehand 3D data acquisition, calibration, registration, and visualization schemes. Early results of experimental carotid artery scans of volunteers are presented.

  6. Hepatic lesions segmentation in ultrasound nonlinear imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissi, Adelaide A.; Cormier, Stephane; Pourcelot, Leandre; Tranquart, Francois

    2005-04-01

    Doppler has been used for many years for cardiovascular exploration in order to visualize the vessels walls and anatomical or functional diseases. The use of ultrasound contrast agents makes it possible to improve ultrasonic information. Nonlinear ultrasound imaging highlights the detection of these agents within an organ and hence is a powerful technique to image perfusion of an organ in real-time. The visualization of flow and perfusion provides important information for the diagnosis of various diseases as well as for the detection of tumors. However, the images are buried in noise, the speckle, inherent in the image formation. Furthermore at portal phase, there is often an absence of clear contrast between lesions and surrounding tissues because the organ is filled with agents. In this context, we propose a new method of automatic liver lesions segmentation in nonlinear imaging sequences for the quantification of perfusion. Our method of segmentation is divided into two stages. Initially, we developed an anisotropic diffusion step which raised the structural characteristics to eliminate the speckle. Then, a fuzzy competitive clustering process allowed us to delineate liver lesions. This method has been used to detect focal hepatic lesions (metastasis, nodular hyperplasia, adenoma). Compared to medical expert"s report obtained on 15 varied lesions, the automatic segmentation allows us to identify and delineate focal liver lesions during the portal phase which high accuracy. Our results show that this method improves markedly the recognition of focal hepatic lesions and opens the way for future precise quantification of contrast enhancement.

  7. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; de Vries, P. C.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.; García-Muñoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  8. Automated fetal spine detection in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolay, Paresh; Vajinepalli, Pallavi; Bhattacharya, Puranjoy; Firtion, Celine; Sisodia, Rajendra Singh

    2009-02-01

    A novel method is proposed for the automatic detection of fetal spine in ultrasound images along with its orientation in this paper. This problem presents a variety of challenges, including robustness to speckle noise, variations in the visible shape of the spine due to orientation of the ultrasound probe with respect to the fetus and the lack of a proper edge enclosing the entire spine on account of its composition out of distinct vertebra. The proposed method improves robustness and accuracy by making use of two independent techniques to estimate the spine, and then detects the exact location using a cross-correlation approach. Experimental results show that the proposed method is promising for fetal spine detection.

  9. In vivo three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging based on a clinical matrix array ultrasound probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Erpelding, Todd N.; Jankovic, Ladislav; Guo, Zijian; Robert, Jean-Luc; David, Guillaume; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    We present an integrated photoacoustic and ultrasonic three-dimensional (3-D) volumetric imaging system based on a two-dimensional (2-D) matrix array ultrasound probe. A wavelength-tunable dye laser pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser serves as the light source and a modified commercial ultrasound imaging system (iU22, Philips Healthcare) with a 2-D array transducer (X7-2, Philips Healthcare) detects both the pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic signals. A multichannel data acquisition system acquires the RF channel data. The imaging system enables rendering of co-registered 3-D ultrasound and photoacoustic images without mechanical scanning. The resolution along the azimuth, elevation, and axial direction are measured to be 0.69, 0.90 and 0.84 mm for photoacoustic imaging. In vivo 3-D photoacoustic mapping of the sentinel lymph node was demonstrated in a rat model using methylene blue dye. These results highlight the clinical potential of 3-D PA imaging for identification of sentinel lymph nodes for cancer staging in humans.

  10. A comparative study in ultrasound breast imaging classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Moi Hoon; Edirisinghe, Eran A.; Bez, Helmut E.

    2009-02-01

    American College of Radiology introduces a standard in classification, the breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS), standardize the reporting of ultrasound findings, clarify its interpretation, and facilitate communication between clinicians. The effective use of new technologies to support healthcare initiatives is important and current research is moving towards implementing computer tools in the diagnostics process. Initially a detailed study was carried out to evaluate the performance of two commonly used appearance based classification algorithms, based on the use of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and two dimensional linear discriminant analysis (2D-LDA). The study showed that these two appearance based classification approaches are not capable of handling the classification of ultrasound breast image lesions. Therefore further investigations in the use of a popular feature based classifier - Support Vector Machine (SVM) was conducted. A pre-processing step before feature based classification is feature extraction, which involve shape, texture and edge descriptors for the Region of Interest (ROI). The input dataset to SVM classification is from a fully automated ROI detection. We achieve the success rate of 0.550 in PCA, 0.500 in LDA, and 0.931 in SVM. The best combination of features in SVM classification is to combine the shape, texture and edge descriptors, with sensitivity 0.840 and specificity 0.968. This paper briefly reviews the background to the project and then details the ongoing research. In conclusion, we discuss the contributions, limitations, and future plans of our work.

  11. Image reconstruction for robot assisted ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Zhang, Haichong K.; Rahmim, Arman; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    An investigation of several image reconstruction methods for robot-assisted ultrasound (US) tomography setup is presented. In the robot-assisted setup, an expert moves the US probe to the location of interest, and a robotic arm automatically aligns another US probe with it. The two aligned probes can then transmit and receive US signals which are subsequently used for tomographic reconstruction. This study focuses on reconstruction of the speed of sound. In various simulation evaluations as well as in an experiment with a millimeter-range inaccuracy, we demonstrate that the limited data provided by two probes can be used to reconstruct pixel-wise images differentiating between media with different speeds of sound. Combining the results of this investigation with the developed robot-assisted US tomography setup, we envision feasibility of this setup for tomographic imaging in applications beyond breast imaging, with potentially significant efficacy in cancer diagnosis.

  12. Twofold processing for denoising ultrasound medical images.

    PubMed

    Kishore, P V V; Kumar, K V V; Kumar, D Anil; Prasad, M V D; Goutham, E N D; Rahul, R; Krishna, C B S Vamsi; Sandeep, Y

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound medical (US) imaging non-invasively pictures inside of a human body for disease diagnostics. Speckle noise attacks ultrasound images degrading their visual quality. A twofold processing algorithm is proposed in this work to reduce this multiplicative speckle noise. First fold used block based thresholding, both hard (BHT) and soft (BST), on pixels in wavelet domain with 8, 16, 32 and 64 non-overlapping block sizes. This first fold process is a better denoising method for reducing speckle and also inducing object of interest blurring. The second fold process initiates to restore object boundaries and texture with adaptive wavelet fusion. The degraded object restoration in block thresholded US image is carried through wavelet coefficient fusion of object in original US mage and block thresholded US image. Fusion rules and wavelet decomposition levels are made adaptive for each block using gradient histograms with normalized differential mean (NDF) to introduce highest level of contrast between the denoised pixels and the object pixels in the resultant image. Thus the proposed twofold methods are named as adaptive NDF block fusion with hard and soft thresholding (ANBF-HT and ANBF-ST). The results indicate visual quality improvement to an interesting level with the proposed twofold processing, where the first fold removes noise and second fold restores object properties. Peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR), normalized cross correlation coefficient (NCC), edge strength (ES), image quality Index (IQI) and structural similarity index (SSIM), measure the quantitative quality of the twofold processing technique. Validation of the proposed method is done by comparing with anisotropic diffusion (AD), total variational filtering (TVF) and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for enhancement of US images. The US images are provided by AMMA hospital radiology labs at Vijayawada, India. PMID:26697285

  13. Multi-Frequency Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Yu, Mingyue; Chen, Zeyu; Fei, Chunlong; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is frequently associated with the sudden rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque within the coronary artery. Several unique physiological features, including a thin fibrous cap accompanied by a necrotic lipid core, are the targeted indicators for identifying the vulnerable plaques. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), a catheter-based imaging technology, has been routinely performed in clinics for more than 20 years to describe the morphology of the coronary artery and guide percutaneous coronary interventions. However, conventional IVUS cannot facilitate the risk assessment of ACS because of its intrinsic limitations, such as insufficient resolution. Renovation of the IVUS technology is essentially needed to overcome the limitations and enhance the coronary artery characterization. In this paper, a multi-frequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system was developed by incorporating a higher frequency IVUS transducer (80 to 150 MHz) with the conventional IVUS (30–50 MHz) system. The newly developed system maintains the advantage of deeply penetrating imaging with the conventional IVUS, while offering an improved higher resolution image with IVUS at a higher frequency. The prototyped multi-frequency catheter has a clinically compatible size of 0.95 mm and a favorable capability of automated image co-registration. In vitro human coronary artery imaging has demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of the multi-frequency IVUS imaging system to deliver a more comprehensive visualization of the coronary artery. This ultrasonic-only intravascular imaging technique, based on a moderate refinement of the conventional IVUS system, is not only cost-effective from the perspective of manufacturing and clinical practice, but also holds the promise of future translation into clinical benefits. PMID:25585394

  14. Micro-ultrasound for preclinical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Foster, F. Stuart; Hossack, John; Adamson, S. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, non-invasive preclinical imaging has emerged as an important tool to facilitate biomedical discovery. Not only have the markets for these tools accelerated, but the numbers of peer-reviewed papers in which imaging end points and biomarkers have been used have grown dramatically. High frequency ‘micro-ultrasound’ has steadily evolved in the post-genomic era as a rapid, comparatively inexpensive imaging tool for studying normal development and models of human disease in small animals. One of the fundamental barriers to this development was the technological hurdle associated with high-frequency array transducers. Recently, new approaches have enabled the upper limits of linear and phased arrays to be pushed from about 20 to over 50 MHz enabling a broad range of new applications. The innovations leading to the new transducer technology and scanner architecture are reviewed. Applications of preclinical micro-ultrasound are explored for developmental biology, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. With respect to the future, the latest developments in high-frequency ultrasound imaging are described. PMID:22866232

  15. Intelligent speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion algorithm for automated 3-D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Shi, Xinling; Zhang, Junhua; Chen, Yue; Pang, Yun

    2015-02-01

    A novel 3-D filtering method is presented for speckle reduction and detail preservation in automated 3-D ultrasound images. First, texture features of an image are analyzed by using the improved quadtree (QT) decomposition. Then, the optimal homogeneous and the obvious heterogeneous regions are selected from QT decomposition results. Finally, diffusion parameters and diffusion process are automatically decided based on the properties of these two selected regions. The computing time needed for 2-D speckle reduction is very short. However, the computing time required for 3-D speckle reduction is often hundreds of times longer than 2-D speckle reduction. This may limit its potential application in practice. Because this new filter can adaptively adjust the time step of iteration, the computation time is reduced effectively. Both synthetic and real 3-D ultrasound images are used to evaluate the proposed filter. It is shown that this filter is superior to other methods in both practicality and efficiency. PMID:26366596

  16. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zichun; Guo, Xiaohu; Cai, Yiqi; Yang, Yin; Wang, Jing; Jia, Xun; Mao, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs) are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes. PMID:27019849

  17. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaohu; Cai, Yiqi; Yang, Yin; Wang, Jing; Jia, Xun

    2016-01-01

    By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs) are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes. PMID:27019849

  18. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis.

  19. Geometric uncertainty of 2D projection imaging in monitoring 3D tumor motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Yelin; Dieterich, Sonja; Keall, Paul J.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging methods in three-dimensional (3D) tumor motion monitoring. Many commercial linear accelerator types have projection imaging capabilities, and tumor motion monitoring is useful for motion inclusive, respiratory gated or tumor tracking strategies. Since 2D projection imaging is limited in its ability to resolve the motion along the imaging beam axis, there is unresolved motion when monitoring 3D tumor motion. From the 3D tumor motion data of 160 treatment fractions for 46 thoracic and abdominal cancer patients, the unresolved motion due to the geometric limitation of 2D projection imaging was calculated as displacement in the imaging beam axis for different beam angles and time intervals. The geometric uncertainty to monitor 3D motion caused by the unresolved motion of 2D imaging was quantified using the root-mean-square (rms) metric. Geometric uncertainty showed interfractional and intrafractional variation. Patient-to-patient variation was much more significant than variation for different time intervals. For the patient cohort studied, as the time intervals increase, the rms, minimum and maximum values of the rms uncertainty show decreasing tendencies for the lung patients but increasing for the liver and retroperitoneal patients, which could be attributed to patient relaxation. Geometric uncertainty was smaller for coplanar treatments than non-coplanar treatments, as superior-inferior (SI) tumor motion, the predominant motion from patient respiration, could be always resolved for coplanar treatments. Overall rms of the rms uncertainty was 0.13 cm for all treatment fractions and 0.18 cm for the treatment fractions whose average breathing peak-trough ranges were more than 0.5 cm. The geometric uncertainty for 2D imaging varies depending on the tumor site, tumor motion range, time interval and beam angle as well as between patients, between fractions and within a

  20. Nanohole-array-based device for 2D snapshot multispectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) snapshot multispectral imager that utilizes the optical transmission characteristics of nanohole arrays (NHAs) in a gold film to resolve a mixture of input colors into multiple spectral bands. The multispectral device consists of blocks of NHAs, wherein each NHA has a unique periodicity that results in transmission resonances and minima in the visible and near-infrared regions. The multispectral device was illuminated over a wide spectral range, and the transmission was spectrally unmixed using a least-squares estimation algorithm. A NHA-based multispectral imaging system was built and tested in both reflection and transmission modes. The NHA-based multispectral imager was capable of extracting 2D multispectral images representative of four independent bands within the spectral range of 662 nm to 832 nm for a variety of targets. The multispectral device can potentially be integrated into a variety of imaging sensor systems. PMID:24005065

  1. Separation of image parts using 2-D parallel form recursive filters.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishna, R

    1996-01-01

    This correspondence deals with a new technique to separate objects or image parts in a composite image. A parallel form extension of a 2-D Steiglitz-McBride method is applied to the discrete cosine transform (DCT) of the image containing the objects that are to be separated. The obtained parallel form is the sum of several filters or systems, where the impulse response of each filter corresponds to the DCT of one object in the original image. Preliminary results on an image with two objects show that the algorithm works well, even in the case where one object occludes another as well as in the case of moderate noise. PMID:18285105

  2. Multi-dimensional transfer functions for effective visualization of streaming ultrasound and elasticity images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, David; Caban, Jesus J.; Stolka, Philipp J.; Boctor, Emad M.; Yoo, Terry S.

    2011-03-01

    The low-cost and minimum health risks associated with ultrasound (US) have made ultrasonic imaging a widely accepted method to perform diagnostic and image-guided procedures. Despite the existence of 3D ultrasound probes, most analysis and diagnostic procedures are done by studying the B-mode images. Currently, multiple ultrasound probes include 6-DOF sensors that can provide positioning information. Such tracking information can be used to reconstruct a 3D volume from a set of 2D US images. Recent advances in ultrasound imaging have also shown that, directly from the streaming radio frequency (RF) data, it is possible to obtain additional information of the anatomical region under consideration including the elasticity properties. This paper presents a generic framework that takes advantage of current graphics hardware to create a low-latency system to visualize streaming US data while combining multiple tissue attributes into a single illustration. In particular, we introduce a framework that enables real-time reconstruction and interactive visualization of streaming data while enhancing the illustration with elasticity information. The visualization module uses two-dimensional transfer functions (2D TFs) to more effectively fuse and map B-mode and strain values into specific opacity and color values. On commodity hardware, our framework can simultaneously reconstruct, render, and provide user interaction at over 15 fps. Results with phantom and real-world medical datasets show the advantages and effectiveness of our technique with ultrasound data. In particular, our results show how two-dimensional transfer functions can be used to more effectively identify, analyze and visualize lesions in ultrasound images.

  3. Consider ultrasound first for imaging the female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Benacerraf, Beryl R; Abuhamad, Alfred Z; Bromley, Bryann; Goldstein, Steven R; Groszmann, Yvette; Shipp, Thomas D; Timor-Tritsch, Ilan E

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound technology has evolved dramatically in recent years and now includes applications such as 3-dimensional volume imaging, real-time evaluation of pelvic organs (simultaneous with the physical examination), and Doppler blood flow mapping without the need for contrast, which makes ultrasound imaging unique for imaging the female pelvis. Among the many cross-sectional imaging techniques, we should use the most informative, less invasive, and less expensive modality to avoid radiation when possible. Hence, ultrasound imaging should be the first imaging modality used in women with pelvic symptoms.

  4. The tongue stops here: Ultrasound imaging of the palate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Melissa A.; Stone, Maureen

    2005-10-01

    This letter presents a method for imaging the palate and extracting the palate contour from ultrasound images. Ultrasound does not usually capture the palate because the air at the tongue surface reflects the ultrasound beam back to the transducer. However, when the tongue touches the palate during a swallow, the ultrasound beam is transmitted through the soft tissue until it reaches and is reflected by the palate. In combination with tongue contours, the palate contour has the potential for disambiguation of the tongue surface, registration of images within and across subjects, and calculation of phonetically important measures.

  5. Ultrasound imaging of the anal sphincter complex: a review.

    PubMed

    Abdool, Z; Sultan, A H; Thakar, R

    2012-07-01

    Endoanal ultrasound is now regarded as the gold standard for evaluating anal sphincter pathology in the investigation of anal incontinence. The advent of three-dimensional ultrasound has further improved our understanding of the two-dimensional technique. Endoanal ultrasound requires specialised equipment and its relative invasiveness has prompted clinicians to explore alternative imaging techniques. Transvaginal and transperineal ultrasound have been recently evaluated as alternative imaging modalities. However, the need for technique standardisation, validation and reporting is of paramount importance. We conducted a MEDLINE search (1950 to February 2010) and critically reviewed studies using the three imaging techniques in evaluating anal sphincter integrity.

  6. Tensor representation of color images and fast 2D quaternion discrete Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a general, efficient, split algorithm to compute the two-dimensional quaternion discrete Fourier transform (2-D QDFT), by using the special partitioning in the frequency domain, is introduced. The partition determines an effective transformation, or color image representation in the form of 1-D quaternion signals which allow for splitting the N × M-point 2-D QDFT into a set of 1-D QDFTs. Comparative estimates revealing the efficiency of the proposed algorithms with respect to the known ones are given. In particular, a proposed method of calculating the 2r × 2r -point 2-D QDFT uses 18N2 less multiplications than the well-known column-row method and method of calculation based on the symplectic decomposition. The proposed algorithm is simple to apply and design, which makes it very practical in color image processing in the frequency domain.

  7. Quantitative blood speed imaging with intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Crowe, J R; O'Donnell, M

    2001-03-01

    Previously, we presented a method of real-time arterial color flow imaging using an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system, where real-time RF A-scans were processed with an FIR (finite-impulse response) filter bank to estimate relative blood speed. Although qualitative flow measurements are clinically valuable, realizing the full potential of blood flow imaging requires quantitative flow speed and volume measurements in real time. Unfortunately, the rate of RF echo-to-echo decorrelation is not directly related to scatterer speed in a side-looking IVUS system because the elevational extent of the imaging slice varies with range. Consequently, flow imaging methods using any type of decorrelation processing to estimate blood speed without accounting for spatial variation of the radiation pattern will have estimation errors that prohibit accurate comparison of speed estimates from different depths. The FIR filter bank approach measures the rate of change of the ultrasound signal by estimating the slow-time spectrum of RF echoes. A filter bank of M bandpass filters is applied in parallel to estimate M components of the slow-time DFT (discrete Fourier transform). The relationship between the slow-time spectrum, aperture diffraction pattern, and scatterer speed is derived for a simplified target. Because the ultimate goal of this work is to make quantitative speed measurements, we present a method to map slow time spectral characteristics to a quantitative estimate. Results of the speed estimator are shown for a simulated circumferential catheter array insonifying blood moving uniformly past the array (i.e., plug flow) and blood moving with a parabolic profile (i.e., laminar flow). PMID:11370361

  8. Automatic 2D-to-3D image conversion using 3D examples from the internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, J.; Brown, G.; Wang, M.; Ishwar, P.; Wu, C.; Mukherjee, D.

    2012-03-01

    The availability of 3D hardware has so far outpaced the production of 3D content. Although to date many methods have been proposed to convert 2D images to 3D stereopairs, the most successful ones involve human operators and, therefore, are time-consuming and costly, while the fully-automatic ones have not yet achieved the same level of quality. This subpar performance is due to the fact that automatic methods usually rely on assumptions about the captured 3D scene that are often violated in practice. In this paper, we explore a radically different approach inspired by our work on saliency detection in images. Instead of relying on a deterministic scene model for the input 2D image, we propose to "learn" the model from a large dictionary of stereopairs, such as YouTube 3D. Our new approach is built upon a key observation and an assumption. The key observation is that among millions of stereopairs available on-line, there likely exist many stereopairs whose 3D content matches that of the 2D input (query). We assume that two stereopairs whose left images are photometrically similar are likely to have similar disparity fields. Our approach first finds a number of on-line stereopairs whose left image is a close photometric match to the 2D query and then extracts depth information from these stereopairs. Since disparities for the selected stereopairs differ due to differences in underlying image content, level of noise, distortions, etc., we combine them by using the median. We apply the resulting median disparity field to the 2D query to obtain the corresponding right image, while handling occlusions and newly-exposed areas in the usual way. We have applied our method in two scenarios. First, we used YouTube 3D videos in search of the most similar frames. Then, we repeated the experiments on a small, but carefully-selected, dictionary of stereopairs closely matching the query. This, to a degree, emulates the results one would expect from the use of an extremely large 3D

  9. Interference-free ultrasound imaging during HIFU therapy, using software tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaezy, Shahram (Inventor); Held, Robert (Inventor); Sikdar, Siddhartha (Inventor); Managuli, Ravi (Inventor); Zderic, Vesna (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method for obtaining a composite interference-free ultrasound image when non-imaging ultrasound waves would otherwise interfere with ultrasound imaging. A conventional ultrasound imaging system is used to collect frames of ultrasound image data in the presence of non-imaging ultrasound waves, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). The frames are directed to a processor that analyzes the frames to identify portions of the frame that are interference-free. Interference-free portions of a plurality of different ultrasound image frames are combined to generate a single composite interference-free ultrasound image that is displayed to a user. In this approach, a frequency of the non-imaging ultrasound waves is offset relative to a frequency of the ultrasound imaging waves, such that the interference introduced by the non-imaging ultrasound waves appears in a different portion of the frames.

  10. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  11. Agnathia-otocephaly: prenatal diagnosis by two- and three-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Case report.

    PubMed

    Hisaba, Wagner Jou; Milani, Hérbene José Figuinha; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Passos, Jurandir Piassi; Barreto, Enoch Quinderé Sá; Carvalho, Natália Silva; Helfer, Talita Micheletti; Pares, David Batista Silva; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    A case of prenatally diagnosed otocephaly is reported. Otocephaly is an extremely rare malformation characterized by absence or hypoplasia of the mandible and abnormal horizontal position of the ears. 2D ultrasound performed at 25 weeks of gestation revealed agnathia, proboscis and hypotelorism. 3D ultrasound (rendering mode) and magnetic resonance imaging were used to evaluate the facial features, and were essential for characterization of facial malformations in otocephaly and for the demonstration and correct prenatal counseling of the couple. PMID:25463893

  12. Single particle 3D reconstruction for 2D crystal images of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Sebastian; Arheit, Marcel; Kowal, Julia; Zeng, Xiangyan; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-03-01

    In cases where ultra-flat cryo-preparations of well-ordered two-dimensional (2D) crystals are available, electron crystallography is a powerful method for the determination of the high-resolution structures of membrane and soluble proteins. However, crystal unbending and Fourier-filtering methods in electron crystallography three-dimensional (3D) image processing are generally limited in their performance for 2D crystals that are badly ordered or non-flat. Here we present a single particle image processing approach, which is implemented as an extension of the 2D crystallographic pipeline realized in the 2dx software package, for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of membrane proteins. The algorithm presented, addresses the low single-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 2D crystal images by exploiting neighborhood correlation between adjacent proteins in the 2D crystal. Compared with conventional single particle processing for randomly oriented particles, the computational costs are greatly reduced due to the crystal-induced limited search space, which allows a much finer search space compared to classical single particle processing. To reduce the considerable computational costs, our software features a hybrid parallelization scheme for multi-CPU clusters and computer with high-end graphic processing units (GPUs). We successfully apply the new refinement method to the structure of the potassium channel MloK1. The calculated 3D reconstruction shows more structural details and contains less noise than the map obtained by conventional Fourier-filtering based processing of the same 2D crystal images.

  13. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wataganara, Tuangsit; Ebrashy, Alaa; Aliyu, Labaran Dayyabu; Moreira de Sa, Renato Augusto; Pooh, Ritsuko; Kurjak, Asim; Sen, Cihat; Adra, Abdallah; Stanojevic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly adopted in obstetrics practice in the past three decades. MRI aids prenatal ultrasound and improves diagnostic accuracy for selected maternal and fetal conditions. However, it should be considered only when high-quality ultrasound cannot provide certain information that affects the counseling, prenatal intervention, pregnancy course, and delivery plan. Major indications of fetal MRI include, but are not restricted to, morbidly adherent placenta, selected cases of fetal brain anomalies, thoracic lesions (especially in severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia), and soft tissue tumors at head and neck regions of the fetus. For fetal anatomy assessment, a 1.5-Tesla machine with a fast T2-weighted single-shot technique is recommended for image requisition of common fetal abnormalities. Individual judgment needs to be applied when considering usage of a 3-Tesla machine. Gadolinium MRI contrast is not recommended during pregnancy. MRI should be avoided in the first half of pregnancy due to small fetal structures and motion artifacts. Assessment of fetal cerebral cortex can be achieved with MRI in the third trimester. MRI is a viable research tool for noninvasive interrogation of the fetus and the placenta. PMID:27092644

  14. Detection of Leptomeningeal Metastasis by Contrast-Enhanced 3D T1-SPACE: Comparison with 2D FLAIR and Contrast-Enhanced 2D T1-Weighted Images

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Bomi; Hwang, Eo-Jin; Lee, Song; Jang, Jinhee; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced 3D(dimensional) T1-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions (T1-SPACE), 2D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image in detection of leptomeningeal metastasis except for invasive procedures such as a CSF tapping. Materials and Methods Three groups of patients were included retrospectively for 9 months (from 2013-04-01 to 2013-12-31). Group 1 patients with positive malignant cells in CSF cytology (n = 22); group 2, stroke patients with steno-occlusion in ICA or MCA (n = 16); and group 3, patients with negative results on MRI, whose symptom were dizziness or headache (n = 25). A total of 63 sets of MR images are separately collected and randomly arranged: (1) CE 3D T1-SPACE; (2) 2D FLAIR; and (3) CE T1-GRE using a 3-Tesla MR system. A faculty neuroradiologist with 8-year-experience and another 2nd grade trainee in radiology reviewed each MR image- blinded by the results of CSF cytology and coded their observations as positives or negatives of leptomeningeal metastasis. The CSF cytology result was considered as a gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity of each MR images were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using a McNemar’s test. A Cohen's kappa analysis was performed to assess inter-observer agreements. Results Diagnostic accuracy was not different between 3D T1-SPACE and CSF cytology by both raters. However, the accuracy test of 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE was inconsistent by the two raters. The Kappa statistic results were 0.657 (3D T1-SPACE), 0.420 (2D FLAIR), and 0.160 (2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE). The 3D T1-SPACE images showed the highest inter-observer agreements between the raters. Conclusions Compared to 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE, contrast-enhanced 3D T1 SPACE showed a better detection rate of

  15. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K. Sanpei, A. Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S.; Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  16. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2005-01-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  17. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2004-12-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  18. A Guide to Analysing Tongue Motion from Ultrasound Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    This paper is meant to be an introduction to and general reference for ultrasound imaging for new and moderately experienced users of the instrument. The paper consists of eight sections. The first explains how ultrasound works, including beam properties, scan types and machine features. The second section discusses image quality, including the…

  19. Two-dimensional ultrasound receive array using an angle-tuned Fabry-Perot polymer film sensor for transducer field characterization and transmission ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Beard, Paul Christopher

    2005-06-01

    A 2-D optical ultrasound receive array has been investigated. The transduction mechanism is based upon the detection of acoustically induced changes in the optical thickness of a thin polymer film acting as a Fabry-Perot sensing interferometer (FPI). By illuminating the sensor with a large-area laser beam and mechanically scanning a photodiode across the reflected output beam, while using a novel angle-tuned phase bias control system to optimally set the FPI working point, a notional 2-D ultrasound array was synthesized. To demonstrate the concept, 1-D and 2-D ultrasound field distributions produced by planar 3.5-MHz and focused 5-MHz PZT ultrasound transducers were mapped. The system was also evaluated by performing transmission ultrasound imaging of a spatially calibrated target. The "array" aperture, defined by the dimensions of the incident optical field, was elliptical, of dimensions 16 x 12 mm and spatially sampled in steps of 0.1 mm or 0.2 mm. Element sizes, defined by the photodiode aperture, of 0.8, 0.4, and 0.2 mm were variously used for these experiments. Two types of sensor were evaluated. One was a discrete 75-microm-thick polyethylene terephthalate FPI bonded to a polymer backing stub which had a wideband peak noise-equivalent pressure of 6.5 kPa and an acoustic bandwidth 12 MHz. The other was a 40-microm Parylene film FPI which was directly vacuum-deposited onto a glass backing stub and had an NEP of 8 kPa and an acoustic bandwidth of 17.5 MHz. It is considered that this approach offers an alternative to piezoelectric ultrasound arrays for transducer field characterization, transmission medical and industrial ultrasound imaging, biomedical photoacoustic imaging, and ultrasonic nondestructive testing.

  20. Image-based registration for two-dimensional and three-dimensional ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, Jochen

    Image based registration techniques were developed, evaluated, and applied to 2D and 3D ultrasound (US) imaging in the context of deformation and aberration detection and correction. The specific applications demonstrated here include 3D compounding, generation of extended fields of view, and sound speed estimation. Despite the enormous clinical importance that diagnostic US has gained over more than four decades, and despite the fact that advances in software development and computer technology have made image registration a widely studied and moderately applied technique in other medical imaging modalities, US and image registration have rarely been combined in research or clinical application. We will show that not only can some image registration methods be transferred from other imaging modalities and adjusted to operate on US images, but also that registration can overcome or greatly ameliorate some of the existing limitations of US imaging. A nonlinear registration algorithm developed specifically for ultrasound showed registration accuracy of 0.2 mm in volumes with synthetic deformations, 0.3 mm in phantom experiments, and 0.6 mm in vivo. Extended high-resolution ultrasound volumes with lateral extents of over 10 cm were created by fusing together 3 or 4 individual volumes, using image registration in the areas of overlap. 3D compounding in the out-of-plane direction was achieved by registration of US volumes obtained from different look directions. Examples of compounding in phantoms and in vivo show increased contrast/noise and better visualization of specular reflectors. Image-based estimates of the average sound speed in the field of view were obtained using registration of steered 2D US images. The accuracy of the estimates was improved by including simulations of the sound field generated by the array. Evaluated over a range of sound speeds from 1490 to 1560 m/s in a custom-made phantom, the simulation results reduced the RMS deviation between the

  1. SQL based cardiovascular ultrasound image classification.

    PubMed

    Nandagopalan, S; Suryanarayana, Adiga B; Sudarshan, T S B; Chandrashekar, Dhanalakshmi; Manjunath, C N

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method to analyze and classify the cardiovascular ultrasound echocardiographic images using Naïve-Bayesian model via database OLAP-SQL. Efficient data mining algorithms based on tightly-coupled model is used to extract features. Three algorithms are proposed for classification namely Naïve-Bayesian Classifier for Discrete variables (NBCD) with SQL, NBCD with OLAP-SQL, and Naïve-Bayesian Classifier for Continuous variables (NBCC) using OLAP-SQL. The proposed model is trained with 207 patient images containing normal and abnormal categories. Out of the three proposed algorithms, a high classification accuracy of 96.59% was achieved from NBCC which is better than the earlier methods.

  2. Combining 2D synchrosqueezed wave packet transform with optimization for crystal image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Wirth, Benedikt; Yang, Haizhao

    2016-04-01

    We develop a variational optimization method for crystal analysis in atomic resolution images, which uses information from a 2D synchrosqueezed transform (SST) as input. The synchrosqueezed transform is applied to extract initial information from atomic crystal images: crystal defects, rotations and the gradient of elastic deformation. The deformation gradient estimate is then improved outside the identified defect region via a variational approach, to obtain more robust results agreeing better with the physical constraints. The variational model is optimized by a nonlinear projected conjugate gradient method. Both examples of images from computer simulations and imaging experiments are analyzed, with results demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. In vivo liver tracking with a high volume rate 4D ultrasound scanner and a 2D matrix array probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Byram, Brett C.; Harris, Emma J.; Evans, Philip M.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.

    2012-03-01

    The effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is compromised by involuntary motion (e.g. respiration, cardiac activity). The feasibility of processing ultrasound echo data to automatically estimate 3D liver motion for real-time IMRT guidance was previously demonstrated, but performance was limited by an acquisition speed of 2 volumes per second due to hardware restrictions of a mechanical linear array probe. Utilizing a 2D matrix array probe with parallel receive beamforming offered increased acquisition speeds and an opportunity to investigate the benefits of higher volume rates. In vivo livers of three volunteers were scanned with and without respiratory motion at volume rates of 24 and 48 Hz, respectively. Respiration was suspended via voluntary breath hold. Correlation-based, phase-sensitive 3D speckle tracking was applied to consecutively acquired volumes of echo data. Volumes were omitted at fixed intervals and 3D speckle tracking was re-applied to study the effect of lower scan rates. Results revealed periodic motion that corresponded with the heart rate or breathing cycle in the absence or presence of respiration, respectively. For cardiac-induced motion, volume rates for adequate tracking ranged from 8 to 12 Hz and was limited by frequency discrepancies between tracking estimates from higher and lower frequency scan rates. Thus, the scan rate of volume data acquired without respiration was limited by the need to sample the frequency induced by the beating heart. In respiratory-dominated motion, volume rate limits ranged from 4 to 12 Hz, interpretable from the root-mean-squared deviation (RMSD) from tracking estimates at 24 Hz. While higher volume rates yielded RMSD values less than 1 mm in most cases, lower volume rates yielded RMSD values of 2-6 mm.

  4. Robust 2D phase correction for echo planar imaging under a tight field-of-view.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; King, Kevin F; Zur, Yuval; Hinks, R Scott

    2010-12-01

    Nyquist ghost artifacts are a serious issue in echo planar imaging. These artifacts primarily originate from phase difference between even and odd echo images and can be removed or reduced using phase correction methods. The commonly used 1D phase correction can only correct phase difference along readout axis. 2D correction is, therefore, necessary when phase difference presents along both readout and phase encoding axes. However, existing 2D methods have several unaddressed issues that affect their practicality. These issues include uncharacterized noise behavior, image artifact due to unoptimized phase estimation, Gibbs ringing artifact when directly applying to partial k(y) data, and most seriously a new image artifact under tight field-of-view (i.e., field-of-view slightly smaller than object size). All these issues are addressed in this article. Specifically, theoretical analysis of noise amplification and effect of phase estimation error is provided, and tradeoff between noise and ghost is studied. A new 2D phase correction method with improved polynomial fitting, joint homodyne processing and phase correction, compatibility with tight field-of-view is then proposed. Various results show that the proposed method can robustly generate images free of Nyquist ghosts and other image artifacts even in oblique scans or when cross-term eddy current terms are significant. PMID:20806354

  5. Ultrasound Thermal Field Imaging of Opaque Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andereck, C. David

    1999-01-01

    We have initiated an experimental program to develop an ultrasound system for non-intrusively imaging the thermal field in opaque fluids under an externally imposed temperature gradient. Many industrial processes involve opaque fluids, such as molten metals, semiconductors, and polymers, often in situations in which thermal gradients are important. For example, one may wish to understand semiconductor crystal growth dynamics in a Bridgman apparatus. Destructive testing of the crystal after the process is completed gives only indirect information about the fluid dynamics of the formation process. Knowledge of the coupled thermal and velocity fields during the growth process is then essential. Most techniques for non-intrusive velocity and temperature measurement in fluids are optical in nature, and hence the fluids studied must be transparent. In some cases (for example, LDV (laser Doppler velocimetry) and PIV (particle imaging velocimetry)) the velocities of small neutrally buoyant seed particles suspended in the fluid, are measured. Without particle seeding one can use the variation of the index of refraction of the fluid with temperature to visualize, through interferometric, Schlieren or shadowgraph techniques, the thermal field. The thermal field in turn gives a picture of the pattern existing in the fluid. If the object of study is opaque, non-optical techniques must be used. In this project we focus on the use of ultrasound, which propagates easily through opaque liquids and solids. To date ultrasound measurements have almost exclusively relied on the detection of sound scattered from density discontinuities inside the opaque material of interest. In most cases it has been used to visualize structural properties, but more recently the ultrasound Doppler velocimeter has become available. As in the optical case, it relies on seed particles that scatter Doppler shifted sound back to the detector. Doppler ultrasound techniques are, however, not useful for

  6. Standards of ultrasound imaging of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Słapa, Rafał Z; Jakubowski, Wiesław S; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna A

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal glands are paired endocrine glands located over the upper renal poles. Adrenal pathologies have various clinical presentations. They can coexist with the hyperfunction of individual cortical zones or the medulla, insufficiency of the adrenal cortex or retained normal hormonal function. The most common adrenal masses are tumors incidentally detected in imaging examinations (ultrasound, tomography, magnetic resonance imaging), referred to as incidentalomas. They include a range of histopathological entities but cortical adenomas without hormonal hyperfunction are the most common. Each abdominal ultrasound scan of a child or adult should include the assessment of the suprarenal areas. If a previously non-reported, incidental solid focal lesion exceeding 1 cm (incidentaloma) is detected in the suprarenal area, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be conducted to confirm its presence and for differentiation and the tumor functional status should be determined. Ultrasound imaging is also used to monitor adrenal incidentaloma that is not eligible for a surgery. The paper presents recommendations concerning the performance and assessment of ultrasound examinations of the adrenal glands and their pathological lesions. The article includes new ultrasound techniques, such as tissue harmonic imaging, spatial compound imaging, three-dimensional ultrasound, elastography, contrast-enhanced ultrasound and parametric imaging. The guidelines presented above are consistent with the recommendations of the Polish Ultrasound Society.

  7. 2D ESR image reconstruction from 1D projections using the modulated field gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páli, T.; Sass, L.; Horvat, L. I.; Ebert, B.

    A method for the reconstruction of 2D ESR images from 1 D projections which is based on the modulated field gradient method has been explored. The 2D distribution of spin-labeled stearic acid in oriented and unoriented dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine multilayers on a flat quartz support was determined. Such samples are potentially useful for the determination of lipid lateral diffusion in oriented multilayers by monitoring the spreading of a sharp concentration profile in one or two dimensions. The limitations of the method are discussed and the improvements which are needed for dynamic measurements are outlined.

  8. Cardiac phase detection in intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Lemos, Pedro Alves; Yoneyama, Takashi; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi

    2008-03-01

    Image gating is related to image modalities that involve quasi-periodic moving organs. Therefore, during intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination, there is cardiac movement interference. In this paper, we aim to obtain IVUS gated images based on the images themselves. This would allow the reconstruction of 3D coronaries with temporal accuracy for any cardiac phase, which is an advantage over the ECG-gated acquisition that shows a single one. It is also important for retrospective studies, as in existing IVUS databases there are no additional reference signals (ECG). From the images, we calculated signals based on average intensity (AI), and, from consecutive frames, average intensity difference (AID), cross-correlation coefficient (CC) and mutual information (MI). The process includes a wavelet-based filter step and ascendant zero-cross detection in order to obtain the phase information. Firstly, we tested 90 simulated sequences with 1025 frames each. Our method was able to achieve more than 95.0% of true positives and less than 2.3% of false positives ratio, for all signals. Afterwards, we tested in a real examination, with 897 frames and ECG as gold-standard. We achieved 97.4% of true positives (CC and MI), and 2.5% of false positives. For future works, methodology should be tested in wider range of IVUS examinations.

  9. Density-tapered spiral arrays for ultrasound 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramalli, Alessandro; Boni, Enrico; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Tortoli, Piero

    2015-08-01

    The current high interest in 3-D ultrasound imaging is pushing the development of 2-D probes with a challenging number of active elements. The most popular approach to limit this number is the sparse array technique, which designs the array layout by means of complex optimization algorithms. These algorithms are typically constrained by a few steering conditions, and, as such, cannot guarantee uniform side-lobe performance at all angles. The performance may be improved by the ungridded extensions of the sparse array technique, but this result is achieved at the expense of a further complication of the optimization process. In this paper, a method to design the layout of large circular arrays with a limited number of elements according to Fermat's spiral seeds and spatial density modulation is proposed and shown to be suitable for application to 3-D ultrasound imaging. This deterministic, aperiodic, and balanced positioning procedure attempts to guarantee uniform performance over a wide range of steering angles. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by simulating and comparing the performance of spiral and dense arrays. A good trade-off for small vessel imaging is found, e.g., in the 60λ spiral array with 1.0λ elements and Blackman density tapering window. Here, the grating lobe level is -16 dB, the lateral resolution is lower than 6λ the depth of field is 120λ and, the average contrast is 10.3 dB, while the sensitivity remains in a 5 dB range for a wide selection of steering angles. The simulation results may represent a reference guide to the design of spiral sparse array probes for different application fields. PMID:26285181

  10. Research on 2D representation method of wireless Micro-Ball endoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Xie, Xiang; Li, Guolin; Gu, Yingke; Yin, Zheng; Wang, Zhihua

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays the interpretation of the images acquired by wireless endoscopy system is a tedious job for doctors. A viable solution is to construct a map, which is the 2D representation of gastrointestinal (GI) tract to reduce the redundancy of images and improve the understandability of them. The work reported in this paper addresses the problem of the 2D representation of GI tract based on a new wireless Micro-Ball endoscopy system with multiple image sensors. This paper firstly models the problem of constructing the map, and then discusses mainly on the issues of perspective distortion correction, image preprocessing and image registration, which lie in the whole problem. The perspective distortion correction algorithm is realized based on attitude angles, while the image registration is based on phase correlation method (PCM) and scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) combined with particular image preprocessing methods. Based on R channels of images, the algorithm can deal with 26.3% to 100% of image registration when the ratio of overlap varies from 25% to 80%. The performance and effectiveness of the algorithms are verified by experiments.

  11. 2D Doppler backscattering using synthetic aperture microwave imaging of MAST edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. A.; Brunner, K. J.; Freethy, S. J.; Huang, B. K.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is already established as a powerful diagnostic; its extension to 2D enables imaging of turbulence characteristics from an extended region of the cut-off surface. The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D DBS experiments of MAST edge plasma. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (±40° vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-34.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24° FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial observations of phenomena previously measured by conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch angle to be made; preliminary results are presented. Capabilities gained through steering a beam using a phased array and the limitations of this technique are discussed.

  12. High-Accuracy Ultrasound Contrast Agent Detection Method for Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Noro, Kazumasa; Yanagisawa, Yukari; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Shiga, Kiyoto; Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoki, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    An accurate method for detecting contrast agents using diagnostic ultrasound imaging systems is proposed. Contrast agents, such as microbubbles, passing through a blood vessel during ultrasound imaging are detected as blinking signals in the temporal axis, because their intensity value is constantly in motion. Ultrasound contrast agents are detected by evaluating the intensity variation of a pixel in the temporal axis. Conventional methods are based on simple subtraction of ultrasound images to detect ultrasound contrast agents. Even if the subject moves only slightly, a conventional detection method will introduce significant error. In contrast, the proposed technique employs spatiotemporal analysis of the pixel intensity variation over several frames. Experiments visualizing blood vessels in the mouse tail illustrated that the proposed method performs efficiently compared with conventional approaches. We also report that the new technique is useful for observing temporal changes in microvessel density in subiliac lymph nodes containing tumors. The results are compared with those of contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

  13. Integrated intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) - ultrasound (US) imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiechen; Yang, Hao-Chung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Hu, Changhong; Zhang, Jun; Shung, K. Kirk; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) are considered two complementary imaging techniques in the detection and diagnosis of atherosclerosis. OCT permits visualization of micron-scale features of atherosclerosis plaque, and IVUS offers full imaging depth of vessel wall. Under the guidance of IVUS, minimal amount of flushing agent will be needed to obtain OCT imaging of the interested area. We report on a dual-modality optical coherence tomography (OCT) - ultrasound (US) system for intravascular imaging. To the best of our knowledge, we have developed the first integrated OCT-US probe that combines OCT optical components with an ultrasound transducer. The OCT optical components mainly consist of a single mode fiber, a gradient index (GRIN) lens for light beam focusing, and a right-angled prism for reflecting light into biological tissue. A 40MHz PZT-5H side-viewing ultrasound transducer was fabricated to obtain the ultrasound image. These components were integrated into a single probe, enabling both OCT and ultrasound imaging at the same time. In vitro OCT and ultrasound images of a rabbit aorta were obtained using this dual-modality imaging system. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an OCT-US system for intravascular imaging which is expected to have a prominent impact on early detection and characterization of atherosclerosis.

  14. Effects of modulation phase of ultrasound-modulated light on the ultrasound-modulated optical image in turbid media.

    PubMed

    Weng, Cuncheng; Zhang, Jing

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, our investigations suggest that the modulation phase of ultrasound-modulated light escaping from the different locations in the ultrasonic field is different. In turbid media, the modulation phase causes the ultrasound-modulated light intensity collected outside the media to fluctuate. However, the ultrasound-modulated optical technology uses the ultrasound-modulated light signals to image. Consequently, the modulation phase affects the quality of ultrasound-modulated optical imaging.

  15. A quantitative damage imaging technique based on enhanced CCRTM for composite plates using 2D scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-10-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) non-contact areal scan system was developed to image and quantify impact damage in a composite plate using an enhanced zero-lag cross-correlation reverse-time migration (E-CCRTM) technique. The system comprises a single piezoelectric wafer mounted on the composite plate and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for scanning a region in the vicinity of the PZT to capture the scattered wavefield. The proposed damage imaging technique takes into account the amplitude, phase, geometric spreading, and all of the frequency content of the Lamb waves propagating in the plate; thus, a reflectivity coefficients of the delamination is calculated and potentially related to damage severity. Comparisons are made in terms of damage imaging quality between 2D areal scans and 1D line scans as well as between the proposed and existing imaging conditions. The experimental results show that the 2D E-CCRTM performs robustly when imaging and quantifying impact damage in large-scale composites using a single PZT actuator with a nearby areal scan using LDV.

  16. ULTRASOUND SIMULATION IN THE DISTAL RADIUS USING CLINICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION PERIPHERAL-CT IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Floch, Vincent Le; McMahon, Donald J.; Luo, Gangming; Cohen, Adi; Kaufman, Jonathan J.; Shane, Elizabeth; Siffert, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop an ultrasonic method for noninvasive assessment of the distal radius. The specific objective of this study was to examine the propagation of ultrasound through the distal radius and determine the relationships between bone mass and architecture and ultrasound parameters. Twenty-six high-resolution peripheral-CT clinical images were obtained from a set of subjects that were part of a larger study on secondary osteoporosis. A single midsection binary slice from each image was selected and used in the two-dimensional (2D) simulation of an ultrasound wave propagating from the anterior to the posterior surfaces of each radius. Mass and architectural parameters associated with each radius, including total (trabecular and cortical) bone mass, trabecular volume fraction, trabecular number and trabecular thickness were computed. Ultrasound parameters, including net time delay (NTD), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and ultrasound velocity (UV) were also evaluated. Significant correlations were found between NTD and total bone mass (R2 = 0.92, p < 0.001), BUA and trabecular number (R2 = 0.78, p < 0.01) and UV and trabecular bone volume fraction (R2 = 0.82, p < 0.01). There was only weak, statistically insignificant correlation (R2 < 0.14, p = 0.21) found between trabecular thickness and any of the ultrasound parameters. The study shows that ultrasound measurements are correlated with bone mass and architecture at the distal radius and, thus, ultrasound may prove useful as a method for noninvasive assessment of osteoporosis and fracture risk. PMID:18343017

  17. [Cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy: diagnosis with 2D, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound and 3D power doppler of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, E; Gunev, D; Diavolov, V; Slavchev, B

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy is rare type of ectopic pregnancy. It is associated with severe complication if it is not diagnosed early in pregnancy. We present a case of difficult first-trimester diagnosis of Cesarean scar pregnancy. In this paper we discuss the incidence of this condition, the antenatal diagnosis, the prognosis and management and the importance of 2D and 3D ultrasound technique as a diagnostic tool. PMID:24501880

  18. Simultaneous 3D–2D image registration and C-arm calibration: Application to endovascular image-guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrović, Uroš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Špiclin, Žiga

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D–2D) image registration is a key to fusion and simultaneous visualization of valuable information contained in 3D pre-interventional and 2D intra-interventional images with the final goal of image guidance of a procedure. In this paper, the authors focus on 3D–2D image registration within the context of intracranial endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs), where the 3D and 2D images are generally acquired with the same C-arm system. The accuracy and robustness of any 3D–2D registration method, to be used in a clinical setting, is influenced by (1) the method itself, (2) uncertainty of initial pose of the 3D image from which registration starts, (3) uncertainty of C-arm’s geometry and pose, and (4) the number of 2D intra-interventional images used for registration, which is generally one and at most two. The study of these influences requires rigorous and objective validation of any 3D–2D registration method against a highly accurate reference or “gold standard” registration, performed on clinical image datasets acquired in the context of the intervention. Methods: The registration process is split into two sequential, i.e., initial and final, registration stages. The initial stage is either machine-based or template matching. The latter aims to reduce possibly large in-plane translation errors by matching a projection of the 3D vessel model and 2D image. In the final registration stage, four state-of-the-art intrinsic image-based 3D–2D registration methods, which involve simultaneous refinement of rigid-body and C-arm parameters, are evaluated. For objective validation, the authors acquired an image database of 15 patients undergoing cerebral EIGI, for which accurate gold standard registrations were established by fiducial marker coregistration. Results: Based on target registration error, the obtained success rates of 3D to a single 2D image registration after initial machine-based and

  19. A new architecture for fast ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cruza, J. F.; Camacho, J.; Moreno, J. M.; Medina, L.

    2014-02-18

    Some ultrasound imaging applications require high frame rate, for example 3D imaging and automated inspections of large components. Being the signal-processing throughput of the system the main bottleneck, parallel beamforming is required to achieve hundreds to thousands of images per second. Simultaneous A-scan line beamforming in all active channels is required to reach the intended high frame rate. To this purpose, a new parallel beamforming architecture that exploits the currently available processing resources available in state-of-the-art FPGAs is proposed. The work aims to get the optimal resource usage, high scalability and flexibility for different applications. To achieve these goals, the basic beamforming function is reformulated to be adapted to the DSP-cell architecture of state-of-the-art FPGAs. This allows performing simultaneous dynamic focusing on multiple A-scan lines. Some realistic examples are analyzed, evaluating resource requirements and maximum operating frequency. For example, a 128-channel system, with 128 scan lines and acquiring at 20 MSPS, can be built with 4 mid-range FPGAs, achieving up to 18000 frames per second, just limited by the maximum PRF. The gold standard Synthetic Transmit Aperture method (also called Total Focusing Method) can be carried out in real time at a processing rate of 140 high-resolution images per second (16 cm depth on steel)

  20. High-frequency ultrasound imaging for breast cancer biopsy guidance.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Thomas; Yoon, Changhan; Choi, Hojong; Eliahoo, Payam; Kim, Hyung Ham; Yamashita, Mary W; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda J; Lang, Julie E; Sener, Stephen F; Vallone, John; Martin, Sue E; Kirk Shung, K

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided core needle biopsy is the current gold standard for breast cancer diagnosis. Microcalcifications, an important radiographic finding on mammography suggestive of early breast cancer such as ductal carcinoma in situ, are usually biopsied under stereotactic guidance. This procedure, however, is uncomfortable for patients and requires the use of ionizing radiation. It would be preferable to biopsy microcalcifications under ultrasound guidance since it is a faster procedure, more comfortable for the patient, and requires no radiation. However, microcalcifications cannot reliably be detected with the current standard ultrasound imaging systems. This study is motivated by the clinical need for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging of microcalcifications, so that biopsies can be accurately performed under ultrasound guidance. We have investigated how high-frequency ultrasound imaging can enable visualization of microstructures in ex vivo breast tissue biopsy samples. We generated B-mode images of breast tissue and applied the Nakagami filtering technique to help refine image output so that microcalcifications could be better assessed during ultrasound-guided core biopsies. We describe the preliminary clinical results of high-frequency ultrasound imaging of ex vivo breast biopsy tissue with microcalcifications and without Nakagami filtering and the correlation of these images with the pathology examination by hematoxylin and eosin stain and whole slide digital scanning. PMID:26693167

  1. Occluded target viewing and identification high-resolution 2D imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Dippel, George F.; Cecchetti, Kristen D.; Wikman, John C.; Drouin, David P.; Egbert, Paul I.

    2007-09-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has developed a high-resolution 2D imaging laser radar (LADAR) system that has proven its ability to detect and identify hard targets in occluded environments, through battlefield obscurants, and through naturally occurring image-degrading atmospheres. Limitations of passive infrared imaging for target identification using medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long wavelength infrared (LWIR) atmospheric windows are well known. Of particular concern is that as wavelength is increased the aperture must be increased to maintain resolution, hence, driving apertures to be very larger for long-range identification; impractical because of size, weight, and optics cost. Conversely, at smaller apertures and with large f-numbers images may become photon starved with long integration times. Here, images are most susceptible to distortion from atmospheric turbulence, platform vibration, or both. Additionally, long-range identification using passive thermal imaging is clutter limited arising from objects in close proximity to the target object.

  2. Mechanically assisted 3D prostate ultrasound imaging and biopsy needle-guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Williams, Jackie; Cool, Derek; Gardi, Lori; Montreuil, Jacques; Karnik, Vaishali; Sherebrin, Shi; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-02-01

    Prostate biopsy procedures are currently limited to using 2D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging to guide the biopsy needle. Being limited to 2D causes ambiguity in needle guidance and provides an insufficient record to allow guidance to the same suspicious locations or avoid regions that are negative during previous biopsy sessions. We have developed a mechanically assisted 3D ultrasound imaging and needle tracking system, which supports a commercially available TRUS probe and integrated needle guide for prostate biopsy. The mechanical device is fixed to a cart and the mechanical tracking linkage allows its joints to be manually manipulated while fully supporting the weight of the ultrasound probe. The computer interface is provided in order to track the needle trajectory and display its path on a corresponding 3D TRUS image, allowing the physician to aim the needle-guide at predefined targets within the prostate. The system has been designed for use with several end-fired transducers that can be rotated about the longitudinal axis of the probe in order to generate 3D image for 3D navigation. Using the system, 3D TRUS prostate images can be generated in approximately 10 seconds. The system reduces most of the user variability from conventional hand-held probes, which make them unsuitable for precision biopsy, while preserving some of the user familiarity and procedural workflow. In this paper, we describe the 3D TRUS guided biopsy system and report on the initial clinical use of this system for prostate biopsy.

  3. The start-to-end chemometric image processing of 2D thin-layer videoscans.

    PubMed

    Komsta, Łukasz; Cieśla, Łukasz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Józefczyk, Aleksandra; Kryszeń, Jakub; Waksmundzka-Hajnos, Monika

    2011-05-13

    The purpose of the research was to recommend a unified procedure of image preprocessing of 2D thin layer videoscans for further supervised or unsupervised chemometric analysis. All work was done with open source software. The videoscans saved as JPG files underwent the following procedures: denoising using a median filter, baseline removal with the rollerball algorithm and nonlinear warping using spline functions. The application of the proposed procedure enabled filtration of random difference between images (background intensity changes and spatial differences of the spots location). After the preprocessing only spot intensities have an influence on the performed PCA or other techniques. The proposed technique was successfully applied to recognize the differences between three Carex species from the 2D videoscans of the extracts. The proposed solution may be of value for the any chemometric task--both unsupervised and supervised.

  4. On 2-D recursive LMS algorithms using ARMA prediction for ADPCM encoding of images.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y S; Kanefsky, M

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) linear predictor which has an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) representation well as a bias term is adapted for adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) encoding of nonnegative images. The predictor coefficients are updated by using a 2D recursive LMS (TRLMS) algorithm. A constraint on optimum values for the convergence factors and an updating algorithm based on the constraint are developed. The coefficient updating algorithm can be modified with a stability control factor. This realization can operate in real time and in the spatial domain. A comparison of three different types of predictors is made for real images. ARMA predictors show improved performance relative to an AR algorithm. PMID:18296174

  5. Image Pretreatment Tools II: Normalization Techniques for 2-DE and 2-D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Robotti, Elisa; Marengo, Emilio; Quasso, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is usually applied to identify different protein expression profiles in biological samples (e.g., control vs. pathological, control vs. treated). Information about the effect to be investigated (a pathology, a drug, a ripening effect, etc.) is however generally confounded with experimental variability that is quite large in 2-DE and may arise from small variations in the sample preparation, reagents, sample loading, electrophoretic conditions, staining and image acquisition. Obtaining valid quantitative estimates of protein abundances in each map, before the differential analysis, is therefore fundamental to provide robust candidate biomarkers. Normalization procedures are applied to reduce experimental noise and make the images comparable, improving the accuracy of differential analysis. Certainly, they may deeply influence the final results, and to this respect they have to be applied with care. Here, the most widespread normalization procedures are described both for what regards the applications to 2-DE and 2D Difference Gel-electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) maps.

  6. Interpretation of Line-Integrated Signals from 2-D Phase Contrast Imaging on LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Clive; Tanaka, Kenji; Vyacheslavov, Leonid; Sanin, Andrei; Kawahata, Kazuo; Okajima, S.

    Two dimensional (2D) phase contrast imaging (PCI) is an excellent method to measure core and edge turbulence with good spatial resolution (Δρ ˜ 0.1). General analytical consideration is given to the signal interpretation of the line-integrated signals, with specific application to images from 2D PCI. It is shown that the Fourier components of fluctuations having any non-zero component propagating along the line of sight are not detected. The ramifications of this constraint are discussed, including consideration of the angle between the sight line and flux surface normal. In the experimental geometry, at the point where the flux surfaces are tangent to the sight line, it is shown that it may be possible to detect large poloidally extended (though with small radial wavelength) structures, such as GAMS. The spatial localization technique of this diagnostic is illustrated with experimental data.

  7. Multimedia systems in ultrasound image boundary detection and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Chalana, Vikram; Kim, Yongmin

    1997-05-01

    Ultrasound as a medical imaging modality offers the clinician a real-time of the anatomy of the internal organs/tissues, their movement, and flow noninvasively. One of the applications of ultrasound is to monitor fetal growth by measuring biparietal diameter (BPD) and head circumference (HC). We have been working on automatic detection of fetal head boundaries in ultrasound images. These detected boundaries are used to measure BPD and HC. The boundary detection algorithm is based on active contour models and takes 32 seconds on an external high-end workstation, SUN SparcStation 20/71. Our goal has been to make this tool available within an ultrasound machine and at the same time significantly improve its performance utilizing multimedia technology. With the advent of high- performance programmable digital signal processors (DSP), the software solution within an ultrasound machine instead of the traditional hardwired approach or requiring an external computer is now possible. We have integrated our boundary detection algorithm into a programmable ultrasound image processor (PUIP) that fits into a commercial ultrasound machine. The PUIP provides both the high computing power and flexibility needed to support computationally-intensive image processing algorithms within an ultrasound machine. According to our data analysis, BPD/HC measurements made on PUIP lie within the interobserver variability. Hence, the errors in the automated BPD/HC measurements using the algorithm are on the same order as the average interobserver differences. On PUIP, it takes 360 ms to measure the values of BPD/HC on one head image. When processing multiple head images in sequence, it takes 185 ms per image, thus enabling 5.4 BPD/HC measurements per second. Reduction in the overall execution time from 32 seconds to a fraction of a second and making this multimedia system available within an ultrasound machine will help this image processing algorithm and other computer-intensive imaging

  8. Research on respiratory motion correction method based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound images of single mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji; Li, Tao; Zheng, Shiqiang; Li, Yiyong

    2015-03-01

    To reduce the effects of respiratory motion in the quantitative analysis based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) image sequencesof single mode. The image gating method and the iterative registration method using model image were adopted to register liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequences of single mode. The feasibility of the proposed respiratory motion correction method was explored preliminarily using 10 hepatocellular carcinomas CEUS cases. The positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images after correction were visually evaluated. Before and after correction, the quality of the weighted sum of transit time (WSTT) parametric images were also compared, in terms of the accuracy and spatial resolution. For the corrected and uncorrected sequences, their mean deviation values (mDVs) of time-intensity curve (TIC) fitting derived from CEUS sequences were measured. After the correction, the positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images were almost invariant. In contrast, the lesions in the uncorrected images all shifted noticeably. The quality of the WSTT parametric maps derived from liver CEUS image sequences were improved more greatly. Moreover, the mDVs of TIC fitting derived from CEUS sequences after the correction decreased by an average of 48.48+/-42.15. The proposed correction method could improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis based on liver CEUS image sequences of single mode, which would help in enhancing the differential diagnosis efficiency of liver tumors.

  9. Gender and ethnicity specific generic elastic models from a single 2D image for novel 2D pose face synthesis and recognition.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jingu; Savvides, Marios

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method for generating a realistic 3D human face from a single 2D face image for the purpose of synthesizing new 2D face images at arbitrary poses using gender and ethnicity specific models. We employ the Generic Elastic Model (GEM) approach, which elastically deforms a generic 3D depth-map based on the sparse observations of an input face image in order to estimate the depth of the face image. Particularly, we show that Gender and Ethnicity specific GEMs (GE-GEMs) can approximate the 3D shape of the input face image more accurately, achieving a better generalization of 3D face modeling and reconstruction compared to the original GEM approach. We qualitatively validate our method using publicly available databases by showing each reconstructed 3D shape generated from a single image and new synthesized poses of the same person at arbitrary angles. For quantitative comparisons, we compare our synthesized results against 3D scanned data and also perform face recognition using synthesized images generated from a single enrollment frontal image. We obtain promising results for handling pose and expression changes based on the proposed method. PMID:22201062

  10. Image quality of up-converted 2D video from frame-compatible 3D video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, Filippo; Tam, Wa James; Vázquez, Carlos; Renaud, Ronald; Blanchfield, Phil

    2011-03-01

    In the stereoscopic frame-compatible format, the separate high-definition left and high-definition right views are reduced in resolution and packed to fit within the same video frame as a conventional two-dimensional high-definition signal. This format has been suggested for 3DTV since it does not require additional transmission bandwidth and entails only small changes to the existing broadcasting infrastructure. In some instances, the frame-compatible format might be used to deliver both 2D and 3D services, e.g., for over-the-air television services. In those cases, the video quality of the 2D service is bound to decrease since the 2D signal will have to be generated by up-converting one of the two views. In this study, we investigated such loss by measuring the perceptual image quality of 1080i and 720p up-converted video as compared to that of full resolution original 2D video. The video was encoded with either a MPEG-2 or a H.264/AVC codec at different bit rates and presented for viewing with either no polarized glasses (2D viewing mode) or with polarized glasses (3D viewing mode). The results confirmed a loss of video quality of the 2D video up-converted material. The loss due to the sampling processes inherent to the frame-compatible format was rather small for both 1080i and 720p video formats; the loss became more substantial with encoding, particularly for MPEG-2 encoding. The 3D viewing mode provided higher quality ratings, possibly because the visibility of the degradations was reduced.

  11. Fully automatic detection of the vertebrae in 2D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Franz; Kriegel, Hans-Peter; Schubert, Matthias; Strukelj, Michael; Cavallaro, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    Knowledge about the vertebrae is a valuable source of information for several annotation tasks. In recent years, the research community spent a considerable effort for detecting, segmenting and analyzing the vertebrae and the spine in various image modalities like CT or MR. Most of these methods rely on prior knowledge like the location of the vertebrae or other initial information like the manual detection of the spine. Furthermore, the majority of these methods require a complete volume scan. With the existence of use cases where only a single slice is available, there arises a demand for methods allowing the detection of the vertebrae in 2D images. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic and parameterless algorithm for detecting the vertebrae in 2D CT images. Our algorithm starts with detecting candidate locations by taking the density of bone-like structures into account. Afterwards, the candidate locations are extended into candidate regions for which certain image features are extracted. The resulting feature vectors are compared to a sample set of previously annotated and processed images in order to determine the best candidate region. In a final step, the result region is readjusted until convergence to a locally optimal position. Our new method is validated on a real world data set of more than 9 329 images of 34 patients being annotated by a clinician in order to provide a realistic ground truth.

  12. Extraction of Individual Filaments from 2D Confocal Microscopy Images of Flat Cells.

    PubMed

    Basu, Saurav; Chi Liu; Rohde, Gustavo Kunde

    2015-01-01

    A crucial step in understanding the architecture of cells and tissues from microscopy images, and consequently explain important biological events such as wound healing and cancer metastases, is the complete extraction and enumeration of individual filaments from the cellular cytoskeletal network. Current efforts at quantitative estimation of filament length distribution, architecture and orientation from microscopy images are predominantly limited to visual estimation and indirect experimental inference. Here we demonstrate the application of a new algorithm to reliably estimate centerlines of biological filament bundles and extract individual filaments from the centerlines by systematically disambiguating filament intersections. We utilize a filament enhancement step followed by reverse diffusion based filament localization and an integer programming based set combination to systematically extract accurate filaments automatically from microscopy images. Experiments on simulated and real confocal microscope images of flat cells (2D images) show efficacy of the new method.

  13. Night vision image fusion for target detection with improved 2D maximum entropy segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lian-fa; Liu, Ying-bin; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi

    2013-08-01

    Infrared and LLL image are used for night vision target detection. In allusion to the characteristics of night vision imaging and lack of traditional detection algorithm for segmentation and extraction of targets, we propose a method of infrared and LLL image fusion for target detection with improved 2D maximum entropy segmentation. Firstly, two-dimensional histogram was improved by gray level and maximum gray level in weighted area, weights were selected to calculate the maximum entropy for infrared and LLL image segmentation by using the histogram. Compared with the traditional maximum entropy segmentation, the algorithm had significant effect in target detection, and the functions of background suppression and target extraction. And then, the validity of multi-dimensional characteristics AND operation on the infrared and LLL image feature level fusion for target detection is verified. Experimental results show that detection algorithm has a relatively good effect and application in target detection and multiple targets detection in complex background.

  14. Image restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model and structure curve construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V. V.; Marchuk, V. I.; Petrosov, S. P.; Svirin, I.; Agaian, S.; Egiazarian, K.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper an image inpainting approach based on the construction of a composite curve for the restoration of the edges of objects in an image using the concepts of parametric and geometric continuity is presented. It is shown that this approach allows to restore the curved edges and provide more flexibility for curve design in damaged image by interpolating the boundaries of objects by cubic splines. After edge restoration stage, a texture restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model is carried out. The image intensity is locally modeled by a first spatial autoregressive model with support in a strongly causal prediction region on the plane. Model parameters are estimated by Yule-Walker method. Several examples considered in this paper show the effectiveness of the proposed approach for large objects removal as well as recovery of small regions on several test images.

  15. Imaging nonmelanoma skin cancers with combined ultrasound-photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunar, Ulas; Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Morgan, Janet; Zeitouni, Natalie

    2013-03-01

    PDT has become a treatment of choice especially for the cases with multiple sites and large areas. However, the efficacy of PDT is limited for thicker and deeper tumors. Depth and size information as well as vascularity can provide useful information to clinicians for planning and evaluating PDT. High-resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging can provide information regarding skin structure and vascularity. We utilized combined ultrasound-photoacoustic microscopy for imaging a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tumor pre-PDT and the results indicate that combined ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging can be useful tool for PDT planning by providing both structural and functional contrasts.

  16. Alternative representations of an image via the 2D wavelet transform: application to character recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, Jean-Pierre; Vandergheynst, Pierre; Bouyoucef, Karim; Murenzi, Romain

    1995-06-01

    Both in 1D (signal analysis) and 2D (image processing), the wavelet transform (WT) has become by now a standard tool. Although the discrete version, based on multiresolution analysis, is probably better known, the continous WT (CWT) plays a crucial role for the detection and analysis of particular features in a signal, and we will focus here on the latter. In 2D however, one faces a practical problem. Indeed, the full parameter space of the wavelet transform of an image is 4D. It yields a representation of the image in position parameters (range and perception angle), as well as scale and anisotropy angle. The real challenge is to compute and visualize the full continuous wavelet transform in all four variables--obviously a demanding task. Thus, in order to obtain a manageable tool, some of the variables must be frozen. In other words, one must limit oneself to sections of the parameter space, usually 2D or 3D. For 2D sections, two variables are fixed and the transform is viewed as a function of the two remaing ones, and similarly for 3D sections. Among the six possible 2D sections, two play a privileged role. They yield respectively the position representation, which is the standard one, and the scale-angle representation, which has been proposed and studied systematically by two of us in a number of works. In this paper we will review these results and investigate the four remaining 2D representations. We will also make some comments on possible applications of 3D sections. The most spectacular property of the CWT is its ability at detecting discontinuities in a signal. In an image, this means in particular the sharp boundary between two regions of different luminosity, that is, a contour or an edge. Even more prominent in the transform are the corners of a given contour, for instance the contour of a letter. In a second part, we will exploit this property of the CWT and describe how one may design an algorithm for automatic character recognition (here we

  17. Application of tissue characterization in intravascular ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, William L.; Fitzgerald, Peter J.; Yock, Paul G.

    1994-05-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound imaging technology is able to determine the extent and distribution of pathologic processes within the vessel wall, but is not highly sensitive in discriminating between certain types of tissue. `Tissue characterization' refers to a set of computer-based techniques that utilize features of the ultrasound signal beyond basic amplitude to help define the composition of the tissue of interest. This technique involves quantitative analysis of the ultrasound signals reflected from tissue before these signals pass through the processing steps in the ultrasound instrument.

  18. Transcranial ultrasound imaging with speed of sound-based phase correction: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianren; Jing, Yun

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical study for ultrasound transcranial imaging. To correct for the phase aberration from the skull, two critical steps are needed prior to brain imaging. In the first step, the skull shape and speed of sound are acquired by either CT scans or ultrasound scans. In the ultrasound scan approach, phased array and double focusing technique are utilized, which are able to estimate the thickness of the skull with a maximum error of around 10% and the average speed of sound in the skull is underestimated by less than 2%. In the second step, the fast marching method is used to compute the phase delay based on the known skull shape and sound speed from the first step, and the computation can be completed in seconds for 2D problems. The computed phase delays are then used in combination with the conventional delay-and-sum algorithm for generating B-mode images. Images of wire phantoms with CT or ultrasound scan-based phase correction are shown to have much less artifact than the ones without correction. Errors of deducing speed of sound from CT scans are also discussed regarding its effect on the transcranial ultrasound images. Assuming the speed of sound grows linearly with the density, this study shows that, the CT-based phase correction approach can provide clear images of wire phantoms even if the speed of sound is overestimated by 400 m s-1, or the linear coefficient is overestimated by 40%. While in this study, ultrasound scan-based phase correction performs almost equally well with the CT-based approach, potential problems are identified and discussed.

  19. Transcranial ultrasound imaging with speed of sound-based phase correction: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianren; Jing, Yun

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical study for ultrasound transcranial imaging. To correct for the phase aberration from the skull, two critical steps are needed prior to brain imaging. In the first step, the skull shape and speed of sound are acquired by either CT scans or ultrasound scans. In the ultrasound scan approach, phased array and double focusing technique are utilized, which are able to estimate the thickness of the skull with a maximum error of around 10% and the average speed of sound in the skull is underestimated by less than 2%. In the second step, the fast marching method is used to compute the phase delay based on the known skull shape and sound speed from the first step, and the computation can be completed in seconds for 2D problems. The computed phase delays are then used in combination with the conventional delay-and-sum algorithm for generating B-mode images. Images of wire phantoms with CT or ultrasound scan-based phase correction are shown to have much less artifact than the ones without correction. Errors of deducing speed of sound from CT scans are also discussed regarding its effect on the transcranial ultrasound images. Assuming the speed of sound grows linearly with the density, this study shows that, the CT-based phase correction approach can provide clear images of wire phantoms even if the speed of sound is overestimated by 400 m s(-1), or the linear coefficient is overestimated by 40%. While in this study, ultrasound scan-based phase correction performs almost equally well with the CT-based approach, potential problems are identified and discussed.

  20. A new fringeline-tracking approach for color Doppler ultrasound imaging phase unwrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Ashraf A.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    2008-03-01

    Color Doppler ultrasound imaging is a powerful non-invasive diagnostic tool for many clinical applications that involve examining the anatomy and hemodynamics of human blood vessels. These clinical applications include cardio-vascular diseases, obstetrics, and abdominal diseases. Since its commercial introduction in the early eighties, color Doppler ultrasound imaging has been used mainly as a qualitative tool with very little attempts to quantify its images. Many imaging artifacts hinder the quantification of the color Doppler images, the most important of which is the aliasing artifact that distorts the blood flow velocities measured by the color Doppler technique. In this work we will address the color Doppler aliasing problem and present a recovery methodology for the true flow velocities from the aliased ones. The problem is formulated as a 2D phase-unwrapping problem, which is a well-defined problem with solid theoretical foundations for other imaging domains, including synthetic aperture radar and magnetic resonance imaging. This paper documents the need for a phase unwrapping algorithm for use in color Doppler ultrasound image analysis. It describes a new phase-unwrapping algorithm that relies on the recently developed cutline detection approaches. The algorithm is novel in its use of heuristic information provided by the ultrasound imaging modality to guide the phase unwrapping process. Experiments have been performed on both in-vitro flow-phantom data and in-vivo human blood flow data. Both data types were acquired under a controlled acquisition protocol developed to minimize the distortion of the color Doppler data and hence to simplify the phase-unwrapping task. In addition to the qualitative assessment of the results, a quantitative assessment approach was developed to measure the success of the results. The results of our new algorithm have been compared on ultrasound data to those from other well-known algorithms, and it outperforms all of them.

  1. Group-wise feature-based registration of CT and ultrasound images of spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulian, Abtin; Mousavi, Parvin; Hedjazi Moghari, Mehdi; Foroughi, Pezhman; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2010-02-01

    Registration of pre-operative CT and freehand intra-operative ultrasound of lumbar spine could aid surgeons in the spinal needle injection which is a common procedure for pain management. Patients are always in a supine position during the CT scan, and in the prone or sitting position during the intervention. This leads to a difference in the spinal curvature between the two imaging modalities, which means a single rigid registration cannot be used for all of the lumbar vertebrae. In this work, a method for group-wise registration of pre-operative CT and intra-operative freehand 2-D ultrasound images of the lumbar spine is presented. The approach utilizes a pointbased registration technique based on the unscented Kalman filter, taking as input segmented vertebrae surfaces in both CT and ultrasound data. Ultrasound images are automatically segmented using a dynamic programming approach, while the CT images are semi-automatically segmented using thresholding. Since the curvature of the spine is different between the pre-operative and the intra-operative data, the registration approach is designed to simultaneously align individual groups of points segmented from each vertebra in the two imaging modalities. A biomechanical model is used to constrain the vertebrae transformation parameters during the registration and to ensure convergence. The mean target registration error achieved for individual vertebrae on five spine phantoms generated from CT data of patients, is 2.47 mm with standard deviation of 1.14 mm.

  2. 2D-CELL: image processing software for extraction and analysis of 2-dimensional cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, F.; Telley, H.; Leibling, Th. M.; Mocellin, A.

    1992-01-01

    2D-CELL is a software package for the processing and analyzing of photographic images of cellular structures in a largely interactive way. Starting from a binary digitized image, the programs extract the line network (skeleton) of the structure and determine the graph representation that best models it. Provision is made for manually correcting defects such as incorrect node positions or dangling bonds. Then a suitable algorithm retrieves polygonal contours which define individual cells — local boundary curvatures are neglected for simplicity. Using elementary analytical geometry relations, a range of metric and topological parameters describing the population are then computed, organized into statistical distributions and graphically displayed.

  3. Multilayer Array Transducer for Nonlinear Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Neil R.; Kaczkowski, Peter J.; Li, Tong; Gross, Dan; Postlewait, Steven M.; Curra, Francesco P.

    2011-09-01

    The properties of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation are known to be able to improve the resolution of ultrasound imaging, and could be used to dynamically estimate the physical properties of tissue. However, transducers capable of launching a wave that becomes nonlinear through propagation do not typically have the necessary bandwidth to detect the higher harmonics. Here we present the design and characterization of a novel multilayer transducer for high intensity transmit and broadband receive. The transmit layer was made from a narrow-band, high-power piezoceramic (PZT), with nominal frequency of 2.0 MHz, that was diced into an array of 32 elements. Each element was 0.300 mm wide and 6.3 mm in elevation, and with a pitch of 0.400 mm the overall aperture width was 12.7 mm. A quarter-wave matching layer was attached to the PZT substrate to improve transmit efficiency and bandwidth. The overlaid receive layer was made from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) that had gold metalization on one side. A custom two-sided flex circuit routed electrical connections to the PZT elements and patterned the PVDF elements; the PZT and PVDF elements had identical apertures. A low viscosity and electrically nonconductive epoxy was used for all adhesion layers. Characterization of electrical parameters and acoustic output were performed per standard methods, where transmit and receive events were driven by a software-controlled ultrasound engine. Echo data, collected from ex vivo tissue and digitized at 45 MS/s, exhibited frequency content up to the 4th harmonic of the 2 MHz transmit frequency.

  4. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  5. 2D image classification for 3D anatomy localization: employing deep convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; de Jong, Pim A.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Localization of anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) is a preprocessing step in many medical image analysis tasks. While trivial for humans, it is complex for automatic methods. Classic machine learning approaches require the challenge of hand crafting features to describe differences between ROIs and background. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) alleviate this by automatically finding hierarchical feature representations from raw images. We employ this trait to detect anatomical ROIs in 2D image slices in order to localize them in 3D. In 100 low-dose non-contrast enhanced non-ECG synchronized screening chest CT scans, a reference standard was defined by manually delineating rectangular bounding boxes around three anatomical ROIs -- heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Every anatomical ROI was automatically identified using a combination of three CNNs, each analyzing one orthogonal image plane. While single CNNs predicted presence or absence of a specific ROI in the given plane, the combination of their results provided a 3D bounding box around it. Classification performance of each CNN, expressed in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was >=0.988. Additionally, the performance of ROI localization was evaluated. Median Dice scores for automatically determined bounding boxes around the heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta were 0.89, 0.70, and 0.85 respectively. The results demonstrate that accurate automatic 3D localization of anatomical structures by CNN-based 2D image classification is feasible.

  6. Quantitative 3-d diagnostic ultrasound imaging using a modified transducer array and an automated image tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Hossack, John A; Sumanaweera, Thilaka S; Napel, Sandy; Ha, Jun S

    2002-08-01

    An approach for acquiring dimensionally accurate three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound data from multiple 2-D image planes is presented. This is based on the use of a modified linear-phased array comprising a central imaging array that acquires multiple, essentially parallel, 2-D slices as the transducer is translated over the tissue of interest. Small, perpendicularly oriented, tracking arrays are integrally mounted on each end of the imaging transducer. As the transducer is translated in an elevational direction with respect to the central imaging array, the images obtained by the tracking arrays remain largely coplanar. The motion between successive tracking images is determined using a minimum sum of absolute difference (MSAD) image matching technique with subpixel matching resolution. An initial phantom scanning-based test of a prototype 8 MHz array indicates that linear dimensional accuracy of 4.6% (2 sigma) is achievable. This result compares favorably with those obtained using an assumed average velocity [31.5% (2 sigma) accuracy] and using an approach based on measuring image-to-image decorrelation [8.4% (2 sigma) accuracy]. The prototype array and imaging system were also tested in a clinical environment, and early results suggest that the approach has the potential to enable a low cost, rapid, screening method for detecting carotid artery stenosis. The average time for performing a screening test for carotid stenosis was reduced from an average of 45 minutes using 2-D duplex Doppler to 12 minutes using the new 3-D scanning approach.

  7. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  8. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  9. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle.

    PubMed

    Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  10. Image compression-encryption scheme based on hyper-chaotic system and 2D compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanrun; Pan, Shumin; Cheng, Shan; Zhou, Zhihong

    2016-08-01

    Most image encryption algorithms based on low-dimensional chaos systems bear security risks and suffer encryption data expansion when adopting nonlinear transformation directly. To overcome these weaknesses and reduce the possible transmission burden, an efficient image compression-encryption scheme based on hyper-chaotic system and 2D compressive sensing is proposed. The original image is measured by the measurement matrices in two directions to achieve compression and encryption simultaneously, and then the resulting image is re-encrypted by the cycle shift operation controlled by a hyper-chaotic system. Cycle shift operation can change the values of the pixels efficiently. The proposed cryptosystem decreases the volume of data to be transmitted and simplifies the keys distribution simultaneously as a nonlinear encryption system. Simulation results verify the validity and the reliability of the proposed algorithm with acceptable compression and security performance.

  11. Toward image analysis and decision support for ultrasound technology.

    PubMed

    Crofts, Gillian; Padman, Rema; Maharaja, Nisha

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is a low cost and efficient method of detecting diseases and abnormalities in the body. Yet there is a lack of precision and reliability associated with the technology, partly due to the operator dependent nature of ultrasound scanning. When scanning is performed to an agreed protocol, ultrasound has been shown to be highly reliable. This research aims to minimize these limitations that arise during ultrasound training, scanning and reporting by developing and evaluating an image analysis and decision support system that can aid the decision making process. We hypothesize that this intervention will likely increase the role of ultrasound in diagnosis when compared with other imaging technologies, particularly in low resource settings. PMID:23920862

  12. Synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound imaging: design, simulation, and experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haichong K; Cheng, Alexis; Bottenus, Nick; Guo, Xiaoyu; Trahey, Gregg E; Boctor, Emad M

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonography is a widely used imaging modality to visualize anatomical structures due to its low cost and ease of use; however, it is challenging to acquire acceptable image quality in deep tissue. Synthetic aperture (SA) is a technique used to increase image resolution by synthesizing information from multiple subapertures, but the resolution improvement is limited by the physical size of the array transducer. With a large F-number, it is difficult to achieve high resolution in deep regions without extending the effective aperture size. We propose a method to extend the available aperture size for SA-called synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound (STRATUS) imaging-by sweeping an ultrasound transducer while tracking its orientation and location. Tracking information of the ultrasound probe is used to synthesize the signals received at different positions. Considering the practical implementation, we estimated the effect of tracking and ultrasound calibration error to the quality of the final beamformed image through simulation. In addition, to experimentally validate this approach, a 6 degree-of-freedom robot arm was used as a mechanical tracker to hold an ultrasound transducer and to apply in-plane lateral translational motion. Results indicate that STRATUS imaging with robotic tracking has the potential to improve ultrasound image quality. PMID:27088108

  13. Clinical Assessment of 2D/3D Registration Accuracy in 4 Major Anatomic Sites Using On-Board 2D Kilovoltage Images for 6D Patient Setup

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Yang, T. Jonathan; Furtado, Hugo; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Ballangrud, Åse; Powell, Simon N.; Mechalakos, James

    2015-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive assessment of patient setup accuracy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOFs) using 2-dimensional/3-dimensional (2D/3D) image registration with on-board 2-dimensional kilovoltage (OB-2DkV) radiographic images, we evaluated cranial, head and neck (HN), and thoracic and abdominal sites under clinical conditions. A fast 2D/3D image registration method using graphics processing unit GPU was modified for registration between OB-2DkV and 3D simulation computed tomography (simCT) images, with 3D/3D registration as the gold standard for 6DOF alignment. In 2D/3D registration, body roll rotation was obtained solely by matching orthogonal OB-2DkV images with a series of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from simCT with a small rotational increment along the gantry rotation axis. The window/level adjustments for optimal visualization of the bone in OB-2DkV and DRRs were performed prior to registration. Ideal patient alignment at the isocenter was calculated and used as an initial registration position. In 3D/3D registration, cone-beam CT (CBCT) was aligned to simCT on bony structures using a bone density filter in 6DOF. Included in this retrospective study were 37 patients treated in 55 fractions with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic body radiotherapy for cranial and paraspinal cancer. A cranial phantom was used to serve as a control. In all cases, CBCT images were acquired for patient setup with subsequent OB-2DkV verification. It was found that the accuracy of the 2D/3D registration was 0.0 ± 0.5 mm and 0.1° ± 0.4° in phantom. In patient, it is site dependent due to deformation of the anatomy: 0.2 ± 1.6 mm and −0.4° ± 1.2° on average for each dimension for the cranial site, 0.7 ± 1.6 mm and 0.3° ± 1.3° for HN, 0.7 ± 2.0 mm and −0.7° ± 1.1° for the thorax, and 1.1 ± 2.6 mm and −0.5° ± 1.9° for the abdomen. Anatomical deformation and presence of soft tissue in 2D/3D registration affect the consistency with

  14. Imaging Meso-Scale Structures in TEXTOR with 2D-ECE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Spakman, G. W.; van der Pol, M. J.; Domier, C. W.; Donne, A. J. H.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Westerhof, E.; Jakubowski, M. W.; TEXTOR Team

    The detection and control of instabilities in a tokamak is one of the exciting challenges in fusion research on the way to a reactor. Thanks to a combination of an innovative 2D temperature imaging technique (ECEI), a versatile ECRH/ECCD system and a unique possibility to externally induce tearing modes in the plasma, TEXTOR is able to make pioneering contributions in this field. This paper focuses on two meso-scale phenomena in tokamaks: m = 2 tearing modes and magnetic structures in the stochastic boundary. In these cases the 2D-ECEI diagnostic can resolve features not attainable before. In addition the possibility to use the diagnostic for fluctuation measurements is addressed.

  15. Acoustic Radiation Force Elasticity Imaging in Diagnostic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods has been the focus of intense research activity since the mid-1990s. In characterizing the mechanical properties of soft tissues, these techniques image an entirely new subset of tissue properties that cannot be derived with conventional ultrasound techniques. Clinically, tissue elasticity is known to be associated with pathological condition and with the ability to image these features in vivo, elasticity imaging methods may prove to be invaluable tools for the diagnosis and/or monitoring of disease. This review focuses on ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods that generate an acoustic radiation force to induce tissue displacements. These methods can be performed non-invasively during routine exams to provide either qualitative or quantitative metrics of tissue elasticity. A brief overview of soft tissue mechanics relevant to elasticity imaging is provided, including a derivation of acoustic radiation force, and an overview of the various acoustic radiation force elasticity imaging methods. PMID:23549529

  16. 3D/2D image registration using weighted histogram of gradient directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafurian, Soheil; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Tan, Virak; Li, Kang

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional (3D) to two dimensional (2D) image registration is crucial in many medical applications such as image-guided evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders. One of the key problems is to estimate the 3D CT- reconstructed bone model positions (translation and rotation) which maximize the similarity between the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and the 2D fluoroscopic images using a registration method. This problem is computational-intensive due to a large search space and the complicated DRR generation process. Also, finding a similarity measure which converges to the global optimum instead of local optima adds to the challenge. To circumvent these issues, most existing registration methods need a manual initialization, which requires user interaction and is prone to human error. In this paper, we introduce a novel feature-based registration method using the weighted histogram of gradient directions of images. This method simplifies the computation by searching the parameter space (rotation and translation) sequentially rather than simultaneously. In our numeric simulation experiments, the proposed registration algorithm was able to achieve sub-millimeter and sub-degree accuracies. Moreover, our method is robust to the initial guess. It can tolerate up to +/-90°rotation offset from the global optimal solution, which minimizes the need for human interaction to initialize the algorithm.

  17. 2D Imaging in a Lightweight Portable MRI Scanner without Gradient Coils

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman; Stockmann, Jason P.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lev, Michael H.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose As the premiere modality for brain imaging, MRI could find wider applicability if lightweight, portable systems were available for siting in unconventional locations such as Intensive Care Units, physician offices, surgical suites, ambulances, emergency rooms, sports facilities, or rural healthcare sites. Methods We construct and validate a truly portable (<100kg) and silent proof-of-concept MRI scanner which replaces conventional gradient encoding with a rotating lightweight cryogen-free, low-field magnet. When rotated about the object, the inhomogeneous field pattern is used as a rotating Spatial Encoding Magnetic field (rSEM) to create generalized projections which encode the iteratively reconstructed 2D image. Multiple receive channels are used to disambiguate the non-bijective encoding field. Results The system is validated with experimental images of 2D test phantoms. Similar to other non-linear field encoding schemes, the spatial resolution is position dependent with blurring in the center, but is shown to be likely sufficient for many medical applications. Conclusion The presented MRI scanner demonstrates the potential for portability by simultaneously relaxing the magnet homogeneity criteria and eliminating the gradient coil. This new architecture and encoding scheme shows convincing proof of concept images that are expected to be further improved with refinement of the calibration and methodology. PMID:24668520

  18. Augmented depth perception visualization in 2D/3D image fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Kreiser, Matthias; Wang, Lejing; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    2D/3D image fusion applications are widely used in endovascular interventions. Complaints from interventionists about existing state-of-art visualization software are usually related to the strong compromise between 2D and 3D visibility or the lack of depth perception. In this paper, we investigate several concepts enabling improvement of current image fusion visualization found in the operating room. First, a contour enhanced visualization is used to circumvent hidden information in the X-ray image. Second, an occlusion and depth color-coding scheme is considered to improve depth perception. To validate our visualization technique both phantom and clinical data are considered. An evaluation is performed in the form of a questionnaire which included 24 participants: ten clinicians and fourteen non-clinicians. Results indicate that the occlusion correction method provides 100% correctness when determining the true position of an aneurysm in X-ray. Further, when integrating an RGB or RB color-depth encoding in the image fusion both perception and intuitiveness are improved.

  19. Physical principles of microbubbles for ultrasound imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Stride, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents have been in clinical use for more than two decades, during which time their range of applications has increased to encompass echocardiography, Doppler enhancement, perfusion studies and molecular imaging, as well as a number of therapeutic applications, including drug delivery, gene therapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound treatments and sonothrombolysis. The aim of this article is to review the different types of microbubble agents, their physical behaviours and the mechanisms underlying their effectiveness in imaging and therapeutic applications.

  20. Physical principles of microbubbles for ultrasound imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Stride, Eleanor

    2009-01-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents have been in clinical use for more than two decades, during which time their range of applications has increased to encompass echocardiography, Doppler enhancement, perfusion studies and molecular imaging, as well as a number of therapeutic applications including drug delivery, gene therapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound treatments and sonothrombolysis. The aim of this article is to review the different types of microbubble agent, their physical behaviour and the mechanisms underlying their effectiveness in imaging and therapeutic applications.

  1. Designing of sparse 2D arrays for Lamb wave imaging using coarray concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    2D ultrasonic arrays have considerable application potential in Lamb wave based SHM systems, since they enable equivocal damage imaging and even in some cases wave-mode selection. Recently, it has been shown that the 2D arrays can be used in SHM applications in a synthetic focusing (SF) mode, which is much more effective than the classical phase array mode commonly used in NDT. The SF mode assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the technique, only single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Application of the SF mode for 2D arrays creates additional degrees of freedom during the design of the array topology, which complicates the array design process, however, it enables sparse array designs with performance similar to that of the fully populated dense arrays. In this paper we present the coarray concept to facilitate synthesis process of an array's aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum coarray is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual sub-arrays' elements locations. The coarray framework will be presented here using a an example of a star-shaped array. The approach will be discussed in terms of beampatterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both simulated and experimental results will be included.

  2. Adaptive optofluidic lens(es) for switchable 2D and 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hanyang; Wei, Kang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-03-01

    The stereoscopic image is often captured using dual cameras arranged side-by-side and optical path switching systems such as two separate solid lenses or biprism/mirrors. The miniaturization of the overall size of current stereoscopic devices down to several millimeters is at a sacrifice of further device size shrinkage. The limited light entry worsens the final image resolution and brightness. It is known that optofluidics offer good re-configurability for imaging systems. Leveraging this technique, we report a reconfigurable optofluidic system whose optical layout can be swapped between a singlet lens with 10 mm in diameter and a pair of binocular lenses with each lens of 3 mm in diameter for switchable two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging. The singlet and the binoculars share the same optical path and the same imaging sensor. The singlet acquires a 3D image with better resolution and brightness, while the binoculars capture stereoscopic image pairs for 3D vision and depth perception. The focusing power tuning capability of the singlet and the binoculars enable image acquisition at varied object planes by adjusting the hydrostatic pressure across the lens membrane. The vari-focal singlet and binoculars thus work interchangeably and complementarily. The device is thus expected to have applications in robotic vision, stereoscopy, laparoendoscopy and miniaturized zoom lens system.

  3. Handheld probe integrating laser diode and ultrasound transducer array for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Daoudi, K; van den Berg, P J; Rabot, O; Kohl, A; Tisserand, S; Brands, P; Steenbergen, W

    2014-10-20

    Ultrasound and photoacoustics can be utilized as complementary imaging techniques to improve clinical diagnoses. Photoacoustics provides optical contrast and functional information while ultrasound provides structural and anatomical information. As of yet, photoacoustic imaging uses large and expensive systems, which limits their clinical application and makes the combination costly and impracticable. In this work we present and evaluate a compact and ergonomically designed handheld probe, connected to a portable ultrasound system for inexpensive, real-time dual-modality ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging. The probe integrates an ultrasound transducer array and a highly efficient diode stack laser emitting 130 ns pulses at 805 nm wavelength and a pulse energy of 0.56 mJ, with a high pulse repetition frequency of up to 10 kHz. The diodes are driven by a customized laser driver, which can be triggered externally with a high temporal stability necessary to synchronize the ultrasound detection and laser pulsing. The emitted beam is collimated with cylindrical micro-lenses and shaped using a diffractive optical element, delivering a homogenized rectangular light intensity distribution. The system performance was tested in vitro and in vivo by imaging a human finger joint.

  4. Focused ultrasound thermal therapy system with ultrasound image guidance and temperature measurement feedback.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kao-Han; Young, Sun-Yi; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Chan, Hsu; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Lin, Win-Li

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we developed a focused ultrasound (FUS) thermal therapy system with ultrasound image guidance and thermocouple temperature measurement feedback. Hydraulic position devices and computer-controlled servo motors were used to move the FUS transducer to the desired location with the measurement of actual movement by linear scale. The entire system integrated automatic position devices, FUS transducer, power amplifier, ultrasound image system, and thermocouple temperature measurement into a graphical user interface. For the treatment procedure, a thermocouple was implanted into a targeted treatment region in a tissue-mimicking phantom under ultrasound image guidance, and then the acoustic interference pattern formed by image ultrasound beam and low-power FUS beam was employed as image guidance to move the FUS transducer to have its focal zone coincident with the thermocouple tip. The thermocouple temperature rise was used to determine the sonication duration for a suitable thermal lesion as a high power was turned on and ultrasound image was used to capture the thermal lesion formation. For a multiple lesion formation, the FUS transducer was moved under the acoustic interference guidance to a new location and then it sonicated with the same power level and duration. This system was evaluated and the results showed that it could perform two-dimensional motion control to do a two-dimensional thermal therapy with a small localization error 0.5 mm. Through the user interface, the FUS transducer could be moved to heat the target region with the guidance of ultrasound image and acoustic interference pattern. The preliminary phantom experimental results demonstrated that the system could achieve the desired treatment plan satisfactorily. PMID:19163216

  5. Ultrasound image velocimetry for rheological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurung, A.; Haverkort, J. W.; Drost, S.; Norder, B.; Westerweel, J.; Poelma, C.

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound image velocimetry (UIV) allows for the non-intrusive measurement of a wide range of flows without the need for optical transparency. In this study, we used UIV to measure the local velocity field of a model drilling fluid that exhibits yield stress flow behavior. The radial velocity profile was used to determine the yield stress and the Herschel-Bulkley model flow index n and the consistency index k. Reference data were obtained using the conventional offline Couette rheometry. A comparison showed reasonable agreement between the two methods. The discrepancy in model parameters could be attributed to inherent differences between the methods, which cannot be captured by the three-parameter model used. Overall, with a whole flow field measurement technique such as UIV, we were able to quantify the complex rheology of a model drilling fluid. These preliminary results show that UIV can be used as a non-intrusive diagnostic for in situ, real-time measurement of complex opaque flow rheology.

  6. Ultrasound image velocimetry for rheological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurung, A.; Haverkort, J. W.; Drost, S.; Norder, B.; Westerweel, J.; Poelma, C.

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound image velocimetry (UIV) allows for the non-intrusive measurement of a wide range of flows without the need for optical transparency. In this study, we used UIV to measure the local velocity field of a model drilling fluid that exhibits yield stress flow behavior. The radial velocity profile was used to determine the yield stress and the Herschel–Bulkley model flow index n and the consistency index k. Reference data were obtained using the conventional offline Couette rheometry. A comparison showed reasonable agreement between the two methods. The discrepancy in model parameters could be attributed to inherent differences between the methods, which cannot be captured by the three-parameter model used. Overall, with a whole flow field measurement technique such as UIV, we were able to quantify the complex rheology of a model drilling fluid. These preliminary results show that UIV can be used as a non-intrusive diagnostic for in situ, real-time measurement of complex opaque flow rheology.

  7. Photoacoustic imaging for deep targets in the breast using a multichannel 2D array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Wang, Xueding; Morris, Richard F.; Padilla, Frederic R.; Lecarpentier, Gerald L.; Carson, Paul L.

    2011-03-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) imaging system was developed to achieve high sensitivity for the detection and characterization of vascular anomalies in the breast in the mammographic geometry. Signal detection from deep in the breast was achieved by a broadband 2D PVDF planar array that has a round shape with one side trimmed straight to improve fit near the chest wall. This array has 572 active elements and a -6dB bandwidth of 0.6-1.7 MHz. The low frequency enhances imaging depth and increases the size of vascular collections displayed without edge enhancement. The PA signals from all the elements go through low noise preamplifiers in the probe that are very close to the array elements for optimized noise control. Driven by 20 independent on-probe signal processing channels, imaging with both high sensitivity and good speed was achieved. To evaluate the imaging depth and the spatial resolution of this system,2.38mm I.D. artificial vessels embedded deeply in ex vivo breasts harvested from fresh cadavers and a 3mm I.D. tube in breast mimicking phantoms made of pork loin and fat tissues were imaged. Using near-infrared laser light with incident energy density within the ANSI safety limit, imaging depths of up to 49 mm in human breasts and 52 mm in phantoms were achieved. With a high power tunable laser working on multiple wavelengths, this system might contribute to 3D noninvasive imaging of morphological and physiological tissue features throughout the breast.

  8. GPU accelerated generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs for 2-D/3-D image registration.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Osama M; Laycock, Stephen D; Fisher, Mark H

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in programming languages for graphics processing units (GPUs) provide developers with a convenient way of implementing applications which can be executed on the CPU and GPU interchangeably. GPUs are becoming relatively cheap, powerful, and widely available hardware components, which can be used to perform intensive calculations. The last decade of hardware performance developments shows that GPU-based computation is progressing significantly faster than CPU-based computation, particularly if one considers the execution of highly parallelisable algorithms. Future predictions illustrate that this trend is likely to continue. In this paper, we introduce a way of accelerating 2-D/3-D image registration by developing a hybrid system which executes on the CPU and utilizes the GPU for parallelizing the generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Based on the advancements of the GPU over the CPU, it is timely to exploit the benefits of many-core GPU technology by developing algorithms for DRR generation. Although some previous work has investigated the rendering of DRRs using the GPU, this paper investigates approximations which reduce the computational overhead while still maintaining a quality consistent with that needed for 2-D/3-D registration with sufficient accuracy to be clinically acceptable in certain applications of radiation oncology. Furthermore, by comparing implementations of 2-D/3-D registration on the CPU and GPU, we investigate current performance and propose an optimal framework for PC implementations addressing the rigid registration problem. Using this framework, we are able to render DRR images from a 256×256×133 CT volume in ~24 ms using an NVidia GeForce 8800 GTX and in ~2 ms using NVidia GeForce GTX 580. In addition to applications requiring fast automatic patient setup, these levels of performance suggest image-guided radiation therapy at video frame rates is technically feasible using relatively low cost PC

  9. Development of ultra-fast 2D ion Doppler tomography using image intensified CMOS fast camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; Kuwahata, Akihiro; Yamanaka, Haruki; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; TS-group Team

    2015-11-01

    The world fastest novel time-resolved 2D ion Doppler tomography diagnostics has been developed using fast camera with high-speed gated image intensifier (frame rate: 200kfps. phosphor decay time: ~ 1 μ s). Time evolution of line-integrated spectra are diffracted from a f=1m, F/8.3 and g=2400L/mm Czerny-Turner polychromator, whose output is intensified and recorded to a high-speed camera with spectral resolution of ~0.005nm/pixel. The system can accommodate up to 36 (9 ×4) spatial points recorded at 5 μs time resolution, tomographic reconstruction is applied for the line-integrated spectra, time-resolved (5 μs/frame) local 2D ion temperature measurement has been achieved without any assumption of shot repeatability. Ion heating during intermittent reconnection event which tends to happen during high guide field merging tokamak was measured around diffusion region in UTST. The measured 2D profile shows ion heating inside the acceleration channel of reconnection outflow jet, stagnation point and downstream region where reconnected field forms thick closed flux surface as in MAST. Achieved maximum ion temperature increases as a function of Brec2 and shows good fit with MAST experiment, demonstrating promising CS-less startup scenario for spherical tokamak. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H05750 and 15K20921.

  10. Characterization of thermal shock damage in a 2D-woven fiber CVI SiC composite using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.E.; Singh, R.N.; Cari, H.; Ferber, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Thermal shock damage was generated by a water quench technique in 2-D woven-Nicalon{trademark} fiber chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC composite bars. In this study, resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) was used as a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique to quantify such damage. RUS spectra were measured for each specimen before and after quenching. The results show a clear correlation between the quench temperature difference ({Delta}T) and changes in the RUS spectra. Both the resonant frequencies and the resonance quality factor decreased with increasing magnitude of {Delta}T, thus, providing quantitative measures for the degree of thermal shock damage.

  11. A novel breast ultrasound system for providing coronal images: system development and feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-wei; Li, Cheng; Li, An-hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2015-02-01

    Breast ultrasound images along coronal plane contain important diagnosis information. However, conventional clinical 2D ultrasound cannot provide such images. In order to solve this problem, we developed a novel ultrasound system aimed at providing breast coronal images. In this system, a spatial sensor was fixed on an ultrasound probe to obtain the image spatial data. A narrow-band rendering method was used to form coronal images based on B-mode images and their corresponding spatial data. Software was developed for data acquisition, processing, rendering and visualization. In phantom experiments, 20 inclusions with different size (5-20 mm) were measured using this new system. The results obtained by the new method well correlated with those measured by a micrometer (y=1.0147x, R(2)=0.9927). The phantom tests also showed that this system had excellent intra- and inter-operator repeatability (ICC>0.995). Three subjects with breast lesions were scanned in vivo using this new system and a commercially available three-dimensional (3D) probe. The average scanning times for the two systems were 64 s and 74 s, respectively. The results revealed that this new method required shorter scanning time. The tumor sizes measured on the coronal plane provided by the new method were smaller by 5.6-11.9% in comparison with the results of the 3D probe. The phantom tests and preliminary subject tests indicated the feasibility of this system for clinical applications by providing additional information for clinical breast ultrasound diagnosis.

  12. Ultrasound artifacts: classification, applied physics with illustrations, and imaging appearances.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Somnath J; Kanal, Kalpana; Bhargava, Puneet; Vaidya, Sandeep; Dighe, Manjiri K

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound has become a widely used diagnostic imaging modality in medicine because of its safety and portability. Because of rapid advances in technology, in recent years, sonographic imaging quality has significantly increased. Despite these advances, the potential to encounter artifacts while imaging remains.This article classifies both common and uncommon gray-scale and Doppler ultrasound artifacts into those resulting from physiology and those caused by hardware. A brief applied-physics explanation for each artifact is listed along with an illustrated diagram. The imaging appearance of artifacts is presented in case examples, along with strategies to minimize the artifacts in real time or use them for clinical advantage where applicable.

  13. Visualizing 3D Objects from 2D Cross Sectional Images Displayed "In-Situ" versus "Ex-Situ"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Stetten, George

    2010-01-01

    The present research investigates how mental visualization of a 3D object from 2D cross sectional images is influenced by displacing the images from the source object, as is customary in medical imaging. Three experiments were conducted to assess people's ability to integrate spatial information over a series of cross sectional images in order to…

  14. 2D aperture synthesis for Lamb wave imaging using co-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2014-03-01

    2D ultrasonic arrays in Lamb wave based SHM systems can operate in the phased array (PA) or synthetic focusing (SF) mode. In the real-time PA approach, multiple electronically delayed signals excite transmitting elements to form the desired wave-front, whereas receiving elements are used to sense scattered waves. Due to that, the PA mode requires multi channeled hardware and multiple excitations at numerous azimuths to scan the inspected region of interest. To the contrary, the SF mode, assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing of the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the SF technique, a single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Performance of a 2D imaging array depends on many parameters, such as, its topology, number of its transducers and their spacing in terms of wavelength as well as the type of weighting function (apodization). Moreover, it is possible to use sparse arrays, which means that not all array elements are used for transmitting and/ or receiving. In this paper the co-array concept is applied to facilitate the synthesis process of an array's aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum co-array is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual elements' locations in the sub-arrays used for imaging. The coarray framework will be presented here using two different array topologies, aID uniform linear array and a cross-shaped array that will result in a square coarray. The approach will be discussed in terms of array patterns and beam patterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both, theoretical and experimental results will be given.

  15. High-resolution 3D ultrasound jawbone surface imaging for diagnosis of periodontal bony defects: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ngan, Peter; Crout, Richard; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2010-11-01

    Although medical specialties have recognized the importance of using ultrasonic imaging, dentistry is only beginning to discover its benefit. This has particularly been important in the field of periodontics which studies infections in the gum and bone tissues that surround the teeth. This study investigates the feasibility of using a custom-designed high-frequency ultrasound imaging system to reconstruct high-resolution (< 50 μm) three-dimensional (3D) surface images of periodontal defects in human jawbone. The system employs single-element focused ultrasound transducers with center frequencies ranging from 30 to 60 MHz. Continuous acquisition using a 1 GHz data acquisition card is synchronized with a high-precision two-dimensional (2D) positioning system of ±1 μm resolution for acquiring accurate measurements of the mandible, in vitro. Signal and image processing algorithms are applied to reconstruct high-resolution ultrasound images and extract the jawbone surface in each frame. Then, all edges are combined and smoothed in order to render a 3D surface image of the jawbone. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the system performance using mandibles with teeth (dentate) or without (nondentate). The system was able to reconstruct 3D images for the mandible's outer surface with superior spatial resolution down to 24 μm, and to perform the whole scanning in < 30 s. Major anatomical landmarks on the images were confirmed with the anatomical structures on the mandibles. All the anatomical landmarks were detected and fully described as 3D images using this novel ultrasound imaging technique, whereas the 2D X-ray radiographic images suffered from poor contrast. These results indicate the great potential of utilizing high-resolution ultrasound as a noninvasive, nonionizing imaging technique for the early diagnosis of the more severe form of periodontal disease.

  16. Enhanced detection of the vertebrae in 2D CT-images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Franz; Greil, Robert; Kriegel, Hans-Peter; Schubert, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, a considerable amount of methods have been proposed for detecting and reconstructing the spine and the vertebrae from CT and MR scans. The results are either used for examining the vertebrae or serve as a preprocessing step for further detection and annotation tasks. In this paper, we propose a method for reliably detecting the position of the vertebrae on a single slice of a transversal body CT scan. Thus, our method is not restricted by the available portion of the 3D scan, but even suffices with a single 2D image. A further advantage of our method is that detection does not require adjusting parameters or direct user interaction. Technically, our method is based on an imaging pipeline comprising five steps: The input image is preprocessed. The relevant region of the image is extracted. Then, a set of candidate locations is selected based on bone density. In the next step, image features are extracted from the surrounding of the candidate locations and an instance-based learning approach is used for selecting the best candidate. Finally, a refinement step optimizes the best candidate region. Our proposed method is validated on a large diverse data set of more than 8 000 images and improves the accuracy in terms of area overlap and distance from the true position significantly compared to the only other method being proposed for this task so far.

  17. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of nerves with a clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is of great importance during many ultrasound-guided clinical procedures, including nerve blocks and prostate biopsies. It can be challenging to visualise nerves with conventional ultrasound imaging, however. One of the challenges is that nerves can have very similar appearances to nearby structures such as tendons. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of near-infrared optical spectroscopy for differentiating nerves and adjacent tissues, as this modality can be sensitive to optical absorption of lipids that are present in intra- and extra-neural adipose tissue and in the myelin sheaths. These studies were limited to point measurements, however. In this pilot study, a custom photoacoustic system with a clinical ultrasound imaging probe was used to acquire multi-spectral photoacoustic images of nerves and tendons from swine ex vivo, across the wavelength range of 1100 to 1300 nm. Photoacoustic images were processed and overlaid in colour onto co-registered conventional ultrasound images that were acquired with the same imaging probe. A pronounced optical absorption peak centred at 1210 nm was observed in the photoacoustic signals obtained from nerves, and it was absent in those obtained from tendons. This absorption peak, which is consistent with the presence of lipids, provides a novel image contrast mechanism to significantly enhance the visualization of nerves. In particular, image contrast for nerves was up to 5.5 times greater with photoacoustic imaging (0.82 +/- 0.15) than with conventional ultrasound imaging (0.148 +/- 0.002), with a maximum contrast of 0.95 +/- 0.02 obtained in photoacoustic mode. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of photoacoustic imaging to improve clinical outcomes in ultrasound-guided interventions in regional anaesthesia and interventional oncology.

  18. Review of Quantitative Ultrasound: Envelope Statistics and Backscatter Coefficient Imaging and Contributions to Diagnostic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Michael L; Mamou, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Conventional medical imaging technologies, including ultrasound, have continued to improve over the years. For example, in oncology, medical imaging is characterized by high sensitivity, i.e., the ability to detect anomalous tissue features, but the ability to classify these tissue features from images often lacks specificity. As a result, a large number of biopsies of tissues with suspicious image findings are performed each year with a vast majority of these biopsies resulting in a negative finding. To improve specificity of cancer imaging, quantitative imaging techniques can play an important role. Conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging is mainly qualitative in nature. However, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging can provide specific numbers related to tissue features that can increase the specificity of image findings leading to improvements in diagnostic ultrasound. QUS imaging can encompass a wide variety of techniques including spectral-based parameterization, elastography, shear wave imaging, flow estimation, and envelope statistics. Currently, spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics are not available on most conventional clinical ultrasound machines. However, in recent years, QUS techniques involving spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics have demonstrated success in many applications, providing additional diagnostic capabilities. Spectral-based techniques include the estimation of the backscatter coefficient (BSC), estimation of attenuation, and estimation of scatterer properties such as the correlation length associated with an effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC) of scatterers. Envelope statistics include the estimation of the number density of scatterers and quantification of coherent to incoherent signals produced from the tissue. Challenges for clinical application include correctly accounting for attenuation effects and transmission losses and implementation of QUS on

  19. Imaging the hip joint in osteoarthritis: A place for ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Sudula, S N

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis has traditionally been imaged with conventional radiographs; this has been regarded as the reference technique in osteoarthritis for a long time. However, in recent years, innovative imaging techniques such as ultrasonography have been used to obtain a better understanding of this disease. This is mainly due to tremendous technical advances and progressive developments of ultrasound equipment occurring over the past decade. Ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be a valuable imaging technique in the diagnosis and management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Application of this imaging methodology for osteoarthritis has improved the understanding of the disease process and may aid in the assessment of the efficacy of future therapies. The execution of ultrasound-guided procedures with safety and reliability has a relevant significance in patient management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. This paper reviews the use of ultrasound as an imaging technique for the evaluation and treatment of osteoarthritis hip joint.

  20. Programmable Real-time Clinical Photoacoustic and Ultrasound Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeesu; Park, Sara; Jung, Yuhan; Chang, Sunyeob; Park, Jinyong; Zhang, Yumiao; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has attracted interest for its capacity to capture functional spectral information with high spatial and temporal resolution in biological tissues. Several photoacoustic imaging systems have been commercialized recently, but they are variously limited by non-clinically relevant designs, immobility, single anatomical utility (e.g., breast only), or non-programmable interfaces. Here, we present a real-time clinical photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system which consists of an FDA-approved clinical ultrasound system integrated with a portable laser. The system is completely programmable, has an intuitive user interface, and can be adapted for different applications by switching handheld imaging probes with various transducer types. The customizable photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system is intended to meet the diverse needs of medical researchers performing both clinical and preclinical photoacoustic studies. PMID:27731357

  1. Imaging the hip joint in osteoarthritis: A place for ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Sudula, S N

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis has traditionally been imaged with conventional radiographs; this has been regarded as the reference technique in osteoarthritis for a long time. However, in recent years, innovative imaging techniques such as ultrasonography have been used to obtain a better understanding of this disease. This is mainly due to tremendous technical advances and progressive developments of ultrasound equipment occurring over the past decade. Ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be a valuable imaging technique in the diagnosis and management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Application of this imaging methodology for osteoarthritis has improved the understanding of the disease process and may aid in the assessment of the efficacy of future therapies. The execution of ultrasound-guided procedures with safety and reliability has a relevant significance in patient management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. This paper reviews the use of ultrasound as an imaging technique for the evaluation and treatment of osteoarthritis hip joint. PMID:27482280

  2. High-resolution imaging with a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Simonetti, Francesco; Williamson, Michael; Rosenberg, Robert; Heintz, Philip; Sandoval, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    It is difficult for ultrasound to image small targets such as breast microcalcifications. Synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging has recently developed as a promising tool to improve the capabilities of medical ultrasound. We use two different tissueequivalent phantoms to study the imaging capabilities of a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system for imaging small targets. The InnerVision ultrasound system DAS009 is an investigational system for real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. We use the system to image the two phantoms, and compare the images with those obtained from clinical scanners Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. Our results show that synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging produces images with higher resolution and less image artifacts than Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. In addition, we study the effects of sound speed on synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and demonstrate that an accurate sound speed is very important for imaging small targets.

  3. Diesel combustion and emissions formation using multiple 2-D imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dec, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Understanding how emissions are formed during diesel combustion is central to developing new engines that can comply with increasingly stringent emission standards while maintaining or improving performance levels. Laser-based planar imaging diagnostics are uniquely capable of providing the temporally and spatially resolved information required for this understanding. Using an optically accessible research engine, a variety of two-dimensional (2-D) imaging diagnostics have been applied to investigators of direct-injection (DI) diesel combustion and emissions formation. These optical measurements have included the following laser-sheet imaging data: Mie scattering to determine liquid-phase fuel distributions, Rayleigh scattering for quantitative vapor-phase-fuel/air mixture images, laser induced incandescence (LII) for relative soot concentrations, simultaneous LII and Rayleigh scattering for relative soot particle-size distributions, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to obtain early PAH (polyaromatic hydrocarbon) distributions, PLIF images of the OH radical that show the diffusion flame structure, and PLIF images of the NO radical showing the onset of NO{sub x} production. In addition, natural-emission chemiluminescence images were obtained to investigate autoignition. The experimental setup is described, and the image data showing the most relevant results are presented. Then the conceptual model of diesel combustion is summarized in a series of idealized schematics depicting the temporal and spatial evolution of a reacting diesel fuel jet during the time period investigated. Finally, recent PLIF images of the NO distribution are presented and shown to support the timing and location of NO formation hypothesized from the conceptual model.

  4. Ultrasound, normal fetus - head measurements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many health care providers like to have fetal measurements to verify the size of the fetus and ... any abnormalities. This ultrasound is of a head measurement, indicated by the cross hairs and dotted lines.

  5. Ultrasound, normal fetus - abdomen measurements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many health care providers like to have fetal measurements to verify the size of the fetus and ... any abnormalities. This ultrasound is of an abdominal measurement. It shows a cross-section of the abdomen, ...

  6. Ultrasound, normal placenta - Braxton Hicks (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... performed at 17 weeks gestation. It shows the placenta during a normal (Braxton Hicks) contraction. Throughout the ... contracts to facilitate better blood flow through the placenta and the fetus. In this ultrasound, the placenta ...

  7. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Y. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  8. 2D label-free imaging of resonant grating biochips in ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Bougot-Robin, K; Reverchon, J-L; Fromant, M; Mugherli, L; Plateau, P; Benisty, H

    2010-05-24

    2D images of label-free biochips exploiting resonant waveguide grating (RWG) are presented. They indicate sensitivities on the order of 1 pg/mm2 for proteins in air, and hence 10 pg/mm2 in water can be safely expected. A 320x256 pixels Aluminum-Gallium-Nitride-based sensor array is used, with an intrinsic narrow spectral window centered at 280 nm. The additional role of characteristic biological layer absorption at this wavelength is calculated, and regimes revealing its impact are discussed. Experimentally, the resonance of a chip coated with protein is revealed and the sensitivity evaluated through angular spectroscopy and imaging. In addition to a sensitivity similar to surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the RWGs resonance can be flexibly tailored to gain spatial, biochemical, or spectral sensitivity.

  9. High contrast 2D visualization of edge plasma instabilities by ECE imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, G. S.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    High contrast high resolution 2D images of edge MHD instabilities have been obtained for the KSTAR H-mode plasmas in 2010 using an electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging system. A fast structural evolution of the edge instabilities has been identified where the validity of the observed structures, i.e., the local measurement is ensured by the high contrast. On the other hand, the exact interpretation of the ECE intensity (Trad) is not straightforward due to the marginal optical depth ( ~ 1) in the plasma edge region. The effect of the electron temperature (Te) and density (ne) profiles in the edge region on the ECE localization and intensity have been evaluated for typical KSTAR H-mode discharges.

  10. Fast Confocal Raman Imaging Using a 2-D Multifocal Array for Parallel Hyperspectral Detection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbo; Navas-Moreno, Maria; Chan, James W

    2016-01-19

    We present the development of a novel confocal hyperspectral Raman microscope capable of imaging at speeds up to 100 times faster than conventional point-scan Raman microscopy under high noise conditions. The microscope utilizes scanning galvomirrors to generate a two-dimensional (2-D) multifocal array at the sample plane, generating Raman signals simultaneously at each focus of the array pattern. The signals are combined into a single beam and delivered through a confocal pinhole before being focused through the slit of a spectrometer. To separate the signals from each row of the array, a synchronized scan mirror placed in front of the spectrometer slit positions the Raman signals onto different pixel rows of the detector. We devised an approach to deconvolve the superimposed signals and retrieve the individual spectra at each focal position within a given row. The galvomirrors were programmed to scan different focal arrays following Hadamard encoding patterns. A key feature of the Hadamard detection is the reconstruction of individual spectra with improved signal-to-noise ratio. Using polystyrene beads as test samples, we demonstrated not only that our system images faster than a conventional point-scan method but that it is especially advantageous under noisy conditions, such as when the CCD detector operates at fast read-out rates and high temperatures. This is the first demonstration of multifocal confocal Raman imaging in which parallel spectral detection is implemented along both axes of the CCD detector chip. We envision this novel 2-D multifocal spectral detection technique can be used to develop faster imaging spontaneous Raman microscopes with lower cost detectors. PMID:26654100

  11. 2-D Gaussian beam imaging of multicomponent seismic data in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protasov, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    An approach for true-amplitude seismic beam imaging of multicomponent seismic data in 2-D anisotropic elastic media is presented and discussed. Here, the recovered true-amplitude function is a scattering potential. This approach is a migration procedure based on the weighted summation of pre-stack data. The true-amplitude weights are computed by applying Gaussian beams (GBs). We shoot a pair of properly chosen GBs with a fixed dip and opening angles from the current imaging point towards an acquisition system. This pair of beams is used to compute a true-amplitude selective image of a rapid velocity variation. The total true-amplitude image is constructed by superimposing selective images computed for a range of available dip angles. The global regularity of the GBs allows one to disregard whether a ray field is regular or irregular. P- and S-wave GBs can be used to handle raw multicomponent data without separating the waves. The use of anisotropic GBs allows one to take into account the anisotropy of the background model.

  12. Constructing a Database from Multiple 2D Images for Camera Pose Estimation and Robot Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Michael; Ansar, Adnan I.; Brennan, Shane; Clouse, Daniel S.; Padgett, Curtis W.

    2012-01-01

    The LMDB (Landmark Database) Builder software identifies persistent image features (landmarks) in a scene viewed multiple times and precisely estimates the landmarks 3D world positions. The software receives as input multiple 2D images of approximately the same scene, along with an initial guess of the camera poses for each image, and a table of features matched pair-wise in each frame. LMDB Builder aggregates landmarks across an arbitrarily large collection of frames with matched features. Range data from stereo vision processing can also be passed to improve the initial guess of the 3D point estimates. The LMDB Builder aggregates feature lists across all frames, manages the process to promote selected features to landmarks, and iteratively calculates the 3D landmark positions using the current camera pose estimations (via an optimal ray projection method), and then improves the camera pose estimates using the 3D landmark positions. Finally, it extracts image patches for each landmark from auto-selected key frames and constructs the landmark database. The landmark database can then be used to estimate future camera poses (and therefore localize a robotic vehicle that may be carrying the cameras) by matching current imagery to landmark database image patches and using the known 3D landmark positions to estimate the current pose.

  13. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eirik Bø, Lars; Fagertun Hofstad, Erlend; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy.

  14. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Bø, Lars Eirik; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A N

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy. PMID:25855886

  15. In vivo thermal ablation monitoring using ultrasound echo decorrelation imaging.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Rudich, Steven M; Alqadah, Amel; Karunakaran, Chandra Priya; Rao, Marepalli B; Mast, T Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Previous work indicated that ultrasound echo decorrelation imaging can track and quantify changes in echo signals to predict thermal damage during in vitro radiofrequency ablation (RFA). In the in vivo studies reported here, the feasibility of using echo decorrelation imaging as a treatment monitoring tool was assessed. RFA was performed on normal swine liver (N = 5), and ultrasound ablation using image-ablate arrays was performed on rabbit liver implanted with VX2 tumors (N = 2). Echo decorrelation and integrated backscatter were computed from Hilbert transformed pulse-echo data acquired during RFA and ultrasound ablation treatments. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were employed to assess the ability of echo decorrelation imaging and integrated backscatter to predict ablation. Area under the ROC curves (AUROC) was determined for RFA and ultrasound ablation using echo decorrelation imaging. Ablation was predicted more accurately using echo decorrelation imaging (AUROC = 0.832 and 0.776 for RFA and ultrasound ablation, respectively) than using integrated backscatter (AUROC = 0.734 and 0.494). PMID:24239361

  16. Current Role of Ultrasound in Small Bowel Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wale, Anita; Pilcher, James

    2016-08-01

    Bowel ultrasound is cheap, relatively quick, allows dynamic evaluation of the bowel, has no radiation burden, is well tolerated by patients, and allows repeat imaging. Bowel ultrasound requires a systematic assessment of the entire bowel using high-frequency probes. In addition, hydrosonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be performed. We present the normal sonographic appearances of large and small bowel and the sonographic appearances of acute appendicitis, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, intestinal tuberculosis, small bowel ileus and obstruction, small bowel ischemia, and malignant tumors. PMID:27342894

  17. Ultrasound elasticity imaging of human posterior tibial tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang

    ) would improve the estimation. Next, UEI was performed on five human cadaver feet mounted in a materials testing system (MTS) while the PTT was attached to a force actuator. A portable ultrasound scanner collected 2D data during loading cycles. Young's modulus was calculated from the strain, loading force and cross sectional area of the PTT. Average Young's modulus for the five tendons was (0.45+/-0.16GPa) using UEI. This was consistent with simultaneous measurements made by the MTS across the whole tendon (0.52+/-0.18GPa). We also calculated the scaling factor (0.12+/-0.01) between the load on the PTT and the inversion force at the forefoot, a measurable quantity in vivo. This study suggests that UEI could be a reliable in vivo technique for estimating the mechanical properties of the human PTT. Finally, we built a custom ankle inversion platform for in vivo imaging of human subjects (eight healthy volunteers and nine advanced PTTD patients). We found non-linear elastic properties of the PTTD, which could be quantified by the slope between the elastic modulus (E) and the inversion force (F). This slope (DeltaE/DeltaF), or Non-linear Elasticity Parameter (NEP), was significantly different for the two groups: 0.16+/-0.20 MPa/N for healthy tendons and 0.45+/-0.43 MPa/N for PTTD tendons. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve revealed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.83+/-0.07, which indicated that the classifier system is valid. In summary, the acoustic modeling, cadaveric studies, and in vivo experiments together demonstrated that UEI accurately quantifies tendon mechanical properties. As a valuable clinical tool, UEI also has the potential to help guide treatment decisions for advanced PTTD and other tendinopathies.

  18. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging of the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Fenster, A; Lee, D; Sherebrin, S; Rankin, R; Downey, D

    1998-02-01

    With conventional ultrasonography, the diagnostician must view a series of two-dimensional images in order to form a mental impression of the three-dimensional anatomy, an efficient and time consuming practice prone to operator variability, which may cause variable or even incorrect diagnoses. Also, a conventional two-dimensional ultrasound image represents a thin slice of the patients anatomy at a single location and orientation, which is difficult to reproduce at a later time. These factors make conventional ultrasonography non-optimal for prospective or follow-up studies. Our efforts have focused on overcoming these deficiencies by developing three-dimensional ultrasound imaging techniques that are capable of acquiring B-mode, colour Doppler and power Doppler images of the vasculature, by using a conventional ultrasound system to acquire a series of two-dimensional images and then mathematically reconstructing them into a single three-dimensional image, which may then be viewed interactively on an inexpensive desktop computer. We report here on two approaches: (1) free-hand scanning, in which a magnetic positioning device is attached to the ultrasound transducer to record the position and orientation of each two-dimensional image needed for the three-dimensional image reconstruction; and (2) mechanical scanning, in which a motor-driven assembly is used to translate the transducer linearly across the neck, yielding a set of uniformly-spaced parallel two-dimensional images.

  19. Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging with Contrast Ultrasound: Principles and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Chi Young

    2014-01-01

    Methods for imaging the molecular or cellular profile of tissue are being developed for all forms of non-invasive cardiovascular imaging. It is thought that these technologies will potentially improve patient outcomes by allowing diagnosis of disease at an early-stage, monitoring disease progression, providing important information on patient risk, and for tailoring therapy to the molecular basis of disease. Molecular imaging is also already assuming an important role in science by providing a better understanding of the molecular basis of cardiovascular pathology, for assessing response to new therapies, and for rapidly optimizing new or established therapies. Ultrasound-based molecular imaging is one of these new approaches. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound molecular imaging relies on the detection of novel site-targeted microbubbles (MB) or other acoustically active particles which are administered by intravenous injection, circulate throughout the vascular compartment, and are then retained and imaged within regions of disease by ligand-directed binding. The technique is thought to be advantageous in practical terms of cost, time, and ease of use. The aim of this review is to discuss the molecular participants of cardiovascular disease that have been targeted for ultrasound imaging, general features of site-targeted MB, imaging protocols, and potential roles of ultrasound molecular imaging in cardiovascular research and clinical medicine. PMID:24497883

  20. A survey among Brazilian thoracic surgeons about the use of preoperative 2D and 3D images

    PubMed Central

    Cipriano, Federico Enrique Garcia; Arcêncio, Livia; Dessotte, Lycio Umeda; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Vicente, Walter Villela de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Background Describe the characteristics of how the thoracic surgeon uses the 2D/3D medical imaging to perform surgical planning, clinical practice and teaching in thoracic surgery and check the initial choice and the final choice of the Brazilian Thoracic surgeon as the 2D and 3D models pictures before and after acquiring theoretical knowledge on the generation, manipulation and interactive 3D views. Methods A descriptive research type Survey cross to data provided by the Brazilian Thoracic Surgeons (members of the Brazilian Society of Thoracic Surgery) who responded to the online questionnaire via the internet on their computers or personal devices. Results Of the 395 invitations visualized distributed by email, 107 surgeons completed the survey. There was no statically difference when comparing the 2D vs. 3D models pictures for the following purposes: diagnosis, assessment of the extent of disease, preoperative surgical planning, and communication among physicians, resident training, and undergraduate medical education. Regarding the type of tomographic image display routinely used in clinical practice (2D or 3D or 2D–3D model image) and the one preferred by the surgeon at the end of the questionnaire. Answers surgeons for exclusive use of 2D images: initial choice =50.47% and preferably end =14.02%. Responses surgeons to use 3D models in combination with 2D images: initial choice =48.60% and preferably end =85.05%. There was a significant change in the final selection of 3D models used together with the 2D images (P<0.0001). Conclusions There is a lack of knowledge of the 3D imaging, as well as the use and interactive manipulation in dedicated 3D applications, with consequent lack of uniformity in the surgical planning based on CT images. These findings certainly confirm in changing the preference of thoracic surgeons of 2D views of technologies for 3D images.

  1. A survey among Brazilian thoracic surgeons about the use of preoperative 2D and 3D images

    PubMed Central

    Cipriano, Federico Enrique Garcia; Arcêncio, Livia; Dessotte, Lycio Umeda; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Vicente, Walter Villela de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Background Describe the characteristics of how the thoracic surgeon uses the 2D/3D medical imaging to perform surgical planning, clinical practice and teaching in thoracic surgery and check the initial choice and the final choice of the Brazilian Thoracic surgeon as the 2D and 3D models pictures before and after acquiring theoretical knowledge on the generation, manipulation and interactive 3D views. Methods A descriptive research type Survey cross to data provided by the Brazilian Thoracic Surgeons (members of the Brazilian Society of Thoracic Surgery) who responded to the online questionnaire via the internet on their computers or personal devices. Results Of the 395 invitations visualized distributed by email, 107 surgeons completed the survey. There was no statically difference when comparing the 2D vs. 3D models pictures for the following purposes: diagnosis, assessment of the extent of disease, preoperative surgical planning, and communication among physicians, resident training, and undergraduate medical education. Regarding the type of tomographic image display routinely used in clinical practice (2D or 3D or 2D–3D model image) and the one preferred by the surgeon at the end of the questionnaire. Answers surgeons for exclusive use of 2D images: initial choice =50.47% and preferably end =14.02%. Responses surgeons to use 3D models in combination with 2D images: initial choice =48.60% and preferably end =85.05%. There was a significant change in the final selection of 3D models used together with the 2D images (P<0.0001). Conclusions There is a lack of knowledge of the 3D imaging, as well as the use and interactive manipulation in dedicated 3D applications, with consequent lack of uniformity in the surgical planning based on CT images. These findings certainly confirm in changing the preference of thoracic surgeons of 2D views of technologies for 3D images. PMID:27621874

  2. Rotationally symmetric triangulation sensor with integrated object imaging using only one 2D detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Johannes; Lei, Wang; Becker, Jonathan; Jun, Gao; Ott, Peter

    2006-04-01

    In this paper a distance measurement sensor is introduced, equipped with two integrated optical systems, the first one for rotationally symmetric triangulation and the second one for imaging the object while using only one 2D detector for both purposes. Rotationally symmetric triangulation, introduced in [1], eliminates some disadvantages of classical triangulation sensors, especially at steps or strong curvatures of the object, wherefore the measurement result depends not any longer on the angular orientation of the sensor. This is achieved by imaging the scattered light from an illuminated object point to a centered and sharp ring on a low cost area detector. The diameter of the ring is proportional to the distance of the object. The optical system consists of two off axis aspheric reflecting surfaces. This system allows for integrating a second optical system in order to capture images of the object at the same 2D detector. A mock-up was realized for the first time which consists of the reflecting optics for triangulation manufactured by diamond turning. A commercially available appropriate small lens system for imaging was mechanically integrated in the reflecting optics. Alternatively, some designs of retrofocus lens system for larger field of views were investigated. The optical designs allow overlying the image of the object and the ring for distance measurement in the same plane. In this plane a CCD detector is mounted, centered to the optical axis for both channels. A fast algorithm for the evaluation of the ring is implemented. The characteristics, i.e. the ring diameter versus object distance shows very linear behavior. For illumination of the object point for distance measurement, the beam of a red laser diode system is reflected by a wavelength bandpath filter on the axis of the optical system in. Additionally, the surface of the object is illuminated by LED's in the green spectrum. The LED's are located on the outside rim of the reflecting optics. The

  3. Ultrasound Imaging Using Diffraction Tomography in a Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Littrup, P

    2002-01-24

    Tomographic images of tissue phantoms and a sample of breast tissue have been produced from an acoustic synthetic array system for frequencies near 500 kHz. The images for sound speed and attenuation show millimeter resolution and demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining high-resolution tomographic images with frequencies that can deeply penetrate tissue. The image reconstruction method is based on the Born approximation to acoustic scattering and is a simplified version of a method previously used by Andre (Andre, et. al., Int. J. Imaging Systems and Technology, Vol 8, No. 1, 1997) for a circular acoustic array system. The images have comparable resolution to conventional ultrasound images at much higher frequencies (3-5 MHz) but with lower speckle noise. This shows the potential of low frequency, deeply penetrating, ultrasound for high-resolution quantitative imaging.

  4. Ultrasound stylet for non-image-guided ventricular catheterization.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Nathaniel K; Chiarelli, Peter A; Su, David K; Chang, Jason J; MacConaghy, Brian; Murthy, Revathi; Toms, Peter; Robb, Terrence L; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Browd, Samuel R; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Urgent ventriculostomy placement can be a lifesaving procedure in the setting of hydrocephalus or elevated intracranial pressure. While external ventricular drain (EVD) insertion is common, there remains a high rate of suboptimal drain placement. Here, the authors seek to demonstrate the feasibility of an ultrasound-based guidance system that can be inserted into an existing EVD catheter to provide a linear ultrasound trace that guides the user toward the ventricle. METHODS The ultrasound stylet was constructed as a thin metal tube, with dimensions equivalent to standard catheter stylets, bearing a single-element, ceramic ultrasound transducer at the tip. Ultrasound backscatter signals from the porcine ventricle were processed by custom electronics to offer real-time information about ventricular location relative to the catheter. Data collected from the prototype device were compared with reference measurements obtained using standard clinical ultrasound imaging. RESULTS A study of porcine ventricular catheterization using the experimental device yielded a high rate of successful catheter placement after a single pass (10 of 12 trials), despite the small size of pig ventricles and the lack of prior instruction on porcine ventricular architecture. A characteristic double-peak signal was identified, which originated from ultrasound reflections off of the near and far ventricular walls. Ventricular dimensions, as obtained from the width between peaks, were in agreement with standard ultrasound reference measurements (p < 0.05). Furthermore, linear ultrasound backscatter data permitted in situ measurement of the stylet distance to the ventricular wall (p < 0.05), which assisted in catheter guidance. CONCLUSIONS The authors have demonstrated the ability of the prototype ultrasound stylet to guide ventricular access in the porcine brain. The alternative design of the device makes it potentially easy to integrate into the standard workflow for bedside EVD

  5. Dynamic Ultrasound Imaging Applications to Quantify Musculoskeletal Function

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Wei, Qi; Cortes, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging methods have led to new capability to study muscle and tendon motion in vivo. Direct measurements of muscle and tendon kinematics using imaging may lead to improved understanding of musculoskeletal function. This review presents quantitative ultrasound methods for muscle dynamics that can be used to assess in vivo musculoskeletal function when integrated with other conventional biomechanical measurements. PMID:24949846

  6. Image-based registration of ultrasound and magnetic resonance images: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagoulatos, Niko; Haynor, David R.; Kim, Yongmin

    2000-04-01

    A number of surgical procedures are planned and executed based on medical images. Typically, x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images are acquired preoperatively for diagnosis and surgical planning. In the operating room, execution of the surgical plan becomes feasible due to registration between preoperative images and surgical space where patient anatomy lies. In this paper, we present a new automatic algorithm where we use ultrasound (US) 2D B-mode images to register the preoperative MR image coordinate system with the surgical space which in our experiments is represented by the reference coordinate system of a DC magnetic position sensor. The position sensor is also used for tracking the position and orientation of the US images. Furthermore, we simulated patient anatomy by using custom-built phantoms. Our registration algorithm is a hybrid between fiducial- based and image-based registration algorithms. Initially, we perform a fiducial-based rigid-body registration between MR and position sensor space. Then, by changing various parameters of the rigid-body fiducial-based transformation, we produce an MR-sensor misregistration in order to simulate potential movements of the skin fiducials and/or the organs. The perturbed transformation serves as the initial estimate for the image-based registration algorithm, which uses normalized mutual information as a similarity measure, where one or more US images of the phantom are automatically matched with the MR image data set. By using the fiducial- based registration as the gold standard, we could compute the accuracy of the image-based registration algorithm in registering MR and sensor spaces. The registration error varied depending on the number of 2D US images used for registration. A good compromise between accuracy and computation time was the use of 3 US slices. In this case, the registration error had a mean value of 1.88 mm and standard deviation of 0.42 mm, whereas the required

  7. Guideline report. Medical ultrasound imaging: progress and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Burns, M

    1989-01-01

    Utilization of medical ultrasound has expanded rapidly during the past several years. In 1988, sales of ultrasound equipment will approach $600 million, which is higher than any other individual imaging modality, including the most capital intensive, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and cath lab angiography. This growth would have been difficult to predict previously, since ultrasound appeared to be a relatively mature imaging modality not too long ago. There are several reasons for this growth. Technological developments have been quite rapid; ultrasound has become easier to use, image quality has improved dramatically, and diagnostic accuracy has been enhanced. There has been a proliferation of new equipment at all ends of the price spectrum, allowing the user a wide choice in instrument performance, multi-function capabilities, and automated features to increase patient throughput. The DRG environment and the prospect for more pre-admission tests have also been a stimulus. Hospital buying activity has expanded, and many more ultrasound exams are now being conducted on an outpatient basis. Sales to freestanding imaging centers and individual physicians have similarly increased. The hospital user is willing to pay a large premium for advanced technical performance and is prepared to retire or replace older technology in less than three years. This replacement cycle is much shorter than the four to five year period which existed prior to 1985. By comparison, some of the more traditional imaging areas, such as radiology, have replacement rates of eight to ten years. The reason for early replacement is obvious. Ultrasound exams in hospitals generate revenues at a rate that justifies the purchase of the most advanced equipment. It also improves the referral rate and positions the hospital as a high quality provider. Even with low utilization rates, an ultrasound instrument can normally pay for itself in less than one year of regular

  8. Real-time kidney ultrasound image segmentation: a prospective study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, S.; Frenoux, E.; Osorio, A.

    2009-02-01

    Segmentation of ultrasound kidney images represents a challenge due to low quality data. Speckle, shadows, signal dropout and low contrast make segmentation a harsh task. In addition, kidney ultrasound imaging presents a great variability concerning the organ's shape on the image. This characteristic makes learning methods hard to use. The aim of this study is to develop a real time kidney ultrasound image segmentation method usable during surgical operations such as punctures. To deal with real time constraints, we decided to focus on region based methods and particularly split and merge algorithm. In this prospective study, the selection of the interesting area in the initial image is made by the physician, drawing a coarse bounding box around the organ. A pre-processing phase is first performed to correct image's artefacts. This phase is composed of three major steps. First, an image specification is made between the image to segment and a reference one. Then, a Haar wavelet filtering method is applied on the resulting image and finally an anisotropic diffusion filter is applied to smooth the result. Then, a split and merge algorithm is applied on the resulting image. Both split and merge criteria are based on regions statistics. Our method has been successfully applied on a set of 22 clinical images coming from 10 different patients and presenting different points of view regarding kidney's shape. We obtained very good results, for an average computational time of 8.5 seconds per image.

  9. List-mode likelihood: EM algorithm and image quality estimation demonstrated on 2-D PET.

    PubMed

    Parra, L; Barrett, H H

    1998-04-01

    Using a theory of list-mode maximum-likelihood (ML) source reconstruction presented recently by Barrett et al., this paper formulates a corresponding expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, as well as a method for estimating noise properties at the ML estimate. List-mode ML is of interest in cases where the dimensionality of the measurement space impedes a binning of the measurement data. It can be advantageous in cases where a better forward model can be obtained by including more measurement coordinates provided by a given detector. Different figures of merit for the detector performance can be computed from the Fisher information matrix (FIM). This paper uses the observed FIM, which requires a single data set, thus, avoiding costly ensemble statistics. The proposed techniques are demonstrated for an idealized two-dimensional (2-D) positron emission tomography (PET) [2-D PET] detector. We compute from simulation data the improved image quality obtained by including the time of flight of the coincident quanta.

  10. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  11. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  12. Ultrasound introscopic image quantitative characteristics for medical diagnostics and refinements of physical noise rise reasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselets, Mikhail K.; Radchenko, Sergiy P.; Tsubin, Vitaliy A.; Gridko, Alexander N.

    1994-05-01

    Ultrasound images obtained with a simple sector scan show a granular appearance, called `speckle'. The speckle is the useless property of the ultrasound introskopic images as it mask all small differences of the images. The possibility of the speckle noise reduction by special created filter is analyzed. The computer processing results of ultrasound introskopic thyroid gland images by such filter are presented.

  13. Ultrasound Imaging of the Pelvic Floor.

    PubMed

    Stone, Daniel E; Quiroz, Lieschen H

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the background and appraisal of endoluminal ultrasound of the pelvic floor. It provides a detailed anatomic assessment of the muscles and surrounding organs of the pelvic floor. Different anatomic variability and pathology, such as prolapse, fecal incontinence, urinary incontinence, vaginal wall cysts, synthetic implanted material, and pelvic pain, are easily assessed with endoluminal vaginal ultrasound. With pelvic organ prolapse in particular, not only is the prolapse itself seen but the underlying cause related to the anatomic and functional abnormalities of the pelvic floor muscle structures are also visualized.

  14. Ultrasound and fluoroscopic images fusion by autonomous ultrasound probe detection.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Kaizer, Markus; Mamaghani, Sina; Wu, Wen; Chen, Terrence; John, Matthias; Boese, Jan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    New minimal-invasive interventions such as transcatheter valve procedures exploit multiple imaging modalities to guide tools (fluoroscopy) and visualize soft tissue (transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)). Currently, these complementary modalities are visualized in separate coordinate systems and on separate monitors creating a challenging clinical workflow. This paper proposes a novel framework for fusing TEE and fluoroscopy by detecting the pose of the TEE probe in the fluoroscopic image. Probe pose detection is challenging in fluoroscopy and conventional computer vision techniques are not well suited. Current research requires manual initialization or the addition of fiducials. The main contribution of this paper is autonomous six DoF pose detection by combining discriminative learning techniques with a fast binary template library. The pose estimation problem is reformulated to incrementally detect pose parameters by exploiting natural invariances in the image. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated on synthetic, phantom and in vivo data. The practical application of this technique is supported by accurate results (< 5 mm in-plane error) and computation time of 0.5s.

  15. Ultrasound and fluoroscopic images fusion by autonomous ultrasound probe detection.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Kaizer, Markus; Mamaghani, Sina; Wu, Wen; Chen, Terrence; John, Matthias; Boese, Jan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    New minimal-invasive interventions such as transcatheter valve procedures exploit multiple imaging modalities to guide tools (fluoroscopy) and visualize soft tissue (transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)). Currently, these complementary modalities are visualized in separate coordinate systems and on separate monitors creating a challenging clinical workflow. This paper proposes a novel framework for fusing TEE and fluoroscopy by detecting the pose of the TEE probe in the fluoroscopic image. Probe pose detection is challenging in fluoroscopy and conventional computer vision techniques are not well suited. Current research requires manual initialization or the addition of fiducials. The main contribution of this paper is autonomous six DoF pose detection by combining discriminative learning techniques with a fast binary template library. The pose estimation problem is reformulated to incrementally detect pose parameters by exploiting natural invariances in the image. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated on synthetic, phantom and in vivo data. The practical application of this technique is supported by accurate results (< 5 mm in-plane error) and computation time of 0.5s. PMID:23286091

  16. Quantizing calcification in the lumbar aorta on 2-D lateral x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad-Hansen, Lars A.; Lauze, Francois; Tanko, Laszlo B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we seek to improve upon the standard method of assessing the degree of calcification in the lumbar aorta, which is commonly used on lateral 2-D x-rays. The necessity for improvement arises from the fact that the existing method can not measure subtle progressions in the plaque development; neither is it possible to express the density of individual plaques. Both of these qualities would be desireable to assess, since they are the key for making progression studies as well as for testing the effect of drugs in longitudinal studies. Our approach is based on inpainting, a technique used in image restoration as well as postprocessing of film. In this study we discuss the potential implications of total variation inpainting for characterizing aortic calcification.

  17. Nonrigid 2D registration of fluoroscopic coronary artery image sequence with layered motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taewoo; Jung, Hoyup; Yun, Il Dong

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method for nonrigid registration of coronary artery models with layered motion information. 2D nonrigid registration method is proposed that brings layered motion information into correspondence with fluoroscopic angiograms. The registered model is overlaid on top of interventional angiograms to provide surgical assistance during image-guided chronic total occlusion procedures. The proposed methodology is divided into two parts: layered structures alignments and local nonrigid registration. In the first part, inpainting method is used to estimate a layered rigid transformation that aligns layered motion information. In the second part, a nonrigid registration method is implemented and used to compensate for any local shape discrepancy. Experimental evaluation conducted on a set of 7 fluoroscopic angiograms results in a reduced target registration error, which showed the effectiveness of the proposed method over single layered approach.

  18. Opto-acoustic breast imaging with co-registered ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Clingman, Bryan; Herzog, Don; Miller, Tom; Stavros, A. Thomas; Oraevsky, Alexander; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. Carol; Otto, Pamela

    2014-03-01

    We present results from a recent study involving the ImagioTM breast imaging system, which produces fused real-time two-dimensional color-coded opto-acoustic (OA) images that are co-registered and temporally inter- leaved with real-time gray scale ultrasound using a specialized duplex handheld probe. The use of dual optical wavelengths provides functional blood map images of breast tissue and tumors displayed with high contrast based on total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation of the blood. This provides functional diagnostic information pertaining to tumor metabolism. OA also shows morphologic information about tumor neo-vascularity that is complementary to the morphological information obtained with conventional gray scale ultrasound. This fusion technology conveniently enables real-time analysis of the functional opto-acoustic features of lesions detected by readers familiar with anatomical gray scale ultrasound. We demonstrate co-registered opto-acoustic and ultrasonic images of malignant and benign tumors from a recent clinical study that provide new insight into the function of tumors in-vivo. Results from the Feasibility Study show preliminary evidence that the technology may have the capability to improve characterization of benign and malignant breast masses over conventional diagnostic breast ultrasound alone and to improve overall accuracy of breast mass diagnosis. In particular, OA improved speci city over that of conventional diagnostic ultrasound, which could potentially reduce the number of negative biopsies performed without missing cancers.

  19. Segmentation of ultrasound breast images based on a neutrosophic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Ling; Cheng, Heng-Da

    2010-11-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading cancers of women. Ultrasound is often used for breast cancer diagnosis because it is harmless, portable, and low-cost. However, the segmentation of breast ultrasound (BUS) images is a difficult task due to their low contrast and speckle noise. Neutrosophy studies the origin, nature, and scope of neutralities and their interactions with different ideational spectra. It is a new philosophy to extend fuzzy logic and is the basis of neutrosophic logic, neutrosophic probability theory, neutrosophic set theory, and neutrosophic statistics. In this paper, we employ neutrosophy and develop a fully automatic algorithm for BUS image segmentation. By using neutrosophy, we integrate two conflicting opinions about speckle in ultrasound image: speckle is noise and speckle includes pattern information. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach is accurate, effective, and robust.

  20. Robust contour tracking in ultrasound tongue image sequences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kele; Yang, Yin; Stone, Maureen; Jaumard-Hakoun, Aurore; Leboullenger, Clémence; Dreyfus, Gérard; Roussel, Pierre; Denby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    A new contour-tracking algorithm is presented for ultrasound tongue image sequences, which can follow the motion of tongue contours over long durations with good robustness. To cope with missing segments caused by noise, or by the tongue midsagittal surface being parallel to the direction of ultrasound wave propagation, active contours with a contour-similarity constraint are introduced, which can be used to provide 'prior' shape information. Also, in order to address accumulation of tracking errors over long sequences, we present an automatic re-initialization technique, based on the complex wavelet image similarity index. Experiments on synthetic data and on real 60 frame per second (fps) data from different subjects demonstrate that the proposed method gives good contour tracking for ultrasound image sequences even over durations of minutes, which can be useful in applications such as speech recognition where very long sequences must be analyzed in their entirety.

  1. MMSE Reconstruction for 3D Freehand Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Zheng, Yibin

    2008-01-01

    The reconstruction of 3D ultrasound (US) images from mechanically registered, but otherwise irregularly positioned, B-scan slices is of great interest in image guided therapy procedures. Conventional 3D ultrasound algorithms have low computational complexity, but the reconstructed volume suffers from severe speckle contamination. Furthermore, the current method cannot reconstruct uniform high-resolution data from several low-resolution B-scans. In this paper, the minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) method is applied to 3D ultrasound reconstruction. Data redundancies due to overlapping samples as well as correlation of the target and speckle are naturally accounted for in the MMSE reconstruction algorithm. Thus, the reconstruction process unifies the interpolation and spatial compounding. Simulation results for synthetic US images are presented to demonstrate the excellent reconstruction. PMID:18382623

  2. Detection of vascular defects during operation by imaging ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, B; Coelho, J C; Flanigan, D P; Schuler, J J; Machi, J; Beitler, J C

    1982-01-01

    Real-time high resolution ultrasound imaging was employed during reconstructive vascular operation in 165 patients. The purpose of this diagnostic procedure was to detect unrecognized strictures, thrombi, and intimal flaps in order to permit their surgical correction at the primary operation. Defects were discovered in 48 patients (29%). In 34 patients (21%), because of size and location, defects were not considered sufficiently significant to warrant re-exploration. In 14 patients (8%), ultrasound revealed defects that prompted immediate re-exploration. Patients with ultrasound defects considered to be insignificant did as well as patients with no demonstrable defects. In the 14 patients who were re-explored, 12 had major defects that were corrected. These 12 patients also did well after operation. In two of the 14 patients, defects could not be found at re-exploration. Both these patients experienced early thrombosis of bypass grafts. In 56 patients, ultrasound was compared with arteriography at the same operation. The accuracy of operative ultrasound and operative arteriography was 96% and 85%, respectively. Operative ultrasound is more accurate, simpler and safer than arteriography and may be the preferred method for detection of vascular defects at reconstructive surgery. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7125733

  3. Time-resolved diffusion tomographic 2D and 3D imaging in highly scattering turbid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Cai, Wei (Inventor); Liu, Feng (Inventor); Lax, Melvin (Inventor); Das, Bidyut B. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for imaging objects in highly scattering turbid media. According to one embodiment of the invention, the method involves using a plurality of intersecting source/detectors sets and time-resolving equipment to generate a plurality of time-resolved intensity curves for the diffusive component of light emergent from the medium. For each of the curves, the intensities at a plurality of times are then inputted into the following inverse reconstruction algorithm to form an image of the medium: ##EQU1## wherein W is a matrix relating output at source and detector positions r.sub.s and r.sub.d, at time t, to position r, .LAMBDA. is a regularization matrix, chosen for convenience to be diagonal, but selected in a way related to the ratio of the noise, to fluctuations in the absorption (or diffusion) X.sub.j that we are trying to determine: .LAMBDA..sub.ij =.lambda..sub.j .delta..sub.ij with .lambda..sub.j =/<.DELTA.Xj.DELTA.Xj> Y is the data collected at the detectors, and X.sup.k is the kth iterate toward the desired absoption information. An algorithm, which combines a two dimensional (2D) matrix inversion with a one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform inversion is used to obtain images of three dimensional hidden objects in turbid scattering media.

  4. Time-resolved diffusion tomographic 2D and 3D imaging in highly scattering turbid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Cai, Wei (Inventor); Gayen, Swapan K. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for imaging objects in highly scattering turbid media. According to one embodiment of the invention, the method involves using a plurality of intersecting source/detectors sets and time-resolving equipment to generate a plurality of time-resolved intensity curves for the diffusive component of light emergent from the medium. For each of the curves, the intensities at a plurality of times are then inputted into the following inverse reconstruction algorithm to form an image of the medium: wherein W is a matrix relating output at source and detector positions r.sub.s and r.sub.d, at time t, to position r, .LAMBDA. is a regularization matrix, chosen for convenience to be diagonal, but selected in a way related to the ratio of the noise, to fluctuations in the absorption (or diffusion) X.sub.j that we are trying to determine: .LAMBDA..sub.ij =.lambda..sub.j .delta..sub.ij with .lambda..sub.j =/<.DELTA.Xj.DELTA.Xj> Y is the data collected at the detectors, and X.sup.k is the kth iterate toward the desired absorption information. An algorithm, which combines a two dimensional (2D) matrix inversion with a one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform inversion is used to obtain images of three dimensional hidden objects in turbid scattering media.

  5. Extending Ripley’s K-Function to Quantify Aggregation in 2-D Grayscale Images

    PubMed Central

    Amgad, Mohamed; Itoh, Anri; Tsui, Marco Man Kin

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe the extension of Ripley’s K-function to allow for overlapping events at very high event densities. We show that problematic edge effects introduce significant bias to the function at very high densities and small radii, and propose a simple correction method that successfully restores the function’s centralization. Using simulations of homogeneous Poisson distributions of events, as well as simulations of event clustering under different conditions, we investigate various aspects of the function, including its shape-dependence and correspondence between true cluster radius and radius at which the K-function is maximized. Furthermore, we validate the utility of the function in quantifying clustering in 2-D grayscale images using three modalities: (i) Simulations of particle clustering; (ii) Experimental co-expression of soluble and diffuse protein at varying ratios; (iii) Quantifying chromatin clustering in the nuclei of wt and crwn1 crwn2 mutant Arabidopsis plant cells, using a previously-published image dataset. Overall, our work shows that Ripley’s K-function is a valid abstract statistical measure whose utility extends beyond the quantification of clustering of non-overlapping events. Potential benefits of this work include the quantification of protein and chromatin aggregation in fluorescent microscopic images. Furthermore, this function has the potential to become one of various abstract texture descriptors that are utilized in computer-assisted diagnostics in anatomic pathology and diagnostic radiology. PMID:26636680

  6. Directional adaptive deformable models for segmentation with application to 2D and 3D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougon, Nicolas F.; Preteux, Francoise J.

    1993-09-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of adapting the functions controlling the material properties of 2D snakes, and show how introducing oriented smoothness constraints results in a novel class of active contour models for segmentation which extends standard isotropic inhomogeneous membrane/thin-plate stabilizers. These constraints, expressed as adaptive L2 matrix norms, are defined by two 2nd-order symmetric and positive definite tensors which are invariant with respect to rigid motions in the image plane. These tensors, equivalent to directional adaptive stretching and bending densities, are quadratic with respect to 1st- and 2nd-order derivatives of the image intensity, respectively. A representation theorem specifying their canonical form is established and a geometrical interpretation of their effects if developed. Within this framework, it is shown that, by achieving a directional control of regularization, such non-isotropic constraints consistently relate the differential properties (metric and curvature) of the deformable model with those of the underlying intensity surface, yielding a satisfying preservation of image contour characteristics.

  7. Extending Ripley's K-Function to Quantify Aggregation in 2-D Grayscale Images.

    PubMed

    Amgad, Mohamed; Itoh, Anri; Tsui, Marco Man Kin

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe the extension of Ripley's K-function to allow for overlapping events at very high event densities. We show that problematic edge effects introduce significant bias to the function at very high densities and small radii, and propose a simple correction method that successfully restores the function's centralization. Using simulations of homogeneous Poisson distributions of events, as well as simulations of event clustering under different conditions, we investigate various aspects of the function, including its shape-dependence and correspondence between true cluster radius and radius at which the K-function is maximized. Furthermore, we validate the utility of the function in quantifying clustering in 2-D grayscale images using three modalities: (i) Simulations of particle clustering; (ii) Experimental co-expression of soluble and diffuse protein at varying ratios; (iii) Quantifying chromatin clustering in the nuclei of wt and crwn1 crwn2 mutant Arabidopsis plant cells, using a previously-published image dataset. Overall, our work shows that Ripley's K-function is a valid abstract statistical measure whose utility extends beyond the quantification of clustering of non-overlapping events. Potential benefits of this work include the quantification of protein and chromatin aggregation in fluorescent microscopic images. Furthermore, this function has the potential to become one of various abstract texture descriptors that are utilized in computer-assisted diagnostics in anatomic pathology and diagnostic radiology. PMID:26636680

  8. Spatial anatomic knowledge for 2-D interactive medical image segmentation and matching.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, J F

    1991-01-01

    A representation is described for two-dimensional anatomic shapes which can be described by single-valued distortions of a circle. The representation, called a radial contour model, is both generic, in that it captures the expected shape as well as the range of variation for an anatomic shape class, and flexible, in that the model can deform to fit an individual instance of the shape class. The model is implemented in a program called SCANNER (version 0.61) for 2-D interactive image segmentation and matching. An initial evaluation was performed using 7 shape models learned from a training set of 93 contours, and a control model containing no shape knowledge. Evaluation using 60 additional contours showed that in general the shape knowledge should reduce interactive segmentation time by a factor of two over the control, and that for specific shapes such as the eye, the improvement is much greater. A matching function was also devised which showed that the radial contour model should allow diagnosis of subtle shape changes. These results suggest that the use of spatial anatomic knowledge, when combined with good interactive tools, can help to alleviate the segmentation bottleneck in medical imaging. The models, when extended to more complex shapes, will form the spatial component of a knowledge base of anatomy that could have many uses in addition to image segmentation.

  9. Clinical applications of 2D and 3D CT imaging of the airways--a review.

    PubMed

    Salvolini, L; Bichi Secchi, E; Costarelli, L; De Nicola, M

    2000-04-01

    Hardware and software evolution has broadened the possibilities of 2D and 3D reformatting of spiral CT and MR data set. In the study of the thorax, intrinsic benefits of volumetric CT scanning and better quality of reconstructed images offer us the possibility to apply additional rendering techniques to everyday clinical practice. Considering the large number and redundancy of possible post-processing imaging techniques that we can apply to raw CT sections data, it is necessary to precisely set a well-defined number of clinical applications of each of them, by careful evaluation of their benefits and possible pitfalls in each clinical setting. In diagnostic evaluation of pathological processes affecting the airways, a huge number of thin sections is necessary for detailed appraisal and has to be evaluated, and information must then be transferred to referring clinicians. By additional rendering it is possible to make image evaluation and data transfer easier, faster, and more effective. In the study of central airways, additional rendering can be of interest for precise evaluation of the length, morphology, and degree of stenoses. It may help in depicting exactly the locoregional extent of central tumours by better display of relations with bronchovascular interfaces and can increase CT/bronchoscopy sinergy. It may allow closer radiotherapy planning and better depiction of air collections, and, finally, it could ease panoramic evaluation of the results of dynamic or functional studies, that are made possible by increased speed of spiral scanning. When applied to the evaluation of peripheral airways, as a completion to conventional HRCT scans, High-Resolution Volumetric CT, by projection slabs applied to target areas of interest, can better depict the profusion and extension of affected bronchial segments in bronchiectasis, influence the choice of different approaches for tissue sampling by better evaluation of the relations of lung nodules with the airways, or help

  10. Absorption and scattering 2-D volcano images from numerically calculated space-weighting functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Ibañez, Jesus; Prudencio, Janire; Bianco, Francesca; De Siena, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Short-period small magnitude seismograms mainly comprise scattered waves in the form of coda waves (the tail part of the seismogram, starting after S waves and ending when the noise prevails), spanning more than 70 per cent of the whole seismogram duration. Corresponding coda envelopes provide important information about the earth inhomogeneity, which can be stochastically modeled in terms of distribution of scatterers in a random medium. In suitable experimental conditions (i.e. high earth heterogeneity), either the two parameters describing heterogeneity (scattering coefficient), intrinsic energy dissipation (coefficient of intrinsic attenuation) or a combination of them (extinction length and seismic albedo) can be used to image Earth structures. Once a set of such parameter couples has been measured in a given area and for a number of sources and receivers, imaging their space distribution with standard methods is straightforward. However, as for finite-frequency and full-waveform tomography, the essential problem for a correct imaging is the determination of the weighting function describing the spatial sensitivity of observable data to scattering and absorption anomalies. Due to the nature of coda waves, the measured parameter couple can be seen as a weighted space average of the real parameters characterizing the rock volumes illuminated by the scattered waves. This paper uses the Monte Carlo numerical solution of the Energy Transport Equation to find approximate but realistic 2-D space-weighting functions for coda waves. Separate images for scattering and absorption based on these sensitivity functions are then compared with those obtained with commonly used sensitivity functions in an application to data from an active seismic experiment carried out at Deception Island (Antarctica). Results show that these novel functions are based on a reliable and physically grounded method to image magnitude and shape of scattering and absorption anomalies. Their

  11. High-resolution GPR imaging using a nonstandard 2D EEMD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Sung; Jeng*, Yih; Yu, Hung-Ming

    2013-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data are affected by a variety of factors. Linear and nonlinear data processing methods each have been widely applied to the GPR use in geophysical and engineering investigations. For complicated data such as the shallow earth image of urban area, a better result can be achieved by integrating both approaches. In this study, we introduce a nonstandard 2D EEMD approach, which integrates the natural logarithm transformed (NLT) ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) method with the linear filtering technique to process GPR images. The NLT converts the data into logarithmic values; therefore, it permits a wide dynamic range for the recorded GPR data to be presented. The EEMD dyadic filter bank decomposes the data into multiple components ready for image reconstruction. Consequently, the NLT EEMD method provides a new way of nonlinear energy compensating and noise filtering with results having minimal artifacts. However, horizontal noise in the GPR time-distance section may be enhanced after NLT process in some cases. To solve the dilemma, we process the data two dimensionally. At first, the vertical background noise of each GPR trace is removed by using a standard linear method, the background noise removal algorithm, or simply by performing the sliding background removal filter. After that, the NLT is applied to the data for examining the horizontal coherent energy. Next, we employ the EEMD filter bank horizontally at each time step to remove the horizontal coherent energy. After removing the vertical background noise and horizontal coherent energy, a vertical EEMD method is then applied to generate a filter bank of the GPR time-distance section for final image reconstruction. Two buried models imitating common shallow earth targets are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. One model is a brick cistern buried in a disturbed site of poor reflection quality. The other model is a buried two-stack metallic target

  12. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  13. Resolution and quantitative accuracy improvements in ultrasound transmission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevert, T. L.

    The type of ultrasound transmission imaging, referred to as ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT), reconstructs distributions of tissue speed of sound and sound attenuation properties from measurements of acoustic pulse time of flight (TCF) and energy received through tissue. Although clinical studies with experimental UCT scanners have demonstrated UCT is sensitive to certain tissue pathologies not easily detected with conventional ultrasound imaging, they have also shown UCT to suffer from artifacts due to physical differences between the acoustic beam and its ray model implicit in image reconstruction algorithms. Artifacts are expressed as large quantitative errors in attenuation images, and poor spatial resolution and size distortion (exaggerated size of high speed of sound regions) in speed of sound images. Methods are introduced and investigated which alleviate these problems in UCT imaging by providing improved measurements of pulse TCF and energy.

  14. Integrated intravascular optical coherence tomography ultrasound imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiechen; Yang, Hao-Chung; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Qifa; Hu, Changhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    We report on a dual-modality optical coherence tomography (OCT) ultrasound (US) system for intravascular imaging. To the best of our knowledge, we have developed the first integrated OCT-US probe that combines OCT optical components with an US transducer. The OCT optical components mainly consist of a single-mode fiber, a gradient index lens for light-beam focusing, and a right-angled prism for reflecting light into biological tissue. A 40-MHz piezoelectric transducer (PZT-5H) side-viewing US transducer was fabricated to obtain the US image. These components were integrated into a single probe, enabling both OCT and US imaging at the same time. In vitro OCT and ultrasound images of a rabbit aorta were obtained using this dual-modality imaging system. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an OCT-US system for intravascular imaging, which is expected to have a prominent impact on early detection and characterization of atherosclerosis.

  15. Simultaneous three-dimensional laser-ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurzinger, Gerhild; Nuster, Robert; Schmitner, Nicole; Gratt, Sibylle; Paltauf, Günther

    2013-06-01

    A purely optical setup for simultaneous photoacoustic (PA) and laser-ultrasound (US) tomography is presented. It is shown that combined imaging can be achieved by using the same laser pulse for photoacoustic generation and for launching a broadband ultrasound pulse from an optically absorbing target. Detection of the laser-generated plane waves that have been scattered at the imaging object and of the photoacoustic signals emitted from the sample is done interferometrically. This way data for PA and US imaging are acquired within one single measurement. Distinction between the signals is possible due to their different times of flight. After data separation, image reconstruction is done using standard back-projection algorithms. The resolution of the setup was estimated and images of a zebra fish are shown, demonstrating the complementary information of the two imaging modalities.

  16. Nonlinear optical microscopy and ultrasound imaging of human cervical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, Lisa M.; Feltovich, Helen; Carlson, Lindsey C.; Hall, Gunnsteinn; Campagnola, Paul J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    The cervix softens and shortens as its collagen microstructure rearranges in preparation for birth, but premature change may lead to premature birth. The global preterm birth rate has not decreased despite decades of research, likely because cervical microstructure is poorly understood. Our group has developed a multilevel approach to evaluating the human cervix. We are developing quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques for noninvasive interrogation of cervical microstructure and corroborating those results with high-resolution images of microstructure from second harmonic generation imaging (SHG) microscopy. We obtain ultrasound measurements from hysterectomy specimens, prepare the tissue for SHG, and stitch together several hundred images to create a comprehensive view of large areas of cervix. The images are analyzed for collagen orientation and alignment with curvelet transform, and registered with QUS data, facilitating multiscale analysis in which the micron-scale SHG images and millimeter-scale ultrasound data interpretation inform each other. This novel combination of modalities allows comprehensive characterization of cervical microstructure in high resolution. Through a detailed comparative study, we demonstrate that SHG imaging both corroborates the quantitative ultrasound measurements and provides further insight. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of specific microstructural cervical change in pregnancy should lead to novel approaches to the prevention of preterm birth.

  17. Coronary arteries motion modeling on 2D x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Sundar, Hari

    2012-02-01

    During interventional procedures, 3D imaging modalities like CT and MRI are not commonly used due to interference with the surgery and radiation exposure concerns. Therefore, real-time information is usually limited and building models of cardiac motion are difficult. In such case, vessel motion modeling based on 2-D angiography images become indispensable. Due to issues with existing vessel segmentation algorithms and the lack of contrast in occluded vessels, manual segmentation of certain branches is usually necessary. In addition, such occluded branches are the most important vessels during coronary interventions and obtaining motion models for these can greatly help in reducing the procedure time and radiation exposure. Segmenting different cardiac phases independently does not guarantee temporal consistency and is not efficient for occluded branches required manual segmentation. In this paper, we propose a coronary motion modeling system which extracts the coronary tree for every cardiac phase, maintaining the segmentation by tracking the coronary tree during the cardiac cycle. It is able to map every frame to the specific cardiac phase, thereby inferring the shape information of the coronary arteries using the model corresponding to its phase. Our experiments show that our motion modeling system can achieve promising results with real-time performance.

  18. Discriminative imaging of maternal and fetal blood flow within the placenta using ultrafast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Lecarpentier, Edouard; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-09-16

    Being able to map accurately placental blood flow in clinics could have major implications in the diagnosis and follow-up of pregnancy complications such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Moreover, the impact of such an imaging modality for a better diagnosis of placental dysfunction would require to solve the unsolved problem of discriminating the strongly intricated maternal and fetal vascular networks. However, no current imaging modality allows both to achieve sufficient sensitivity and selectivity to tell these entangled flows apart. Although ultrasound imaging would be the clinical modality of choice for such a problem, conventional Doppler echography both lacks of sensibility to detect and map the placenta microvascularization and a concept to discriminate both entangled flows. In this work, we propose to use an ultrafast Doppler imaging approach both to map with an enhanced sensitivity the small vessels of the placenta (~100 μm) and to assess the variation of the Doppler frequency simultaneously in all pixels of the image within a cardiac cycle. This approach is evaluated in vivo in the placenta of pregnant rabbits: By studying the local flow pulsatility pixel per pixel, it becomes possible to separate maternal and fetal blood in 2D from their pulsatile behavior. Significance Statement: The in vivo ability to image and discriminate maternal and fetal blood flow within the placenta is an unsolved problem which could improve the diagnosis of pregnancy complications such as intrauterine growth restriction or preeclampsia. To date, no imaging modality has both sufficient sensitivity and selectivity to discriminate these intimately entangled flows. We demonstrate that Ultrafast Doppler ultrasound method with a frame rate 100x faster than conventional imaging solves this issue. It permits the mapping of small vessels of the placenta (~100 μm) in 2D with an enhanced sensitivity. By assessing pixel-per-pixel pulsatility within single cardiac cycles, it

  19. Discriminative imaging of maternal and fetal blood flow within the placenta using ultrafast ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Lecarpentier, Edouard; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    Being able to map accurately placental blood flow in clinics could have major implications in the diagnosis and follow-up of pregnancy complications such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Moreover, the impact of such an imaging modality for a better diagnosis of placental dysfunction would require to solve the unsolved problem of discriminating the strongly intricated maternal and fetal vascular networks. However, no current imaging modality allows both to achieve sufficient sensitivity and selectivity to tell these entangled flows apart. Although ultrasound imaging would be the clinical modality of choice for such a problem, conventional Doppler echography both lacks of sensibility to detect and map the placenta microvascularization and a concept to discriminate both entangled flows. In this work, we propose to use an ultrafast Doppler imaging approach both to map with an enhanced sensitivity the small vessels of the placenta (~100 μm) and to assess the variation of the Doppler frequency simultaneously in all pixels of the image within a cardiac cycle. This approach is evaluated in vivo in the placenta of pregnant rabbits: By studying the local flow pulsatility pixel per pixel, it becomes possible to separate maternal and fetal blood in 2D from their pulsatile behavior. Significance Statement: The in vivo ability to image and discriminate maternal and fetal blood flow within the placenta is an unsolved problem which could improve the diagnosis of pregnancy complications such as intrauterine growth restriction or preeclampsia. To date, no imaging modality has both sufficient sensitivity and selectivity to discriminate these intimately entangled flows. We demonstrate that Ultrafast Doppler ultrasound method with a frame rate 100x faster than conventional imaging solves this issue. It permits the mapping of small vessels of the placenta (~100 μm) in 2D with an enhanced sensitivity. By assessing pixel-per-pixel pulsatility within single cardiac cycles

  20. Imaging Performance of Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lenox, Mark W.; Wiskin, James; Lewis, Matthew A.; Darrouzet, Stephen; Borup, David; Hsieh, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound (QTUS) is a tomographic transmission ultrasound modality that is capable of generating 3D speed-of-sound maps of objects in the field of view. It performs this measurement by propagating a plane wave through the medium from a transmitter on one side of a water tank to a high resolution receiver on the opposite side. This information is then used via inverse scattering to compute a speed map. In addition, the presence of reflection transducers allows the creation of a high resolution, spatially compounded reflection map that is natively coregistered to the speed map. A prototype QTUS system was evaluated for measurement and geometric accuracy as well as for the ability to correctly determine speed of sound. PMID:26604918

  1. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future.

  2. FluoRender: An Application of 2D Image Space Methods for 3D and 4D Confocal Microscopy Data Visualization in Neurobiology Research

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yong; Otsuna, Hideo; Chien, Chi-Bin; Hansen, Charles

    2013-01-01

    2D image space methods are processing methods applied after the volumetric data are projected and rendered into the 2D image space, such as 2D filtering, tone mapping and compositing. In the application domain of volume visualization, most 2D image space methods can be carried out more efficiently than their 3D counterparts. Most importantly, 2D image space methods can be used to enhance volume visualization quality when applied together with volume rendering methods. In this paper, we present and discuss the applications of a series of 2D image space methods as enhancements to confocal microscopy visualizations, including 2D tone mapping, 2D compositing, and 2D color mapping. These methods are easily integrated with our existing confocal visualization tool, FluoRender, and the outcome is a full-featured visualization system that meets neurobiologists’ demands for qualitative analysis of confocal microscopy data. PMID:23584131

  3. FluoRender: An Application of 2D Image Space Methods for 3D and 4D Confocal Microscopy Data Visualization in Neurobiology Research.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yong; Otsuna, Hideo; Chien, Chi-Bin; Hansen, Charles

    2012-01-01

    2D image space methods are processing methods applied after the volumetric data are projected and rendered into the 2D image space, such as 2D filtering, tone mapping and compositing. In the application domain of volume visualization, most 2D image space methods can be carried out more efficiently than their 3D counterparts. Most importantly, 2D image space methods can be used to enhance volume visualization quality when applied together with volume rendering methods. In this paper, we present and discuss the applications of a series of 2D image space methods as enhancements to confocal microscopy visualizations, including 2D tone mapping, 2D compositing, and 2D color mapping. These methods are easily integrated with our existing confocal visualization tool, FluoRender, and the outcome is a full-featured visualization system that meets neurobiologists' demands for qualitative analysis of confocal microscopy data.

  4. Characteristics of the audio sound generated by ultrasound imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra; Greenleaf, James F.

    2005-03-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners use high-energy pulses to probe the human body. The radiation force resulting from the impact of such pulses on an object can vibrate the object, producing a localized high-intensity sound in the audible range. Here, a theoretical model for the audio sound generated by ultrasound scanners is presented. This model describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the sound. It has been shown that the sound has rich frequency components at the pulse repetition frequency and its harmonics. Experiments have been conducted in a water tank to measure the sound generated by a clinical ultrasound scanner in various operational modes. Results are in general agreement with the theory. It is shown that a typical ultrasound scanner with a typical spatial-peak pulse-average intensity value at 2 MHz may generate a localized sound-pressure level close to 100 dB relative to 20 μPa in the audible (<20 kHz) range under laboratory conditions. These findings suggest that fetuses may become exposed to a high-intensity audio sound during maternal ultrasound examinations. Therefore, contrary to common beliefs, ultrasound may not be considered a passive tool in fetal imaging..

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of sirenomelia by two-dimensional and three-dimensional skeletal imaging ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Chen, Xin-lin; Yang, Xiao-hong; Ma, Hui-jing

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the contribution of two-dimensional ultrasound (2D-US) and three-dimensional skeletal imaging ultrasound (3D-SUIS) in the prenatal diagnosis of sirenomelia. Between September 2010 and April 2014, a prospective study was conducted in a single referral center using 3D-SUIS performed after 2D-US in 10 cases of sirenomelia. Diagnostic accuracy and detailed findings were compared with postnatal three-dimensional helical computed tomography (3D-HCT), radiological findings and autopsy. Pregnancy was terminated in all 10 sirenomelia cases, including 9 singletons and 1 conjoined twin pregnancy, for a total of 5 males and 5 females. These cases of sirenomelia were determined by autopsy and/or chromosomal examination. Initial 2D-US showed that there were 10 cases of oligohydramnios, bilateral renal agenesis, bladder agenesis, single umbilical artery, fusion of the lower limbs and spinal abnormalities; 8 cases of dipus or monopus; 2 cases of apus; and 8 cases of cardiac abnormalities. Subsequent 3D-SUIS showed that there were 9 cases of scoliosis, 10 cases of sacrococcygeal vertebra dysplasia, 3 cases of hemivertebra, 1 case of vertebral fusion, 3 cases of spina bifida, and 5 cases of rib abnormalities. 3D-SUIS identified significantly more skeletal abnormalities than did 2D-US, and its accuracy was 79.5% (70/88) compared with 3D-HCT and radiography. 3D-SUIS seems to be a useful complementary method to 2D-US and may improve the accuracy of identifying prenatal skeletal abnormalities related to sirenomelia. PMID:26670448

  6. Enhanced ultrasound for advanced diagnostics, ultrasound tomography for volume limb imaging and prosthetic fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging methods hold the potential to deliver low-cost, high-resolution, operator-independent and nonionizing imaging systems - such systems couple appropriate algorithms with imaging devices and techniques. The increasing demands on general practitioners motivate us to develop more usable and productive diagnostic imaging equipment. Ultrasound, specifically freehand ultrasound, is a low cost and safe medical imaging technique. It doesn't expose a patient to ionizing radiation. Its safety and versatility make it very well suited for the increasing demands on general practitioners, or for providing improved medical care in rural regions or the developing world. However it typically suffers from sonographer variability; we will discuss techniques to address user variability. We also discuss our work to combine cylindrical scanning systems with state of the art inversion algorithms to deliver ultrasound systems for imaging and quantifying limbs in 3-D in vivo. Such systems have the potential to track the progression of limb health at a low cost and without radiation exposure, as well as, improve prosthetic socket fitting. Current methods of prosthetic socket fabrication remain subjective and ineffective at creating an interface to the human body that is both comfortable and functional. Though there has been recent success using methods like magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical modeling, a low-cost, streamlined, and quantitative process for prosthetic cup design and fabrication has not been fully demonstrated. Medical ultrasonography may inform the design process of prosthetic sockets in a more objective manner. This keynote talk presents the results of progress in this area.

  7. Image stitching for three-pass whole breast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Chen, Chii-Jen; Takada, Etsuo; Chou, Yi-Hong; Chen, Dar-Ren

    2006-03-01

    Early detection through screening is the best defense against morbidity and mortality from breast cancers. Mammography is the most used screening tool for detecting early breast cancer because it can easily obtain the view of whole breast. However, because the ultrasound images are cross-sectional images, not projection images like mammography, and the ultrasound probe does not fully cover the breast width, it is not a convenient screening tool when adjunct with screening mammography. The physician needs a lot of examination time to perform the breast screening. Recently, some whole breast ultrasound scanning machines are developed. The examination could be performed by an experienced technician. Because the probe width still does not fully cover the breast width, several scanning passes are required to obtain the whole breast image. The physician still cannot have a full view of breast. In this paper, an image stitching technique is proposed to stitch multi-pass images into a full-view image. The produced full-view image can reveal the breast anatomy and assists physicians to reduce extra manual adjustment.

  8. Longitudinal left ventricular myocardial dysfunction assessed by 2D colour tissue Doppler imaging in a dog with systemic hypertension and severe arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, A P; Carlos Sampedrano, C; Fontaine, J J; Tessier-Vetzel, D; Goumi, V; Pelligand, L; Pouchelon, J-L; Chetboul, V

    2005-03-01

    A 12-year-old sexually intact male Vendee Griffon Basset was presented for acute pulmonary oedema. Severe systemic systolic arterial hypertension (SAH) was diagnosed (290 mmHg). Despite blood and abdominal ultrasound tests, the underlying cause of the systemic hypertension could not be determined, and primary SAH was therefore suspected. Conventional echocardiography showed eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy with normal fractional shortening. Despite this apparent normal systolic function, 2D colour tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) identified a marked longitudinal systolic left ventricular myocardial alteration, whereas radial function was still preserved. Three months later, the dog underwent euthanasia because of an acute episode of distal aortic thromboembolism. Necropsy revealed severe aortic and iliac arteriosclerosis. SAH related to arteriosclerosis is a common finding in humans, but has not been previously described in dogs. Moreover, its consequence on longitudinal myocardial function using TDI has never been documented before in this species.

  9. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  10. Combined Ultrasound and MR Imaging to Guide Focused Ultrasound Therapies in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation – the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength, and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. Materials and Methods We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. Results The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. Conclusion While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate it will also prove to

  11. Reproducing 2D breast mammography images with 3D printed phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Matthew; Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    Mammography is currently the standard imaging modality used to screen women for breast abnormalities and, as a result, it is a tool of great importance for the early detection of breast cancer. Physical phantoms are commonly used as surrogates of breast tissue to evaluate some aspects of the performance of mammography systems. However, most phantoms do not reproduce the anatomic heterogeneity of real breasts. New fabrication technologies, such as 3D printing, have created the opportunity to build more complex, anatomically realistic breast phantoms that could potentially assist in the evaluation of mammography systems. The primary objective of this work is to present a simple, easily reproducible methodology to design and print 3D objects that replicate the attenuation profile observed in real 2D mammograms. The secondary objective is to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the competing 3D printing technologies, and characterize the x-ray properties of the different materials they use. Printable phantoms can be created using the open-source code introduced in this work, which processes a raw mammography image to estimate the amount of x-ray attenuation at each pixel, and outputs a triangle mesh object that encodes the observed attenuation map. The conversion from the observed pixel gray value to a column of printed material with equivalent attenuation requires certain assumptions and knowledge of multiple imaging system parameters, such as x-ray energy spectrum, source-to-object distance, compressed breast thickness, and average breast material attenuation. A detailed description of the new software, a characterization of the printed materials using x-ray spectroscopy, and an evaluation of the realism of the sample printed phantoms are presented.

  12. A New High Frequency Ultrasound Skin Imaging System: Imaging Properties and Clinical in Vivo Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M.; Scharenberg, R.; Moussa, G.; Sand, M.; Hoffmann, K.; Altmeyer, P.; Ermert, H.

    In this paper, a new high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) system for high-resolution skin imaging is presented. For imaging, mechanical scans are performed with spherically focused single element transducers. Two separate applicators with different transducers are utilized to fulfill the different requirements for imaging the skin with 20MHz ultrasound and for lower range high resolution imaging of the uppermost skin layers with HFUS in the 100MHz range. Clinical images were acquired in the imaging lab of the Dermatological University Hospital. Imaging results of wound healing process and skin lesion nevus investigations are presented

  13. Image enhancement and segmentation of fluid-filled structures in 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalana, Vikram; Dudycha, Stephen; McMorrow, Gerald

    2003-05-01

    Segmentation of fluid-filled structures, such as the urinary bladder, from three-dimensional ultrasound images is necessary for measuring their volume. This paper describes a system for image enhancement, segmentation and volume measurement of fluid-filled structures on 3D ultrasound images. The system was applied for the measurement of urinary bladder volume. Results show an average error of less than 10% in the estimation of the total bladder volume.

  14. Speckle-reduction algorithm for ultrasound images in complex wavelet domain using genetic algorithm-based mixture model.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Muhammad Shahin; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew J; Pickering, Mark R; Marchese, Margaret; Stuart, Iain

    2016-05-20

    Compared with other medical-imaging modalities, ultrasound (US) imaging is a valuable way to examine the body's internal organs, and two-dimensional (2D) imaging is currently the most common technique used in clinical diagnoses. Conventional 2D US imaging systems are highly flexible cost-effective imaging tools that permit operators to observe and record images of a large variety of thin anatomical sections in real time. Recently, 3D US imaging has also been gaining popularity due to its considerable advantages over 2D US imaging. It reduces dependency on the operator and provides better qualitative and quantitative information for an effective diagnosis. Furthermore, it provides a 3D view, which allows the observation of volume information. The major shortcoming of any type of US imaging is the presence of speckle noise. Hence, speckle reduction is vital in providing a better clinical diagnosis. The key objective of any speckle-reduction algorithm is to attain a speckle-free image while preserving the important anatomical features. In this paper we introduce a nonlinear multi-scale complex wavelet-diffusion based algorithm for speckle reduction and sharp-edge preservation of 2D and 3D US images. In the proposed method we use a Rayleigh and Maxwell-mixture model for 2D and 3D US images, respectively, where a genetic algorithm is used in combination with an expectation maximization method to estimate mixture parameters. Experimental results using both 2D and 3D synthetic, physical phantom, and clinical data demonstrate that our proposed algorithm significantly reduces speckle noise while preserving sharp edges without discernible distortions. The proposed approach performs better than the state-of-the-art approaches in both qualitative and quantitative measures. PMID:27411128

  15. Techniques for Field Application of Lingual Ultrasound Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gick, Bryan; Bird, Sonya; Wilson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for using ultrasound for lingual imaging in field-related applications. The greatest challenges we have faced distinguishing the field setting from the laboratory setting are the lack of controlled head/transducer movement, and the related issue of tissue compression. Two experiments are reported. First, a pilot study…

  16. Imaging of the pancreatic duct by linear endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rai, Praveer; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Arya, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    The current gold standard investigation for anatomic exploration of the pancreatic duct (PD) is endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is a noninvasive method for exploration of the PD. A comprehensive evaluation of the course of PD and its branches has not been described by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). In this article, we describe the techniques of imaging of PD using linear EUS. PMID:26374577

  17. Microwave thermal imaging of scanned focused ultrasound heating: animal experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tian; Meaney, Paul M.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Geimer, Shireen D.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2011-03-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) uses focused ultrasound beams to ablate localized tumors noninvasively. Multiple clinical trials using HIFU treatment of liver, kidney, breast, pancreas and brain tumors have been conducted, while monitoring the temperature distribution with various imaging modalities such as MRI, CT and ultrasound. HIFU has achieved only minimal acceptance partially due to insufficient guidance from the limited temperature monitoring capability and availability. MR proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift thermometry is currently the most effective monitoring method; however, it is insensitive in temperature changes in fat, susceptible to motion artifacts, and is high cost. Exploiting the relationship between dielectric properties (i.e. permittivity and conductivity) and tissue temperature, in vivo dielectric property distributions of tissue during heating were reconstructed with our microwave tomographic imaging technology. Previous phantom studies have demonstrated sub-Celsius temperature accuracy and sub-centimeter spatial resolution in microwave thermal imaging. In this paper, initial animal experiments have been conducted to further investigate its potential. In vivo conductivity changes inside the piglet's liver due to focused ultrasound heating were observed in the microwave images with good correlation between conductivity changes and temperature.

  18. Denoising of Ultrasound Cervix Image Using Improved Anisotropic Diffusion Filter

    PubMed Central

    Rose, R Jemila; Allwin, S

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate an improved oriented speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (IADF) filter that suppress the speckle noise from ultrasound B-mode images and shows better result than previous filters such as anisotropic diffusion, wavelet denoising and local statistics. Methods: The clinical ultrasound images of the cervix were obtained by ATL HDI 5000 ultrasound machine from the Regional Cancer Centre, Medical College campus, Thiruvananthapuram. The standardized ways of organizing and storing the image were in the format of bmp and the dimensions of 256 × 256 with the help of an improved oriented speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion filter. For analysis, 24 ultrasound cervix images were tested and the performance measured. Results: This provides quality metrics in the case of maximum peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of 31 dB, structural similarity index map (SSIM) of 0.88 and edge preservation accuracy of 88%. Conclusion: The IADF filter is the optimal method and it is capable of strong speckle suppression with less computational complexity. PMID:26624591

  19. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D–2D image registration

    PubMed Central

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM = 0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE = 0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional

  20. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a 'self-calibration' of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM-e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE-e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  1. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a 'self-calibration' of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM-e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE-e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  2. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  3. Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE): A Novel Method for Two-dimensional Shear Elasticity Imaging of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2012-01-01

    Fast and accurate tissue elasticity imaging is essential in studying dynamic tissue mechanical properties. Various ultrasound shear elasticity imaging techniques have been developed in the last two decades. However, to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear elasticity map, multiple data acquisitions are typically required. In this paper, a novel shear elasticity imaging technique, comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE), is introduced in which only one rapid data acquisition (less than 35 ms) is needed to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear wave speed map (40 mm × 38 mm). Multiple unfocused ultrasound beams arranged in a comb pattern (comb-push) are used to generate shear waves. A directional filter is then applied upon the shear wave field to extract the left-to-right (LR) and right-to-left (RL) propagating shear waves. Local shear wave speed is recovered using a time-of-flight method based on both LR and RL waves. Finally a 2D shear wave speed map is reconstructed by combining the LR and RL speed maps. Smooth and accurate shear wave speed maps are reconstructed using the proposed CUSE method in two calibrated homogeneous phantoms with different moduli. Inclusion phantom experiments demonstrate that CUSE is capable of providing good contrast (contrast-to-noise-ratio ≥ 25 dB) between the inclusion and background without artifacts and is insensitive to inclusion positions. Safety measurements demonstrate that all regulated parameters of the ultrasound output level used in CUSE sequence are well below the FDA limits for diagnostic ultrasound. PMID:22736690

  4. Coregistered photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging applied to brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer wherein sustained radiation doses can be precisely targeted to the tumor area by the implantation of small radioactive seeds around the treatment area. Ultrasound is a popular imaging mode for seed implantation, but the seeds are difficult to distinguish from the tissue structure. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for identifying brachytherapy seeds in a tissue phantom, comparing the received intensity to endogenous contrast. We have found that photoacoustic imaging at 1064 nm can identify brachytherapy seeds uniquely at laser penetration depths of 5 cm in biological tissue at the ANSI limit for human exposure with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 26.5 dB. Our realtime combined photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging approach may be suitable for brachytherapy seed placement and post-placement verification, potentially allowing for realtime dosimetry assessment during implantation.

  5. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level. PMID:27114911

  6. Statistical approach for detecting cancer lesions from prostate ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, A. G.; Premkumar, Saganti B.; Babaian, Richard J.; Pitts, David E.

    1993-07-01

    Sequential digitized cross-sectional ultrasound image planes of several prostates have been studied at the pixel level during the past year. The statistical distribution of gray scale values in terms of simple statistics, sample means and sample standard deviations, have been considered for estimating the differences between cross-sectional image planes of the gland due to the presence of cancer lesions. Based on a variability measure, the results for identifying the presence of cancer lesions in the peripheral zone of the gland for 25 blind test cases were found to be 64% accurate. This accuracy is higher than that obtained by visual photo interpretation of the image data, though not as high as our earlier results were indicating. Axial-view ultrasound image planes of prostate glands were obtained from the apex to the base of the gland at 2 mm intervals. Results for the 25 different prostate glands, which include pathologically confirmed benign and cancer cases, are presented.

  7. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Moore, Michael J; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  8. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  9. Stochastic rank correlation: A robust merit function for 2D/3D registration of image data obtained at different energies

    PubMed Central

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Stock, Markus; Figl, Michael; Gendrin, Christelle; Hummel, Johann; Dong, Shuo; Kettenbach, Joachim; Georg, Dietmar; Bergmann, Helmar

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors evaluate a merit function for 2D/3D registration called stochastic rank correlation (SRC). SRC is characterized by the fact that differences in image intensity do not influence the registration result; it therefore combines the numerical advantages of cross correlation (CC)-type merit functions with the flexibility of mutual-information-type merit functions. The basic idea is that registration is achieved on a random subset of the image, which allows for an efficient computation of Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. This measure is, by nature, invariant to monotonic intensity transforms in the images under comparison, which renders it an ideal solution for intramodal images acquired at different energy levels as encountered in intrafractional kV imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. Initial evaluation was undertaken using a 2D/3D registration reference image dataset of a cadaver spine. Even with no radiometric calibration, SRC shows a significant improvement in robustness and stability compared to CC. Pattern intensity, another merit function that was evaluated for comparison, gave rather poor results due to its limited convergence range. The time required for SRC with 5% image content compares well to the other merit functions; increasing the image content does not significantly influence the algorithm accuracy. The authors conclude that SRC is a promising measure for 2D/3D registration in IGRT and image-guided therapy in general. PMID:19746775

  10. Imaging of human tooth enamel using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Culjat, M; Singh, R S; Yoon, D C; Brown, E R

    2003-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a complete circumferential scan of a human tooth and its underlying dentino-enamel junction using ultrasound at frequencies in the 10-MHz range. The imagery shows clearly a two-dimensional contour of the dentinoenamel junction with a depth and lateral resolution of approximately 100 microm and 750 microm, respectively. The resulting sonograph is compared with an optical micrograph of the same tooth to verify the accuracy of the ultrasonic technique. The results are a significant step toward the biolocation of submillimeter size features within the tooth volume.

  11. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two- ... sound waves and appear dark or black. An ultrasound can supply vital information about a mother's pregnancy ...

  12. Discrete echo signal modeling of ultrasound imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Zhang, Cishen

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, a discrete model representing the pulse-tissue interaction in the medical ultrasound scanning and imaging process is developed. The model is based on discretizing the acoustical wave equation and is in terms of convolution between the input ultrasound pulses and the tissue mass density variation. Such a model can provide a useful means for ultrasound echo signal processing and imaging. Most existing models used for ultrasound imaging are based on frequency domain transform. A disadvantage of the frequency domain transform is that it is only applicable to shift-invariant models. Thus it has ignored the shift-variant nature of the original acoustic wave equation where the tissue compressibility and mass density distributions are spatial-variant factors. The discretized frequency domain model also obscures the compressibility and mass density representations of the tissue, which may mislead the physical understanding and interpretation of the image obtained. Moreover, only the classical frequency domain filtering methods have been applied to the frequency domain model for acquiring some tissue information from the scattered echo signals. These methods are non-parametric and require a prior knowledge of frequency spectra of the transmitted pulses. Our proposed model technique will lead to discrete, multidimensional, shift-variant and parametric difference or convolution equations with the transmitted pulse pressure as the input, the measurement data of the echo signals as the output, and functions of the tissue compressibility and mass density distributions as shift-variant parameters that can be readily identified from input-output measurements. The proposed model represents the entire multiple scattering process, and hence overcomes the key limitation in the current ultrasound imaging methods.

  13. Large resistive 2D Micromegas with genetic multiplexing and some imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouteille, S.; Attié, D.; Baron, P.; Calvet, D.; Magnier, P.; Mandjavidze, I.; Procureur, S.; Riallot, M.

    2016-10-01

    The performance of the first large resistive Micromegas detectors with 2D readout and genetic multiplexing is presented. These detectors have a 50 × 50cm2 active area and are equipped with 1024 strips both in X- and Y-directions. The same genetic multiplexing pattern is applied on both coordinates, resulting in the compression of signals on 2 × 61 readout channels. Four such detectors have been built at CERN, and extensively tested with cosmics. The resistive strip film allows for very high gain operation, compensating for the charge spread on the 2 dimensions as well as the S / N loss due to the huge, 1 nF input capacitance. This film also creates a significantly different signal shape in the X- and Y-coordinates due to the charge evacuation along the resistive strips. All in all a detection efficiency above 95% is achieved with a 1 cm drift gap. Though not yet optimal, the measured 300 μm spatial resolution allows for very precise imaging in the field of muon tomography, and some applications of these detectors are presented.

  14. Determining ice water content from 2D crystal images in convective cloud systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Coutris, Pierre; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2016-04-01

    Cloud microphysical in-situ instrumentation measures bulk parameters like total water content (TWC) and/or derives particle size distributions (PSD) (utilizing optical spectrometers and optical array probes (OAP)). The goal of this work is to introduce a comprehensive methodology to compute TWC from OAP measurements, based on the dataset collected during recent HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals)/HIWC (High Ice Water Content) field campaigns. Indeed, the HAIC/HIWC field campaigns in Darwin (2014) and Cayenne (2015) provide a unique opportunity to explore the complex relationship between cloud particle mass and size in ice crystal environments. Numerous mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were sampled with the French Falcon 20 research aircraft at different temperature levels from -10°C up to 50°C. The aircraft instrumentation included an IKP-2 (isokinetic probe) to get reliable measurements of TWC and the optical array probes 2D-S and PIP recording images over the entire ice crystal size range. Based on the known principle relating crystal mass and size with a power law (m=α•Dβ), Fontaine et al. (2014) performed extended 3D crystal simulations and thereby demonstrated that it is possible to estimate the value of the exponent β from OAP data, by analyzing the surface-size relationship for the 2D images as a function of time. Leroy et al. (2015) proposed an extended version of this method that produces estimates of β from the analysis of both the surface-size and perimeter-size relationships. Knowing the value of β, α then is deduced from the simultaneous IKP-2 TWC measurements for the entire HAIC/HIWC dataset. The statistical analysis of α and β values for the HAIC/HIWC dataset firstly shows that α is closely linked to β and that this link changes with temperature. From these trends, a generalized parameterization for α is proposed. Finally, the comparison with the initial IKP-2 measurements demonstrates that the method is able to predict TWC values

  15. Image reconstruction and system optimization for three-dimensional speed of sound tomography using laser-induced ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anis, Fatima; Su, Richard; Nadvoretsky, Vyacheslav V.; Conjusteau, André; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2013-03-01

    We developed the first prototype of dual-modality imager combining optoacoustic tomography (OAT) and laser ultrasound tomography (UST) using computer models followed by experimental validation. The system designed for preclinical biomedical research can concurrently yield images depicting both the absorbed optical energy density and acoustic properties (speed of sound) of an object. In our design of the UST imager, we seek to replace conventional electrical generation of ultrasound waves by laser-induced ultrasound (LU). While earlier studies yielded encouraging results [Manohar, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett, 131911, 2007], they were limited to two-dimensional (2D) geometries. In this work, we conduct computer-simulation studies to investigate different designs for the 3D LU UST imager. The number and location of the laser ultrasound emitters, which are constrained to reside on the cylindrical surface opposite to the arc of detectors, are optimized. In addition to the system parameters, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm was optimized. We demonstrate that high quality volumetric maps of the speed of sound can be reconstructed when only 32 emitters and 128 receiving transducers are employed to record time-of-flight data at 360 tomographic view angles. The implications of the proposed system for small animal and breast-cancer imaging are discussed.

  16. Development of Ultrasound Tomography for Breast Imaging: Technical Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Duric, N; Littrup, P; Babkin, A; Chambers, D; Azevedo, S; Arkady, K; Pevzner, R; Tokarev, M; Holsapple, E

    2004-09-30

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used in medicine because of its benign characteristics and real-time capabilities. Physics theory suggests that the application of tomographic techniques may allow ultrasound imaging to reach its full potential as a diagnostic tool allowing it to compete with other tomographic modalities such as X-ray CT and MRI. This paper describes the construction and use of a prototype tomographic scanner and reports on the feasibility of implementing tomographic theory in practice and the potential of US tomography in diagnostic imaging. Data were collected with the prototype by scanning two types of phantoms and a cadaveric breast. A specialized suite of algorithms was developed and utilized to construct images of reflectivity and sound speed from the phantom data. The basic results can be summarized as follows: (1) A fast, clinically relevant US tomography scanner can be built using existing technology. (2) The spatial resolution, deduced from images of reflectivity, is 0.4 mm. The demonstrated 10 cm depth-of-field is superior to that of conventional ultrasound and the image contrast is improved through the reduction of speckle noise and overall lowering of the noise floor. (3) Images of acoustic properties such as sound speed suggest that it is possible to measure variations in the sound speed of 5 m/s. An apparent correlation with X-ray attenuation suggests that the sound speed can be used to discriminate between various types of soft tissue. (4) Ultrasound tomography has the potential to improve diagnostic imaging in relation to breast cancer detection.

  17. Evaluation of storage phosphor imaging for quantitative analysis of 2-D gels using the Quest II system.

    PubMed

    Patterson, S D; Latter, G I

    1993-12-01

    The advent of storage phosphor technology has been of considerable benefit to the imaging of gel-separated radiolabeled proteins due to the rapid and quantitative nature of the data acquisition process. Previously, times over one month were required to obtain fluorographs of the same gel to yield data of sufficient dynamic range for quantitative analysis of high-resolution two-dimensional (2-D) gels. As we are in the process of building a human 2-D gel protein database, and therefore have a high throughput of 2-D gels both to image and quantitate using the Quest II software, we undertook an evaluation of a storage phosphor imager, including an evaluation of signal fade. The results of this evaluation demonstrate the feasibility of using such a system, and we describe the procedures that allow us to use this technique for quantitative analysis of many complex 2-D gel patterns. These procedures include a useful batch printing program that allows printing of many images in a non-interactive mode. Examples will be presented of how autoradiography, using storage phosphor plates and the Quest II system, have enabled us to begin building a human 2-D gel protein database including posttranslational modification information, without the previous time constraints associated with such a project.

  18. Integrated ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous temperature and cavitation monitoring during focused ultrasound therapies

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound can be used to noninvasively produce different bioeffects via viscous heating, acoustic cavitation, or their combination, and these effects can be exploited to develop a wide range of therapies for cancer and other disorders. In order to accurately localize and control these different effects, imaging methods are desired that can map both temperature changes and cavitation activity. To address these needs, the authors integrated an ultrasound imaging array into an MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system to simultaneously visualize thermal and mechanical effects via passive acoustic mapping (PAM) and MR temperature imaging (MRTI), respectively. Methods: The system was tested with an MRgFUS system developed for transcranial sonication for brain tumor ablation in experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and a phantom-filled ex vivo macaque skull. In experiments on cavitation-enhanced heating, 10 s continuous wave sonications were applied at increasing power levels (30–110 W) until broadband acoustic emissions (a signature for inertial cavitation) were evident. The presence or lack of signal in the PAM, as well as its magnitude and location, were compared to the focal heating in the MRTI. Additional experiments compared PAM with standard B-mode ultrasound imaging and tested the feasibility of the system to map cavitation activity produced during low-power (5 W) burst sonications in a channel filled with a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent. Results: When inertial cavitation was evident, localized activity was present in PAM and a marked increase in heating was observed in MRTI. The location of the cavitation activity and heating agreed on average after registration of the two imaging modalities; the distance between the maximum cavitation activity and focal heating was −3.4 ± 2.1 mm and −0.1 ± 3.3 mm in the axial and transverse ultrasound array directions, respectively. Distortions and other MRI issues introduced small

  19. Detection of Cracks Using 2d Electrical Resistivity Imaging In A Cultivated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samouëlian, A.; Cousin, I.; Richard, G.; Bruand, A.

    Variations of soil structure is significant for the understanding of water and gas trans- fer in soil profiles. In the context of arable land, soil structure can be compacted due to either agriculture operation (wheel tracks), or hardsetting and crusting processes. As a consequence, soil porosity is reduced which may lead to decrease water infiltra- tion and to anoxic conditions. Porosity can be increased by cracks formation due to swelling and shrinking phenomenon. We present here a laboratory experiment based on soil electrical characteristics. Electrical resistivity allows a non destructive three di- mensional and dynamical analysis of the soil structure. Our main objective is to detect cracks in the soil. Cracks form an electrical resistant object and the contrast of resis- tivity between air and soil is large enough to be detected. Our sample is an undisturbed soil block 240mm*170mm*160mm with an initial structure compacted by wheel traf- fic. Successive artificial cracks are generated. Electrodes built with 2 mm ceramic cups permit a good electrical contact at the soil surface whatever its water content. They are installed 15 mm apart and the electrical resistivity is monitored using a dipole-dipole and wenner multi-electrodes 2D imaging method which gives a picture of the subsur- face resistivity. The interpreted resistivity sections show the major soil structure. The electrical response changes with the cracks formation. The structure information ex- tracted from the electrical map are in good agreement with the artificially man-made cracks. These first results demonstrate the relevance of high resolution electrical imag- ing of the soil profile. Further experiments need to be carried out in order to monitor natural soil structure evolution during wetting-drying cycles.

  20. Fast 2-D soft X-ray imaging device based on micro pattern gas detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacella, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Pizzicaroli, G.

    2003-09-01

    An innovative fast system for X-ray imaging has been developed at ENEA Frascati (Italy) to be used as diagnostic of magnetic plasmas for thermonuclear fusion. It is based on a pinhole camera coupled to a Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) having a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) as amplifying stage. This detector (2.5 cm × 2.5 cm active area) is equipped with a 2-D read-out printed circuit board with 144 pixels (12 × 12), with an electronic channel for each pixel (charge conversion, shaping, discrimination and counting). Working in photon counting mode, in proportional regime, it is able to get X-ray images of the plasma in a selectable X-ray energy range, at very high photon fluxes (106 ph s-̊1mm-2 all over the detector) and high framing rate (up to 100 kHz). It has very high dynamic range, high signal to noise ratio (statistical) and large flexibility in the optical configurations (magnification and views on the plasma). The system has been tested successfully on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU), having central electron temperature of a few keV and density of 1020 m-3, during the summer 2001, with a one-dimensional perpendicular view of the plasma. In collaboration with ENEA, the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and Princeton Plasma Physics (PPPL), this system has been set up and calibrated in the X-ray energy range 2-8 keV and it has been installed, with a two-dimensional tangential view, on the spherical tokamak NSTX at Princeton. Time resolved X-ray images of the NSTX plasma core have been obtained. Fast acquisitions, performed up to 50 kHz of framing rate, allow the study of the plasma evolution and its magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities, while with a slower sampling (a few kHz) the curvature of the magnetic surfaces can be measured. All these results reveal the good imaging properties of this device at high time resolution, despite of the low number of pixels, and the effectiveness of the fine controlled energy discrimination.

  1. Accurate 3D reconstruction of complex blood vessel geometries from intravascular ultrasound images: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K R; Thubrikar, M J; Fowler, B; Mostafavi, M T; Funk, M W

    2000-01-01

    We present a technique that accurately reconstructs complex three dimensional blood vessel geometry from 2D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. Biplane x-ray fluoroscopy is used to image the ultrasound catheter tip at a few key points along its path as the catheter is pulled through the blood vessel. An interpolating spline describes the continuous catheter path. The IVUS images are located orthogonal to the path, resulting in a non-uniform structured scalar volume of echo densities. Isocontour surfaces are used to view the vessel geometry, while transparency and clipping enable interactive exploration of interior structures. The two geometries studied are a bovine artery vascular graft having U-shape and a constriction, and a canine carotid artery having multiple branches and a constriction. Accuracy of the reconstructions is established by comparing the reconstructions to (1) silicone moulds of the vessel interior, (2) biplane x-ray images, and (3) the original echo images. Excellent shape and geometry correspondence was observed in both geometries. Quantitative measurements made at key locations of the 3D reconstructions also were in good agreement with those made in silicone moulds. The proposed technique is easily adoptable in clinical practice, since it uses x-rays with minimal exposure and existing IVUS technology. PMID:11105284

  2. Quantitative ultrasound images generated by a PE-CMOS sensor array: scatter modeling and image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chu-Chuan; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Freedman, Matthew T.; Lasser, Marvin E.; Lasser, Bob; Kula, John; Wang, Yue Joseph

    2007-03-01

    In the projection geometry, the detected ultrasound energy through a soft-tissue is mainly attributed to the attenuated primary intensity and the scatter intensity. In order to extract ultrasound image of attenuated primary beam out of the detected raw data, the scatter component must be carefully quantified for restoring the original image. In this study, we have designed a set of apparatus to modeling the ultrasound scattering in soft-tissue. The employed ultrasound imaging device was a C-Scan (projection) prototype using a 4th generation PE-CMOS sensor array (model I400, by Imperium Inc., Silver Spring, MD) as the detector. Right after the plane wave ultrasound transmitting through a soft-tissue mimicking material (Zerdine, by CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA), a ring aperture is used to collimate the signal before reaching the acoustic lens and the PE-CMOS sensor. Three sets of collimated ring images were acquired and analyzed to obtain the scattering components as a function of the off-center distance. Several pathological specimens and breast phantoms consisting of simulated breast tissue with masses, cysts and microcalcifications were imaged by the same C-Scan imaging prototype. The restoration of these ultrasound images were performed by using a standard deconvolution computation. Our study indicated that the resultant images show shaper edges and detailed features as compared to their unprocessed counterparts.

  3. Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction Applied to Medical Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Michael

    Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for many diagnostic applications due to its real-time image reconstruction and low cost. Nonetheless, conventional ultrasound is not used in many applications because of limited spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast. Most commercial ultrasound systems reconstruct images using a simple delay-and-sum architecture on receive, which is fast and robust but does not utilize all information available in the raw data. Recently, more sophisticated image reconstruction methods have been developed that make use of far more information in the raw data to improve resolution and contrast. One such method is the Time-Domain Optimized Near-Field Estimator (TONE), which employs a maximum a priori estimation to solve a highly underdetermined problem, given a well-defined system model. TONE has been shown to significantly improve both the contrast and resolution of ultrasound images when compared to conventional methods. However, TONE's lack of robustness to variations from the system model and extremely high computational cost hinder it from being readily adopted in clinical scanners. This dissertation aims to reduce the impact of TONE's shortcomings, transforming it from an academic construct to a clinically viable image reconstruction algorithm. By altering the system model from a collection of individual hypothetical scatterers to a collection of weighted, diffuse regions, dTONE is able to achieve much greater robustness to modeling errors. A method for efficient parallelization of dTONE is presented that reduces reconstruction time by more than an order of magnitude with little loss in image fidelity. An alternative reconstruction algorithm, called qTONE, is also developed and is able to reduce reconstruction times by another two orders of magnitude while simultaneously improving image contrast. Each of these methods for improving TONE are presented, their limitations are explored, and all are used in concert to reconstruct in

  4. Speckle reduction in ultrasound images using nonisotropic adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Eom, Kie B

    2011-10-01

    In this article, a speckle reduction approach for ultrasound imaging that preserves important features such as edges, corners and point targets is presented. Speckle reduction is an important problem in coherent imaging, such as ultrasound imaging or synthetic aperture radar, and many speckle reduction algorithms have been developed. Speckle is a non-additive and non-white process and the reduction of speckle without blurring sharp features is known to be difficult. The new speckle reduction algorithm presented in this article utilizes a nonhomogeneous filter that adapts to the proximity and direction of the nearest important features. To remove speckle without blurring important features, the location and direction of edges in the image are estimated. Then for each pixel in the image, the distance and angle to the nearest edge are efficiently computed by a two-pass algorithm and stored in distance and angle maps. Finally for each pixel, an adaptive directional filter aligned to the nearest edge is applied. The shape and orientation of the adaptive filter are determined from the distance and angle maps. The new speckle reduction algorithm is tested with both synthesized and real ultrasound images. The performance of the new algorithm is also compared with those of other speckle reduction approaches and it is shown that the new algorithm performs favorably in reducing speckle without blurring important features.

  5. Pulse sequences for uniform perfluorocarbon droplet vaporization and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Puett, C; Sheeran, P S; Rojas, J D; Dayton, P A

    2014-09-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) consist of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that can be vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles by pulsed ultrasound waves at diagnostic pressures and frequencies. These activatable contrast agents provide benefits of longer circulating times and smaller sizes relative to conventional microbubble contrast agents. However, optimizing ultrasound-induced activation of these agents requires coordinated pulse sequences not found on current clinical systems, in order to both initiate droplet vaporization and image the resulting microbubble population. Specifically, the activation process must provide a spatially uniform distribution of microbubbles and needs to occur quickly enough to image the vaporized agents before they migrate out of the imaging field of view. The development and evaluation of protocols for PCCA-enhanced ultrasound imaging using a commercial array transducer are described. The developed pulse sequences consist of three states: (1) initial imaging at sub-activation pressures, (2) activating droplets within a selected region of interest, and (3) imaging the resulting microbubbles. Bubble clouds produced by the vaporization of decafluorobutane and octafluoropropane droplets were characterized as a function of focused pulse parameters and acoustic field location. Pulse sequences were designed to manipulate the geometries of discrete microbubble clouds using electronic steering, and cloud spacing was tailored to build a uniform vaporization field. The complete pulse sequence was demonstrated in the water bath and then in vivo in a rodent kidney. The resulting contrast provided a significant increase (>15 dB) in signal intensity.

  6. Integrated ultrasound and gamma imaging probe for medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Polito, C.; Orlandi, C.; Fabbri, A.; De Vincentis, G.

    2016-03-01

    In the last few years, integrated multi-modality systems have been developed, aimed at improving the accuracy of medical diagnosis correlating information from different imaging techniques. In this contest, a novel dual modality probe is proposed, based on an ultrasound detector integrated with a small field of view single photon emission gamma camera. The probe, dedicated to visualize small organs or tissues located at short depths, performs dual modality images and permits to correlate morphological and functional information. The small field of view gamma camera consists of a continuous NaI:Tl scintillation crystal coupled with two multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. Both detectors were characterized in terms of position linearity and spatial resolution performances in order to guarantee the spatial correspondence between the ultrasound and the gamma images. Finally, dual-modality images of custom phantoms are obtained highlighting the good co-registration between ultrasound and gamma images, in terms of geometry and image processing, as a consequence of calibration procedures.

  7. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  8. Estimation of fetal gestational age from ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Valiollah

    1992-06-01

    Estimation of fetal gestational age, weight, and determination of fetal growth from the measurements of certain parameters of fetal head, abdomen, and femur have been well established in prenatal sonography. The measurements are made from the two dimensional, B- mode, ultrasound images of the fetus. The most common parameters measured are, biparietal diameter, occipital frontal diameter, head circumference, femur diaphysis length, and abdominal circumference. Since the fetal head has an elliptical shape and the femur has a linear shape, fitting the ellipse on the image of the fetal head, a line on the image of the femur are the tasks of image processing which are discussed in this paper.

  9. A CT-ultrasound-coregistered augmented reality enhanced image-guided surgery system and its preliminary study on brain-shift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. H.; Hsieh, C. H.; Lee, J. D.; Huang, W. C.; Lee, S. T.; Wu, C. T.; Sun, Y. N.; Wu, Y. T.

    2012-08-01

    With the combined view on the physical space and the medical imaging data, augmented reality (AR) visualization can provide perceptive advantages during image-guided surgery (IGS). However, the imaging data are usually captured before surgery and might be different from the up-to-date one due to natural shift of soft tissues. This study presents an AR-enhanced IGS system which is capable to correct the movement of soft tissues from the pre-operative CT images by using intra-operative ultrasound images. First, with reconstructing 2-D free-hand ultrasound images to 3-D volume data, the system applies a Mutual-Information based registration algorithm to estimate the deformation between pre-operative and intra-operative ultrasound images. The estimated deformation transform describes the movement of soft tissues and is then applied to the pre-operative CT images which provide high-resolution anatomical information. As a result, the system thus displays the fusion of the corrected CT images or the real-time 2-D ultrasound images with the patient in the physical space through a head mounted display device, providing an immersive augmented-reality environment. For the performance validation of the proposed system, a brain phantom was utilized to simulate brain-shift scenario. Experimental results reveal that when the shift of an artificial tumor is from 5mm ~ 12mm, the correction rates can be improved from 32% ~ 45% to 87% ~ 95% by using the proposed system.

  10. Multifractal and Singularity Maps of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbrera, Ramiro; Millán, Humberto; Martín-Sotoca, Juan Jose; Pérez Soto, Luis; Sanchez, Maria Elena; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    methods for mapping geochemical anomalies caused by buried sources and for predicting undiscovered mineral deposits in covered areas. Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 122, 55-70. Cumbrera, R., Ana M. Tarquis, Gabriel Gascó, Humberto Millán (2012) Fractal scaling of apparent soil moisture estimated from vertical planes of Vertisol pit images. Journal of Hydrology (452-453), 205-212. Martin Sotoca; J.J. Antonio Saa-Requejo, Juan Grau and Ana M. Tarquis (2016). Segmentation of singularity maps in the context of soil porosity. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 18, EGU2016-11402. Millán, H., Cumbrera, R. and Ana M. Tarquis (2016) Multifractal and Levy-stable statistics of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis. Applied Mathematical Modelling, 40(3), 2384-2395.

  11. Application of 2D and 3D Digital Image Correlation on CO2-like altered carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zinsmeister, Louis; Dautriat, Jérémie; Dimanov, Alexandre; Raphanel, Jean; Bornert, Michel

    2013-04-01

    In order to provide mechanical constitutive laws for reservoir monitoring during CO2 long term storage, we studied the mechanical properties of Lavoux limestone before and after a homogeneous alteration following the protocol of acid treatments defined by Egermann et al, (2006). The mechanical data have been analysed at the light of systematic microstructural investigations. Firstly, the alteration impact on the evolution of flow properties related to microstructural changes was studied at successive levels of alteration by classical petrophysical measurements of porosity and permeability (including NMR, mercury porosimetry and laser diffraction) and by observations of microstructures on thin sections and by SEM. Secondly, the mechanical properties of the samples were investigated by classical (macroscopic) triaxial and uniaxial tests and are discussed in terms of the structural modifications. The macroscopic tests indicate that the alteration weakens the material, according to the observed decrease of elastic moduli and Uniaxial Compressive Strengths, from 29MPa to 19MPa after 6 cycles of acid treatments. The study is further complemented by 2D full (mechanical) field measurements, thanks to Digital Image Correlation (DIC) performed on images acquired during the uniaxial tests. This technique allows for continuous quantitative micro-mechanical monitoring in terms of deformation history and localisation processes during compression. This technique was applied on both intact and altered materials and at different scales of observation: (i) cm-sized samples were compressed in a classical load frame and optically imaged, (ii) mm-sized samples were loaded with a miniaturized compression rig implemented within a Scanning Electron Microscope. At last, 3D full field measurements were performed by 3D-DIC on mm-sized samples, which were compressed "in-situ" an X-ray microtomograph thanks to a miniaturized triaxial cell allowing for confining pressures of up to 15 MPa. At

  12. The effects of transducer geometry on artifacts common to diagnostic bone imaging with conventional medical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, F William; Owen, Kevin; Tiouririne, Mohamed; Hossack, John A

    2012-06-01

    The portability, low cost, and non-ionizing radiation associated with medical ultrasound suggest that it has potential as a superior alternative to X-ray for bone imaging. However, when conventional ultrasound imaging systems are used for bone imaging, clinical acceptance is frequently limited by artifacts derived from reflections occurring away from the main axis of the acoustic beam. In this paper, the physical source of off-axis artifacts and the effect of transducer geometry on these artifacts are investigated in simulation and experimental studies. In agreement with diffraction theory, the sampled linear-array geometry possessed increased off-axis energy compared with single-element piston geometry, and therefore, exhibited greater levels of artifact signal. Simulation and experimental results demonstrated that the linear-array geometry exhibited increased artifact signal when the center frequency increased, when energy off-axis to the main acoustic beam (i.e., grating lobes) was perpendicularly incident upon off-axis surfaces, and when off-axis surfaces were specular rather than diffusive. The simulation model used to simulate specular reflections was validated experimentally and a correlation coefficient of 0.97 between experimental and simulated peak reflection contrast was observed. In ex vivo experiments, the piston geometry yielded 4 and 6.2 dB average contrast improvement compared with the linear array when imaging the spinous process and interlaminar space of an animal spine, respectively. This work indicates that off-axis reflections are a major source of ultrasound image artifacts, particularly in environments comprising specular reflecting (i.e., bone or bone-like) objects. Transducer geometries with reduced sensitivity to off-axis surface reflections, such as a piston transducer geometry, yield significant reductions in image artifact.

  13. Dual-modality imaging system combined fast photoacoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Yuan, Yi

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we have developed a fast dual-modality imaging system for reconstruction photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging based on a novel digital phased array. The scanning mode and image reconstruction algorithms were modified from our previous work to improve the image quality. A 128-element linear transducer array is connected to a multichannel signal acquisition and digital beam-formation system providing techniques of dynamic receiving focus and dynamic receiving apodization to process the signal. We use the linear transducer array with combined scanning mode to detect signals at multiple locations on a circle around the sample. It makes our dual-modality imaging own the ability of imaging complicated structures of objects. An improved limited-field filtered back projection algorithm with directivity factors was applied in photoacoustic imaging to further improve the lateral resolution. Phase-controlled imaging algorithm was applied to reconstruct acoustical impedance difference in the pure ultrasound imaging. The experiments on phantoms and in vivo early breast cancer detection in a mouse model were performed. The images are clearly, accurately provided.

  14. Characterization of a Broadband All-Optical Ultrasound Transducer—From Optical and Acoustical Properties to Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yang; Kim, Jin-Sung; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ashkenazi, Shai; Guo, L. Jay; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    A broadband all-optical ultrasound transducer has been designed, fabricated, and evaluated for high-frequency ultrasound imaging. The device consists of a 2-D gold nanostructure imprinted on top of a glass substrate, followed by a 3 μm PDMS layer and a 30 nm gold layer. A laser pulse at the resonance wavelength of the gold nanostructure is focused onto the surface for ultrasound generation, while the gold nanostructure, together with the 30 nm thick gold layer and the PDMS layer in between, forms an etalon for ultrasound detection, which uses a CW laser at a wavelength far from resonance as the probing beam. The center frequency of a pulse-echo signal recorded in the far field of the transducer is 40 MHz with -6 dB bandwidth of 57 MHz. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) from a 70 μm diameter transmit element combined with a 20 μm diameter receive element probing a near perfect reflector positioned 1.5 mm from the transducer surface is more than 10 dB and has the potential to be improved by at least another 40 dB. A high-frequency ultrasound array has been emulated using multiple measurements from the transducer while mechanically scanning an imaging target. Characterization of the device’s optical and acoustical properties, as well as preliminary imaging results, strongly suggest that all-optical ultrasound transducers can be used to build high-frequency arrays for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging. PMID:18986929

  15. Liver ultrasound image classification by using fractal dimension of edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Moraru, Luminita

    2012-08-01

    Medical ultrasound image edge detection is an important component in increasing the number of application of segmentation, and hence it has been subject of many studies in the literature. In this study, we have classified the liver ultrasound images (US) combining Canny and Sobel edge detectors with fractal analysis in order to provide an indicator about of the US images roughness. We intend to provide a classification rule of the focal liver lesions as: cirrhotic liver, liver hemangioma and healthy liver. For edges detection the Canny and Sobel operators were used. Fractal analyses have been applied for texture analysis and classification of focal liver lesions according to fractal dimension (FD) determined by using the Box Counting method. To assess the performance and accuracy rate of the proposed method the contrast-to-noise (CNR) is analyzed.

  16. Effects of nonlinear propagation in ultrasound contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meng-Xing; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates two types of nonlinear propagation and their effects on image intensity and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in contrast ultrasound images. Previous studies have shown that nonlinear propagation can occur when ultrasound travels through tissue and microbubble clouds, making tissue farther down the acoustic path appear brighter in pulse inversion (PI) images, thus reducing CTR. In this study, the effect of nonlinear propagation through tissue or microbubbles on PI image intensity and CTR are compared at low mechanical index. A combination of simulation and experiment with SonoVue microbubbles were performed using a microbubble dynamics model, a laboratory ultrasound system and a clinical prototype scanner. The results show that, close to the bubble resonance frequency, nonlinear propagation through a bubble cloud of a few centimeter thickness with a modest concentration (1:10000 dilution of SonoVue microbubbles) is much more significant than through tissue-mimicking material. Consequently, CTR in regions distal to the imaging probe is greatly reduced for nonlinear propagation through the bubble cloud, with as much as a 12-dB reduction compared with nonlinear propagation through tissue-mimicking material. Both types of nonlinear propagation cause only a small change in bubble PI signals at the bubble resonance frequency. When the driving frequency increases beyond bubble resonance, nonlinear propagation through bubbles is greatly reduced in absolute values. However because of a greater reduction in nonlinear scattering from bubbles at higher frequencies, the corresponding CTR is much lower than that at bubble resonance frequency.

  17. Acoustic reciprocity of spatial coherence in ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Bottenus, Nick; Üstüner, Kutay F

    2015-05-01

    A conventional ultrasound image is formed by transmitting a focused wave into tissue, time-shifting the backscattered echoes received on an array transducer, and summing the resulting signals. The van Cittert-Zernike theorem predicts a particular similarity, or coherence, of these focused signals across the receiving array. Many groups have used an estimate of the coherence to augment or replace the B-mode image in an effort to suppress noise and stationary clutter echo signals, but this measurement requires access to individual receive channel data. Most clinical systems have efficient pipelines for producing focused and summed RF data without any direct way to individually address the receive channels. We describe a method for performing coherence measurements that is more accessible for a wide range of coherence-based imaging. The reciprocity of the transmit and receive apertures in the context of coherence is derived and equivalence of the coherence function is validated experimentally using a research scanner. The proposed method is implemented on a commercial ultrasound system and in vivo short-lag spatial coherence imaging is demonstrated using only summed RF data. The components beyond the acquisition hardware and beamformer necessary to produce a real-time ultrasound coherence imaging system are discussed. PMID:25965679

  18. Mirizzi Syndrome with Endoscopic Ultrasound Image

    PubMed Central

    Rayapudi, K.; Gholami, P.; Olyaee, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 1 Mirizzi syndrome diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound. He presented with acute onset of jaundice, malaise, dark urine over 3–4 days, and was found to have obstructive jaundice on lab testing. CT scan of the abdomen showed intrahepatic biliary ductal dilation, a 1.5 cm common bile duct (CBD) above the pancreas, and possible stones in the CBD, but no masses. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) by a community gastroenterologist failed to cannulate the CBD. At the University Center, type 1 Mirizzi syndrome was noted on endoscopic ultrasound with narrowing of the CBD with extrinsic compression from cystic duct stone. During repeat ERCP, the CBD could be cannulated over the pancreatic duct wire. A mid CBD narrowing, distal CBD stones, proximal CBD and extrahepatic duct dilation were noted, and biliary sphincterotomy was performed. A small stone in the distal CBD was removed with an extraction balloon. The cystic duct stone was moved with the biliary balloon into the CBD, mechanical basket lithotripsy was performed and stone fragments were delivered out with an extraction balloon. The patient was seen 7 weeks later in the clinic. Skin and scleral icterus had cleared up and he is scheduled for an elective cholecystectomy. Mirizzi syndrome refers to biliary obstruction resulting from impacted stone in the cystic duct or neck of the gallbladder and commonly presents with obstructive jaundice. Type 1 does not have cholecystocholedochal fistulas, but they present in types 2, 3 and 4. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy. Endoscopic treatment is effective and can also be used as a temporizing measure or definitive treatment in poor surgical risk candidates. PMID:23741207

  19. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  20. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Szopiński, Tomasz; Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-09-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  1. A framework for simulating ultrasound imaging based on first order nonlinear pressure-velocity relations.

    PubMed

    Du, Yigang; Fan, Rui; Li, Yong; Chen, Siping; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-07-01

    An ultrasound imaging framework modeled with the first order nonlinear pressure-velocity relations (NPVR) and implemented by a half-time staggered solution and pseudospectral method is presented in this paper. The framework is capable of simulating linear and nonlinear ultrasound propagation and reflections in a heterogeneous medium with different sound speeds and densities. It can be initialized with arbitrary focus, excitation and apodization for multiple individual channels in both 2D and 3D spatial fields. The simulated channel data can be generated using this framework, and ultrasound image can be obtained by beamforming the simulated channel data. Various results simulated by different algorithms are illustrated for comparisons. The root mean square (RMS) errors for each compared pulses are calculated. The linear propagation is validated by an angular spectrum approach (ASA) with a RMS error of 3% at the focal point for a 2D field, and Field II with RMS errors of 0.8% and 1.5% at the electronic and the elevation focuses for 3D fields, respectively. The accuracy for the NPVR based nonlinear propagation is investigated by comparing with the Abersim simulation for pulsed fields and with the nonlinear ASA for monochromatic fields. The RMS errors of the nonlinear pulses calculated by the NPVR and Abersim are respectively 2.4%, 7.4%, 17.6% and 36.6% corresponding to initial pressure amplitudes of 50kPa, 200kPa, 500kPa and 1MPa at the transducer. By increasing the sampling frequency for the strong nonlinearity, the RMS error for 1MPa initial pressure amplitude is reduced from 36.6% to 27.3%. PMID:27107165

  2. Process to generate a synthetic diagnostic for microwave imaging reflectometry with the full-wave code FWR2D.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Domier, C W; Kramer, G; Luhmann, N C; Muscatello, C M; Shi, L; Tobias, B J; Valeo, E

    2014-11-01

    A synthetic microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) diagnostic employing the full-wave reflectometer code (FWR2D) has been developed and is currently being used to guide the design of real systems, such as the one recently installed on DIII-D. The FWR2D code utilizes real plasma profiles as input, and it is combined with optical simulation tools for synthetic diagnostic signal generation. A detailed discussion of FWR2D and the process to generate the synthetic signal are presented in this paper. The synthetic signal is also compared to a prescribed density fluctuation spectrum to quantify the imaging quality. An example is presented with H-mode-like plasma profiles derived from a DIII-D discharge, where the MIR focal is located in the pedestal region. It is shown that MIR is suitable for diagnosing fluctuations with poloidal wavenumber up to 2.0 cm(-1) and fluctuation amplitudes less than 5%.

  3. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  4. Ultrasound in Radiology: from Anatomic, Functional, Molecular Imaging to Drug Delivery and Image-Guided Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, ultrasound has expanded medical imaging well beyond the “traditional” radiology setting - a combination of portability, low cost and ease of use makes ultrasound imaging an indispensable tool for radiologists as well as for other medical professionals who need to obtain imaging diagnosis or guide a therapeutic intervention quickly and efficiently. Ultrasound combines excellent ability for deep penetration into soft tissues with very good spatial resolution, with only a few exceptions (i.e. those involving overlying bone or gas). Real-time imaging (up to hundreds and thousands frames per second) enables guidance of therapeutic procedures and biopsies; characterization of the mechanical properties of the tissues greatly aids with the accuracy of the procedures. The ability of ultrasound to deposit energy locally brings about the potential for localized intervention encompassing: tissue ablation, enhancing penetration through the natural barriers to drug delivery in the body and triggering drug release from carrier micro- and nanoparticles. The use of microbubble contrast agents brings the ability to monitor and quantify tissue perfusion, and microbubble targeting with ligand-decorated microbubbles brings the ability to obtain molecular biomarker information, i.e., ultrasound molecular imaging. Overall, ultrasound has become the most widely used imaging modality in modern medicine; it will continue to grow and expand. PMID:26200224

  5. Reduction of attenuation effects in 3D transrectal ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, Hans; Acosta, Oscar; Fenster, Aaron; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most used imaging modalities today as it is cheap, reliable, safe and widely available. There are a number of issues with US images in general. Besides reflections which is the basis of ultrasonic imaging, other phenomena such as diffraction, refraction, attenuation, dispersion and scattering appear when ultrasound propagates through different tissues. The generated images are therefore corrupted by false boundaries, lack of signal for surface tangential to ultrasound propagation, large amount of noise giving rise to local properties, and anisotropic sampling space complicating image processing tasks. Although 3D Transrectal US (TRUS) probes are not yet widely available, within a few years they will likely be introduced in hospitals. Therefore, the improvement of automatic segmentation from 3D TRUS images, making the process independent of human factor is desirable. We introduce an algorithm for attenuation correction, reducing enhancement/shadowing effects and average attenuation effects in 3D US images, taking into account the physical properties of US. The parameters of acquisition such as logarithmic correction are unknown, therefore no additional information is available to restore the image. As the physical properties are related to the direction of each US ray, the 3D US data set is resampled into cylindrical coordinates using a fully automatic algorithm. Enhancement and shadowing effects, as well as average attenuation effects, are then removed with a rescaling process optimizing simultaneously in and perpendicular to the US ray direction. A set of tests using anisotropic diffusion are performed to illustrate the improvement in image quality, where well defined structures are visible. The evolution of both the entropy and the contrast show that our algorithm is a suitable pre-processing step for segmentation tasks.

  6. Reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images based on Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay filters.

    PubMed

    Toonkum, Pollakrit; Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Chinrungrueng, Chedsada

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reconstruction algorithm for generation of 3D images from a series of two-dimensional (2D) B-scans acquired in the mechanical linear scanning framework. Unlike most existing 3D ultrasound reconstruction algorithms, which have been developed and evaluated in the freehand scanning framework, the new algorithm has been designed to capitalize the regularity pattern of the mechanical linear scanning, where all the B-scan slices are precisely parallel and evenly spaced. The new reconstruction algorithm, referred to as the Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay (CRSG) filter, is a new variant of the Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing filter. The CRSG filter has been improved upon the original SG filter in two respects: First, the cyclic indicator function has been incorporated into the least square cost function to enable the CRSG filter to approximate nonuniformly spaced data of the unobserved image intensities contained in unfilled voxels and reduce speckle noise of the observed image intensities contained in filled voxels. Second, the regularization function has been augmented to the least squares cost function as a mechanism to balance between the degree of speckle reduction and the degree of detail preservation. The CRSG filter has been evaluated and compared with the Voxel Nearest-Neighbor (VNN) interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Speckle Reduction (ASR) filter, the VNN interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Weighted Median (AWM) filter, the Distance-Weighted (DW) interpolation, and the Adaptive Distance-Weighted (ADW) interpolation, on reconstructing a synthetic 3D spherical image and a clinical 3D carotid artery bifurcation in the mechanical linear scanning framework. This preliminary evaluation indicates that the CRSG filter is more effective in both speckle reduction and geometric reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images than the other methods. PMID:20696448

  7. Attenuation mapping for monitoring thermal therapy using ultrasound transmission imaging.

    PubMed

    Parmar, N; Kolios, M C

    2004-01-01

    The use of an ultrasound (US) transmission imaging system to monitor attenuation changes during tissue heating was investigated. This work presents preliminary results of images obtained from an acoustic camera before, during and after heating tissue phantoms using a heated needle. Two types of tissue-mimicking phantoms were used, agar and polyacrylamide-based. Regions of interests were chosen in images obtained from the real-time imaging system, and the pixel intensity values before, during and after heating were compared. In both phantoms, a decrease in image intensities was observed during heating, indicating an increase in tissue attenuation. Additionally, an irreversible change in image intensity was observed in regions close to the heat source. The reversibility of the intensity change was shown to be a function of the distance from the heating needle to the selected region. Initial results indicate that US transmission imaging can be used to monitor thermal therapy. PMID:17271937

  8. Diagnostic value of 2D and 3D imaging in odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shahbazian, M; Jacobs, R

    2012-04-01

    This review aims to explore whether 3D imaging offers an added value in diagnosis of odontogenic sinusitis. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis accounts for approximately 10-12% of maxillary sinusitis cases. Proper diagnosis of odontogenic sinusitis is based on a thorough dental and medical examination and crucial to ensure therapeutic efficacy. To establish the odontogenic cause of maxillary sinusitis, 2D and 3D imaging modalities may be considered, each presenting distinct advantages and drawbacks. The available research indicates that 2D imaging modalities may often mask the origin of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. This limitation is particularly evident in the maxillary molar region, stressing the need for 3D cross-sectional imaging. The advent of low-dose cone beam computed tomography in dentistry may be particularly useful when odontogenic maxillary sinusitis is not responsive to therapy. Yet, it seems that more research is needed to validate its use in odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

  9. Automatic 3D lesion segmentation on breast ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hsien-Chi; Giger, Maryellen L.; Reiser, Ingrid; Drukker, Karen; Edwards, Alexandra; Sennett, Charlene A.

    2013-02-01

    Automatically acquired and reconstructed 3D breast ultrasound images allow radiologists to detect and evaluate breast lesions in 3D. However, assessing potential cancers in 3D ultrasound can be difficult and time consuming. In this study, we evaluate a 3D lesion segmentation method, which we had previously developed for breast CT, and investigate its robustness on lesions on 3D breast ultrasound images. Our dataset includes 98 3D breast ultrasound images obtained on an ABUS system from 55 patients containing 64 cancers. Cancers depicted on 54 US images had been clinically interpreted as negative on screening mammography and 44 had been clinically visible on mammography. All were from women with breast density BI-RADS 3 or 4. Tumor centers and margins were indicated and outlined by radiologists. Initial RGI-eroded contours were automatically calculated and served as input to the active contour segmentation algorithm yielding the final lesion contour. Tumor segmentation was evaluated by determining the overlap ratio (OR) between computer-determined and manually-drawn outlines. Resulting average overlap ratios on coronal, transverse, and sagittal views were 0.60 +/- 0.17, 0.57 +/- 0.18, and 0.58 +/- 0.17, respectively. All OR values were significantly higher the 0.4, which is deemed "acceptable". Within the groups of mammogram-negative and mammogram-positive cancers, the overlap ratios were 0.63 +/- 0.17 and 0.56 +/- 0.16, respectively, on the coronal views; with similar results on the other views. The segmentation performance was not found to be correlated to tumor size. Results indicate robustness of the 3D lesion segmentation technique in multi-modality 3D breast imaging.

  10. Oil-based gel phantom for ultrasound and optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C.; Pelissari, Pedro I. B. G. B.; Aggarwal, Lucimara P.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Pavan, Theo. Z.

    2015-06-01

    Water-based materials are commonly used in phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. Styrene-Ethylene/Butylene-Styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples were made varying the SEBS concentration between 5-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0-9%. Acoustic properties such as speed of sound and attenuation coefficient were obtained by the substitution technique with frequencies ranging from 2.25-10 MHz, and were consistent to that of soft tissue. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration; speed of sound from 1445-1480 m/s, and attenuation from 0.86-11.31 dB/cm were observed. SEBS gels with 0% of LDPE were optically transparent, presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum. In order to fully characterize the optical properties of the samples, the reflectances of the surfaces were measured, along with the absorption. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm to 1200 nm were calculated for each compound. The results showed that the presence of LDPE increased absorption and scattering of the phantoms. The results suggest the copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, what make them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  11. High resolution three-dimensional prostate ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinbo; Patil, Abhay; Hossack, John A.

    2006-03-01

    This work reports on the application of ultrasound elastography to prostate cancer detection using a high resolution three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging system. The imaging was performed at a relatively high frequency (14 MHz), yielding very fine resolution that is optimal for prostate ultrasound imaging. The fine resolution achieved aids in locating smaller lesions than are normally detectable. Elasticity was measured with a quantitative and automatically controlled "Synthetic Digital Rectal Examination (SDRE)" wherein a smoothly increasing force was applied by injecting water, controlled by an electronic syringe pump, into a latex cover over the transrectal transducer. The lesion identified as stiffened tissue was visually enhanced by colorizing and superimposing it over the conventional B-mode image. Experimental results using a tissue-mimicking phantom demonstrated that the reconstruction accuracy of the I-Beam transducer resulted in less than 15% volumetric error. Thus, this high resolution 3D prostate elastography is possible and may provide reliable and accurate determination of the size and the location of cancers, which may result in improved specificity and sensitivity of cancer detection.

  12. Real Time Fast Ultrasound Imaging Technology and Possible Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruza, J. F.; Perez, M.; Moreno, J. M.; Fritsch, C.

    In this work, a novel hardware architecture for fast ultrasound imaging based on FPGA devices is proposed. A key difference over other approaches is the unlimited scalability in terms of active channels without performance losses. Acquisition and processing tasks share the same hardware, eliminating communication bottlenecks with smaller size and power losses. These features make this system suitable to implement the most demanding imaging applications, like 3D Phased Array, Total Focusing Method, Vector Doppler, Image Compounding, High Speed Part Scanning and advanced elastographic techniques. A single medium sized FPGA allows beamforming up to 200 scan lines simultaneously, which is enough to perform most of the above mentioned applications in strict real time.

  13. Ultrasound introscopic image quantitative characteristics for medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselets, Mikhail K.; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Gridko, Alexander N.; Tcheban, Anatoliy K.

    1993-09-01

    The results on computer aided extraction of quantitative characteristics (QC) of ultrasound introscopic images for medical diagnosis are presented. Thyroid gland (TG) images of Chernobil Accident sufferers are considered. It is shown that TG diseases can be associated with some values of selected QCs of random echo distribution in the image. The possibility of these QCs usage for TG diseases recognition in accordance with calculated values is analyzed. The role of speckle noise elimination in the solution of the problem on TG diagnosis is considered too.

  14. A regularization-free Young's modulus reconstruction algorithm for ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaochang; Gao, Jing; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elasticity imaging aims to reconstruct the distribution of elastic modulus (e.g., Young's modulus) within biological tissues, since the value of elastic modulus is often related to pathological changes. Currently, most elasticity imaging algorithms face a challenge of choosing the value of the regularization constant. We propose a more applicable algorithm without the need of any regularization. This algorithm is not only simple to use, but has a relatively high accuracy. Our method comprises of a nonrigid registration technique and tissue incompressibility assumption to estimate the two-dimensional (2D) displacement field, and finite element method (FEM) to reconstruct the Young's modulus distribution. Simulation and phantom experiments are performed to evaluate the algorithm. Simulation and phantom results showed that the proposed algorithm can reconstruct the Young's modulus with an accuracy of 63∼85%.

  15. Viewing effects of 3-D images synthesized from a series of 2-D tomograms by VAP and HAP approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, H. C.; Wang, M. W.; Liu, F. M.; Hsu, Ken Y.

    We report, for the first time, the experimental result and its analysis of synthesizing a series of simulating 2-D tomograms into a 3-D monochromatic image. Our result shows clearly the advantage in monochromaticity of a vertical area-partition (VAP) approach over a horizontal area-partition (HAP) approach during the final white-light reconstruction. This monochromaticity will ensure a 3-D image synthesis without any distortion in gray level or positional recovery.

  16. Optimal angular dose distribution to acquire 3D and extra 2D images for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Gang, Won-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, JaeGu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal non-uniform angular dose distribution to improve the quality of the 3D reconstructed images and to acquire extra 2D projection images. In this analysis, 7 acquisition sets were generated by using four different values for the number of projections (11, 15, 21, and 29) and total angular range (±14°, ±17.5°, ±21°, and ±24.5° ). For all acquisition sets, the zero-degree projection was used as the 2D image that was close to that of standard conventional mammography (CM). Exposures used were 50, 100, 150, and 200 mR for the zero-degree projection, and the remaining dose was distributed over the remaining projection angles. To quantitatively evaluate image quality, we computed the CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) and the ASF (artifact spread function) for the same radiation dose. The results indicate that, for microcalcifications, acquisition sets with approximately 4 times higher exposure on the zero-degree projection than the average exposure for the remaining projection angles yielded higher CNR values and were 3% higher than the uniform distribution. However, very high dose concentrations toward the zero-degree projection may reduce the quality of the reconstructed images due to increasing noise in the peripheral views. The zero-degree projection of the non-uniform dose distribution offers a 2D image similar to that of standard CM, but with a significantly lower radiation dose. Therefore, we need to evaluate the diagnostic potential of extra 2D projection image when diagnose breast cancer by using 3D images with non-uniform angular dose distributions.

  17. Detecting breast microcalcifications using super-resolution ultrasound imaging: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Hanson, Kenneth; Sandoval, Daniel; Pohl, Jennifer; Williamson, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Imaging breast microcalcifications is crucial for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. It is challenging for current clinical ultrasound to image breast microcalcifications. However, new imaging techniques using data acquired with a synthetic-aperture ultrasound system have the potential to significantly improve ultrasound imaging. We recently developed a super-resolution ultrasound imaging method termed the phase-coherent multiple-signal classification (PC-MUSIC). This signal subspace method accounts for the phase response of transducer elements to improve image resolution. In this paper, we investigate the clinical feasibility of our super-resolution ultrasound imaging method for detecting breast microcalcifications. We use our custom-built, real-time synthetic-aperture ultrasound system to acquire breast ultrasound data for 40 patients whose mammograms show the presence of breast microcalcifications. We apply our super-resolution ultrasound imaging method to the patient data, and produce clear images of breast calcifications. Our super-resolution ultrasound PC-MUSIC imaging with synthetic-aperture ultrasound data can provide a new imaging modality for detecting breast microcalcifications in clinic without using ionizing radiation.

  18. Ultrasound imaging of the mouse pancreatic duct using lipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, B.; McKeown, K. R.; Skovan, B.; Ogram, E.; Ingram, P.; Ignatenko, N.; Paine-Murrieta, G.; Witte, R.; Matsunaga, T. O.

    2012-03-01

    Research requiring the murine pancreatic duct to be imaged is often challenging due to the difficulty in selectively cannulating the pancreatic duct. We have successfully catheterized the pancreatic duct through the common bile duct in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice and imaged the pancreatic duct with gas filled lipid microbubbles that increase ultrasound imaging sensitivity due to exquisite scattering at the gas/liquid interface. A SCID mouse was euthanized by CO2, a midline abdominal incision made, the common bile duct cut at its midpoint, a 2 cm, 32 gauge tip catheter was inserted about 1 mm into the duct and tied with suture. The duodenum and pancreas were excised, removed in toto, embedded in agar and an infusion pump was used to instill normal saline or lipid-coated microbubbles (10 million / ml) into the duct. B-mode images before and after infusion of the duct with microbubbles imaged the entire pancreatic duct (~ 1 cm) with high contrast. The microbubbles were cavitated by high mechanical index (HMI) ultrasound for imaging to be repeated. Our technique of catheterization and using lipid microbubbles as a contrast agent may provide an effective, affordable technique of imaging the murine pancreatic duct; cavitation with HMI ultrasound would enable repeated imaging to be performed and clustering of targeted microbubbles to receptors on ductal cells would allow pathology to be localized accurately. This research was supported by the Experimental Mouse Shared Service of the AZ Cancer Center (Grant Number P30CA023074, NIH/NCI and the GI SPORE (NIH/NCI P50 CA95060).

  19. SOUND-SPEED AND ATTENUATION IMAGING OF BREAST TISSUE USING WAVEFORM TOMOGRAPHY OF TRANSMISSION ULTRASOUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, LIANJIE; PRATT, R. GERHARD; DURIC, NEB; LITTRUP, PETER

    2007-01-25

    Waveform tomography results are presented from 800 kHz ultrasound transmission scans of a breast phantom, and from an in vivo ultrasound breast scan: significant improvements are demonstrated in resolution over time-of-flight reconstructions. Quantitative reconstructions of both sound-speed and inelastic attenuation are recovered. The data were acquired in the Computed Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system, comprising a 20 cm diameter solid-state ultrasound ring array with 256 active, non-beamforming transducers. Waveform tomography is capable of resolving variations in acoustic properties at sub-wavelength scales. This was verified through comparison of the breast phantom reconstructions with x-ray CT results: the final images resolve variations in sound speed with a spatial resolution close to 2 mm. Waveform tomography overcomes the resolution limit of time-of-flight methods caused by finite frequency (diffraction) effects. The method is a combination of time-of-flight tomography, and 2-D acoustic waveform inversion of the transmission arrivals in ultrasonic data. For selected frequency components of the waveforms, a finite-difference simulation of the visco-acoustic wave equation is used to compute synthetic data in the current model, and the data residuals are formed by subtraction. The residuals are used in an iterative, gradient-based scheme to update the sound-speed and attenuation model to produce a reduced misfit to the data. Computational efficiency is achieved through the use of time-reversal of the data residuals to construct the model updates. Lower frequencies are used first, to establish the long wavelength components of the image, and higher frequencies are introduced later to provide increased resolution.

  20. Evaluation of Carotid Plaque Using Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Traditional risk factors for predicting of cardiovascular disease are not always effective predictors for development of cardiovascular events. This review summarizes several newly developed noninvasive imaging techniques for evaluating carotid plaques and their role in cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:27358696

  1. Ultrasound imaging velocimetry: effect of beam sweeping on velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Fraser, Katharine H; Poelma, Christian; Mari, Jean-Martial; Eckersley, Robert J; Weinberg, Peter D; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2013-09-01

    As an emerging flow-mapping tool that can penetrate deep into optically opaque media such as human tissue, ultrasound imaging velocimetry has promise in various clinical applications. Previous studies have shown that errors occur in velocity estimation, but the causes have not been well characterised. In this study, the error in velocity estimation resulting from ultrasound beam sweeping in image acquisition is quantitatively investigated. The effects on velocity estimation of the speed and direction of beam sweeping relative to those of the flow are studied through simulation and experiment. The results indicate that a relative error in velocity estimation of up to 20% can be expected. Correction methods to reduce the errors under steady flow conditions are proposed and evaluated. Errors in flow estimation under unsteady flow are discussed.

  2. Thermal imaging and air-coupled ultrasound characterization of a continuous-fiber ceramic composite panels.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.; Easler, T. E.; Szweda, A.; Pillai, T. A. K.; Deemer, C.; Ellingson, W. A.

    1998-04-01

    SYLRAMIC{trademark} continuous fiber ceramic-matrix composites (Nicalon{trademark} fiber/SiNC matrix) were fabricated by Dow Corning Corporation with the polymer-impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) process. The composite microstructure and its uniformity, and the completeness of infiltration during processing were studied as a function of number of PIP cycles. Two nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods, i.e., infrared thermal imaging and air-coupled ultrasound (UT), were used to investigate flat composite panels of two thicknesses and various sizes. The thermal imaging method provided two-dimensional (2D) images of through-thickness thermal diffusivity distributions, and the air-coupled UT method provided 2D images of through-thickness ultrasonic transmission of the panel components. Results from both types of NDEs were compared at various PIP cycles during fabrication of the composites. A delaminated region was clearly detected and its progressive repair was monitored during processing. The NDE data were also correlated to results obtained from destructive characterization.

  3. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion. PMID:24264647

  4. Optical Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (OMUT)-- A New Approach for High Frequency Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadayon, Mohammad Amin

    Piezoelectric technology is the backbone of most medical ultrasound imaging arrays, however, in scaling the technology to sizes required for high frequency operation (> 20 MHz), it encounters substantial difficulties in fabrication and signal transduction efficiency. These limitations particularly affect the design of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging probes whose operating frequency can approach 60 MHz. Optical technology has been proposed and investigated for several decades as an alternative approach for high frequency ultrasound transducers. However, to apply this promising technology in guiding clinical operations such as in interventional cardiology, brain surgery, and laparoscopic surgery further raise in the sensitivity is required. Here, in order to achieve the required sensitivity for an intravascular ultrasound imaging probe, we introduce design changes making use of alternative receiver mechanisms. First, we present an air cavity detector that makes use of a polymer membrane for increased mechanical deflection. We have also significantly raised the thin film detector sensitivity by improving its optical characteristics. This can be achieved by inducing a refractive index feature inside the Fabry-Perot resonator that simply creates a waveguide between the two mirrors. This approach eliminates the loss in energy due to diffraction in the cavity, and therefore the Q-factor is only limited by mirror loss and absorption. To demonstrate this optical improvements, a waveguide Fabry-Perot resonator has been fabricated consisting of two dielectric Bragg reflectors with a layer of photosensitive polymer between them. The measured finesse of the fabricated resonator was 692, and the Q-factor was 55000. The fabrication process of this device has been modified to fabricate an ultrasonically testable waveguide Fabry-Perot resonator. By applying this method, we have achieved a noise equivalent pressure of 178 Pa over a bandwidth of 28 MHz or 0.03 Pa/Hz1/2 which

  5. A 4-DOF Robot for Positioning Ultrasound Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Degirmenci, Alperen; Tenzer, Yaroslav; Howe, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the design, fabrication, and testing of a robot for automatically positioning ultrasound imaging catheters. Our system will point ultrasound (US) catheters to provide real-time imaging of anatomical structures and working instruments during minimally invasive surgeries. Manually navigating US catheters is difficult and requires extensive training in order to aim the US imager at desired targets. Therefore, a four DOF robotic system was developed to automatically navigate US imaging catheters for enhanced imaging. A rotational transmission enables three DOF for pitch, yaw, and roll of the imager. This transmission is translated by the fourth DOF. An accuracy analysis was conducted to calculate the maximum allowable joint motion error. Rotational joints must be accurate to within 1.5° and the translational joint must be accurate within 1.4 mm. Motion tests were then conducted to validate the accuracy of the robot. The average resulting errors in positioning of the rotational joints were measured to be 0.28°-0.38° with average measured backlash error 0.44°. Average translational positioning and backlash errors were measured to be significantly lower than the reported accuracy of the position sensor. The resulting joint motion errors were well within the required specifications for accurate robot motion. Such effective navigation of US imaging catheters will enable better visualization in various procedures ranging from cardiac arrhythmia treatment to tumor removal in urological cases. PMID:26925468

  6. Development of a Hybrid Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasound Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Victoria; Rivens, Ian; Collins, David J.; Leach, Martin O.; ter Haar, Gail R.

    2014-01-01

    A system which allows magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) image data to be acquired simultaneously has been developed. B-mode and Doppler US were performed inside the bore of a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner using a clinical 1–4 MHz US transducer with an 8-metre cable. Susceptibility artefacts and RF noise were introduced into MR images by the US imaging system. RF noise was minimised by using aluminium foil to shield the transducer. A study of MR and B-mode US image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of transducer-phantom separation was performed using a gel phantom. This revealed that a 4 cm separation between the phantom surface and the transducer was sufficient to minimise the effect of the susceptibility artefact in MR images. MR-US imaging was demonstrated in vivo with the aid of a 2 mm VeroWhite 3D-printed spherical target placed over the thigh muscle of a rat. The target allowed single-point registration of MR and US images in the axial plane to be performed. The system was subsequently demonstrated as a tool for the targeting and visualisation of high intensity focused ultrasound exposure in the rat thigh muscle. PMID:25177702

  7. EEG and functional ultrasound imaging in mobile rats

    PubMed Central

    Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Pernot, Mathieu; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickaël; Cohen, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We developed an integrated experimental framework which extends the brain exploration capabilities of functional ultrasound imaging to awake/mobile animals. In addition to hemodynamic data, this method further allows parallel access to EEG recordings of neuronal activity. This approach is illustrated with two proofs of concept: first, a behavioral study, concerning theta rhythm activation in a maze running task and, second, a disease-related study concerning spontaneous epileptic seizures. PMID:26237228

  8. Fully automatic contour detection in intravascular ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusseau, Elisabeth F.; de Korte, Chris L.; Mastik, Fritz; Schaar, Johannes; van der Steen, Anton F.

    2004-04-01

    Segmentation of deformable structures remains a challenging task in ultrasound imaging especially in low signal-to-noise ratio applications. In this paper a fully automatic method, dedicated to the luminal contour segmentation in intracoronary ultrasound imaging is introduced. The method is based on an active contour with a priori properties that evolves according to the statistics of the ultrasound texture brightness, determined as being mainly Rayleigh distributed. However, contrary to classical snake-based algorithms, the presented technique neither requires from the user the pre-selection of a region of interest tight around the boundary, nor parameter tuning. This fully automatic character is achieved by an initial contour that is not set, but estimated and thus adapted to each image. Its estimation combines two statistical criteria extracted from the a posteriori probability, function of the contour position. These criteria are the location of the function maximum (or maximum a posteriori estimator) and the first zero-crossing of the function derivative. Then starting form the initial contour, a region of interest is automatically selected and the process iterated until the contour evolution can be ignored. In vivo coronary images from 15 patients, acquired with a 20 MHz central frequency Jomed Invision ultrasound scanner were segmented with the developed method. Automatic contours were compared to those manually drawn by two physician in terms of mean absolute difference. Results demonstrate that the error between automatic contours and the average of manual ones (0.099+/-0.032mm) and the inter-expert error (0.097+/-0.027mm) are similar and of small amplitude.

  9. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Parrish, Angela R; Cotarla, Ion; Jones, Laundette P; Johnson, Michael D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary. PMID:18215290

  10. Comparison of 3-D synthetic aperture phased-array ultrasound imaging and parallel beamforming.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) can be used to achieve real-time 3-D ultrasound phased-array imaging. It investigates whether SAI increases the image quality compared with the parallel beamforming (PB) technique for real-time 3-D imaging. Data are obtained using both simulations and measurements with an ultrasound research scanner and a commercially available 3.5- MHz 1024-element 2-D transducer array. To limit the probe cable thickness, 256 active elements are used in transmit and receive for both techniques. The two imaging techniques were designed for cardiac imaging, which requires sequences designed for imaging down to 15 cm of depth and a frame rate of at least 20 Hz. The imaging quality of the two techniques is investigated through simulations as a function of depth and angle. SAI improved the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) at low steering angles by 35%, and the 20-dB cystic resolution by up to 62%. The FWHM of the measured line spread function (LSF) at 80 mm depth showed a difference of 20% in favor of SAI. SAI reduced the cyst radius at 60 mm depth by 39% in measurements. SAI improved the contrast-to-noise ratio measured on anechoic cysts embedded in a tissue-mimicking material by 29% at 70 mm depth. The estimated penetration depth on the same tissue-mimicking phantom shows that SAI increased the penetration by 24% compared with PB. Neither SAI nor PB achieved the design goal of 15 cm penetration depth. This is likely due to the limited transducer surface area and a low SNR of the experimental scanner used.

  11. Improved 2-D resistivity imaging of features in covered karst terrain with arrays of implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiflu, H. G.; Kruse, S. E.; Harro, D.; Loke, M. H.; Wilkinson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography is commonly used to identify geologic features associated with sinkhole formation. In covered karst terrain, however, it can be difficult to resolve the depth to top of limestone with this method. This is due to the fact that array lengths, and hence depth of resolution, are often limited by residential or commercial lot dimensions in urban environments. Furthermore, the sediments mantling the limestone are often clay-rich and highly conductive. The resistivity method has limited sensitivity to resistive zones beneath conductive zones. This sensitivity can be improved significantly with electrodes implanted at depth in the cover sediments near the top of limestone. An array of deep electrodes is installed with direct push technology in the karst cover. When combined with a surface array in which each surface electrode is underlain by a deep electrode, the array geometry is similar to a borehole array turned on its side. This method, called the Multi-Electrode Resistivity Implant Technique (MERIT), offers the promise of significantly improved resolution of epikarst and cover collapse development zones in the overlying sediment, the limestone or at the sediment-bedrock interface in heterogeneous karst environments. With a non-traditional array design, the question of optimal array geometries arises. Optimizing array geometries is complicated by the fact that many plausible 4-electrode readings will produce negative apparent resistivity values, even in homogeneous terrain. Negative apparent resistivities cannot be used in inversions based on the logarithm of the apparent resistivity. New algorithms for seeking optimal array geometries have been developed by modifying the 'Compare R' method of Wilkinson and Loke. The optimized arrays show significantly improved resolution over basic arrays adapted from traditional 2D surface geometries. Several MERIT case study surveys have been conducted in covered karst in west-central Florida, with

  12. Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Diaz, Oliver; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Bosmans, Hilde; Strudley, Celia J.; Wells, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials.

  13. Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Warren, Lucy M; Mackenzie, Alistair; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Diaz, Oliver; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Bosmans, Hilde; Strudley, Celia J; Wells, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials.

  14. Dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers for contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Martin, K Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  15. Dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers for contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Martin, K Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-11-04

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed.

  16. Variogram methods for texture classification of atherosclerotic plaque ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeromin, Oliver M.; Pattichis, Marios S.; Pattichis, Constantinos; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos; Nicolaides, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the western world and the major cause of disability in adults. The type and stenosis of extracranial carotid artery disease is often responsible for ischemic strokes, transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or amaurosis fugax (AF). The identification and grading of stenosis can be done using gray scale ultrasound scans. The appearance of B-scan pictures containing various granular structures makes the use of texture analysis techniques suitable for computer assisted tissue characterization purposes. The objective of this study is to investigate the usefulness of variogram analysis in the assessment of ultrasound plague morphology. The variogram estimates the variance of random fields, from arbitrary samples in space. We explore stationary random field models based on the variogram, which can be applied in ultrasound plaque imaging leading to a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system for the early detection of symptomatic atherosclerotic plaques. Non-parametric tests on the variogram coefficients show that the cofficients coming from symptomatic versus asymptomatic plaques come from distinct distributions. Furthermore, we show significant improvement in class separation, when a log point-transformation is applied to the images, prior to variogram estimation. Model fitting using least squares is explored for anisotropic variograms along specific directions. Comparative classification results, show that variogram coefficients can be used for the early detection of symptomatic cases, and also exhibit the largest class distances between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque images, as compared to over 60 other texture features, used in the literature.

  17. Dual-Frequency Piezoelectric Transducers for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K. Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F. Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  18. Beef quality parameters estimation using ultrasound and color images

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Beef quality measurement is a complex task with high economic impact. There is high interest in obtaining an automatic quality parameters estimation in live cattle or post mortem. In this paper we set out to obtain beef quality estimates from the analysis of ultrasound (in vivo) and color images (post mortem), with the measurement of various parameters related to tenderness and amount of meat: rib eye area, percentage of intramuscular fat and backfat thickness or subcutaneous fat. Proposal An algorithm based on curve evolution is implemented to calculate the rib eye area. The backfat thickness is estimated from the profile of distances between two curves that limit the steak and the rib eye, previously detected. A model base in Support Vector Regression (SVR) is trained to estimate the intramuscular fat percentage. A series of features extracted on a region of interest, previously detected in both ultrasound and color images, were proposed. In all cases, a complete evaluation was performed with different databases including: color and ultrasound images acquired by a beef industry expert, intramuscular fat estimation obtained by an expert using a commercial software, and chemical analysis. Conclusions The proposed algorithms show good results to calculate the rib eye area and the backfat thickness measure and profile. They are also promising in predicting the percentage of intramuscular fat. PMID:25734452

  19. Estimation of 3-D pore network coordination number of rocks from watershed segmentation of a single 2-D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, Arash; Ayatollahi, Shahab; Kharrat, Riyaz; Dashti, Nader

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we have utilized 3-D micro-tomography images of real and synthetic rocks to introduce two mathematical correlations which estimate the distribution parameters of 3-D coordination number using a single 2-D cross-sectional image. By applying a watershed segmentation algorithm, it is found that the distribution of 3-D coordination number is acceptably predictable by statistical analysis of the network extracted from 2-D images. In this study, we have utilized 25 volumetric images of rocks in order to propose two mathematical formulas. These formulas aim to approximate the average and standard deviation of coordination number in 3-D pore networks. Then, the formulas are applied for five independent test samples to evaluate the reliability. Finally, pore network flow modeling is used to find the error of absolute permeability prediction using estimated and measured coordination numbers. Results show that the 2-D images are considerably informative about the 3-D network of the rocks and can be utilized to approximate the 3-D connectivity of the porous spaces with determination coefficient of about 0.85 that seems to be acceptable considering the variety of the studied samples.

  20. An enhanced CCRTM (E-CCRTM) damage imaging technique using a 2D areal scan for composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) non-contact areal scan system was developed to image and quantify impact damage in a composite plate using an enhanced zero-lag cross-correlation reverse-time migration (E-CCRTM) technique. The system comprises a single piezoelectric actuator mounted on the composite plate and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for scanning a region to capture the scattered wavefield in the vicinity of the PZT. The proposed damage imaging technique takes into account the amplitude, phase, geometric spreading, and all of the frequency content of the Lamb waves propagating in the plate; thus, the reflectivity coefficients of the delamination can be calculated and potentially related to damage severity. Comparisons are made in terms of damage imaging quality between 2-D areal scans and linear scans as well as between the proposed and existing imaging conditions. The experimental results show that the 2-D E-CCRTM performs robustly when imaging and quantifying impact damage in large-scale composites using a single PZT actuator with a nearby areal scan using LDV.

  1. Parametric imaging of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    A new image processing strategy is detailed for the simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. A technique for locally mapping tumor perfusion parameters using skeletonized neovascular data is also introduced. Simulated images were used to test the neovascular skeletonization technique and variance (error) of relevant parametric estimates. Preliminary DCE-US image datasets were collected in 6 female patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 MHz transducer and Definity contrast agent. Simulation data demonstrates that neovascular morphology parametric estimation is reproducible albeit measurement error can occur at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Experimental results indicate the feasibility of our approach to performing both tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology measurements from DCE-US images. Future work will expand on our initial clinical findings and also extent our image processing strategy to 3-dimensional space to allow whole tumor characterization.

  2. Refraction Correction in 3D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first correction of refraction in three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging using an iterative approach that traces propagation paths through a two-layer planar tissue model, applying Snell’s law in 3D. This approach is applied to real-time 3D transcranial ultrasound imaging by precomputing delays offline for several skull thicknesses, allowing the user to switch between three sets of delays for phased array imaging at the push of a button. Simulations indicate that refraction correction may be expected to increase sensitivity, reduce beam steering errors, and partially restore lost spatial resolution, with the greatest improvements occurring at the largest steering angles. Distorted images of cylindrical lesions were created by imaging through an acrylic plate in a tissue-mimicking phantom. As a result of correcting for refraction, lesions were restored to 93.6% of their original diameter in the lateral direction and 98.1% of their original shape along the long axis of the cylinders. In imaging two healthy volunteers, the mean brightness increased by 8.3% and showed no spatial dependency. PMID:24275538

  3. Assessment of some problematic factors in facial image identification using a 2D/3D superimposition technique.

    PubMed

    Atsuchi, Masaru; Tsuji, Akiko; Usumoto, Yosuke; Yoshino, Mineo; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2013-09-01

    The number of criminal cases requiring facial image identification of a suspect has been increasing because a surveillance camera is installed everywhere in the city and furthermore, the intercom with the recording function is installed in the home. In this study, we aimed to analyze the usefulness of a 2D/3D facial image superimposition system for image identification when facial aging, facial expression, and twins are under consideration. As a result, the mean values of the average distances calculated from the 16 anatomical landmarks between the 3D facial images of the 50s groups and the 2D facial images of the 20s, 30s, and 40s groups were 2.6, 2.3, and 2.2mm, respectively (facial aging). The mean values of the average distances calculated from 12 anatomical landmarks between the 3D normal facial images and four emotional expressions were 4.9 (laughter), 2.9 (anger), 2.9 (sadness), and 3.6mm (surprised), respectively (facial expressions). The average distance obtained from 11 anatomical landmarks between the same person in twins was 1.1mm, while the average distance between different person in twins was 2.0mm (twins). Facial image identification using the 2D/3D facial image superimposition system demonstrated adequate statistical power and identified an individual with high accuracy, suggesting its usefulness. However, computer technology concerning video image processing and superimpose progress, there is a need to keep familiar with the morphology and anatomy as its base. PMID:23886899

  4. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Schlosser, Jeffrey; Chen, Josephine; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To build Monte Carlo (MC) models of two ultrasound (US) probes and to quantify the effect of beam attenuation due to the US probes for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their megavoltage (MV) CT images acquired in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam in the EGSnrc, BEAMnrc, and DOSXYZnrc codes. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2 and 8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the US probes in horizontal (for both probes) and vertical (for the X6-1 probe) orientation was measured in a solid water phantom for 6 and 15 MV (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams with a 2D ionization chamber array and radiographic films at 5 cm depth. The MC models of the US probes were validated by comparison of the measured dose distributions and dose distributions predicted by MC. Attenuation of depth dose in the (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams and small circular beams due to the presence of the probes was assessed by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities in the X6-1 and C5-2 probes were found to be 4.8 and 5.2 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Dose profile differences between MC simulations and measurements of less than 3% for US probes in horizontal orientation were found, with the exception of the penumbra region. The largest 6% dose difference was observed in dose profiles of the X6-1 probe placed in vertical orientation, which was attributed to inadequate modeling of the probe cable. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses showed that over 96% of measurement points passed the 3%/3 mm criteria for both probes placed in horizontal orientation and for the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation. The

  5. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Schlosser, Jeffrey; Chen, Josephine; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To build Monte Carlo (MC) models of two ultrasound (US) probes and to quantify the effect of beam attenuation due to the US probes for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their megavoltage (MV) CT images acquired in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam in the EGSnrc, BEAMnrc, and DOSXYZnrc codes. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2 and 8.0 g/cm3. Beam attenuation due to the US probes in horizontal (for both probes) and vertical (for the X6-1 probe) orientation was measured in a solid water phantom for 6 and 15 MV (15 × 15) cm2 beams with a 2D ionization chamber array and radiographic films at 5 cm depth. The MC models of the US probes were validated by comparison of the measured dose distributions and dose distributions predicted by MC. Attenuation of depth dose in the (15 × 15) cm2 beams and small circular beams due to the presence of the probes was assessed by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R2 > 0.99. The maximum mass densities in the X6-1 and C5-2 probes were found to be 4.8 and 5.2 g/cm3, respectively. Dose profile differences between MC simulations and measurements of less than 3% for US probes in horizontal orientation were found, with the exception of the penumbra region. The largest 6% dose difference was observed in dose profiles of the X6-1 probe placed in vertical orientation, which was attributed to inadequate modeling of the probe cable. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses showed that over 96% of measurement points passed the 3%/3 mm criteria for both probes placed in horizontal orientation and for the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation. The X6-1 probe in vertical

  6. Barker-coded excitation in ophthalmological ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Jun; Ji, Jian-Jun; Wang, Yan-Qun

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound is an attractive means to obtain fine-resolution images of biological tissues for ophthalmologic imaging. To solve the tradeoff between axial resolution and detection depth, existing in the conventional single-pulse excitation, this study develops a new method which uses 13-bit Barker-coded excitation and a mismatched filter for high-frequency ophthalmologic imaging. A novel imaging platform has been designed after trying out various encoding methods. The simulation and experiment result show that the mismatched filter can achieve a much higher out signal main to side lobe which is 9.7 times of the matched one. The coded excitation method has significant advantages over the single-pulse excitation system in terms of a lower MI, a higher resolution, and a deeper detection depth, which improve the quality of ophthalmic tissue imaging. Therefore, this method has great values in scientific application and medical market. PMID:25356093

  7. Adaptive texture filtering for defect inspection in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmola, Carl; Segal, Andrew C.; Lovewell, Brian; Nash, Charles

    1993-05-01

    The use of ultrasonic imaging to analyze defects and characterize materials is critical in the development of non-destructive testing and non-destructive evaluation (NDT/NDE) tools for manufacturing. To develop better quality control and reliability in the manufacturing environment advanced image processing techniques are useful. For example, through the use of texture filtering on ultrasound images, we have been able to filter characteristic textures from highly-textured C-scan images of materials. The materials have highly regular characteristic textures which are of the same resolution and dynamic range as other important features within the image. By applying texture filters and adaptively modifying their filter response, we have examined a family of filters for removing these textures.

  8. Material characterization and defect inspection in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmola, Carl; Segal, Andrew C.; Lovewell, Brian; Mahdavieh, Jacob; Ross, Joseph; Nash, Charles

    1992-08-01

    The use of ultrasonic imaging to analyze defects and characterize materials is critical in the development of non-destructive testing and non-destructive evaluation (NDT/NDE) tools for manufacturing. To develop better quality control and reliability in the manufacturing environment advanced image processing techniques are useful. For example, through the use of texture filtering on ultrasound images, we have been able to filter characteristic textures from highly textured C-scan images of materials. The materials have highly regular characteristic textures which are of the same resolution and dynamic range as other important features within the image. By applying texture filters and adaptively modifying their filter response, we have examined a family of filters for removing these textures.

  9. Expectation-Driven Text Extraction from Medical Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Reul, Christian; Köberle, Philipp; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Puppe, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In this study an expectation-driven approach is proposed to extract data stored as pixel structures in medical ultrasound images. Prior knowledge about certain properties like the position of the text and its background and foreground grayscale values is utilized. Several open source Java libraries are used to pre-process the image and extract the textual information. The results are presented in an Excel table together with the outcome of several consistency checks. After manually correcting potential errors, the outcome is automatically stored in the main database. The proposed system yielded excellent results, reaching an accuracy of 99.94% and reducing the necessary human effort to a minimum. PMID:27577478

  10. Integrated transrectal probe for translational ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Kevan L.; Harrison, Tyler; Usmani, Nawaid; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    A compact photoacoustic transrectal probe is constructed for improved imaging in brachytherapy treatment. A 192 element 5 MHz linear transducer array is mounted inside a small 3D printed casing along with an array of optical fibers. The device is fed by a pump laser and tunable NIR-optical parametric oscillator with data collected by a Verasonics ultrasound platform. This assembly demonstrates improved imaging of brachytherapy seeds in phantoms with depths up to 5 cm. The tuneable excitation in combination with standard US integration provides adjustable contrast between the brachytherapy seeds, blood filled tubes and background tissue.

  11. Double difference tomography for breast ultrasound sound speed imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Rama, Olsi; Burger, Angelika; Polin, Lisa; Nechiporchik, Nicole

    2011-03-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. Double difference (DD) tomography utilizes more accurate differential time-of-flight (ToF) data to reconstruct the sound speed structure of the breast. It can produce more precise and better resolution sound speed images than standard tomography that uses absolute ToF data. We apply DD tomography to phantom data and excised mouse mammary glands data. DD tomograms demonstrate sharper sound speed contrast than the standard tomograms.

  12. Optical Flow-Based Tracking of Needles and Needle-Tip Localization Using Circular Hough Transform in Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Ayvali, Elif; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided interventions have become the standard of care for needle-based procedures. The success of the image-guided procedures depends on the ability to precisely locate and track the needle. This work is primarily focused on 2D ultrasound-based tracking of a hollow needle (cannula) that is composed of straight segments connected by shape memory alloy actuators. An in-plane tracking algorithm based on optical flow was proposed to track the cannula configuration in real-time. Optical flow is a robust tracking algorithm that can easily run on a CPU. However, the algorithm does not perform well when it is applied to the ultrasound images directly due to the intensity variation in the images. The method presented in this work enables using the optical flow algorithm on ultrasound images to track features of the needle. By taking advantage of the bevel tip, Circular Hough transform was used to accurately locate the needle tip when the imaging is out-of-plane. Through experiments inside tissue phantom and ex-vivo experiments in bovine kidney, the success of the proposed tracking methods were demonstrated. Using the methods presented in this work, quantitative information about the needle configuration is obtained in real-time which is crucial for generating control inputs for the needle and automating the needle insertion. PMID:25503523

  13. A new combined prior based reconstruction method for compressed sensing in 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Muhammad S.; Islam, Rafiqul; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew J.; Pickering, Mark R.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities, with 3D US imaging gaining popularity recently due to its considerable advantages over 2D US imaging. However, as it is limited by long acquisition times and the huge amount of data processing it requires, methods for reducing these factors have attracted considerable research interest. Compressed sensing (CS) is one of the best candidates for accelerating the acquisition rate and reducing the data processing time without degrading image quality. However, CS is prone to introduce noise-like artefacts due to random under-sampling. To address this issue, we propose a combined prior-based reconstruction method for 3D US imaging. A Laplacian mixture model (LMM) constraint in the wavelet domain is combined with a total variation (TV) constraint to create a new regularization regularization prior. An experimental evaluation conducted to validate our method using synthetic 3D US images shows that it performs better than other approaches in terms of both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  14. Integration of 3D and 2D imaging data for assured navigation in unknown environments: initial steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Evan; Uijt de Haag, Maarten

    2009-05-01

    This paper discusses the initial steps of the development of a novel navigation method that integrates three-dimensional (3D) point cloud data, two-dimensional (2D) gray-level (intensity), and data from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). A time-of-flight camera such as MESA's Swissranger will output both the 3D and 2D data. The target application is position and attitude determination of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and autonomous ground vehicles (AGV) in urban or indoor environments. In urban and indoor environments a GPS position capability may not only be unavailable due to shadowing, significant signal attenuation or multipath, but also due to intentional denial or deception. The proposed algorithm extracts key features such as planar surfaces, lines and corner-points from both the 3D (point-cloud) and 2D (intensity) imagery. Consecutive observations of corresponding features in the 3D and 2D image frames are then used to compute estimates of position and orientation changes. Since the use of 3D image features for positioning suffers from limited feature observability resulting in deteriorated position accuracies, and the 2D imagery suffers from an unknown depth when estimating the pose from consecutive image frames, it is expected that the integration of both data sets will alleviate the problems with the individual methods resulting in an position and attitude determination method with a high level of assurance. An Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is used to set up the tracking gates necessary to perform data association of the features in consecutive frames. Finally, the position and orientation change estimates can be used to correct for the IMU drift errors.

  15. Localized harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound surgery targeting.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-08-01

    Recently, an in vivo real-time ultrasound-based monitoring technique that uses localized harmonic motion (LHM) to detect changes in tissues during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) has been proposed to control the exposure. This technique can potentially be used as well for targeting imaging. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of using LHM to detect changes in stiffness and the feasibility of using it for imaging purposes in phantoms and in vivo tumor detection. A single-element FUS transducer (80 mm focal length, 100 mm diameter, 1.485 MHz) was used for inducing a localized harmonic motion and a separate ultrasound diagnostic transducer excited by a pulser/receiver (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion. The motion was estimated using cross-correlation techniques on the acquired radio-frequency (RF) signal. Silicon phantom studies were performed to determine the size of inclusion that was possible to detect using this technique. Inclusions were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude and it was possible to depict inclusions as small as 4 mm. The amplitude of the induced LHM was always lower at the inclusions compared with the one obtained at the surroundings. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs and LHM was induced and measured at the tumor region. Tumors (as small as 10 mm in length and 4 mm in width) were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude.

  16. Analysis of left ventricular impedance in comparison with ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong Wook; Park, Sung Min

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac monitoring of ventricular assist devices (VADs) is important for detecting heart failure risks, such as critical arrhythmia and ventricular fibrillation, and for supplying data that are useful for hemodynamic control. Specifically, impedance cardiograms (ICGs) are especially beneficial because they have no effect on the tissue or organs and can monitor various parameters simultaneously, including the heart rate and heart contractions. In this article, we measured impedance changes in porcine left ventricles using electrodes placed around the inlet and outlet cannulae of the VAD. The measured left ventricular impedance (LVI) waveform changes are caused by heart movements, such as cardiac muscle contraction and changes in blood volume as a result of heart filling and emptying. In contrast to other impedance measurements, LVI is less affected by the movement of other organs. Using a porcine model, LVIs were measured and compared with blood flow data measured with an ultrasound blood flowmeter. The ICG showed the same frequency as the animal's heart rate, and their amplitudes were closely related to cardiac output (CO). However, the waveform differed from other vital signs, such as CO, electrocardiogram, and blood pressure. Ultrasound images were used to explain the impedance waveform. In the ultrasound images, we obtained the shape and size of the animal's heart and calculated the predicted impedance data. We then compared these to the actual measured data. These results show that the impedance signal contains detailed information on heart rate and CO; these results were unaffected by the cannulae or VAD perfusion. PMID:22188560

  17. Compensation of log-compressed images for 3-D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sanches, João M; Marques, Jorge S

    2003-02-01

    In this study, a Bayesian approach was used for 3-D reconstruction in the presence of multiplicative noise and nonlinear compression of the ultrasound (US) data. Ultrasound images are often considered as being corrupted by multiplicative noise (speckle). Several statistical models have been developed to represent the US data. However, commercial US equipment performs a nonlinear image compression that reduces the dynamic range of the US signal for visualization purposes. This operation changes the distribution of the image pixels, preventing a straightforward application of the models. In this paper, the nonlinear compression is explicitly modeled and considered in the reconstruction process, where the speckle noise present in the radio frequency (RF) US data is modeled with a Rayleigh distribution. The results obtained by considering the compression of the US data are then compared with those obtained assuming no compression. It is shown that the estimation performed using the nonlinear log-compression model leads to better results than those obtained with the Rayleigh reconstruction method. The proposed algorithm is tested with synthetic and real data and the results are discussed. The results have shown an improvement in the reconstruction results when the compression operation is included in the image formation model, leading to sharper images with enhanced anatomical details.

  18. Ultrasound-aided high-resolution biophotonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-10-01

    We develop novel biophotonic imaging for early-cancer detection, a grand challenge in cancer research, using nonionizing electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves. Unlike ionizing x-ray radiation, nonionizing electromagnetic waves such as optical waves are safe for biomedical applications and reveal new contrast mechanisms and functional information. For example, our spectroscopic oblique-incidence reflectometry can detect skin cancers based on functional hemoglobin parameters and cell nuclear size with 95% accuracy. Unfortunately, electromagnetic waves in the nonionizing spectral region do not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as do x-rays. Consequently, high-resolution tomography based on nonionizing electromagnetic waves alone, as demonstrated by our Mueller optical coherence tomography, is limited to superficial tissue imaging. Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, furnishes good imaging resolution but has poor contrast in early-stage tumors and has strong speckle artifacts as well. We developed ultrasound-mediated imaging modalities by combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically. The hybrid modalities yield speckle-free electromagnetic-contrast at ultrasonic resolution in relatively large biological tissue. In ultrasound-modulated (acousto)-optical tomography, a focused ultrasonic wave encodes diffuse laser light in scattering biological tissue. In photo-acoustic (thermo-acoustic) tomography, a low-energy laser (RF) pulse induces ultrasonic waves in biological tissue due to thermoelastic expansion.

  19. Comparison of algorithms for ultrasound image segmentation without ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikka, Karan; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2010-02-01

    Image segmentation is a pre-requisite to medical image analysis. A variety of segmentation algorithms have been proposed, and most are evaluated on a small dataset or based on classification of a single feature. The lack of a gold standard (ground truth) further adds to the discrepancy in these comparisons. This work proposes a new methodology for comparing image segmentation algorithms without ground truth by building a matrix called region-correlation matrix. Subsequently, suitable distance measures are proposed for quantitative assessment of similarity. The first measure takes into account the degree of region overlap or identical match. The second considers the degree of splitting or misclassification by using an appropriate penalty term. These measures are shown to satisfy the axioms of a quasi-metric. They are applied for a comparative analysis of synthetic segmentation maps to show their direct correlation with human intuition of similar segmentation. Since ultrasound images are difficult to segment and usually lack a ground truth, the measures are further used to compare the recently proposed spectral clustering algorithm (encoding spatial and edge information) with standard k-means over abdominal ultrasound images. Improving the parameterization and enlarging the feature space for k-means steadily increased segmentation quality to that of spectral clustering.

  20. Advanced noise reduction in placental ultrasound imaging using CPU and GPU: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zombori, G.; Ryan, J.; McAuliffe, F.; Rainford, L.; Moran, M.; Brennan, P.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of different implementations of 3D anisotropic diffusion speckle noise reduction technique on ultrasound images. In this project we are developing a novel volumetric calcification assessment metric for the placenta, and providing a software tool for this purpose. The tool can also automatically segment and visualize (in 3D) ultrasound data. One of the first steps when developing such a tool is to find a fast and efficient way to eliminate speckle noise. Previous works on this topic by Duan, Q. [1] and Sun, Q. [2] have proven that the 3D noise reducing anisotropic diffusion (3D SRAD) method shows exceptional performance in enhancing ultrasound images for object segmentation. Therefore we have implemented this method in our software application and performed a comparative study on the different variants in terms of performance and computation time. To increase processing speed it was necessary to utilize the full potential of current state of the art Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Our 3D datasets are represented in a spherical volume format. With the aim of 2D slice visualization and segmentation, a "scan conversion" or "slice-reconstruction" step is needed, which includes coordinate transformation from spherical to Cartesian, re-sampling of the volume and interpolation. Combining the noise filtering and slice reconstruction in one process on the GPU, we can achieve close to real-time operation on high quality data sets without the need for down-sampling or reducing image quality. For the GPU programming OpenCL language was used. Therefore the presented solution is fully portable.

  1. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal spot localization using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the -3dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R(2) = 0.821 at p < 0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated the

  2. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal spot localization using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the  -3dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R2 = 0.821 at p  <  0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated

  3. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Focal Spot Localization Using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial