Science.gov

Sample records for 2d velocity field

  1. On Animating 2D Velocity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A velocity field, even one that represents a steady state flow, implies a dynamical system. Animated velocity fields is an important tool in understanding such complex phenomena. This paper looks at a number of techniques that animate velocity fields and propose two new alternatives. These are texture advection and streamline cycling. The common theme among these techniques is the use of advection on some texture to generate a realistic animation of the velocity field. Texture synthesis and selection for these methods are presented. Strengths and weaknesses of the techniques are also discussed in conjunctions with several examples.

  2. On Animating 2D Velocity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex

    2000-01-01

    A velocity field. even one that represents a steady state flow implies a dynamical system. Animated velocity fields is an important tool in understanding such complex phenomena. This paper looks at a number of techniques that animate velocity fields and propose two new alternatives, These are texture advection and streamline cycling. The common theme among these techniques is the use of advection on some texture to generate a realistic animation of the velocity field. Texture synthesis and selection for these methods are presented. Strengths and weaknesses of the techniques are also discussed in conjunction with several examples.

  3. Measuring curvature and velocity vector fields for waves of cardiac excitation in 2-D media.

    PubMed

    Kay, Matthew W; Gray, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Excitable media theory predicts the effect of electrical wavefront morphology on the dynamics of propagation in cardiac tissue. It specifies that a convex wavefront propagates slower and a concave wavefront propagates faster than a planar wavefront. Because of this, wavefront curvature is thought to be an important functional mechanism of cardiac arrhythmias. However, the curvature of wavefronts during an arrhythmia are generally unknown. We introduce a robust, automated method to measure the curvature vector field of discretely characterized, arbitrarily shaped, two-dimensional (2-D) wavefronts. The method relies on generating a smooth, continuous parameterization of the shape of a wave using cubic smoothing splines fitted to an isopotential at a specified level, which we choose to be -30 mV. Twice differentiating the parametric form provides local curvature vectors along the wavefront and waveback. Local conduction velocities are computed as the wave speed along lines normal to the parametric form. In this way, the curvature and velocity vector field for wavefronts and wavebacks can be measured. We applied the method to data sampled from a 2-D numerical model and several examples are provided to illustrate its usefulness for studying the dynamics of cardiac propagation in 2-D media.

  4. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  5. Effective filtering and interpolation of 2D discrete velocity fields with Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saumier, Louis-Philippe; Khouider, Boualem; Agueh, Martial

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new variational technique to interpolate and filter a two-dimensional velocity vector field which is discretely sampled in a region of {{{R}}}2 and sampled only once at a time, on a small time-interval [0,{{Δ }}t]. The main idea is to find a solution of the Navier-Stokes equations that is closest to a prescribed field in the sense that it minimizes the l 2 norm of the difference between this solution and the target field. The minimization is performed on the initial vorticity by expanding it into radial basis functions of Gaussian type, with a fixed size expressed by a parameter ɛ. In addition, a penalty term with parameter k e is added to the minimizing functional in order to select a solution with a small kinetic energy. This additional term makes the minimizing functional strongly convex, and therefore ensures that the minimization problem is well-posed. The interplay between the parameters k e and ɛ effectively contributes to smoothing the discrete velocity field, as demonstrated by the numerical experiments on synthetic and real data.

  6. New insights from velocity field measurements in multiphase flow of water and liquid CO2 in 2D porous micromodels for

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Kyritsis, D. C.; Christensen, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    We study the multiphase flow of water and liquid/supercritical CO2 in 2D porous micromodels, with the goal of developing a more complete understanding of pore-scale flow dynamics for the scenario of geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. Fluorescent microscopy and the microscopic particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique are employed to simultaneously visualize both phases and obtain the velocity field in the aqueous phase. This technique provides a powerful tool for studying such flow systems and the results give valuable insight into flow processes at the pore scale. The fluid-fluid interface curvature from the images can be used to estimate the local capillary pressure. The velocity measurements illustrate active and passive flow pathways and circulation regions near the fluid-fluid interfaces induced by shear. Thin water films observed on the solid surfaces confirm the hydrophilic nature of the micromodels. The velocity of the said films is measured by particle tracking.

  7. Demonstration of synchronised scanning Lidar measurements of 2D velocity fields in a boundary-layer wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dooren, M. F.; Kühn, M.; PetroviĆ, V.; Bottasso, C. L.; Campagnolo, F.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.; Mikkelsen, T.; Croce, A.; Zasso, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper combines the currently relevant research methodologies of scaled wind turbine model experiments in wind tunnels with remote-sensing short-range WindScanner Lidar measurement technology. The wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano was equipped with three wind turbine models and two short-range WindScanner Lidars to demonstrate the benefits of synchronised scanning Lidars in such experimental surroundings for the first time. The dual- Lidar system can provide fully synchronised trajectory scans with sampling time scales ranging from seconds to minutes. First, staring mode measurements were compared to hot wire probe measurements commonly used in wind tunnels. This yielded goodness of fit coefficients of 0.969 and 0.902 for the 1 Hz averaged u- and v-components of the wind speed, respectively, validating the 2D measurement capability of the Lidar scanners. Subsequently, the measurement of wake profiles on a line as well as wake area scans were executed to illustrate the applicability of Lidar scanning to measuring small scale wind flow effects. The downsides of Lidar with respect to the hot wire probes are the larger measurement probe volume and the loss of some measurements due to moving blades. In contrast, the benefits are the high flexibility in conducting both point measurements and area scanning, and the fact that remote sensing techniques do not disturb the flow while measuring. The research campaign revealed a high potential for using short-range WindScanner Lidar for accurately measuring small scale flow structures in a wind tunnel.

  8. Predicting abnormal pressure from 2-D seismic velocity modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Grauls, D.; Dunand, J.P.; Beaufort, D.

    1995-12-01

    Seismic velocities are the only data available, before drilling, on which to base a quantitative, present-day estimate of abnormal pressure. Recent advances in seismic velocity processing have enabled them to obtain, using an in-house approach, an optimized 2-D interval velocity field and consequently to better define the lateral extension of pressure regimes. The methodology, interpretation and quantification of overpressure-related anomalies are supported by case studies, selected in sand-shale dominated Tertiary basins, offshore West Africa. Another advantage of this approach is that it can also account for the presence of reservoir-potential intervals at great depth and thus provide significant insight, from a prospective standpoint, into very poorly explored areas. Although at the outset the 2-D seismic tool legitimately merits being favored, optimization of the final predictive pressure model, prior to drilling, will depend upon the success of its combined use with other concepts and approaches, pertaining to structural geology, sedimentology, rock mechanics and fluid dynamics.

  9. Estimating 2-D vector velocities using multidimensional spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Oddershede, Niels; Løvstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-08-01

    Wilson (1991) presented an ultrasonic wideband estimator for axial blood flow velocity estimation through the use of the 2-D Fourier transform. It was shown how a single velocity component was concentrated along a line in the 2-D Fourier space, where the slope was given by the axial velocity. Later, it was shown that this approach could also be used for finding the lateral velocity component by also including a lateral sampling. A single velocity component would then be concentrated along a plane in the 3-D Fourier space, tilted according to the 2 velocity components. This paper presents 2 new velocity estimators for finding both the axial and lateral velocity components. The estimators essentially search for the plane in the 3- D Fourier space, where the integrated power spectrum is largest. The first uses the 3-D Fourier transform to find the power spectrum, while the second uses a minimum variance approach. Based on this plane, the axial and lateral velocity components are estimated. Several phantom measurements, for flow-to-depth angles of 60, 75, and 90 degrees, were performed. Multiple parallel lines were beamformed simultaneously, and 2 different receive apodization schemes were tried. The 2 estimators were then applied to the data. The axial velocity component was estimated with an average standard deviation below 2.8% of the peak velocity, while the average standard deviation of the lateral velocity estimates was between 2.0% and 16.4%. The 2 estimators were also tested on in vivo data from a transverse scan of the common carotid artery, showing the potential of the vector velocity estimation method under in vivo conditions. PMID:18986918

  10. Velocity distributions for 2D inelastic granular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracle, Dylan J.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Moon, Sung Joon; Rericha, Erin; Swift, J. B.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2002-11-01

    A previous study of a vertically vibrated 2D granular gas found a time-averaged horizontal velocity distribution function of the form P(v) exp(-C|v|^3/2) for the entire velocity range(F. Rouyer and N. Menon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85), 3676 (2000).. We examine the dependence of the velocity distribution function on phase in the cycle, height above the plate and air pressure in the container. We use 1.6 mm stainless steel balls confined to a vertical plane by a container 32σ tall, 48σ wide, and 1.15σ thick, where σ is the particle diameter. The container oscillates with peak acceleration 20g and frequency 50 Hz. We observe that a shock forms at collision of the plate with the layer and propagates through the layer, heating the grains. The shock rapidly decays over a distance of approximately 8σ above the plate; above this height the granular temperature and density are essentially independent of phase in the cycle. In this steady-state region, we compare the observed functional form of the velocity distribution to molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Estimation of pseudo-2D shear-velocity section by inversion of high frequency surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Liu, J.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2006-01-01

    A scheme to generate pseudo-2D shear-velocity sections with high horizontal resolution and low field cost by inversion of high frequency surface waves is presented. It contains six steps. The key step is the joint method of crossed correlation and phase shift scanning. This joint method chooses only two traces to generate image of dispersion curve. For Rayleigh-wave dispersion is most important for estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity, it can effectively obtain reliable images of dispersion curves with a couple of traces. The result of a synthetic example shows the feasibility of this scheme. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. Wide-Field H2D+ Observations of Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, James; Friesen, R.; Caselli, P.; Myers, P. C.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, isolated starless cores have been revealed to have significant chemical differentiation with very low abundances of carbon-bearing molecules (such as CO and its isotopologues) in their cold, dense interiors. The inner regions of such cores, however, may be quite interesting, e.g., if contraction or collapse begins there. To explore these regions, we present detections of six isolated starless cores in the 110-111 line of H2D+ at 372 GHz using the new HARP instrument at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Since the detection of this line requires very dry conditions on Mauna Kea (i.e., κ(225 GHz) < 0.05), only a multi-beam receiver system like the 4 X 4 HARP array can locate H2D+ emission across such cores in a practical amount of observing time. In all cases, the brightest line emission is coincident with the local peak of submillimeter continuum emission, but significant H2D+ emission is detected offset from the continuum peak in some. In addition, we describe the thermal and turbulent velocity fields in these cores revealed by these lines.

  13. 2-D Drift Velocities from the IMAGE EUV Plasmaspheric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D.; Adrian, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IMAGE Mission extreme ultraviolet imager (EUY) observes He+ plasmaspheric ions throughout the inner magnetosphere. Limited by ionizing radiation and viewing close to the Sun, images of the He+ distribution are available every 10 minutes for many hours as the spacecraft passes through apogee in its highly elliptical orbit. As a consistent constituent at about 15%, He+ is an excellent surrogate for monitoring all of the processes that control the dynamics of plasmaspheric plasma. In particular, the motion ofHe+ transverse to the ambient magnetic field is a direct indication of convective electric fields. The analysis of boundary motions has already achieved new insights into the electrodynamic coupling processes taking place between energetic magnetospheric plasmas and the ionosphere. Yet to be fulfilled, however, is the original promise that global EUY images of the plasmasphere might yield two-dimensional pictures of meso-scale to macro-scale electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. This work details the technique and initial application of an IMAGE EUY analysis that appears capable of following thermal plasma motion on a global basis.

  14. 2-D Drift Velocities from the IMAGE EUV Plasmaspheric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The IMAGE Mission extreme ultraviolet imager (EW) observes He(+) plasmaspheric ions throughout the inner magnetosphere. Limited by ionizing radiation and viewing close to the Sun, images of the He(+) distribution are available every 10 minutes for many hours as the spacecraft passes through apogee in its highly elliptical orbit. As a consistent constituent at about 15%, He(+) is an excellent surrogate for monitoring all of the processes that control the dynamics of plasmaspheric plasma. In particular, the motion of He' transverse to the ambient magnetic field is a direct indication of convective electric fields. The analysis of boundary motions has already achieved new insights into the electrodynamic coupling processes taking place between energetic magnetospheric plasmas and the ionosphere. Yet to be fulfilled, however, is the original promise that global E W images of the plasmasphere might yield two-dimensional pictures of mesoscale to macro-scale electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. This work details the technique and initial application of an IMAGE EUV analysis that appears capable of following thermal plasma motion on a global basis.

  15. Simulating photospheric Doppler velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for constructing artificial data that realistically simulate photospheric velocity fields. The velocity fields include rotation, differential rotation, meridional circulation, giant cell convection, supergranulation, convective limb shift, p-mode oscillations, and observer motion. Data constructed by this method can be used for testing algorithms designed to extract and analyze these velocity fields in real Doppler velocity data.

  16. 2D He+ pickup ion velocity distribution functions: STEREO PLASTIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, C.; Berger, L.; Taut, A.; Peleikis, T.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Context. He+ pickup ions are either born from the ionization of interstellar neutral helium inside our heliosphere, the so-called interstellar pickup ions, or through the interaction of solar wind ions with small dust particles, the so-called inner source of pickup ions. Until now, most observations of pickup ions were limited to reduced 1D velocity spectra, which are insufficient to study certain characteristics of the He+ velocity distribution function (VDF). Aims: It is generally assumed that rapid pitch-angle scattering of freshly created pickup ions quickly leads to a fully isotropic He+ VDF. In light of recent observations, this assumption has found to be oversimplified and needs to be reinvestigated. Methods: Using He+ pickup ion data from the PLASTIC instrument on board the STEREO A spacecraft, we reconstruct a reduced form of the He+ VDF in two dimensions. This allows us to study relative changes of the 2D He+ VDF as a function of the configuration of the heliospheric magnetic field. Results: Our observations show that the He+ VDF is highly anisotropic and even indicates that, at least for certain configurations of B, it is not fully gyrotropic. Our results further suggest, that the observed velocity and pitch angle of He+ depends strongly on the local solar magnetic field vector, B, the ecliptic longitude, λ, the solar wind speed, vsw, and the global distribution of B. Conclusions: We found two distinct signatures that systematically change as a function of the alignment of B: (1) a ring beam distribution that is most pronounced at wsw> 0.5 and likely attributed to interstellar He+; (2) a beam signature aligned parallel to B that is most pronounced at wsw < 0.5 and attributed to inner-source He+. The strong anisotropy and the aforementioned dependencies of the He+ VDF also imply that observations of 1D velocity spectra of He+ pickup ions are potentially deceiving.

  17. Relationship between Entrainment and Static Pressure Field on 2-D Jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Ono, K.; Saima, A.

    1996-11-01

    It is well know that entrainment carried out in wakes and jets. This experimental study aimes at investigation the relationship between the entrainment and the pressure field in 2-D jet. The 2-D jet was generated by 2-D rectangular wind tunnel. The velocity and prressure fields were observed in order to investigate the free shear layer of jet. These value were measured by the x type hot-wire anemometer, LDV and the newly developed static pressure probe. Jet diffusion process is visualized by smoke wire method. The result of the experiment was that the static pressure fluctuated intensively, and was negative mean value because of the velocity intermittence in the free shear layer of the 2-D jet. It seems reasonable to suppose that entrainment occurs owing to the negative static pressure by the eddy motion and large scale convection in the free shear layer.

  18. Structure, Density and Velocity Fluctuations in Quasi-2D non-Brownian Suspensions of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, Florence; Lhuillier, Daniel; Martin, Jérôme; Salin, Dominique

    1999-11-01

    Non-brownian sedimenting suspensions exhibit density and velocity fluctuations. We have performed experiments on a quasi-2D counter-flow stabilized suspension of 2000 spherical particles, namely a liquid-solid fluidized bed in a Hele-Shaw cell. This 2D suspension displays a uniform concentration but the particle radial distribution function and the fluctuations of the particle number in a sub-volume of the suspension suggest that the micostructure is homogeneous but not random. We have also measured the velocity fluctuations of a test-particle and the fluctuation of the mean particle velocity in a sub-volume. It happens that the relation between velocity and concentration fluctuation in a sub-volume can be deduced from a balance between buoyancy and parietal friction forces.

  19. Visualization of 2-D and 3-D Tensor Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1997-01-01

    In previous work we have developed a novel approach to visualizing second order symmetric 2-D tensor fields based on degenerate point analysis. At degenerate points the eigenvalues are either zero or equal to each other, and the hyper-streamlines about these points give rise to tri-sector or wedge points. These singularities and their connecting hyper-streamlines determine the topology of the tensor field. In this study we are developing new methods for analyzing and displaying 3-D tensor fields. This problem is considerably more difficult than the 2-D one, as the richness of the data set is much larger. Here we report on our progress and a novel method to find , analyze and display 3-D degenerate points. First we discuss the theory, then an application involving a 3-D tensor field, the Boussinesq problem with two forces.

  20. Visualization of 2-D and 3-D Tensor Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1995-01-01

    In previous work we have developed a novel approach to visualizing second order symmetric 2-D tensor fields based on degenerate point analysis. At degenerate points the eigenvalues are either zero or equal to each other, and the hyperstreamlines about these points give rise to trisector or wedge points. These singularities and their connecting hyperstreamlines determine the topology of the tensor field. In this study we are developing new methods for analyzing and displaying 3-D tensor fields. This problem is considerably more difficult than the 2-D one, as the richness of the data set is much larger. Here we report on our progress and a novel method to find, analyze and display 3-D degenerate points. First we discuss the theory, then an application involving a 3-D tensor field, the Boussinesq problem with two forces.

  1. Simulation of 2D Fields of Raindrop Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berne, A.; Schleiss, M.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2008-12-01

    The raindrop size distribution (DSD hereafter) is of primary importance for quantitative applications of weather radar measurements. The radar reflectivity~Z (directly measured by radar) is related to the power backscattered by the ensemble of hydrometeors within the radar sampling volume. However, the rain rate~R (the flux of water to the surface) is the variable of interest for many applications (hydrology, weather forecasting, air traffic for example). Usually, radar reflectivity is converted into rain rate using a power law such as Z=aRb. The coefficients a and b of the Z-R relationship depend on the DSD. The variability of the DSD in space and time has to be taken into account to improve radar rain rate estimates. Therefore, the ability to generate a large number of 2D fields of DSD which are statistically homogeneous provides a very useful simulation framework that nicely complements experimental approaches based on DSD data, in order to investigate radar beam propagation through rain as well as radar retrieval techniques. The proposed approach is based on geostatistics for structural analysis and stochastic simulation. First, the DSD is assumed to follow a gamma distribution. Hence a 2D field of DSDs can be adequately described as a 2D field of a multivariate random function consisting of the three DSD parameters. Such fields are simulated by combining a Gaussian anamorphosis and a multivariate Gaussian random field simulation algorithm. Using the (cross-)variogram models fitted on data guaranties that the spatial structure of the simulated fields is consistent with the observed one. To assess its validity, the proposed method is applied to data collected during intense Mediterranean rainfall. As only time series are available, Taylor's hypothesis is assumed to convert time series in 1D range profile. Moreover, DSD fields are assumed to be isotropic so that the 1D structure can be used to simulate 2D fields. A large number of 2D fields of DSD parameters are

  2. CBEAM. 2-D: a two-dimensional beam field code

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, K.A.

    1985-05-01

    CBEAM.2-D is a two-dimensional solution of Maxwell's equations for the case of an electron beam propagating through an air medium. Solutions are performed in the beam-retarded time frame. Conductivity is calculated self-consistently with field equations, allowing sophisticated dependence of plasma parameters to be handled. A unique feature of the code is that it is implemented on an IBM PC microcomputer in the BASIC language. Consequently, it should be available to a wide audience.

  3. Method to Rapidly Collect Thousands of Velocity Observations to Validate Million-Element 2D Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.; Bratovich, P.; Massa, D.; Reedy, G.; Johnson, T.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional (depth-averaged) hydrodynamic models have existed for decades and are used to study a variety of hydrogeomorphic processes as well as to design river rehabilitation projects. Rapid computer and coding advances are revolutionizing the size and detail of 2D models. Meanwhile, advances in topo mapping and environmental informatics are providing the data inputs to drive large, detailed simulations. Million-element computational meshes are in hand. With simulations of this size and detail, the primary challenge has shifted to finding rapid and inexpensive means for testing model predictions against observations. Standard methods for collecting velocity data include boat-mounted ADCP and point-based sensors on boats or wading rods. These methods are labor intensive and often limited to a narrow flow range. Also, they generate small datasets at a few cross-sections, which is inadequate to characterize the statistical structure of the relation between predictions and observations. Drawing on the long-standing oceanographic method of using drogues to track water currents, previous studies have demonstrated the potential of small dGPS units to obtain surface velocity in rivers. However, dGPS is too inaccurate to test 2D models. Also, there is financial risk in losing drogues in rough currents. In this study, an RTK GPS unit was mounted onto a manned whitewater kayak. The boater positioned himself into the current and used floating debris to maintain a speed and heading consistent with the ambient surface flow field. RTK GPS measurements were taken ever 5 sec. From these positions, a 2D velocity vector was obtained. The method was tested over ~20 km of the lower Yuba River in California in flows ranging from 500-5000 cfs, yielding 5816 observations. To compare velocity magnitude against the 2D model-predicted depth-averaged value, kayak-based surface values were scaled down by an optimized constant (0.72), which had no negative effect on regression analysis

  4. Catalog of velocity distributions around a reconnection site in 2D PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Lukas; Bourdin, Philippe-A.; Nakamura, Takuma K. M.; Nakamura, Rumi; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The velocity distribution of electrons and ions are known to be a marker for regions where magnetic reconnection develops. Past theoretical and computational works demonstrated that non-gyrotropic and anisotropic distributions depending on particle meandering motions and accelerations are seen around the reconnection point. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is expected to resolve such kinetic scale reconnection regions. We present a catalog of velocity distribution functions that can give hints on the location within the current sheet relative to the reconnection point, which is sometimes unclear from pure spacecraft observations. We use 2D PIC simulations of anti-parallel magnetic reconnection to obtain velocity distributions at different locations, like in the center of the reconnection site, the ion and electron diffusion regions, or the reconnection inflow and outflow regions. With sufficiently large number of particles we resolve the distribution functions also in rather small regions. Such catalog may be compared with future MMS observations of the Earth's magnetotail.

  5. Conformal field theory of critical Casimir interactions in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, G.; Emig, T.; Kardar, M.

    2013-10-01

    Thermal fluctuations of a critical system induce long-ranged Casimir forces between objects that couple to the underlying field. For two-dimensional (2D) conformal field theories (CFT) we derive an exact result for the Casimir interaction between two objects of arbitrary shape, in terms of 1) the free energy of a circular ring whose radii are determined by the mutual capacitance of two conductors with the objects' shape; and 2) a purely geometric energy that is proportional to the conformal charge of the CFT, but otherwise super-universal in that it depends only on the shapes and is independent of boundary conditions and other details.

  6. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  7. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation.more » By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  8. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  9. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  10. Three-bosons in 2D with a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittenhouse, Seth; Johnson, Brad; Wray, Andrew; D'Incao, Jose

    2016-05-01

    Systems of interacting particles in reduced dimensions in the presence of external fields can exhibit a number of surprising behaviors, for instance the emergence of the fractional quantum Hall effect. Examining few-body interactions and effects can lead to significant insights within these systems. In this talk we examine a system of three bosons confined to two dimensions in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field within the framework of the adiabatic hyperspherical method. For the case of zero-range, regularized pseudo-potential interactions, we find that the system is nearly separable in hyperspherical coordinates and that, away from a set of narrow avoided crossings, the full energy eigenspectrum as a function of the 2D s-wave scattering length is well described by ignoring coupling between adiabatic hyperradial potentials. In the case of weak attractive or repulsive interactions, we find the lowest three-body energy states exhibit even/odd parity oscillations as a function of total internal 2D angular momentum and that for weak repulsive interactions, the universal lowest energy interacting state has an internal angular momentum of M=3. We also discuss the effect of including finite range and higher partial-wave interactions.

  11. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  12. Numerical Simulations of 2-D Phase-Field Model with Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; McDonough, J. M.; Tagavi, K. A.

    2003-11-01

    We present a 2-D isotropic phase-field model with convection induced by a flow field applied to freezing into a supercooled melt of pure substance, nickle. Numerical procedures and details of numerical parameters employed are provided, and the convergence of the numerical method is demonstrated by conducting grid-function convergence tests. Dendrite structures, temperature fields, pressure fields, streamlines and velocity vector fields are presented at several different times during the dendrite growth process. Comparisons of dendrites and temperature fields with and without convection indicate that the flow field has a significant effect on the growth rate of the dendrites; in particular, it inhibits the growth. In addition, the flow field influences the dendritic structural morphologies and thickness of the interface. Moreover, the dendrites behave as a solid body in the flow leading to stagnation points and other interesting flow features.

  13. Surface wave phase velocities from 2-D surface wave tomography studies in the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Kutlu, Yusuf; Erduran, Murat; Çakır, Özcan; Vinnik, Lev; Kosarev, Grigoriy; Oreshin, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    We study the Rayleigh and Love surface wave fundamental mode propagation beneath the Anatolian plate. To examine the inter-station phase velocities a two-station method is used along with the Multiple Filter Technique (MFT) in the Computer Programs in Seismology (Herrmann and Ammon, 2004). The near-station waveform is deconvolved from the far-station waveform removing the propagation effects between the source and the station. This method requires that the near and far stations are aligned with the epicentre on a great circle path. The azimuthal difference of the earthquake to the two-stations and the azimuthal difference between the earthquake and the station are restricted to be smaller than 5o. We selected 3378 teleseismic events (Mw >= 5.7) recorded by 394 broadband local stations with high signal-to-noise ratio within the years 1999-2013. Corrected for the instrument response suitable seismogram pairs are analyzed with the two-station method yielding a collection of phase velocity curves in various period ranges (mainly in the range 25-185 sec). Diffraction from lateral heterogeneities, multipathing, interference of Rayleigh and Love waves can alter the dispersion measurements. In order to obtain quality measurements, we select only smooth portions of the phase velocity curves, remove outliers and average over many measurements. We discard these average phase velocity curves suspected of suffering from phase wrapping errors by comparing them with a reference Earth model (IASP91 by Kennett and Engdahl, 1991). The outlined analysis procedure yields 3035 Rayleigh and 1637 Love individual phase velocity curves. To obtain Rayleigh and Love wave travel times for a given region we performed 2-D tomographic inversion for which the Fast Marching Surface Tomography (FMST) code developed by N. Rawlinson at the Australian National University was utilized. This software package is based on the multistage fast marching method by Rawlinson and Sambridge (2004a, 2004b). The

  14. Moment Invariants for 2D Flow Fields via Normalization in Detail.

    PubMed

    Bujack, Roxana; Hotz, Ingrid; Scheuermann, Gerik; Hitzer, Eckhard

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of 2D flow data is often guided by the search for characteristic structures with semantic meaning. One way to approach this question is to identify structures of interest by a human observer, with the goal of finding similar structures in the same or other datasets. The major challenges related to this task are to specify the notion of similarity and define respective pattern descriptors. While the descriptors should be invariant to certain transformations, such as rotation and scaling, they should provide a similarity measure with respect to other transformations, such as deformations. In this paper, we propose to use moment invariants as pattern descriptors for flow fields. Moment invariants are one of the most popular techniques for the description of objects in the field of image recognition. They have recently also been applied to identify 2D vector patterns limited to the directional properties of flow fields. Moreover, we discuss which transformations should be considered for the application to flow analysis. In contrast to previous work, we follow the intuitive approach of moment normalization, which results in a complete and independent set of translation, rotation, and scaling invariant flow field descriptors. They also allow to distinguish flow features with different velocity profiles. We apply the moment invariants in a pattern recognition algorithm to a real world dataset and show that the theoretical results can be extended to discrete functions in a robust way. PMID:26357255

  15. VLT/VIMOS integral field spectroscopy of luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies: 2D kinematic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellocchi, Enrica; Arribas, Santiago; Colina, Luis; Miralles-Caballero, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Context. (Ultra) Luminous infrared galaxies [(U)LIRGs] host the most extreme star-forming events in the present universe and are places where a significant fraction of the past star formation beyond z ~ 1 has occurred. The kinematic characterization of this population is important to constrain the processes that govern such events. Aims: We present and discuss the 2D kinematic properties of the ionized gas (Hα) in sample local (U)LIRGs, for which relatively high linear resolution and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio can be obtained. Methods: We have obtained Very Large Telescope VIMOS optical integral field spectroscopy (IFS) for 38 local (z < 0.1) (U)LIRGs (31 LIRGs and 7 ULIRGs, 51 individual galaxies). This sample covers well the less studied LIRG luminosity range, and it includes the morphological types corresponding to the different phases along the merging process (i.e., isolated disks, interacting and merging systems). Results: The vast majority of objects have two main kinematically distinct components. One component (i.e., narrow or systemic) extends over the whole line-emitting region and is characterized by small-to-intermediate velocity dispersions (i.e., σ from 30 to 160 km s-1). The second component (broad) has a larger velocity dispersion (up to 320 km s-1); it is mainly found in the inner regions and is generally blueshifted with respect to the systemic component. The largest extensions and extreme kinematic properties are observed in interacting and merging systems, and they are likely associated with nuclear outflows. The systemic component traces the overall velocity field, showing a large variety of kinematic 2D structures, from very regular velocity patterns typical of pure rotating disks (29%) to kinematically perturbed disks (47%) and highly disrupted and complex velocity fields (24%). Thus, most of the objects (76%) are dominated by rotation. We find that rotation is more relevant in LIRGs than in ULIRGs. There is a clear correlation between

  16. Detailed temporally resolved 2-D Velocity Measurements in a Novel Heat Exchanger Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guezennec, Yann G.; Ko, Jang-Hyok; Choi, Woong-Chul

    1998-11-01

    Using flow visualization as a primary tool, a novel, high-performance heat transfer surface for compact heat exchangers was designed, specifically for low Reynolds number applications. This geometry was specifically created to enhance or generate strong three-dimensional transport even at low Reynolds number. It consists of a staggered array of "pin" mounted normal to the fins. A 15:1 model of this heat exchanger surface core was built out of Plexiglas to provide optical access and this model was placed in a 1'x1' water channel. The flow speed was adjusted to match the Reynolds based on the hydraulic diameter based on the fin pitch. The flow was seeded with small polystyrene particles and illuminated by a laser sheet from an Argon Ion laser. The fluid motion was recorded using a CCD camera and an S-VHS video recorder. In post-processing, the video records were automatically digitized and processed using a cinematographic PIV technique. The temporal evolution of the 2-D flow field (side view) clearly shows the presence of unsteady, shed vortical regions behind the pins, modulated by the spatially-periodic acceleration/deceleration and meandering of the mean flow between the periodic array of staggered pins. In the perpendicular view (top view), the results show the presence of two strong cross-stream transport mechanisms, mainly the horse-shoe vortex near the pin-fin junctions and the very strong spanwise transport in the separated wake region of the pins. This transport is most likely associated with the strong interaction of the longitudinal vortices (emanating form the horseshoe) and the spanwise vortices from the pin wake. This vortex interaction sets up a strong spanwise pressure gradient inducing large cross-stream transport from the fin to the core flow. Animation of the results illustrating these effects will be presented.

  17. New GNSS velocity field and preliminary velocity model for Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Ludeña, Marco P.; Staller, Alejandra; Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge M.; Belén Benito, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new preliminary velocity model of Ecuador based on the GNSS data of the REGME network (continuous monitoring GNSS network). To date, there is no velocity model available for the country. The only existing model in the zone is the regional model VEMOS2009 for South America and Caribbean (Drewes and Heidbach, 2012). This model was developed from the SIRGAS station positions, the velocities of the SIRGAS-CON stations, and several geodynamics projects performed in the region. Just two continuous GNSS (cGNSS) stations of Ecuador were taking into account in the VEMOS2009 model. The first continuous station of the REGME network was established in 2008. At present, it is composed by 32 continuous GNSS stations, covering the country. All the stations provided data during at least two years. We processed the data of the 32 GNSS stations of REGME for the 2008-2014 period, as well as 20 IGS stations in order to link to the global reference frame IGb08 (ITRF2008). GPS data were processed using Bernese 5.0 software (Dach et al., 2007). We obtained and analyzed the GNSS coordinate time series of the 32 REGME stations and we calculated the GPS-derived horizontal velocity field of the country. Velocities in ITRF2008 were transformed into a South American fixed reference frame, using the Euler pole calculated from 8 cGNSS stations throughout this plate. Our velocity field is consistent with the tectonics of the country and contributes to a better understanding of it. From the horizontal velocity field, we determined a preliminary model using the kriging geostatistical technique. To check the results we use the cross-validation method. The differences between the observed and estimated values range from ± 5 mm. This is a new velocity model obtained from GNSS data for Ecuador.

  18. Perfect 2-d quadrupole fields from permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Vella, M.

    1996-04-01

    Consider the 13-beam channel array shown in Figure 1. It is asserted that, under mathematically ideal assumptions, a pure quadrupole field is centered in each of the 13 beam channel boxes. An identical quadrupole field (for {bar H}, not {bar B}) is also centered in each of the 4 boxes containing 4 magnetic wedges located near the center of the system. An iron yoke ({mu} = {infinity}) with the displayed zig-zag shape provides a boundary condition (H{sub {parallel}} = 0) that makes the 13 channels equivalent to a portion of an infinite array. A similar array can be readily drawn for any number of beams. The quadrupole gradient in the beam channels is B{prime} = M{sub o}/2b, where M{sub o} is the remnant field of the magnetic wedges, and the channel diameter (wedge-to-wedge) is 2b. Note that a unit cell of the array, containing one beam, has diameter 2{radical}2 b (viewed from 45{degree} tilt) so its area is 8 b{sup 2}. A significant advantage of this design over those using dipolar blocks is the large fraction of cross section devoted to beam channels (50% vs 25%). Application to a heavy ion fusion driver is discussed.

  19. Using overlapping sonobuoy data from the Ross Sea to construct a 2D deep crustal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Clayton, R. W.; Stock, J. M.; Granot, R.

    2012-03-01

    Sonobuoys provide an alternative to using long streamers while conducting multi-channel seismic (MCS) studies, in order to provide deeper velocity control. We present analysis and modeling techniques for interpreting the sonobuoy data and illustrate the method with ten overlapping sonobuoys collected in the Ross Sea, offshore from Antarctica. We demonstrate the importance of using the MCS data to correct for ocean currents and changes in ship navigation, which is required before using standard methods for obtaining a 1D velocity profile from each sonobuoy. We verify our 1D velocity models using acoustic finite-difference (FD) modeling and by performing depth migration on the data, and demonstrate the usefulness of FD modeling for tying interval velocities to the shallow crust imaged using MCS data. Finally, we show how overlapping sonobuoys along an MCS line can be used to construct a 2D velocity model of the crust. The velocity model reveals a thin crust (5.5 ± 0.4 km) at the boundary between the Adare and Northern Basins, and implies that the crustal structure of the Northern Basin may be more similar to that of the oceanic crust in the Adare Basin than to the stretched continental crust further south in the Ross Sea.

  20. Generalized 2D Euler-Boussinesq equations with a singular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KC, Durga; Regmi, Dipendra; Tao, Lizheng; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-07-01

    This paper studies the global (in time) regularity problem concerning a system of equations generalizing the two-dimensional incompressible Boussinesq equations. The velocity here is determined by the vorticity through a more singular relation than the standard Biot-Savart law and involves a Fourier multiplier operator. The temperature equation has a dissipative term given by the fractional Laplacian operator √{-Δ}. We establish the global existence and uniqueness of solutions to the initial-value problem of this generalized Boussinesq equations when the velocity is “double logarithmically” more singular than the one given by the Biot-Savart law. This global regularity result goes beyond the critical case. In addition, we recover a result of Chae, Constantin and Wu [8] when the initial temperature is set to zero.

  1. 2D Mica Crystal as Electret in Organic Field-Effect Transistors for Multistate Memory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotao; He, Yudong; Li, Rongjin; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2016-05-01

    Organic nonvolatile multistate storage devices based on organic field-effect transistors using mica as the 2D single-crystal electrets are developed. A4-paper-sized 2D mica crystals with flat surface are prepared successfully. Devices with mica electrets exhibit a typical memory effect and show ideal output curves on both the on and the off states.

  2. Generalized Diffuse Field Within a 2d Alluvial Basin: a Numerical Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina Villegas, J.; Baena, M.; Piña, J.; Perton, M.; Suarez, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2013-05-01

    Since the pioneering work of Aki (1957), the seismic noise has been used to infer the wave velocity distribution of soil formations. Later, diffuse-field concepts from room acoustics began to be used in elastodynamics by Weaver (1982) and flourished in many applications thanks to the contributions of Campillo and coworkers. It was established that diffusion like regimes are obtained when the field is produced by equipartitioned, uniform illumination. Within an elastodynamic diffuse-field the average correlation of the displacement field between two stations is proportional to the Green function of the system for those points. Usually, the surface waves can be interpreted by means of the retrieved Green function, from which very important information about the properties in depth can be obtained. Seismic noise and coda are frequently considered as diffuse-fields. This assumption is well supported by ideas of multiple scattering of waves and the resultant energy equipartition. There are few examples of numerically generated diffuse-fields. Some are based on random distributed forces (e.g. Sánchez-Sesma et al., 2006), while others used a set of plane waves with varying incidence angles and polarization (e.g. Sánchez-Sesma and Campillo 2006; Kawase et al. 2011). In this work we generate numerically a diffuse field within the Kawase and Aki (1989) 2D model using a random set of independent and uncorrelated incident plane P, SV and Rayleigh waves. For the simulations we use the indirect boundary element method (IBEM). Thus, we obtained the Green function for pairs of receivers by averaging correlations between different stations on the surface. In order to validate our results we compute the model's Green function as the response for a unit point load using the IBEM. Our numerical experiment provides guidelines for actual calculations of earthquakes in real alluvial basins.

  3. Clinical characterization of 2D pressure field in human left ventricles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, Maria; Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Perez Del Villar, Candelas; Gonzalez-Mansilla, Ana; Barrio, Alicia; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Bermejo, Javier; Khan, Andrew; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2014-11-01

    The evaluation of left ventricle (LV) function in the clinical setting remains a challenge. Pressure gradient is a reliable and reproducible indicator of the LV function. We obtain 2D relative pressure field in the LV using in-vivo measurements obtained by processing Doppler-echocardiography images of healthy and dilated hearts. Exploiting mass conservation, we solve the Poisson pressure equation (PPE) dropping the time derivatives and viscous terms. The flow acceleration appears only in the boundary conditions, making our method weakly sensible to the time resolution of in-vivo acquisitions. To ensure continuity with respect to the discrete operator and grid used, a potential flow correction is applied beforehand, which gives another Poisson equation. The new incompressible velocity field ensures that the compatibility equation for the PPE is satisfied. Both Poisson equations are efficiently solved on a Cartesian grid using a multi-grid method and immersed boundary for the LV wall. The whole process is computationally inexpensive and could play a diagnostic role in the clinical assessment of LV function.

  4. Dynamics of shear velocity layer with bent magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.

    A fully three-dimensional, magnetohydro-dynamic simulation of velocity-sheared plasma flow in an ambient transverse magnetic field with bent magnetic field lines has been performed. “Ionospheric-like” boundary conditions were used for closing field-aligned currents, the two ionospheres being represented by conducting plates with constant resistivity. Compared to the standard plane 2D case with a uniform transverse magnetic field, the growth rate of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability drops significantly as bending increases. Under conditions representative of the Earth's low latitude boundary layer, the instability may be suppressed completely by the magnetic field-line tension if the field-line bending is sufficiently strong. For weak bending, a combination of the tearing mode instability and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leads to the formation of localized 3D current/vortex tubes, the ionospheric foot prints of which are possible models of the auroral bright spots observed by the Viking satellite.

  5. AMTCLAB: A MATLAB ®-based program for traveltime analysis and velocity tuning in 2D elliptical anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Martínez, J. L.; Pedruelo González, L. M.; García Gonzalo, E.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present the program AMTCLAB, a MATLAB ®-based computer code that analyzes the traveltime distribution and performs quality analysis at the pre-inversion stage for elliptically anisotropic media explored via 2D transmission experiments. This software generalizes the program MTCLAB presented in the past for the case of layered isotropic media, and makes use of traditional and robust traveltime distribution descriptors (mean, standard deviation, median, lower and upper quartiles, inter-quartile range and minimum absolute deviation), which are valid for all kinds of recording geometries. A guided user interface leads the modeller through the algorithm steps using the same data MTCLAB-structures. This methodology offers better understanding of the data variability prior to inversion, and provides the geophysicist with a macroscopic elliptical anisotropic velocity model, which is valid at the experiment scale, and matches the experimental mean traveltime distribution. To solve the inverse problems involved, program AMTCLAB uses the particle swarm optimisation algorithm, which allows the use of different norms and sampling the region of equivalent anisotropic velocity models in order to perform posterior sample statistics in each individual model parameter. The approximated velocity model issued from this analysis can serve in the traveltime inverse problem as an initial guess, or as a reference model in the subsequent inversion.

  6. 2D-2D tunneling field-effect transistors using WSe2/SnSe2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tania; Tosun, Mahmut; Hettick, Mark; Ahn, Geun Ho; Hu, Chenming; Javey, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials present a versatile platform for developing steep transistors due to their uniform thickness and sharp band edges. We demonstrate 2D-2D tunneling in a WSe2/SnSe2 van der Waals vertical heterojunction device, where WSe2 is used as the gate controlled p-layer and SnSe2 is the degenerately n-type layer. The van der Waals gap facilitates the regulation of band alignment at the heterojunction, without the necessity of a tunneling barrier. ZrO2 is used as the gate dielectric, allowing the scaling of gate oxide to improve device subthreshold swing. Efficient gate control and clean interfaces yield a subthreshold swing of ˜100 mV/dec for >2 decades of drain current at room temperature, hitherto unobserved in 2D-2D tunneling devices. The subthreshold swing is independent of temperature, which is a clear signature of band-to-band tunneling at the heterojunction. A maximum switching ratio ION/IOFF of 107 is obtained. Negative differential resistance in the forward bias characteristics is observed at 77 K. This work bodes well for the possibilities of two-dimensional materials for the realization of energy-efficient future-generation electronics.

  7. Comparison of 4D flow and 2D velocity-encoded phase contrast MRI sequences for the evaluation of aortic hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bollache, Emilie; van Ooij, Pim; Powell, Alex; Carr, James; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare aortic flow and velocity quantification using 4D flow MRI and 2D CINE phase-contrast (PC)-MRI with either one-directional (2D-1dir) or three-directional (2D-3dir) velocity encoding. 15 healthy volunteers (51 ± 19 years) underwent MRI including (1) breath-holding 2D-1dir and (2) free breathing 2D-3dir PC-MRI in planes orthogonal to the ascending (AA) and descending (DA) aorta, as well as (3) free breathing 4D flow MRI with full thoracic aorta coverage. Flow quantification included the co-registration of the 2D PC acquisition planes with 4D flow MRI data, AA and DA segmentation, and calculation of AA and DA peak systolic velocity, peak flow and net flow volume for all sequences. Additionally, the 2D-3dir velocity taking into account the through-plane component only was used to obtain results analogous to a free breathing 2D-1dir acquisition. Good agreement was found between 4D flow and 2D-3dir peak velocity (differences = -3 to 6 %), peak flow (-7 %) and net volume (-14 to -9 %). In contrast, breath-holding 2D-1dir measurements exhibited indices significantly lower than free breathing 2D-3dir and 2D-1dir (differences = -35 to -7 %, p < 0.05). Finally, high correlations (r ≥ 0.97) were obtained for indices estimated with or without eddy current correction, with the lowest correlation observed for net volume. 4D flow and 2D-3dir aortic hemodynamic indices were in concordance. However, differences between respiration state and 2D-1dir and 2D-3dir measurements indicate that reference values should be established according to the PC-MRI sequence, especially for the widely used net flow (e.g. stroke volume in the AA). PMID:27435230

  8. Comparison of 4D flow and 2D velocity-encoded phase contrast MRI sequences for the evaluation of aortic hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bollache, Emilie; van Ooij, Pim; Powell, Alex; Carr, James; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare aortic flow and velocity quantification using 4D flow MRI and 2D CINE phase-contrast (PC)-MRI with either one-directional (2D-1dir) or three-directional (2D-3dir) velocity encoding. 15 healthy volunteers (51 ± 19 years) underwent MRI including (1) breath-holding 2D-1dir and (2) free breathing 2D-3dir PC-MRI in planes orthogonal to the ascending (AA) and descending (DA) aorta, as well as (3) free breathing 4D flow MRI with full thoracic aorta coverage. Flow quantification included the co-registration of the 2D PC acquisition planes with 4D flow MRI data, AA and DA segmentation, and calculation of AA and DA peak systolic velocity, peak flow and net flow volume for all sequences. Additionally, the 2D-3dir velocity taking into account the through-plane component only was used to obtain results analogous to a free breathing 2D-1dir acquisition. Good agreement was found between 4D flow and 2D-3dir peak velocity (differences = -3 to 6 %), peak flow (-7 %) and net volume (-14 to -9 %). In contrast, breath-holding 2D-1dir measurements exhibited indices significantly lower than free breathing 2D-3dir and 2D-1dir (differences = -35 to -7 %, p < 0.05). Finally, high correlations (r ≥ 0.97) were obtained for indices estimated with or without eddy current correction, with the lowest correlation observed for net volume. 4D flow and 2D-3dir aortic hemodynamic indices were in concordance. However, differences between respiration state and 2D-1dir and 2D-3dir measurements indicate that reference values should be established according to the PC-MRI sequence, especially for the widely used net flow (e.g. stroke volume in the AA).

  9. Propagator-resolved 2D exchange in porous media in the inhomogeneous magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Burcaw, Lauren M; Hunter, Mark W; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-08-01

    We present a propagator-resolved 2D exchange spectroscopy technique for observing fluid motion in a porous medium. The susceptibility difference between the matrix and the fluid is exploited to produce an inhomogeneous internal magnetic field, causing the Larmor frequency to change as molecules migrate. We test our method using a randomly packed monodisperse 100 microm diameter glass bead matrix saturated with distilled water. Building upon previous 2D exchange spectroscopy work we add a displacement dimension which allows us to obtain 2D exchange spectra that are defined by both mixing time and spatial displacement rather than by mixing time alone. We also simulate our system using a Monte Carlo process in a random nonpenetrating monodisperse bead pack, finding good agreement with experiment. A simple analytic model is used to interpret the NMR data in terms of a characteristic length scale over which molecules must diffuse to sample the inhomogeneous field distribution. PMID:20554230

  10. Raindrop axis ratios, fall velocities and size distribution over Sumatra from 2D-Video Disdrometer measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki; Randeu, Walter L.; Kozu, Toshiaki; Shimomai, Toyoshi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Schönhuber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution are important in broad list of applications. However, they are not frequently observed in the equatorial region. This paper elucidated the characteristics of raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution based on 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) data that have been collected in the equatorial Indonesia, particularly at Kototabang (hereafter called KT), west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). A comprehensive follow-up of the previous study on the natural variability of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) is presented. Precipitation was classified through 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation. The dependence of raindrop falling velocity and axis ratio on rainfall type was not clearly observed. Overall, measured raindrop fall velocities were in good agreement with Gunn-Kinzer's data. Raindrop axis ratio at KT was more spherical than that of artificial rain and equilibrium model, and close to the values reported in the turbulent high shear zone of surface layer which can be partially due to the effect of the instrument errors (e.g., location and container shape). Of some natural variations of DSD investigated, the dependence of DSD on rainfall rate and rainfall type as well as diurnal variation was clearly visible. A striking contrast between the stratiform and convective rains is that the size distributions from the stratiform (convective) rains tend to narrow (broaden) with increasing rainfall rates. For rainfall rate R < 10 mm/h, the size distribution of stratiform was broader than that of convective. On the other hand, at higher rainfall rate more large-sized drops were found in convective rain. During the convective rain, very large-sized drops were found mainly at the very start of rain event while for the stratiform they were found to be associated with a strong bright band. In diurnal basis, the DSDs in the morning hours were narrower than those in the evening which was

  11. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; García-Muñoz, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Tardini, G.; Weiland, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function f(v‖, v⊥). To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) light from the plasma centre in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra agree very well with synthetic spectra calculated from a TRANSP/NUBEAM simulation. Based on the measured FIDA spectra alone, we infer f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion. Salient features of our measurement of f(v‖, v⊥) agree reasonably well with the simulation: the measured as well as the simulated f(v‖, v⊥) are lopsided towards negative velocities parallel to the magnetic field, and they have similar shapes. Further, the peaks in the simulation of f(v‖, v⊥) at full and half injection energies of the neutral beam also appear in the measurement at similar velocity-space locations. We expect that we can measure spectra in up to seven views simultaneously in the next ASDEX Upgrade campaign which would further improve measurements of f(v‖, v⊥) by tomographic inversion.

  12. High-resolution 2D NMR spectra in inhomogeneous fields via 3D acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yanqin; Wei, Zhiliang; Zhang, Liandi; Lin, Liangjie; Chen, Zhong

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical studies. Here, a pulse sequence, based on coherence transfer module of tracking differences of precession frequencies of two spins and spin echo module, is proposed to obtain two dimension (2D) high-resolution NMR spectra via 3D acquisition under large field inhomogeneity. The proposed scheme composes of simple hard pulses and rectangle gradients. Resulting 2D spectra exhibit chemical shift differences and J coupling splittings in two orthogonal dimensions. The method developed here may offer a promising way for in situ high-resolution NMR studies on combinatorial chemistry.

  13. 2D ESR image reconstruction from 1D projections using the modulated field gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páli, T.; Sass, L.; Horvat, L. I.; Ebert, B.

    A method for the reconstruction of 2D ESR images from 1 D projections which is based on the modulated field gradient method has been explored. The 2D distribution of spin-labeled stearic acid in oriented and unoriented dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine multilayers on a flat quartz support was determined. Such samples are potentially useful for the determination of lipid lateral diffusion in oriented multilayers by monitoring the spreading of a sharp concentration profile in one or two dimensions. The limitations of the method are discussed and the improvements which are needed for dynamic measurements are outlined.

  14. 2-D Reflectometer Modeling for Optimizing the ITER Low-field Side Reflectometer System

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.J.; Budny, R.V.; Kessel, C.; Johnson, D.

    2005-09-02

    The response of a low-field side reflectometer system for ITER is simulated with a 2?D reflectometer code using a realistic plasma equilibrium. It is found that the reflected beam will often miss its launch point by as much as 40 cm and that a vertical array of receiving antennas is essential in order to observe a reflection on the low-field side of ITER.

  15. Experimental validation of a 2D overland flow model using high resolution water depth and velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, L.; Legout, C.; Darboux, F.; Esteves, M.; Nord, G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a validation of a two-dimensional overland flow model using empirical laboratory data. Unlike previous publications in which model performance is evaluated as the ability to predict an outlet hydrograph, we use high resolution 2D water depth and velocity data to analyze to what degree the model is able to reproduce the spatial distribution of these variables. Several overland flow conditions over two impervious surfaces of the order of one square meter with different micro and macro-roughness characteristics are studied. The first surface is a simplified representation of a sinusoidal terrain with three crests and furrows, while the second one is a mould of a real agricultural seedbed terrain. We analyze four different bed friction parameterizations and we show that the performance of formulations which consider the transition between laminar, smooth turbulent and rough turbulent flow do not improve the results obtained with Manning or Keulegan formulas for rough turbulent flow. The simulations performed show that using Keulegan formula with a physically-based definition of the bed roughness coefficient, a two-dimensional shallow water model is able to reproduce satisfactorily the flow hydrodynamics. It is shown that, even if the resolution of the topography data and numerical mesh are high enough to include all the small scale features of the bed surface, the roughness coefficient must account for the macro-roughness characteristics of the terrain in order to correctly reproduce the flow hydrodynamics.

  16. An updated GPS velocity field for Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craymer, M. R.; Henton, J. A.; Piraszewski, M.; Lapelle, E.

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to improve previous continental-scale GPS velocity fields for North America and Canada in particular, we have reprocessed data from nearly all continuous GPS sites in Canada, the northern portions of the US including Alaska, Greenland as well as a set of global sites used to define the reference frame. In addition, repeated high accuracy campaign surveys of the Canadian Base Network were included. Previous velocity fields were derived from coordinate time series of somewhat inhomogeneous GPS results due to: (1) the use of relative antenna calibrations that did not include satellite antennas or account for the presence of antenna radomes, (2) the use of different reference frames, (3) the use of IGS precise orbits based on these calibrations and reference frames, and (4) the use of different (evolving) versions of GPS processing software and procedures. This reprocessing effort of all previous data since 2000 is based on more consistent and accurate absolute antenna calibrations of both station and satellite antennas, the ITRF2005 reference frame and the latest versions of the Bernese GPS Software and IGS processing procedures with their so-called "repro1" reprocessed orbits. Also, more than four additional years of continuous data and a new CBN survey campaign have been included in this velocity field estimation. Furthermore, we have processed all the continuous data with NRCan's Precise Point Positioning (PPP) software using the same IGS repro1 orbits, precise clocks and absolute antenna calibrations together with the Vienna Mapping Function (VMF1) for the tropospheric model. The PPP software has proven to be highly efficient for processing such large networks and the additional solutions have provided much needed redundancy for some regions. The new time series and velocity results from both the Bernese and PPP solutions are compared with each other and with our previous solution. Comparisons are also made with solutions from other GPS analysis

  17. THE VELOCITY FIELD AROUND GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwick, F. D. A.

    2011-06-15

    A statistical method is presented for determining the velocity field in the immediate vicinity of groups of galaxies using only positional and redshift information with the goal of studying the perturbation of the Hubble flow around groups more distant than the Local Group. The velocities are assumed to obey a Hubble-like expansion law, i.e., V = H{sub exp} R, where the expansion rate H{sub exp} is to be determined. The method is applied to a large, representative group catalog and evidence is found for a sub-Hubble expansion rate within two well-defined radii beyond the virial radii of the groups. This result is consistent with that of Teerikorpi et al. who found a similar expansion law around three nearby groups and extends it to a more representative volume of space.

  18. Characteristics of 2D magnetic field sensor based on magnetic sensitivity diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xianghong; Yu, Yang; Wu, Tong; Wen, Dianzhong

    2015-04-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field sensor is proposed in this paper. It contains two Wheatstone bridges composed of four magnetic sensitivity diodes(MSDs)with similar characteristics and four loading resistances. In order to realize the axial symmetric distribution of four MSDs, two MSDs with opposite magnetic sensitive directions were located along the x and -x axes, and two with opposite magnetic sensitive directions were located along the y and -y axes. The experimental results indicate that when VDD = 5.0 V, the magnetic sensitivities of the 2D magnetic sensor can reach SxB = 544 mV/T and SyB = 498 mV/T in the x and y directions, respectively. Consequently, it is possible to measure the two-dimensional magnetic field.

  19. Extreme value statistics of 2D Gaussian free field: effect of finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Rosso, A.; Santachiara, R.

    2016-01-01

    We study minima statistics of the 2D Gaussian free field (GFF) on circles in the unit disk with Dirichlet boundary condition. Free energy distributions of the associated random energy models are exactly calculated in the high temperature phase, and shown to satisfy the duality property, which enables us to predict the minima distribution by assuming the freezing scenario. Numerical tests are provided. Related questions concerning the GFF on a sphere are also considered.

  20. Robust 2D phase correction for echo planar imaging under a tight field-of-view.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; King, Kevin F; Zur, Yuval; Hinks, R Scott

    2010-12-01

    Nyquist ghost artifacts are a serious issue in echo planar imaging. These artifacts primarily originate from phase difference between even and odd echo images and can be removed or reduced using phase correction methods. The commonly used 1D phase correction can only correct phase difference along readout axis. 2D correction is, therefore, necessary when phase difference presents along both readout and phase encoding axes. However, existing 2D methods have several unaddressed issues that affect their practicality. These issues include uncharacterized noise behavior, image artifact due to unoptimized phase estimation, Gibbs ringing artifact when directly applying to partial k(y) data, and most seriously a new image artifact under tight field-of-view (i.e., field-of-view slightly smaller than object size). All these issues are addressed in this article. Specifically, theoretical analysis of noise amplification and effect of phase estimation error is provided, and tradeoff between noise and ghost is studied. A new 2D phase correction method with improved polynomial fitting, joint homodyne processing and phase correction, compatibility with tight field-of-view is then proposed. Various results show that the proposed method can robustly generate images free of Nyquist ghosts and other image artifacts even in oblique scans or when cross-term eddy current terms are significant. PMID:20806354

  1. The interface between ferroelectric and 2D material for a Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Nahee; Kang, Haeyong; Lee, Sang-Goo; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    We have studied electrical property of ferroelectric field-effect transistor which consists of graphene on hexagonal Boron-Nitride (h-BN) gated by a ferroelectric, PMN-PT (i.e. (1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3-xPbTiO3) single-crystal substrate. The PMN-PT was expected to have an effect on polarization field into the graphene channel and to induce a giant amount of surface charge. The hexagonal Boron-Nitride (h-BN) flake was directly exfoliated on the PMN-PT substrate for preventing graphene from directly contacting on the PMN-PT substrate. It can make us to observe the effect of the interface between ferroelectric and 2D material on the device operation. Monolayer graphene as 2D channel material, which was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, was transferred on top of the hexagonal Boron-Nitride (h-BN) by using the conventional dry-transfer method. Here, we can demonstrate that the structure of graphene/hexagonal-BN/ferroelectric field-effect transistor makes us to clearly understand the device operation as well as the interface between ferroelectric and 2D materials by inserting h-BN between them. The phenomena such as anti-hysteresis, current saturation behavior, and hump-like increase of channel current, will be discussed by in terms of ferroelectric switching, polarization-assisted charge trapping.

  2. Velocity field of isolated turbulent puffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaem-Maghami, E.; Johari, H.

    2010-11-01

    The velocity field of isolated turbulent puffs was measured using the particle image velocimetry technique and was compared with the steady jet flow field. Puffs were generated by injecting air through a 5 mm diameter nozzle into a flow chamber with a weak coflow. Isolated puffs with a Reynolds number of 5000 were examined in the range of 40-75 diameters downstream of the nozzle. The injection time was varied in order to assess the effects of injection volume and equivalent stroke ratio on the puff structure. The results from phase-locked measurements indicate that as the injection volume increased, puffs elongated in the axial direction and became similar to starting jets in the range considered. The largest scaled fluctuating velocities and turbulent shear stress within the puffs were twice the steady jet values. Inspection of the vorticity field revealed the presence of vorticity throughout the puff volume. Entrainment takes place on the portion of the puff closest to the nozzle and the entrainment rate is greater for the puffs with the smaller injection volume. This is consistent with the observations of rapid mixing and combustion of puffs in previous studies.

  3. Fast and Memory-Efficient Topological Denoising of 2D and 3D Scalar Fields.

    PubMed

    Günther, David; Jacobson, Alec; Reininghaus, Jan; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Weinkauf, Tino

    2014-12-01

    Data acquisition, numerical inaccuracies, and sampling often introduce noise in measurements and simulations. Removing this noise is often necessary for efficient analysis and visualization of this data, yet many denoising techniques change the minima and maxima of a scalar field. For example, the extrema can appear or disappear, spatially move, and change their value. This can lead to wrong interpretations of the data, e.g., when the maximum temperature over an area is falsely reported being a few degrees cooler because the denoising method is unaware of these features. Recently, a topological denoising technique based on a global energy optimization was proposed, which allows the topology-controlled denoising of 2D scalar fields. While this method preserves the minima and maxima, it is constrained by the size of the data. We extend this work to large 2D data and medium-sized 3D data by introducing a novel domain decomposition approach. It allows processing small patches of the domain independently while still avoiding the introduction of new critical points. Furthermore, we propose an iterative refinement of the solution, which decreases the optimization energy compared to the previous approach and therefore gives smoother results that are closer to the input. We illustrate our technique on synthetic and real-world 2D and 3D data sets that highlight potential applications. PMID:26356972

  4. The velocity field in MOND cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.

    2016-08-01

    The recently developed code for N-body/hydrodynamics simulations in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), known as RAYMOND, is used to investigate the consequences of MOND on structure formation in a cosmological context, with a particular focus on the velocity field. This preliminary study investigates the results obtained with the two formulations of MOND implemented in RAYMOND, as well as considering the effects of changing the choice of MOND interpolation function, and the cosmological evolution of the MOND acceleration scale. The simulations are contrived such that structure forms in a background cosmology that is similar to Λcold dark matter, but with a significantly lower matter content. Given this, and the fact that a fully consistent MOND cosmology is still lacking, we compare our results with a standard ΛCDM simulation, rather than observations. As well as demonstrating the effectiveness of using RAYMOND for cosmological simulations, it is shown that a significant enhancement of the velocity field is likely an unavoidable consequence of the gravitational modification implemented in MOND, and may represent a clear observational signature of such a modification. It is further suggested that such a signal may be clearest in intermediate-density regions such as cluster outskirts and filaments.

  5. Current sheets with inhomogeneous plasma temperature: Effects of polarization electric field and 2D solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Catapano, F. Zimbardo, G.; Artemyev, A. V. Vasko, I. Y.

    2015-09-15

    We develop current sheet models which allow to regulate the level of plasma temperature and density inhomogeneities across the sheet. These models generalize the classical Harris model via including two current-carrying plasma populations with different temperature and the background plasma not contributing to the current density. The parameters of these plasma populations allow regulating contributions of plasma density and temperature to the pressure balance. A brief comparison with spacecraft observations demonstrates the model applicability for describing the Earth magnetotail current sheet. We also develop a two dimensional (2D) generalization of the proposed model. The interesting effect found for 2D models is the nonmonotonous profile (along the current sheet) of the magnetic field component perpendicular to the current sheet. Possible applications of the model are discussed.

  6. Whole field velocity measurements in three-dimensional periodic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Urmila Chennuru

    To quantify flows around rotorcraft, rapid measurements of scalar and vector fields are needed over large volumes. The techniques used must be suitable for large test facilities. This thesis studies methods for acquiring and reconstructing four-dimensional, spatio-temporal measurements of flow properties in periodic flows. It involves both the theoretical studies needed for algorithm development and the solution of practical problems required to enable multi-dimensional velocity field measurement in flows typical of full-scale rotorcraft. Resolving the four-dimensional flowfield is viewed as a problem in the tomographic reconstruction of scalar and vector fields. Theoretical formulations reconstructing n-dimensional scalar fields from (n-1)-dimensional projections are studied. This work was a precursor to the extraction of three-component, three-dimensional velocity fields from planar Spatial Cross-Correlation Velocimetry (SCV). SCV measures a planar displacement field by cross-correlating two time-separated images of the flow. A scalable system that uses inexpensive pulsed white light sources and enables large-area imaging has been integrated for use in full-scale test facilities. The flowfield around a V22 half-model was studied using this technique. SCV discovered the existence of a transient upflow above the rotor plane, unique to compressible rotor flows, and verified other flow features. Measurements in a turbofan engine test cell validated system performance in the highly turbulent and vibrating test environment, under time limitations typical of industry testing. Studies of a two-bladed rotor in axial flight revealed basic vortex pairing and merger phenomena. These tests provided the first proof that full-scale rotor wakes at high Reynolds number and Mach number are cleanly periodic when facility interference effects are eliminated. A method was developed to compute the 3D, three-component, periodic velocity field by integrating 2D, phase-resolved, SCV data

  7. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  8. Enhanced diffusion in random velocity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumofen, G.; Klafter, J.; Blumen, A.

    1990-10-01

    We study superlinear diffusion in a layered medium containing random velocity fields, where the mean-squared displacement grows as ~tα with α>1 [S. Redner, Physica D 38, 287 (1989)]. For a two-dimensional system with preassigned random velocities in the longitudinal x direction and with diffusional motion in the transversal direction, we determine exactly the asymptotic behavior of the first three nontrivial moments M2m=/m of the displacement. Furthermore, we succeed in relating the diffusional problem to the one-dimensional trapping problem. We then are in a position to analyze the scaling form of the propagator P(x,t)~t-3/4f(x3/4), where the function f(z) obeys a complicated stretched exponential behavior. We also generalize the problem to transverse motion on fractals and ultrametric spaces that leads to α values that interpolate between 1 and 2. We support our theoretical analytical results by simulation calculations.

  9. The velocity field of laboratory fire whirls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Katherine; Guo, Stacy; Smits, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Fire whirls increase the intensity of wild fires, and they enhance the spreading rate of fire by ejecting flaming debris, often rendering prepared fire fighting plans useless. Fire whirls are produced by buoyancy, ambient vorticity, and the titling of regions of intense horizontal negative shear at the fire front. They can shed from a smoke plume, form in the turbulent wake of a hill, or arise due to concentrated heat sources. To understand and model fire whirls in greater detail, an experimental study is conducted to generate a fire whirl in the laboratory, and examine the velocity fields outside and inside the vortex core. We use flow visualization and PIV to obtain qualitative and quantitative data, and discuss the scaling behavior.

  10. Chiral scale and conformal invariance in 2D quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Diego M; Strominger, Andrew

    2011-10-14

    It is well known that a local, unitary Poincaré-invariant 2D quantum field theory with a global scaling symmetry and a discrete non-negative spectrum of scaling dimensions necessarily has both a left and a right local conformal symmetry. In this Letter, we consider a chiral situation beginning with only a left global scaling symmetry and do not assume Lorentz invariance. We find that a left conformal symmetry is still implied, while right translations are enhanced either to a right conformal symmetry or a left U(1) Kac-Moody symmetry.

  11. Dynamics of 2D Dust Clusters with a Perpendicular Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Franko; Carstensen, Jan; Hou Lujing; Piel, Alexander

    2008-09-07

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) dust clusters in an unmagnetized plasma sheath has been understood in dept. However, introduction of a perpendicular magnetic field into the dusty plasma sheath leads to some new effects, such as rotation and compression of dust clusters, whose mechanism is still unclear. It is found that even for a magnetic field as low as the earth magnetic field ({approx_equal}40 {mu}T), clusters rotate as rigid about their centers. It was proposed [U. Konopka, PRE 61, 1890 (2000)] that the ExB-induced ion flow drives the dust clusters into rotation. Simulations [L.-J. Hou, PoP 12, 042104 (2005)] based on the same hypothesis also reproduced the rotation of 2D clusters in a qualitative manner. However, this model cannot fully explain the experimental observations. We present detailed experimental investigations, which show that the rotation of a dust cluster critically depends on the detailed discharge geometry. In particular, the co-rotation of the background neutral gas and its role in driving dust-cluster rotation is proposed as a mechanism to set the dust cluster in rotation.

  12. A 2-D semi-analytical model of double-gate tunnel field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huifang, Xu; Yuehua, Dai; Ning, Li; Jianbin, Xu

    2015-05-01

    A 2-D semi-analytical model of double gate (DG) tunneling field-effect transistor (TFET) is proposed. By aid of introducing two rectangular sources located in the gate dielectric layer and the channel, the 2-D Poisson equation is solved by using a semi-analytical method combined with an eigenfunction expansion method. The expression of the surface potential is obtained, which is a special function for the infinite series expressions. The influence of the mobile charges on the potential profile is taken into account in the proposed model. On the basis of the potential profile, the shortest tunneling length and the average electrical field can be derived, and the drain current is then constructed by using Kane's model. In particular, the changes of the tunneling parameters Ak and Bk influenced by the drain—source voltage are also incorporated in the predicted model. The proposed model shows a good agreement with TCAD simulation results under different drain—source voltages, silicon film thicknesses, gate dielectric layer thicknesses, and gate dielectric layer constants. Therefore, it is useful to optimize the DG TFET and this provides a physical insight for circuit level design. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61376106) and the Graduate Innovation Fund of Anhui University.

  13. Commissioning a small-field biological irradiator using point, 2D, and 3D dosimetry techniques

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Joseph; Oldham, Mark; Thomas, Andrew; Li, Yifan; Adamovics, John; Kirsch, David G.; Das, Shiva

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To commission a small-field biological irradiator, the XRad225Cx from Precision x-Ray, Inc., for research use. The system produces a 225 kVp x-ray beam and is equipped with collimating cones that produce both square and circular radiation fields ranging in size from 1 to 40 mm. This work incorporates point, 2D, and 3D measurements to determine output factors (OF), percent-depth-dose (PDD) and dose profiles at multiple depths. Methods: Three independent dosimetry systems were used: ion-chambers (a farmer chamber and a micro-ionisation chamber), 2D EBT2 radiochromic film, and a novel 3D dosimetry system (DLOS/PRESAGE®). Reference point dose rates and output factors were determined from in-air ionization chamber measurements for fields down to ∼13 mm using the formalism of TG61. PDD, profiles, and output factors at three separate depths (0, 0.5, and 2 cm), were determined for all field sizes from EBT2 film measurements in solid water. Several film PDD curves required a scaling correction, reflecting the challenge of accurate film alignment in very small fields. PDDs, profiles, and output factors were also determined with the 3D DLOS/PRESAGE® system which generated isotropic 0.2 mm data, in scan times of 20 min. Results: Surface output factors determined by ion-chamber were observed to gradually drop by ∼9% when the field size was reduced from 40 to 13 mm. More dramatic drops were observed for the smallest fields as determined by EBT∼18% and ∼42% for the 2.5 mm and 1 mm fields, respectively. PRESAGE® and film output factors agreed well for fields <20 mm (where 3D data were available) with mean deviation of 2.2% (range 1%–4%). PDD values at 2 cm depth varied from ∼72% for the 40 mm field, down to ∼55% for the 1 mm field. EBT and PRESAGE® PDDs agreed within ∼3% in the typical therapy region (1–4 cm). At deeper depths the EBT curves were slightly steeper (2.5% at 5 cm). These results indicate good overall consistency between ion-chamber, EBT

  14. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  15. Determining velocity displacement field from cardiac image sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyering, Wietske I.; Gutierrez, Marco A.; Robilotta, Cecil C.; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2002-04-01

    Estimation of left ventricle motion and deformation from series of images has been an area of attention in the medical image analysis and still remains an open and challenging problem. Left ventricle contractile abnormalities can be an important manifestation of coronary artery disease. The proper motion tracking of left ventricle wall can contribute to isolate the location and extent of ischemic or infarcted myocardium and constitutes a fundamental goal of image modalities, such as Nuclear Medicine. This work describes a method to automatically estimate the velocity vector field for a beating heart based on the study of variation in frequency content in a series of 2D images as time varies. The frequency analysis is performed by computing the Wigner-Ville and the Choi-Williams distributions to each image pixel, yielding the corresponding 3D-frequency spectrum. From this 3D spectrum the local velocity of each pixel is calculated by employing a multiple linear regression model. Experimental validation was carried out using synthetic phantoms that simulate translation and rotation between successive frames. Results obtained from gated SPECT perfusion studies are also presented.

  16. Some features of auroral electric fields as seen in 2D numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemann, H.; Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Results of 2D plasma simulations are presented and related to auroral observations. The formation of V-shaped potentials is studied with a 2 1/2 dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell code for a magnetized plasma. It is shown that amplitudes for perpendicular electric fields are larger than for parallel electric fields, and for Te less than 100 eV, the amplitudes are comparable to the electric fields associated with the electrostatic shocks observed from the S3-3 satellite. The excitation of electrostatic ion-cyclotron EIC waves which occurs in the region below the parallel potential drop is discussed. In auroral plasmas EIC waves are observed above the V-shaped double layers in association with ion beams and field-aligned currents. The results also show that oppositely directed electric fields in the center and at the edges of the simulation region produce oppositely directed currents. Precipitating auroral ions in association with electron inverted-V events are seen by the DMSP-F6 satellite.

  17. Segmentation of 2D gel electrophoresis spots using a Markov random field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeflich, Christopher S.; Corso, Jason J.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a statistical model-based approach for the segmentation of fragments of DNA as a first step in the automation of the primarily manual process of comparing two or more images resulting from the Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning (RLGS) method. These 2D gel electrophoresis images are the product of the separation of DNA into fragments that appear as spots on X-ray films. The goal is to find instances where a spot appears in one image and not in another since a missing spot can be correlated with a region of DNA that has been affected by a disease such as cancer. The entire comparison process is typically done manually, which is tedious and very error prone. We pose the problem as the labeling of each image pixel as either a spot or non-spot and use a Markov Random Field (MRF) model and simulated annealing for inference. Neighboring spot labels are then connected to form spot regions. The MRF based model was tested on actual 2D gel electrophoresis images.

  18. RADIAL VELOCITY VARIABILITY OF FIELD BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, L.; Mace, G. N.; Rice, E. L.; McLean, I. S.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Burgasser, A. J.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2015-07-20

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity (RV) precision of ∼2 km s{sup −1}, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1σ upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included seven known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant RV variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant fraction of the orbital period. Specialized techniques are required to reach the high precisions sensitive to motion in orbits of very low-mass systems. For eight objects, including six T dwarfs, we present the first published high-resolution spectra, many with high signal to noise, that will provide valuable comparison data for models of brown dwarf atmospheres.

  19. Lineage tracing of the bivalve shell field with special interest in the descendants of the 2d blastomere.

    PubMed

    Mohri, Masakuni; Hashimoto, Naoki; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    By evolving bilaterally separated shell plates, bivalves acquired a unique body plan in which their soft tissues are completely protected by hard shell plates. In this unique body plan, mobility between the separated shell plates is provided by novel structures such as a ligament and adductor muscles. As a first step towards understanding how the bivalve body plan was established, we investigated the development of the separated shell plates and ligament. Over 100 years ago, it was hypothesized that the development of separated shell plates is tightly linked with the unique cell cleavage (division) pattern of bivalves during development, wherein each bilateral daughter cell of the 2d descendant 2d(1121) develops into one of the bilateral shell fields. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by tracing the cell lineages of the Japanese purple mussel Septifer virgatus. Although the shell fields were found to be exclusively derived from the bilateral descendant cells of 2d: 2d(11211) and 2d(11212), the descendants of these cells were not restricted to shell fields alone, nor were they confined to the left or right side of the shell field based on their lineage. Our study demonstrated that ligament cells are also derived from 2d(11211) and 2d(11212), indicating that the ligament cells emerged as a subpopulation of shell field cells. This also suggests that the establishment of the novel developmental system for the ligament cells was critical for the evolution of the unique body plan of bivalves.

  20. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  1. Models Ion Trajectories in 2D and 3D Electrostatic and Magnetic Fields

    2000-02-21

    SIMION3D7.0REV is a C based ion optics simulation program that can model complex problems using Laplace equation solutions for potential fields. The program uses an ion optics workbench that can hold up to 200 2D and/or 3D electrostatic/magnetic potential arrays. Arrays can have up to 50,000,000 points. SIMION3D7.0''s 32 bit virtual Graphics User Interface provides a highly interactive advanced user environment. All potential arrays are visualized as 3D objects that the user can cut awaymore » to inspect ion trajectories and potential energy surfaces. User programs allow the user to customize the program for specific simulations. A geometry file option supports the definition of highly complex array geometry. Algorithm modifications have improved this version''s computational speed and accuracy.« less

  2. a Field-Theoretical Investigation of 2-D Coulomb Systems with Short-Range Yukawa Repulsion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jargocki, Krzysztof Piotr

    correspond to the two-dimensional Coulomb dipole gas in the functional integral formulation. A different type of a field theory is found for the dipole gas using the collective field formalism. A comparison is made with the critical behavior in the nonlinear sigma model, the 2-D Heisenberg model, and the nonabelian gauge theories.

  3. Variance Anisotropy of Solar Wind Velocity and Magnetic Field Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    At MHD scales in the solar wind, velocity and magnetic fieldfluctuations are typically observed to have much more energy in thecomponents transverse to the mean magnetic field, relative to theparallel components [eg, 1,2]. This is often referred to asvariance anisotropy. Various explanations for it have been suggested,including that the fluctuations are predominantly shear Alfvén waves[1] and that turbulent dynamics leads to such states [eg, 3].Here we investigate the origin and strength of such varianceanisotropies, using spectral method simulations of thecompressible (polytropic) 3D MHD equations. We report on results from runs with several different classes ofinitial conditions. These classes include(i) fluctuations polarized only in the same sense as shear Alfvénwaves (aka toroidal polarization),(ii) randomly polarized fluctuations, and(iii) fluctuations restricted so that most of the energy is inmodes which have their wavevectors perpendicular, or nearly so, to thebackground magnetic field: quasi-2D modes. The plasma beta and Mach number dependence [4] of quantities like the variance anisotropy, Alfven ratio, and fraction of the energy in the toroidal fluctuations will be examined, along with the timescales for the development of any systematic features.Implications for solar wind fluctuations will be discussed. References:[1] Belcher & Davis 1971, J. Geophys. Res, 76, 3534.[2] Oughton et al 2015, Phil Trans Roy Soc A, 373, 20140152.[3] Matthaeus et al 1996, J. Geophys. Res, 101, 7619.[4] Smith et al 2006, J. Geophys. Res, 111, A09111.

  4. 2D-3D registration for brain radiation therapy using a 3D CBCT and a single limited field-of-view 2D kV radiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munbodh, R.; Moseley, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    We report results of an intensity-based 2D-3D rigid registration framework for patient positioning and monitoring during brain radiotherapy. We evaluated two intensity-based similarity measures, the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Maximum Likelihood with Gaussian noise (MLG) derived from the statistics of transmission images. A useful image frequency band was identified from the bone-to-no-bone ratio. Validation was performed on gold-standard data consisting of 3D kV CBCT scans and 2D kV radiographs of an anthropomorphic head phantom acquired at 23 different poses with parameter variations along six degrees of freedom. At each pose, a single limited field of view kV radiograph was registered to the reference CBCT. The ground truth was determined from markers affixed to the phantom and visible in the CBCT images. The mean (and standard deviation) of the absolute errors in recovering each of the six transformation parameters along the x, y and z axes for ICC were varphix: 0.08(0.04)°, varphiy: 0.10(0.09)°, varphiz: 0.03(0.03)°, tx: 0.13(0.11) mm, ty: 0.08(0.06) mm and tz: 0.44(0.23) mm. For MLG, the corresponding results were varphix: 0.10(0.04)°, varphiy: 0.10(0.09)°, varphiz: 0.05(0.07)°, tx: 0.11(0.13) mm, ty: 0.05(0.05) mm and tz: 0.44(0.31) mm. It is feasible to accurately estimate all six transformation parameters from a 3D CBCT of the head and a single 2D kV radiograph within an intensity-based registration framework that incorporates the physics of transmission images.

  5. Analytical solution in 2D domain for nonlinear response of piezoelectric slabs under weak electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, M. K.; Seshu, P.

    2009-06-01

    Piezoceramic materials exhibit different types of nonlinearities depending upon the magnitude of the mechanical and electric field strength in the continuum. Some of the nonlinearities observed under weak electric fields are: presence of superharmonics in the response spectra and jump phenomena etc. especially if the system is excited near resonance. In this paper, an analytical solution (in 2D plane stress domain) for the nonlinear response of a rectangular piezoceramic slab has been obtained by use of Rayleigh-Ritz method and perturbation technique. The eigenfunction obtained from solution of the differential equation of the linear problem has been used as the shape function in the Rayleigh-Ritz method. Forced vibration experiments have been conducted on a rectangular piezoceramic slab by applying varying electric field strengths across the thickness and the results have been compared with those of analytical solution. The analytical solutions compare well with those of experimental results. These solutions should serve as a method to validate the FE formulations as well as help in the determination of nonlinear material property coefficients for these materials.

  6. Field-induced magnetization jumps and quantum criticality in the 2D J-Q model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaizzi, Adam; Sandvik, Anders

    The J-Q model is a `designer hamiltonian' formed by adding a four spin `Q' term to the standard antiferromagnetic S = 1 / 2 Heisenberg model. The Q term drives a quantum phase transition to a valence-bond solid (VBS) state: a non-magnetic state with a pattern of local singlets which breaks lattice symmetries. The elementary excitations of the VBS are triplons, i.e. gapped S=1 quasiparticles. There is considerable interest in the quantum phase transition between the Néel and VBS states as an example of deconfined quantum criticality. Near the phase boundary, triplons deconfine into pairs of bosonic spin-1/2 excitations known as spinons. Using exact diagonalization and the stochastic series expansion quantum monte carlo method, we study the 2D J-Q model in the presence of an external magnetic field. We use the field to force a nonzero density of magnetic excitations at T=0 and look for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation of spinons. At higher magnetic fields, there is a jump in the induced magnetization caused by the onset of an effective attractive interaction between magnons on a ferromagnetic background. We characterize the first order quantum phase transition and determine the minimum value of the coupling ratio q ≡ Q / J required to produce this jump. Funded by NSF DMR-1410126.

  7. Instantaneous 2D Velocity and Temperature Measurements in High Speed Flows Based on Spectrally Resolved Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for high speed flows is described for the simultaneous, instantaneous measurement of gas temperature and velocity at a number (up to about one hundred) of locations in a plane illuminated by an injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Molecular Rayleigh scattered light is collected and passed through a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. The resulting image is analyzed to determine the gas temperature and bulk velocity at each of the regions. The Cramer Rao lower bound for measurement uncertainty is calculated. Experimental data is presented for a free jet and for preliminary measurements in the Lewis 4 inch by 10 inch supersonic wind tunnel.

  8. Instantaneous velocity field imaging instrument for supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Legner, H. H.; Mcmanus, K. R.; Mulhall, P. A.; Parker, T. E.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The technical tasks conducted to develop and demonstrate a new gas velocity measurement technique for high enthalpy reacting flows is described. The technique is based on Doppler-shifted Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical. The imaging approach permits, in principle, single-shot measurements of the 2-D distribution of a single velocity component in the measurement plane, and is thus a technique of choice for applications in high enthalpy transient flow facilities. In contrast to previous work in this area, the present program demonstrated an approach which modified the diagnostic technique to function under the constraints of practical flow conditions of engineering interest, rather than vice-versa. In order to accomplish the experimental demonstrations, the state-of-the-art in PLIF diagnostic techniques was advanced in several ways. Each of these tasks is described in detail and is intended to serve as a reference in supporting the transition of this new capability to the fielded PLIF instruments now installed at several national test facilities. Among the new results of general interest in LlF-based flow diagnostics, a detailed set of the first measurements of the collisional broadening and shifting behavior of OH (1,0) band transitions in H7-air combustion environments is included. Such measurements are critical in the design of a successful strategy for PLIF velocity imaging; they also relate to accurate concentration and temperature measurements, particularly in compressible flow regimes. Furthermore, the results shed new light on the fundamental relationship between broadening and energy transfer collisions in OH A(sup 2)Sigma(+)v(sup ') = 1. The first single-pulse, spectrally-resolved measurements of the output of common pulsed dye lasers were also produced during the course of this effort. As with the OH broadening measurements, these data are a significant aspect of a successful velocity imaging strategy, and also have

  9. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  10. Correlation between the neighborhood and the velocity of a bead in a 2D non-brownian suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, Florence; Martin, Jerome; Salin, Dominique

    2000-03-01

    We quantitatively analyze the correlation between the dynamic of one sphere and its neighborhood in a 2D fluidized suspension of macroscopic spheres. It appears that both the radial and the orientational distribution of spheres around a referenced one clearly depend on wether this particle flows upwards or downwards. We then look at the dynamics of groups of spheres, in order to adress the question: can we analyze this dynamics of our monodisperse suspension as resulting from its local polydispersivity due to these groups?

  11. Blind test of methods for obtaining 2-D near-surface seismic velocity models from first-arrival traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Colin A.; Haines, Seth; Powers, Michael H.; Sheehan, Jacob; Rohdewald, Siegfried; Link, Curtis; Hayashi, Koichi; Zhao, Don; Zhou, Hua-wei; Burton, Bethany L.; Petersen, Uni K.; Bonal, Nedra D.; Doll, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic refraction methods are used in environmental and engineering studies to image the shallow subsurface. We present a blind test of inversion and tomographic refraction analysis methods using a synthetic first-arrival-time dataset that was made available to the community in 2010. The data are realistic in terms of the near-surface velocity model, shot-receiver geometry and the data's frequency and added noise. Fourteen estimated models were determined by ten participants using eight different inversion algorithms, with the true model unknown to the participants until it was revealed at a session at the 2011 SAGEEP meeting. The estimated models are generally consistent in terms of their large-scale features, demonstrating the robustness of refraction data inversion in general, and the eight inversion algorithms in particular. When compared to the true model, all of the estimated models contain a smooth expression of its two main features: a large offset in the bedrock and the top of a steeply dipping low-velocity fault zone. The estimated models do not contain a subtle low-velocity zone and other fine-scale features, in accord with conventional wisdom. Together, the results support confidence in the reliability and robustness of modern refraction inversion and tomographic methods.

  12. A Field Study on the Raindrop Fall Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Kalimur; Testik, Firat

    2016-04-01

    Raindrop fall velocity is a critical parameter in various rainfall related applications such as dual-polarization radar rainfall estimation. In such applications, it is typically assumed that raindrops fall at terminal velocity. Recent field observations, however, challenged this assumption of terminal raindrops. In this study, we investigated raindrop fall velocity in rainfall events using a new optical-type disdrometer called the High-speed Optical Disdrometer (HOD). We developed the HOD recently for precipitation microphysical observations, in particular for investigating raindrop dynamics including raindrop fall velocity. Our field observations showed clear deviations of raindrop fall velocities from predicted terminal velocities. These new field observations and our ongoing efforts to elucidate raindrop fall velocity characteristics will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AGS-1612681.

  13. Three-dimensional reconstruction of cardiac flows based on multi-planar velocity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Kheradvar, Arash

    2014-11-01

    Measurement of the three-dimensional flow field inside the cardiac chambers has proven to be a challenging task. This is mainly due to the fact that generalized full-volume velocimetry techniques cannot be easily implemented to the heart chambers. In addition, the rapid pace of the events in the heart does not allow for accurate real-time flow measurements in 3D using imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, which neglects the transient variations of the flow due to averaging of the flow over multiple heartbeats. In order to overcome these current limitations, we introduce a multi-planar velocity reconstruction approach that can characterize 3D incompressible flows based on the reconstruction of 2D velocity fields. Here, two-dimensional, two-component velocity fields acquired on multiple perpendicular planes are reconstructed into a 3D velocity field through Kriging interpolation and by imposing the incompressibility constraint. Subsequently, the scattered experimental data are projected into a divergence-free vector field space using a fractional step approach. We validate the method in exemplary 3D flows, including the Hill's spherical vortex and a numerically simulated flow downstream of a 3D orifice. During the process of validation, different signal-to-noise ratios are introduced to the flow field, and the method's performance is assessed accordingly. The results show that as the signal-to-noise ratio decreases, the corrected velocity field significantly improves. The method is also applied to the experimental flow inside a mock model of the heart's right ventricle. Taking advantage of the periodicity of the flow, multiple 2D velocity fields in multiple perpendicular planes at different locations of the mock model are measured while being phase-locked for the 3D reconstruction. The results suggest the metamorphosis of the original transvalvular vortex, which forms downstream of the inlet valve during the early filling phase of the right

  14. A generic shape/texture descriptor over multiscale edge field: 2-D walking ant histogram.

    PubMed

    Kiranyaz, Serkan; Ferreira, Miguel; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2008-03-01

    A novel shape descriptor, which can be extracted from the major object edges automatically and used for the multimedia content-based retrieval in multimedia databases, is presented. By adopting a multiscale approach over the edge field where the scale represents the amount of simplification, the most relevant edge segments, referred to as subsegments, which eventually represent the major object boundaries, are extracted from a scale-map. Similar to the process of a walking ant with a limited line of sight over the boundary of a particular object, we traverse through each subsegment and describe a certain line of sight, whether it is a continuous branch or a corner, using individual 2-D histograms. Furthermore, the proposed method can also be tuned to be an efficient texture descriptor, which achieves a superior performance especially for directional textures. Finally, integrating the whole process as feature extraction module into MUVIS framework allows us to test the mutual performance of the proposed shape descriptor in the context of multimedia indexing and retrieval. PMID:18270126

  15. 2-D acoustic Laplace-domain waveform inversion of marine field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Wansoo; Chung, Wookeen; Park, Eunjin; Shin, Changsoo

    2012-07-01

    The Laplace-domain full waveform inversion method can build a macroscale subsurface velocity model that can be used as an accurate initial model for a conventional full waveform inversion. The acoustic Laplace-domain inversion produced is promising for marine field data examples. Although applying an acoustic inversion method to the field data generally requires several pre-processing steps, pre-processing for the Laplace-domain inversion has not been explained in detail. We provide a detailed explanation of how to apply the Laplace-domain waveform inversion to field data through numerical tests with Gulf of Mexico data sets. The pre-processing includes bandpass filtering, muting of the noise before the first arrival, and extraction of the water depth. We choose the range and the interval between the Laplace damping constants empirically by applying a threshold value to the damped time traces and the Laplace-domain wavefields. The observed data are transformed to the Laplace domain using the selected damping; this method yielded a long-wavelength inversion result. The damping constant and the maximum offset affect the penetration depth of the inversion result. The maximum recording time is important for a stable Laplace-transformation and affects the inversion result; however, the latter effect is not significant.

  16. Character relations and replication identities in 2d Conformal Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bantay, P.

    2016-10-01

    We study replication identities satisfied by conformal characters of a 2D CFT, providing a natural framework for a physics interpretation of the famous Hauptmodul property of Monstrous Moonshine, and illustrate the underlying ideas in simple cases.

  17. Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography.

    PubMed

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Karhunen, Kimmo; Vauhkonen, Marko

    2016-06-28

    Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the surface of the pipe. In this work, a velocity field reconstruction method for EMFT is proposed. The method uses a previously developed finite-element-based computational forward model for computing boundary voltages and a Bayesian framework for inverse problems. In the approach, the vz-component of the velocity field along the longitudinal axis of the pipe is estimated on the pipe cross section. Different asymmetric velocity fields encountered near pipe elbows, solids-in-water flows in inclined pipes and in stratified or multiphase flows are tested. The results suggest that the proposed reconstruction method could be used to estimate velocity fields in complicated pipe flows in which the conventional EMFMs have limited accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185961

  18. Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography.

    PubMed

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Karhunen, Kimmo; Vauhkonen, Marko

    2016-06-28

    Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the surface of the pipe. In this work, a velocity field reconstruction method for EMFT is proposed. The method uses a previously developed finite-element-based computational forward model for computing boundary voltages and a Bayesian framework for inverse problems. In the approach, the vz-component of the velocity field along the longitudinal axis of the pipe is estimated on the pipe cross section. Different asymmetric velocity fields encountered near pipe elbows, solids-in-water flows in inclined pipes and in stratified or multiphase flows are tested. The results suggest that the proposed reconstruction method could be used to estimate velocity fields in complicated pipe flows in which the conventional EMFMs have limited accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  19. Field Evaluation of a Novel 2D Preferential Flow Snowpack Hydrology Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, N.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Kinar, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate estimation of snowmelt flux is of primary importance for runoff hydrograph prediction, which is used for water management and flood forecasting. Lateral flows and preferential flow pathways in porous media flow have proven critical for improving soil and groundwater flow models, but though many physically-based layered snowmelt models have been developed, only 1D matrix flow is accounted for in these models. Therefore, there is a need for snowmelt models that include these processes so as to examine the potential to improve snowmelt hydrological modelling. A 2D model is proposed that enables an improved understanding of energy and water flows within deep heterogeneous snowpacks, including those on slopes. A dual pathway theory is presented that simulates the formation of preferential flow paths, vertical and lateral water flows through the snow matrix and flow fingers, internal energy fluxes, melt, wet snow metamorphism, and internal refreezing. The dual pathway model utilizes an explicit finite volume method to solve for the energy and water flux equations over a non-orthogonal grid. It was run and evaluated using in-situ data collected from snowpit - accessed gravimetric, thermometric, photographic, and dielectric observations and novel non-invasive acoustic observations of layering, temperature, flowpath geometry, density and wetness at the Fortress Mountain Snow Laboratory, Alberta, Canada. The melt of a natural snowpack was artificially generated after detailed observation of snowpack initial conditions such as snow layer properties, temperature, and liquid water content. Snowpack ablation and liquid water content distribution over time were then measured and used for model parameterization and validation. Energy available at the snow surface and soil slope angle were set as mondel inputs. Model verification was based on snowpack property evolution. The heterogeneous flow model can be an important tool to help understand snowmelt flow processes, how

  20. Addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscopy based on 2D acousto-optical deflector and spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonghong; Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben

    2013-01-01

    We present an addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscope by combining a 2D acousto-optical deflector with a spatial light modulator. The SLM shapes an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:Sapphire laser beam into a multifocus array, which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a 2D acousto-optical deflector. Compared to the single-beam-scan technique, the multifocus array scan can increase the scanning rate and the field-of-view size with the multi-region imaging ability. PMID:24307756

  1. Seismic Velocity Structure Across the Quebrada and Gofar Oceanic Transform Faults from 2D Refraction Tomography - A Comparison of Faults with High and Low Seismic Slip Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2009-12-01

    We perform two 2-D tomographic inversions using data collected as a part of the Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar (QDG) Transform Fault Active/Passive Experiment. The QDG transform faults are located in the southern Pacific Ocean and offset the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at approximately 4° south. In the spring of 2008, two ~100 km refraction profiles were collected, each using 8 short period Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) from OBSIP and over 900 shots from the RV Marcus Langseth, across the easternmost segments of the Quebrada and Gofar transform faults. The two refraction profiles are modeled using a 2-D tomographic code that allows joint inversion of the Pg, PmP, and Pn arrivals (Korenaga et al., 2000). Variations in crustal velocity and thickness, as well as the width and depth extent of a significant low velocity zone within and below the transform valley provide some insight into the material properties of each of the fault-zones. Reduced seismic velocities that are 0.5 to over 1.0 km/s slower than velocities associated with the oceanic crust outside the fault zone may indicate the highly fractured fault zone lithology. The low velocity zone associated with the Quebrada fault also extends to the south of the active fault zone, beneath a fossil fault trace. Because Gofar is offset by an intratransform spreading center, we are able to compare ‘normal’ oceanic crust produced at the EPR to the south of the fault with crust associated with the ~15 km intratransform spreading center to the north. These two high slip rate (14 cm/yr) faults look similar morphologically and demonstrate comparable microseismicity characteristics, however their abilities to generate large earthquakes differ significantly. Gofar generates large earthquakes (Mw ~6) regularly every few years, but in the past 24 years only one large (Mw 5.6) event has been reliably located on Quebrada. The contrasting seismic behavior of these faults represents the range of behavior observed in the global

  2. STUDYING THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM ANISOTROPIES IN VELOCITY CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D. E-mail: lazarian@astro.wisc.edu

    2015-11-20

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic due to the ubiquitous magnetic fields. This anisotropy depends on the strength of the magnetic field and leaves an imprint on observations of spectral line maps. We use a grid of ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of driven turbulence and produce synthetic position–position–velocity maps to study the turbulence anisotropy in velocity channels of various resolutions. We found that the average structure function of velocity channels is aligned with the projection of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky. We also found that the degree of such anisotropy increases with the magnitude of the magnetic field. For thick velocity channels (low velocity resolution), the anisotropy is dominated by density, and the degree of anisotropy in these maps allows one to distinguish sub-Alfvénic and super-Alfvénic turbulence regimes, but it also depends strongly on the sonic Mach number. For thin channels (high velocity resolution), we find that the anisotropy depends less on the sonic Mach number. An important limitation of this technique is that it only gives a lower limit on the magnetic field strength because the anisotropy is related only to the magnetic field component on the plane of the sky. It can, and should, be used in combination with other techniques to estimate the magnetic field, such as the Fermi-Chandrasekhar method, anisotropies in centroids, Faraday rotation measurements, or direct line-of-sight determinations of the field from Zeeman effect observations.

  3. Solution to Shape Identification of Steady-state Viscous Flow Fields to Prescribe Flow Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katamine, Eiji; Kanai, Ryoma

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical solution to shape identification problem of steady-state viscous flow fields. In this study, a shape identification problem is formulated for flow velocity distribution prescribed problem, while the total dissipated energy is constrained to less than a desired value, in the viscous flow field. The square error integral between the actual flow velocity distributions and the prescribed flow velocity distributions in the prescribed sub-domains is used as the objective functional. Shape gradient of the shape identification problem is derived theoretically using the Lagrange multiplier method, adjoint variable method, and the formulae of the material derivative. Reshaping is carried out by the traction method proposed as an approach to solving shape optimization problems. The validity of proposed method is confirmed by results of 2D numerical analysis.

  4. Velocity field measurement of a round jet using quantitative schlieren.

    PubMed

    Iffa, Emishaw D; Aziz, A Rashid A; Malik, Aamir S

    2011-02-10

    This paper utilizes the background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to measure the velocity field of a variable density round jet. The density field of the jet is computed based on the light deflection created during the passage of light through the understudy jet. The deflection vector estimation was carried out using phase-based optical flow algorithms. The density field is further exploited to extract the axial and radial velocity vectors with the aid of continuity and energy equations. The experiment is conducted at six different jet-exit temperature values. Additional turbulence parameters, such as velocity variance and power spectral density of the vector field, are also computed. Finally, the measured velocity parameters are compared with the hot wire anemometer measurements and their correlation is displayed.

  5. Velocity field measurement of a round jet using quantitative schlieren

    SciTech Connect

    Iffa, Emishaw D.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.; Malik, Aamir S.

    2011-02-10

    This paper utilizes the background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to measure the velocity field of a variable density round jet. The density field of the jet is computed based on the light deflection created during the passage of light through the understudy jet. The deflection vector estimation was carried out using phase-based optical flow algorithms. The density field is further exploited to extract the axial and radial velocity vectors with the aid of continuity and energy equations. The experiment is conducted at six different jet-exit temperature values. Additional turbulence parameters, such as velocity variance and power spectral density of the vector field, are also computed. Finally, the measured velocity parameters are compared with the hot wire anemometer measurements and their correlation is displayed.

  6. MONTE GENEROSO ROCKFALL FIELD TEST (SWITZERLAND): Real size experiment to constraint 2D and 3D rockfall simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humair, F.; Matasci, B.; Carrea, D.; Pedrazzini, A.; Loye, A.; Pedrozzi, G.; Nicolet, P.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    In numerical rockfall simulation, the runout of rockfall is highly dependent of the restitution coefficients which are one of the key parameters to estimate the energy and simulate the rebounds of the blocks during their travel. Restitution coefficients values derived from literature may however not be adapted to every rockfall area as they do not integrate some of the influencing parameters as, among others, block shape rock size, soil cover… The aim is to illustrate how real size rockfall experiment can improve the reliability of computational trajectory simulations of rockfall propagation by calibrating these latter with experiment extracted results. Experimental rockfall tests were performed in the slopes of Monte Generoso area (lat 720850/ long 84830) which is located in the canton of Ticino in south Switzerland above a highway. The field site is a forested area with a thin soil cover on a bedrock characterized by massive carbonates. The elevation ranges between 894m and 322m above see level with a slope of 35 to 40° in the upper part, 60 to 89° in the medium part and 28 to 38° in the lower part. 22 blocks with different size and shape were manually released down, imparting little or no initial velocity. The failing blocks were coloured to make the impacts easier to recognize. The paths of the failing blocks are recorded using two high speed cameras and the impacts of the blocks were sampled using dGNSS. The rockfall trajectories were analysed based on the movies. As the movies have to be referenced in x and y direction, the distance between two known point in the terrain as well as the position of the cameras were measured prior to the blocks throws. Measurements of bounce height, angular and translational velocity (as well as energy) and restitution coefficients (normal kn and tangential kt) were attempt to be deduced from the movies. First, a-priori simulations are compared with the real size experiment throw. Then a-fortiori simulations taking into

  7. Developing of 2D helical waves in semiconductor under the action of femtosecond laser pulse and external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Egorenkov, Vladimir A.; Loginova, Mariya M.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze laser-induced periodic structure developing in a semiconductor under the condition of both optical bistability existence and action of 2D external electric field. Optical bistability occurs because of nonlinear dependence of semiconductor absorption coefficient on charged particles concentration. The electron mobility, diffusion of electrons and laser-induced electric field are taken into account for laser pulse propagation analyzing. 2D external electric field together with electric field, induced by free electrons and ionized donors, governs the charged particle motion. Under certain conditions, the additional positive inverse loop between electron motion and electric field, caused by redistribution of free charged particles, appears. As a result, the helical wave for free charged particle concentration of electron-hole plasma in semiconductor develops under the electric field action. For computer simulation of a problem under consideration, a new finite-difference scheme is proposed. The main feature of proposed method consists in constructed two-step iteration process. We pay a special attention for calculation of initial functions distributions. For their calculation we solve the set of 2D stationary partial differential equations by using additional iteration process that is similar to the iteration process, applied for the main problem solution.

  8. Takes Electric or Magnetic field data through Inversion process a 2D Distributon

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory

    2008-05-01

    Program images 2D distributions in electrical conductivity for geophysical applications. The program can treat surface based and cross well measurement geometries, including inductive and grounded source antennas in the quasi-static limit. The algorithm using Krylov iterative methods to solve for the predicted data and model sensitivities. The model update is achieved using a Gauss-newton optimization process for stability. A new line search capability is now included in the algorithm to insure global convergence of the inversion iteration.

  9. Takes Electric or Magnetic field data through Inversion process a 2D Distributon

    2008-05-01

    Program images 2D distributions in electrical conductivity for geophysical applications. The program can treat surface based and cross well measurement geometries, including inductive and grounded source antennas in the quasi-static limit. The algorithm using Krylov iterative methods to solve for the predicted data and model sensitivities. The model update is achieved using a Gauss-newton optimization process for stability. A new line search capability is now included in the algorithm to insure global convergence of themore » inversion iteration.« less

  10. Magnetic Cloud Field Intensities and Solar Wind Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Clau de Gonzalez, Alicia D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Arballo, John K.

    1997-01-01

    For the sets of magnetic clouds studied in this work we have shown that there is a general relationship between their magnetic fields strength and velocities. With a clear tendency that the faster the speed of the cloud the higher the magnetic field.

  11. Electric field enhancement in a self-assembled 2D array of silver nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z. E-mail: wayne.hess@pnnl.gov; Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Abellan, Patricia; Browning, Nigel D.; Hess, Wayne P. E-mail: wayne.hess@pnnl.gov; Khon, Elena; Hu, Dehong; Zamkov, Mikhail; Evans, James E.

    2014-12-07

    We investigate the plasmonic properties of a self-assembled 2D array of Ag nanospheres (average particle diameter/inter-particle separation distance of 9/3.7 nm). The structures of the individual particles and their assemblies are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The plasmonic response of the nanoparticle network is probed using two-photon photoemission electron microscopy (TP-PEEM). HR-TEM and TP-PEEM statistics reveal the structure and plasmonic response of the network to be homogeneous on average. This translates into a relatively uniform surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response from biphenyl,4-4{sup ′}-dithiol (BPDT) molecules adsorbed onto different sites of the network. Reproducible, bright, and low-background SERS spectra are recorded and assigned on the basis of density functional theory calculations in which BPDT is chemisorbed onto the vertex of a finite tetrahedral Ag cluster consisting of 20 Ag atoms. A notable agreement between experiment and theory allows us to rigorously account for the observable vibrational states of BPDT in the ∼200–2200 cm{sup −1} region of the spectrum. Finite difference time domain simulations further reveal that physical enhancement factors on the order of 10{sup 6} are attainable at the nanogaps formed between the silver nanospheres in the 2D array. Combined with modest chemical enhancement factors, this study paves the way for reproducible single molecule signals from an easily self-assembled SERS substrate.

  12. Electric Field Enhancement in a Self-Assembled 2D Array of Silver Nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Khon, Elena; Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Abellan, Patricia; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.; Hu, Dehong; Zamkov, Mikhail; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-07

    We investigate the plasmonic properties of a self-assembled 2D array of Ag nanospheres (average particle diameter/inter-particle separation distance of ~9/~4 nm). The structures of the individual particles and their assemblies are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The plasmonic response of the nanoparticle network is probed using two-photon photoemission electron microscopy (TP-PEEM). HR-TEM and TP-PEEM statistics reveal the structure and plasmonic response of the network to be homogeneous on average. This translates into a relatively uniform surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response from biphenyl,4-4’-dithiol (BPDT) molecules adsorbed onto different sites of the network. Bright and background free SERS spectra are recorded, assigned on the basis of density 2 functional theory calculations in which BPDT is chemisorbed onto the vertex of a finitie tetrahedral Ag cluster consisting of 20 Ag atoms. A remarkable agreement between experiment and theory allows us to rigorously account for the observable vibrational states of BPDT in the ~200-2200 cm-1 region of the spectrum. Finite difference time domain simulations further reveal that physical enhancement factors on the order of 106 are attainable at the nanogaps formed between the silver nanospheres in the 2D array. Combined with modest chemical enhancement factors, this study paves the way for reproducible single molecule signals from an easily self-assembled SERS substrate.

  13. 2D profile of poloidal magnetic field diagnosed by a laser-driven ion-beam trace probe (LITP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Chijie; Chen, Yihang; Xu, Tianchao; Lin, Chen; Wang, Long; Xu, Min; Yu, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Based on large energy spread of laser-driven ion beam (LIB), a new method, the Laser-driven Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP), was suggested recently to diagnose the poloidal magnetic field (Bp) and radial electric field (Er) in toroidal devices. Based on another property of LIB, a wide angular distribution, here we suggested that LITP could be extended to get 2D Bp profile or 1D profile of both poloidal and radial magnetic fields at the same time. In this paper, we show the basic principle, some preliminary simulation results, and experimental preparation to test the basic principle of LITP.

  14. Velocity and temperature field in MHD Falkner-Skan flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soundalgekar, V. M.; Takhar, H. S.; Singh, M.

    1981-09-01

    The paper develops an exact analysis of MHD Falkner-Skan flow of an electrically conducting, incompressible viscous fluid. The existence of similarity solutions is demonstrated when the applied magnetic field is inversely proportional to the boundary layer thickness. Numerical solutions for velocity, temperature, skin-friction and rate of heat transfer are obtained. The numerical values of skin-friction and rate of heat transfer are tabulated and the velocity and temperature are graphically exhibited.

  15. Methodology to estimate the relative pressure field from noisy experimental velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, C. D.; Raguin, L. G.

    2008-11-01

    The determination of intravascular pressure fields is important to the characterization of cardiovascular pathology. We present a two-stage method that solves the inverse problem of estimating the relative pressure field from noisy velocity fields measured by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) on an irregular domain with limited spatial resolution, and includes a filter for the experimental noise. For the pressure calculation, the Poisson pressure equation is solved by embedding the irregular flow domain into a regular domain. To lessen the propagation of the noise inherent to the velocity measurements, three filters - a median filter and two physics-based filters - are evaluated using a 2-D Couette flow. The two physics-based filters outperform the median filter for the estimation of the relative pressure field for realistic signal-to-noise ratios (SNR = 5 to 30). The most accurate pressure field results from a filter that applies in a least-squares sense three constraints simultaneously: consistency between measured and filtered velocity fields, divergence-free and additional smoothness conditions. This filter leads to a 5-fold gain in accuracy for the estimated relative pressure field compared to without noise filtering, in conditions consistent with PC-MRI of the carotid artery: SNR = 5, 20 x 20 discretized flow domain (25 X 25 computational domain).

  16. Bayesian inversion of marine CSEM data from the Scarborough gas field using a transdimensional 2-D parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Anandaroop; Key, Kerry; Bodin, Thomas; Myer, David; Constable, Steven

    2014-12-01

    We apply a reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo method to sample the Bayesian posterior model probability density function of 2-D seafloor resistivity as constrained by marine controlled source electromagnetic data. This density function of earth models conveys information on which parts of the model space are illuminated by the data. Whereas conventional gradient-based inversion approaches require subjective regularization choices to stabilize this highly non-linear and non-unique inverse problem and provide only a single solution with no model uncertainty information, the method we use entirely avoids model regularization. The result of our approach is an ensemble of models that can be visualized and queried to provide meaningful information about the sensitivity of the data to the subsurface, and the level of resolution of model parameters. We represent models in 2-D using a Voronoi cell parametrization. To make the 2-D problem practical, we use a source-receiver common midpoint approximation with 1-D forward modelling. Our algorithm is transdimensional and self-parametrizing where the number of resistivity cells within a 2-D depth section is variable, as are their positions and geometries. Two synthetic studies demonstrate the algorithm's use in the appraisal of a thin, segmented, resistive reservoir which makes for a challenging exploration target. As a demonstration example, we apply our method to survey data collected over the Scarborough gas field on the Northwest Australian shelf.

  17. 2D electrostatic micromirror array with high field factor for high-power application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lani, S.; Bayat, D.; Pétremand, Y.

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of a 20×20 micro mirror array (MMA) designed for high optical power application (5- 8kW/m2). Each pixel can attain a 2D mechanical tilt angle of +/- 4° in any arbitrary axis with an applied voltage of 150V. A novel packaging architecture is proposed to increase the ratio of mirror surface to packaging surface based on fully vertically integration process of the actuation (vertical electrodes), electrical interconnections (TSV) and signal processing (electronic). All components have a pitch smaller than the mirror surface. A detailed assessment of the fabrication process - including 3D wafer level assembly, through silicon via (TSV), electronic integration, and characterization methodology is presented with experimental results.

  18. Velocity field in a vicinity of cylinder bouncing off horizontal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chara, Z.; Kysela, B.; Dolansky, J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes experimental and numerical investigations of velocity fields around a circular cylinder colliding perpendicularly with a plane wall. The cylinder of the diameter D = 20 mm was moving vertically in a water tank and the motion was recorded by a fast digital camera. Reynolds numbers ranged from 3000 to 8100 and the initial positions L of the cylinder above the wall were L/D = 2.5; 3.5; 4.5 and 5.5. An evolution of fluid agitation in an area close to the impact point was based on the results of the velocity field measurements. The numerical simulations were performed using a 2D-LES model.

  19. Sound field separation with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclère, Quentin

    2012-12-01

    In conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH) it is not possible to distinguish between sound from the two sides of the array, thus, it is a requirement that all the sources are confined to only one side and radiate into a free field. When this requirement cannot be fulfilled, sound field separation techniques make it possible to distinguish between outgoing and incoming waves from the two sides, and thus NAH can be applied. In this paper, a separation method based on the measurement of the particle velocity in two layers and another method based on the measurement of the pressure and the velocity in a single layer are proposed. The two methods use an equivalent source formulation with separate transfer matrices for the outgoing and incoming waves, so that the sound from the two sides of the array can be modeled independently. A weighting scheme is proposed to account for the distance between the equivalent sources and measurement surfaces and for the difference in magnitude between pressure and velocity. Experimental and numerical studies have been conducted to examine the methods. The double layer velocity method seems to be more robust to noise and flanking sound than the combined pressure-velocity method, although it requires an additional measurement surface. On the whole, the separation methods can be useful when the disturbance of the incoming field is significant. Otherwise the direct reconstruction is more accurate and straightforward.

  20. The 2D electric field above a planar sequence of independent strip electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Manuel; Clague, David

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes an analytical solution for the electrostatic potential and electric field in dielectrophoretic (DEP) microfluidic devices. DEP devices are engineered to be DNA concentrators in automated, flow-through systems of sample preparation for biological assays. DEP devices deflect and trap particles suspended in liquid flows because macromolecular particles polarize in response to an electric field, and the coupling of this polarization with the field alters particle motions. The DEP effect is proportional to ∇(E.E). The electric field is produced by a sequence of independent strip electrodes and is two dimensional throughout the volume of the flow. As the potentials used in DEP devices are low-frequency sinusoids, the field of interest is the gradient of the squared root-mean-square (rms) of the electric field, ∇Erms2. An example of this field is shown.

  1. Asymptotic calculation of the velocity field for shallow- water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Alexander

    2005-11-01

    An approximate calculation is made of the velocity field for the propagation of a soliton on the surface of a fluid in a channel of constant depth, The time evolution equation for the stream function for a viscous fluid described by the Navier-Stokes equation is solved for large distances from the crest of the soliton. Boundary conditions at the bottom and at the free surface are included. The results for the velocity field are in fairly good agreement with the numerical calculation of C.J. Tang et al. (1) (1) C.J. Tang,V.C. Patel and L. Landweber, J.Comut. Phys. 88, 86 (1990)

  2. Normalized velocity profiles of field-measured turbidity currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Jingping

    2010-01-01

    Multiple turbidity currents were recorded in two submarine canyons with maximum speed as high as 280 cm/s. For each individual turbidity current measured at a fixed station, its depth-averaged velocity typically decreased over time while its thickness increased. Some turbidity currents gained in speed as they traveled downcanyon, suggesting a possible self-accelerating process. The measured velocity profiles, first in this high resolution, allowed normalizations with various schemes. Empirical functions, obtained from laboratory experiments whose spatial and time scales are two to three orders of magnitude smaller, were found to represent the field data fairly well. The best similarity collapse of the velocity profiles was achieved when the streamwise velocity and the elevation were normalized respectively by the depth-averaged velocity and the turbidity current thickness. This normalization scheme can be generalized to an empirical function Y = exp(–αXβ) for the jet region above the velocity maximum. Confirming theoretical arguments and laboratory results of other studies, the field turbidity currents are Froude-supercritical.

  3. Sub-60 mV/decade switching in 2D negative capacitance field-effect transistors with integrated ferroelectric polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Felicia A.; Cheng, Zhihui; Price, Katherine; Franklin, Aaron D.

    2016-08-01

    There is a rising interest in employing the negative capacitance (NC) effect to achieve sub-60 mV/decade (below the thermal limit) switching in field-effect transistors (FETs). The NC effect, which is an effectual amplification of the applied gate potential, is realized by incorporating a ferroelectric material in series with a dielectric in the gate stack of a FET. One of the leading challenges to such NC-FETs is the variable substrate capacitance exhibited in 3D semiconductor channels (bulk, Fin, or nanowire) that minimizes the extent of sub-60 mV/decade switching. In this work, we demonstrate 2D NC-FETs that combine the NC effect with 2D MoS2 channels to extend the steep switching behavior. Using the ferroelectric polymer, poly(vinylidene difluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)), these 2D NC-FETs are fabricated by modification of top-gated 2D FETs through the integrated addition of P(VDF-TrFE) into the gate stack. The impact of including an interfacial metal between the ferroelectric and dielectric is studied and shown to be critical. These 2D NC-FETs exhibit a decrease in subthreshold swing from 113 mV/decade down to 11.7 mV/decade at room temperature with sub-60 mV/decade switching occurring over more than 4 decades of current. The P(VDF-TrFE) proves to be an unstable option for a device technology, yet the superb switching behavior observed herein opens the way for further exploration of nanomaterials for extremely low-voltage NC-FETs.

  4. Electromagnetic induction by finite wavenumber source fields in 2-D lateral heterogeneities - The transverse electric mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction in a laterally homogeneous earth is analyzed in terms of a source field with finite dimensions. Attention is focused on a time-varying two-dimensional current source directed parallel to the strike of a two-dimensional anomalous structure within the earth, i.e., the E-parallel mode. The spatially harmonic source field is expressed as discontinuities in the magnetic (or electric) field of the current in the source. The model is applied to describing the magnetic gradients across megatectonic features, and may be used to predict the magnetic fields encountered by a satellite orbiting above the ionosphere.

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Variational approach to the scaling function of the 2D Ising model in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangazeev, Vladimir V.; Batchelor, Murray T.; Bazhanov, Vladimir V.; Dudalev, Michael Yu

    2009-01-01

    The universal scaling function of the square lattice Ising model in a magnetic field is obtained numerically via Baxter's variational corner transfer matrix approach. The high precision numerical data are in perfect agreement with the remarkable field theory results obtained by Fonseca and Zamolodchikov, as well as with many previously known exact and numerical results for the 2D Ising model. This includes excellent agreement with analytic results for the magnetic susceptibility obtained by Orrick, Nickel, Guttmann and Perk. In general, the high precision of the numerical results underlines the potential and full power of the variational corner transfer matrix approach.

  6. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing–Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing–Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  7. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing-Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing-Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  8. Assessing Methods for Mapping 2D Field Concentrations of CO2 Over Large Spatial Areas for Monitoring Time Varying Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccheo, T. S.; Pernini, T.; Botos, C.; Dobler, J. T.; Blume, N.; Braun, M.; Levine, Z. H.; Pintar, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for constructing 2D estimates of CO2 field concentrations from integrated open path measurements of CO2 concentrations. It provides a description of the methodology, an assessment based on simulated data and results from preliminary field trials. The Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE) system, currently under development by Exelis and AER, consists of a set of laser-based transceivers and a number of retro-reflectors coupled with a cloud-based compute environment to enable real-time monitoring of integrated CO2 path concentrations, and provides 2D maps of estimated concentrations over an extended area of interest. The GreenLITE transceiver-reflector pairs provide laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) measurements of differential absorption due to CO2 along intersecting chords within the field of interest. These differential absorption values for the intersecting chords of horizontal path are not only used to construct estimated values of integrated concentration, but also employed in an optimal estimation technique to derive 2D maps of underlying concentration fields. This optimal estimation technique combines these sparse data with in situ measurements of wind speed/direction and an analytic plume model to provide tomographic-like reconstruction of the field of interest. This work provides an assessment of this reconstruction method and preliminary results from the Fall 2014 testing at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) site in Bozeman, Montana. This work is funded in part under the GreenLITE program developed under a cooperative agreement between Exelis and the National Energy and Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Department of Energy (DOE), contract # DE-FE0012574. Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. is a major partner in this development.

  9. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  10. Electric field measurements during the Condor critical velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation of the Condor critical velocity Ba experiment (Wescott et al., 1986) for the measurements of the energetic particles and the electric field associated with a Ba explosion is described. The Ba explosion created a complex electric field pulse detected in situ by a single-axis double electric-field probe on a separate spacecraft. The measurements provide evidence of several important links in the critical-velocity chain, and are consistent with two hypotheses. The first hypothesis involves the creation of large polarization electric field due to charge separation; the second hypothesis implies a polarization of the beam by currents flowing across it. The chain of physical processes inferred from the observations is in agreement with most theories for the Alfven process.

  11. Velocity Profile Normalization of Field-Measured Turbidity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.

    2009-05-01

    Multiple occurrences of turbidity currents were observed in moored-ADCP measurements in Monterey (2002/03) and Hueneme (2007/08) submarine canyons, California. These turbidity currents, almost all of which were supercritical (densimetric Froude number greater than unity), lasted for hours and obtained a maximum speed of greater than 200 cm/s. The layer-averaged velocity of the turbidity currents varied from 100+ cm/s at the onset of the turbidity currents to 20+ cm/s toward the end of the events. The thickness of the turbidity currents tended to increase from 10 to 40 m over an event. Empirical functions, obtained from laboratory experiments whose spatial and time scales are two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the field measurements [e.g. Altinakar, Graf, and Hopfinger, 1996, Flow structure in turbidity currents, Journal of Hydraulic Research, 34(5):713-718], were found to represent the field data fairly well. However, the best similarity collapse of the turbidity current velocity profiles was obtained when the streamwise velocity was normalized by the layer-averaged velocity and the elevation was normalized by the turbidity current thickness. This normalization scheme can be generalized to the same empirical function y = exp (-α xm) for the jet region above the velocity maximum.

  12. A simple measuring technique of surface flow velocity to analyze the behavior of velocity fields in hydraulic engineering applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Jackson; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    An important achievement in hydraulic engineering is the proposal and development of new techniques for the measurement of field velocities in hydraulic problems. The technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the market, and the advances in digital image processing techniques now provides a tremendous potential to measure and study the behavior of the water surface flows. This technique was applied at the Laboratory of Hydraulics at the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech to study the 2D velocity fields in the vicinity of a grate inlet. We used a platform to test grate inlets capacity with dimensions of 5.5 m long and 4 m wide allowing a zone of useful study of 5.5m x 3m, where the width is similar of the urban road lane. The platform allows you to modify the longitudinal slopes from 0% to 10% and transversal slope from 0% to 4%. Flow rates can arrive to 200 l/s. In addition a high resolution camera with 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution with maximum speed of 488 frames per second was used. A novel technique using particle image velocimetry to measure surface flow velocities has been developed and validated with the experimental data from the grate inlets capacity. In this case, the proposed methodology can become a useful tools to understand the velocity fields of the flow approaching the inlet where the traditional measuring equipment have serious problems and limitations. References DigiFlow User Guide. (2012), (June). Russo, B., Gómez, M., & Tellez, J. (2013). Methodology to Estimate the Hydraulic Efficiency of Nontested Continuous Transverse Grates. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 139(10), 864-871. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000625 Teresa Vila (1), Jackson Tellez (1), Jesus Maria Sanchez (2), Laura Sotillos (1), Margarita Diez (3, 1), and J., & (1), M. R. (2014). Diffusion in fractal wakes and convective thermoelectric flows. Geophysical Research Abstracts - EGU General Assembly 2014

  13. Computation of flow pressure fields from magnetic resonance velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Yang, G Z; Kilner, P J; Wood, N B; Underwood, S R; Firmin, D N

    1996-10-01

    Magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping has unrivalled capacities for acquiring in vivo multi-directional blood flow information. In this study, the authors set out to derive both spatial and temporal components of acceleration, and hence differences of pressure in a flow field using cine magnetic resonance velocity data. An efficient numerical algorithm based on the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible Newtonian fluid was used. The computational approach was validated with in vitro flow phantoms. This work aims to contribute to a better understanding of cardiovascular dynamics and to serve as a basis for investigating pulsatile pressure/flow relationships associated with normal and impaired cardiovascular function. PMID:8892202

  14. Turbulence in Flowing Soap Films: Velocity, Vorticity, and Thickness Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, M.; Vorobieff, P.; Ecke, R.E.

    1998-08-01

    We report experimental measurements of the velocity, vorticity, and thickness fields of turbulent flowing soap films using a modified particle-image velocimetry technique. These data yield the turbulent energy and enstrophy of the two-dimensional flows with microscale Reynolds numbers of about 100 and demonstrate the effects of compressibility arising from variations in film thickness. Despite the compressibility of the flow, real-space correlations of velocity, vorticity, and enstrophy flux are consistent with theoretical predictions for two-dimensional turbulence. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  15. Preliminary results of an updated North American GPS velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craymer, M. R.; Henton, J. A.; Piraszewski, M.; Lapelle, E.

    2010-12-01

    In an effort to improve previous continental-scale GPS velocity fields for North America, we and other collaborators in the North American Reference Frame (NAREF) Working Group have reprocessed, or are in the process of reprocessing, data from nearly all continuous GPS sites in North America (as well as a selection of global sites used to define the reference frame). Previous velocity fields were derived from coordinate time series of somewhat inhomogeneous GPS results due to: (1) the use of relative antenna calibrations that did not include satellite antennas or account for the presence of antenna radomes, (2) the use of difference reference frames, (3) the use of IGS precise orbits based on these calibrations and reference frames, and (4) the use of different (evolving) versions of GPS processing software and procedures. This reprocessing effort of all previous data is based on more consistent and accurate absolute antenna calibrations of both station and satellite antennas, the ITRF2005 reference frame and the latest versions of GPS processing software and procedures. Also, more than three additional years of data have been included in the velocity field estimation. The new time series and velocity results from the different NAREF collaborators are compared with each other and with previous reported results. We also compare these results to new precise point positioning (PPP) solutions that are much more efficient for processing large networks and to recent model predictions of glacial isostatic adjustment.

  16. The galloping chromosphere. [H alpha observation of oscillating velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, C.

    1974-01-01

    Oscillating velocity fields can be observed on H-alpha filtergrams as a shifting pattern of intensity fluctuations known as 'the galloping chromosphere'. The characteristics of this activity are those of horizontal running waves of typical period of about 300 sec and long wavelength (about 20,000 km) that can be interpreted as acoustic-gravity waves propagating in the acoustic domain. Periods are longer in dark, structured regions, and in fibrils, and the change is quantitatively consistent with the reduction of resonance frequency in a magnetic field of 1 to 10 gauss. These easily observed fluctuations thus offer a means of estimating magnetic-field strength at specific locations in the chromosphere. Phase velocities are high, ranging upward from typical values between 50 and 100 km per sec, and tending to be lower in active regions and toward the limb.

  17. High-Resolution Hα Velocity Fields of Nearby Spiral Galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; Williams, Ted; Spekkens, Kristine; Lee-Waddell, Karen; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Sellwood, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to test ΛCDM predictions of galaxy mass distributions, we have obtained spectrophotometric observations of several nearby spiral galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometer as part of the RSS Imaging spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey. Utilizing the SALT FP's 8 arcmin field of view and 2 arcsec angular resolution, we have derived 2D velocity fields of the Hα emission line to high spatial resolution at large radii. We have modeled these velocity fields with the DiskFit software package and found them to be in good agreement with lower-resolution velocity fields of the HI 21 cm line for the same galaxies. Here we present our Hα kinematic map of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 578. At the distance to this galaxy (22 Mpc), our kinematic data has a spatial resolution of 185 pc and extends to galactocentric radii of 13 kpc. The high spatial resolution of this data allows us to resolve the inner rising part of the rotation curves, which is compromised by beam smearing in lower-resolution observations. We are using these Hα kinematic data, combined with HI 21 cm kinematics and broadband photometric observations, to place constraints on NGC 578's mass distribution.

  18. Hamiltonian structure of Dubrovin{close_quote}s equation of associativity in 2-d topological field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, C.A.; Nutku, Y.

    1996-12-01

    mA third order Monge-Amp{grave e}re type equation of associativity that Dubrovin has obtained in 2-d topological field theory is formulated in terms of a variational principle subject to second class constraints. Using Dirac{close_quote}s theory of constraints this degenerate Lagrangian system is cast into Hamiltonian form and the Hamiltonian operator is obtained from the Dirac bracket. There is a new type of Kac-Moody algebra that corresponds to this Hamiltonian operator. In particular, it is not a W-algebra. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. On Barnes Beta Distributions and Applications to the Maximum Distribution of the 2D Gaussian Free Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    A new family of Barnes beta distributions on (0, ∞) is introduced and its infinite divisibility, moment determinacy, scaling, and factorization properties are established. The Morris integral probability distribution is constructed from Barnes beta distributions of types (1, 0) and (2, 2), and its moment determinacy and involution invariance properties are established. For application, the maximum distributions of the 2D gaussian free field on the unit interval and circle with a non-random logarithmic potential are conjecturally related to the critical Selberg and Morris integral probability distributions, respectively, and expressed in terms of sums of Barnes beta distributions of types (1, 0) and (2, 2).

  20. Ultrasonic field profile evaluation in acoustically inhomogeneous anisotropic materials using 2D ray tracing model: Numerical and experimental comparison.

    PubMed

    Kolkoori, S R; Rahman, M-U; Chinta, P K; Ktreutzbruck, M; Rethmeier, M; Prager, J

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials is difficult to examine because of the directional dependency of elastic properties. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic non destructive testing techniques for the inspection of anisotropic materials particularly austenitic cladded materials, austenitic welds and dissimilar welds. In this contribution we present an adapted 2D ray tracing model for evaluating ultrasonic wave fields quantitatively in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. Inhomogeneity in the anisotropic material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The presented algorithm evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase relations as well as transmission coefficients. The ray tracing model is able to calculate the ultrasonic wave fields generated by a point source as well as a finite dimension transducer. The ray tracing model results are validated quantitatively with the results obtained from 2D Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT) on several configurations generally occurring in the ultrasonic non destructive testing of anisotropic materials. Finally, the quantitative comparison of ray tracing model results with experiments on 32mm thick austenitic weld material and 62mm thick austenitic cladded material is discussed.

  1. Monolithic integration of focused 2D GMR spin valve magnetic field sensor for high-sensitivity (compass) applications (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueberschär, Olaf; Almeida, Maria J.; Matthes, Patrick; Müller, Mathias; Ecke, Ramona; Exner, Horst; Schulz, Stefan E.

    2015-09-01

    We have designed and fabricated 2D GMR spin valve sensors on the basis of IrMn/CoFe/Cu/CoFe/NiFe nanolayers in monolithic integration for high sensitivity applications. For a maximum signal-to-noise ratio, we realize a focused double full bridge layout featuring an antiparallel exchange bias pinning for neighbouring meanders and an orthogonal pinning for different bridges. This precise alignment is achieved with microscopic precision by laser heating and subsequent in-field cooling. Striving for maximum signal sensitivity and minimum hysteresis, we study in detail the impact of single meander geometry on the total magnetic structure and electronic transport properties. The investigated geometrical parameters include stripe width, stripe length, cross bar material and total meander length. In addition, the influence of the relative alignment between reference magnetization (pinned layer) and shape anisotropy (free layer) is studied. The experimentally obtained data are moreover compared to the predictions of tailored micromagnetic simulations. Using a set of optimum parameters, we demonstrate that our sensor may readily be employed to measure small magnetic fields, such as the ambient (geomagnetic) field, in terms of a 2D vector with high spatial (~200 μm) and temporal (~1 ms) resolution.

  2. 2-D modeling of gas and overpressure generation in the Venture field (Canada)

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, P.L.; Ungerer, P. ); Mudford, S. )

    1990-05-01

    Venture field is located in an overpressured zone of gas accumulations in a region that had low sedimentation rates over the last 80 m.y. This could support the hydrocarbon generation, rather than compaction disequilibrium, as the main cause for overpressuring. Study of these accumulations can be done using the IFP (Institut Francais du Petrole) THEMIS model, which integrates compactions, hydraulic fracturation, fluid flows, heat transfer, and formation and migration of hydrocarbons. A single phase basin scale model is constructed first to assess the input parameters related to the fluid-flow reconstruction. The permeability of faults is calibrated to fit the actual pressure distribution through the field. Permeability is found to be very low and allows a fit to the regional distribution of overpressuring. In a second step, a two-phase model, restricted to the field itself, is used to test parameters related to hydrocarbon and source rocks. Gas accumulations are effectively obtained in the reservoir units. Finally, the two-phase model is extended to the regional scale to check the parameters previously assessed. At this scale, the gas and overpressure distributions are found to fit those actually observed. Gas accumulations contribute slightly to overpressuring, which is better accounted for by compaction disequilibrium despite the low sedimentation rates. Generation in or close to the reservoir unit does not contribute significantly to the gas accumulations. However, gas sources are found in the underlying formations.

  3. Velocity-map imaging at low extraction fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horke, Daniel A.; Roberts, Gareth M.; Lecointre, Julien; Verlet, Jan R. R.

    2012-06-01

    We present a velocity-map imaging (VMI) setup for photoelectron imaging that utilizes low electric extraction fields. This avoids any complications that could arise from electrostatic interactions between the extraction field and the molecular properties that are probed and has a minimal effect on the trajectory of ions in ion beam experiments. By using an attractive potential supplied to the detector, and keeping the electrodes at ground (zero) potential, we show that fringe fields between the VMI arrangement and the vacuum chamber can be eliminated, which is important in experiments on ions.

  4. Extension of Migration Velocity Analysis to transmitted wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameloise, Charles-Antoine; Chauris, Hervé

    2016-08-01

    Migration Velocity Analysis aims at automatically updating the large scale components of the velocity model, called macromodel. Extended Common Image Gathers are panels used to evaluate focusing after imaging and are constructed as a function of a spatial shift introduced in the imaging condition. We investigate how transmitted waves can also be used in Migration Velocity Analysis: instead of back-propagating the residuals associated to reflected waves, we propose to back-propagate the full wave field. The image function, equivalent of the migrated section for reflected data does not exhibit localised events in space along horizons but is still sensitive to the choice of the background velocity model and can thus be coupled to the same objective function defined in the image domain. In order to enhance the benefits of direct waves, we consider a cross-well configuration. Direct waves provide a large illumination between two vertical wells. Associated Common Image Gathers present different characteristics than the ones associated to reflected waves in surface acquisition. In particular, energy is spread over up to the maximum penetration depth. We invert cross-well seismic data along two lines. In the first case, the input data contain the full wavefield dominated by transmitted waves. It demonstrates the possibility to handle transmitted waves to determine the velocity model. It appears that the misfit in the data domain is largely reduced after inversion. In the second case, we use the same algorithm, but with reflected observed data only, as in a classical approach. Most of velocity updates are localised around the reflectivity, leading to an incorrect final model. This demonstrates the benefit of transmitted waves for Migration Velocity Analysis in a cross-well configuration

  5. 3-D heterogeneous field data versus 2-D simulations. How can it be accomplished in a sedimentary porous formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvini, G.; Salandin, P.

    2009-12-01

    To analyze the impact of the hydraulic conductivity K spatial variability in a real field case (as an example to delimitate a well catchment), numerical simulations can be reasonably developed in a two-dimensional vertical average context. Nevertheless the plume evolution is a consequence of a more complex three-dimensional heterogeneous structure whose vertical variability dominates the dispersion phenomena at local scale. In larger domains, the effect of the vertical heterogeneity combines itself with that one due to the horizontal variability of K, and only when the plume has travelled a large number of (horizontal) integral scales, its evolution can be analyzed in a regional context, under the hypothesis that the transmissivity spatial distribution prevails. Until this limit is reached, the vertical and horizontal variability of K are combined to give a fully 3-D dispersion process. In all these situations, to successfully accomplish the 3-D heterogeneous structure of the aquifer in 2-D simulations, more than the planimetric depth-averaged variability of K must be accounted for. To define the uncertainty related to the use of different planimetric schematizations of the real hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution, we present here the results of some numerical experiments that compare the 3-D plume evolution with 2-D simulations developed by tacking into account different hydraulic conductivity distribution schematization, by considering a hierarchical architecture of media also. This description of a sedimentary formation combined with the finite size of the plume requires theoretical and numerical tools able to take into account the flow field inhomogeneity and the ergodicity lack that characterize the transport phenomena. Following this way it will be possible to quantify / reduce the uncertainty related to a 2-D schematization in a large number of real cases where the domain spans between the local and the regional scale and whose dimension may lead to

  6. Emission-Line Galaxies from the PEARS Hubble Ultra Deep Field: A 2-D Detection Method and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Straughn, Amber N.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Cohen, Seth H.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, james; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Xu, Chun; Gronwall, Caryl; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Walsh, Jeremy; diSeregoAlighieri, Sperello

    2007-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism PEARS (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) survey provides a large dataset of low-resolution spectra from thousands of galaxies in the GOODS North and South fields. One important subset of objects in these data are emission-line galaxies (ELGs), and we have investigated several different methods aimed at systematically selecting these galaxies. Here we present a new methodology and results of a search for these ELGs in the PEARS observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) using a 2D detection method that utilizes the observation that many emission lines originate from clumpy knots within galaxies. This 2D line-finding method proves to be useful in detecting emission lines from compact knots within galaxies that might not otherwise be detected using more traditional 1D line-finding techniques. We find in total 96 emission lines in the HUDF, originating from 81 distinct "knots" within 63 individual galaxies. We find in general that [0 1111 emitters are the most common, comprising 44% of the sample, and on average have high equivalent widths (70% of [0 1111 emitters having rest-frame EW> 100A). There are 12 galaxies with multiple emitting knots; several show evidence of variations in H-alpha flux in the knots, suggesting that the differing star formation properties across a single galaxy can in general be probed at redshifts approximately greater than 0.2 - 0.4. The most prevalent morphologies are large face-on spirals and clumpy interacting systems, many being unique detections owing to the 2D method described here, thus highlighting the strength of this technique.

  7. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  8. Experimental Observation of a Metal-insulator Transition in 2D at Zero Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, S. V.

    1996-03-01

    The scaling theory of Abrahams et al. ^1 has had considerable success in describing many features of metal-insulator transitions. Within this theory, which was developed for non-interacting electrons, no such transition is possible in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in the absence of a magnetic field. However, we show experimentally that an ultra-high-mobility 2DES on the surface of silicon does exhibit the signature of a true metal-insulator phase transition at zero magnetic field at a critical electron density n_c ~10^11 cm-2. The energy of electron-electron interactions, ignored in the scaling theory,^1 is the dominant parameter in this 2DES. The resistivity, ρ, is empirically found to scale near the critical point both with temperature T and electric field E so that it can be represented by the form ρ(T,n_s)=ρ(T/T_0(n_s)) as Earrow0 or ρ(E,n_s)=ρ(E/E_0(n_s)) as Tarrow0. At the transition, the resistivity is close to 3h/e^2. Both scaling parameters, T0 and E_0, show power law behavior at the critical point. This is characteristic of a true phase transition and strongly resembles, in particular, the superconductor-insulator transition in disordered thin films,^2 as well as the transition between quantum Hall liquid and insulator.^3 Many high-mobility samples from two different sources (Institute for Metrological Service, Russia, and Siemens AG, Germany) with different oxide thicknesses and gate materials have been studied and similar results were found. Work done in collaboration with J. E. Furneaux, Whitney Mason, V. M. Pudalov, and M. D'Iorio, supported by NSF. ^1 E. Abrahams, P. W. Anderson, D. C. Licciardello, and T. V. Ramakrishnan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 673 (1979). ^2 Y. Liu, K. A. McGreer, B. Nease, D. B. Haviland, G. Martinez, J. W. Halley, and A. M. Goldman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2068 (1991). ^3 T. Wang, K. P. Clark, G. F. Spencer, A. M. Mack, and W. P. Kirk, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 709 (1994).

  9. Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-D plasma with a linear magnetic field null

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-dimensional plasma near an O type magnetic null is investigated. Specifically, an elongated Z-pinch is considered, and applied to Field Reversed Configurations at Los Alamos National Laboratory by making a cylindrical approximation of the compact torus. The orbits near an elliptical O type null are found to be very complicated; the orbits are large and some are stochastic. The kinetic corrections to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated by evaluating the expectation values of the growth rates of a Vlasov Fluid dispersion functional by using a set of trial functions based on ideal MHD. The dispersion functional involves fluid parts and orbit dependent parts. The latter involves phase integral of two time correlations. The phase integral is replaced by the time integral both for the regular and for the stochastic orbits. Two trial functions are used; one has a large displacement near the null and the other away from the null.

  10. Controlling spin lifetime with Dresselhaus and Rashba fields in the 2D semiconductor MX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Li, Pengke

    It is widely believed that whenever spin encodes logic state in a semiconductor device, transport channel materials with the longest spin lifetime are the most suitable choice. However, once a logic operation is completed, residual spins can and will interfere with those involved in future operations. We propose to solve this problem by utilizing the unique properties of spin-orbit effects in the electronic structure of monolayer of group-III metal-monochalcogenide (MX) semiconductors. The interplay of Dresselhaus and Rashba effective magnetic fields in these materials will be shown to provide effective external control over spin polarization lifetime, potentially useful for future spin-enabled digital devices. Based upon: Pengke Li and Ian Appelbaum, arXiv:1508.06963 (to appear in Phys. Rev. B). We acknowledge support from NSF, DTRA, and ONR.

  11. Electronic Structure calculations in a 2D SixGe1-x alloy under an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilha, José. Eduardo; Pontes, Renato B.; Seixas, Leandro; da Silva, António J. R.; Fazzio, Adalberto

    2013-03-01

    The recent advances and promises in nanoscience and nanotechnology have been focused on hexagonal materials, mainly on carbon-based nanostructures. Recently, new candidates have been raised, where the greatest efforts are devoted to a new hexagonal and buckled material made of silicon, named Silicene. This new material presents an energy gap due to spin-orbit interaction of approximately 1.5 meV, where the measurement of quantum spin Hall effect(QSHE) can be made experimentally. Some investigations also show that the QSHE in 2D low-buckled hexagonal structures of germanium is present. Since the similarities, and at the same time the differences, between Si and Ge, over the years, have motivated a lot of investigations in these materials. In this work we performed systematic investigations on the electronic structure and band topology in both ordered and disordered SixGe1-x alloys monolayer with 2D honeycomb geometry by first-principles calculations. We show that an applied electric field can tune the gap size for both alloys. However, as a function of electric field, the disordered alloy presents a W-shaped behavior, similarly to the pure Si or Ge, whereas for the ordered alloy a V-shaped behavior is observed. This work is supported by CAPES, CNPq and FAPESP.

  12. Field lines and magnetic surfaces in a two-component slab/2D model of interplanetary magnetic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Pontius, D. H., Jr.; Gray, P. C.; Bieber, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    A two-component model for the spectrum of interplanetary magnetic fluctuations was proposed on the basis of ISEE observations, and has found an intriguing level of application in other solar wind studies. The model fluctuations consist of a fraction of 'slab' fluctuations, varying only in the direction parallel to the locally uniform mean magnetic field B(0) and a complement of 2D (two-dimensional) fluctuations that vary in the directions transverse to B(0). We have developed an spectral method computational algorithm for computing the magnetic flux surfaces (flux tubes) associated with the composite model, based upon a precise analogy with equations for ideal transport of a passive scalar in planar two dimensional geometry. Visualization of various composite models will be presented, including the 80 percent 2D/ 20 percent slab model with delta B/B(0) approximately equals 1 and a minus 5/3 spectral law, that is thought to approximately represent a snapshot of solar wind turbulence. Characteristically, the visualizations show that flux tubes, even when defined as regular on some plane, shred and disperse rapidly as they are viewed along the parallel direction. This diffusive process, which generalizes the standard picture of field line random walk, will be discussed in detail. Evidently, the traditional picture that flux tubes randomize like strands of spaghetti with a uniform tangle along the axial direction is in need of modification.

  13. 2D Laplace-Domain Waveform Inversion of Field Data Using a Power Objective Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eunjin; Ha, Wansoo; Chung, Wookeen; Shin, Changsoo; Min, Dong-Joo

    2013-12-01

    The wavefield in the Laplace domain has a very small amplitude except only near the source point. In order to deal with this characteristic, the logarithmic objective function has been used in many Laplace domain inversion studies. The Laplace-domain waveform inversion using the logarithmic objective function has fewer local minima than the time- or frequency domain inversion. Recently, the power objective function was suggested as an alternative to the logarithmic objective function in the Laplace domain. Since amplitudes of wavefields are very small generally, a power <1 amplifies the wavefields especially at large offset. Therefore, the power objective function can enhance the Laplace-domain inversion results. In previous studies about synthetic datasets, it is confirmed that the inversion using a power objective function shows a similar result when compared with the inversion using a logarithmic objective function. In this paper, we apply an inversion algorithm using a power objective function to field datasets. We perform the waveform inversion using the power objective function and compare the result obtained by the logarithmic objective function. The Gulf of Mexico dataset is used for the comparison. When we use a power objective function in the inversion algorithm, it is important to choose the appropriate exponent. By testing the various exponents, we can select the range of the exponent from 5 × 10-3 to 5 × 10-8 in the Gulf of Mexico dataset. The results obtained from the power objective function with appropriate exponent are very similar to the results of the logarithmic objective function. Even though we do not get better results than the conventional method, we can confirm the possibility of applying the power objective function for field data. In addition, the power objective function shows good results in spite of little difference in the amplitude of the wavefield. Based on these results, we can expect that the power objective function will

  14. An energy stable, hexagonal finite difference scheme for the 2D phase field crystal amplitude equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhen; Heinonen, Vili; Lowengrub, John; Wang, Cheng; Wise, Steven M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we construct an energy stable finite difference scheme for the amplitude expansion equations for the two-dimensional phase field crystal (PFC) model. The equations are formulated in a periodic hexagonal domain with respect to the reciprocal lattice vectors to achieve a provably unconditionally energy stable and solvable scheme. To our knowledge, this is the first such energy stable scheme for the PFC amplitude equations. The convexity of each part in the amplitude equations is analyzed, in both the semi-discrete and fully-discrete cases. Energy stability is based on a careful convexity analysis for the energy (in both the spatially continuous and discrete cases). As a result, unique solvability and unconditional energy stability are available for the resulting scheme. Moreover, we show that the scheme is point-wise stable for any time and space step sizes. An efficient multigrid solver is devised to solve the scheme, and a few numerical experiments are presented, including grain rotation and shrinkage and grain growth studies, as examples of the strength and robustness of the proposed scheme and solver.

  15. Research on reconstruction algorithms for 2D temperature field based on TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography(TDLAT), as a promising technique which combines Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy(TDLAS) and computer tomography, has shown the advantages of high spatial resolution for temperature measurement. Given the large number of tomography algorithms, it is necessary to understand the feature of tomography algorithms and find suitable ones for the specific experiment. This paper illustrates two different algorithms including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and simulated annealing (SA) which are implemented using Matlab. The reconstruction simulations of unimodal and bimodal temperature phantom were done under different conditions, and the results of the simulation were analyzed. It shows that for the unimodal temperature phantom, the both algorithms work well, the reconstruction quality is acceptable under suitable conditions and the result of ART is better. But for the bimodal temperature phantom, the result of SA is much better. More specifically, the reconstruction quality of ART is mainly affected by the ray coverage, the maximum deviation for the unimodal temperature phantom is 5.9%, while for the bimodal temperature field, it is up to 25%. The reconstruction quality of SA is mainly affected by the number of the transitions, the maximum deviation for the unimodal temperature phantom is 9.2% when 6 transitions are used which is a little worse than the result of ART; however, the maximum deviation for the bimodal temperature phantom is much better than ART's, which is about 5.2% when 6 transitions are used.

  16. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-08-08

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphics pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  17. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-03-01

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphite pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  18. CNNEDGEPOT: CNN based edge detection of 2D near surface potential field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, D.

    2012-09-01

    All anomalies are important in the interpretation of gravity and magnetic data because they indicate some important structural features. One of the advantages of using gravity or magnetic data for searching contacts is to be detected buried structures whose signs could not be seen on the surface. In this paper, a general view of the cellular neural network (CNN) method with a large scale nonlinear circuit is presented focusing on its image processing applications. The proposed CNN model is used consecutively in order to extract body and body edges. The algorithm is a stochastic image processing method based on close neighborhood relationship of the cells and optimization of A, B and I matrices entitled as cloning template operators. Setting up a CNN (continues time cellular neural network (CTCNN) or discrete time cellular neural network (DTCNN)) for a particular task needs a proper selection of cloning templates which determine the dynamics of the method. The proposed algorithm is used for image enhancement and edge detection. The proposed method is applied on synthetic and field data generated for edge detection of near-surface geological bodies that mask each other in various depths and dimensions. The program named as CNNEDGEPOT is a set of functions written in MATLAB software. The GUI helps the user to easily change all the required CNN model parameters. A visual evaluation of the outputs due to DTCNN and CTCNN are carried out and the results are compared with each other. These examples demonstrate that in detecting the geological features the CNN model can be used for visual interpretation of near surface gravity or magnetic anomaly maps.

  19. VELOCITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTION IN A FORMING PENUMBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, P.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Frasca, D.; Zuccarello, F.; Ermolli, I.; Tritschler, A.; Reardon, K. P.

    2013-07-01

    We present results from the analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric and spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, obtained shortly before the formation of a penumbra in one of the leading polarity sunspots of NOAA active region 11490. The observations were performed at the Dunn Solar Telescope of the National Solar Observatory on 2012 May 28, using the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer. The data set is comprised of a 1 hr time sequence of measurements in the Fe I 617.3 nm and Fe I 630.25 nm lines (full Stokes polarimetry) and in the Ca II 854.2 nm line (Stokes I only). We perform an inversion of the Fe I 630.25 nm Stokes profiles to derive magnetic field parameters and the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity at the photospheric level. We characterize chromospheric LOS velocities by the Doppler shift of the centroid of the Ca II 854.2 nm line. We find that, before the formation of the penumbra, an annular zone of 3''-5'' width is visible around the sunspot. In the photosphere, we find that this zone is characterized by an uncombed structure of the magnetic field although no visible penumbra has formed yet. We also find that the chromospheric LOS velocity field shows several elongated structures characterized by downflow and upflow motions in the inner and outer parts of the annular zone, respectively.

  20. Lattice Models for Granular-Like Velocity Fields: Hydrodynamic Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manacorda, Alessandro; Plata, Carlos A.; Lasanta, Antonio; Puglisi, Andrea; Prados, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A recently introduced model describing—on a 1d lattice—the velocity field of a granular fluid is discussed in detail. The dynamics of the velocity field occurs through next-neighbours inelastic collisions which conserve momentum but dissipate energy. The dynamics is described through the corresponding Master Equation for the time evolution of the probability distribution. In the continuum limit, equations for the average velocity and temperature fields with fluctuating currents are derived, which are analogous to hydrodynamic equations of granular fluids when restricted to the shear modes. Therefore, the homogeneous cooling state, with its linear instability, and other relevant regimes such as the uniform shear flow and the Couette flow states are described. The evolution in time and space of the single particle probability distribution, in all those regimes, is also discussed, showing that the local equilibrium is not valid in general. The noise for the momentum and energy currents, which are correlated, are white and Gaussian. The same is true for the noise of the energy sink, which is usually negligible.

  1. A 2D ion chamber array audit of wedged and asymmetric fields in an inhomogeneous lung phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, Jessica; Dunn, Leon Alves, Andrew; Kenny, John; Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan; Kron, Tomas; Cole, Andrew

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) has implemented a new method of a nonreference condition Level II type dosimetric audit of radiotherapy services to increase measurement accuracy and patient safety within Australia. The aim of this work is to describe the methodology, tolerances, and outcomes from the new audit. Methods: The ACDS Level II audit measures the dose delivered in 2D planes using an ionization chamber based array positioned at multiple depths. Measurements are made in rectilinear homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms composed of slabs of solid water and lung. Computer generated computed tomography data sets of the rectilinear phantoms are supplied to the facility prior to audit for planning of a range of cases including reference fields, asymmetric fields, and wedged fields. The audit assesses 3D planning with 6 MV photons with a static (zero degree) gantry. Scoring is performed using local dose differences between the planned and measured dose within 80% of the field width. The overall audit result is determined by the maximum dose difference over all scoring points, cases, and planes. Pass (Optimal Level) is defined as maximum dose difference ≤3.3%, Pass (Action Level) is ≤5.0%, and Fail (Out of Tolerance) is >5.0%. Results: At close of 2013, the ACDS had performed 24 Level II audits. 63% of the audits passed, 33% failed, and the remaining audit was not assessable. Of the 15 audits that passed, 3 were at Pass (Action Level). The high fail rate is largely due to a systemic issue with modeling asymmetric 60° wedges which caused a delivered overdose of 5%–8%. Conclusions: The ACDS has implemented a nonreference condition Level II type audit, based on ion chamber 2D array measurements in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. The powerful diagnostic ability of this audit has allowed the ACDS to rigorously test the treatment planning systems implemented in Australian radiotherapy facilities. Recommendations from audits have led to

  2. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOEpatents

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Fritz, I.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1984-04-19

    In a field-effect transistor comprising a semiconductor having therein a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship, there is provided an improvement wherein said semiconductor is a superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers comprising a first direct gap semiconductor material which in bulk form has a certain bandgap and a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, the barrier layers comprising a second semiconductor material having a bandgap wider than that of said first semiconductor material, wherein the layer thicknesses of said quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice having a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, and wherein the thicknesses of said quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field whereby, at applied electric fields higher than that at which the maximum electron velocity occurs in said first material when in bulk form, the electron velocities are higher in said superlattice than they are in said first semiconductor material in bulk form.

  3. Computation of self-field hysteresis losses in conductors with helicoidal structure using a 2D finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenvall, A.; Siahrang, M.; Grilli, F.; Sirois, F.

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that twisting current-carrying conductors helps to reduce their coupling losses. However, the impact of twisting on self-field hysteresis losses has not been as extensively investigated as that on the reduction of coupling losses. This is mostly because the reduction of coupling losses has been an important issue to tackle in the past, and it is not possible to consider twisting within the classical two-dimensional (2D) approaches for the computation of self-field hysteresis losses. Recently, numerical codes considering the effect of twisting in continuous symmetries have appeared. For general three-dimensional (3D) simulations, one issue is that no robust, widely accepted and easy to obtain model for expressing the relationship between the current density and the electric field is available. On the other hand, we can consider that in these helicoidal structures currents flow only along the helicoidal trajectories. This approach allows one to use the scalar power-law for superconductor resistivity and makes the eddy current approach to a solution of a hysteresis loss problem feasible. In this paper we use the finite element method to solve the eddy current model in helicoidal structures in 2D domains utilizing the helicoidal symmetry. The developed tool uses the full 3D geometry but allows discretization which takes advantage of the helicoidal symmetry to reduce the computational domain to a 2D one. We utilize in this tool the non-linear power law for modelling the resistivity in the superconducting regions and study how the self-field losses are influenced by the twisting of a 10-filament wire. Additionally, in the case of high aspect ratio tapes, we compare the results computed with the new tool and a one-dimensional program based on the integral equation method and developed for simulating single layer power cables made of ReBCO coated conductors. Finally, we discuss modelling issues and present open questions related to helicoidal structures

  4. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0 +/- 1.4, B=13.1 +/- 1.2, K=1.1 +/- 1.8, and C=2.9 +/- 1.4 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at approximately -20 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z greater than 1 kpc

  5. Constraints on the original ejection velocity fields of asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Nesvorný, D.

    2016-04-01

    Asteroid families form as a result of large-scale collisions among main belt asteroids. The orbital distribution of fragments after a family-forming impact could inform us about their ejection velocities. Unfortunately, however, orbits dynamically evolve by a number of effects, including the Yarkovsky drift, chaotic diffusion, and gravitational encounters with massive asteroids, such that it is difficult to infer the ejection velocities eons after each family's formation. Here, we analyse the inclination distribution of asteroid families, because proper inclination can remain constant over long time intervals, and could help us to understand the distribution of the component of the ejection velocity that is perpendicular to the orbital plane (vW). From modelling the initial break up, we find that the distribution of vW of the fragments, which manage to escape the parent body's gravity, should be more peaked than a Gaussian distribution (i.e. be leptokurtic) even if the initial distribution was Gaussian. We surveyed known asteroid families for signs of a peaked distribution of vW using a statistical measure of the distribution peakedness or flatness known as kurtosis. We identified eight families whose vW distribution is significantly leptokurtic. These cases (e.g. the Koronis family) are located in dynamically quiet regions of the main belt, where, presumably, the initial distribution of vW was not modified by subsequent orbital evolution. We suggest that, in these cases, the inclination distribution can be used to obtain interesting information about the original ejection velocity field.

  6. Velocity field measurements on high-frequency, supersonic microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, Phillip A.; Ali, Mohd Y.; Fernandez, Erik J.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    The resonance-enhanced microjet actuator which was developed at the Advanced Aero-Propulsion Laboratory at Florida State University is a fluidic-based device that produces pulsed, supersonic microjets by utilizing a number of microscale, flow-acoustic resonance phenomena. The microactuator used in this study consists of an underexpanded source jet that flows into a cylindrical cavity with a single, 1-mm-diameter exhaust orifice through which an unsteady, supersonic jet issues at a resonant frequency of 7 kHz. The flowfields of a 1-mm underexpanded free jet and the microactuator are studied in detail using high-magnification, phase-locked flow visualizations (microschlieren) and two-component particle image velocimetry. These are the first direct measurements of the velocity fields produced by such actuators. Comparisons are made between the flow visualizations and the velocity field measurements. The results clearly show that the microactuator produces pulsed, supersonic jets with velocities exceeding 400 m/s for roughly 60 % of their cycles. With high unsteady momentum output, this type of microactuator has potential in a range of ow control applications.

  7. Shear velocity of the Rotokawa geothermal field using ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civilini, F.; Savage, M. K.; Townend, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise correlation is an increasingly popular seismological technique that uses the ambient seismic noise recorded at two stations to construct an empirical Green's function. Applications of this technique include determining shear velocity structure and attenuation. An advantage of ambient noise is that it does not rely on external sources of seismic energy such as local or teleseismic earthquakes. This method has been used in the geothermal industry to determine the depths at which magmatic processes occur, to distinguish between production and non-production areas, and to observe seismic velocity perturbations associated with fluid extraction. We will present a velocity model for the Rotokawa geothermal field near Taupo, New Zealand, produced from ambient noise cross correlations. Production at Rotokawa is based on the "Rotokawa A" combined cycle power station established in 1997 and the "Nga Awa Purua" triple flash power plant established in 2010. Rotokawa Joint Venture, a partnership between Mighty River Power and Tauhara North No. 2 Trust currently operates 174 MW of generation at Rotokawa. An array of short period seismometers was installed in 2008 and occupies an area of roughly 5 square kilometers around the site. Although both cultural and natural noise sources are recorded at the stations, the instrument separation distance provides a unique challenge for analyzing cross correlations produced by both signal types. The inter-station spacing is on the order of a few kilometers, so waves from cultural sources generally are not coherent from one station to the other, while the wavelength produced by natural noise is greater than the station separation. Velocity models produced from these two source types will be compared to known geological models of the site. Depending on the amount of data needed to adequately construct cross-correlations, a time-dependent model of velocity will be established and compared with geothermal production processes.

  8. Velocity and Attenuation Structure of the Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zucca, J. J.; Hutchings, L. J.; Kasameyer, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. The resource consists of primarily dry steam which is produced from a low, porosity fractured graywacke. Over the last several years steam pressure at the Geysers has been dropping. Concern over decline of the resource has prompted research to understand its fundamental nature. A key issue is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and attenuation data at the Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of approximately 300 earthquakes that are of magnitude 1.2 and are distributed in depth between sea level and 2.5 km. Using compressional-wave arrival times, we invert for earthquake location, origin time, and velocity along a three-dimensional grid. Using the initial pulse width of the compressional-wave, we invert for the initial pulse width associated with the source, and the one-dimensional Q structure. We find that the velocity structure correlates with known mapped geologic units, including a velocity high that is correlated with a felsite body at depth that is known from drilling. The dry steam reservoir, which is also known from drilling, is mostly correlated with low velocity. The Q increases with depth to the top of the dry steam reservoir and decreases with depth within the reservoir. The decrease of Q with depth probably indicates that the saturation of the matrix of the reservoir rock increases with depth.

  9. Optical measurement of ultrasonic Poynting and velocity vector fields.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Todd A; Greenleaf, James F

    2002-02-01

    This report describes a method for estimating several wide bandwidth ultrasonic field parameters from optical measurements of the local, acoustically induced, refractive index perturbation in water. These parameters include Poynting and particle velocity vector fields as well as pressure and density fields at any temporal delay under mild (forward-propagating) assumptions on the angular plane-wave spectrum of the ultrasound field. A sampling theorem is derived stating that two complete measurements of the three-dimensional pressure field separated in time by delta t allow release of the forward-propagating assumption for every acoustic wave number k satisfying k not = n pi/(c delta t), where c is the acoustic wave speed in the medium and n an integer greater than zero. The approach provides detailed measurements of very general ultrasound fields. Two optical measurement methods that acquire the Radon transform of the three-dimensional refractive index perturbation are briefly reviewed. It is shown that the Radon transform of the field itself satisfies a two-dimensional wave equation and may be propagated independently forward or backward in time under a source-free model. Conversely, the Radon transform of the ultrasound field measurement at several known time delays provides a means of applying a filter to the data based on known ultrasound propagation models. Each two-dimensional distribution may be propagated to a common time point and the ensemble averaged, thus incorporating the propagation model into the measurement. We support the presented theory with several experiments.

  10. Kinematics of the crustal velocity field in the western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, F. F.

    2008-12-01

    GPS measurements embodied in PBO and PBO Nucleus allow the crustal velocity field of the western US to be constructed in unprecedented detail. Velocity and strain fields span the entire San Andreas fault system and Cascadia subduction zone from Baja California to northern Washington as well as the continental interior including the Great Basin and Wasatch Front. Rationalizing the GPS velocity field over the several tectonic regimes provides key tests of prevailing notions of interseismic crustal deformation. In our interpretation, we begin with the premise that the load-carrying portion of the lithosphere coincides with the (seismogenic) upper crust with an effective elastic thickness of ~20 km at the time scales of interseimic motions (Thatcher and Pollitz, 2008). End member kinematic models include (1) viscoelastic relaxation of the ductile lower crust and upper mantle following large earthquakes, and (2) slip in the lower elastic lithosphere, each of which serves to localize strain around major faults during interseismic periods. More detailed kinematic models emphasize the roles of lateral variations in rigidity and/or effective elastic plate thickness as well as distributed deformation. Our modeling of western US kinematics shows that the GPS velocity field is well explained with a range of models involving a combination of all of the above components; no single endmember suffices. Zones of inferred distributed deformation in the continental interior coincide with well-known seismic belts (Eastern California Shear Zone; Walker Lane; Interseismic Mountain Belt). Continued acquisition of vector constraints on crustal motions and study of available geodetic data are needed to clarify active deformation patterns in several areas. Some outstanding issues are: The nature of distributed faulting at the margins of the Great Basin (southern Nevada Transverse Zone, northern Walker Lane); understanding how dextral shear from the eastern boundary of the Sierra Nevada

  11. Electromagnetic hydrophone with tomographic system for absolute velocity field mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Mari, Jean-Martial; Gilles, Bruno; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril

    2012-06-01

    The velocity and pressure of an ultrasonic wave can be measured by an electromagnetic hydrophone made of a thin wire and a magnet. The ultrasonic wave vibrates the wire inside a magnetic field, inducing an electrical current. Previous articles reported poor spatial resolution of comparable hydrophones along the axis of the wire. In this study, submillimetric spatial resolution has been achieved by using a tomographic method. Moreover, a physical model is presented for obtaining absolute measurements. A pressure differential of 8% has been found between piezoelectric and electromagnetic hydrophone measurements. These characteristics show this technique as an alternative to standard hydrophones.

  12. Measurement of the velocity field behind the automotive vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ležovič, Tomáš; Lízal, František; Jedelský, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Passenger comfort in a personal vehicle cabin strongly depends on the appropriate function of the cabin ventilation system. Great attention is therefore paid to the effective functioning of the automotive vents. Various techniques can be employed to evaluate the proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) was used in our case for accurate measurement of the velocity field and consequent assessment of jet boundaries and jet axis. A novel methodology has been developed for the simulation of realistic conditions when using just a single vent under laboratory conditions instead of the complete vehicle ventilation system. A special technique has also been developed for determination of the terminal inclination angles of vent vanes for the particular vent type, which can be completely closed by the adjustable horizontal vanes. A two wire CTA probe was used for measurement of the actual velocity over predefined planes, which were specified according to smoke visualization. Mean velocities and the turbulence intensity were evaluated on the basis of the obtained data and are presented in a form of charts. Both jet boundary and orientation of the jet for a given setup of the vent are important characteristics of particular vent type. Effectiveness of different vents could be compared using our methodology and hence contribute to development of advanced ventilation system.

  13. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-15

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model. PMID:21386517

  14. Anti-Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistors Based On Few-Layer 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Wang, Yan; Huang, Le; Wang, Xiaoting; Li, Xingyun; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Wei, Zhongming; Li, Jingbo

    2016-06-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials and their related van der Waals heterostructures have attracted considerable interest for their fascinating new properties. There are still many challenges in realizing the potential of 2D semiconductors in practical (opto)electronics such as signal transmission and logic circuit, etc. Herein, we report the gate-tunable anti-ambipolar devices on the basis of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) heterostructures to gain higher information storage density. Our study shows that carrier concentration regulated by the gate voltage plays a major role in the "anti-ambipolar" behavior, where the drain-source current can only pass through in specific range of gate voltage (Vg) and it will be restrained if the Vg goes beyond the range. Several improved strategies were theoretically discussed and experimentally adopted to obtain higher current on/off ratio for the anti-ambipolar devices, such as choosing suitable p-/n-pair, increasing carrier concentration by using thicker-layer TMDs, and so on. The modified SnS2/WSe2 device with the current on/off ratio exceeding 200 and on-state Vg ranging from -20 to 0 V was successfully achieved. On the basis of the anti-ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs), we also reveal the potential of three-channel device unit for signal processing and information storage. With the equal quantity N of device units, 3(N) digital signals can be obtained from such three-channel devices, which are much larger than 2(N) ones obtained from traditional two-channel complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). PMID:27258569

  15. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  16. The velocity field under breaking waves: coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melville, W. Kendall; Veron, Fabrice; White, Christopher J.

    2002-03-01

    Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) measurements of the velocity field under breaking waves in the laboratory are presented. The region of turbulent fluid directly generated by breaking is too large to be imaged in one video frame and so an ensemble-averaged representation of the flow is built up from a mosaic of image frames. It is found that breaking generates at least one coherent vortex that slowly propagates downstream at a speed consistent with the velocity induced by its image in the free surface. Both the kinetic energy of the flow and the vorticity decay approximately as t[minus sign]1. The Reynolds stress of the turbulence also decays as t[minus sign]1 and is, within the accuracy of the measurements, everywhere negative, consistent with downward transport of streamwise momentum. Estimates of the mometum flux from waves to currents based on the measurements of the Reynolds stress are consistent with earlier estimates. The implications of the measurements for breaking in the field are discussed. Based on geometrical optics and wave action conservation, we suggest that the presence of the breaking-induced vortex provides an explanation for the suppression of short waves by breaking. Finally, in Appendices, estimates of the majority of the terms in the turbulent kinetic energy budget are presented at an early stage in the evolution of the turbulence, and comparisons with independent acoustical measurements of breaking are presented.

  17. Preliminary measurements of the edge magnetic field pitch from 2-D Doppler backscattering in MAST and NSTX-U (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Vann, R. G. L.; Brunner, K. J.; Ellis, R.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D. A.

    2016-09-13

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system is a novel diagnostic consisting of an array of 8 independently phased antennas. At any one time, SAMI operates at one of the 16 frequencies in the range 10-34.5 GHz. The imaging beam is steered in software post-shot to create a picture of the entire emission surface. In SAMI’s active probing mode of operation, the plasma edge is illuminated with a monochromatic source and SAMI reconstructs an image of the Doppler back-scattered (DBS) signal. By assuming that density fluctuations are extended along magnetic field lines, and knowing that the strongest back-scattered signals aremore » directed perpendicular to the density fluctuations, SAMI’s 2-D DBS imaging capability can be used to measure the pitch of the edge magnetic field. In this paper, we present preliminary pitch angle measurements obtained by SAMI on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at Culham Centre for Fusion Energy and on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Lastly, the results demonstrate encouraging agreement between SAMI and other independent measurements.« less

  18. Preliminary measurements of the edge magnetic field pitch from 2-D Doppler backscattering in MAST and NSTX-U (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vann, R. G. L.; Brunner, K. J.; Ellis, R.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system is a novel diagnostic consisting of an array of 8 independently phased antennas. At any one time, SAMI operates at one of the 16 frequencies in the range 10-34.5 GHz. The imaging beam is steered in software post-shot to create a picture of the entire emission surface. In SAMI's active probing mode of operation, the plasma edge is illuminated with a monochromatic source and SAMI reconstructs an image of the Doppler back-scattered (DBS) signal. By assuming that density fluctuations are extended along magnetic field lines, and knowing that the strongest back-scattered signals are directed perpendicular to the density fluctuations, SAMI's 2-D DBS imaging capability can be used to measure the pitch of the edge magnetic field. In this paper, we present preliminary pitch angle measurements obtained by SAMI on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at Culham Centre for Fusion Energy and on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The results demonstrate encouraging agreement between SAMI and other independent measurements.

  19. Galaxy Transformation as probed by Morphology and Velocity Fields of Distant Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Bodo

    2005-07-01

    We seek to obtain ACS imaging of four distant {0.3field covered by a 2x2 mosaic to determine morphological and structural parameters of late-type galaxies. We specifically concentrate on peculiarities indicative of past or ongoing interaction processes. The 90 target galaxies have been {Period74} or will be {P75} observed with 3D-spectroscopy at ESO-VLT yielding 2D-velocity fields with unprecedented spatial coverage and sampling. The good spatial resolution of the ground-based data will be further enhanced by a deconvolution method based on the proposed ACS images. The velocity field and the morphology in restframe-UV light will reveal possible transformation mechanisms affecting not only the stellar populations but also the mass distribution of the galaxies. Additionally, it will be possible to pin down the nature of the interaction {e.g. tidally or ram-pressure induced}. This assessment gets supported by our N-body/SPH simulations {including star formation} of different interaction processes that allow the direct comparison of structural and kinematical characteristics at each time step with the observations on an individual basis taking into account all observational constraints for a given galaxy. All together, we will be able to explore the relative efficiency of the various proposed transformation phenomena. In the case of non-disturbed spirals, a rotation curve can be extracted from the full 2D velocity field with unprecedented quality, from which the maximum rotation speed can be derived with high confidence. In combination with accurate size and luminosity determinations from the ACS images, we will be able to establish the Tully-Fisher and Fundamental Plane relations of cluster spiral members at cosmological epochs. At these distances cluster assembly is predicted to peak and we can probe the galaxies' luminosity, size and mass evolution with robust methods. Together with our already existing sample of 200

  20. Velocity field measurements in the wake of a propeller model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund, R.; Kumar, A. Chandan

    2016-10-01

    Turboprop configurations are being revisited for the modern-day regional transport aircrafts for their fuel efficiency. The use of laminar flow wings is an effort in this direction. One way to further improve their efficiency is by optimizing the flow over the wing in the propeller wake. Previous studies have focused on improving the gross aerodynamic characteristics of the wing. It is known that the propeller slipstream causes early transition of the boundary layer on the wing. However, an optimized design of the propeller and wing combination could delay this transition and decrease the skin friction drag. Such a wing design would require the detailed knowledge of the development of the slipstream in isolated conditions. There are very few studies in the literature addressing the requirements of transport aircraft having six-bladed propeller and cruising at a high propeller advance ratio. Low-speed wind tunnel experiments have been conducted on a powered propeller model in isolated conditions, measuring the velocity field in the vertical plane behind the propeller using two-component hot-wire anemometry. The data obtained clearly resolved the mean velocity, the turbulence, the ensemble phase averages and the structure and development of the tip vortex. The turbulence in the slipstream showed that transition could be close to the leading edge of the wing, making it a fine case for optimization. The development of the wake with distance shows some interesting flow features, and the data are valuable for flow computation and optimization.

  1. An algorithm to estimate unsteady and quasi-steady pressure fields from velocity field measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O; Bose, Sanjeeb; Gemmell, Brad J; Colin, Sean P; Costello, John H

    2014-02-01

    We describe and characterize a method for estimating the pressure field corresponding to velocity field measurements such as those obtained by using particle image velocimetry. The pressure gradient is estimated from a time series of velocity fields for unsteady calculations or from a single velocity field for quasi-steady calculations. The corresponding pressure field is determined based on median polling of several integration paths through the pressure gradient field in order to reduce the effect of measurement errors that accumulate along individual integration paths. Integration paths are restricted to the nodes of the measured velocity field, thereby eliminating the need for measurement interpolation during this step and significantly reducing the computational cost of the algorithm relative to previous approaches. The method is validated by using numerically simulated flow past a stationary, two-dimensional bluff body and a computational model of a three-dimensional, self-propelled anguilliform swimmer to study the effects of spatial and temporal resolution, domain size, signal-to-noise ratio and out-of-plane effects. Particle image velocimetry measurements of a freely swimming jellyfish medusa and a freely swimming lamprey are analyzed using the method to demonstrate the efficacy of the approach when applied to empirical data.

  2. An algorithm to estimate unsteady and quasi-steady pressure fields from velocity field measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O; Bose, Sanjeeb; Gemmell, Brad J; Colin, Sean P; Costello, John H

    2014-02-01

    We describe and characterize a method for estimating the pressure field corresponding to velocity field measurements such as those obtained by using particle image velocimetry. The pressure gradient is estimated from a time series of velocity fields for unsteady calculations or from a single velocity field for quasi-steady calculations. The corresponding pressure field is determined based on median polling of several integration paths through the pressure gradient field in order to reduce the effect of measurement errors that accumulate along individual integration paths. Integration paths are restricted to the nodes of the measured velocity field, thereby eliminating the need for measurement interpolation during this step and significantly reducing the computational cost of the algorithm relative to previous approaches. The method is validated by using numerically simulated flow past a stationary, two-dimensional bluff body and a computational model of a three-dimensional, self-propelled anguilliform swimmer to study the effects of spatial and temporal resolution, domain size, signal-to-noise ratio and out-of-plane effects. Particle image velocimetry measurements of a freely swimming jellyfish medusa and a freely swimming lamprey are analyzed using the method to demonstrate the efficacy of the approach when applied to empirical data. PMID:24115059

  3. Control of translating velocity using pulse field on field-reversed configuration plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, T.; Gota, H.; Hasegawa, Y.; Kanamaru, Y.; Fujimoto, K.; Asai, T.; Takahashi, T.; Nogi, Y.

    2006-01-15

    The translating velocity of a field-reversed configuration plasma is controlled using a pulse mirror field. Numerical calculations are carried out, using a flux-conserving moving mirror coil, to simulate the motion of the plasma subject to the pulse field. The calculations suggest that it is possible to stop the plasma smoothly without reflection under the pulse mirror coil when the strength of the mirror is changed depending on the velocity of the plasma. In the experiment, the pulse field is produced by a current flowing in a one-turn coil installed inside a theta-pinch coil. It is demonstrated that the translating plasma passing under the one-turn coil is reflected and stops depending on the strength of the pulse field. The optimum strength of the field to stop the plasma without reflection is in good agreement with the estimation of the calculations.

  4. Complex Velocity Fields in the Shell of T Pyxidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margon, Bruce; Deutsch, Eric W.

    1998-05-01

    We present spatially resolved, moderate-resolution spectrophotometry of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis and a portion of the surrounding shell. The spectrum extracted from a strip of width 10'' centered on the star shows well-known, strong emission lines typical of old novae plus a prominent, unfamiliar emission line at 6590 Å. This line, and a weaker companion at 6540 Å, which we also detect, has been previously reported by Shahbaz et al. and attributed to Doppler-shifted Hα emission from a collimated jet emerging from T Pyx. We demonstrate that these lines are instead due to [N II] λλ6548, 6584 from a complex velocity field in the surrounding nebula. The comments of past workers concerning the great strength of He II λ4686 in T Pyx itself are also reiterated.

  5. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  6. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Herwig; Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance Ron,dyn vs. the breakdown voltage Vbd. In literature, it has been shown that with a high Vbd, Ron,dyn is deteriorated. The impairment of Ron,dyn is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  7. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  8. Variable Field Analytical Ultracentrifugation: II. Gravitational Sweep Sedimentation Velocity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia; Zhao, Huaying; Sandmaier, Julia; Alexander Liddle, J; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity (SV) analytical ultracentrifugation is a classical biophysical technique for the determination of the size-distribution of macromolecules, macromolecular complexes, and nanoparticles. SV has traditionally been carried out at a constant rotor speed, which limits the range of sedimentation coefficients that can be detected in a single experiment. Recently we have introduced methods to implement experiments with variable rotor speeds, in combination with variable field solutions to the Lamm equation, with the application to expedite the approach to sedimentation equilibrium. Here, we describe the use of variable-field sedimentation analysis to increase the size-range covered in SV experiments by ∼100-fold with a quasi-continuous increase of rotor speed during the experiment. Such a gravitational-sweep sedimentation approach has previously been shown to be very effective in the study of nanoparticles with large size ranges. In the past, diffusion processes were not accounted for, thereby posing a lower limit of particle sizes and limiting the accuracy of the size distribution. In this work, we combine variable field solutions to the Lamm equation with diffusion-deconvoluted sedimentation coefficient distributions c(s), which further extend the macromolecular size range that can be observed in a single SV experiment while maintaining accuracy and resolution. In this way, approximately five orders of magnitude of sedimentation coefficients, or eight orders of magnitude of particle mass, can be probed in a single experiment. This can be useful, for example, in the study of proteins forming large assemblies, as in fibrillation process or capsid self-assembly, in studies of the interaction between very dissimilar-sized macromolecular species, or in the study of broadly distributed nanoparticles.

  9. Velocity Field Characteristics at the Inlet to a Pipe Culvert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolerski, Tomasz; Wielgat, Paweł

    2014-12-01

    A poorly designed culvert inlet structure causes scouring, which can lead to the collapse of the culvert and significant damage to the neighboring land. A set of laboratory tests was evaluated to examine velocity distribution at the culvert inlet. A three-dimensional acoustic Doppler velocimeter was used to measure instantaneous flow velocity upstream of the culvert. The analysis of mean velocities, turbulence strength, and Reynolds stresses was performed to understand the flow structure near the culvert entrance.

  10. A new present-day velocity field for eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpersdorf, A.; Tavakoli, F.; Hatzfeld, D.; Jadidi, A.; Vergnolle, M.; Djamour, Y.; Nankali, H. R.; Sedighi, M.; Bellier, O.; Shabanian, E.

    2009-04-01

    Since 2004, extensive GPS campaigns and the upcoming Iranian permanent GPS network are monitoring the present-day deformation in eastern Iran. We present a new GPS velocity field that extends from Central Iran to the Turkmen shield and the Hellmand block on the Eurasian plate. It permits to monitor the right lateral shear across the aseismic Lut block between Central Iran and the Hellmand block, and the resulting shortening across the Kopeh Dagh mountain belt limiting NE Iran towards Turkmenistan. The present-day deformation pattern is used to verify existing tectonic models. Individual instantaneous fault slip rates are compared to short term and long term geological estimates. We find that GPS slip rates are generally coherent with short term geologic determinations (from dating of geomorphologic offsets over some 10-100 ka). Some differences with respect to long term estimates (from total geologic fault offsets and onset ages of several Ma) indicate non-constant slip rates over different time scales or that the onset of the present-day deformation presumed to 3-7 Ma in eastern Iran has to be revised.

  11. Far-Field Spectroscopy and Near-Field Optical Imaging of Coupled Plasmon-Phonon Polaritons in 2D van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhai, Feng; Hu, Hai; Hu, Debo; Liu, Ruina; Zhang, Shunping; Sun, Mengtao; Sun, Zhipei; Chen, Jianing; Dai, Qing

    2016-04-20

    A new hybridized plasmon-phonon polariton mode in graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures is presented, featuring the ultrahigh field confinement characteristic of the graphene plasmon and the long lifetime property of the h-BN transverse optical phonon. This enables an ultralong hybrid plasmon lifetime of up to 1.6 ps (with ultrahigh mode confinement up to >l0(2)/7000 and ultrasmall group velocity down to 0.001c, where c is the speed of light in vacuum), superior to any localized plasmon ever demonstrated.

  12. Crustal Velocity Field from InSAR and GPS reveals Internal Deformation of Western Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Wright, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Two contrasting views continue to dominate the debate about continental tectonics - do the continents behave like the oceans, with a few large plates (blocks) separated by major faults (e.g. Tapponnier et al., 1982, 2001; Thatcher, 2007; Meade, 2007), or is a smooth continuum a more appropriate and compact description (e.g. England and Molnar, 1997, 2005). The Tibetan plateau has long been the testing ground for this debate and despite decades of research it has yet to be put to bed. Existing observations of crustal deformation in Tibet are largely derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS). Because large gaps in the GPS coverage exist, particularly in central and Western Tibet, the data have been used to support both the models (e.g. England and Molnar, 2005; Thatcher, 2007; Meade, 2007). On the other hand, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) offers an independent means of measuring present-day crustal deformation with a spatial resolution of a few tens of meters and an accuracy comparable to with GPS (e.g., Wright et al., 2001, 2004; Wang et al 2009). We have used InSAR data from multiple tracks in conjunction with available GPS to constrain a 2D velocity field model for the Tibetan plateau. About 300 ERS/Envisat interferograms are produced spanning 6 tracks (five descending and one ascending), covering ~200,000 km2 of Western Tibet. Each track is analysed using a network approach which yields line-of-sight deformation rates and realistic uncertainties (Biggs et al., 2007; Elliott et al., 2008; Wang et al., 2009). These are combined with the GPS, using full covariances, by adapting the velocity field method of England and Molnar (1997) to incorporate InSAR observations. Initially, we set up a triangular mesh spanning the target area; we then solve for the horizontal velocities on each node, as well as additional orbital and atmospheric terms for the InSAR data. The solution is regularised using Laplacian smoothing, whose weight is determined as

  13. Induced velocity field of a jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Weston, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a subsonic round jet exhausting perpendicularly from a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature was conducted. Velocity and pressure measurements were made in planes perpendicular to the path of the jet for ratios of jet velocity to crossflow velocity ranging from 3 to 10. The results of these measurements are presented in tabular and graphical forms. A pair of diffuse contrarotating vortices is identified as a significant feature of the flow, and the characteristics of the vortices are discussed.

  14. Organic Memory Devices: 2D Mica Crystal as Electret in Organic Field-Effect Transistors for Multistate Memory (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotao; He, Yudong; Li, Rongjin; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2016-05-01

    R. Li, H. Dong, and co-workers describe the exfoliation of cheap and abundant minerals, such as mica, into nanometer-thick 2D crystals with atomically flat surfaces. As described on page 3755, the application of the 2D electret in organic field-effect transistors is well-suited for flexible nonvolatile memory devices. Stored information can be retrieved even after power cycling. Moreover, the devices can be used as full-function transistors with a low-resistance and a high-resistance state.

  15. Global existence and uniqueness theorem to 2-D incompressible non-resistive MHD system with non-equilibrium background magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Cuili; Zhang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we consider the global existence and uniqueness of the solution to the 2D incompressible non-resistive MHD system with non-equilibrium background magnetic field. Our result implies that a strong enough non-equilibrium background magnetic field will guarantee the stability of the nonlinear MHD system. Beside the classical energy method, the interpolation inequalities and the algebraic structure of the equations coming from the incompressibility of the fluid are crucial in our arguments.

  16. On the latitude dependence of drift velocity of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukutake, Takesi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi

    2016-08-01

    There is an apparent difference in the westward drift between the geomagnetic main field and its time derivative, secular variation. The drift velocity of the main field is about 0.2°/year, definitely lower than that of the secular variation, 0.3°/year. The drift velocity of the main field appears to change with latitude, being low at high latitudes and higher at low latitudes, whereas the velocity of the secular variation is nearly constant irrespective of latitude. This paper examines what causes this difference by adopting the drifting and standing field model that assumes the geomagnetic field consists of the field steadily drifting westwards and the field remaining at nearly the same location. In this study, we confirm that the existence of the non-drifting standing field significantly affects the estimate of the drift velocity of the total field (i.e., the main field), and makes it slower than that of the secular variation. The drifting field is intense in low latitudes with its maximum at the equator, while the standing field dominates in higher latitudes. As a consequence, reduction of the apparent drifting velocity of the total field by the standing field is conspicuous in higher latitudes and less so in low latitudes. This creates the observed latitudinal structure of the drift velocity of the main field. On the other hand, the drift velocity of the secular variation is less affected by existence of the standing field, and mostly reflects the velocity of the drifting field that is almost constant with latitude. The velocity of the secular variation thus becomes almost uniform independent of latitude. The observed difference between the main field and the secular variation is naturally derived from the drifting and standing field model. This implies that physical mechanisms to generate the drifting and standing fields can be considered independently.

  17. Two Dimensional Electrostrictive Field Effect Transistor (2D-EFET): A sub-60mV/decade Steep Slope Device with High ON current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Saptarshi

    2016-10-01

    This article proposes a disruptive device concept which meets both low power and high performance criterion for post-CMOS computing and at the same time enables aggressive channel length scaling. This device, hereafter refer to as two-dimensional electrostrictive field effect transistor or 2D-EFET, allows sub-60 mV/decade subthreshold swing and considerably higher ON current compared to any state of the art FETs. Additionally, by the virtue of its ultra-thin body nature and electrostatic integrity, the 2D-EFET enjoys scaling beyond 10 nm technology node. The 2D-EFET works on the principle of voltage induced strain transduction. It uses an electrostrictive material as gate oxide which expands in response to an applied gate bias and thereby transduces an out-of-plane stress on the 2D channel material. This stress reduces the inter-layer distance between the consecutive layers of the semiconducting 2D material and dynamically reduces its bandgap to zero i.e. converts it into a semi-metal. Thus the device operates with a large bandgap in the OFF state and a small or zero bandgap in the ON state. As a consequence of this transduction mechanism, internal voltage amplification takes place which results in sub-60 mV/decade subthreshold swing (SS).

  18. Two Dimensional Electrostrictive Field Effect Transistor (2D-EFET): A sub-60mV/decade Steep Slope Device with High ON current

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saptarshi

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a disruptive device concept which meets both low power and high performance criterion for post-CMOS computing and at the same time enables aggressive channel length scaling. This device, hereafter refer to as two-dimensional electrostrictive field effect transistor or 2D-EFET, allows sub-60 mV/decade subthreshold swing and considerably higher ON current compared to any state of the art FETs. Additionally, by the virtue of its ultra-thin body nature and electrostatic integrity, the 2D-EFET enjoys scaling beyond 10 nm technology node. The 2D-EFET works on the principle of voltage induced strain transduction. It uses an electrostrictive material as gate oxide which expands in response to an applied gate bias and thereby transduces an out-of-plane stress on the 2D channel material. This stress reduces the inter-layer distance between the consecutive layers of the semiconducting 2D material and dynamically reduces its bandgap to zero i.e. converts it into a semi-metal. Thus the device operates with a large bandgap in the OFF state and a small or zero bandgap in the ON state. As a consequence of this transduction mechanism, internal voltage amplification takes place which results in sub-60 mV/decade subthreshold swing (SS). PMID:27721489

  19. Peculiar velocity field: Constraining the tilt of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Yinzhe; Gordon, Christopher; Feldman, Hume A.

    2011-05-15

    A large bulk flow, which is in tension with the Lambda cold dark matter ({Lambda}CDM) cosmological model, has been observed. In this paper, we provide a physically plausible explanation of this bulk flow, based on the assumption that some fraction of the observed dipole in the cosmic microwave background is due to an intrinsic fluctuation, so that the subtraction of the observed dipole leads to a mismatch between the cosmic microwave background defined rest frame and the matter rest frame. We investigate a model that takes into account the relative velocity (hereafter the tilted velocity) between the two frames, and develop a Bayesian statistic to explore the likelihood of this tilted velocity. By studying various independent peculiar velocity catalogs, we find that (1) the magnitude of the tilted velocity u is around 400 km/s, and its direction is close to what is found from previous bulk flow analyses; for most catalogs analyzed, u=0 is excluded at about the 2.5{sigma} level; (2) constraints on the magnitude of the tilted velocity can result in constraints on the duration of inflation, due to the fact that inflation can neither be too long (no dipole effect) nor too short (very large dipole effect); (3) under the assumption of a superhorizon isocurvature fluctuation, the constraints on the tilted velocity require that inflation lasts at least 6 e-folds longer (at the 95% confidence interval) than that required to solve the horizon problem. This opens a new window for testing inflation and models of the early universe from observations of large scale structure.

  20. The global velocity field of the filament in NGC 6334

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zernickel, A.; Schilke, P.; Smith, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: Star formation involves the collapse of gas from the scale of giant molecular clouds down to dense cores. Our aim is to trace the velocities in the filamentary, massive star-forming region NGC 6334 and to explain its dynamics. Methods: The main filament was mapped with the single-dish telescope APEX in HCO+ (J = 3-2) at 267.6 GHz to trace the dense gas. In order to reproduce the position-velocity diagram, we use a 3D radiative transfer code and create a model of a cylinder that undergoes a gravitational collapse toward its center. Results: We find a velocity gradient in the filament from the end toward its center, with the highest masses being found at both ends. Similar velocities have been predicted by recent calculations of the gravitational collapse of a sheet or cylinder of gas, and the observed velocities are consistent with these predictions. The 3D structure is revealed by taking the inclination and curvature of the filament into account. The free-fall collapse timescale of the filamentary molecular cloud is estimated to be ~1 Myr. This publication is based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory.

  1. State of the Field: Extreme Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Arriagada, Pamela; Baluev, Roman V.; Bean, Jacob L.; Bouchy, Francois; Buchhave, Lars A.; Carroll, Thorsten; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Crepp, Justin R.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Diddams, Scott A.; Dumusque, Xavier; Eastman, Jason D.; Endl, Michael; Figueira, Pedro; Ford, Eric B.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Fournier, Paul; Fűrész, Gabor; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gregory, Philip C.; Grundahl, Frank; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hébrard, Guillaume; Herrero, Enrique; Hogg, David W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Jorden, Paul; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Latham, David W.; Laughlin, Greg; Loredo, Thomas J.; Lovis, Christophe; Mahadevan, Suvrath; McCracken, Tyler M.; Pepe, Francesco; Perez, Mario; Phillips, David F.; Plavchan, Peter P.; Prato, Lisa; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reiners, Ansgar; Robertson, Paul; Santos, Nuno C.; Sawyer, David; Segransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Steinmetz, Tilo; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stéphane; Valenti, Jeff A.; Wang, Sharon X.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2016-06-01

    The Second Workshop on Extreme Precision Radial Velocities defined circa 2015 the state of the art Doppler precision and identified the critical path challenges for reaching 10 cm s-1 measurement precision. The presentations and discussion of key issues for instrumentation and data analysis and the workshop recommendations for achieving this bold precision are summarized here. Beginning with the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher spectrograph, technological advances for precision radial velocity (RV) measurements have focused on building extremely stable instruments. To reach still higher precision, future spectrometers will need to improve upon the state of the art, producing even higher fidelity spectra. This should be possible with improved environmental control, greater stability in the illumination of the spectrometer optics, better detectors, more precise wavelength calibration, and broader bandwidth spectra. Key data analysis challenges for the precision RV community include distinguishing center of mass (COM) Keplerian motion from photospheric velocities (time correlated noise) and the proper treatment of telluric contamination. Success here is coupled to the instrument design, but also requires the implementation of robust statistical and modeling techniques. COM velocities produce Doppler shifts that affect every line identically, while photospheric velocities produce line profile asymmetries with wavelength and temporal dependencies that are different from Keplerian signals. Exoplanets are an important subfield of astronomy and there has been an impressive rate of discovery over the past two decades. However, higher precision RV measurements are required to serve as a discovery technique for potentially habitable worlds, to confirm and characterize detections from transit missions, and to provide mass measurements for other space-based missions. The future of exoplanet science has very different trajectories depending on the precision that can

  2. State of the Field: Extreme Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Arriagada, Pamela; Baluev, Roman V.; Bean, Jacob L.; Bouchy, Francois; Buchhave, Lars A.; Carroll, Thorsten; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Crepp, Justin R.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Diddams, Scott A.; Dumusque, Xavier; Eastman, Jason D.; Endl, Michael; Figueira, Pedro; Ford, Eric B.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Fournier, Paul; Fűrész, Gabor; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gregory, Philip C.; Grundahl, Frank; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hébrard, Guillaume; Herrero, Enrique; Hogg, David W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Jorden, Paul; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Latham, David W.; Laughlin, Greg; Loredo, Thomas J.; Lovis, Christophe; Mahadevan, Suvrath; McCracken, Tyler M.; Pepe, Francesco; Perez, Mario; Phillips, David F.; Plavchan, Peter P.; Prato, Lisa; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reiners, Ansgar; Robertson, Paul; Santos, Nuno C.; Sawyer, David; Segransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Steinmetz, Tilo; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stéphane; Valenti, Jeff A.; Wang, Sharon X.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2016-06-01

    The Second Workshop on Extreme Precision Radial Velocities defined circa 2015 the state of the art Doppler precision and identified the critical path challenges for reaching 10 cm s‑1 measurement precision. The presentations and discussion of key issues for instrumentation and data analysis and the workshop recommendations for achieving this bold precision are summarized here. Beginning with the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher spectrograph, technological advances for precision radial velocity (RV) measurements have focused on building extremely stable instruments. To reach still higher precision, future spectrometers will need to improve upon the state of the art, producing even higher fidelity spectra. This should be possible with improved environmental control, greater stability in the illumination of the spectrometer optics, better detectors, more precise wavelength calibration, and broader bandwidth spectra. Key data analysis challenges for the precision RV community include distinguishing center of mass (COM) Keplerian motion from photospheric velocities (time correlated noise) and the proper treatment of telluric contamination. Success here is coupled to the instrument design, but also requires the implementation of robust statistical and modeling techniques. COM velocities produce Doppler shifts that affect every line identically, while photospheric velocities produce line profile asymmetries with wavelength and temporal dependencies that are different from Keplerian signals. Exoplanets are an important subfield of astronomy and there has been an impressive rate of discovery over the past two decades. However, higher precision RV measurements are required to serve as a discovery technique for potentially habitable worlds, to confirm and characterize detections from transit missions, and to provide mass measurements for other space-based missions. The future of exoplanet science has very different trajectories depending on the precision that

  3. Seismic imaging for velocity and attenuation structure in geothermal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zucca, J.J. ); Evans, J.R. )

    1989-06-01

    We have applied the attenuation inversion technique developed by Evans and Zucca (1988) to a seismic tomographic data set taken at Newberry Volcano by Achauer et al. (1988). Our preliminary results suggest that the interpretation of the velocity data by Achauer et al. that a magma chamber is present 3 km beneath the caldera is not confirmed by the attenuation data.

  4. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  5. Laboratory Velocity Measurements Used for Recovering Soil Distributions from Field Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P A; Bertete-Aguirre, H

    1999-10-20

    Recent advances in field methods make it possible to obtain high quality compressional (P) and shear (S) velocity data for the shallow subsurface. Environmental and engineering problems require new methods for interpreting the velocity data in terms of sub-surface soil distribution. Recent advances in laboratory measurement techniques have provided high quality velocity data for soils at low pressures that can be used to improve interpretation of field data. We show how laboratory data can be used to infer lithology from field data. We use laboratory ultrasonic velocity measurements from artificial soils made by combining various amounts of sand and peat moss.

  6. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOEpatents

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Fritz, I.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-06-08

    A field effect transistor comprises a semiconductor having a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship. The semiconductor is a strained layer superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers and barrier layers being selected from the group of layer pairs consisting of InGaAs/AlGaAs, InAs/InAlGaAs, and InAs/InAlAsP. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice which has a superlattice conduction band energy level structure in k-vector space. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice L/sub 2D/-valley which has a shape which is substantially more two-dimensional than that of said bulk L-valley. 2 figs.

  7. Three-dimensional measurement of temperature and velocity field in buoyancy driven flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Sato, Gen; Ohkawa, Youhei

    2008-11-01

    Three-dimensional measurements of temperature and velocity field in buoyancy driven flows are carried out using a background oriented Schlieren combined with tomographic reconstruction technique. This method is based on the refractive index measurement in the three-dimensional flow field, and the corresponding velocity field is evaluated from the displacement of the measured temperature field. The accuracy of this measurement is examined using the artificial images derived from the numerical simulation.

  8. Efficient decoding of 2D structured illumination with linear phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Gomella, Andrew A; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    The ability to map the phase distribution and lateral coherence of an x-ray wavefront offers the potential for imaging the human body through phase contrast, without the need to deposit significant radiation energy. The classic means to achieve this goal is structured illumination, in which a periodic intensity modulation is introduced into the image, and changes in the phase distribution of the wavefront are detected as distortions of the modulation pattern. Two-dimensional periodic patterns are needed to fully characterize a transverse wavefront. Traditionally, the information in a 2D pattern is retrieved at high resolution by acquiring multiple images while shifting the pattern over a 2D matrix of positions. Here we describe a method to decode 2D periodic patterns with single-axis phase stepping, without either a loss of information or increasing the number of sampling steps. The method is created to reduce the instrumentation complexity of high-resolution 2D wavefront sensing in general. It is demonstrated with motionless electromagnetic phase stepping and a flexible processing algorithm in x-ray dark-field and phase contrast imaging.

  9. Characterizing the original ejection velocity field of the Koronis family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Nesvorný, D.; Aljbaae, S.

    2016-06-01

    An asteroid family forms as a result of a collision between an impactor and a parent body. The fragments with ejection speeds higher than the escape velocity from the parent body can escape its gravitational pull. The cloud of escaping debris can be identified by the proximity of orbits in proper element, or frequency, domains. Obtaining estimates of the original ejection speed can provide valuable constraints on the physical processes occurring during collision, and used to calibrate impact simulations. Unfortunately, proper elements of asteroids families are modified by gravitational and non-gravitational effects, such as resonant dynamics, encounters with massive bodies, and the Yarkovsky effect, such that information on the original ejection speeds is often lost, especially for older, more evolved families. It has been recently suggested that the distribution in proper inclination of the Koronis family may have not been significantly perturbed by local dynamics, and that information on the component of the ejection velocity that is perpendicular to the orbital plane (vW), may still be available, at least in part. In this work we estimate the magnitude of the original ejection velocity speeds of Koronis members using the observed distribution in proper eccentricity and inclination, and accounting for the spread caused by dynamical effects. Our results show that (i) the spread in the original ejection speeds is, to within a 15% error, inversely proportional to the fragment size, and (ii) the minimum ejection velocity is of the order of 50 m/s, with larger values possible depending on the orbital configuration at the break-up.

  10. Far-Field and Middle-Field Vertical Velocities Associated with Megathrust Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleitout, L.; Trubienko, O.; Klein, E.; Vigny, C.; Garaud, J.; Shestakov, N.; Satirapod, C.; Simons, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    The recent megathrust earthquakes (Sumatra, Chili and Japan) have induced far-field postseismic subsidence with velocities from a few mm/yr to more than 1cm/yr at distances from 500 to 1500km from the earthquake epicentre, for several years following the earthquake. This subsidence is observed in Argentina, China, Korea, far-East Russia and in Malaysia and Thailand as reported by Satirapod et al. ( ASR, 2013). In the middle-field a very pronounced uplift is localized on the flank of the volcanic arc facing the trench. This is observed both over Honshu, in Chile and on the South-West coast of Sumatra. In Japan, the deformations prior to Tohoku earthquake are well measured by the GSI GPS network: While the East coast was slightly subsiding, the West coast was raising. A 3D finite element code (Zebulon-Zset) is used to understand the deformations through the seismic cycle in the areas surrounding the last three large subduction earthquakes. The meshes designed for each region feature a broad spherical shell portion with a viscoelastic asthenosphere. They are refined close to the subduction zones. Using these finite element models, we find that the pattern of the predicted far-field vertical postseismic displacements depends upon the thicknesses of the elastic plate and of the low viscosity asthenosphere. A low viscosity asthenosphere at shallow depth, just below the lithosphere is required to explain the subsidence at distances from 500 to 1500km. A thick (for example 600km) asthenosphere with a uniform viscosity predicts subsidence too far away from the trench. Slip on the subduction interface is unable tot induce the observed far-field subsidence. However, a combination of relaxation in a low viscosity wedge and slip or relaxation on the bottom part of the subduction interface is necessary to explain the observed postseismic uplift in the middle-field (volcanic arc area). The creep laws of the various zones used to explain the postseismic data can be injected in

  11. Global Neuromagnetic Cortical Fields Have Non-Zero Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, David M.; Nikolaev, Andrey R.; Jurica, Peter; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Mathiak, Klaus; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Globally coherent patterns of phase can be obscured by analysis techniques that aggregate brain activity measures across-trials, whether prior to source localization or for estimating inter-areal coherence. We analyzed, at single-trial level, whole head MEG recorded during an observer-triggered apparent motion task. Episodes of globally coherent activity occurred in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands of the signal in the form of large-scale waves, which propagated with a variety of velocities. Their mean speed at each frequency band was proportional to temporal frequency, giving a range of 0.06 to 4.0 m/s, from delta to beta. The wave peaks moved over the entire measurement array, during both ongoing activity and task-relevant intervals; direction of motion was more predictable during the latter. A large proportion of the cortical signal, measurable at the scalp, exists as large-scale coherent motion. We argue that the distribution of observable phase velocities in MEG is dominated by spatial filtering considerations in combination with group velocity of cortical activity. Traveling waves may index processes involved in global coordination of cortical activity. PMID:26953886

  12. Measurement of core velocity fluctuations and the dynamo in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Fontana, P.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Chapman, J.T.

    1998-12-31

    Plasma flow velocity fluctuations have been directly measured in the high temperature magnetically confined plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP). These measurements show that the flow velocity fluctuations are correlated with magnetic field fluctuations. This initial measurement is subject to limitations of spatial localization and other uncertainties, but is evidence for sustainment of the RFP magnetic field configuration by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo. Both the flow velocity and magnetic field fluctuations are the result of global resistive MHD modes of helicity m = 1, n = 5--10 in the core of MST. Chord-averaged flow velocity fluctuations are measured in the core of MST by recording the Doppler shift of impurity line emission with a specialized high resolution and throughput grating spectrometer. Magnetic field fluctuations are recorded with a large array of small edge pickup coils, which allows spectral decomposition into discrete modes and subsequent correlation with the velocity fluctuation data.

  13. Simulations of the C-2/C-2U Field Reversed Configurations with the Q2D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, Marco; Dettrick, Sean; Barnes, Daniel; Tajima, Toshiki; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    C-2U was built to sustain advanced beam-driven FRCs for 5 + ms. The Q2D transport code is used to simulate the evolution of C-2U discharges and to study sustainment via fast ion current and pressure, with the latter comparable to the thermal plasma pressure. The code solves the MHD equations together with source terms due to neutral beams, which are calculated by a Monte Carlo method. We compare simulations with experimental results obtained in the HPF14 regime of C-2 (6 neutral beams with energy of 20 keV and total power of 4.2 MW). All simulations start from an initial equilibrium and transport coefficients are chosen to match experimental data. The best agreement is obtained when utilizing an enhanced energy transfer between fast ions and the plasma, which may be an indication of anomalous heating due to beneficial beam-plasma instabilities. Similar simulations of C-2U (neutral beam power increased to 10 + MW and angled beam injection) are compared with experimental results, where a steady state has been obtained for 5 + ms, correlated with the neutral beam pulse and limited by engineering constraints.

  14. The effect of baryons on redshift space distortions and cosmic density and velocity fields in the EAGLE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Frenk, Carlos S.; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.

    2016-09-01

    We use the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) galaxy formation simulation to study the effects of baryons on the power spectrum of the total matter and dark matter distributions and on the velocity fields of dark matter and galaxies. On scales k ≳ 4 h Mpc-1 the effect of baryons on the amplitude of the total matter power spectrum is greater than 1 per cent. The back-reaction of baryons affects the density field of the dark matter at the level of ˜3 per cent on scales of 1 ≤ k/( h Mpc-1) ≤ 5. The dark matter velocity divergence power spectrum at k ≲ 0.5 h Mpc-1 is changed by less than 1 per cent. The 2D redshift space power spectrum is affected at the level of ˜6 per cent at |k|≳ 1 h Mpc^{-1} (for μ > 0.5), but for |k|≤ 0.4 h Mpc^{-1} it differs by less than 1 per cent. We report vanishingly small baryonic velocity bias for haloes: the peculiar velocities of haloes with M200 > 3 × 1011 M⊙ (hosting galaxies with M* > 109 M⊙) are affected at the level of at most 1 km s-1, which is negligible for 1 per cent-precision cosmology. We caution that since EAGLE overestimates cluster gas fractions it may also underestimate the impact of baryons, particularly for the total matter power spectrum. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that for theoretical modelling of redshift space distortions and galaxy velocity-based statistics, baryons and their back-reaction can be safely ignored at the current level of observational accuracy. However, we confirm that the modelling of the total matter power spectrum in weak lensing studies needs to include realistic galaxy formation physics in order to achieve the accuracy required in the precision cosmology era.

  15. New Interpretations of Measured Antihydrogen Velocities and Field Ionization Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Gabrielse, G.

    2006-10-06

    We present extensive Monte Carlo simulations, showing that cold antihydrogen (H) atoms are produced when antiprotons (p) are gently heated in the side wells of a nested Penning trap. The observed H with high energies, that had seemed to indicate otherwise, are instead explained by a surprisingly effective charge-exchange mechanism. We shed light on the previously measured field-ionization spectrum, and reproduce both the characteristic low-field power law as well as the enhanced H production at higher fields. The latter feature is shown to arise from H atoms too deeply bound to be described as guiding center atoms, atoms with internally chaotic motion.

  16. New interpretations of measured antihydrogen velocities and field ionization spectra.

    PubMed

    Pohl, T; Sadeghpour, H R; Gabrielse, G

    2006-10-01

    We present extensive Monte Carlo simulations, showing that cold antihydrogen (H) atoms are produced when antiprotons (p) are gently heated in the side wells of a nested Penning trap. The observed H with high energies, that had seemed to indicate otherwise, are instead explained by a surprisingly effective charge-exchange mechanism. We shed light on the previously measured field-ionization spectrum, and reproduce both the characteristic low-field power law as well as the enhanced H production at higher fields. The latter feature is shown to arise from H toms too deeply bound to be described as guiding center atoms, atoms with internally chaotic motion.

  17. Laser transit anemometer measurements of a JANNAF nozzle base velocity flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Russ, C. E., Jr.; Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Velocity flow fields of a nozzle jet exhausting into a supersonic flow were surveyed. The measurements were obtained with a laser transit anemometer (LTA) system in the time domain with a correlation instrument. The LTA data is transformed into the velocity domain to remove the error that occurs when the data is analyzed in the time domain. The final data is shown in velocity vector plots for positions upstream, downstream, and in the exhaust plane of the jet nozzle.

  18. Surface plasmon hurdles leading to a strongly localized giant field enhancement on two-dimensional (2D) metallic diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Brûlé, Yoann; Demésy, Guillaume; Gralak, Boris; Popov, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    An extensive numerical study of diffraction of a plane monochromatic wave by a single gold cone on a plane gold substrate and by a periodical array of such cones shows formation of curls in the map of the Poynting vector. They result from the interference between the incident wave, the wave reflected by the substrate, and the field scattered by the cone(s). In case of a single cone, when going away from its base along the surface, the main contribution in the scattered field is given by the plasmon surface wave (PSW) excited on the surface. As expected, it has a predominant direction of propagation, determined by the incident wave polarization. Two particular cones with height approximately 1/6 and 1/3 of the wavelength are studied in detail, as they present the strongest absorption and field enhancement when arranged in a periodic array. While the PSW excited by the smaller single cone shows an energy flux globally directed along the substrate surface, we show that curls of the Poynting vector generated with the larger cone touch the diopter surface. At this point, their direction is opposite to the energy flow of the PSW, which is then forced to jump over the vortex regions. Arranging the cones in a two-dimensional subwavelength periodic array (diffraction grating), supporting a specular reflected order only, resonantly strengthens the field intensity at the tip of cones and leads to a field intensity enhancement of the order of 10 000 with respect to the incident wave intensity. The enhanced field is strongly localized on the rounded top of the cones. It is accompanied by a total absorption of the incident light exhibiting large angular tolerances. This strongly localized giant field enhancement can be of much interest in many applications, including fluorescence spectroscopy, label-free biosensing, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), nonlinear optical effects and photovoltaics.

  19. Far field velocity potential induced by a rapidly decaying vorticity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Rupert; Ting, LU

    1990-01-01

    The velocity field induced by a vorticity distribution decaying rapidly in the distance from the origin is investigated. It is shown that the sum of vector potentials for the velocity field can be expressed as a linear combination of Mn values, where Mn denotes the number of linearly independent vector functions of nth order. It is then shown that only the linear combinations 2n + 1 of these Mn vector functions contribute to the far field velocity which is irrotational, and that the corresponding scalar potential is then represented by a linear combination of 2n + 1 spherical harmonics of nth order whose coefficients are linear combinations of nth moments of vorticity.

  20. Observation and analysis of abrupt changes in the interplanetary plasma velocity and magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. N.; Belcher, J. W.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a limited study of the physical nature of abrupt changes in the interplanetary plasma velocity and magnetic field based on 19 day's data from the Pioneer 6 spacecraft. The period was chosen to include a high-velocity solar wind stream and low-velocity wind. Abrupt events were accepted for study if the sum of the energy density in the magnetic field and velocity changes was above a specified minimum. A statistical analysis of the events in the high-velocity solar wind stream shows that Alfvenic changes predominate. This conclusion is independent of whether steady state requirements are imposed on conditions before and after the event. Alfvenic changes do not dominate in the lower-speed wind. This study extends the plasma field evidence for outwardly propagating Alfvenic changes to time scales as small as 1 min (scale lengths on the order of 20,000 km).

  1. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  2. Hα LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES AND THE CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE VELOCITY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kennedy, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Simões, P. J. A.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Fletcher, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Graham, D.

    2015-11-10

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  3. Controllable strain fields in multimonolayer 2D-layered TiO2 (110) crystals studied by STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhisheng; Potapenko, Denis; Osgood, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Strain of crystal lattice can change the electronic property of materials, such as oxides and semiconductors, significantly. However, experimental studies of lattice effects in oxides are limited especially in atomic scale, due to the difficulty of generating strain field experimentally. In this work, we generate a strain field in multiple monolayer sample of at TiO2 (110) by very low energy bombardment of single crystal TiO2 samples with argon ions at 1000oC. The interstitial argon diffuses so as to form nanometer scale regions of local exfoliated TiO2 layers. These layers retain their unstressed surface reconstruction although the top-most surface layers have a convex morphology. We use STM studies along with a continuum model to show the strain field. Our studies also show that the strained surface layers are free of oxygen vacancies and that the adsorption energy of hydrogen is altered by the local strain field. The authors gratefully acknowledge support of this work by the Basic Energy Sciences Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-FG02-90ER14104.

  4. Strain-Gated Field Effect Transistor of a MoS2-ZnO 2D-1D Hybrid Structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Libo; Xue, Fei; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Xin; Wang, Longfei; Kou, Jinzong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is an exciting material due to its unique electrical, optical, and piezoelectric properties. Owing to an intrinsic band gap of 1.2-1.9 eV, monolayer or a-few-layer MoS2 is used for fabricating field effect transistors (FETs) with high electron mobility and on/off ratio. However, the traditional FETs are controlled by an externally supplied gate voltage, which may not be sensitive enough to directly interface with a mechanical stimulus for applications in electronic skin. Here we report a type of top-pressure/force-gated field effect transistors (PGFETs) based on a hybrid structure of a 2D MoS2 flake and 1D ZnO nanowire (NW) array. Once an external pressure is applied, the piezoelectric polarization charges created at the tips of ZnO NWs grown on MoS2 act as a gate voltage to tune/control the source-drain transport property in MoS2. At a 6.25 MPa applied stimulus on a packaged device, the source-drain current can be tuned for ∼25%, equivalent to the results of applying an extra -5 V back gate voltage. Another type of PGFET with a dielectric layer (Al2O3) sandwiched between MoS2 and ZnO also shows consistent results. A theoretical model is proposed to interpret the received data. This study sets the foundation for applying the 2D material-based FETs in the field of artificial intelligence.

  5. Strain-Gated Field Effect Transistor of a MoS2-ZnO 2D-1D Hybrid Structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Libo; Xue, Fei; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Xin; Wang, Longfei; Kou, Jinzong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is an exciting material due to its unique electrical, optical, and piezoelectric properties. Owing to an intrinsic band gap of 1.2-1.9 eV, monolayer or a-few-layer MoS2 is used for fabricating field effect transistors (FETs) with high electron mobility and on/off ratio. However, the traditional FETs are controlled by an externally supplied gate voltage, which may not be sensitive enough to directly interface with a mechanical stimulus for applications in electronic skin. Here we report a type of top-pressure/force-gated field effect transistors (PGFETs) based on a hybrid structure of a 2D MoS2 flake and 1D ZnO nanowire (NW) array. Once an external pressure is applied, the piezoelectric polarization charges created at the tips of ZnO NWs grown on MoS2 act as a gate voltage to tune/control the source-drain transport property in MoS2. At a 6.25 MPa applied stimulus on a packaged device, the source-drain current can be tuned for ∼25%, equivalent to the results of applying an extra -5 V back gate voltage. Another type of PGFET with a dielectric layer (Al2O3) sandwiched between MoS2 and ZnO also shows consistent results. A theoretical model is proposed to interpret the received data. This study sets the foundation for applying the 2D material-based FETs in the field of artificial intelligence. PMID:26695840

  6. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOEpatents

    Chaffin, deceased, Roger J.; Dawson, Ralph; Fritz, Ian J.; Osbourn, Gordon C.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    A field effect transistor comprises a semiconductor having a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship. The semiconductor is a strained layer superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers and barrier layers being selected from the group of layer pairs consisting of InGaAs/AlGaAs, InAs/InAlGaAs, and InAs/InAlAsP. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice which has a superlattice conduction band energy level structure in k-vector space which includes a lowest energy .GAMMA.-valley and a next lowest energy L-valley, each k-vector corresponding to one of the orthogonal directions defined by the planes of said layers and the directions perpendicular thereto. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice L.sub.2D -valley which has a shape which is substantially more two-dimensional than that of said bulk L-valley.

  7. The effect of a magnetic field on a 2D problem of fibre-reinforced thermoelasticity rotation under three theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kh., Lotfy

    2012-06-01

    In the present paper, we introduce the coupled theory (CD), Lord-Schulman (LS) theory, and Green-Lindsay (GL) theory to study the influences of a magnetic field and rotation on a two-dimensional problem of fibre-reinforced thermoelasticity. The material is a homogeneous isotropic elastic half-space. The method applied here is to use normal mode analysis to solve a thermal shock problem. Some particular cases are also discussed in the context of the problem. Deformation of a body depends on the nature of the force applied as well as the type of boundary conditions. Numerical results for the temperature, displacement, and thermal stress components are given and illustrated graphically in the absence and the presence of the magnetic field and rotation.

  8. Low field magnetoresistance in a 2D topological insulator based on wide HgTe quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshanetsky, E. B.; Kvon, Z. D.; Gusev, G. M.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Low field magnetoresistance is experimentally studied in a two-dimensional topological insulator (TI) in both diffusive and quasiballistic samples fabricated on top of a wide (14 nm) HgTe quantum well. In all cases a pronounced quasi-linear positive magnetoresistance is observed similar to that found previously in diffusive samples based on a narrow (8 nm) HgTe well. The experimental results are compared with the main existing theoretical models based on different types of disorder: sample edge roughness, nonmagnetic disorder in an otherwise coherent TI and metallic puddles due to locally trapped charges that act like local gate on the sample. The quasiballistic samples with resistance close to the expected quantized values also show a positive low-field magnetoresistance but with a pronounced admixture of mesoscopic effects.

  9. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  10. Band structure of a 2D photonic crystal based on ferrofluids of Co(1-x)Znx Fe2O4 nanoparticles under perpendicular applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Javier; Gonzalez, Luz Esther; Quinonez, Mario; Porras, Nelson; Zambrano, Gustavo; Gomez, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Using a ferrfluid of cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles Co(1 - x)ZnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid and suspended in ethanol, we have fabricated a 2D photonic crystal (PC) by the application of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the ferrofluid. The 2D PC is made by rods of nanoparticles organized in a hexagonal structure. By means of the plane-wave expansion method, we study its photonic band structure (PBS) which depends on the effective permittivity and on the area ratio of the liquid phase. Additionaly, taking into account the Maxwell-Garnett theory we calculated the effective permittivity of the rods. We have found that the effective refractive index of the ferrofluid increases with its magnetization. Using these results we calculate the band structure of the photonic crystal at different applied magnetic fields, finding that the increase of the applied magnetic field shifts the band structure to lower frequencies with the appearance of more band gaps. Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali, Colombia

  11. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapour concentration field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially direct scanning tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapour concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m × 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emission from certain soil structures shall be monitored. The whole concentration field was measured with up to 2.5 Hz. In this paper, we present the setup and spectroscopic performance of the instrument regarding the influence of the polygon rotation speed and mode on the absorption signal. Homogeneous H2O distributions were measured and compared to a single channel, bi-static reference TDLAS spectrometer for validation of the instrument. Good accuracy and precision with errors of less than 6% of the absolute concentration and length and bandwidth normalized detection limits of up to 1.1 ppmv · m · √Hz-1 were achieved. The spectrometer is a robust and easy to set up instrument for tomographic reconstructions of 2-D-concentration fields that can be considered a good basis for future field measurements in environmental research.

  12. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapor concentration field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially scanning direct tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapor concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m x 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emission from certain soil structures shall be monitored. The whole concentration field was measured with up to 2.5 Hz. In this paper, we present the setup and spectroscopic performance of the instrument regarding the influence of the polygon rotation speed and mode on the absorption signal. Homogeneous H2O distributions were measured and compared to a single channel, bi-static reference TDLAS spectrometer for validation of the instrument. Good accuracy and precision with errors of less than 6% of the absolute concentration and length and bandwidth normalized detection limits of up to 1.1 ppmv . m (Hz)-0.5 were achieved. The spectrometer is a robust and easy to set up instrument for tomographic reconstructions of 2-D-concentration fields that can be considered as a good basis for future field measurements in environmental research.

  13. Investigation of enhanced 2D field-stitching method as a simulation-tool for line-edge roughness in scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilski, Bartosz; Frenner, Karsten; Osten, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Scatterometry is a method commonly used in semiconductor metrology for measuring critical dimension (CD). It relies on measurement of light diffracted on a periodic structure and using it to derive the actual profile by running complex simulations. As CD is getting smaller with next lithography nodes, the Line-Edge Roughness/Line Width Roughness (LER/LWR) are becoming significant fraction of its overall size - therefore there is a need to include them in the simulations. Simulation of the LER/LWR's influence, in its random nature, calls for simulating relatively large fields. These large fields, if treated with rigorous electromagnetic simulations, are either very time-extensive or impossible to conduct, therefore computationally bearable, approximate approach needs to be applied. Our approximate method is "Field-Stitching Method" (FSM). We present its 2D version with varying parameter called "overlap region". We simulate the line grating structure with CD disturbed by LER/LWR and apply Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) supported by the 2D FSM. We also generate the results obtained exclusively by RCWA, to which we compare the results of the approximate approach. Based on the comparison we discuss the benefits FSM brings and its limitations.

  14. Solar subsurface magnetic and velocity fields from tilt angle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranyi, Tünde; Muraközy, Judit; Ludmány, András

    2015-08-01

    ABSTRACT A refined form of the well known Joy's law has been formulated by using the new Debrecen tilt angle datasets. These data are intercalibrated with the traditional datasets and several determination methods help to make the material reliable. It has been found that the latitudinal distribution of the tilt angles is not merely a monotonously increasing function, but it has a plateau between the latitudes of about 15-25 degrees, where the toroidal field is the strongest. This may provide new constraints for the theoretical investigations about the mechanisms contributing to the observable tilt angles. The new data also allow to demonstrate that the tilts are primarily caused by the Coriolis impact, no signature has been found for the winding up of the global magnetic field. This work has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2012-2015) under grant agreement No. 284461 (eHEROES).

  15. Measurement of velocity and vorticity fields in the wake of an airfoil in periodic pitching motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The velocity field created by the wake of an airfoil undergoing a prescribed pitching motion was sampled using hot wire anemometry. Data analysis methods concerning resolution of velocity components from cross wire data, computation of vorticity from velocity time history data, and calculation of vortex circulation from vorticity field data are discussed. These data analysis methods are applied to a flow field relevant to a two dimensional blade-vortex interaction study. Velocity time history data were differentiated to yield vorticity field data which are used to characterize the wake of the pitching airfoil. Measurement of vortex strength in sinusoidal and nonsinusoidal wakes show vortices in the sinusoidal wake have stronger circulation and more concentrated vorticity distributions than the tailored nonsinusoidal wake.

  16. Note on the velocity and related fields of steady irrotational two-dimensional surface gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Clamond, Didier

    2012-04-13

    The velocity and other fields of steady two-dimensional surface gravity waves in irrotational motion are investigated numerically. Only symmetric waves with one crest per wavelength are considered, i.e. Stokes waves of finite amplitude, but not the highest waves, nor subharmonic and superharmonic bifurcations of Stokes waves. The numerical results are analysed, and several conjectures are made about the velocity and acceleration fields.

  17. First-order torques and solid-body spinning velocities in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Rudnick, I.

    1977-01-01

    The letter reports an observation of first-order nonzero time-averaged torques and solid-body spinning velocities in intense acoustic fields. The experimental apparatus consisted of a vertical cylindrical rod supported on an air bearing and passing through a box with two loudspeakers centered on adjoining vertical sides. The rim velocity of the cylinder and the torque on the cylinder are measured as functions of air-particle velocity and the phase difference between the x and y components of the particle velocity. It is found that both rim velocity and torque are linear functions of particle velocity. Difficulties in constructing a proper theoretical description of the observed effects are discussed.

  18. Vertically averaged velocities in the North Atlantic Current from field trials of a Lagrangian electric-field float

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuts, Zoltan B.; Sanford, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    A subsurface Lagrangian float that utilizes motional induction to calculate vertically averaged velocities was tested in the North Atlantic Current (NAC), taking advantage of existing cruises and infrastructure. The Electric Field Float (EFF) is a RAFOS float with horizontal electrodes that measures its own velocity by RAFOS tracking and calculates vertically averaged velocities when merged with the electrode system. The observations showed depth-averaged velocities that were fast in the core of the NAC (0.6-0.9 m s -1) and moderate in adjacent recirculations and eddies (0.3-0.4 m s-1). A float at 850 dbar moved at close to the depth-averaged velocity, while shallower floats followed surface intensified flow on top of the depth-averaged motion. Integral time scales of depth-averaged velocity (1.3-1.6±0.4 d) are slightly shorter than time scales of float velocity (1.6-2.0±0.3 d), while integral length scales of depth-averaged water velocity (35±10 km for u, 18±6 km for v) are slightly shorter than length scales of float motion (53±12 km for u, 28±6 km for v). Velocity spectra of depth-averaged velocity show significant variance at inertial periods. Quantitative and qualitative validation with multiple independent data sets confirms the accuracy of the instrument and sampling strategy in the NAC, advancing the limited observational knowledge of depth-averaged circulation in subpolar regions.

  19. An exact solution of solute transport by one-dimensional random velocity fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cvetkovic, V.D.; Dagan, G.; Shapiro, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of one-dimensional transport of passive solute by a random steady velocity field is investigated. This problem is representative of solute movement in porous media, for example, in vertical flow through a horizontally stratified formation of variable porosity with a constant flux at the soil surface. Relating moments of particle travel time and displacement, exact expressions for the advection and dispersion coefficients in the Focker-Planck equation are compared with the perturbation results for large distances. The first- and second-order approximations for the dispersion coefficient are robust for a lognormal velocity field. The mean Lagrangian velocity is the harmonic mean of the Eulerian velocity for large distances. This is an artifact of one-dimensional flow where the continuity equation provides for a divergence free fluid flux, rather than a divergence free fluid velocity. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Application of a Solar Wind Model Driven by Turbulence Dissipation to a 2D Magnetic Field Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Velli, Marco; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Mikić, Zoran

    2014-12-01

    Although it is widely accepted that photospheric motions provide the energy source and that the magnetic field must play a key role in the process, the detailed mechanisms responsible for heating the Sun's corona and accelerating the solar wind are still not fully understood. Cranmer et al. developed a sophisticated, one-dimensional (1D), time-steady model of the solar wind with turbulence dissipation. By varying the coronal magnetic field, they obtain, for a single choice of wave properties, a realistic range of slow and fast wind conditions with a sharp latitudinal transition between the two streams. Using a 1D, time-dependent model of the solar wind of Lionello et al., which incorporates turbulent dissipation of Alfvén waves to provide heating and acceleration of the plasma, we have explored a similar configuration, obtaining qualitatively equivalent results. However, our calculations suggest that the rapid transition between slow and fast wind suggested by this 1D model may be disrupted in multidimensional MHD simulations by the requirement of transverse force balance.

  1. Application of a solar wind model driven by turbulence dissipation to a 2D magnetic field configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Mikić, Zoran; Velli, Marco E-mail: cdowns@predsci.com E-mail: mikic@predsci.com

    2014-12-01

    Although it is widely accepted that photospheric motions provide the energy source and that the magnetic field must play a key role in the process, the detailed mechanisms responsible for heating the Sun's corona and accelerating the solar wind are still not fully understood. Cranmer et al. developed a sophisticated, one-dimensional (1D), time-steady model of the solar wind with turbulence dissipation. By varying the coronal magnetic field, they obtain, for a single choice of wave properties, a realistic range of slow and fast wind conditions with a sharp latitudinal transition between the two streams. Using a 1D, time-dependent model of the solar wind of Lionello et al., which incorporates turbulent dissipation of Alfvén waves to provide heating and acceleration of the plasma, we have explored a similar configuration, obtaining qualitatively equivalent results. However, our calculations suggest that the rapid transition between slow and fast wind suggested by this 1D model may be disrupted in multidimensional MHD simulations by the requirement of transverse force balance.

  2. Exact off-resonance near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic 2-D lenses illuminated by plane waves.

    PubMed

    Boriskin, Artem V; Sauleau, Ronan; Nosich, Alexander I

    2009-02-01

    The near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic lenses made of rexolite and isotropic quartz and illuminated by E- and H-polarized plane waves are studied. Variations in the focal domain size, shape, and location are reported versus the angle of incidence of the incoming wave. The problem is solved numerically in a two-dimensional formulation. The accuracy of results is guaranteed by using a highly efficient numerical algorithm based on the combination of the Muller boundary integral equations, the method of analytical regularization, and the trigonometric Galerkin discretization scheme. The analysis fully accounts for the finite size of the lens as well as its curvature and thus can be considered as a reference solution for other electromagnetic solvers. Moreover, the trusted description of the focusing ability of a finite-size hemielliptic lens can be useful in the design of antenna receivers.

  3. Radiography by selective detection of scatter field velocity components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A reconfigurable collimated radiation detector, system and related method includes at least one collimated radiation detector. The detector has an adjustable collimator assembly including at least one feature, such as a fin, optically coupled thereto. Adjustments to the adjustable collimator selects particular directions of travel of scattered radiation emitted from an irradiated object which reach the detector. The collimated detector is preferably a collimated detector array, where the collimators are independently adjustable. The independent motion capability provides the capability to focus the image by selection of the desired scatter field components. When an array of reconfigurable collimated detectors is provided, separate image data can be obtained from each of the detectors and the respective images cross-correlated and combined to form an enhanced image.

  4. Reduction of velocity fluctuations in a turbulent flow of gallium by an external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Berhanu, Michael; Gallet, Basile; Mordant, Nicolas; Fauve, Stéphan

    2008-07-01

    The magnetic field of planets or stars is generated by the motion of a conducting fluid through a dynamo instability. The saturation of the magnetic field occurs through the reaction of the Lorentz force on the flow. In relation to this phenomenon, we study the effect of a magnetic field on a turbulent flow of liquid gallium. The measurement of electric potential differences provides a signal related to the local velocity fluctuations. We observe a reduction of velocity fluctuations at all frequencies in the spectrum when the magnetic field is increased. PMID:18764010

  5. Locating earthquakes in west Texas oil fields using 3-D anisotropic velocity models

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Fa; Doser, D.; Baker, M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    Earthquakes within the War-Wink gas field, Ward County, Texas, that have been located with a 1-D velocity model occur near the edges and top of a naturally occurring overpressured zone. Because the War-Wink field is a structurally controlled anticline with significant velocity anisotropy associated with the overpressured zone and finely layered evaporites, the authors have attempted to re-locate earthquakes using a 3-D anisotropic velocity model. Preliminary results with this model give the unsatisfactory result that many earthquakes previously located at the top of the overpressured zone (3-3.5 km) moved into the evaporites (1-1.5 km) above the field. They believe that this result could be caused by: (1) aliasing the velocity model; or (2) problems in determining the correct location minima when several minima exist. They are currently attempting to determine which of these causes is more likely for the unsatisfactory result observed.

  6. Pulsed-Field Ultrasonic Experiments in the Quasi-2D Antiferromagnet Cs2CuBr4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, B.; Cong, P. T.; Krüger, N.; Ritter, F.; Assmus, W.; Lang, M.

    2013-03-01

    The magnetic insulators Cs2CuCl4 and Cs2CuBr4 are model systems for a frustrated quasi-two-dimensional triangular-lattice spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet with a weak interlayer coupling. The quasi-two-dimensional character manifests itself in a broad maximum at T max in the magnetic susceptibility, which for Cs2CuCl4 has been found to mark the upper bound for a spin-liquid regime (R. Coldea et al. in Phys. Rev. B 68:134424, 2003). Motivated by the observation of characteristic B 2 dependencies in the elastic constants and ultrasound attenuation in the spin-liquid regime for this material, we look for corresponding signatures in the related Cs2CuBr4 compound at low temperatures T≤4.2 K and fields B≤50 T. We observe a softening of the elastic constant up to B s ˜32 T ( B∥ a) and a maximum in the sound attenuation at 0.86 B s . Both quantities exhibit the same characteristic B 2 dependence as found for Cs2CuCl4, suggesting the existence of a spin-liquid phase in Cs2CuBr4 as well.

  7. Computer simulation of topological evolution in 2-d grain growth using a continuum diffuse-interface field model

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Geng, C.; Chen, L.Q.

    1997-03-01

    The local kinetics and topological phenomena during normal grain growth were studied in two dimensions by computer simulations employing a continuum diffuse-interface field model. The relationships between topological class and individual grain growth kinetics were examined, and compared with results obtained previously from analytical theories, experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations. It was shown that both the grain-size and grain-shape (side) distributions are time-invariant and the linear relationship between the mean radii of individual grains and topological class n was reproduced. The moments of the shape distribution were determined, and the differences among the data from soap froth. Potts model and the present simulation were discussed. In the limit when the grain size goes to zero, the average number of grain edges per grain is shown to be between 4 and 5, implying the direct vanishing of 4- and 5-sided grains, which seems to be consistent with recent experimental observations on thin films. Based on the simulation results, the conditions for the applicability of the familiar Mullins-Von Neumann law and the Hillert`s equation were discussed.

  8. Volumetric Velocity Fields Downstream of a 2-Bladed Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troolin, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Tip vortices of axial-flow turbines are important in understanding the mean and turbulent characteristics of the wake. Volumetric 3-component velocimetry (V3V) was used to examine the flow downstream of a model two-bladed turbine in air. The turbine had a diameter of 177.8 mm and was powered by a motor operating at approximately 150 rpm. The measurement volume (50 × 50 × 20 mm) was positioned approximately 5 mm downstream of the blade tip, in order to examine the tip vortex structure. The V3V system utilized three 4MP cameras with 85 mm lenses positioned in a fixed triangular frame located at a distance of 450 mm from the back of the measurement volume. The illumination source was a 200 mJ dual-head pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 7.25 Hz and illuminating 1 micron olive oil droplets as tracer particles. The particle images were then analyzed to produce volumetric vector fields. The focus was placed on visualizing the complex interaction between the turbine tip vortices. Insights on the tip vortex dynamics and three dimensional characteristics of the wake flow will be discussed.

  9. Velocity field measurements in oblique static divergent vocal fold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron

    2005-11-01

    During normal phonation, the vocal fold cycle is characterized by the glottal opening transitioning from a convergent to a divergent passage and then closing before the cycle is repeated. Under ordinary phonatory conditions, both vocal folds, which form the glottal passage, move in phase with each other, creating a time-varying symmetric opening. However, abnormal pathological conditions, such as unilateral paralysis, and polyps, can result in geometrical asymmetries between the vocal folds throughout the phonatory cycle. This study investigates pulsatile flow fields through 7.5 times life-size vocal fold models with included divergence angles of 5 to 30 degrees, and obliquities between the vocal folds of up to 15 degrees. Flow conditions were scaled to match physiological parameters. Data were taken at the anterior posterior mid-plane using phase-averaged Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Viscous flow phenomena including the Coanda effect, flow separation points, and jet "flapping" were investigated. The results are compared to previously reported work of flow through symmetric divergent vocal fold models.

  10. The Effect of Magnetic Field on 2-D Problem for a Mode-I Crack of a Fiber-Reinforced in Generalized Thermoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Kh.; Othman, Mohamed I. A.

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, the coupled theory, Lord-Şhulman theory, and Green-Lindsay theory are introduced to study the influence of a magnetic field on the 2-D problem of a fiber-reinforced thermoelastic. These theories are also applied to study the influence of reinforcement on the total deformation of an infinite space weakened by a finite linear opening Mode-I crack. The material is homogeneous and an isotropic elastic half-space. The crack is subjected to a prescribed temperature and stress distribution. Normal mode analysis is used to solve the problem of a Mode-I crack. Numerical results for the temperature, the displacement, and thermal stress components are given and illustrated graphically in the absence and the presence of the magnetic field. A comparison between the three theories is also made for different depths.

  11. The relationship between the instantaneous velocity field and the rate of moment release in the lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2003-01-01

    Instantaneous velocity gradients within the continental lithosphere are often related to the tectonic driving forces. This relationship is direct if the forces are secular, as for the case of loading of a locked section of a subduction interface by the downgoing plate. If the forces are static, as for the case of lateral variations in gravitational potential energy, then velocity gradients can be produced only if the lithosphere has, on average, zero strength. The static force model may be related to the long-term velocity field but not the instantaneous velocity field (typically measured geodetically over a period of several years) because over short time intervals the upper lithosphere behaves elastically. In order to describe both the short- and long-term behaviour of an (elastic) lithosphere-(viscoelastic) asthenosphere system in a self-consistent manner, I construct a deformation model termed the expected interseismic velocity (EIV) model. Assuming that the lithosphere is populated with faults that rupture continually, each with a definite mean recurrence time, and that the Earth is well approximated as a linear elastic-viscoelastic coupled system, I derive a simple relationship between the instantaneous velocity field and the average rate of moment release in the lithosphere. Examples with synthetic fault networks demonstrate that velocity gradients in actively deforming regions may to a large extent be the product of compounded viscoelastic relaxation from past earthquakes on hundreds of faults distributed over large (??? 106 km2) areas.

  12. Lattice models for granular-like velocity fields: finite-size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, C. A.; Manacorda, A.; Lasanta, A.; Puglisi, A.; Prados, A.

    2016-09-01

    Long-range spatial correlations in the velocity and energy fields of a granular fluid are discussed in the framework of a 1d lattice model. The dynamics of the velocity field occurs through nearest-neighbour inelastic collisions that conserve momentum but dissipate energy. A set of equations for the fluctuating hydrodynamics of the velocity and energy mesoscopic fields give a first approximation for (i) the velocity structure factor and (ii) the finite-size correction to the Haff law, both in the homogeneous cooling regime. At a more refined level, we have derived the equations for the two-site velocity correlations and the total energy fluctuations. First, we seek a perturbative solution thereof, in powers of the inverse of system size. On the one hand, when scaled with the granular temperature, the velocity correlations tend to a stationary value in the long time limit. On the other hand, the scaled standard deviation of the total energy diverges, that is, the system shows multiscaling. Second, we find an exact solution for the velocity correlations in terms of the spectrum of eigenvalues of a certain matrix. The results of numerical simulations of the microscopic model confirm our theoretical results, including the above described multiscaling phenomenon.

  13. An industrial light-field camera applied for 3D velocity measurements in a slot jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredkin, A. V.; Shestakov, M. V.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Modern light-field cameras have found their application in different areas like photography, surveillance and quality control in industry. A number of studies have been reported relatively low spatial resolution of 3D profiles of registered objects along the optical axis of the camera. This article describes a method for 3D velocity measurements in fluid flows using an industrial light-field camera and an alternative reconstruction algorithm based on a statistical approach. This method is more accurate than triangulation when applied for tracking small registered objects like tracer particles in images. The technique was used to measure 3D velocity fields in a turbulent slot jet.

  14. Creating analytically divergence-free velocity fields from grid-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravu, Bharath; Rudman, Murray; Metcalfe, Guy; Lester, Daniel R.; Khakhar, Devang V.

    2016-10-01

    We present a method, based on B-splines, to calculate a C2 continuous analytic vector potential from discrete 3D velocity data on a regular grid. A continuous analytically divergence-free velocity field can then be obtained from the curl of the potential. This field can be used to robustly and accurately integrate particle trajectories in incompressible flow fields. Based on the method of Finn and Chacon (2005) [10] this new method ensures that the analytic velocity field matches the grid values almost everywhere, with errors that are two to four orders of magnitude lower than those of existing methods. We demonstrate its application to three different problems (each in a different coordinate system) and provide details of the specifics required in each case. We show how the additional accuracy of the method results in qualitatively and quantitatively superior trajectories that results in more accurate identification of Lagrangian coherent structures.

  15. Axis and velocity determination for quasi two-dimensional plasma/field structures from Faraday's law: A second look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnerup, Bengt U. Ö.; Denton, Richard E.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Swisdak, M.

    2013-05-01

    We re-examine the basic premises of a single-spacecraft data analysis method, developed by Sonnerup and Hasegawa (2005), for determining the axis orientation and proper frame velocity of quasi two-dimensional, quasi-steady structures of magnetic field and plasma. The method, which is based on Faraday's law, makes use of magnetic and electric field data measured by a single spacecraft traversing the structure, although in many circumstances the convection electric field, - v × B, can serve as a proxy for E. It has been used with success for flux ropes observed at the magnetopause but has usually failed to provide acceptable results when applied to real space data from reconnection events as well as to virtual data from numerical MHD simulations of such events. In the present paper, the reasons for these shortcomings are identified, analyzed, and discussed in detail. Certain basic properties of the method are presented in the form of five theorems, the last of which makes use of singular value decomposition to treat the special case where the magnetic variance matrix is non-invertible. These theorems are illustrated using data from analytical models of flux ropes and also from MHD simulations as well as a 2-D kinetic simulation of reconnection. The results make clear that the method requires the presence of a significant, non-removable electric field distribution in the plane transverse to the invariant direction and that it is sensitive to deviations from strict two-dimensionality and strict time stationarity.

  16. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Syahputra, Ahmad; Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  17. Near field acoustic holography based on the equivalent source method and pressure-velocity transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Bin; Jacobsen, Finn; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Chen, Xin-Zhao

    2009-09-01

    The advantage of using the normal component of the particle velocity rather than the sound pressure in the hologram plane as the input of conventional spatial Fourier transform based near field acoustic holography (NAH) and also as the input of the statistically optimized variant of NAH has recently been demonstrated. This paper examines whether there might be a similar advantage in using the particle velocity as the input of NAH based on the equivalent source method (ESM). Error sensitivity considerations indicate that ESM-based NAH is less sensitive to measurement errors when it is based on particle velocity input data than when it is based on measurements of sound pressure data, and this is confirmed by a simulation study and by experimental results. A method that combines pressure- and particle velocity-based reconstructions in order to distinguish between contributions to the sound field generated by sources on the two sides of the hologram plane is also examined.

  18. Emission line eclipse mapping of velocity fields in dwarf nova accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, M.; Mineshige, S.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a new method, emission-line eclipse mapping, to map the velocity fields in an accretion disc. We apply the usual eclipse mapping technique to the light curves at each of 12-24 wavelengths across the line center to map the region with same line-of-sight velocity, from which we are able to plot the rotational velocity as a function of radius on the assumption of axisymmetric disc. We calculate time changes of the emission line profiles, assuming Keplerian rotation fields (vvarphi propto r-1/2) and the emissivity distribution of j propto r-3/2, and reconstruct emissivity profiles. The results show typically a `two-eye' pattern for high line-of-sight velocities and we can recover the relation, vvarphi propto d-1/2, where d is the separation of two lq eyes.'

  19. Spatiotemporal properties of Sub-Rayleigh and supershear rupture velocity fields: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Michael; Bhat, Harsha S.; Rosakis, Ares J.

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental spatiotemporal field properties and particle velocity waveform signatures of sub-Rayleigh and supershear ruptures were experimentally investigated through a series of laboratory earthquake experiments. We appeal to dynamic rupture theory to extract and highlight previously unnoticed aspects and results, which are of direct relevance to our new experiments. Kinematic relationships derived from both singular and non-singular solutions are applied to analyze and interpret various features observed in these experiments. A strong correspondence is demonstrated between particle velocity records obtained in lab experiments and synthetic particle velocity waveform profiles derived from theory. Predicted temporal profiles, sense of particle motion, and amplitude decay properties of sub-Rayleigh and supershear particle velocity waveforms are experimentally verified. In a particular set of supershear rupture experiments, the fault-normal (FN) and fault-parallel (FP) velocity waveforms were simultaneously recorded at fixed, off-fault field points as a shear Mach front swept these locations. Particle velocity records collected over a broad range of stable supershear rupture speeds validate the predicted scaling relationship δu˙1s / δu˙2s =√{Vr2 / Cs2-1 } =βs, between the FP (δu1ṡ) and the FN (δu2ṡ) velocity jumps propagated by a shear Mach front. Additional experimental findings include detailed rupture speed measurements of sub-Rayleigh and supershear ruptures and the observation of a supershear daughter crack with vanishing shear Mach front.

  20. How to recover both velocity components in discs of barred galaxies with integral-field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Witold; Emsellem, Eric; Krajnović, Davor

    2012-12-01

    We present a new method that derives both velocity components in the equatorial plane of a barred stellar disc from the observed line-of-sight velocity, assuming the geometry of a thin disc. The method can be applied to large departures from circular motion, and does not require multipole decomposition. It is based on assumptions that the bar is close to steady state (i.e. does not evolve fast) and that both morphology and kinematics are symmetrical with respect to the major axis of the bar. We derive the equations used in the method and analyse the effect of observational errors on the inferred velocity fields. We show that this method produces meaningful results via a simple schematic model. We also apply the method on integral-field data of NGC 936, for which we recover both velocity components in the disc. Knowing both velocity components in the disc, i.e. the non-observable transverse velocity in addition to the line-of-sight velocity, puts additional constraints on dynamical models and allows for new ways of determining parameters that are crucial in characterizing galaxies.

  1. Using a constraint on the parallel velocity when determining electric fields with EISCAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudal, G.; Blanc, M.

    1988-01-01

    A method is proposed to determine the perpendicular components of the ion velocity vector (and hence the perpendicular electric field) from EISCAT tristatic measurements, in which one introduces an additional constraint on the parallel velocity, in order to take account of our knowledge that the parallel velocity of ions is small. This procedure removes some artificial features introduced when the tristatic geometry becomes too unfavorable. It is particularly well suited for the southernmost or northernmost positions of the tristatic measurements performed by meridian scan experiments (CP3 mode).

  2. The velocity field near the orifice of a Helmholtz resonator in grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charwat, A. F.; Walker, B. E.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement of the time-dependent velocities induced inside and outside the opening of acoustically excited, two-dimensional Helmholtz resonator imbedded in a grazing flow are presented. The remarkably clear structure of the perturbation field which evokes a pulsating source and a coherently pulsating vortex-image pair is described. The simple phenomenological "lid-model" which correlates the variation in the components of the acoustic impedance with the velocity of the grazing flow is discussed and extended.

  3. Automatic NMO Correction and Full Common Depth Point NMO Velocity Field Estimation in Anisotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedek, Mohamed; Gross, Lutz; Tyson, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    We present a new computational method of automatic normal moveout (NMO) correction that not only accurately flattens and corrects the far offset data, but simultaneously provides NMO velocity (v_nmo ) for each individual seismic trace. The method is based on a predefined number of NMO velocity sweeps using linear vertical interpolation of different NMO velocities at each seismic trace. At each sweep, we measure the semblance between the zero offset trace (pilot trace) and the next seismic trace using a trace-by-trace rather than sample-by-sample based semblance measure; then after all the sweeps are done, the one with the maximum semblance value is chosen, which is assumed to be the most suitable NMO velocity trace that accurately flattens seismic reflection events. Other traces follow the same process, and a final velocity field is then extracted. Isotropic, anisotropic and lateral heterogenous synthetic geological models were built to test the method. A range of synthetic background noise, ranging from 10 to 30 %, was applied to the models. In addition, the method was tested on Hess's VTI (vertical transverse isotropy) model. Furthermore, we tested our method on a real pre-stack seismic CDP gathered from a gas field in Alaska. The results from the presented examples show an excellent NMO correction and extracted a reasonably accurate NMO velocity field.

  4. Hopping energy and percolation-type transport in p-GaAs low densities near the 2D metal-insulator transition at zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlimi, S.; El kaaouachi, A.; Narjis, A.; Limouny, L.; Sybous, A.; Errai, M.

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the temperature dependence of resistivity of a high mobility two-dimensional holes system grown on the (311) GaAs surface in the absence of the magnetic field near the metal-insulator transition. The Coulomb hopping was found in a wide range of temperature and carrier density. Quantitative analysis of our results suggests that a crossover from Efros-Shklovskii to Mott variable range hopping due to screening phenomenon when the hopping distance increases. We found that using the 2D single particle hopping amplitude CES gives unreasonably high localization lengths. Therefore, we believe that electrical transport is dominated by correlated hopping and the hopping amplitude must be renormalized by a reduction factor A≈1.6. The localization length appears to diverge in a power-law fashion near the transition point. The analysis of the hopping gives results consistent with the prediction of the critical point from a recent study of percolation and other experiences.

  5. Dimensional 3D-2D cross-over under magnetic field in Bi2Sr2-xLaxCuOy induced by La/Sr substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrills, C. D.; Li, Z. Z.; Raffy, H.

    2015-06-01

    The single CuO2 layer Bi2Sr2CuO6 (Bi-2201) is characterized by a low anisotropy under magnetic field. We show that this anisotropy increases exponentially from 4 to 400 with La/Sr substitution in Bi2Sr2-xLaxCu06 (Bi(La)-2201). We present a phase diagram showing the change in transport properties from 3D to 2D when the La concentration is increased, deduced from angular transport measurements in the mixed state of c-axis oriented epitaxial Bi(La)-2201 thin films with columnar pinning centers parallel to the c-axis. We attribute this anisotropy increase to the decrease of the distortion of CuO2 planes by La/Sr substitution.

  6. A Unified Geodetic Vertical Velocity Field (UGVVF), Version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzle, G.; Wdowinski, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tectonic motion, volcanic inflation or deflation, as well as oil, gas and water pumping can induce vertical motion. In southern California these signals are inter-mingled. In tectonics, properly identifying regions that are contaminated by other signals can be important when estimating fault slip rates. Until recently vertical deformation rates determined by high precision Global Positioning Systems (GPS) had large uncertainties compared to horizontal components and were rarely used to constrain tectonic models of fault motion. However, many continuously occupied GPS stations have been operating for ten or more years, often delivering uncertainties of ~1 mm/yr or less, providing better constraints for tectonic modeling. Various processing centers produced GPS time series and estimated vertical velocity fields, each with their own set of processing techniques and assumptions. We compare vertical velocity solutions estimated by seven data processing groups as well as two combined solutions (Figure 1). These groups include: Central Washington University (CWU) and New Mexico Institute of Technology (NMT), and their combined solution provided by the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) through the UNAVCO website. Also compared are the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC) and their combined solution provided as part of the NASA MEaSUREs project. Smaller velocity fields included are from Amos et al., 2014, processed at the Nevada Geodetic Laboratory, Shen et al., 2011, processed by UCLA and called the Crustal Motion Map 4.0 (CMM4) dataset, and a new velocity field provided by the University of Miami (UM). Our analysis includes estimating and correcting for systematic vertical velocity and uncertainty differences between groups. Our final product is a unified velocity field that contains the median values of the adjusted velocity fields and their uncertainties. This product will be periodically updated when new velocity fields

  7. FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled numerical simulation of wavefields near excavation boundaries in underground mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Cai, M.

    2016-11-01

    A nonlinear velocity model that considers the influence of confinement and rock mass failure on wave velocity is developed. A numerical method, which couples FLAC and SPECFEM2D, is developed for ground motion modeling near excavation boundaries in underground mines. The motivation of developing the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled approach is to take merits of each code, such as the stress analysis capability in FLAC and the powerful wave propagation analysis capability in SPECFEM2D. Because stress redistribution and failure of the rock mass around an excavation are considered, realistic non-uniform velocity fields for the SPECFEM2D model can be obtained, and this is a notable feature of this study. Very large differences in wavefields and ground motion are observed between the results from the non-uniform and the uniform velocity models. If the non-uniform velocity model is used, the ground motion around a stope can be amplified up to five times larger than that given by the design scaling law. If a uniform velocity model is used, the amplification factor is only about three. Using the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled modeling approach, accurate velocity models can be constructed and this in turn will assist in predicting ground motions accurately around underground excavations.

  8. Velocity field from twenty-two years of combined GPS daily coordinate time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilo, Meilano, Irwan; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Sapiie, Benyamin; Efendi, Joni; Wijanarto, Antonius B.

    2016-05-01

    We uses survey mode (sGPS) and continuous GPS (cGPS) from Geospatial Information Agency, National Land Agency and Sumatran GPS Array (SUGAR) from 1993 - 2014 to derive new GPS velocities field in Indonesia region. In this study we quantify the velocities field from our GPS sites during this period. We reprocess and analyses our GPS data using the GAMIT/GLOBK 10.5 software suite. Our analysis reveals that the velocities field in Indonesia region has a distinctly pattern with the different direction and magnitude which represents the plates or blocks tectonic motion in Indonesia region. This information is useful for determines Indonesian deformation model to support the new Indonesian datum which called Sistem Referensi Geospasial Indonesia 2013 (Indonesian Geospatial Reference System 2013).

  9. Trace projection transformation: A new method for measurement of debris flow surface velocity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yan; Cui, Peng; Guo, Xiaojun; Ge, Yonggang

    2016-09-01

    Spatiotemporal variation of velocity is important for debris flow dynamics. This paper presents a new method, the trace projection transformation, for accurate, non-contact measurement of a debris-flow surface velocity field based on a combination of dense optical flow and perspective projection transformation. The algorithm for interpreting and processing is implemented in C ++ and realized in Visual Studio 2012. The method allows quantitative analysis of flow motion through videos from various angles (camera positioned at the opposite direction of fluid motion). It yields the spatiotemporal distribution of surface velocity field at pixel level and thus provides a quantitative description of the surface processes. The trace projection transformation is superior to conventional measurement methods in that it obtains the full surface velocity field by computing the optical flow of all pixels. The result achieves a 90% accuracy of when comparing with the observed values. As a case study, the method is applied to the quantitative analysis of surface velocity field of a specific debris flow.

  10. Mass-conservative reconstruction of Galerkin velocity fields for transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudeler, C.; Putti, M.; Paniconi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate calculation of mass-conservative velocity fields from numerical solutions of Richards' equation is central to reliable surface-subsurface flow and transport modeling, for example in long-term tracer simulations to determine catchment residence time distributions. In this study we assess the performance of a local Larson-Niklasson (LN) post-processing procedure for reconstructing mass-conservative velocities from a linear (P1) Galerkin finite element solution of Richards' equation. This approach, originally proposed for a-posteriori error estimation, modifies the standard finite element velocities by imposing local conservation on element patches. The resulting reconstructed flow field is characterized by continuous fluxes on element edges that can be efficiently used to drive a second order finite volume advective transport model. Through a series of tests of increasing complexity that compare results from the LN scheme to those using velocity fields derived directly from the P1 Galerkin solution, we show that a locally mass-conservative velocity field is necessary to obtain accurate transport results. We also show that the accuracy of the LN reconstruction procedure is comparable to that of the inherently conservative mixed finite element approach, taken as a reference solution, but that the LN scheme has much lower computational costs. The numerical tests examine steady and unsteady, saturated and variably saturated, and homogeneous and heterogeneous cases along with initial and boundary conditions that include dry soil infiltration, alternating solute and water injection, and seepage face outflow. Typical problems that arise with velocities derived from P1 Galerkin solutions include outgoing solute flux from no-flow boundaries, solute entrapment in zones of low hydraulic conductivity, and occurrences of anomalous sources and sinks. In addition to inducing significant mass balance errors, such manifestations often lead to oscillations in concentration

  11. A Simple Method to Predict Threshold Shear Velocity in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Okin, G. S.; Herrick, J. E.; Miller, M. E.; Munson, S. M.; Belnap, J.

    2009-12-01

    A very important parameter in predicting wind erosion is the threshold shear velocity, which is the minimal shear velocity required to initiate deflation of soil particles. Modeling and wind tunnel are primary methods in predicting threshold shear velocity. However, most models have limited applications in the presence of roughness elements, and running a wind tunnel in the field is labor-intensive and time-consuming. Soil crust (both physical and biological) is known to be a crucial factor affecting soil stability and threshold shear velocity. In this report, a simple and portable field method was tested in multiple locations of Utah for the estimation of threshold shear velocity. This method includes measuring size of holes (length and width) induced by shooting a “bullet ball” or “BB” gun, applying a pocket penetrometer, and a torvane on soil surface in the field. In the first stage of the experiment, a conventional wind tunnel was run in combination with BB gun, penetrometer, and torvane in field conditions for a range of soil texture. Results from both the BB gun and penetrometer applied at 45 degree to the ground were significantly correlated with the threshold shear velocity obtained using the wind tunnel (R2=0.70, P<0.001). In the second stage, BB gun and penetrometer method was applied to a serial of sites which have BSNE wind erosion monitors and known horizontal sediment fluxes. Our results showed that a combination of BB gun and penetrometer is able to provide decent prediction of threshold shear velocity in the presence of vegetation under different soil physical and biological conditions.

  12. Electric and magnetic field measurements inside a high-velocity neutral beam undergoing ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Swenson, C. M.; Brenning, N.; Baker, K.; Pfaff, R.

    1991-01-01

    Vector electric field measurements were made inside two ionizing, high-velocity streams of barium atoms in the earth's ionosphere, and a variety of electrical phenomena across the frequency spectrum are reported. A very large quasi-dc electric field was detected antiparallel to the beam velocity at a roughly 45 deg angle with the magnetic field B0. A very large component of E is found parallel to B0. The fluctuating electric fields are also quite large, of the same order of magnitude as the quasi-dc pulse. The wave energy maximizes at frequencies below the barium lower hybrid frequency and includes strong signatures of the oxygen cyclotron frequency. Measurements made on a subpayload separated across B0 by several hundred meters and along B0 by several km do not show the large pulse. Very large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations were observed in both bursts.

  13. Open-path TDL-Spectrometry for a Tomographic Reconstruction of 2D H2O-Concentration Fields in the Soil-Air-Boundary-Layer of Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2013-04-01

    The melting of permafrost soils in arctic regions is one of the effects of climate change. It is recognized that climatically relevant gases are emitted during the thawing process, and that they may lead to a positive atmospheric feedback [1]. For a better understanding of these developments, a quantification of the gases emitted from the soil would be required. Extractive sensors with local point-wise gas sampling are currently used for this task, but are hampered due to the complex spatial structure of the soil surface, which complicates the situation due to the essential need for finding a representative gas sampling point. For this situation it would be much preferred if a sensor for detecting 2D-concentration fields of e.g. water vapor, (and in the mid-term also for methane or carbon dioxide) directly in the soil-atmosphere-boundary layer of permafrost soils would be available. However, it also has to be kept in mind that field measurements over long time periods in such a harsh environment require very sturdy instrumentation preferably without the need for sensor calibration. Therefore we are currently developing a new, robust TDLAS (tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy)-spectrometer based on cheap reflective foils [2]. The spectrometer is easily transportable, requires hardly any alignment and consists of industrially available, very stable components (e.g. diode lasers and glass fibers). Our measurement technique, open path TDLAS, allows for calibration-free measurements of absolute H2O concentrations. The static instrument for sampling open-path H2O concentrations consists of a joint sending and receiving optics at one side of the measurement path and a reflective element at the other side. The latter is very easy to align, since it is a foil usually applied for traffic purposes that retro-reflects the light to its origin even for large angles of misalignment (up to 60°). With this instrument, we achieved normalized detection limits of up to 0

  14. Measurements of Dendritic Growth Velocities in Undercooled Melts of Pure Nickel Under Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Jianrong; Zhang, Zongning; Zhang, Yingjie

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic growth velocities in undercooled melts of pure Ni have been intensively studied over the past fifty years. However, the literature data are at marked variance with the prediction of the widely accepted model for rapid dendritic growth both at small and at large undercoolings. In the present work, bulk melts of pure Ni samples of high purity were undercooled by glass fluxing treatment under a static magnetic field. The recalescence processes of the samples at different undercoolings were recorded using a high-speed camera, and were modeled using a software to determine the dendritic growth velocities. The present data confirmed the effect of melt flow on dendritic growth velocities at undercoolings below 100 K. A comparison of the present data with previous measurements on a lower purity material suggested an effect of impurities on dendritic growth velocities at undercoolings larger than 200 K as well.

  15. Full-field velocity imaging of red blood cells in capillaries with spatiotemporal demodulation autocorrelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingyi; Zeng, Yaguang; Dong, Nannan; Liao, Riwei; Yang, Guojian

    2016-03-01

    We propose a full-field optical method for the label-free and quantitative mapping of the velocities of red blood cells (RBCs) in capillaries. It integrates spatiotemporal demodulation and an autocorrelation algorithm, and measures RBC velocity according to the ratio of RBC length to lag time. Conventionally, RBC length is assumed to be a constant and lag time is taken as a variable, while our method treats both of them as variables. We use temporal demodulation and the Butterworth spatial filter to separate RBC signal from background signal, based on which we obtain the RBC length by image segmentation and lag time by autocorrelation analysis. The RBC velocity calculated now is more accurate. The validity of our method is verified by an in vivo experiment on a mouse ear. Owing to its higher image signal-to-noise ratio, our method can be used for mapping RBC velocity in the turbid tissue case.

  16. GIRAFFE multiple integral field units at VLT: A unique tool to recover velocity fields of distant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, H.; Puech, M.; Hammer, F.; Garrido, O.; Hernandez, O.

    2004-06-01

    The GIRAFFE spectrograph is unique in providing the integral field spectroscopy of fifteen distant galaxies at the same time. It has been successfully implemented at the second VLT unit within the FLAMES facility. We present GIRAFFE observations acquired during the Guaranteed Time Observation of the Paris Observatory, using total exposure times ranging from 6 to 12 h. The reduced 3D cube of each galaxy has been deconvolved using our new package DisGal3D. This software has been written using the only assumption that UV light traces the emission line regions. The comparison between GIRAFFE spectra and HST imagery allows us to recover details on velocity fields as small as 0.3-0.4 arcsec. It has been successfully tested using Fabry Perot observations of nearby galaxies purposely redshifted to large distances. We present here preliminary results for three distant galaxies at 0.45< z < 0.65, whose velocity fields have been derived with exquisite spectral (R=10 000) and spatial resolutions. Observed velocity fields range from disturbed fields expected in major merger events to those of regular spiral with minor perturbations. For the latter, one could accurately derive the dynamical major axis and the maximal rotational velocity. We conclude that dynamical properties of a large number of distant galaxies can be routinely derived at VLT. This opens a new avenue towards the understanding of the galaxy formation and evolution during the last 8 Gyr. Based on ESO GTO programs No 71.A-0322(A) and 72.A-0169(A).

  17. Velocity Fields in H II Regions Using High Resolution Imaging Fabry-Perot Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seema, P.

    1996-05-01

    The thesis comprises of two parts: I. Instrumentation II. Observations, results and discussion. An imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer (IFPS) is designed and constructed for the studies on kinematics of extended astronomical objects (Seema et al., 1992). IFPS comprises of a field aperture, collimating lens and a two dimensional imaging sensor called Imaging Photon Detector (IPD). It is the first time that IPD which uses a resistive anode for position determination is being used in the spectroscopic studies of astronomical objects. Observations were made on Orion and Trifid nebula covering a wide field of view using a 35cm Celestron-14 telescope (f/11 cassegrain) at Gurushikhar, Mt.Abu, India. Orion Nebula: Observations were made in [OIII] 5007A, line with a spectral resolution of 6 km/sec and spatial resolution of 4" covering a field of view of 10.5', to study (i) general velocity flow (ii) high velocity flow and (iii)random motions. Line profiles generated for about 2000 positions showed an asymmetric shape with (a)a narrow component 20 +- 3 km/sec and (b) a broad component 50 +- 3 km/sec. The two components could be interpreted in terms of the interaction of the ionized gas (from the trapezium stars) with the condensations present in the nebula, resulting in the secondary flows. The iso-velocity contour map generated for both the components showed velocity flow in agreement with the champagne flow model (Tenorio-Tagle 1982). A model emission line profile constructed assuming a champagne flow in [OIII] 5007A, line for a position 2' away from theta-1 C Ori showed a reasonably good agreement with the narrow component of the observed profile. Certain high velocity flow (~50 km/s) regions are observed to be superimposed on the main flow of the narrow component. These flows are either radiation pressure driven stellar winds or jets generated during the formation phase of Young stellar objects. The radial velocity was found to be low with no high velocity flow regions in

  18. Evaluating a campaign GNSS velocity field derived from an online precise point positioning service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, L.; Silcock, D.; Choy, S.; Cas, R.; Ailleres, L.; Fournier, N.

    2016-10-01

    Traditional processing of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data using dedicated scientific software has provided the highest levels of positional accuracy, and has been used extensively in geophysical deformation studies. To achieve these accuracies a significant level of understanding and training is required, limiting their availability to the general scientific community. Various online GNSS processing services, now freely available, address some of these difficulties and allow users to easily process their own GNSS data and potentially obtain high quality results. Previous research into these services has focused on Continually Operating Reference Station (CORS) GNSS data. Less research exists on the results achievable with these services using large campaign GNSS datasets, which are inherently noisier than CORS data. Even less research exists on the quality of velocity fields derived from campaign GNSS data processed through online PPP services. Particularly, whether they are suitable for geodynamic and deformation studies where precise and reliable velocities are needed. In this research, we process a very large campaign GPS dataset (spanning ten years) with the online Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Automated Precise Positioning Service (APPS) service. This dataset is taken from a GNSS network specifically designed and surveyed to measure deformation through the central North Island of New Zealand (NZ). This includes regional CORS stations. We then use these coordinates to derive a horizontal and vertical velocity field. This is the first time that a large campaign GPS dataset has been processed solely using an online service and the solutions used to determine a horizontal and vertical velocity field. We compared this velocity field to that of another well utilised GNSS scientific software package. The results show a good agreement between the CORS positions and campaign station velocities obtained from the two approaches. We discuss the

  19. Exploiting SENTINEL-1 Amplitude Data for Glacier Surface Velocity Field Measurements: Feasibility Demonstration on Baltoro Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascetti, A.; Nocchi, F.; Camplani, A.; Di Rico, C.; Crespi, M.

    2016-06-01

    The leading idea of this work is to continuously retrieve glaciers surface velocity through SAR imagery, in particular using the amplitude data from the new ESA satellite sensor Sentinel-1 imagery. These imagery key aspects are the free access policy, the very short revisit time (down to 6 days with the launch of the Sentinel-1B satellite) and the high amplitude resolution (up to 5 m). In order to verify the reliability of the proposed approach, a first experiment has been performed using Sentinel-1 imagery acquired over the Karakoram mountain range (North Pakistan) and Baltoro and other three glaciers have been investigated. During this study, a stack of 11 images acquired in the period from October 2014 to September 2015 has been used in order to investigate the potentialities of the Sentinel-1 SAR sensor to retrieve the glacier surface velocity every month. The aim of this test was to measure the glacier surface velocity between each subsequent pair, in order to produce a time series of the surface velocity fields along the investigated period. The necessary coregistration procedure between the images has been performed and subsequently the glaciers areas have been sampled using a regular grid with a 250 × 250 meters posting. Finally the surface velocity field has been estimated, for each image pair, using a template matching procedure, and an outlier filtering procedure based on the signal to noise ratio values has been applied, in order to exclude from the analysis unreliable points. The achieved velocity values range from 10 to 25 meters/month and they are coherent to those obtained in previous studies carried out on the same glaciers and the results highlight that it is possible to have a continuous update of the glacier surface velocity field through free Sentinel-1 imagery, that could be very useful to investigate the seasonal effects on the glaciers fluid-dynamics.

  20. Magnetic and velocity fluctuation measurements in the REPUTE-1 reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ejiri, A.; Ohdachi, S.; Oikawa, T.; Shinohara, S.; Yamagishi, K.; Toyama, H.; Miyamoto, K. )

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic and velocity fluctuations are studied in the REPUTE-1 [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion [bold 28], 805 (1986)] reversed-field pinch (RFP). The first measurement of velocity fluctuation in an RFP plasma has been done using a Doppler shift of the O V(O[sup 4+], 278.1 nm) line. The fluctuation level increases as the radius of the viewing chord increases. Magnetic fluctuation measurements by an insertable probe reveal that the radial cross correlation of toroidal field fluctuation changes its sign at the radius slightly inside the reversal surface. The level of magnetohydrodynamic dynamo term is estimated from magnetic fluctuations at the surface correlation changes and oxygen velocity fluctuations measured with the chord distance of 115 mm. The dynamo term and that due to resistivity are the same level. This fact is consistent with Ohm's law on which magnetohydrodynamic dynamo models are based.

  1. Effects of magnetic field and Hall current to the blood velocity and LDL transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, I.; Naser, N.; Talib, A. H.; Mahali, S.

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic field and Hall current effects have been considered on blood velocity and concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). It is important to observe those effects to the flowing blood in a stenosed artery. The analysis from the obtained results may be useful to some clinical procedures, such as MRI, where the radiologists may have more information in the investigations before cardiac operations could be done. In this study, the uniform magnetic field and Hall current are applied to the Newtonian blood flow through an artery having a cosine-shaped stenosis. The governing equations are coupled with mass transfer and solved employing a finite difference Marker and Cell (MAC) method with an appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The graphical results of velocity profiles and LDL concentration are presented in this paper and the results show that the velocity increases and concentration decreases as Hall parameter increased.

  2. VELOCITY POWER SPECTRA FROM CROSS-FIELD TURBULENCE IN THE PROTON KINETIC REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, Bernard J.; Markovskii, Sergei A. E-mail: sergei.markovskii@unh.edu

    2012-03-01

    Numerical hybrid simulations with particle protons and fluid electrons are conducted for turbulent fluctuations with spatial variations in a plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field. In the turbulent phase, the proton bulk velocity spectrum has a dissipation range starting at a smaller wavenumber than the magnetic spectrum dissipation range. The steepened portion of the proton bulk velocity spectrum is constrained to a smaller wavenumber with an increasing ratio of background proton plasma to magnetic pressure {beta}{sub p}. The form of the magnetic spectrum does not depend on {beta}{sub p}. The collisionless proton and fluctuation interaction which heats protons mainly across the magnetic field is deemed to be the result of a viscous-like interaction based, in part, on the dependence of the velocity spectrum on {beta}{sub p}.

  3. Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Jaeger, F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; D'Azevedo, E.; Carter, M.D.; Ershov, N.M.; Smirnov, A.P.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.C.; Smithe, D.N.

    2005-09-26

    Jaeger et al. have calculated bounce-averaged QL diffusion coefficients from AORSA full-wave fields, based on non-Maxwellian distributions from CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. A zero banana-width approximation is employed. Complementing this calculation, a fully numerical calculation of ion velocity diffusion coefficients using the full-wave fields in numerical tokamak equilibria has been implemented to determine the finite orbit width effects. The un-approximated Lorentz equation of motion is integrated to obtain the change in velocity after one complete poloidal transit of the tokamak. Averaging velocity changes over initial starting gyro-phase and toroidal angle gives bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. The coefficients from the full-wave and Lorentz orbit methods are compared for an ITER DT second harmonic tritium ICRF heating case: the diffusion coefficients are similar in magnitude but reveal substantial finite orbit effects.

  4. A 2D-Computer Model of Atrial Tissue Based on Histographs Describes the Electro-Anatomical Impact of Microstructure on Endocardiac Potentials and Electric Near-Fields

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fernando O.; Wiener, Thomas; Prassl, Anton J.; Ahammer, Helmut; Plank, Gernot; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Hofer, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    In experiments with cardiac tissue, local conduction is described by waveform analysis of the derivative of the extracellular potential Φ.e and by the loop morphology of the near-field strength E (the components of the electric field parallel and very close to the tissue surface). The question arises whether the features of these signals can be used to quantify the degree of fibrosis in the heart. A computer model allows us to study the behavior of electric signals at the endocardium with respect to known configurations of microstructure which can not be detected during the electrophysiological experiments. This work presents a 2D-computer model with sub-cellular resolution of atrial micro-conduction in the rabbit heart. It is based on the monodomain equations and digitized histographs from tissue slices obtained post-experimentum. It could be shown that excitation spread in densely coupled regions produces uniform and anisotropic conduction. In contrast, zones with parallel fibers separated by uncoupling interstitial space or connective tissue may show uniform or complex signals depending on pacing site. These results suggest that the analysis of Φ.e and E combined with multi-site pacing could be used to characterize the type and the size of fibrosis. PMID:21096441

  5. Conditions for similitude between the fluid velocity and electric field in electroosmotic flow

    SciTech Connect

    E. B. Cummings; S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson; P. H. Paul

    1999-04-01

    Electroosmotic flow is fluid motion driven by an electric field acting on the net fluid charge produced by charge separation at a fluid-solid interface. Under many conditions of practical interest, the resulting fluid velocity is proportional to the local electric field, and the constant of proportionality is everywhere the same. Here the authors show that the main conditions necessary for this similitude are a steady electric field, uniform fluid and electric properties, an electric Debye layer that is thin compared to any physical dimension, and fluid velocities on all inlet and outlet boundaries that satisfy the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski relation normally applicable to fluid-solid boundaries. Under these conditions, the velocity field can be determined directly from the Laplace equation governing the electric potential, without solving either the continuity or momentum equations. Three important consequences of these conditions are that the fluid motion is everywhere irrotational, that fluid velocities in two-dimensional channels bounded by parallel planes are independent of the channel depth, and that such flows exhibit no dependence on the Reynolds number.

  6. A simple method to estimate threshold friction velocity of wind erosion in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nearly all wind erosion models require the specification of threshold friction velocity (TFV). Yet determining TFV of wind erosion in field conditions is difficult as it depends on both soil characteristics and distribution of vegetation or other roughness elements. While several reliable methods ha...

  7. Electric-field dependence of electron drift velocity in 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P. A.; Potapov, A. S.; Samsonova, T. P.; Grekhov, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    Room temperature isothermal forward current-voltage characteristics of mesa-epitaxial 4H-SiC Schottky diodes were measured at high electric fields (beyond 105 V/cm) in the 34-μm thick n-base doped at 1 × 1015 cm-3. The effect of diode self-heating on current was minimized when using single 4-ns pulses. The analytical formula was derived for the dependence of electron drift velocity on electric field along c-axis.

  8. Clear and measurable signature of modified gravity in the galaxy velocity field.

    PubMed

    Hellwing, Wojciech A; Barreira, Alexandre; Frenk, Carlos S; Li, Baojiu; Cole, Shaun

    2014-06-01

    The velocity field of dark matter and galaxies reflects the continued action of gravity throughout cosmic history. We show that the low-order moments of the pairwise velocity distribution v_{12} are a powerful diagnostic of the laws of gravity on cosmological scales. In particular, the projected line-of-sight galaxy pairwise velocity dispersion σ_{12}(r) is very sensitive to the presence of modified gravity. Using a set of high-resolution N-body simulations, we compute the pairwise velocity distribution and its projected line-of-sight dispersion for a class of modified gravity theories: the chameleon f(R) gravity and Galileon gravity (cubic and quartic). The velocities of dark matter halos with a wide range of masses would exhibit deviations from general relativity at the (5-10)σ level. We examine strategies for detecting these deviations in galaxy redshift and peculiar velocity surveys. If detected, this signature would be a "smoking gun" for modified gravity. PMID:24949751

  9. The implications of groundwater velocity variations on microbial transport and wellhead protection - review of field evidence.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard; Cronin, Aidan; Pedley, Steve; Barker, John; Atkinson, Tim

    2004-07-01

    Current strategies to protect groundwater sources from microbial contamination (e.g., wellhead protection areas) rely upon natural attenuation of microorganisms between wells or springs and potential sources of contamination and are determined using average (macroscopic) groundwater flow velocities defined by Darcy's Law. However, field studies of sewage contamination and microbial transport using deliberately applied tracers provide evidence of groundwater flow paths that permit the transport of microorganisms by rapid, statistically extreme velocities. These paths can be detected because of (i) the high concentrations of bacteria and viruses that enter near-surface environments in sewage or are deliberately applied as tracers (e.g., bacteriophage); and (ii) low detection limits of these microorganisms in water. Such paths must comprise linked microscopic pathways (sub-paths) that are biased toward high groundwater velocities. In media where microorganisms may be excluded from the matrix (pores and fissures), the disparity between the average linear velocity of groundwater flow and flow velocities transporting released or applied microorganisms is intensified. It is critical to recognise the limited protection afforded by source protection measures that disregard rapid, statistically extreme groundwater velocities transporting pathogenic microorganisms, particularly in areas dependent upon untreated groundwater supplies.

  10. Effect of Range and Angular Velocity of Passive Movement on Somatosensory Evoked Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Hideaki; Yamashiro, Koya; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kotan, Shinichi; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2016-09-01

    To clarify characteristics of each human somatosensory evoked field (SEF) component following passive movement (PM), PM1, PM2, and PM3, using high spatiotemporal resolution 306-channel magnetoencephalography and varying PM range and angular velocity. We recorded SEFs following PM under three conditions [normal range-normal velocity (NN), small range-normal velocity (SN), and small range-slow velocity (SS)] with changing movement range and angular velocity in 12 participants and calculated the amplitude, equivalent current dipole (ECD) location, and the ECD strength for each component. All components were observed in six participants, whereas only PM1 and PM3 in the other six. Clear response deflections at the ipsilateral hemisphere to PM side were observed in seven participants. PM1 amplitude was larger under NN and SN conditions, and mean ECD location for PM1 was at primary motor area. PM3 amplitude was larger under SN condition and mean ECD location for PM3 under SS condition was at primary somatosensory area. PM1 amplitude was dependent on the angular velocity of PM, suggesting that PM1 reflects afferent input from muscle spindle, whereas PM3 amplitude was dependent on the duration. The ECD for PM3 was located in the primary somatosensory cortex, suggesting that PM3 reflects cutaneous input. We confirmed the hypothesis for locally distinct generators and characteristics of each SEF component.

  11. Field assessment of noncontact stream gauging using portable surface velocity radars (SVR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welber, Matilde; Le Coz, Jérôme; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Zolezzi, Guido; Zamler, Daniel; Dramais, Guillaume; Hauet, Alexandre; Salvaro, Martino

    2016-02-01

    The applicability of a portable, commercially available surface velocity radar (SVR) for noncontact stream gauging was evaluated through a series of field-scale experiments carried out in a variety of sites and deployment conditions. Comparisons with various concurrent techniques showed acceptable agreement with velocity profiles, with larger uncertainties close to the banks. In addition to discharge error sources shared with intrusive velocity-area techniques, SVR discharge estimates are affected by flood-induced changes in the bed profile and by the selection of a depth-averaged to surface velocity ratio, or velocity coefficient (α). Cross-sectional averaged velocity coefficients showed smaller fluctuations and closer agreement with theoretical values than those computed on individual verticals, especially in channels with high relative roughness. Our findings confirm that α = 0.85 is a valid default value, with a preferred site-specific calibration to avoid underestimation of discharge in very smooth channels (relative roughness ˜ 0.001) and overestimation in very rough channels (relative roughness > 0.05). Theoretically derived and site-calibrated values of α also give accurate SVR-based discharge estimates (within 10%) for low and intermediate roughness flows (relative roughness 0.001 to 0.05). Moreover, discharge uncertainty does not exceed 10% even for a limited number of SVR positions along the cross section (particularly advantageous to gauge unsteady flood flows and very large floods), thereby extending the range of validity of rating curves.

  12. Separation of non-stationary sound fields with single layer pressure-velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chuan-Xing; Geng, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Zheng

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of extracting the non-stationary sound field generated by a target source in the presence of disturbing source from single layer pressure-velocity measurements. Unlike the method described in a previous paper [Bi, Geng, and Zhang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135(6), 3474-3482 (2014)], the proposed method allows measurements of pressure and particle velocity signals on a single plane instead of pressure signals on two planes, and the time-dependent pressure generated by the target source is extracted by a simple superposition of the measured pressure and the convolution between the measured particle velocity and the corresponding impulse response function. Because the particle velocity here is measured directly, the error caused by the finite difference approximation can be avoided, which makes it possible to perform the separation better than the previous method. In this paper, a Microflown pressure-velocity probe is used to perform the experimental measurements, and the calibration procedure of the probe in the time domain is given. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in extracting the desired non-stationary sound field generated by the target source from the mixed one in both time and space domains, and it obtains more accurate results than the previous method. PMID:26936560

  13. Separation of non-stationary sound fields with single layer pressure-velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chuan-Xing; Geng, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Zheng

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of extracting the non-stationary sound field generated by a target source in the presence of disturbing source from single layer pressure-velocity measurements. Unlike the method described in a previous paper [Bi, Geng, and Zhang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135(6), 3474-3482 (2014)], the proposed method allows measurements of pressure and particle velocity signals on a single plane instead of pressure signals on two planes, and the time-dependent pressure generated by the target source is extracted by a simple superposition of the measured pressure and the convolution between the measured particle velocity and the corresponding impulse response function. Because the particle velocity here is measured directly, the error caused by the finite difference approximation can be avoided, which makes it possible to perform the separation better than the previous method. In this paper, a Microflown pressure-velocity probe is used to perform the experimental measurements, and the calibration procedure of the probe in the time domain is given. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in extracting the desired non-stationary sound field generated by the target source from the mixed one in both time and space domains, and it obtains more accurate results than the previous method.

  14. Near-field Oblique Remote Sensing of Stream Water-surface Elevation, Slope, and Surface Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.; McDonald, R.; Wright, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for estimating discharges during flood events or in steep channels is the difficulty and hazard inherent in obtaining in-stream measurements. One possible solution is to use near-field remote sensing to obtain simultaneous water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities. In this test case, we utilized Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to remotely measure water-surface elevations and slope in combination with surface velocities estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) obtained by video-camera and/or infrared camera. We tested this method at several sites in New Mexico and Colorado using independent validation data consisting of in-channel measurements from survey-grade GPS and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instruments. Preliminary results indicate that for relatively turbid or steep streams, TLS collects tens of thousands of water-surface elevations and slopes in minutes, much faster than conventional means and at relatively high precision, at least as good as continuous survey-grade GPS measurements. Estimated surface velocities from this technique are within 15% of measured velocity magnitudes and within 10 degrees from the measured velocity direction (using extrapolation from the shallowest bin of the ADCP measurements). Accurately aligning the PIV results into Cartesian coordinates appears to be one of the main sources of error, primarily due to the sensitivity at these shallow oblique look angles and the low numbers of stationary objects for rectification. Combining remotely-sensed water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities produces simultaneous velocity measurements from a large number of locations in the channel and is more spatially extensive than traditional velocity measurements. These factors make this technique useful for improving estimates of flow measurements during flood flows and in steep channels while also decreasing the difficulty and hazard associated with making measurements in these

  15. New experimental technique for the measurement of the velocity field in thin films falling over obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landel, Julien R.; Daglis, Ana; McEvoy, Harry; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2014-11-01

    We present a new experimental technique to measure the surface velocity of a thin falling film. Thin falling films are important in various processes such as cooling in heat exchangers or cleaning processes. For instance, in a household dishwasher cleaning depends on the ability of a thin draining film to remove material from a substrate. We are interested in the impact of obstacles attached to a substrate on the velocity field of a thin film flowing over them. Measuring the velocity field of thin falling films is a challenging experimental problem due to the small depth of the flow and the large velocity gradient across its depth. We propose a new technique based on PIV to measure the plane components of the velocity at the surface of the film over an arbitrarily large area and an arbitrarily large resolution, depending mostly on the image acquisition technique. We perform experiments with thin films of water flowing on a flat inclined surface, made of glass or stainless steel. The typical Reynolds number of the film is of the order of 100 to 1000, computed using the surface velocity, the film thickness and the kinematic viscosity of the film. We measure the modification to the flow field, from a viscous-gravity regime, caused by small solid obstacles, such as three-dimensional hemispherical obstacles and two-dimensional steps. We compare our results with past theoretical and numerical studies. This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-12-D-0003-0001.

  16. Ring Diagram Analysis of Velocity Fields within the Solar Convection Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sarbani; Antia, H. M.; Tripathy, S. C.

    Ring diagram analysis of solar oscillation power spectra obtained from GONG and MDI data is performed to study the velocity fields within the solar convection zone. The three dimensional power spectra are fitted to a model with Lorentzian profile in frequency and includes the advection of the wave front by horizontal flows. We obtain the two horizontal components of flows as a function of the horizontal wave number and radial order of the oscillation modes. This information is then inverted using the OLA and RLS techniques to infer the variation in flow velocity with depth.

  17. Online computing of non-stationary distributions velocity fields by an accuracy controlled growing neural gas.

    PubMed

    Frezza-Buet, Hervé

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a vector quantization process that can be applied online to a stream of inputs. It enables to set up and maintain a dynamical representation of the current information in the stream as a topology preserving graph of prototypical values, as well as a velocity field. The algorithm relies on the formulation of the accuracy of the quantization process, that allows for both the updating of the number of prototypes according to the stream evolution and the stabilization of the representation from which velocities can be extracted. A video processing application is presented. PMID:25248032

  18. Velocity controlled sound field reproduction by non-uniformly spaced loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Mincheol; Nelson, Philip A.; Fazi, Filippo M.; Seo, Jeongil

    2016-05-01

    One approach to the reproduction of a sound field is to ensure the reproduction of the acoustic pressure on the surface bounding the volume within which reproduction is sought. However, this approach suffers from technical limitations when the loudspeakers used for the reproduction of the surface acoustic pressures are unevenly spaced. It is shown in this paper that sound field reproduction with a spatially non-uniform loudspeaker arrangement can be considerably improved by changing the physical quantity to be controlled on the bounding surface from pressure to particle velocity. One of the main advantages of the velocity control method is the simplicity with which the inverse problem can be regularized, irrespective of the direction of arrival of the sound to be reproduced. In addition, the velocity controlled sound field shows better reproduction of the time averaged intensity flow in the reproduction region which in turn appears to be closely linked with better human perception of sound localization. Furthermore, the proposed method results in smoother "panning functions" that describe the variation of the source outputs as a function of the angle of incidence of the sound to be reproduced. The performance of the velocity matching method has been evaluated by comparison to the conventional pressure matching method and through simulations with several non-uniform loudspeaker layouts. The simulated results were also verified with experiments and subjective tests.

  19. Cooling tower irrigator layout with allowances for non-uniformity of the airflow velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushnov, A. S.; Ryabushenko, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    This article covers the results of analysis of aerodynamic processes in the cooling tower irrigator and provides the approaches to optimal layout of preformed packing blocks (of the irrigator) developed based on these results. The analysis of the airflow velocity field in the cooling towers shows that the irrigation space can be broken down into the following zones: the peripheral zone of the cooling tower near the airblast windows, the zone near the cooling tower center, and the intermediate zone. Furthermore, the highest level of nonuniformity of the airflow velocity field in cooling towers is in the zone adjoining the tower's airblast windows. The proposed concept of the cooling tower irrigator's layout is made with allowances for the airflow velocity field characteristics in the cross-section of the irrigation space of the cooling tower. Based on this concept, we suggest that higher irrigator blocks should be placed in the zone of increased airflow consumption, which provides the possibility to enhance the hydraulic resistance and, respectively, decrease the gas flow velocity as well as to boost the efficiency of chilling the circulating water in the cooling tower. For this purpose, additional irrigator blocks can be of the same design as the main irrigator. As an option, it is possible to use blocks of the geometry and design other than the main irrigator block in the cooling tower.

  20. Impact of the vertical velocity field on charging processes and charge separation in a simulated thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yijun; Zheng, Dong; Xu, Liangtao

    2015-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) charging-discharging cloud resolution model was used to investigate the impact of the vertical velocity field on the charging processes and the formation of charge structure in a strong thunderstorm. The distribution and evolution of ice particle content and charges on ice particles were analyzed in different vertical velocity fields. The results show that the ice particles in the vertical velocity range from 1 to 5 m s-1 obtained the most charge through charging processes during the lifetime of the thunderstorm. The magnitude of the charges could reach 1014 nC. Before the beginning of lightning activity, the charges produced in updraft region 2 (updraft speed ⩾ 13 m s-1) and updraft region 1 (updraft speed between 5 and 13 m s-1) were relatively significant. The magnitudes of charge reached 1013 nC, which clearly impacted upon the early lightning activity. The vertical velocity conditions in the quasi-steady region (updraft speed between -1 and 1 m s-1) were the most conducive for charge separation on ice particles on different scales. Accordingly, a net charge structure always appeared in the quasi-steady and adjacent regions. Based on the results, a conceptual model of ice particle charging, charge separation, and charge structure formation in the flow field was constructed. The model helps to explain observations of the "lightning hole" phenomenon.

  1. Erratum: Precision Velocity Fields in Spiral Galaxies. I. Noncircular Motions and rms Noise in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Charles; Bothun, G.

    2000-05-01

    In the paper ``Precision Velocity Fields in Spiral Galaxies. I. Noncircular Motions and rms Noise in Disks'' by Charles Beauvais and G. Bothun (ApJS, 125, 99) the abstract was incorrect. The corrected abstract is as follows: Imaging Fabry-Perot data have been acquired for a sample of spiral galaxies from which two-dimensional velocity fields have been constructed on a subkiloparsec resolution scale. These velocity fields are then examined for evidence of noncircular motions. Individual spectra are extracted and the resultant line profiles are fitted with Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian functions. Gaussians are shown to provide a better model for simultaneously fitting a large number of line profiles, successfully fitting a higher fraction. The kinematic disk (i.e., tilted ring) modeling procedure is studied in detail and is shown to accurately recover the underlying rotational structure of galactic disks. The process of obtaining rotation curves from full two-dimensional velocity data is examined. Small-scale ``bumps and wiggles'' on the rotation curves are shown to be due to the inclusion of noncircular motions. Use of the rotation curve estimate returned by the modeling procedure rather than deprojection of the velocity field is recommended to avoid their inclusion. Investigation of the symmetry of the major- and minor-axis rotation curves reveal strong evidence of nonconcentric gas orbits with the maximum center shift of ~300 pc. Comparisons between kinematic and photometric structure (e.g., position angles, inclinations, centers) show considerable noise on small scales. Although large-scale averages are in agreement, this noise is a matter of some concern in the application of the Tully-Fisher method to disk galaxies. Moreover, cases of significant misalignment in position angle between the inner and outer disks are seen in two of the sample galaxies and may indicate the transition between luminous and dark-matter-dominated regions (i.e., where the maximum disk

  2. Synchrotron microimaging technique for measuring the velocity fields of real blood flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Kim, Guk Bae

    2005-03-15

    Angiography and Doppler methods used for diagnosing vascular diseases give information on the shape of blood vessels and pointwise blood speed but do not provide detailed information on the flow fields inside the blood vessels. In this study, we developed a method for visualizing blood flow by using coherent synchrotron x rays. This method, which does not require the addition of any contrast agent or tracer particles, visualizes the flow pattern of blood by enhancing the diffraction and interference characteristics of the blood cells. This was achieved by optimizing the sample- (blood) to-detector (charge-coupled device camera) distance and the sample thickness. The proposed method was used to extract quantitative velocity field information from blood flowing inside an opaque microchannel by applying a two-frame particle image velocimetry algorithm to enhanced x-ray images of the blood flow. The measured velocity field data showed a flow structure typical of flow in a macrochannel.

  3. Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; O'Sullivan, Maurice; Hui, Rongqing

    2012-11-01

    A coherent lidar system based on the measurement of complex optical field is demonstrated for the first time. An electro-optic in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator is used in the lidar transmitter to realize carrier-suppressed complex optical field modulation in which the positive and the negative optical sidebands can carry independent modulation waveforms. A fiber-optic 90° hybrid is used in the lidar receiver for coherent heterodyne detection and to recover the complex optical field. By loading a constant modulation frequency on the lower optical sideband and a wideband linear frequency chirp on the upper sideband, vector velocity and target distance can be measured independently. The wide modulation bandwidth of this lidar system also enabled unprecedented range resolution and the capability of measuring high velocity unambiguously. PMID:23187404

  4. Stopping power for arbitrary angle between test particle velocity and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Cereceda, Carlo; Peretti, Michel de; Deutsch, Claude

    2005-02-01

    Using the longitudinal dielectric function derived previously for charged test particles in helical movement around magnetic field lines, the numerical convergence of the series involved is found and the double numerical integrations on wave vector components are performed yielding the stopping power for arbitrary angle between the test particle velocity and magnetic field. Calculations are performed for particle Larmor radius larger and shorter than Debye length, i.e., for protons in a cold magnetized plasma and for thermonuclear {alpha} particles in a dense, hot, and strongly magnetized plasma. A strong decrease is found for the energy loss as the angle varies from 0 to {pi}/2. The range of thermonuclear {alpha} particles as a function of the velocity angle with respect to the magnetic field is also given.

  5. The isolated head model of the plasma bullet/streamer propagation: electric field-velocity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sretenović, Goran B.; Krstić, Ivan B.; Kovačević, Vesna V.; Obradović, Bratislav M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.

    2014-09-01

    A model of the isolated streamer head based on Meek's criterion of the avalanche to streamer transition is applied for description of the plasma bullet propagation in a helium/air admixture. According to the model previously proposed by Kulikovsky for streamers in air, along with the knowledge of one of three parameters: electric field, ionization integral or the width of the space charge layer, the other two parameters could be determined. Furthermore, using the streamer current or radius, it is possible to determine the electric field-streamer velocity functional dependence. Obtained results showed satisfactory agreement with both the results of the fluid model from the literature and the experimental results of plasma jet studies. Finally, for the sake of comparison, streamer velocity dependence on the electric field strength range of 10-250 kV cm-1 is determined for helium, argon and air.

  6. Electric-field control of magnetic domain-wall velocity in ultrathin cobalt with perpendicular magnetization.

    PubMed

    Chiba, D; Kawaguchi, M; Fukami, S; Ishiwata, N; Shimamura, K; Kobayashi, K; Ono, T

    2012-06-06

    Controlling the displacement of a magnetic domain wall is potentially useful for information processing in magnetic non-volatile memories and logic devices. A magnetic domain wall can be moved by applying an external magnetic field and/or electric current, and its velocity depends on their magnitudes. Here we show that the applying an electric field can change the velocity of a magnetic domain wall significantly. A field-effect device, consisting of a top-gate electrode, a dielectric insulator layer, and a wire-shaped ferromagnetic Co/Pt thin layer with perpendicular anisotropy, was used to observe it in a finite magnetic field. We found that the application of the electric fields in the range of ± 2-3 MV cm(-1) can change the magnetic domain wall velocity in its creep regime (10(6)-10(3) m s(-1)) by more than an order of magnitude. This significant change is due to electrical modulation of the energy barrier for the magnetic domain wall motion.

  7. Precision Velocity Fields in Spiral Galaxies. I. Noncircular Motions and rms Noise in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Charles; Bothun, G.

    1999-11-01

    Investigation of the symmetry of the major- and minor-axis rotation curves reveals strong evidence of nonconcentric gas orbits with the maximum center shift of ~300 pc. Comparisons between kinematic and photometric structure (e.g., position angles, inclinations, centers) show considerable noise on small scales. Although large-scale averages are in agreement, this noise is a matter of some concern in the application of the Tully-Fisher method to disk galaxies. Moreover, cases of significant misalignment in position angle between the inner and outer disks are seen in two of the sample galaxies and may indicate the transition between luminous and dark-matter-dominated regions (i.e., where the maximum-disk hypothesis begins to fail). The kinematic disk models are used to find the residual velocity fields, and typical residuals are found to be 10-15 km s-1 over regions 0.5-1.5 kpc in diameter. Correlations are shown to exist between the residual velocity fields and both the Hα intensity and the velocity dispersion images. This suggests that kinematic feedback to the gas from star formation is an important source of noncircular motion. However, the relative quiescence of the large-scale velocity field indicates that the effect does not cause a significant deviation from circular symmetry, kinematically indicating that star formation is not a hidden parameter in the Tully-Fisher relation. Finally, the residual velocity fields are examined for signs of noncircular orbits by looking for azimuthal angular harmonics that would be present if disk galaxies are embedded in a triaxial dark matter potential. For our sample we find the ellipticity of the gas orbits to be <~0.08, which implies the potential is relatively round. This is consistent with disks being maximal.

  8. A comparison of measured and modeled velocity fields for a laminar flow in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. D.; Apte, S. V.; Liburdy, J. A.; Ziazi, R. M.; He, X.; Finn, J. R.; Patil, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Obtaining highly-resolved velocity data from experimental measurements in porous media is a significant challenge. The goal of this work is to compare the velocity fields measured in a randomly-packed porous medium obtained from particle image velocimetry (PIV) with corresponding fields predicted from direct numerical simulation (DNS). Experimentally, the porous medium was comprised of 15 mm diameter spherical beads made of optical glass placed in a glass flow cell to create the packed bed. A solution of ammonium thiocyanate was refractive-index matched to the glass creating a medium that could be illuminated with a laser sheet without distortion. The bead center locations were quantified using the imaging system so that the geometry of the porous medium was known very accurately. Two-dimensional PIV data were collected and processed to provide high-resolution velocity fields at a single plane within the porous medium. A Cartesian-grid-based fictitious domain approach was adopted for the direct numerical simulation of flow through the same geometry as the experimental measurements and without any adjustable parameters. The uncertainties associated with characterization of the pore geometry, PIV measurements, and DNS predictions were all systematically quantified. Although uncertainties in bead position measurements led to minor discrepancies in the comparison of the velocity fields, the axial and normal velocity deviations exhibited normalized root mean squared deviations (NRMSD) of only 11.32% and 4.74%, respectively. The high fidelity of both the experimental and numerical methods have significant implications for understanding and even for engineering the micro-macro relationship in porous materials. The ability to measure and model sub-pore-scale flow features also has relevance to the development of upscaled models for flow in porous media, where physically reasonable closure models must be developed at the sub-pore scale. These results provide valuable data

  9. Velocity-Field Measurements of an Axisymmetric Separated Flow Subjected to Amplitude-Modulated Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosin, Barry James

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control was applied at the point of separation of an axisymmetric, backward-facing-step flow. The control was implemented by employing a Helmholtz resonator that was externally driven by an amplitude-modulated, acoustic disturbance from a speaker located upstream of the wind tunnel. The velocity field of the separating/reattaching flow region downstream of the step was characterized using hotwire velocity measurements with and without flow control. Conventional statistics of the data reveal that the separating/reattaching flow is affected by the imposed forcing. Triple decomposition along with conditional averaging was used to distinguish periodic disturbances from random turbulence in the fluctuating velocity component. A significant outcome of the present study is that it demonstrates that amplitude-modulated forcing of the separated flow alters the flow in the same manner as the more conventional method of periodic excitation.

  10. Velocity Field Measurements of Human Coughing Using Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, T.; Marr, D. R.; Higuchi, H.; Glauser, M. N.

    2003-11-01

    Quantitative fluid mechanics analysis of human coughing has been carried out using new Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TRPIV). The study involves measurement of velocity vector time-histories and velocity profiles. It is focused on the average normal human coughing. Some work in the past on cough mechanics has involved measurement of flow rates, tidal volumes and sub-glottis pressure. However, data of unsteady velocity vector field of the exiting highly time-dependent jets is not available. In this study, human cough waveform data are first acquired in vivo using conventional respiratory instrumentation for various volunteers of different gender/age groups. The representative waveform is then reproduced with a coughing/breathing simulator (with or without a manikin) for TRPIV measurements and analysis. The results of this study would be useful not only for designing of indoor air quality and heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, but also for devising means of protection against infectious diseases.

  11. Estimates of the seasonal mean vertical velocity fields of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Indirect methods are employed to estimate the wintertime and summertime mean vertical velocity fields of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere and intercomparisons are made, together with comparisons with mean seasonal patterns of cloudiness and precipitation. Twice-daily NMC operational analyses produced general circulation statistics for 11 winters and 12 summers, permitting calculation of the seasonal NMC averages for 6 hr forecasts, solution of the omega equation, integration of continuity equation downward from 100 mb, and solution of the thermodynamic energy equation in the absence of diabatic heating. The methods all yielded similar vertical velocity patterns; however, the magnitude of the vertical velocities could not be calculated with great accuracy. Orography was concluded to have less of an effect in summer than in winter, when winds are stronger.

  12. Dynamic Measurements of High Explosive Velocity Fields using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brandon; Wood, Wm. M.; Olson, Russ

    2015-06-01

    A non-invasive technique for measuring dynamic particle velocities using pRad images ahead and behind an HE detonation burn front is presented. The technique uses proven principles from particle image velocimetry (PIV). Time-resolved radiographs of detonated HE (PBX 9501 and 9502) doped with tungsten particles (<= 10 μ m) are captured at pRad at Los Alamos National Laboratory. From sequential radiographs, resolved velocity fields are measured by local cross-correlations of tungsten tracer positions. With this technique, we resolve the Taylor wave and can measure the particle velocity directly behind the detonation front. Results for single detonation waves and colliding detonation waves are presented. We also discuss the capabilities, limitations, applications, and future of this technique.

  13. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  14. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  15. Effect of a magnetic field on massive-star winds - I. Mass-loss and velocity for a dipole field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Christopher; Townsend, Richard H. D.

    2016-11-01

    We generalize the Rigid-Field Hydrodynamic equations to accommodate arbitrary magnetic field topologies, resulting in a new Arbitrary Rigid-Field Hydrodynamic (ARFHD) formalism. We undertake a critical point calculation of the steady-state ARFHD equations with a CAK-type radiative acceleration and determine the effects of a dipole magnetic field on the usual CAK mass-loss rate and velocity structure. Enforcing the proper optically thin limit for the radiative line-acceleration is found to decrease both the mass-loss and wind acceleration, while rotation boosts both properties. We define optically thin correction and rotation parameters to quantify these effects on the global mass-loss rate and develop scaling laws for the surface mass-flux as a function of surface colatitude. These scaling laws are found to agree with previous laws derived from magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetospheres. The dipole magnetosphere velocity structure is found to differ from a global beta-velocity law, which contradicts a central assumption of the previously developed XADM model of X-ray emission from magnetospheres.

  16. Field-derived relationships for flow velocity and resistance in high-gradient streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Comiti, F.; Mao, L.; Wilcox, A.; Wohl, E.E.; Lenzi, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    We measured velocity and channel geometry in 10 reaches (bed gradient = 0.08-0.21) of a predominantly step-pool channel, the Rio Cordon, Italy, over a range of discharges (3-80% of the bankfull discharge). The resulting data were used to compute flow resistance. At-a-station hydraulic geometry relations indicate that in most reaches, the exponent describing the rate of velocity increases with discharge was between 0.48 and 0.6, which is within the range of published values for pool-riffle channels. The Rio Cordon data are also combined with published hydraulics data from step-pool streams to explore non-dimensional relationships between velocity and flow resistance and factors including unit discharge, channel gradient, and step geometry. Multiple regression analysis of this combined field dataset indicated that dimensionless unit discharge (q*) is the most important independent variable overall in explaining variations in velocity and flow resistance, followed by channel slope and the ratio of step height to step length. Empirical equations are provided both for dimensionless velocity and flow resistance, but prediction of the former variable appears more reliable. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Italy - Adriatic Sea - Barbara - A giant gas field marked by seismic velocity anomaly - A subtle trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ianniello, A.; Bolelli, W.; Di Scala, L. )

    1990-09-01

    Barbara gas field, discovered in 1971, is located in the northern sector of the Adriatic offshore. The field is a gentle anticline involving Quaternary clastic sediments and shaped by carbonate Mesozoic morphology. The presence of shallow gas pockets at the crest of the structure distort the seismic signal to such an extent that structural reconstruction using seismic data is not possible. Moreover, time delays and ray-path anomalies do not allow the use of staking velocities for the depth conversion. Seismic attribute analysis, instead of velocities, and time delays on the isochrone maps are providing a key to the understanding of seismic anomalies and are an indirect tool for reconstructing the real structural configuration of the field. The appraisal story of the field illustrates how the previously mentioned complications influenced its delineation and how an understanding of these complications helped in upgrading the reserves from an initial value of 10 billion ECM of gas to 40 billion ECM. Additional data acquired with the development wells tend to increase the estimate. Therefore, Barbara field is the most important Italian gas field of the decade. The producing formation is composed of very thin-bedded sandstone and shale intercalations, representing the peculiarity of this reservoir. Development of the field is being achieved with six production platforms and 72 wells.

  18. Cluster Analysis of Velocity Field Derived from Dense GNSS Network of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, A.; Hashimoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Dense GNSS networks have been widely used to observe crustal deformation. Simpson et al. (2012) and Savage and Simpson (2013) have conducted cluster analyses of GNSS velocity field in the San Francisco Bay Area and Mojave Desert, respectively. They have successfully found velocity discontinuities. They also showed an advantage of cluster analysis for classifying GNSS velocity field. Since in western United States, strike-slip events are dominant, geometry is simple. However, the Japanese Islands are tectonically complicated due to subduction of oceanic plates. There are many types of crustal deformation such as slow slip event and large postseismic deformation. We propose a modified clustering method of GNSS velocity field in Japan to separate time variant and static crustal deformation. Our modification is performing cluster analysis every several months or years, then qualifying cluster member similarity. If a GNSS station moved differently from its neighboring GNSS stations, the station will not belong to in the cluster which includes its surrounding stations. With this method, time variant phenomena were distinguished. We applied our method to GNSS data of Japan from 1996 to 2015. According to the analyses, following conclusions were derived. The first is the clusters boundaries are consistent with known active faults. For examples, the Arima-Takatsuki-Hanaore fault system and the Shimane-Tottori segment proposed by Nishimura (2015) are recognized, though without using prior information. The second is improving detectability of time variable phenomena, such as a slow slip event in northern part of Hokkaido region detected by Ohzono et al. (2015). The last one is the classification of postseismic deformation caused by large earthquakes. The result suggested velocity discontinuities in postseismic deformation of the Tohoku-oki earthquake. This result implies that postseismic deformation is not continuously decaying proportional to distance from its epicenter.

  19. Influence of sprint acceleration stance kinetics on velocity and step kinematics in field sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Schultz, Adrian B; Jeffriess, Matthew D; Callaghan, Samuel J

    2013-09-01

    The interaction between step kinematics and stance kinetics determines sprint velocity. However, the influence that stance kinetics has on effective acceleration in field sport athletes requires clarification. About 25 men (age = 22.4 ± 3.2 years; mass = 82.8 ± 7.2 kg; height = 1.81 ± 0.07 m) completed twelve 10-m sprints, 6 sprints each for kinematic and kinetic assessment. Pearson's correlations (p ≤ 0.05) examined relationships between 0-5, 5-10, and 0-10 m velocity; step kinematics (mean step length [SL], step frequency, contact time [CT], flight time over each interval); and stance kinetics (relative vertical, horizontal, and resultant force and impulse; resultant force angle; ratio of horizontal to resultant force [RatF] for the first, second, and last contacts within the 10-m sprint). Relationships were found between 0-5, 5-10, and 0-10 m SL and 0-5 and 0-10 m velocity (r = 0.397-0.535). CT of 0-5 and 0-10 m correlated with 5-10 m velocity (r = -0.506 and -0.477, respectively). Last contact vertical force correlated with 5-10 m velocity (r = 0.405). Relationships were established between the second and last contact vertical and resultant force and CT over all intervals (r = -0.398 to 0.569). First and second contact vertical impulse correlated with 0-5 m SL (r = 0.434 and 0.442, respectively). Subjects produced resultant force angles and RatF suitable for horizontal force production. Faster acceleration in field sport athletes involved longer steps, with shorter CT. Greater vertical force production was linked with shorter CT, illustrating efficient force production. Greater SLs during acceleration were facilitated by higher vertical impulse and appropriate horizontal force. Speed training for field sport athletes should be tailored to encourage these technique adaptations.

  20. Density and compressibility effects in turbulent subsonic jets part 1: mean velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhexuan; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2010-02-01

    The behavior of compressible jets originated from initially turbulent pipe flows issuing in still air has been investigated at three different subsonic Mach numbers, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9. Helium, nitrogen and krypton gases were used to generate the jet flows and investigate the additional effects of density on the flow structure. Particle image velocimetry, high-frequency response pressure transducers and thermocouples were used to obtain velocity, Mach number and total temperature measurements inside the flow field. The jets were formed at the exit of an adiabatic compressible frictional turbulent pipe flow, which was developing toward its corresponding sonic conditions inside the pipe, and continued to expand within the first four diameters distance after it exited the pipe. Theoretical considerations based on flow self-similarity were used to obtain the decay of Mach number along the centerline of the jets for the first time. It was found that this decay depends on two contributions, one from the velocity field which is inversely proportional to the distance from the exit and one from the thermal field which is proportional to this distance. As a result, a small non-linearity in the variation of the inverse Mach number with downstream distance was found. The decay of the Mach number at the centerline of the axisymmetric jets increases by increasing the initial Mach number at the exit of the flow for all jets. The decay of mean velocity at the centerline of the jets is also higher at higher exit Mach numbers. However, the velocity non-dimensionalized by the exit velocity seems to decrease faster at low exit Mach numbers, suggesting a reduced mixing with increasing exit flow Mach numbers. Helium jets were found to have the largest spreading rate among the three different gas jets used in the present investigation, while krypton jets had the lowest spreading rate. The spreading rate of each gas decreases with increasing its kinetic energy relatively to its internal

  1. Emission-Line Eclipse Mapping of Velocity Fields in a Dwarf-Nova Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Makoto; Mineshige, Shin

    2002-06-01

    We propose a new method, emission-line eclipse mapping, to map the velocity fields of an accretion disk in position space. Quiescent dwarf novae usually exhibit double-peaked emission-line profiles because of disk rotation. Since a part of a disk having a different line-of-sight velocity is successively obscured by a companion in eclipsing systems, they show time-varying line profiles. We calculated the time changes of the emission-line profiles, assuming Keplerian rotation fields (vφ ~ r-1/2 with r being the distance from the disk center) and an emissivity distribution of j ~ r-3/2. We, then, applied the usual eclipse mapping technique to the light curves at each of 12-24 wavelengths across the line center to map the region with the same line-of-sight velocity. The reconstructed images typically exhibit a `two-eye' pattern for high line-of-sight velocities, and we can recover the relation, vφ ~ d-1/2, on the assumption of an axisymmetric disk, where d is the separation between the two `eyes'. We will be able to probe the Keplerian rotation law, the most fundamental assumption adopted in many disk models, by high-speed spectroscopic observations with 8-m class telescopes.

  2. The velocity and vorticity fields of the turbulent near wake of a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James; Ong, Lawrence; Moin, Parviz

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide a detailed experimental database of velocity and vorticity statistics in the very near wake (x/d less than 10) of a circular cylinder at Reynolds number of 3900. This study has determined that estimations of the streamwise velocity component in flow fields with large nonzero cross-stream components are not accurate. Similarly, X-wire measurements of the u and v velocity components in flows containing large w are also subject to the errors due to binormal cooling. Using the look-up table (LUT) technique, and by calibrating the X-wire probe used here to include the range of expected angles of attack (+/- 40 deg), accurate X-wire measurements of instantaneous u and v velocity components in the very near wake region of a circular cylinder has been accomplished. The approximate two-dimensionality of the present flow field was verified with four-wire probe measurements, and to some extent the spanwise correlation measurements with the multisensor rake. Hence, binormal cooling errors in the present X-wire measurements are small.

  3. The Velocity Field of the Local Universe From Measurements of Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Haugbolle, T.; Hannestad, S.; Thomsen, B.; Fynbo, J.; Sollerman, J.; Jha, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-12-08

    We present a measurement of the velocity flow of the local universe relative to the CMB rest frame, based on the Jha, Riess & Kirshner (2007) sample of 133 low redshift type Ia supernovae. At a depth of 4500 km s{sup -1} we find a dipole amplitude of 279 {+-} 68 km s{sup -1} in the direction l = 285{sup o} {+-} 18{sup o}, b = -10{sup o} {+-} 15{sup o}, consistent with earlier measurements and with the assumption that the local velocity field is dominated by the Great Attractor region. At a larger depth of 5900 km s{sup -1} we find a shift in the dipole direction towards the Shapley concentration. We also present the first measurement of the quadrupole term in the local velocity flow at these depths. Finally, we have performed detailed studies based on N-body simulations of the expected precision with which the lowest multipoles in the velocity field can be measured out to redshifts of order 0.1. Our mock catalogues are in good agreement with current observations, and demonstrate that our results are robust with respect to assumptions about the influence of local environment on the type Ia supernova rate.

  4. Magnetic field structure due to the global velocity field in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarba, H.; Lesch, H.; Dolag, K.; Naab, T.; Johansson, P. H.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2009-08-01

    We present a set of global, self-consistent N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations of the dynamic evolution of galactic discs with gas, including magnetic fields. We have implemented a description to follow the evolution of magnetic fields with the ideal induction equation in the SPH part of the VINE code. Results from a direct implementation of the field equations are compared to a representation by Euler potentials, which pose a ∇ . B-free description, a constraint not fulfilled for the direct implementation. All simulations are compared to an implementation of magnetic fields in the GADGET code which also includes cleaning methods for ∇ . B. Starting with a homogeneous seed field, we find that by differential rotation and spiral structure formation of the disc the field is amplified by one order of magnitude within five rotation periods of the disc. The amplification is stronger for higher numerical resolution. Moreover, we find a tight connection of the magnetic field structure to the density pattern of the galaxy in our simulations, with the magnetic field lines being aligned with the developing spiral pattern of the gas. Our simulations clearly show the importance of non-axisymmetry for the evolution of the magnetic field.

  5. Velocity field measurements in sedimentary rock cores by magnetization prepared 3D SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-10-01

    A time-efficient MRI method suitable for quantitative mapping of 3-D velocity fields in sedimentary rock cores, and granular samples is discussed. The method combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T(1) Enhancement (SPRITE). Collecting a few samples near the q-space origin and employing restricted k-space sampling dramatically improves the performance of the imaging method. The APGSTE-SPRITE method is illustrated through mapping of 3-D velocity field in a macroscopic bead pack and heterogeneous sandstone and limestone core plugs. The observed flow patterns are consistent with a general trend for permeability to increase with the porosity. Domains of low permeability obstruct the flow within the core volume. Water tends to flow along macroscopic zones of higher porosity and across zones of lower porosity. PMID:22967892

  6. Velocity field measurements in sedimentary rock cores by magnetization prepared 3D SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-10-01

    A time-efficient MRI method suitable for quantitative mapping of 3-D velocity fields in sedimentary rock cores, and granular samples is discussed. The method combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T(1) Enhancement (SPRITE). Collecting a few samples near the q-space origin and employing restricted k-space sampling dramatically improves the performance of the imaging method. The APGSTE-SPRITE method is illustrated through mapping of 3-D velocity field in a macroscopic bead pack and heterogeneous sandstone and limestone core plugs. The observed flow patterns are consistent with a general trend for permeability to increase with the porosity. Domains of low permeability obstruct the flow within the core volume. Water tends to flow along macroscopic zones of higher porosity and across zones of lower porosity.

  7. Application of Helical Characteristics of the Velocity Field to Evaluate the Intensity of Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levina, G.; Glebova, E.; Naumov, A.; Trosnikov, I.

    The paper presents results of numerical analysis for helical features of velocity field to investigate the process of tropical cyclone formation, namely, the downward helicity flux through the upper boundary of the viscous atmospheric turbulent boundary layer has been calculated. The simulation was carried out by use of the regional atmospheric ETA model and NCEP reanalysis global data. Calculations were performed for two tropical cyclones - Wilma (Atlantic basin, 2005) and Man-Yi (North-West Pacific, 2007). It has been found, that the chosen helical characteristic reveals an adequate response to basic trends in variation of such important meteorological fields as pressure and wind velocity during the hurricane vortex evolution. The analysis carried out in the paper shows that the helicity flux can be used as an illustrative characteristic to describe the intensity and destructive power of tropical cyclones.

  8. Lift distribution and velocity field measurements for a three-dimensional, steady blade/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Norman, Thomas R.

    1987-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment simulating a steady three-dimensional helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction is reported. The experimental configuration consisted of a vertical semispan vortex-generating wing, mounted upstream of a horizontal semispan rotor blade airfoil. A three-dimensional laser velocimeter was used to measure the velocity field in the region of the blade. Sectional lift coefficients were calculated by integrating the velocity field to obtain the bound vorticity. Total lift values, obtained by using an internal strain-gauge balance, verified the laser velocimeter data. Parametric variations of vortex strength, rotor blade angle of attack, and vortex position relative to the rotor blade were explored. These data are reported (with attention to experimental limitations) to provide a dataset for the validation of analytical work.

  9. The passage of a distorted velocity field through a cascade of airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis has been developed to predict the unsteady force and moment generated by the passage of a timewise periodic total pressure distortion through an arbitrary cascade of airfoils. The mathematical formulation of this analysis is based on the assumption that the magnitudes of the timewise fluctuations of the variables which describe the flow field are small compared to their time average values. This assumption permits the development of a linear unsteady perturbation analysis about a steady flow field. In addition to this linearization assumption the fluid medium is assumed to be incompressible and inviscid. The mathematical development begins by decomposing the velocity field surrounding an infinite cascade of airfoils into its irrotational and rotational components. The rotational component is associated with an upstream unsteady total pressure distortion and is defined in terms of the vorticity field associated with the distortion pattern. The irrotational component is further decomposed into a steady and unsteady part. A combined analytical and numerical procedure has been developed to solve the field equations which govern the rotational and irrotational velocity fields. Results of this analysis show a strong influence of mean loading on the unsteady force generated by the passage of a one dimensional gust through a cascade of compressor blades.

  10. Visualizing flow fields using acoustic Doppler current profilers and the Velocity Mapping Toolbox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide examples of how the U.S. Geological Survey is using acoustic Doppler current profilers for much more than routine discharge measurements. These instruments are capable of mapping complex three-dimensional flow fields within rivers, lakes, and estuaries. Using the Velocity Mapping Toolbox to process the ADCP data allows detailed visualization of the data, providing valuable information for a range of studies and applications.

  11. 2-D High Resolution Seismic Imaging and Potential-Field Modeling of Small-Scale Intrabasin Faulting in Surprise Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athens, N.; Fontiveros, V. C.; Klemperer, S. L.; Egger, A. E.; Glen, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Surprise Valley, located in the northeast corner of California, constitutes the westernmost basin of the Basin and Range Province (BRP) and acts as a transition zone between the unextended Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Modoc Plateau to the west and the extended BRP to the east. Previous seismic experiments undertaken in Surprise Valley to examine the structural setting of a developing extensional basin imaged the Surprise Valley Fault (SVF), the large-scale structure that controls the basin formation. In this study, we image small-scale structures associated with a prominent N-S-trending magnetic anomaly in the basin; these small-scale structures have no surface expression, yet they presumably play a role in the active geothermal system in the valley and may lend insight into the development of the basin. We recorded a total of 198 shots fired between geophones on a fixed linear array spanning ~ 1 km using a Betsy Seisgun source. The source yielded excellent penetration depths of up to 400 m, presumably due to the ideal conditions of fine-grained lake deposits saturated almost immediately below the surface. We used a standard seismic processing sequence to create an unmigrated time section, but lack of velocity control at depth led to the creation of a suite of different migrated images to explore the effects of strong lateral velocity variations in the subsurface. . Images obtained by applying Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration to the seismic data reveal what we interpret to be an east-dipping (~56°) normal fault offsetting tilted strata of probable Oligocene age with ~250 meters of vertical throw. In addition to the 1 km seismic line, detailed gravity and magnetic surveys were undertaken to fully image the structure(s) north and south of the seismic line. The magnetic survey was performed with a cesium vapor total-field magnetometer installed on our newly developed all-terrain vehicle (ATV) magnetometer system, which was designed for efficient surveying in

  12. Spatially selective 2D RF inner field of view (iFOV) diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) of the pediatric spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Chris J.; Middleton, Devon M.; Alizadeh, Mahdi; Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Raunig, David L.; Faro, Scott H.; Shah, Pallav; Krisa, Laura; Sinko, Rebecca; Delalic, Joan Z.; Mulcahey, M.J.; Mohamed, Feroze B.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance based diffusion imaging has been gaining more utility and clinical relevance over the past decade. Using conventional echo planar techniques, it is possible to acquire and characterize water diffusion within the central nervous system (CNS); namely in the form of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). While each modality provides valuable clinical information in terms of the presence of diffusion and its directionality, both techniques are limited to assuming an ideal Gaussian distribution for water displacement with no intermolecular interactions. This assumption neglects pathological processes that are not Gaussian therefore reducing the amount of potentially clinically relevant information. Additions to the Gaussian distribution measured by the excess kurtosis, or peakedness, of the probabilistic model provide a better understanding of the underlying cellular structure. The objective of this work is to provide mathematical and experimental evidence that Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) can offer additional information about the micromolecular environment of the pediatric spinal cord. This is accomplished by a more thorough characterization of the nature of random water displacement within the cord. A novel DKI imaging sequence based on a tilted 2D spatially selective radio frequency pulse providing reduced field of view (FOV) imaging was developed, implemented, and optimized on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, and tested on pediatric subjects (healthy subjects: 15; patients with spinal cord injury (SCI):5). Software was developed and validated for post processing of the DKI images and estimation of the tensor parameters. The results show statistically significant differences in mean kurtosis (p < 0.01) and radial kurtosis (p < 0.01) between healthy subjects and subjects with SCI. DKI provides incremental and novel information over conventional diffusion acquisitions when coupled with higher order estimation algorithms

  13. Spatially selective 2D RF inner field of view (iFOV) diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) of the pediatric spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Chris J; Middleton, Devon M; Alizadeh, Mahdi; Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Raunig, David L; Faro, Scott H; Shah, Pallav; Krisa, Laura; Sinko, Rebecca; Delalic, Joan Z; Mulcahey, M J; Mohamed, Feroze B

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance based diffusion imaging has been gaining more utility and clinical relevance over the past decade. Using conventional echo planar techniques, it is possible to acquire and characterize water diffusion within the central nervous system (CNS); namely in the form of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). While each modality provides valuable clinical information in terms of the presence of diffusion and its directionality, both techniques are limited to assuming an ideal Gaussian distribution for water displacement with no intermolecular interactions. This assumption neglects pathological processes that are not Gaussian therefore reducing the amount of potentially clinically relevant information. Additions to the Gaussian distribution measured by the excess kurtosis, or peakedness, of the probabilistic model provide a better understanding of the underlying cellular structure. The objective of this work is to provide mathematical and experimental evidence that Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) can offer additional information about the micromolecular environment of the pediatric spinal cord. This is accomplished by a more thorough characterization of the nature of random water displacement within the cord. A novel DKI imaging sequence based on a tilted 2D spatially selective radio frequency pulse providing reduced field of view (FOV) imaging was developed, implemented, and optimized on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, and tested on pediatric subjects (healthy subjects: 15; patients with spinal cord injury (SCI):5). Software was developed and validated for post processing of the DKI images and estimation of the tensor parameters. The results show statistically significant differences in mean kurtosis (p < 0.01) and radial kurtosis (p < 0.01) between healthy subjects and subjects with SCI. DKI provides incremental and novel information over conventional diffusion acquisitions when coupled with higher order estimation algorithms

  14. Long-term decoding stability of local field potentials from silicon arrays in primate motor cortex during a 2D center out task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Li, Yue; Wang, Yiwen; Zhu, Junming; Zhang, Shaomin; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Many serious concerns exist in the long-term stability of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) based on spike signals (single unit activity, SUA; multi unit activity, MUA). Some studies showed local field potentials (LFPs) could offer a stable decoding performance. However, the decoding stability of LFPs was examined only when high quality spike signals were recorded. Here we aim to examine the long-term decoding stability of LFPs over a larger time scale when the quality of spike signals was from good to poor or even no spike was recorded. Approach. Neural signals were collected from motor cortex of three monkeys via silicon arrays over 230, 290 and 690 days post-implantation when they performed 2D center out task. To compare long-term stability between LFPs and spike signals, we examined them in neural signals characteristics, directional tuning properties and offline decoding performance, respectively. Main results. We observed slow decreasing trends in the number of LFP channels recorded and mean LFP power in different frequency bands when spike signals quality decayed over time. The number of significantly directional tuning LFP channels decreased more slowly than that of tuning SUA and MUA. The variable preferred directions for the same signal features across sessions indicated non-stationarity of neural activity. We also found that LFPs achieved better decoding performance than SUA and MUA in retrained decoder when the quality of spike signals seriously decayed. Especially, when no spike was recorded in one monkey after 671 days post-implantation, LFPs still provided some kinematic information. In addition, LFPs outperformed MUA in long-term decoding stability in a static decoder. Significance. Our results suggested that LFPs were more durable and could provide better decoding performance when spike signals quality seriously decayed. It might be due to their resistance to recording degradation and their high redundancy among channels.

  15. 2D Ball-and-Socket Tectonic Rotation in a Heterogeneous Strain Field: The 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, W. D.; Hayes, G. P.; Briggs, R. W.; Gold, R. D.; Bilham, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    The September 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan strike-slip earthquake ruptured a ~200 km long segment of the curved Hoshab fault within the Makran accretionary prism - the active zone of convergence between the northward subducting Arabia plate and overriding Eurasia. The Hoshab fault ruptured bilaterally with ~10 m of mean sinistral and ~1.7 m of dip slip along the length of the rupture, quantified jointly from geodetic and seismological observations. This rupture is unusual because the fault dips ~60o towards the focus of a small circle centered in northwest Pakistan, and, despite a 30o increase in obliquity along the curving strike of the fault with respect to Arabia:Eurasia convergence, the ratio of strike and dip slip remain relatively uniform. Static friction prior to rupture was unusually weak ( <0.05) as inferred from topographic and slab profiles, and friction may have approached zero during dynamic rupture, thus permitting in part this unusual event. In this presentation, we argue that the northward dipping Hosab fault defines the northern rim of a structural unit in southeast Makran. This unit rotates - akin to a 2-D ball-and-socket joint - counter clockwise in response to India's penetration into the Eurasia plate. According to this interpretation, the mechanically weak Makran accretionary prism is subjected to a highly heterogeneous strain and deforms in response to convergence from both the Arabia and India plates. Rotation of the southeast Makran block accounts for complexity in the Chaman fault system and, in principle, reduces the seismic potential near Karachi by accommodating some slip along the southern Ornach-Nal fault. At the same time, geological indicators and along-strike fault slip profiles indicate that the Hoshab fault may also slip as a reverse fault in response to Arabia:Eurasia convergence - indicating that a single fault may accommodate multiple components of strain partitioning in a heterogeneous strain field over several seismic cycles.

  16. Particle image velocimetry measurement of the velocity field in turbulent thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Sun, Chao; Zhou, Sheng-Qi

    2003-12-01

    The spatial structure of the velocity field in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water has been measured using the particle image velocimetry technique, with the Rayleigh number Ra varying from 9 x 10(8) to 9 x 10(11) and the Prandtl number remaining approximately constant (Pr approximately 4). The study provides a direct confirmation that a rotatory mean wind indeed persists for the highest value of Ra reached in the experiment. The measurement reveals that the mean flow in the central region of the convection cell is of the shape of a coherent elliptical rotating core for Ra below 1 x 10(10). Above this Ra, the orientation of the elliptical core changes by a 90 degrees angle and an inner core rotating at a lower rate inside the original bulk core emerges. It is further found that the rotation frequencies of the inner core and the outer shell have distinct scalings with Ra; the scaling exponent for the outer-shell is 0.5 and it is 0.4 for the inner core. From the measured rms and skewness distributions of the velocity field, we find that velocity fluctuations at the cell center are neither homogeneous nor isotropic. The turbulent energy production fields further reveal that the mean wind is not driven by turbulent fluctuations associated with Reynolds stress.

  17. GNSS-based densification of the ITRF velocity field through a collaborative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Juliette; Bruyninx, Carine; Craymer, Michael; Dawson, John; Griffiths, Jake; Kenyeres, Ambrus; Rebischung, Paul; Sánchez, Laura; Santamaría-Gómez, Alvaro; Saria, Elifuraha; Altamimi, Zuheir

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the IAG Working Group "Integration of Dense Velocity Fields in the ITRF" is to provide a GNSS-based dense, unified and reliable velocity field globally referenced in the ITRF (International Terrestrial Reference Frame) and useful for geodynamical and geophysical interpretations. The WG is embedded in IAG Sub-Commission 1.3 "Regional Reference Frames" where it coexists with the Regional Reference Frame Sub-Commissions AFREF (Africa), APREF (Asia & Pacific), EUREF (Europe), NAREF (North America), SCAR (Antarctica), SIRGAS (Latin America & Caribbean). These IAG Regional Reference Frame sub-commissions are responsible for providing GNSS-based densified weekly solutions for their region. To obtain such a densified velocity field, the WG combined the individual weekly solutions from 7 individual contributors (AFREF, APREF, EUREF, NAREF (NGS, GSB), SIRGAS, IGS) and then stacked these weekly combined solutions in order to derive a ITRF2008 densification as well as the associated residual position time series for more than 2800 sites. Here we present the latest densification results.

  18. Image registration using stationary velocity fields parameterized by norm-minimizing Wendland kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Akshay; Sommer, Stefan; Sørensen, Lauge; Darkner, Sune; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2015-03-01

    Interpolating kernels are crucial to solving a stationary velocity field (SVF) based image registration problem. This is because, velocity fields need to be computed in non-integer locations during integration. The regularity in the solution to the SVF registration problem is controlled by the regularization term. In a variational formulation, this term is traditionally expressed as a squared norm which is a scalar inner product of the interpolating kernels parameterizing the velocity fields. The minimization of this term using the standard spline interpolation kernels (linear or cubic) is only approximative because of the lack of a compatible norm. In this paper, we propose to replace such interpolants with a norm-minimizing interpolant - the Wendland kernel which has the same computational simplicity like B-Splines. An application on the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative showed that Wendland SVF based measures separate (Alzheimer's disease v/s normal controls) better than both B-Spline SVFs (p<0.05 in amygdala) and B-Spline freeform deformation (p<0.05 in amygdala and cortical gray matter).

  19. Temporal Variability in Seismic Velocity at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, T.; Nayak, A.; Brenguier, F.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the temporal variability of ambient noise wavefield and search for velocity changes associated with activities of the geothermal energy development at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. The noise cross-correlations (NCFs) are computed for ~6 years of continuous three-component seismic data (December 2007 through January 2014) collected at 8 sites from the CalEnergy Subnetwork (EN network) with MSNoise software (Lecocq et al., 2014, SRL). All seismic data are downloaded from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center. Velocity changes (dv/v) are obtained by measuring time delay between 5-day stacks of NCFs and the reference NCF (average over the entire 6 year period). The time history of dv/v is determined by averaging dv/v measurements over all station/channel pairs (252 combinations). Our preliminary dv/v measurement suggests a gradual increase in dv/v over the 6-year period in a frequency range of 0.5-8.0 Hz. The resultant increase rate of velocity is about 0.01%/year. We also explore the frequency-dependent velocity change at the 5 different frequency bands (0.5-2.0 Hz, 0.75-3.0 Hz, 1.0-4.0 Hz, 1.5-6.0 Hz, and 2.0-8.0 Hz) and find that the level of this long-term dv/v variability is increased with increase of frequency (i.e., the highest increase rate of ~0.15%/year at the 0.5-2.0 Hz band). This result suggests that the velocity changes were mostly occurred in a depth of ~500 m assuming that the coda parts of NCFs (~10-40 s depending on station distances) are predominantly composed of scattered surface waves, with the SoCal velocity model (Dreger and Helmberger, 1993, JGR). No clear seasonal variation of dv/v is observed in the frequency band of 0.5-8.0 Hz.

  20. Estimate of absolute geostrophic velocity from the density field in the northeastern Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, D.A.

    1981-09-20

    A pair of hydrographic sections (35/sup 0/N, 155/sup 0/W) were analyzed to compute absolute velocity by using a variation of the technique by Stommel and Schott (1977). Absolute velocity is determined from an integrated form of the potential vorticity equation by a technique suggested by Davis (1978). This study is the first application of this technique that allows a direct comparison between the uncertainty in estimating a smooth density field and the amount of imbalance in the system of model equations. Because the amount of incompatibility (imbalance) in the system of equations is far smaller than is allowed by the uncertainty in defining the smooth field, the model equation is considered adequate for this set of data. Below 400 m, the nearly constant zonal isopycnal slope indicates that potential vorticity is uniform on isopycnal surfaces. Since the method depends on resolving flow directions from the intersection of isopycnals and surfaces of constant potential vorticity, the absolute velocity is indeterminate in this region. The model equation does, however, constrain the structure of the meridional density field and requires a poleward shift in the latitude which successively deeper isopycnals reach their maximum depth. The fact that this poleward translation can be predicted over several degrees of latitude suggests potential vorticity is uniform over a substantial portion of the North Pacific subtropical gyre. This poleward translation of the density field is an aspect of subtropical density fields, in general, and occurs in conjunction with a translation in the field of geopotential anomaly. It is directly related to the curvature in the deep portion of the beta spiral.

  1. Crustal velocity field near the big bend of California's San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snay, R.A.; Cline, M.W.; Philipp, C.R.; Jackson, D.D.; Feng, Y.; Shen, Z.-K.; Lisowski, M.

    1996-01-01

    We use geodetic data spanning the 1920-1992 interval to estimate the horizontal velocity field near the big bend segment of California's San Andreas fault (SAF). More specifically, we estimate a horizontal velocity vector for each node of a two-dimensional grid that has a 15-min-by-15-min mesh and that extends between latitudes 34.0??N and 36.0??N and longitudes 117.5??W and 120.5??W. For this estimation process, we apply bilinear interpolation to transfer crustal deformation information from geodetic sites to the grid nodes. The data include over a half century of triangulation measurements, over two decades of repeated electronic distance measurements, a decade of repeated very long baseline interferometry measurements, and several years of Global Positioning System measurements. Magnitudes for our estimated velocity vectors have formal standard errors ranging from 0.7 to 6.8 mm/yr. Our derived velocity field shows that (1) relative motion associated with the SAF exceeds 30 mm/yr and is distributed on the Earth's surface across a band (> 100 km wide) that is roughly centered on this fault; (2) when velocities are expressed relative to a fixed North America plate, the motion within our primary study region has a mean orientation of N44??W ?? 2?? and the surface trace of the SAF is congruent in shape to nearby contours of constant speed yet this trace is oriented between 5?? and 10?? counterclockwise relative to these contours; and (3) large strain rates (shear rates > 150 nrad/yr and/or areal dilatation rates < -150 nstr/yr) exist near the Garlock fault, near the White Wolf fault, and in the Ventura basin.

  2. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  3. Pulse-shape-dependent strong-field ionization viewed with velocity-map imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Geissler, Dominik; Weinacht, Thomas C.; Rozgonyi, Tamas; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Jesus

    2011-11-15

    We explore strong field molecular ionization with velocity map imaging of fragment ions produced by dissociation following ionization. Our measurements and ab initio electronic structure calculations allow us to identify various electronic states of the molecular cation populated during ionization, with multiple pathways to individual states highlighted by the pulse shape dependence. In addition, we show that relative populations can be reconstructed from our measurements. The results illustrate how strong field molecular ionization can be complicated by the presence and interaction of multiple cationic states during ionization.

  4. Modeling of integrated sunlight velocity measurements: The effect of surface darkening by magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Henney, C. J.; Schimpf, S.; Fossat, E.; Gelly, B.; Grec, G.; Loudagh, S.; Schmider, F.-X; Palle, P.; Regulo, C.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since the work by Claverie et al. (1982) that integrated-sunlight velocities measured with the resonance scattering technique show variations with time scales of weeks to months. The cause can be understood in terms of the effects of solar activity as was pointed out by Edmunds & Gough (1983) and Andersen & Maltby (1983). The latter authors included a model calculation based on sunspot areas which showed good promise of being able to quantitatively reproduce the observed velocity shifts. We discuss in this paper a new modeling effort based on daily magnetograms obtained at the 150-ft tower on Mt. Wilson. This type of database is more quantitative than sunspot area. Similar maps of magnetically sensitive quantities will be measured on a continuous time base as part of several planned helioseismology experiments (from space with the Solar Oscillations Imagery/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOI/MDI) experiment on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), see Scherrer et al. (1991) or with ground-based networks, see Hill & Leibacher (1991)). We discuss the correlations between various magnetically sensitive quantities and develop a new model for the effects of magnetic field on line profiles and surface brightness. From these correlations we integrate the line profile changes over the solar surface using observed magnetic field strengths measured at lambda 5250.2. The final output is a new model for the effects of magnetic fields on integrated sunlight velocities which we compare with daily offset velocities derived from the International Research on the Interior of the Sun (IRIS)-T instrument at the Observatorio del Teide.

  5. Rapid analysis of non-uniformly sampled pulsed field gradient data for velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, K; Park, J C; Pavlovskaya, G E; Gibbs, S J

    2001-06-01

    Bretthorst's recent generalization of the Lomb-Scargle periodogram shows that a sufficient statistic for frequency estimation from non-uniformly, but simultaneously sampled quadrature data is equivalent to the FFT of those data with the missing samples replaced by zeros. We have applied this concept to the rapid analysis of pulsed field gradient MRI data which have been non-uniformly sampled in the velocity encoding wave vector q. For a small number of q samples, it is more computationally efficient to calculate the periodogram directly rather than using the FFT algorithm with a large number of zeros. The algorithm we have implemented for finding the peak of the generalized periodogram is simple and robust; it involves repeated apodization and grid searching of the periodogram until the desired velocity resolution is achieved. The final estimate is refined by quadratic interpolation. We have tested the method for fully developed Poiseuille flow of a Newtonian fluid and have demonstrated substantial improvement in the precision of velocity measurement achievable in a fixed acquisition time with non-uniform sampling. The method is readily extendible to multidimensional data. Analysis of a 256 by 256 pixel image with 8 q samples and an effective velocity resolution of better than 1/680 of the Nyquist range requires approximately 1 minute computation time on a 400 MHz SUN Ultrasparc II processor. PMID:11672628

  6. On the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercolli, Lorenzo; Pajer, Enrico

    2014-03-01

    We compute the renormalized two-point functions of density, divergence and vorticity of the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because of momentum and mass conservation, the corrections from short scales to the large-scale power spectra of density, divergence and vorticity must start at order k4. For the vorticity this constitutes one of the two leading terms. Exact (approximated) self-similarity of an Einstein-de Sitter (ΛCDM) background fixes the time dependence so that the vorticity power spectrum at leading order is determined by the symmetries of the problem and the power spectrum around the non-linear scale. We show that to cancel all divergences in the velocity correlators one needs new counterterms. These fix the definition of velocity and do not represent new properties of the system. For an Einstein-de Sitter universe, we show that all three renormalized cross- and auto-correlation functions have the same structure but different numerical coefficients, which we compute. We elucidate the differences between using momentum and velocity.

  7. PIV measurements of the velocity field in counter-rotating cylindrical Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hout, Rene; Katz, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    An experimental investigation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was carried out to study the latitudinal planar velocity field in air counter-rotating cylindrical Couette flow at high Reynolds numbers. The facility consisted of two concentric cylinders with a radius ratio of η=ri / ri ro . - ro= 0.55 and aspect ratio γ=L/( ro-ri )= 11.2. Measurements were done at two outer cylinder Reynolds numbers, Ro = -25,196 and -52,042 while the inner cylinder Reynolds number varied between Ri = 2,635 to 40,446. At constant Ro with increasing Ri, the mean azimuthal velocity profile became increasingly flatter over most of the annulus with a strong shear layer near the cylinder wall. The radius at which Uθ changed sign moved away from the inner cylinder. Plotted against inner wall coordinates, the azimuthal velocity profile displayed log law behavior albeit with increased values of κ and B as Ri was increased. Normalized rms values of the azimuthal fluctuating velocity component and Reynolds stresses peak near to the wall. Magnitudes increase and become more significant over the whole width of the annulus as Ri increased. Higher moments display double peaks. Holding the inner cylinder rotation speed constant while increasing the outer cylinder speed strongly influenced the radial profiles of turbulent stresses.

  8. On the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mercolli, Lorenzo; Pajer, Enrico E-mail: enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    We compute the renormalized two-point functions of density, divergence and vorticity of the velocity in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because of momentum and mass conservation, the corrections from short scales to the large-scale power spectra of density, divergence and vorticity must start at order k{sup 4}. For the vorticity this constitutes one of the two leading terms. Exact (approximated) self-similarity of an Einstein-de Sitter (ΛCDM) background fixes the time dependence so that the vorticity power spectrum at leading order is determined by the symmetries of the problem and the power spectrum around the non-linear scale. We show that to cancel all divergences in the velocity correlators one needs new counterterms. These fix the definition of velocity and do not represent new properties of the system. For an Einstein-de Sitter universe, we show that all three renormalized cross- and auto-correlation functions have the same structure but different numerical coefficients, which we compute. We elucidate the differences between using momentum and velocity.

  9. Advection of passive magnetic field by the Gaussian velocity field with finite correlations in time and spatial parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2013-03-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique the model of passively advected weak magnetic field by an incompressible isotropic helical turbulent flow is investigated up to the second order of the perturbation theory (two-loop approximation) in the framework of an extended Kazantsev-Kraichnan model of kinematic magnetohydrodynamics. Statistical fluctuations of the velocity field are taken in the form of a Gaussian distribution with zero mean and defined noise with finite correlations in time. The two-loop analysis of all possible scaling regimes is done and the influence of helicity on the stability of scaling regimes is discussed and shown in the plane of exponents ɛ - η, where ɛ characterizes the energy spectrum of the velocity field in the inertial range E ∞ k 1 - 2ɛ, and η is related to the correlation time at the wave number k which is scaled as k -2 + η. It is shown that in non-helical case the scaling regimes of the present vector model are completely identical and have also the same properties as those obtained in the corresponding model of passively advected scalar field. Besides, it is also shown that when the turbulent environment under consideration is helical then the properties of the scaling regimes in models of passively advected scalar and vector (magnetic) fields are essentially different. The results demonstrate the importance of the presence of a symmetry breaking in a given turbulent environment for investigation of the influence of an internal tensor structure of the advected field on the inertial range scaling properties of the model under consideration and will be used in the analysis of the influence of helicity on the anomalous scaling of correlation functions of passively advected magnetic field.

  10. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  11. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  12. Pressure and velocity field measurements of pulsating flow in a square channel y-junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuhoff, Markus; Kalpakli, Athanasia; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2013-11-01

    The pressure and velocity fields in a y-junction of a square (40 × 40 mm2) cross-section channel were investigated during pulsating flow. One of the sides of the channel was covered with fast responding pressure sensitive paint (PSP) whereas the velocity field at the channel center parallel to the PSP surface was measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The flow conditions, in terms of mass flow rate and pulsation frequency, were selected to resemble the flow inside an exhaust manifold of a small internal combustion engine, although the gas was at room temperature. The mass flow was varied between 10 and 130 g/s with pulsations between 0 and 80 Hz. For both the PSP and the PIV measurements images were acquired unsynchronized to the pulses using a high-speed camera and phase averages were formed a posteriori. The use of PSP together with PIV demonstrates how the two techniques can be used to verify and complement each other, PIV excelling at the lower mass flow rates and PSP at the higher. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratio for PSP at low velocities can be enhanced using a technique based on singular value decomposition.

  13. GPS Velocity and Strain Rate Fields in Southwest Anatolia from Repeated GPS Measurements.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Saffet; Sahin, Muhammed; Tiryakioğlu, Ibrahim; Gülal, Engin; Telli, Ali Kazım

    2009-01-01

    Southwestern Turkey is a tectonically active area. To determine kinematics and strain distribution in this region, a GPS network of sixteen stations was established. We have used GPS velocity field data for southwest Anatolia from continuous measurements covering the period 2003 to 2006 to estimate current crustal deformation of this tectonically active region. GPS data were processed using GAMIT/GLOBK software and velocity and strain rate fields were estimated in the study area. The measurements showed velocities of 15-30 mm/yr toward the southwest and strain values up to 0.28-8.23×10(-8). Results showed that extension has been determined in the Burdur-Isparta region. In this study, all of strain data reveal an extensional neotectonic regime through the northeast edge of the Isparta Angle despite the previously reported compressional neotectonic regime. Meanwhile, results showed some small differences relatively with the 2006 model of Reilinger et al. As a result, active tectonic movements, in agreement with earthquake fault plane solutions showed important activity. PMID:22573998

  14. GPS Velocity and Strain Rate Fields in Southwest Anatolia from Repeated GPS Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Erdoğan, Saffet; Şahin, Muhammed; Tiryakioğlu, İbrahim; Gülal, Engin; Telli, Ali Kazım

    2009-01-01

    Southwestern Turkey is a tectonically active area. To determine kinematics and strain distribution in this region, a GPS network of sixteen stations was established. We have used GPS velocity field data for southwest Anatolia from continuous measurements covering the period 2003 to 2006 to estimate current crustal deformation of this tectonically active region. GPS data were processed using GAMIT/GLOBK software and velocity and strain rate fields were estimated in the study area. The measurements showed velocities of 15–30 mm/yr toward the southwest and strain values up to 0.28–8.23×10−8. Results showed that extension has been determined in the Burdur-Isparta region. In this study, all of strain data reveal an extensional neotectonic regime through the northeast edge of the Isparta Angle despite the previously reported compressional neotectonic regime. Meanwhile, results showed some small differences relatively with the 2006 model of Reilinger et al. As a result, active tectonic movements, in agreement with earthquake fault plane solutions showed important activity. PMID:22573998

  15. Secondary velocity fields in the conducting airways of the human lung.

    PubMed

    Fresconi, Frank E; Prasad, Ajay K

    2007-10-01

    An understanding of flow and dispersion in the human respiratory airways is necessary to assess the toxicological impact of inhaled particulate matter as well as to optimize the design of inhalable pharmaceutical aerosols and their delivery systems. Secondary flows affect dispersion in the lung by mixing solute in the lumen cross section. The goal of this study is to measure and interpret these secondary velocity fields using in vitro lung models. Particle image velocimetry experiments were conducted in a three-generational, anatomically accurate model of the conducting region of the lung. Inspiration and expiration flows were examined under steady and oscillatory flow conditions. Results illustrate secondary flow fields as a function of flow direction, Reynolds number, axial location with respect to the bifurcation junction, generation, branch, phase in the oscillatory cycle, and Womersley number. Critical Dean number for the formation of secondary vortices in the airways, as well as the strength and development length of secondary flow, is characterized. The normalized secondary velocity magnitude was similar on inspiration and expiration and did not vary appreciably with generation or branch. Oscillatory flow fields were not significantly different from corresponding steady flow fields up to a Womersley number of 1 and no instabilities related to shear were detected on flow reversal. These observations were qualitatively interpreted with respect to the simple streaming, augmented dispersion, and steady streaming convective dispersion mechanisms.

  16. Magnetic Field Strength in an Intermediate-velocity Ionized Filament in the First Galactic Quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stil, J. M.; Hryhoriw, A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the magnetic field in an intermediate-velocity filament for which the Hα intensity in the WHAM survey correlates with excess Faraday rotation of extragalactic radio sources over the length of the filament from b ≈ 20° to b ≈ 55°. The density-weighted mean magnetic field is 2.8 +/- 0.8 μ {{G}}, derived from rotation measures and an empirical relation between Hα emission measure and dispersion measure from Berkhuijsen et al. In view of the uncertainties in the derived magnetic field strength, we propose an alternative use of the available data, rotation measure, and emission measure, to derive a lower limit to the Alfvén speed, weighted by electron density {n}e3/2. We find lower limits to the Alfvén speed that are comparable to or larger than the sound speed in a {10}4 {{K}} plasma, and conclude that the magnetic field is dynamically important. We discuss the role of intermediate-velocity gas as a locus of Faraday rotation in the interstellar medium, and propose that this lower limit to the Alfvén speed may also be applicable to Faraday rotation by galaxy clusters.

  17. Effects of light illumination on electron velocity of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures under high electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Sang, Ling; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Feng, Zhihong; Lv, Yuanjie; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, B.; Ge, Weikun

    2014-12-15

    We have investigated the variation of electron velocity in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures depending on illuminating light intensity and wavelength. It is shown that the electron velocity at high electric field increases under above-band light illumination. This electron velocity enhancement is found to be related to the photo-generated cold holes which interact with hot electrons and thus accelerate the energy relaxation at high electric field. The results suggest an alternative way to improve the electron energy relaxation rate and hence the electron velocity in GaN based heterostructures.

  18. Velocity Field Measurements in Rarefied, Hypersonic Flows of Nitrogen Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Eric

    Velocity fields are measured in the shock layer and boundary layer on a plate with a cylindrical fin immersed in a hypersonic, free jet of nitrogen, using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of iodine. A sheet beam from a single-mode argon laser at 514 nm is used to excite hyperfine components of the P(13), R(15) and P(48), P(103) blended rotational-vibrational lines in the B-X electronic transition for iodine seeded in the flow. The Doppler broadening and shift of these lines, and the relative rotational line strengths are determined for excitation spectra recorded in a planar grid. Using this measurement technique, estimates for iodine of the mass velocity component and kinetic temperature of translation in the direction of laser propagation, rotational temperature, and relative number density are determined at each point. Sectional planes of the flow over the body are investigated at a spatial resolution on the scale of the molecular mean-free-path in the free jet near the plate leading edge. Two directions within each plane are examined, to determine the velocity vector and to investigate translational non-equilibrium. Predictions from two direct simulation Monte Carlo computations of the flow are compared with the measurements. Large values of slip velocity and temperature jump at the plate surface are observed for iodine. Measurements and DSMC predictions indicate strong translational non-equilibrium effects for the iodine in the shock wave and the thick boundary layer on the plate, and are qualitatively consistent with a bimodal velocity distribution function. As a consequence of the ratio of molecular masses, the translational non-equilibrium of iodine is much greater than for nitrogen.

  19. Antarctic Glaciological Data at NSIDC: field data, temperature, and ice velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, R.; Bohlander, J.; Scambos, T.; Berthier, E.; Raup, B.; Scharfen, G.

    2003-12-01

    An extensive collection of many Antarctic glaciological parameters is available for the polar science community upon request. The National Science Foundation's Office of Polar Programs funds the Antarctic Glaciological Data Center (AGDC) at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) to archive and distribute Antarctic glaciological and cryospheric system data collected by the U.S. Antarctic Program. AGDC facilitates data exchange among Principal Investigators, preserves recently collected data useful to future research, gathers data sets from past research, and compiles continent-wide information useful for modeling and field work planning. Data sets are available via our web site, http://nsidc.org/agdc/. From here, users can access extensive documentation, citation information, locator maps, derived images and references, and the numerical data. More than 50 Antarctic scientists have contributed data to the archive. Among the compiled products distributed by AGDC are VELMAP and THERMAP. THERMAP is a compilation of over 600 shallow firn temperature measurements ('10-meter temperatures') collected since 1950. These data provide a record of mean annual temperature, and potentially hold a record of climate change on the continent. The data are represented with maps showing the traverse route, and include data sources, measurement technique, and additional measurements made at each site, i.e., snow density and accumulation. VELMAP is an archive of surface ice velocity measurements for the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The primary objective of VELMAP is to assemble a historic record of outlet glaciers and ice shelf ice motion over the Antarctic. The collection includes both PI-contributed measurements and data generated at NSIDC using Landsat and SPOT satellite imagery. Tabular data contain position, speed, bearing, and data quality information, and related references. Two new VELMAP data sets are highlighted: the Mertz Glacier and the Institute Ice Stream. Mertz Glacier ice

  20. Statistical mechanics of velocity and magnetic fields in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, V.

    1985-02-01

    A statistical mechanics of the velocity and magnetic fields is formulated for an active region plasma. The plasma subjected to the conservation laws emerges in a most probable state which is described by an equilibrium distribution function containing a Lagrange multiplier for every invariant of the system. The Lagrange multipliers are determined by demanding that the measured expectation values of the invariants be reproduced. For a numerical exercise, some probable values are assumed for these invariants. The total energy of a coronal loop is estimated from energy balance considerations. Doppler widths of the UV and EUV lines excited in the coronal loop plasma give a measure of the root-mean-square velocities. Measurements of magnetic helicity are not available for the solar corona.

  1. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.G.; Davis, S.J.; Kessler, W.J.; Sonnenfroh, D.M. )

    1992-07-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties. 13 refs.

  2. Velocity and potential vorticity fields measured by altimetric imaging velocimetry in the rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Y. D.; Rhines, P. B.; Lindahl, E. G.

    2009-12-01

    An optical method of altimetric imaging velocimetry (AIV) for measuring the slope of the surface elevation in the rotating fluid with free surface is described. This method allows one to obtain the major dynamical fields in the fluid layer including velocity, vorticity and surface elevation. When used in combination with the Optical Thickness method the AIV can be used to render the full dynamical characteristics of a two-layer flow. Both methods allow one to achieve very high spatial resolution by rendering a velocity vector in each pixel of the image. An example of the two-layer source-driven flow on a γ-plane (also called polar β-plane) is offered to demonstrate the application of these methods. This “β-plume’ is a gyre-like response to a point source of fluid, including intense jets, eddies and Rossby waves.

  3. Updated velocity field for the Caribbean plate from COCONet GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.

    2013-05-01

    The currently accepted kinematic model of the Caribbean plate presented by DeMets et al., 2007, is based on velocities from 6 continuous and 14 campaign GPS sites. Our work attempts to refine the current plate model by evaluating data from the 60+ continuous GPS stations that comprise COCONet. COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean Observation Network) is an NSF-funded collaborative natural hazards research effort that has enhanced the geodetic infrastructure in the region surrounding the Caribbean plate. Data for this study was obtained from the open data archive at UNAVCO. GPS data have been processed with an absolute point positioning strategy using GIPSY-OASIS II, using the non-fiducial, final precise clock and orbit parameters provided by JPL. An updated velocity field for the Caribbean plate will be presented and co-seismic and post-seismic slip, recorded by network stations will be examined for earthquakes that have occurred within the COCONet footprint.

  4. Experimental investigation of the velocity field and skin friction for convecting vortex/boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacRorie, Michael; Pauley, Wayne R.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between propagating spanwise vortices and a turbulent boundary layer was studied experimentally. The experimental techniques include hotwire anemometry and smoke visualization. The results focus on the relationship between the passage of vortex structures and the response of the boundary layer in terms of unsteady mean velocity, wall shear, and turbulence quantities. Both positive and negative circulation vortices were studied at three different heights above the test surface. The results indicate that the height of the vortex above the surface has an effect on the wall shear response. However, vortex height and strength are related in this experiment. A phase lag between the passage of the vortex center and the peak wall shear stress response is demonstrated. This phase lag was found to increase with streamwise distance. An examination of the response of the mean and turbulent velocity fields in the boundary layer shows that the phase lag is confined to a region close to the wall.

  5. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties.

  6. Ion velocity and plasma potential measurements of a cylindrical cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Young, C. V.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of the most probable time-averaged axial ion velocities and plasma potential within the acceleration channel and in the plume of a straight-channeled cylindrical cusped field thruster operating on xenon are presented. Ion velocities for the thruster are derived from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 5d[4]{sub 7/2}-6p[3]{sub 5/2} xenon ion excited state transition centered at {lambda}=834.72nm. Plasma potential measurements are made using a floating emissive probe with a thoriated-tungsten filament. The thruster is operated in a power matched condition with 300 V applied anode potential for comparison to previous krypton plasma potential measurements, and a low power condition with 150 V applied anode potential. Correlations are seen between the plasma potential drop outside of the thruster and kinetic energy contours of the accelerating ions.

  7. A redshift survey of IRAS galaxies. III - Reconstruction of the velocity and density fields in N-body model universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Marc; Strauss, Michael A.; Yahil, Amos

    1991-01-01

    N-body simulations of a 'cold dark matter' universe are presently used to calibrate the accuracy, and assess the limitations, of the procedure previously employed to predict the velocity field within 8000 km/sec of the Local Group through the application of linear gravitational theory to a full-sky, flux-limited sample of IRAS galaxies. The rms difference between the one-dimensional acceleration and velocity of field particles is an increasing function of local density; linear theory can in this way account for all but one-sixth of kinetic energy. A series of artificial IRAS catalogs closely matching the real sample in space density and clustering amplitude is constructed. Velocity correlation functions are used to demonstrate that the predicted velocity fields are in good agreement with the true velocity fields on large scales.

  8. ICEG2D: An Integrated Software Package for Automated Prediction of Flow Fields for Single-Element Airfoils with Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David S.; Soni, Bharat K.

    2000-01-01

    An integrated software package, ICEG2D, was developed to automate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for single-element airfoils with ice accretion. ICEG2D is designed to automatically perform three primary functions: (1) generating a grid-ready, surface definition based on the geometrical characteristics of the iced airfoil surface, (2) generating a high-quality grid using the generated surface point distribution, and (3) generating the input and restart files needed to run the general purpose CFD solver NPARC. ICEG2D can be executed in batch mode using a script file or in an interactive mode by entering directives from a command line. This report summarizes activities completed in the first year of a three-year research and development program to address issues related to CFD simulations for aircraft components with ice accretion. Specifically, this document describes the technology employed in the software, the installation procedure, and a description of the operation of the software package. Validation of the geometry and grid generation modules of ICEG2D is also discussed.

  9. Axisymmetric electromagnetic field influence on the characteristic velocity of an arc-jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oggero, M.; Gennuso, D.

    1984-01-01

    Tests for determining the influence of an axisymmetric EM field on the characteristic velocity of an arc jet are presented. The experimental set up is briefly described. Tests were performed with rotation induced by the centrifugal and magnetic fields in the same sense. The fuels used were HE and N2 and the results are discussed. It is found that by variation of the induction, current, and arc jet strength, the behavior is determined essentially by the shape of the cathodic and anodic blobs on the electrodes together with their movement under the combined effect of the aerodynamic and magnetic fields. In view of the different characteristics of He and N2 in respect to the dissociation heat and ionization, it is expected that the regime of the arc jet when used with H2 fuel will be similar to that with He.

  10. MTF characterization in 2D and 3D for a high resolution, large field of view flat panel imager for cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Richmond, Michelle; Zentai, George

    2014-03-01

    The 2D and 3D modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a custom made, large 40x30cm2 area, 600- micron CsI-TFT based flat panel imager having 127-micron pixellation, along with the micro-fiber scintillator structure, were characterized in detail using various techniques. The larger area detector yields a reconstructed FOV of 25cm diameter with an 80cm SID in CT mode. The MTFs were determined with 1x1 (intrinsic) binning. The 2D MTFs were determined using a 50.8 micron tungsten wire and a solid lead edge, and the 3D MTF was measured using a custom made phantom consisting of three nearly orthogonal 50.8 micron tungsten wires suspended in an acrylic cubic frame. The 2D projection data was reconstructed using an iterative OSC algorithm using 16 subsets and 5 iterations. As additional verification of the resolution, along with scatter, the Catphan® phantom was also imaged and reconstructed with identical parameters. The measured 2D MTF was ~4% using the wire technique and ~1% using the edge technique at the 3.94 lp/mm Nyquist cut-off frequency. The average 3D MTF measured along the wires was ~8% at the Nyquist. At 50% MTF, the resolutions were 1.2 and 2.1 lp/mm in 2D and 3D, respectively. In the Catphan® phantom, the 1.7 lp/mm bars were easily observed. Lastly, the 3D MTF measured on the three wires has an observed 5.9% RMSD, indicating that the resolution of the imaging system is uniform and spatially independent. This high performance detector is integrated into a dedicated breast SPECT-CT imaging system.

  11. Temporal Evolution of Velocity and Magnetic Field in and around Umbral Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiroko; Bellot Rubio, Luis R.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, Jaime; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc

    2012-09-01

    We study the temporal evolution of umbral dots (UDs) using measurements from the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Scans of the magnetically sensitive 630 nm iron lines were performed under stable atmospheric conditions for 71 minutes with a cadence of 63 s. These observations allow us to investigate the magnetic field and velocity in and around UDs at a resolution approaching 0farcs13. From the analysis of 339 UDs, we draw the following conclusions: (1) UDs show clear hints of upflows, as predicted by magnetohydrodynamic simulations. By contrast, we could not find systematic downflow signals. Only in very deep layers, we detect localized downflows around UDs, but they do not persist in time. (2) We confirm that UDs exhibit weaker and more inclined fields than their surroundings, as reported previously. However, UDs that have strong fields above 2000 G or are in the decay phase show enhanced and more vertical fields. (3) There are enhanced fields at the migration front of UDs detached from penumbral grains, as if their motion were impeded by the ambient field. (4) Long-lived UDs travel longer distances with slower proper motions. Our results appear to confirm some aspects of recent numerical simulations of magnetoconvection in the umbra (e.g., the existence of upflows in UDs), but not others (e.g., the systematic weakening of the magnetic field at the position of UDs).

  12. TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF VELOCITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN AND AROUND UMBRAL DOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Hiroko; Bellot Rubio, Luis R.; De la Cruz Rodriguez, Jaime; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc

    2012-09-20

    We study the temporal evolution of umbral dots (UDs) using measurements from the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Scans of the magnetically sensitive 630 nm iron lines were performed under stable atmospheric conditions for 71 minutes with a cadence of 63 s. These observations allow us to investigate the magnetic field and velocity in and around UDs at a resolution approaching 0.''13. From the analysis of 339 UDs, we draw the following conclusions: (1) UDs show clear hints of upflows, as predicted by magnetohydrodynamic simulations. By contrast, we could not find systematic downflow signals. Only in very deep layers, we detect localized downflows around UDs, but they do not persist in time. (2) We confirm that UDs exhibit weaker and more inclined fields than their surroundings, as reported previously. However, UDs that have strong fields above 2000 G or are in the decay phase show enhanced and more vertical fields. (3) There are enhanced fields at the migration front of UDs detached from penumbral grains, as if their motion were impeded by the ambient field. (4) Long-lived UDs travel longer distances with slower proper motions. Our results appear to confirm some aspects of recent numerical simulations of magnetoconvection in the umbra (e.g., the existence of upflows in UDs), but not others (e.g., the systematic weakening of the magnetic field at the position of UDs).

  13. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  14. Field-aligned and field-perpendicular velocities in the ionospheric F2-layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rishbeth, H.; Ganguly, S.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1978-01-01

    The correlation between variations in the components of the ionospheric F2-layer parallel and perpendicular to the geomagnetic field is theoretically examined. The servo model of Rishbath (1967) is used as a basis for further calculations. The equations involved are presented in full and results are given for various assumed conditions. The response of the model to both steplike and periodic perturbations of the perpendicular component is considered along with the effects of winds and the Coriolis force. Arecibo and Malvern data are reviewed on the basis of theoretically predicted behavior.

  15. Phase-field simulations of velocity selection in rapidly solidified binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Greenwood, Michael; Haataja, Mikko; Provatas, Nikolas

    2006-09-01

    Time-dependent simulations of two-dimensional isothermal Ni-Cu dendrites are simulated using a phase-field model solved with a finite-difference adaptive mesh refinement technique. Dendrite tip velocity selection is examined and found to exhibit a transition between two markedly different regimes as undercooling is increased. At low undercooling, the dendrite tip growth rate is consistent with the kinetics of the classical Stefan problem, where the interface is assume to be in local equilibrium. At high undercooling, the growth velocity selected approaches a linear dependence on melt undercooling, consistent with the continuous growth kinetics of Aziz and with a one-dimensional steady-state phase-field asymptotic analysis of Ahmad [Phys. Rev. E 58, 3436 (1998)]. Our simulations are also consistent with other previously observed behaviors of dendritic growth as undercooling is increased. These include the transition of dendritic morphology to absolute stability and nonequilibrium solute partitioning. Our results show that phase-field models of solidification, which inherently contain a nonzero interface width, can be used to study the dynamics of complex solidification phenomena involving both equilibrium and nonequilibrium interface growth kinetics.

  16. Retrieving density and velocity fields of the ocean's interior from surface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Peng, Shiqiu; Wang, Jinbo; Huang, Rui Xin

    2014-12-01

    Using the "interior + surface quasigeostrophic" (isQG) method, the density and horizontal velocity fields of the ocean's interior can be retrieved from surface data. This method was applied to the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) and the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)/Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA) reanalysis data sets. The input surface data include sea surface height (SSH), sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), and a region-averaged stratification. The retrieved subsurface fields are compared with reanalysis data for three tested regions, and the results indicate that the isQG method is robust. The isQG method is particularly successful in the energetic regions like the Gulf Stream region with weak stratification, and the Kuroshio region with strong correlation between sea surface density (SSD) and SSH. It also works, though less satisfactorily, in the Agulhas leakage region. The performance of the isQG method in retrieving subsurface fields varies with season, and peaks in winter when the mixed layer is deeper and stratification is weaker. In addition, higher-resolution data may facilitate the isQG method to achieve a more successful reconstruction for the velocity retrieval. Our results suggested that the isQG method can be used to reconstruct the ocean interior from the satellite-derived SSH, SST, and SSS data in the near future.

  17. Integrated velocity field from ground and satellite geodetic techniques: application to Arenal volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Cyril; del Potro, Rodrigo; Biggs, Juliet; Gottsmann, Joachim; Ebmeier, Susanna K.; Guillaume, Sébastien; Cattin, Paul-Henri; Van der Laat, Rodolfo

    2015-02-01

    Measurements of ground deformation can be used to identify and interpret geophysical processes occurring at volcanoes. Most studies rely on a single geodetic technique, or fit a geophysical model to the results of multiple geodetic techniques. Here we present a methodology that combines GPS, Total Station measurements and InSAR into a single reference frame to produce an integrated 3-D geodetic velocity surface without any prior geophysical assumptions. The methodology consists of five steps: design of the network, acquisition and processing of the data, spatial integration of the measurements, time series computation and finally the integration of spatial and temporal measurements. The most significant improvements of this method are (1) the reduction of the required field time, (2) the unambiguous detection of outliers, (3) an increased measurement accuracy and (4) the construction of a 3-D geodetic velocity field. We apply this methodology to ongoing motion on Arenal's western flank. Integration of multiple measurement techniques at Arenal volcano revealed a deformation field that is more complex than that described by individual geodetic techniques, yet remains consistent with previous studies. This approach can be applied to volcano monitoring worldwide and has the potential to be extended to incorporate other geodetic techniques and to study transient deformation.

  18. Stationary electron velocity distribution function in crossed electric and magnetic fields with collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shagayda, Andrey

    2012-08-15

    Analytical studies and numerical simulations show that the electron velocity distribution function in a Hall thruster discharge with crossed electric and magnetic fields is not Maxwellian. This is due to the fact that the mean free path between collisions is greater than both the Larmor radius and the characteristic dimensions of the discharge channel. However in numerical models of Hall thrusters, a hydrodynamic approach is often used to describe the electron dynamics, because discharge simulation in a fully kinetic approach requires large computing resources and is time consuming. A more accurate modeling of the electron flow in the hydrodynamic approximation requires taking into account the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function and finding its moments, an approach that reflects the properties of electrons drifting in crossed electric and magnetic fields better than the commonly used Euler or Navier-Stokes approximations. In the present paper, an expression for the electron velocity distribution function in rarefied spatially homogeneous stationary plasma with crossed electric and magnetic fields and predominance of collisions with heavy particles is derived in the relaxation approximation. The main moments of the distribution function including longitudinal and transversal temperatures, the components of the viscous stress tensor, and of the heat flux vector are calculated. Distinctive features of the hydrodynamic description of electrons with a strongly non-equilibrium distribution function and the prospects for further development of the proposed approach for calculating the distribution function in spatially inhomogeneous plasma are discussed.

  19. The field-dependent interface recombination velocity for organic-inorganic heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmytkowski, Jędrzej

    2016-10-01

    We have derived an analytical formula which describes the field-dependent interface recombination velocity for the boundary of two materials characterized by different permittivities. The interface recombination of charge carriers has been considered in the presence of image force Schottky barrier. We suggest that this effect may play an important role in the loss of current for organic-inorganic hybrid heterojunctions. It has been proved that the presented method is a generalization of the Scott-Malliaras model of surface recombination at the organic/metal interface. We also discuss that this model is intuitively similar but not analogous to the Langevin mechanism of bulk recombination.

  20. The Velocity Field Induced by a Trailing Vortex in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    楠瀬, 一洋; 小高, 雄介

    In order to estimate the velocity field induced by a trailing vortex which is located along the free-stream direction in supersonic flow, we extend the Biot-Savart law, that is originally proven for subsonic flow, to supersonic flow. During the derivation we use the linearized perturbation potential equation that can be applied to both subsonic and supersonic (inviscid) flows. It is shown that our current formula reduces to the original Biot-Savart law when the flow speed reduces from supersonic to subsonic one. It is also shown in the appendix that the Kutta-Joukowski theorem is still applicable to supersonic flows within the supersonic thin-airfoil approximations.

  1. Laser Doppler visualisation of the velocity field by excluding the influence of multiparticle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dubnishchev, Yu N; Chugui, Yu V; Kompenhans, J

    2009-10-31

    The method of laser Doppler visualisation and measurement of the velocity field in gas and liquid flows by suppressing the influence of multiparticle scattering is discussed. The cross section of the flow under study is illuminated by a laser beam transformed by an anamorphic optical system into a laser sheet. The effect of multiparticle scattering is eliminated by obtaining differential combinations of frequency-demodulated images of the laser sheet in different regions of the angular spectrum of scattered light. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. The crustal velocity field mosaic of the Alpine Mediterranean area (Italy): Insights from new geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farolfi, Gregorio; Del Ventisette, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    A new horizontal crustal velocity field of Alpine Mediterranean area was determined by continuous long time series (6.5 years) of 113 Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) permanent stations. The processing was performed using state-of-the-art absolute antenna phase center correction model and recomputed precise IGS orbits available since April 2014. Moreover, a new more accurate tropospheric mapping function for geodetic applications was adopted. Results provide a new detailed map of the kinematics throughout the entire study area. This area is characterized by a complex tectonic setting driven by the interaction of Eurasian and African plates. The eastern Alps, Corsica, Sardinia and the Tyrrhenian Sea (which is covered only by interpolation data) show small velocity residuals with respect to the Eurasian plate. The whole Apennines axis discriminates two different velocity patterns, the Adriatic and the Tyrrhenian area. The area around Messina Strait, which separates peninsular Italy and Sicily, represents a poorly understood region. Results identify an important boundary zone between two different domains, Calabria and Sicily, which are characterized by different crustal motions. The northeastern part of Sicily and Calabria move like Adriatic area, whilst the rest of Sicily, Malta and Lampedusa are dominated by African motion.

  3. ICEG2D (v2.0) - An Integrated Software Package for Automated Prediction of Flow Fields for Single-Element Airfoils With Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson David S.; Soni, Bharat K.

    2001-01-01

    An integrated geometry/grid/simulation software package, ICEG2D, is being developed to automate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for single- and multi-element airfoils with ice accretions. The current version, ICEG213 (v2.0), was designed to automatically perform four primary functions: (1) generate a grid-ready surface definition based on the geometrical characteristics of the iced airfoil surface, (2) generate high-quality structured and generalized grids starting from a defined surface definition, (3) generate the input and restart files needed to run the structured grid CFD solver NPARC or the generalized grid CFD solver HYBFL2D, and (4) using the flow solutions, generate solution-adaptive grids. ICEG2D (v2.0) can be operated in either a batch mode using a script file or in an interactive mode by entering directives from a command line within a Unix shell. This report summarizes activities completed in the first two years of a three-year research and development program to address automation issues related to CFD simulations for airfoils with ice accretions. As well as describing the technology employed in the software, this document serves as a users manual providing installation and operating instructions. An evaluation of the software is also presented.

  4. Retrieval of Hydrometeor Drop Size Distributions from TRMM Field Campaign Profiler Doppler Velocity Spectra Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Christopher R.; Gage, Kenneth S.

    2003-01-01

    Consistent with the original proposal and work plan, this project focused on estimating the raindrop size distributions (DSDs) retrieved from vertically pointing Doppler radar profilers and analyzing the relationship of the retrieved DSDs with the dynamics of the precipitation processes. The first phase of this project focused on developing the model to retrieve the DSD from the observed Doppler velocity spectra. The second phase used this model to perform DSD retrievals from the profiler observations made during the TRMM Ground Validation Field Campaigns of TEFLUN-B, TRMM-LBA, and KWAJEX. The third phase of this project established collaborations with scientists involved with each field campaign in order to validate the profiler DSD estimates and to enable the profiler retrievals to be used in their research. Through these collaborations, the retrieved DSDs were placed into context with the dynamical processes of the observed precipitating cloud systems.

  5. Velocity and pressure fields associated with near-wall turbulence structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Arne V.; Alfredsson, P. Henrik; Kim, John

    1990-01-01

    Computer generated databases containing velocity and pressure fields in three-dimensional space at a sequence of time-steps, were used for the investigation of near-wall turbulence structures, their space-time evolution, and their associated pressure fields. The main body of the results were obtained from simulation data for turbulent channel flow at a Reynolds number of 180 (based on half-channel height and friction velocity) with a grid of 128 x 129 x and 128 points. The flow was followed over a total time of 141 viscous time units. Spanwise centering of the detected structures was found to be essential in order to obtain a correct magnitude of the associated Reynolds stress contribution. A positive wall-pressure peak is found immediately beneath the center of the structure. The maximum amplitude of the pressure pattern was, however, found in the buffer region at the center of the shear-layer. It was also found that these flow structures often reach a maximum strength in connection with an asymmetric spanwise motion, which motivated the construction of a conditional sampling scheme that preserved this asymmetry.

  6. Topologies of velocity-field stagnation points generated by a single pair of magnets in free-surface electromagnetic experiments.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, J M García; Vassilicos, J C; Rossi, L

    2014-10-01

    The velocity fields generated by a static pair of magnets in free-surface electromagnetically forced flows are analyzed for different magnet attitudes, ionic currents, and brine depths. A wide range of laminar velocity fields is obtained despite the forcing simplicity. The velocity fields are classified according to their temporal mean flow topology, which strongly depends on the forcing geometry but barely on its strength, even through the bifurcation to unsteady regimes. The mean flow topology possesses a major influence on the critical Reynolds number Rec under which the steady velocity fields remain stable. The qualitative comparison of the dependence of Rec on the topology is in agreement with previous works. The unsteady configurations evidence the advection of smaller flow structures by the largest scales, commonly known as "sweeping."

  7. Topologies of velocity-field stagnation points generated by a single pair of magnets in free-surface electromagnetic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, J. M. García; Vassilicos, J. C.; Rossi, L.

    2014-10-01

    The velocity fields generated by a static pair of magnets in free-surface electromagnetically forced flows are analyzed for different magnet attitudes, ionic currents, and brine depths. A wide range of laminar velocity fields is obtained despite the forcing simplicity. The velocity fields are classified according to their temporal mean flow topology, which strongly depends on the forcing geometry but barely on its strength, even through the bifurcation to unsteady regimes. The mean flow topology possesses a major influence on the critical Reynolds numberRec under which the steady velocity fields remain stable. The qualitative comparison of the dependence of Rec on the topology is in agreement with previous works. The unsteady configurations evidence the advection of smaller flow structures by the largest scales, commonly known as "sweeping."

  8. Gyrokinetic full f analysis of electric field dynamics and poloidal velocity in the FT2-tokamak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Leerink, S.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Nora, M.; Ogando, F.

    2008-09-15

    The ELMFIRE gyrokinetic simulation code has been used to perform full f simulations of the FT-2 tokamak. The dynamics of the radial electric field and the creation of poloidal velocity in the presence of turbulence are presented.

  9. Effects of the curvature of a lava channel on velocity and stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerio, Antonella; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Bends in lava flows due to local variations in topography are commonly observed in volcanic fields. The curvature of a channel affects the flow surface morphology, as described in literature by Greeley (1971) and Peterson (1994). Where channels make an especially sharp bend, crust plates break and are incorporated within the flow by remelting. In some places, they jam together welding to the sides of the channel and forming a stable roof. We propose a model to explain the effects of the curvature of a channel on velocity, shear stress and formation of solid crust at the surface. Lava is described as a Newtonian, homogeneous, isotropic and incompressible fluid. The steady-state solution of the Navier-Stokes equation is found for a unidirectional flow, in cylindrical polar coordinates, neglecting the gradient of pressure and assuming a dependence of velocity on the radial coordinate only. The flow levees are described as arcs of concentric circumferences, with their centres in the origin of the reference frame. The equation is solved using non-slip boundary conditions at the levees. From the constitutive equation of a Newtonian incompressible fluid we obtain the nonvanishing component of the shear stress. As a consequence of the curvature of the channel, velocity and shear stress show an asymmetric behaviour in respect to the centre of the channel. The gradient of velocity and the shear stress reach larger values close to the levee with the higher curvature. Heat radiation and convection into the atmosphere are considered as the main cooling processes. Solid platforms form at the flow surface during cooling. Crust plates are laterally confined by the shear regions with high stress values. The model analyses the effects of the curvature of a channel on the development and shape of surface solid plates. The dimension and shape of plates are controlled by the competition between the shear stress and crust yield strength, and the degree of crust coverage of the channel

  10. Application of acoustic tomography to reconstruct the horizontal flow velocity field in a shallow river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Kaneko, Arata; Nistor, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    A novel acoustic tomographic measurement system capable of resolving sound travel time in extremely shallow rivers is introduced and the results of an extensive field measurements campaign are presented and further discussed. Acoustic pulses were transmitted over a wide frequency band of 20-35 kHz between eight transducers for about a week in a meandering reach of theBāsen River, Hiroshima, Japan. The purpose of the field experiment was validating the concept of acoustic tomography in rivers for visualizing current fields. The particular novelty of the experiment resides in its unusual tomographic features: subbasin scale (100 m × 270 m) and shallowness (0.5-3.0 m) of the physical domain, frequency of the transmitted acoustic signals (central frequency of 30 kHz), and the use of small sampling intervals (105 s). Inverse techniques with no a priori statistical information were used to estimate the depth-average current velocity components from differential travel times. Zeroth-order Tikhonov regularization, in conjunction with L-curve method deployed to stabilize the solution and to determine the weighting factor appearing in the inverse analysis. Concurrent direct environmental measurements were provided in the form of ADCP readings close to the right and left bank. Very good agreement found between along-channel velocities larger than 0.2 m/s obtained from the two techniques. Inverted quantities were, however, underestimated, perhaps due to vicinity of the ADCPs to the banks and strong effect of river geometry on the readings. In general, comparing the visualized currents with direct nodal measurements illustrate the plausibility of the tomographically reconstructed flow structures.

  11. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  12. SAR-based Estimation of Glacial Extent and Velocity Fields on Isanotski Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, D.; Lee, A.; Parker, O. P.; Pressler, Y.; Guo, S.; Osmanoglu, B.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Global studies show that Earth's glaciers are losing mass at increasing rates, creating a challenge for communities that rely on them as natural resources. Field observation of glacial environments is limited by cost and inaccessibility. Optical remote sensing is often precluded by cloud cover and seasonal darkness. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) overcomes these obstacles by using microwave-frequency electromagnetic radiation to provide high resolution information on large spatial scales and in remote, atmospherically obscured environments. SAR is capable of penetrating clouds, operating in darkness, and discriminating between targets with ambiguous spectral signatures. This study evaluated the efficacy of two SAR Earth observation methods on small (< 7 km2) glaciers in rugged topography. The glaciers chosen for this study lie on Isanotski Volcano in Unimak Island, Aleutian Archipelago, USA. The local community on the island, the City of False Pass, relies on glacial melt for drinking water and hydropower. Two methods were used: (1) velocity field estimation based on Repeat Image Feature Tracking (RIFT) and (2) glacial boundary delineation based on interferometric coherence mapping. NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) single-polarized power images and JAXA Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array type L-band SAR (ALOS PALSAR) single-look complex images were analyzed over the period 2008-2011. UAVSAR image pairs were coregistered to sub-pixel accuracy and processed with the Coregistration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) feature tracking module to derive glacial velocity field estimates. Maximum glacier velocities ranged from 28.9 meters/year to 58.3 meters/year. Glacial boundaries were determined from interferometric coherence of ALOS PALSAR data and subsequently refined with masking operations based on terrain slope and segment size. Accuracy was assessed against hand-digitized outlines from high resolution UAVSAR power images

  13. Whole-field, time resolved velocity measurements of flow structures on insect wings during free flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Kenneth; Thomson, Scott; Truscott, Tadd

    2012-11-01

    The development of micro air vehicles (MAVs) that are propelled using flapping flight necessitates an understanding of the unsteady aerodynamics that enable this mode of flight. Flapping flight has been studied using a variety of methods including computational models, experimentation and observation. Until recently, the observation of natural flyers has been limited to qualitative methods such as smoke-line visualization. Advances in imaging technology have enabled the use of particle image velocimetry (PIV) to gain a quantitative understanding of the unsteady nature of the flight. Previously published PIV studies performed on insects have been limited to velocities in a single plane on tethered insects in a wind tunnel. We present the three-dimensional, time-resolved velocity fields of flight around a butterfly, using an array of high-speed cameras at 1 kHz through a technique known as 3D Synthetic Aperture PIV (SAPIV). These results are useful in understanding the relationship between wing kinematics and the unsteady aerodynamics generated.

  14. An experimental investigation of velocity fields in divergent glottal models of the human vocal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2005-09-01

    In speech, sound production arises from fluid-structure interactions within the larynx as well as viscous flow phenomena that is most likely to occur during the divergent orientation of the vocal folds. Of particular interest are the flow mechanisms that influence the location of flow separation points on the vocal folds walls. Physiologically scaled pulsatile flow fields in 7.5 times real size static divergent glottal models were investigated. Three divergence angles were investigated using phase-averaged particle image velocimetry (PIV). The pulsatile glottal jet exhibited a bi-modal stability toward both glottal walls, although there was a significant amount of variance in the angle the jet deflected from the midline. The attachment of the Coanda effect to the glottal model walls occurred when the pulsatile velocity was a maximum, and the acceleration of the waveform was zero. The location of the separation and reattachment points of the flow from the glottal models was a function of the velocity waveform and divergence angle. Acoustic analogies show that a dipole sound source contribution arising from the fluid interaction (Coanda jet) with the vocal fold walls is expected. [Work funded by NIH Grant RO1 DC03577.

  15. Velocity profiles of electric-field-induced backflows in liquid crystals confined between parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Tomohiro; Chono, Shigeomi; Matsumi, Takanori

    2015-02-01

    For the purpose of developing liquid crystalline microactuators, we visualize backflows induced between two parallel plates for various parameters such as the twist angle, cell gap, applied voltage, and molecular configuration mode. We use 4-cyano-4'-pentyl biphenyl, a typical low-molar-mass nematic liquid crystal. By increasing the twist angle from 0° to 180°, the velocity component parallel to the anchoring direction of the lower plate changes from an S-shaped profile to a distorted S-shaped profile before finally becoming unidirectional. In contrast, the velocity component perpendicular to the anchoring direction evolves from a flat profile at 0° into an S-shaped profile at 180°. Because both an increase in the applied voltage and a decrease in the cell gap increase the electric field intensity, the backflow becomes large. The hybrid molecular configuration mode induces a larger backflow than that for the planar aligned mode. The backflow develops in two stages: an early stage with a microsecond time scale and a later stage with a millisecond time scale. The numerical predictions are in qualitative agreement with the measurements, but not quantitative agreement because our computation ignores the plate edge effect of surface tension.

  16. Filaments from the galaxy distribution and from the velocity field in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libeskind, Noam I.; Tempel, Elmo; Hoffman, Yehuda; Tully, R. Brent; Courtois, Hélène

    2015-10-01

    The cosmic web that characterizes the large-scale structure of the Universe can be quantified by a variety of methods. For example, large redshift surveys can be used in combination with point process algorithms to extract long curvilinear filaments in the galaxy distribution. Alternatively, given a full 3D reconstruction of the velocity field, kinematic techniques can be used to decompose the web into voids, sheets, filaments and knots. In this Letter, we look at how two such algorithms - the Bisous model and the velocity shear web - compare with each other in the local Universe (within 100 Mpc), finding good agreement. This is both remarkable and comforting, given that the two methods are radically different in ideology and applied to completely independent and different data sets. Unsurprisingly, the methods are in better agreement when applied to unbiased and complete data sets, like cosmological simulations, than when applied to observational samples. We conclude that more observational data is needed to improve on these methods, but that both methods are most likely properly tracing the underlying distribution of matter in the Universe.

  17. Computer simulations of pressure and velocity fields in a human upper airway during sneezing.

    PubMed

    Rahiminejad, Mohammad; Haghighi, Abdalrahman; Dastan, Alireza; Abouali, Omid; Farid, Mehrdad; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the airflow field including the velocity, pressure and turbulence intensity distributions during sneezing of a female subject was simulated using a computational fluid dynamics model of realistic upper airways including both oral and nasal cavities. The effects of variation of reaction of the subject during sneezing were also investigated. That is, the impacts of holding the nose or closing the mouth during sneezing on the pressure and velocity distributions were studied. Few works have studied the sneeze and therefore different aspects of this phenomenon have remained unknown. To cover more possibilities about the inlet condition of trachea in different sneeze scenarios, it was assumed that the suppressed sneeze happens with either the same inlet pressure or the same flow rate as the normal sneeze. The simulation results showed that during a normal sneeze, the pressure in the trachea reaches about 7000Pa, which is much higher than the pressure level of about 200Pa during the high activity exhalation. In addition, the results showed that, suppressing the sneeze by holding the nose or mouth leads to a noticeable increase in pressure difference in the tract. This increase was about 5 to 24 times of that during a normal sneeze. This significant rise in the pressure can justify some reported damage due to suppressing a sneeze. PMID:26914240

  18. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins

    PubMed Central

    Aschinger, Gerold C.; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels. PMID:26137367

  19. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins.

    PubMed

    Aschinger, Gerold C; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels. PMID:26137367

  20. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins.

    PubMed

    Aschinger, Gerold C; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels.

  1. Fluid dynamics performance of different bipolar plates. Part I. Velocity and pressure fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreras, F.; Lozano, A.; Valiño, L.; Mustata, R.; Marín, C.

    The flow distribution obtained with three different bipolar plate geometries has been studied, analyzing their fluid dynamic performance. Three plate topologies have been selected in some way representative of different design models commonly used. The configurations tested are a set of parallel diagonal channels, a branching cascade type, and a serpentine distribution of parallel channel blocks. The flow distribution across the plates has been first simulated numerically. To visualize the flow pattern at the plate channels plane, a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) trace tracking technique has been applied. From experimental and numerical simulations it is concluded that the diagonal topology distributes the flow in a non-uniform way. On the other hand, an inadequately large pressure drop is established along the serpentine-parallel plate. In the cascade case, both velocity and pressure fields are very uniform, and it can be expected to produce a very homogeneous distribution of reactants over the catalyst layer.

  2. Velocity Vector Field Visualization of Flow in Liquid Acquisition Device Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Chao, David F.; Hall, Nancy R.; Zhang, Nengli

    2012-01-01

    A capillary flow liquid acquisition device (LAD) for cryogenic propellants has been developed and tested in NASA Glenn Research Center to meet the requirements of transferring cryogenic liquid propellants from storage tanks to an engine in reduced gravity environments. The prototypical mesh screen channel LAD was fabricated with a mesh screen, covering a rectangular flow channel with a cylindrical outlet tube, and was tested with liquid oxygen (LOX). In order to better understand the performance in various gravity environments and orientations at different liquid submersion depths of the screen channel LAD, a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of LOX flow through the LAD screen channel was undertaken. The resulting velocity vector field visualization for the flow in the channel has been used to reveal the gravity effects on the flow in the screen channel.

  3. A simple method to estimate threshold friction velocity of wind erosion in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junran; Okin, Gregory S.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Belnap, Jayne; Munson, Seth M.; Miller, Mark E.

    2010-05-01

    This study provides a fast and easy-to-apply method to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of wind erosion in the field. Wind tunnel experiments and a variety of ground measurements including air gun, pocket penetrometer, torvane, and roughness chain were conducted in Moab, Utah and cross-validated in the Mojave Desert, California. Patterns between TFV and ground measurements were examined to identify the optimum method for estimating TFV. The results show that TFVs were best predicted using the air gun and penetrometer measurements in the Moab sites. This empirical method, however, systematically underestimated TFVs in the Mojave Desert sites. Further analysis showed that TFVs in the Mojave sites can be satisfactorily estimated with a correction for rock cover, which is presumably the main cause of the underestimation of TFVs. The proposed method may be also applied to estimate TFVs in environments where other non-erodible elements such as postharvest residuals are found.

  4. Single-shot velocity-map imaging of attosecond light-field control at kilohertz rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süßmann, F.; Zherebtsov, S.; Plenge, J.; Johnson, Nora G.; Kübel, M.; Sayler, A. M.; Mondes, V.; Graf, C.; Rühl, E.; Paulus, G. G.; Schmischke, D.; Swrschek, P.; Kling, M. F.

    2011-09-01

    High-speed, single-shot velocity-map imaging (VMI) is combined with carrier-envelope phase (CEP) tagging by a single-shot stereographic above-threshold ionization (ATI) phase-meter. The experimental setup provides a versatile tool for angle-resolved studies of the attosecond control of electrons in atoms, molecules, and nanostructures. Single-shot VMI at kHz repetition rate is realized with a highly sensitive megapixel complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera omitting the need for additional image intensifiers. The developed camera software allows for efficient background suppression and the storage of up to 1024 events for each image in real time. The approach is demonstrated by measuring the CEP-dependence of the electron emission from ATI of Xe in strong (≈1013 W/cm2) near single-cycle (4 fs) laser fields. Efficient background signal suppression with the system is illustrated for the electron emission from SiO2 nanospheres.

  5. The Lyman alpha bulge of Jupiter - Effects of non-thermal velocity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Jaffel, Lotfi; Clarke, John T.; Prange, Renee; Gladstone, G. R.; Vidal-Madjar, Alfred

    1993-01-01

    We outline for the first time the effect of such nonthermal line broadening processes as turbulence, random waves, convection, etc., on the shape and intensity of the H Ly-alpha line resonance scattered from the atmosphere of Jupiter. We show how a nonthermal velocity field confined to the bulge region, in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, may account for most of the H Ly-alpha bulge features. Both the shape and the brightness of the Ly-alpha line from the bulge region as reported by the IUE instrument and the Voyager UV Spectrometer can be recovered assuming resonant scattering with a total atomic hydrogen of about 4 x 10 exp 17/sq cm, and a nonthermal component H of about 2 x 10 exp 15/sq cm above the thermopause.

  6. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  7. Predicting field-scale dispersion under realistic conditions with the polar Markovian velocity process model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünser, Simon; Meyer, Daniel W.

    2016-06-01

    In most groundwater aquifers, dispersion of tracers is dominated by flow-field inhomogeneities resulting from the underlying heterogeneous conductivity or transmissivity field. This effect is referred to as macrodispersion. Since in practice, besides a few point measurements the complete conductivity field is virtually never available, a probabilistic treatment is needed. To quantify the uncertainty in tracer concentrations from a given geostatistical model for the conductivity, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is typically used. To avoid the excessive computational costs of MC, the polar Markovian velocity process (PMVP) model was recently introduced delivering predictions at about three orders of magnitude smaller computing times. In artificial test cases, the PMVP model has provided good results in comparison with MC. In this study, we further validate the model in a more challenging and realistic setup. The setup considered is derived from the well-known benchmark macrodispersion experiment (MADE), which is highly heterogeneous and non-stationary with a large number of unevenly scattered conductivity measurements. Validations were done against reference MC and good overall agreement was found. Moreover, simulations of a simplified setup with a single measurement were conducted in order to reassess the model's most fundamental assumptions and to provide guidance for model improvements.

  8. Numerical studies of light-matter interaction driven by plasmonic fields: The velocity gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, A.; Ciappina, M. F.; Lewenstein, M.

    2015-12-01

    Conventional theoretical approaches to model strong field phenomena driven by plasmonic fields are based on the length gauge formulation of the laser-matter coupling. Obviously, from the physical point of view, there exists no preferable gauge and, consequently, the predictions and outcomes should be independent of this choice. The use of the length gauge is mainly due to the fact that the quantity obtained from finite-element simulations of plasmonic fields is the plasmonic enhanced laser electric field rather than the laser vector potential. We develop, from first principles, the velocity gauge formulation of the problem and we apply it to the high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) in atoms. A comparison to the results obtained with the length gauge is made. As expected, it is analytically and numerically demonstrated that both gauges give equivalent descriptions of the emitted HHG spectra resulting from the interaction of a spatially inhomogeneous field and the single active electron model of the helium atom. We discuss, however, advantages and disadvantages of using different gauges in terms of numerical efficiency, which turns out to be very different. In order to understand it, we analyze the quantum mechanical results using time-frequency Gabor distributions. This analysis, combined with classical calculations based on solutions of the Newton equation, yields important physical insight into the electronic quantum paths underlying the dynamics of the harmonic generation process. The results obtained in this way also allow us to assess the quality of the quantum approaches in both gauges and put stringent limits on the numerical parameters required for a desired accuracy.

  9. Internal deformation and velocity field measurements by use of digital speckle radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, Fredrik; Grantham, Stephen G.

    2003-05-01

    Using X-rays as information carriers it is possible to obtain data about motion inside an object that is opaque to visible light. An image correlation algorithm can be applied to a set of two X-ray images taken sequentially during a process, where the interior of the object is in motion. A displacement field describing the projected intermediate motion is thus obtained to sub-pixel accuracy. If this image set is expanded to contain several pictures separated in time, together describing the whole process, the images can be sequentially correlated to obtain a dynamic displacement field. In this paper, dynamical displacement field measurements have been carried out on two different objects, the first being a silo, where the motion of the flowing material in the center plane is investigated. In the second case, the motion in a layer of glue between two wooden plates is examined during a process where a shearing force acts on the system. The plane in which the measurements are carried out is defined by the use of a contrast agent, usually a tungsten powder seeding. The obtained displacement field, together with the known intermediate time interval between exposures, gives the velocity field in the seeded plane. The results show good agreement with the expected motion in the respective processes, but also provide evidence of behavior that would be undetectable using other existing techniques. A third experiment has also been carried out on a material requiring no contrast enhancing media. These measurements were performed on a chicken thigh being deformed by an external force. The results will be discussed in relation to their reliability and applicability. Further, the direction of future research will be indicated.

  10. Concurrent field measurements of turbulent velocities, plant reconfiguration and drag forces on Ranunculus penicillatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Maike; Thomas, Robert E.; Keevil, Gareth M.

    2013-04-01

    In lowland rivers, seasonal patterns of in-stream macrophyte growth and decay have significant implications for flood risk. For a given discharge, flood risk is increased when dense macrophyte canopies reduce flow areas, increase blockage ratios and alter reach-scale roughness values. These factors combine and can increase the flow depth. Conversely, submerged vegetation is exposed to drag forces exerted by the flow, which may be sufficient to damage limbs or dislodge plants. The classical drag equation suggests that the force exerted by fluid flows upon submerged vegetation is a function of the fluid properties, the projected area of the vegetation, and the square of the flow velocity. However, very few studies have simultaneously monitored all of these parameters, resulting in significant uncertainty in the estimation of the coefficient that relates these parameters to the drag force and also the related roughness parameters that control the flow depth for a given discharge. To our knowledge, this study presents the first concurrent field measurements of turbulent velocities, plant reconfigurations and drag forces acting on Ranunculus penicillatus ssp. pseudofluitans (Syme) S.D.Webster. Measurements were undertaken in an artificially straightened reach of the chalk-bed River Wylye, near Longbridge Deverill, Wiltshire, UK. The reach is 5.7 m wide and during measurements there was a mean flow depth of 0.28 m and an average discharge of 0.28 m³s-1. The reach is cleared of vegetation up to three times a year for flood defence purposes, but Ranunculus p. grows back within several weeks. Measurements were carried out after re-growth, when plants were fully developed with a mean length of 0.75 m and on average 6 nodes along the stem. The distances between the nodes increased from the base towards the tip and each node produced a capillary leaf, sometimes in conjunction with a branch. Floating leaves and flowers were not present. Plants were attached to a custom

  11. Fermi Surface Studies of QUASI-1D and QUASI-2D Organic Superconductors Using Periodic Orbit Resonance in High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Kovalev, A. E.; Hill, S.; Takasaki, S.; Yamada, J.; Anzai, H.; Qualls, J. S.; Kawano, K.; Tamura, M.; Naito, T.; Kobayashi, H.

    We have studied periodic orbit resonances (PORs) in order to probe the topology of the Fermi surface (FS) of the quasi-1D organic conductor (TMTSF)2ClO4 and the quasi-2D organic conductors κ-(ET)2Cu(NCS)2 and κ-(ET)2I3. The FS of (TMTSF)2ClO4 consists of a pair of weakly corrugated open sheets, while κ-(ET)2Cu(NCS)2 and κ-(ET)2I3 additionally possess warped cylindrical FS sections. In this paper, we review the POR technique for the straightforward case of (TMTSF)2ClO4. We then report on a detailed study of the FS topology for κ-(ET)2Cu(NCS)2.

  12. Fermi Surface Studies of QUASI-1D and QUASI-2D Organic Superconductors Using Periodic Orbit Resonance in High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Kovalev, A. E.; Hill, S.; Takasaki, S.; Yamada, J.; Anzai, H.; Qualls, J. S.; Kawano, K.; Tamura, M.; Naito, T.; Kobayashi, H.

    2005-04-01

    We have studied periodic orbit resonances (PORs) in order to probe the topology of the Fermi surface (FS) of the quasi-1D organic conductor (TMTSF)2ClO4 and the quasi-2D organic conductors κ-(ET)2Cu(NCS)2 and κ-(ET)2I3. The FS of (TMTSF)2ClO4 consists of a pair of weakly corrugated open sheets, while κ-(ET)2Cu(NCS)2 and κ-(ET)2I3 additionally possess warped cylindrical FS sections. In this paper, we review the POR technique for the straightforward case of (TMTSF)2ClO4. We then report on a detailed study of the FS topology for κ-(ET)2Cu(NCS)2.

  13. Field observations of seismic velocity changes caused by shaking-induced damage and healing due to mesoscopic nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassenmeier, M.; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Eulenfeld, T.; Bartsch, M.; Victor, P.; Tilmann, F.; Korn, M.

    2016-03-01

    To investigate temporal seismic velocity changes due to earthquake related processes and environmental forcing in Northern Chile, we analyse 8 yr of ambient seismic noise recorded by the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC). By autocorrelating the ambient seismic noise field measured on the vertical components, approximations of the Green's functions are retrieved and velocity changes are measured with Coda Wave Interferometry. At station PATCX, we observe seasonal changes in seismic velocity caused by thermal stress as well as transient velocity reductions in the frequency range of 4-6 Hz. Sudden velocity drops occur at the time of mostly earthquake-induced ground shaking and recover over a variable period of time. We present an empirical model that describes the seismic velocity variations based on continuous observations of the local ground acceleration. The model assumes that not only the shaking of large earthquakes causes velocity drops, but any small vibrations continuously induce minor velocity variations that are immediately compensated by healing in the steady state. We show that the shaking effect is accumulated over time and best described by the integrated envelope of the ground acceleration over the discretization interval of the velocity measurements, which is one day. In our model, the amplitude of the velocity reduction as well as the recovery time are proportional to the size of the excitation. This model with two free scaling parameters fits the data of the shaking induced velocity variation in remarkable detail. Additionally, a linear trend is observed that might be related to a recovery process from one or more earthquakes before our measurement period. A clear relationship between ground shaking and induced velocity reductions is not visible at other stations. We attribute the outstanding sensitivity of PATCX to ground shaking and thermal stress to the special geological setting of the station, where the subsurface material

  14. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  15. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  16. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  17. Remote Sensing Data in Wind Velocity Field Modelling: a Case Study from the Sudetes (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancewicz, Kacper

    2014-06-01

    The phenomena of wind-field deformation above complex (mountainous) terrain is a popular subject of research related to numerical modelling using GIS techniques. This type of modelling requires, as input data, information on terrain roughness and a digital terrain/elevation model. This information may be provided by remote sensing data. Consequently, its accuracy and spatial resolution may affect the results of modelling. This paper represents an attempt to conduct wind-field modelling in the area of the Śnieżnik Massif (Eastern Sudetes). The modelling process was conducted in WindStation 2.0.10 software (using the computable fluid dynamics solver Canyon). Two different elevation models were used: the Global Land Survey Digital Elevation Model (GLS DEM) and Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) Level 2. The terrain roughness raster was generated on the basis of Corine Land Cover 2006 (CLC 2006) data. The output data were post-processed in ArcInfo 9.3.1 software to achieve a high-quality cartographic presentation. Experimental modelling was conducted for situations from 26 November 2011, 25 May 2012, and 26 May 2012, based on a limited number of field measurements and using parameters of the atmosphere boundary layer derived from the aerological surveys provided by the closest meteorological stations. The model was run in a 100-m and 250-m spatial resolution. In order to verify the model's performance, leave-one-out cross-validation was used. The calculated indices allowed for a comparison with results of former studies pertaining to WindStation's performance. The experiment demonstrated very subtle differences between results in using DTED or GLS DEM elevation data. Additionally, CLC 2006 roughness data provided more noticeable improvements in the model's performance, but only in the resolution corresponding to the original roughness data. The best input data configuration resulted in the following mean values of error measure: root mean squared error of velocity

  18. Transport Properties of 2D-Electron Gas in a InGaAs/GaAs DQW in a Vicinity of Low Magnetic-Field-Induced Insulator-Quantum Hall Liquid Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapov, Yu. G.; Yakunin, M. V.; Gudina, S. V.; Harus, G. I.; Neverov, V. N.; Shelushinina, N. G.; Podgornyh, S. M.; Uskova, E. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2007-04-01

    The resistivity ρ of low mobility dilute 2D-elecron gas in a InGaAs/GaAs double quantum well (DQW) exhibits the monotonic "insulating-like" temperature dependence (dρ/dT < 0) at T = 1.8-70K in zero magnetic field. This temperature interval corresponds to a ballistic regime (kBTτ/ℏ > 0.1) for our samples. We observed the coexistence of both the quantum Hall (QH) effect for the filling factors v = 2, 4 and the low magnetic field insulator — QH liquid (with v = 10) transition.

  19. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-07-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  20. Eulerian mean surface velocity field derived by combining drifter and satellite altimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Hiroshi; Imawaki, Shiro

    2003-03-01

    Combining surface drifter and satellite altimeter data,we estimate Eulerian mean sea-surface velocity with a resolution of quarter degrees in both latitude and longitude. The Eulerian mean velocity is calculated by subtracting the altimeter-derived velocity anomaly (i.e., deviation from the temporal mean) at the time when a drifter measured the surface velocity, from this drifter-measured velocity. The method is applied to the surface flow of the North Pacific, using TOPEX/POSEIDON and ERS-1/2 altimeter data, and WOCE-TOGA surface drifter data obtained during October 1992 to January 2001. The estimated Eulerian mean velocities for the Kuroshio south of Japan and the Kuroshio Extension region tend to be smaller than simple averages of drifter-derived velocities by 20 to 50 cm sec-1. The instantaneous velocities are obtained every ten days as sums of the Eulerian mean velocities and velocity anomalies. They agree well with in situ surface velocities measured by acoustic Doppler current profilers.

  1. Three-dimensional simulation of the motion of a single particle under a simulated turbulent velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Casas, P. A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    A 3D Lagrangian particle tracking model is coupled to a 3D channel velocity field to simulate the saltation motion of a single sediment particle moving in saltation mode. The turbulent field is a high-resolution three dimensional velocity field that reproduces a by-pass transition to turbulence on a flat plate due to free-stream turbulence passing above de plate. In order to reduce computational costs, a decoupled approached is used, i.e., the turbulent flow is simulated independently from the tracking model, and then used to feed the 3D Lagrangian particle model. The simulations are carried using the point-particle approach. The particle tracking model contains three sub-models, namely, particle free-flight, a post-collision velocity and bed representation sub-models. The free-flight sub-model considers the action of the following forces: submerged weight, non-linear drag, lift, virtual mass, Magnus and Basset forces. The model also includes the effect of particle angular velocity. The post-collision velocities are obtained by applying conservation of angular and linear momentum. The complete model was validated with experimental results from literature within the sand range. Results for particle velocity time series and distribution of particle turbulent intensities are presented.

  2. Transient rheology of the upper mantle beneath central Alaska inferred from the crustal velocity field following the 2002 Denali earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2005-01-01

    The M7.9 2002 Denali earthquake, Alaska, is one of the largest strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded. The postseismic GPS velocity field around the 300-km-long rupture is characterized by very rapid horizontal velocity up to ???300 mm/yr for the first 0.1 years and slower but still elevated horizontal velocity up to ???100 mm/yr for the succeeding 1.5 years. I find that the spatial and temporal pattern of the displacement field may be explained by a transient mantle rheology. Representing the regional upper mantle as a Burghers body, I infer steady state and transient viscosities of ??1 = 2.8 ?? 1018 Pa s and ??2 = 1.0 ?? 1017 Pa s, respectively, corresponding to material relaxation times of 1.3 and 0.05 years. The lower crustal viscosity is poorly constrained by the considered horizontal velocity field, and the quoted mantle viscosities assume a steady state lower crust viscosity that is 7??1. Systematic bias in predicted versus observed velocity vectors with respect to a fixed North America during the first 3-6 months following the earthquake is reduced when all velocity vectors are referred to a fixed site. This suggests that the post-Denali GPS time series for the first 1.63 years are shaped by a combination of a common mode noise source during the first 3-6 months plus viscoelastic relaxation controlled by a transient mantle rheology.

  3. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-10-01

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

  4. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  5. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  6. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  7. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  8. Computation of the velocity field and mass balance in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    Darcian velocity has been conventionally calculated in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow by taking the derivatives of the computed pressure field. This results in discontinuities in the velocity field at nodal points and element boundaries. Discontinuities become enormous when the computed pressure field is far from a linear distribution. It is proposed in this paper that the finite element procedure that is used to simulate the pressure field or the moisture content field also be applied to Darcy's law with the derivatives of the computed pressure field as the load function. The problem of discontinuity is then eliminated, and the error of mass balance over the region of interest is much reduced. The reduction is from 23.8 to 2.2% by one numerical scheme and from 29.7 to -3.6% by another for a transient problem.

  9. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  10. Magnetic and Velocity Field of Sunspots in the Photosphere and Upper Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Jayant

    2014-03-01

    Sunspots, the dark blemishes on the solar surface have been widely studied for the past 400 years. Sunspots are the most readily identifiable manifestation of magnetic field concentrations on the solar surface. Interaction of the sunspot magnetic field with the plasma makes them one of the most interesting objects for research in solar physics. This thesis presents a study of the photospheric and upper chromospheric velocity and magnetic field structure of sunspots by analyzing spectro-polarimetric observations. These observations comprise different spectral lines obtained with two ground based telescopes and a space borne telescope. The lower brightness of sunspots on the solar surface is due to the presence of strong magnetic fields (up to 4 kG in the umbra), which makes the overturning convection inefficient. Convection is the main heat transport mechanism in the quiet Sun. The Penumbra, the annular part around the umbra has a brightness of about 75% of that in the quiet Sun. At the same time it has an average magnetic field strength of around 1.5 kG. The brightness of penumbrae has been an enigma for solar physicists for a long time. Theoretical models like the gappy penumbra model and the convective roll model as well as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations suggest that the heat transport in penumbrae is based on the presence of overturning convection. Direct observational evidence for the presence of convective flows in penumbral filaments was missing so far. In Chapter 3 we present observations of a penumbra in the C i 5380 Å spectral line formed in the deep photosphere. These high spatial resolution observations (0. '' 14) are obtained with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST). Doppler map clearly shows the presence of several dark downflow lanes at the edges of the penumbral filaments which surround the bright upflows at the center of the filaments, supporting overturning convection as a mechanism of heat transport in penumbrae. Chapter 4 analyses the

  11. The distribution of spectral index of magnetic field and ion velocity in Pi2 frequency band in BBFs: THEMIS statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Du, A. M.; Volwerk, M.; Wang, G. Q.

    2016-09-01

    A statistical study of the THEMIS FGM and ESA data is performed on turbulence of magnetic field and velocity for 218 selected 12 min intervals in BBFs. The spectral index α in the frequency range of 0.005-0.06 Hz are Gaussian distributions. The peaks indexes of total ion velocity Vi and parallel velocity V‖ are 1.95 and 2.07 nearly the spectral index of intermittent low frequency turbulence with large amplitude. However, most probable α of perpendicular velocity V⊥ is about 1.75. It is a little bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The peak indexes of total magnetic field BT is 1.70 similar to V⊥. Compression magnetic field B‖ are 1.85 which is smaller than 2 and bigger than 5/3 of Kolmogorov (1941). The most probable spectral index of shear B⊥ is about 1.44 which is close to 3/2 of Kraichnan (1965). Max V⊥ have little effect on the power magnitude of VT and V‖ but is positively correlated to spectral index of V⊥. The spectral power of BT, B‖ and B⊥ increase with max perpendicular velocity but spectral indexes of them are negatively correlated to V⊥. The spectral index and the spectral power of magnetic field over the frequency interval 0.005-0.06 Hz is very different from that over 0.08-1 Hz.

  12. Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, M, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Chittick, S.D.; Harrison, William B.; Tayjor, W. Quinlan

    2001-08-07

    In this project a consortium consisting of Cronus Exploration (Traverse City, MI), Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) proposed to develop and execute an economical and environmentally sensitive plan for recovery of hydrocarbons from an abandoned shallow-shelf carbonate field that is typical of many fields in the U.S. Midwest. This is a 5-year project that will use surface geochemistry as a tool to reduce risk in locating and producing hydrocarbons in Class II fields. The project will develop new techniques for measuring hydrocarbon gases in the soil horizon to locate new and bypassed oil in the shallow-shelf carbonate environments typified by the Dundee and Trenton Formations of the Michigan Basin (Fisher et. al., 1988). In Phase I of the project, the consortium proposes to re-develop the Vernon Oil field located in Vernon Twp, Isabella County, Michigan and produce both bypassed hydrocarbons from the original field and to locate and produce extensions of the original field.

  13. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-01-01

    Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Vernon Field demonstration project in Isabella County, Michigan. This new case history and well summary format organizes and presents the technical and historical details of the Vernon Field demonstration, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion. Planning for the annual project meeting in Tampa, Florida has begun. This meeting will be held March 7-9, 2003 at the same site as the last three meetings. The goals of this project were to: (1) test the use of multi-lateral wells to recover bypassed hydrocarbons and (2) to access the potential of using surface geochemistry to reduce drilling risk. Two new demonstration wells, the State-Smock and the Bowers 4-25, were drilled to test the Dundee Formation at Vernon Field for bypassed oil. Neither well was commercial, although both produced hydrocarbon shows. An extensive geochemical survey in the vicinity of Vernon Field, covering much of Isabella County, has produced a base map for interpretation of anomalies in Michigan. Several potential new anomalies were discovered that could be further investigated.

  14. 3D velocity field of present-day crustal motion of the Tibetan Plateau derived from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W.

    2013-12-01

    Using the measurements of 564 GPS stations around the Tibetan plateau for over 10 years, we derived a high-resolution 3D velocity field for the present-day crustal motion of the plateau with improved precision. The horizontal velocity field of the plateau relative to stable Eurasia displays in details the crustal movement and tectonic deformation features of India-Eurasia continental collision zone with thrust compression, lateral extrusion and clockwise rotation. The vertical velocities reveal that the plateau is still rising as a whole relative to its stable north neighbor. However, in some subregions uplift is insignificant or even negative. The main features of the vertical crustal deformation are: a) The Himalayan range is rising at a rate of ~3mm/yr, the most significant in the whole plateau. The uplift rate of the Himalayan range is ~6mm/a relative to its south foot; b) The mid-eastern plateau has an typical uplift rate between 1~2 mm/a, and some high mountain ranges in this area have surprising uplift rates as large as 2~3mm/a; c) In the mid-southern plateau, there is a basin and endorheic subregion with a series of NE striking normal faults, showing obvious sinking with the rates between 0 to -4mm/a; d) The present-day rising and sinking subregions generally correspond well to the Cenozoic orogenic belts and basins, respectively; e) At the southeastern corner of the plateau, although the horizontal velocity field demonstrates an outstanding clockwise rotation and fan-like front of a flow zone, the vertical velocity field does not show a general uplift or incline trend. Horizontal GPS velocities of the Tibetan plateau relative to stable Eurasia Vertical GPS velocities of the Tibetan plateau relative to its stable northern neighbor

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of velocity fields, the void fraction and gas dynamics in a cavitating liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor V.; Arbabi, Aidin; Newling, Benedict; Hamza, Abdelhaq; Adair, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In acoustic cavitation, the relationship between the bubble dynamics on the microscale and the flow properties on the macroscale is critical in determining sonochemical reaction kinetics. A new technique was developed to measure the void fraction and estimate water mobility in the vicinity of cavitating bubbles using phase-encoded magnetic resonance imaging with short characteristic measurement timescales (0.1-1 ms). The exponential behavior of the NMR signal decay indicated the fast diffusion regime, with the relationship between local mechanical dispersion D mix and the average bubble radius R, D_mix≫ 2R^2/10^{-4s}, resulting in dispersion of orders of magnitude greater than diffusion in quiescent water. For two different samples (water and a surfactant solution), the independent measurements of three-dimensional void fraction and velocity fields permitted the calculation of compressibility, divergence and vorticity of the cavitating medium. The measured dynamics of the dissolved gas, compared with that of the surrounding liquid, reflected the difference in the bubble coalescence and lifetimes and correlated with the macroscopic flow parameters.

  16. Event Detection and Visualization of Ocean Eddies based on SSH and Velocity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Daisuke; Araki, Fumiaki; Inoue, Yumi; Sasaki, Hideharu

    2016-04-01

    Numerical studies of ocean eddies have been progressed using high-resolution ocean general circulation models. In order to understand ocean eddies from simulation results with large amount of information volume, it is necessary to visualize not only distribution of eddies of each time step, but also events or phenomena of eddies. However, previous methods cannot precisely detect eddies, especially, during the events such as eddies' amalgamation, bifurcation. In the present study, we propose a new approach of eddy's detection, tracking and event visualization based on sea surface height (SSH) and velocity field. The proposed method detects eddies region as well as streams and currents region, and classifies detected eddies into several types. By tracking the time-varying change of classified eddies, it is possible to detect not only eddies event such as amalgamation and bifurcation but also the interaction between eddy and ocean current. As a result of visualizing detected eddies and events, we succeeded in creating the movie which enables us to intuitively understand the region of interest.

  17. A computer program for the 2-D magnetostatic problem based on integral equations for the field of the conductors and boundary elements

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G.H. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the iterative design of the 2-dimensional cross section of a beam transport magnet having infinitely permeable iron boundaries which requires a fast means of computing the field of the conductors. Solutions in the form of series expansions are used for rectangular iron boundaries, and programs based on the method of images are used to simulate circular iron boundaries. A single procedure or program for dealing with an arbitrary iron boundary would be useful. The present program has been tested with rectangular and circular iron boundaries and provision has been made for the use of other curves. It uses complex contour integral equations for the field of the constant-current density conductors and complex line integrals for the field of the piecewise-linear boundary elements.

  18. Electron drift velocity in lattice-matched AlInN/AlN/GaN channel at high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardaravičius, L.; Ramonas, M.; Liberis, J.; Kiprijanovič, O.; Matulionis, A.; Xie, J.; Wu, M.; Leach, J. H.; Morkoç, H.

    2009-10-01

    Hot-electron transport was probed by nanosecond-pulsed measurements for a nominally undoped two-dimensional channel confined in a nearly lattice-matched Al0.82In0.18N/AlN/GaN structure at room temperature. The electric field was applied parallel to the interface, the pulsed technique enabled minimization of Joule heating. No current saturation was reached at fields up to 180 kV/cm. The effect of the channel length on the current is considered. The electron drift velocity is deduced under the assumption of uniform electric field and field-independent electron density. The highest estimated drift velocity reaches ˜3.2×107 cm/s when the AlN spacer thickness is 1 nm. At high fields, a weak (if any) dependence of the drift velocity on the spacer thickness is found in the range from 1 to 2 nm. The measured drift velocity is low for heterostructures with thinner spacers (0.3 nm).

  19. Settling Velocity Specific SOC Distribution along Hillslopes - A field investigation in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Hu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The net effects of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric CO2, are decisively affected by the spatial re-distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC). The deposition position of eroded SOC, into terrestrial or aquatic systems, is actually decided by the transport distances of soil fractions where the SOC is stored. In theory, the transport distances of aggregated soil fractions are related to their settling velocities under given layer conditions. Yet, little field investigation has been conducted to examine the actual movement of eroded soil fractions along hillslopes, let alone the re-distribution pattern of functional SOC fractions. Eroding sandy soils and sediment were sampled after a series of rainfall events from different topographic positions along a slope on a freshly seeded cropland in Jutland, Denmark. All the soil samples from difference topographic positions along the slope were fractionated into five settling classes using a settling tube apparatus. The SOC content, 13C signature, and C:N ratios of all settling fractions were measured. Our results show that: 1) the spatial distribution of soil settling classes along the slope clearly shows a coarsening effect at the deposition area immediately below the eroding slope, followed by a fining trend on the deposition area at the slope tail. This proves the validity of the conceptual model in Starr et al. 2000 to predict SOC redistribution patterns along eroding hillslopes. 2) The isotopically enriched 13C on the slope back suggests greater decomposition rates possibly experienced by eroded SOC during transport, while the pronounced respiration rates at the slope tail indicate a great potential of CO2 emissions after deposition. Overall, our results illustrate that immediate deposition of fast settling soil fractions, and the thus induced preferential deposition of SOC at foot slope and potential CO2 emissions during transport, must be appropriately accounted for in

  20. USGS Menlo Park GPS Data Processing Techniques and Derived North America Velocity Field (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svarc, J. L.; Murray-Moraleda, J. R.; Langbein, J. O.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park routinely conducts repeated GPS surveys of geodetic markers throughout the western United States using dual-frequency geodetic GPS receivers. We combine campaign, continuous, and semi-permanent data to present a North America fixed velocity field for regions in the western United States. Mobile campaign-based surveys require less up-front investment than permanently monumented and telemetered GPS systems, and hence have achieved a broad and dense spatial coverage. The greater flexibility and mobility comes at the cost of greater uncertainties in individual daily position solutions. We also routinely process continuous GPS data collected at PBO stations operated by UNAVCO along with data from other continuous GPS networks such as BARD, PANGA, and CORS operated by other agencies. We have broken the Western US into several subnetworks containing approximately 150-250 stations each. The data are processed using JPL’s GIPSY-OASIS II release 5.0 software using a modified precise positioning strategy (Zumberge and others, 1997). We use the “ambizap” code provided by Geoff Blewitt (Blewitt, 2008) to fix phase ambiguities in continuous networks. To mitigate the effect of common mode noise we use the positions of stations in the network with very long, clean time series (i.e. those with no large outliers or offsets) to transform all position estimates into “regionally filtered” results following the approach of Hammond and Thatcher (2007). Velocity uncertainties from continuously operated GPS stations tend to be about 3 times smaller than those from campaign data. Langbein (2004) presents a maximum likelihood method for fitting a time series employing a variety of temporal noise models. We assume that GPS observations are contaminated by a combination of white, flicker, and random walk noise. For continuous and semi-permanent time series longer than 2 years we estimate these values, otherwise we fix the amplitudes of these

  1. Small-angle shubnikov-de haas measurements in a 2D electron system: the effect of a strong In-plane magnetic field

    PubMed

    Vitkalov; Zheng; Mertes; Sarachik; Klapwijk

    2000-09-01

    Measurements in magnetic fields applied at small angles relative to the electron plane in silicon MOSFETs indicate a factor of 2 increase of the frequency of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at H>H(sat). This signals the onset of full spin polarization above H(sat), the parallel field above which the resistivity saturates to a constant value. For H

  2. Study of erosion rate, erosion products, and arc velocity under transverse magnetic field in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rongfeng

    1993-01-01

    The advantages of the cathodic arc-coating method include high energy efficiency, high film deposition rates, and good film-to-substrate adhesion. The principal shortcoming of the arc-coating method is that macroparticles are deposited on the substrate as part of the film. The presence of the macroparticles in the coated film degrades film quality which is particularly severe when the deposition process relies on a reaction to form a compound material as the coating. In this case, the macroparticles contain unreacted metal cores which represent impurities in the coated film. This research attempts to identify methods to eliminate or reduce the formation of macroparticles in the coated film by reaching an understanding of the behavior of macroparticles and the angular distribution of erosion products. A transverse magnetic field has been applied to control the arc motion. This reduces the cathode erosion rate and also the formation of macroparticles. The angular distributions of erosion products, i.e. metal ions and macroparticles, are measured to determine the optimum position for the specimens to be coated, and to better understand the cathode spot characteristics. The arc velocity is also measured to determine the effect of the transverse magnetic field on the cathode erosion rate. The variation of the solid angle which the probe represents with respect to the cathode spot when it moves spirally over the cathode surface has been calculated, and it has been shown that the macroscopic measurements can be used to correlate with the microscopic phenomena of the cathode spot. The cooling of macroparticles during the time of flight from the cathode spot to the substrate has been calculated taking into account evaporation and radiation. In general, the low melting point materials produce large macroparticles and high melting point materials produce small ones. It is easier to reduce the number of macroparticles coated on the substrate for low melting point materials

  3. Study of Erosion Rate, Erosion Products, and Arc Velocity Under Transverse Magnetic Field in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rongfeng

    The advantages of the cathodic arc-coating method include high energy efficiency, high film deposition rates, and good film-to-substrate adhesion. The principal shortcoming of the arc-coating method is that macroparticles are deposited on the substrate as part of the film. The presence of the macroparticles in the coated film degrades film quality which is particularly severe when the deposition process relies on a reaction to form a compound material as the coating. In this case, the macroparticles contain unreacted metal cores which represent impurities in the coated film. This research attempts to identify methods to eliminate or reduce the formation of macroparticles in the coated film by reaching an understanding of the behavior of macroparticles and the angular distribution of erosion products. A transverse magnetic field has been applied to control the arc motion. This reduces the cathode erosion rate and also the formation of macroparticles. The angular distributions of erosion products, i.e. metal ions and macroparticles, are measured to determine the optimum position for the specimens to be coated, and to better understand the cathode spot characteristics. The arc velocity is also measured to determine the effect of the transverse magnetic field on the cathode erosion rate. The variation of the solid angle which the probe represents with respect to the cathode spot when it moves spirally over the cathode surface has been calculated, and it has been shown that the macroscopic measurements can be used to correlate with the microscopic phenomena of the cathode spot. The cooling of macroparticles during the time of flight from the cathode spot to the substrate has been calculated taking into account evaporation and radiation. In general, the low melting point materials produce large macroparticles and high melting point materials produce small ones. It is easier to reduce the number of macroparticles coated on the substrate for low melting point materials

  4. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  5. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2001-01-01

    The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

  6. H0, q0 and the local velocity field. [Hubble and deceleration constants in Big Bang expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandage, A.; Tammann, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to find a systematic deviation from linearity for distances that are under the control of the Virgo cluster, and to determine the value of the mean random motion about the systematic flow, in order to improve the measurement of the Hubble and the deceleration constants. The velocity-distance relation for large and intermediate distances is studied, and type I supernovae are calibrated relatively as distance indicators and absolutely to obtain a new value for the Hubble constant. Methods of determining the deceleration constant are assessed, including determination from direct measurement, mean luminosity density, virgocentric motion, and the time scale test. The very local velocity field is investigated, and a solution is preferred with a random peculiar radial velocity of very nearby field galaxies of 90-100 km/s, and a Virgocentric motion of the local group of 220 km/s, leading to an underlying expansion rate of 55, in satisfactory agreement with the global value.

  7. Study of flow field of burning particles in a pyrotechnic flame based on particle image and particle velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, R.; Xu, H. Q.; Li, Y.; Zhu, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    Studying the burning particles in the pyrotechnic flame is important to acquire the decomposition mechanism and spectral radiance of pyrotechnics. The high speed video (HSV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used in this paper to analyze the flow field and velocity of burning particles in the flame of pyrotechnics. The binary image was obtained through gray scale treatment and adaptive threshold segmentation from HSV and PIV data, by which the coordinate of each particle was marked. On the basis, the movement trajectory of each particle during combustion was pursued by the most recent guidelines algorithm of cancroids matching. Through the method proposed in this study, the velocity variation of each particle was obtained, the approximate distribution of particle quantity at each zone was visualized and the mathematical model of pyrotechnic particle velocity flow field was established.

  8. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-04-01

    The principal objective of the study was to test a new analytical technique, Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME), for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. This involved measuring the effectiveness of SPME to extract hydrocarbons under controlled conditions in the laboratory. As part of the study, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the laboratory results. Presented in this quarterly report is the condensed version of the Case History and Well Summary for the Bear Lake area in Manistee County, Michigan. The full version will be in the annual report. The condensed case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and horizontal lateral for Bear Lake, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  9. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-07-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  10. Using the Vertical Component of the Surface Velocity Field to Map the Locked Zone at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulas, E.; Brandon, M. T.; Podladchikov, Y.; Bennett, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    At present, our understanding of the locked zone at Cascadia subduction zone is based on thermal modeling and elastic modeling of horizontal GPS velocities. The thermal model by Hyndman and Wang (1995) provided a first-order assessment of where the subduction thrust might be cold enough for stick-slip behavior. The alternative approach by McCaffrey et al. (2007) is to use a Green's function that relates horizontal surface velocities, as recorded by GPS, to interseismic elastic deformation. The thermal modeling approach is limited by a lack of information about the amount of frictional heating occurring on the thrust (Molnar and England, 1990). The GPS approach is limited in that the horizontal velocity component is fairly insensitive to the structure of the locked zone. The vertical velocity component is much more useful for this purpose. We are fortunate in that vertical velocities can now be measured by GPS to a precision of about 0.2 mm/a. The dislocation model predicts that vertical velocities should range up to about 20 percent of the subduction velocity, which means maximum values of ~7 mm/a. The locked zone is generally entirely offshore at Cascadia, except for the Olympic Peninsula region, where the underlying Juan De Fuca plate has an anomalously low dip. Previous thermal and GPS modeling, as well as tide gauge data and episodic tremors indicate the locked zone there extends about 50 to 75 km onland. This situation provides an opportunity to directly study the locked zone. With that objective in mind, we have constructed a full 3D geodynamic model of the Cascadia subduction zone. At present, the model provides a full representation of the interseismic elastic deformation due to variations of slip on the subduction thrust. The model has been benchmarked against the Savage (2D) and Okada (3D) analytical solutions. This model has an important advantage over traditional dislocation modeling in that we include temperature-sensitive viscosity for the upper and

  11. A closure for Lagrangian velocity gradient evolution in turbulence using recent-deformation mapping of initially Gaussian fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-10-01

    The statistics of the velocity gradient tensor in turbulent flows are of both theoretical and practical importance. The Lagrangian view provides a privileged perspective for studying the dynamics of turbulence in general, and of the velocity gradient tensor in particular. Stochastic models for the Lagrangian evolution of velocity gradients in isotropic turbulence, with closure models for the pressure Hesssian and viscous Laplacian, have been shown to reproduce important features such as non-Gaussian probability distributions, skewness and vorticity strain-rate alignments. The Recent Fluid Deformation (RFD) closure introduced the idea of mapping an isotropic Lagrangian pressure Hessian as upstream initial condition using the fluid deformation tensor. Recent work on a Gaussian fields closure, however, has shown that even Gaussian isotropic velocity fields contain significant anisotropy for the conditional pressure Hessian tensor due to the inherent velocity-pressure couplings, and that assuming an isotropic pressure Hessian as upstream condition may not be realistic. In this paper, Gaussian isotropic field statistics are used to generate more physical upstream conditions for the recent fluid deformation mapping. In this new framework, known isotropy relations can be satisfied {\\it a priori} and no DNS-tuned coefficients are necessary. A detailed comparison of results from the new model, referred to as the recent deformation of Gaussian fields (RDGF) closure, with existing models and DNS shows the improvements gained, especially in various single-time statistics of the velocity gradient tensor at moderate Reynolds numbers. Application to arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers remains an open challenge for this type of model, however.

  12. Jovian Auroral Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (J-AITM): Part 2. Benchmarks of the Ion Velocity Model (IVM) and the Electric Field Model (EFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egert, A.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Bell, J. M.; Goldstein, J.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the Jupiter Auroral Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (J-AITM) construction in support of the Juno mission, we present benchmarks of the Electric Field Model (EFM) and the Ion Velocity Model (IVM). IVM uses the published results from Krupp et al., 2001, to constrain estimated velocities, and it is found that a modified Gaussian distribution gives a first-order approximation to the velocity flow profile. EFM calculates the magnetospheric electric fields using IVM and a magnetic field model, and then assumes magnetic flux conservation to map the electric fields into the ionosphere. These ionospheric electric fields are then used to estimate ionospheric drift velocities.

  13. Measurement of Correlation Between Flow Density, Velocity, and Density*velocity(sup 2) with Far Field Noise in High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2002-01-01

    To locate noise sources in high-speed jets, the sound pressure fluctuations p', measured at far field locations, were correlated with each of radial velocity v, density rho, and phov(exp 2) fluctuations measured from various points in jet plumes. The experiments follow the cause-and-effect method of sound source identification, where correlation is related to the first, and correlation to the second source terms of Lighthill's equation. Three fully expanded, unheated plumes of Mach number 0.95, 1.4 and 1.8 were studied for this purpose. The velocity and density fluctuations were measured simultaneously using a recently developed, non-intrusive, point measurement technique based on molecular Rayleigh scattering. It was observed that along the jet centerline the density fluctuation spectra S(sub rho) have different shapes than the radial velocity spectra S(sub v), while data obtained from the peripheral shear layer show similarity between the two spectra. Density fluctuations in the jet showed significantly higher correlation, than either rhov(sub 2) or v fluctuations. It is found that a single point correlation from the peak sound emitting region at the end of the potential core can account for nearly 10% of all noise at 30 to the jet axis. The correlation, representing the effectiveness of a longitudinal quadrupole in generating noise 90 to the jet axis, is found to be zero within experimental uncertainty. In contrast rhov(exp 2) fluctuations were better correlated with sound pressure fluctuation at the 30 location. The strongest source of sound is found to lie at the centerline and beyond the end of potential core.

  14. Velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and bed roughness from an autonomous field deployed Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler in a mixed sediment tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Thorne, Peter; Cooke, Richard; Cohbed Team

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are among some of the most important global landscapes in terms of population density, ecology and economy. Understanding the dynamics of these natural mixed sediment environments is of particular interest amid growing concerns over sea level rise, climate variations and estuarine response to these changes. Many predictors exist for bed form formation and sand transport in sandy coastal zones; however less work has been published on mixed sediments. This paper details a field study which forms part of the COHBED project aiming to increase understanding of bed forms in a biotic mixed sediment estuarine environment. The study was carried out in the Dee Estuary, in the eastern Irish Sea between England and Wales from the 21st May to 4th June 2013. A state of the art instrumentation frame, known as SEDbed, was deployed at three sites of differing sediment properties and biological makeup within the intertidal zone of the estuary. The SEDbed deployment consisted of a suite of optical and acoustic instrumentation, including an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and a three dimensional acoustic ripple profiler, 3D-ARP. Supplementary field samples and measurements were recorded alongside the frame during each deployment. This paper focuses on the use of new technological developments for the investigation of sediment dynamics. The hydrodynamics at each of the deployment sites are presented including centimetre resolution velocity profiles in the near bed region of the water column, obtained from the ADVP, which is presently the only autonomous field deployed coherent Doppler profiler . Based on these high resolution profiles variations in frictional velocity, bed shear stress and roughness length are calculated. Comparisons are made with theoretical models and with Reynolds stress values obtained from ADV data at a single point within the ADVP profile and from ADVP data itself. Predictions of bed roughness at each

  15. Velocity field measurements in the near wake of a parachute canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desabrais, Kenneth J.

    The velocity field in the wake of a small scale flexible parachute canopy was measured using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry. The experiments were performed in a water tunnel with the Reynolds number ranging from 3.0--6.0 x 104. Both a fully inflated canopy and the inflation phase were investigated in a constant freestream (i.e. an infinite mass condition). The fully inflated canopy experienced a cyclic "breathing" which corresponded to the shedding of a vortex ring from the canopy. The normalized breathing frequency had a value of 0.56 +/- 0.03. The investigation of the canopy inflation showed that during the early stages of the inflation, the boundary layer on the canopy surface remains attached to the canopy while the canopy diameter increases substantially. The boundary layer begins to separate near the apex region when the diameter is ˜68% of the fully inflated diameter. The separation point then progresses upstream from the canopy apex region toward the canopy skirt. During this time period, the force rapidly increases to its maximum value while the separation point of the boundary layer moves upstream towards the skirt. The force then declines rapidly and the separated boundary layer rolls-up into a large vortex ring near the canopy skirt. At the same time, the canopy is drawn into an over-expanded state after which the cyclic breathing initiates. The unsteady potential force was estimated from the rate of change of the canopy volume. It contributed no more than 10% of the peak opening force and was only significant during the early stages of inflation. The majority of the opening force was the result of the time rate of change of the fluid impulse. It accounts for approximately 60% of the peak opening force. This result shows that the formation of the viscous wake is the primary factor in the peak drag force of the canopy.

  16. Velocity field near the jet orifice of a round jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Benson, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    Experimentally determined velocities at selected locations near the jet orifice are presented and analyzed for a round jet in crossflow. Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of four and eight were studied experimentally for a round subsonic jet of air exhausting perpendicularly through a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature. Velocity measurements were made in cross sections to the jet plume located from one to four jet diameters from the orifice. Jet centerline and vortex properties are presented and utilized to extend the results of a previous study into the region close to the jet orifice.

  17. Search for auroral belt E-parallel fields with high-velocity barium ion injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.; Ledley, B. G.; Miller, M. L.; Marionni, P. A.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    In April 1984, four high-velocity shaped-charge Ba(+) injections were conducted from two sounding rockets at 770-975 km over northern Alaska under conditions of active auroral and magnetic disturbance. Spatial ionization (brightness) profiles of high-velocity Ba(+) clouds from photometric scans following each release were found to be consistent with the 28-sec theoretical time constant for Ba photoionization determined by Carlsten (1975). These observations therefore revealed no evidence of anomalous fast ionization predicted by the Alfven critical velocity hypothesis.

  18. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2005-04-01

    In this reporting period two main accomplishments stand out. The Springdale task is in play in the northern Michigan Basin and the geochemical survey work over the Springdale prospect continued to progress. We still need to characterize the play in terms of the type of trap (basal reef diagenetic (?)) and its relation to the well documented pinnacle reef play. Also, we have become aware that Capac Field in the southern reef trend (Figure 1) is a possible analog to Springdale and so will be looking more closely at the literature on that field, particularly the work by Bowers (1987). Future work is directed toward further defining the Springdale project via more wells and examination and characterization of well cuttings. One to two more geochemical surveys are planned, one this spring and a final one in early fall. Based on current oil prices and Springdale production as of January 2005, an ROI, (defined as Total liquids revenue, $5.45m/DOE support, $1.45m) better than 3.75. This does not include gas revenues, which have not yet been calculated.

  19. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01

    One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now

  20. Pilot Study on the Detection of Simulated Lesions Using a 2D and 3D Digital Full-Field Mammography System with a Newly Developed High Resolution Detector Based on Two Shifts of a-Se.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Wendtland, R; Bani, M; Lux, M P; Schwab, S; Loehberg, C R; Jud, S M; Rauh, C; Bayer, C M; Beckmann, M W; Uder, M; Fasching, P A; Adamietz, B; Meier-Meitinger, M

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Experimental study of a new system for digital 2D and 3D full-field mammography (FFDM) using a high resolution detector based on two shifts of a-Se. Material and Methods: Images were acquired using the new FFDM system Amulet® (FujiFilm, Tokio, Japan), an a-Se detector (receptor 24 × 30 cm(2), pixel size 50 µm, memory depth 12 bit, spatial resolution 10 lp/mm, DQE > 0.50). Integrated in the detector is a new method for data transfer, based on optical switch technology. The object of investigation was the Wisconsin Mammographic Random Phantom, Model 152A (Radiation Measurement Inc., Middleton, WI, USA) and the same parameters and exposure data (Tungsten, 100 mAs, 30 kV) were consistently used. We acquired 3 different pairs of images in the c-c and ml planes (2D) and in the c-c and c-c planes with an angle of 4 degrees (3D). Five radiologists experienced in mammography (experience ranging from 3 months to more than 5 years) analyzed the images (monitoring) which had been randomly encoded (random generator) with regard to the recognition of details such as specks of aluminum oxide (200-740 µm), nylon fibers (0.4-1.6 mm) and round lesions/masses (diameters 5-14 mm), using special linear glasses for 3D visualization, and compared the results. Results: A total of 225 correct positive decisions could be detected: we found 222 (98.7 %) correct positive results for 2D and 3D visualization in each case. Conclusion: The results of this phantom study showed the same detection rates for both 2D and 3D imaging using full field digital mammography. Our results must be confirmed in further clinical trials.

  1. Correlation of throwing velocity to the results of lower-body field tests in male college baseball players.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Graeme; Drinkwater, Eric J; Behm, David G

    2013-04-01

    Baseball-specific athleticism, potential, and performance have been difficult to predict. Increased muscle strength and power can increase throwing velocity but the majority of research has focused on the upper body. The present study sought to determine if bilateral or unilateral lower-body field testing correlates with throwing velocity. Baseball throwing velocity scores were correlated to the following tests: medicine ball (MB) scoop toss and squat throw, bilateral and unilateral vertical jumps, single and triple broad jumps, hop and stop in both directions, lateral to medial jumps, 10- and 60-yd sprints, and both left and right single-leg 10-yd hop for speed in 42 college baseball players. A multiple regression analysis (forward method), assessing the relationship between shuffle and stretch throwing velocities and lower-body field test results determined that right-handed throwing velocity from the stretch position was most strongly predicted by lateral to medial jump right (LMJR) and body weight (BW; R = 0.322), whereas lateral to medial jump left (LMJL; R = 0.688) predicted left stretch throw. Right-handed shuffle throw was most strongly predicted by LMJR and MB scoop (R = 0.338), whereas LMJL, BW, and LMJR all contributed to left-handed shuffle throw (R = 0.982). Overall, this study found that lateral to medial jumps were consistently correlated with high throwing velocity in each of the throwing techniques, in both left-handed and right-handed throwers. This is the first study to correlate throwing velocity with a unilateral jump in the frontal plane, mimicking the action of the throwing stride. PMID:22706576

  2. Correlation of throwing velocity to the results of lower-body field tests in male college baseball players.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Graeme; Drinkwater, Eric J; Behm, David G

    2013-04-01

    Baseball-specific athleticism, potential, and performance have been difficult to predict. Increased muscle strength and power can increase throwing velocity but the majority of research has focused on the upper body. The present study sought to determine if bilateral or unilateral lower-body field testing correlates with throwing velocity. Baseball throwing velocity scores were correlated to the following tests: medicine ball (MB) scoop toss and squat throw, bilateral and unilateral vertical jumps, single and triple broad jumps, hop and stop in both directions, lateral to medial jumps, 10- and 60-yd sprints, and both left and right single-leg 10-yd hop for speed in 42 college baseball players. A multiple regression analysis (forward method), assessing the relationship between shuffle and stretch throwing velocities and lower-body field test results determined that right-handed throwing velocity from the stretch position was most strongly predicted by lateral to medial jump right (LMJR) and body weight (BW; R = 0.322), whereas lateral to medial jump left (LMJL; R = 0.688) predicted left stretch throw. Right-handed shuffle throw was most strongly predicted by LMJR and MB scoop (R = 0.338), whereas LMJL, BW, and LMJR all contributed to left-handed shuffle throw (R = 0.982). Overall, this study found that lateral to medial jumps were consistently correlated with high throwing velocity in each of the throwing techniques, in both left-handed and right-handed throwers. This is the first study to correlate throwing velocity with a unilateral jump in the frontal plane, mimicking the action of the throwing stride.

  3. Global positioning system data analysis: velocity ranges and a new definition of sprinting for field sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Dan B; Gabbett, Tim J

    2012-03-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology has improved the speed, accuracy, and ease of time-motion analyses of field sport athletes. The large volume of numerical data generated by GPS technology is usually summarized by reporting the distance traveled and time spent in various locomotor categories (e.g., walking, jogging, and running). There are a variety of definitions used in the literature to represent these categories, which makes it nearly impossible to compare findings among studies. The purpose of this work was to propose standard definitions (velocity ranges) that were determined by an objective analysis of time-motion data. In addition, we discuss the limitations of the existing definition of a sprint and present a new definition of sprinting for field sport athletes. Twenty-five GPS data files collected from 5 different sports (men's and women's field hockey, men's and women's soccer, and Australian Rules Football) were analyzed to identify the average velocity distribution. A curve fitting process was then used to determine the optimal placement of 4 Gaussian curves representing the typical locomotor categories. Based on the findings of these analyses, we make recommendations about sport-specific velocity ranges to be used in future time-motion studies of field sport athletes. We also suggest that a sprint be defined as any movement that reaches or exceeds the sprint threshold velocity for at least 1 second and any movement with an acceleration that occurs within the highest 5% of accelerations found in the corresponding velocity range. From a practical perspective, these analyses provide conditioning coaches with information on the high-intensity sprinting demands of field sport athletes, while also providing a novel method of capturing maximal effort, short-duration sprints.

  4. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-10-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The surface geochemistry sampling at the original Bear Lake demonstration site was updated several months after the prospect was confirmed and production begun. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir.

  5. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2001-10-31

    Two major accomplishments resulted from Phase I. One is the success of the surface geochemistry program, which collected over 800 samples from the site of the 1st demonstration well in Vernon Field and has pretty well provided us with the tools to delineate favorable ground from unfavorable. The second is the recent detailed mapping of the Central Michigan Basin that for the first time revealed the presence of at least two major faults that control the location of many of the reservoirs in the Michigan Basin. These faults were located from structure maps obtained by contouring the surface of the Dundee Formation using top picks from 9861 wells in 14 counties. Faults were inferred where the contour lines were most dense (''stacked'').

  6. Pitot survey of exhaust flow field of a 2-D scramjet nozzle at Mach 6 with air or freon and argon used for exhaust simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monta, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A pitot-rake survey of the simulated exhaust of a half-span scramjet nozzle model was conducted in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel to provide an additional data set for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code comparisons. A wind-tunnel model was tested with a 26-tube pitot rake that could be manually positioned along the mid-semispan plane of the model. The model configuration had an external expansion surface of 20 degrees and an internal cowl expansion of 12 degrees; tests were also performed with a flow fence. Tests were conducted at a free-stream Reynolds number of approximately 6.5 x 10(exp 6) per foot and a model angle of attack of -0.75 degrees. The two exhaust gas mediums that were tested were air and a Freon 12-argon mixture. Each medium was tested at two jet total pressures at approximately 28 and 14 psia. This document presents the flow-field survey results in graphical as well as tabular form, and several observations concerning the results are discussed. The surveys reveal the major expected flow-field characteristics for each test configuration. For a 50-percent freon 12 and 50-percent argon mixture by volume (Fr-Ar), the exhaust jet pressures were slightly higher than those for air. The addition of a flow fence slightly raised the pitot pressure for the Fr-Ar mixture, but it produced little change for air. For the Fr-Ar exhaust, the plume was larger and the region between the shock wave and plume was smaller.

  7. A new laser vibrometry-based 2D selective intensity method for source identification in reverberant fields: part II. Application to an aircraft cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, G. M.; Martarelli, M.; Chiariotti, P.

    2010-07-01

    The selective intensity technique is a powerful tool for the localization of acoustic sources and for the identification of the structural contribution to the acoustic emission. In practice, the selective intensity method is based on simultaneous measurements of acoustic intensity, by means of a couple of matched microphones, and structural vibration of the emitting object. In this paper high spatial density multi-point vibration data, acquired by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer, have been used for the first time. Therefore, by applying the selective intensity algorithm, the contribution of a large number of structural sources to the acoustic field radiated by the vibrating object can be estimated. The selective intensity represents the distribution of the acoustic monopole sources on the emitting surface, as if each monopole acted separately from the others. This innovative selective intensity approach can be very helpful when the measurement is performed on large panels in highly reverberating environments, such as aircraft cabins. In this case the separation of the direct acoustic field (radiated by the vibrating panels of the fuselage) and the reverberant one is difficult by traditional techniques. The work shown in this paper is the application of part of the results of the European project CREDO (Cabin Noise Reduction by Experimental and Numerical Design Optimization) carried out within the framework of the EU. Therefore the aim of this paper is to illustrate a real application of the method to the interior acoustic characterization of an Alenia Aeronautica ATR42 ground test facility, Alenia Aeronautica being a partner of the CREDO project.

  8. A GNSS-derived Velocity Field of the Southern Balkan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangl, Günter; Mitterschiffthaler, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    GNSS stations of Albania, Bulgaria, FYROM and Greece are combined between 2006 and 2014 to a velocity filed. This area covers a part of the transition zone between the Eurasian and Nubian Plate. Even not yet totally reprocessed within IGb08, the lateral components are at the precision of 1 mm/year. The density of stations allows to separate regions with abrupt changes of velocities coinciding with major faults already known from seismology and geology.

  9. 2-D inner-shelf current observations from a single VHF WEllen RAdar (WERA) station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voulgaris, G.; Kumar, N.; Gurgel, K.-W.; Warner, J.C.; List, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of High Frequency (HF) radars used worldwide operate at medium to high frequencies (8 to 30 MHz) providing spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 1.5 km and ranges from 150 to 50 km. This paper presents results from the deployment of a single Very High Frequency (VHF, 48 MHz) WEllen RAdar (WERA) radar with spatial resolution of 150 m and range 10-15 km, used in the nearshore off Cape Hatteras, NC, USA. It consisted of a linear array of 12 antennas operating in beam forming mode. Radial velocities were estimated from radar backscatter for a variety of wind and nearshore wave conditions. A methodology similar to that used for converting acoustically derived beam velocities to an orthogonal system is presented for obtaining 2-D current fields from a single station. The accuracy of the VHF radar-derived radial velocities is examined using a new statistical technique that evaluates the system over the range of measured velocities. The VHF radar velocities showed a bias of 3 to 7 cm/s over the experimental period explainable by the differences in radar penetration and in-situ measurement height. The 2-D current field shows good agreement with the in-situ measurements. Deviations and inaccuracies are well explained by the geometric dilution analysis. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  10. 3D chiral and 2D achiral cobalt(ii) compounds constructed from a 4-(benzimidazole-1-yl)benzoic ligand exhibiting field-induced single-ion-magnet-type slow magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ling; Chen, Lin; Liu, Cai-Ming; Du, Zi-Yi; Chen, Li-Li; Liu, Qing-Yan

    2016-05-01

    Organizing magnetically isolated 3d transition metal ions, which behave as single-ion magnet (SIM) units, in a coordination network is a promising approach to design novel single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Herein 3D chiral and 2D achiral cobalt(ii) coordination compounds based on single metal nodes with a 4-(benzimidazole-1-yl)benzoic acid (Hbmzbc) ligand, namely, [Co(bmzbc)2(1,2-etdio)]n () (1,2-etdio = 1,2-ethanediol) and [Co(bmzbc)2(Hbmzbc)]n (), have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The 3D chiral structure with 2-fold interpenetrating qtz topological nets consisting of totally achiral components was obtained via spontaneous resolution, while the achiral structure is a 2D (4,4) net. In both structures, individual cobalt(ii) ions are spatially well separated by the long organic ligands in the well-defined networks. Magnetic measurements on and showed field-induced slow magnetic relaxation resulting from single-ion anisotropy of the individual Co(ii) ions. Analysis of the dynamic ac susceptibilities with the Arrhenius law afforded an anisotropy energy barrier of 16.8(3) and 31.3(2) K under a 2 kOe static magnetic field for and , respectively. The distinct coordination environments of the Co(ii) ions in and lead to the different anisotropic energy barriers. PMID:27054774

  11. 10kHz TRPIV near-field velocity and far-field noise: experimental results of a Mach 0.6 jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Pinqing; Lewalle, Jacques

    2012-11-01

    Last year, we extracted footprints of sources from far-field pressure data of high speed jet. In this paper, we focus on processing 10kHz TR-PIV data in the near-field region. The velocity and pressure data were collected in the jet experiment of Kerwin Low, et al. in 2011. From the PIV snapshots, we extract kinematic indicators, construct their histories over the sequence of snapshots, and select the most promising diagnostics by cross-correlation with far-field pressure. For these indicators, including mass flux, we map out their fluctuations and their downstream propagation. In particular, the phase velocity of fluctuations is compared to the local convective speed. Events with large relative phase velocity are identified, and the corresponding velocity and vorticity fields are mapped out. Our goal is to correlate such events to the far-field footprints of sources. For more info and results related to the experiment, please refer to abstracts by Z.P. Berger and by M.G. Berry at this meeting. This work is supported by Glauser group of Syracuse University, Spectral Energies LLC under AFOSR SBIR grant, and by a Syracuse University Graduate Fellowship. Thanks for partial support from Spectral Energies LLC (under SBIR grant from AFOSR), Syracuse University and the LCS College.

  12. Non-uniform velocity of homogeneous DNA in a uniform electric field: consequence of electric-field-induced slow dissociation of highly stable DNA-counterion complexes.

    PubMed

    Musheev, Michael U; Kanoatov, Mirzo; Krylov, Sergey N

    2013-05-29

    Identical molecules move with identical velocities when placed in a uniform electric field within a uniform electrolyte. Here we report that homogeneous DNA does not obey this fundamental rule. While most DNA moves with similar velocities, a fraction of DNA moves with velocities that vary within a multiple-fold range. The size of this irregular fraction increases several orders of magnitude when exogenous counterions are added to DNA. The irregular fraction decreases several orders of magnitude when DNA counterions are removed by dialysis against deionized water in the presence of a strong electric field (0.6 kV/cm). Dialysis without the field is ineffective in decreasing the size of irregular fraction. These results suggest that (i) DNA can form very stable complexes with counterions, (ii) these complexes can be dissociated by an electric field, and (iii) the observed non-uniform velocity of DNA is caused by electric-field-induced slow dissociation of these stable complexes. Our findings help to better understand a fundamental property of DNA: its interaction with counterions. In addition, these findings suggest a practical way of making electromigration of DNA more uniform: removal of strongly bound DNA counterions by electro-dialysis against deionized water.

  13. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan; E. Taylor

    2001-07-31

    A principal goal of the Budget Period I was to demonstrate that surface geochemistry could be used to locate bypassed hydrocarbons in old fields. This part of the program was successful. A surface geochemical survey, employing 5 different techniques, was carried out in the Spring and Summer of 2000 and a demonstration well, the State Vernon & Smock 13-23 HD1 (permit number: PN 53945) was drilled in Vernon Township, Isabella County, Michigan in the late fall of 2000. A demonstration well was selected and drilled based on geologic considerations and surface geochemistry. Over 460 soil samples were collected and analyzed over the drill site. A good anomaly was detected near the proposed well site and the demonstration well, the Smock 13-23, was drilled to a depth of 3157 feet by November 17, 2000. Two laterals were drilled, and hydrocarbons were located in a zone approximately 175 feet in length. However, it was determined that the pay zone was too small and difficult reservoir conditions (water production) prevented putting the well in production. The Smock 13-23 was shut in and abandoned January 15, 2001. A post-mortem determined that the main reason the well was not economic was because the zone was nearly completely flushed by earlier recovery operations. The post mortem also revealed the presence of an unmapped shale plug crossing the first lateral. It appears that this shale was detected by the geochemical survey, but its significance was not appreciated at the time. It is possible that sections of the well were faulty, ''porposing'' up and down so as to create water blockages. We are continuing to use the Vernon Field and the demonstration well to calibrate the geochemical data. Eventually, this study may provide a standard site that can be used to test and calibrate geochemical anomalies, something that does not presently exist. A postmortem report on the well, including the geology and geochemistry used to site the well, is presented in Appendix I. Five

  14. Geometric phases generated by the non-trivial spatial topology of static vector fields linearly coupled to a neutral spin-endowed particle: application to 171Yb atoms trapped in a 2D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, Marie-Anne; Bouchiat, Claude

    2012-10-01

    We have constructed the geometric phases emerging from the non-trivial topology of a space-dependent magnetic field B(r), interacting with the spin magnetic moment of a neutral particle. Our basic tool, adapted from a previous work on Berry’s phases, is the space-dependent unitary transformation {U}({\\mathbf {r}}), which leads to the identity, {U}({\\mathbf {r}})^{\\dag }\\, {\\mathbf {S}}\\,{\\bm \\cdot}\\, {\\mathbf {B}}({\\mathbf {r}}) \\, {U}({\\mathbf {r}}) = \\vert {\\mathbf {B}}({\\mathbf {r}}) \\vert \\, S_z, at each point r. In the ‘rotated’ Hamiltonian \\widehat{ H}, \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}} is replaced by the non-Abelian covariant derivative \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}}- \\frac{i}{\\hbar } {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) where {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) = i \\hbar \\, {U}^{\\dag }\\,{\\bm\\cdot}\\, \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}} {U} can be written as A1(r)Sx + A2(r)Sy + A3(r)Sz. The Abelian differentials Ak(r)·dr are given in terms of the Euler angles defining the orientation of B(r). The non-Abelian field {A}({\\mathbf {r}}) transforms as a Yang-Mills field; however, its vanishing ‘curvature’ reveals its purely geometric character. We have defined a perturbation scheme based upon the assumption that in \\widehat{ H} the longitudinal field A3(r) dominates the transverse field A1, 2(r) contributions, evaluated to second order. The geometry embedded in both the vector field A3(r) and the geometric magnetic field \\mathbf { B}_3 ({\\mathbf {r}}) = \\frac{ \\partial }{\\partial {\\mathbf {r}}}\\wedge {{\\mathbf {A}}}_3({\\mathbf {r}}) is described by their associated Aharonov-Bohm phase. As an illustration we study the physics of cold 171Yb atoms dressed by overlaying two circularly polarized stationary waves with orthogonal directions, which form a 2D square optical lattice. The frequency is tuned midway between the two hyperfine levels of the (6s6p)3P1 states to protect the optical B(r) field generated by the

  15. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR; VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-01-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The main news this reporting period is the confirmed discovery of producing hydrocarbons at the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 demonstration well in Manistee County. This well was spudded in late November, tested and put on production in December 2003. To date it is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. The surface geochemistry sampling at the Springdale demonstration site will be repeated this spring after the well has been on production for several months to see if the anomaly pattern changes. We expect that the anomaly will diminish as the original positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. This is the behavior that we observed at the Bear lake demonstration well reported last quarter.

  16. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-07-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, plans were finalized for additional surface geochemical sampling in the new Springdale Prospect field demonstration in Manistee County, Michigan. Plans were also developed to acquire additional surface geochemical data in the vicinity of the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan. The main news this reporting period is the continued success in the Springdale demonstration area. The State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 and the State Springdale & Herban 12-16 horizontal demonstration wells in Manistee County, Michigan are both flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which are good wells in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. A third horizontal well, the State Springdale & Wilburn 1-21 HD has been drilled and is waiting on completion. Two more horizontal wells have been permitted in the Springdale area by our industry partner.

  17. Remarks on the regularity criteria of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system in terms of two velocity field components

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Kazuo

    2014-03-15

    We study the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system and obtain its regularity criteria in terms of only two velocity vector field components eliminating the condition on the third component completely. The proof consists of a new decomposition of the four nonlinear terms of the system and estimating a component of the magnetic vector field in terms of the same component of the velocity vector field. This result may be seen as a component reduction result of many previous works [C. He and Z. Xin, “On the regularity of weak solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic equations,” J. Differ. Equ. 213(2), 234–254 (2005); Y. Zhou, “Remarks on regularities for the 3D MHD equations,” Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 12(5), 881–886 (2005)].

  18. Calculation of Ion Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Ershov, N. M.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J. C.; Jaeger, F.; Batchelor, D. B.; Berry, L. A.; Carter, M. D.; Smithe, D. N.

    2003-10-01

    Numerical calculations of bounce-averaged ion velocity-space diffusion coefficients resulting from full-wave code electromagnetic fields in tokamak geometry have been implemented by two methods: (1) appropriate averaging of velocity "kicks" during one transit of the torus cross-section calculated by direct numerical integration of the Lorentz equation of motion in tokamak and full-wave EM fields; and (2) local Fourier analysis of full-wave fields to obtain wavenumbers and polarizations, followed by analysis with a previously implemented ray-tracing/quasilinear-diffusion-coefficient calculation in the CQL3D collisional-quasilinear Fokker-Planck code. Diffusion coefficient results from the two approaches are compared. The diffusion coefficients are used in the FP code for calculation of the RF-driven nonthermal ion distributions.

  19. Investigation of magnetic field generation by non-Gaussian, non-Markovian velocity fluctuations using meshless, Lagrangian numerical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Raul; Newman, David

    2014-10-01

    Turbulent velocity fields can generate perturbations of the electric current and magnetic field that, under certain conditions, may generate an average, large-scale magnetic field. Such generation is important to understand the behavior of stars, planetary and laboratory plasmas. This generation is traditionally studied by assuming near-Gaussian, random velocity fluctuations. This simplification allows to exprese the effective electromotive force in Faraday's law in terms of a piece proportional to the large-scale magnetic field itself (the α-term) and another proportional to its curl (the β term) assuming certain symmetry conditions are met. Physically, the α-term is a measure of the mean helicity of the flow and drives the dynamo process. In a previous contribution, we examined theoretically what consequences would follow from assuming instead Levy-distributed, Lagrangianly-correlated velocity fields, that have been recently identified as of relevance in regimes of near-marginal turbulence or in the presence of a strong, stable sheared flow. Here, we will discuss and extend these results numerically by implementing the kinematic dynamo equation using a Lagrangian, meshless numerical method inspired by the SPH schemes frequently used in hydrodynamics.

  20. A three-dimensional measuring system based on 2D laser displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Sulun; Fu, Yuegang; Zhu, Wangbin; Zhang, Yingwei; Wang, Weichen

    2014-12-01

    3D(Three-dimensional) measurement has found its applications in the fields of automation process, Reverse engineering(RE), machine vision, as well as medical diagnostic. There are some disadvantages in the present 3D measurement methods. In this paper, a 2D laser displacement sensor-based and fast-dimensional surface measurement method for small size objects was proposed after analyzing the existing three-dimensional measurement methods. This method uses the information collected by 2D laser displacement sensor and encoder in pan-tilt to three-dimensional reconstruct 3D model. And then discuss the restrictive relation between angular velocity of pan-tilt and parameters (measurement range, signal sample rate, precision, etc.) of 2D laser displacement sensor. The sources of error and methods of improving precision were analyzed. Theoretical analyses and experiments have proved the feasibility, high-precision and practical of this method.

  1. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements.

  2. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  3. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTRY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. A major part of the remaining project will focus on using surface geochemistry to delineate prospects. A Niagaran reef field geochemical survey, the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan is scheduled to take place this summer. Previous wells drilled in Bagley Prospect area in the early 1970's and in place in late 2002 and early 2003 resulted in discoveries and numerous hydrocarbon shows in the Brown Niagaran reservoir interval. The Bagley region is still considered an area of interest by the industry and appears ripe for a geochemical survey. Our industry partner is interested in a possible test in the Bagley prospect because subsurface geophysical and geological interpretation indicates the presence of structures. Anomalous production and pressure data further suggest the region is not yet well understood and should not be considered mature. The most recent well, the Bagley 1-22A sidetrack, was unsuccessful at locating a new reef culmination to the south of the original vertical well and did not encounter hydrocarbon shows. The sidetrack and well were plugged and abandoned. The proposed geochemical survey will concentrate on areas away from the Bagley 1-22A to the north and west but will include the entire prospect so that the existing data can be used in interpretations. Bagley appears to offer a unique combination of potential and data for a geochemical study that focuses on looking for new oil in an area that has exhausted traditional geologic and geophysical methods. The Bear Lake pinnacle reef trend in Manistee County, Michigan, is also scheduled for further geochemical work this summer. Industry interest, mostly by small companies, is picking up in this area and it is also ripe for targeted geochemical surveys for the

  4. Developing Improved Water Velocity and Flux Estimation from AUVs - Results From Recent ASTEP Field Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Yoerger, D. R.; Camilli, R.; German, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Water velocity measurements are crucial to quantifying fluxes and better understanding water as a fundamental transport mechanism for marine chemical and biological processes. The importance of flux to understanding these processes makes it a crucial component of astrobiological exploration to moons possessing large bodies of water, such as Europa. Present technology allows us to obtain submerged water velocity measurements from stationary platforms; rarer are measurements from submerged vehicles which possess the ability to autonomously survey tens of kilometers over extended periods. Improving this capability would also allow us to obtain co-registered water velocity and other sensor data (e.g., mass spectrometers, temperature, oxygen, etc) and significantly enhance our ability to estimate fluxes. We report results from 4 recent expeditions in which we measured water velocities from autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to help quantify flux in three different oceanographic contexts: hydrothermal vent plumes; an oil spill cruise responding to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout; and two expeditions investigating naturally occurring methane seeps. On all of these cruises, we directly measured the water velocities with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mounted on the AUV. Vehicle motion was corrected for using bottom-lock Doppler tracks when available and, in the absence of bottom-lock, estimates of vehicle velocity based on dynamic models. In addition, on the methane seep cruises, we explored the potential of using acoustic mapping sonars, such as multi-beam and sub-bottom profiling systems, to localize plumes and indirectly quantify flux. Data obtained on these expeditions enhanced our scientific investigations and provides data for future development of algorithms for autonomously processing, identifying, and classifying water velocity and flux measurements. Such technology will be crucial in future astrobiology missions where highly constrained

  5. Simulation of the flow and mass transfer for KDP crystals undergoing 2D translation during growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Li, Mingwei; Hu, Zhitao; Yin, Huawei; Wang, Bangguo; Cui, Qidong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel motion mode for crystals during growth, i.e., 2D translation, is proposed. Numerical simulations of flow and mass transfer are conducted for the growth of large-scale potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals subjected to the new motion mode. Surface supersaturation and shear stress are obtained as functions of the translational velocity, distance, size, orientation of crystals. The dependence of these two parameters on the flow fields around the crystals is also discussed. The thicknesses of the solute boundary layer varied with translational velocity are described. The characteristics of solution flow and surface supersaturation distribution are summarized, where it suggests that the morphological stability of a crystal surface can be enhanced if the proposed 2D translation is applied to crystal growth.

  6. Effect of Gas Velocity on the Dust Sediment Layer in the Coupled Field of Corona Plasma and Cyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingshan; Ma, Chaochen; Li, Minghua; S, N. Danish

    2006-09-01

    A dust sediment layer was found on the outer tube wall when the ESCP (electrostatic centrifugal precipitator) trapped diesel particulates or ganister sand. The Compton back scatter method was used to measure the sediment thickness during the experiment. The effect of the inlet gas velocity on the dust sediment layer was investigated. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) was used to measure the velocity field between the inner barb tube wall and the outer tube wall. Experiments showed that the thickness of the sediment increased with time, and the sediment layer at the lower end was much thicker than that at the upper end. The agglomeration on the outer tube wall could be removed when the inlet gas velocity was increased to a certain value.

  7. Energetics of a Kerr blackhole in electromagnetic fields Role of the relative angular velocity of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, S.; Dhurandhar, S. V.; Dadhich, N.

    1985-06-01

    The authors consider a rotating black hole in an external dipole magnetic field. By defining the relative angular velocity parameter Ω they analyse the various contributions due to electromagnetic fields and rotation to the effective potential. It turns out that the magnetic field contribution is in general related to Ω. An interesting case of prescribing the orbit for a locally nonrotating observer (LNRO) by a particle of appropriate charge and angular momentum parameters is considered. For such an orbit Ω = 0, stationarity is built in and is ensured by the Lorentz force in contrast to the usual LNRO orbit where it has to be maintained by externally providing proper outward radial acceleration.

  8. Inference of the angular velocity of plasma in the Jovian magnetosphere from the sweepback of magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.; Kivelson, Margaret G.

    1993-01-01

    The averaged angular velocity of plasma from magnetic observations is evaluated using plasma outflow rate as a parameter. New techniques are developed to calculate the normal and azimuthal components of the magnetic field in and near to the plasma sheet in a plasma sheet coordinate system. The revised field components differ substantially from the quantities used in previous analyses. With the revised field values, it appears that during the Voyager 2 flyby for an outflow rate of 2.5 x 10 exp 29 amu/s, the observed magnetic torque may be sufficient to keep the plasma in corotation to radial distances of 50 Rj in the postmidnight quadrant.

  9. NS shear kinematics across the Lut block from a dense GPS velocity field in eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpersdorf, A.; Tavakoli, F.; Hatzfeld, D.; Jadidi, A. M.; Vergnolle, M. M.; Aghamohammadi, A.; Djamour, Y.; Nankali, H. R.; Sedighi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2004, extensive GPS campaigns and the upcoming Iranian permanent GPS network are monitoring the present-day deformation in eastern Iran. We present a new GPS velocity field extending from Central Iran to the Hellmand block on the Eurasian plate. It permits to monitor the right lateral NS shear across the aseismic Lut block between Central Iran and the Hellmand block. While existing tectonic models propose an increase of slip rate from west to east, we find balanced slip rates on both Lut block boundaries. The total shear between Central Iran and the Lut block (the western limit) is evaluated to 7.0 ± 0.5 mm/yr that are accommodated by the Gowk-Nayband fault system and the Anar fault. It even slightly exceeds the 5.5 ± 0.5 mm/yr of shear between the Lut block and stable Eurasia (the eastern limit), localized on different faults of the Sistan Suture zone. Tectonic models propose that at the northern Lut block limit the regional NS shear leads to left lateral activity of large EW trending strike-slip faults (Doruneh and Dasht-e-Bayaz faults). On none of them a significant left lateral displacement is observed, in spite of the recent seismic activity of the Dasht-e-Bayaz and Abiz faults. The instantaneous active deformation is localized rather on oblique NW-SE oriented thrust faults (Janggal and Ferdows thrusts). Individual instantaneous fault slip rates are compared to short term and long term geological estimates. We find that GPS slip rates are in most cases coherent with short term geologic determinations (from dating of geomorphologic offsets over some 10-100 ka). Some differences with respect to long term estimates (from total geologic fault offsets and onset ages of several Ma) indicate non-constant slip rates over different time scales or that the onset of the present-day deformation presumed to 3-7 Ma in eastern Iran has to be revised.

  10. Statistical properties of the surface velocity field in the northern Gulf of Mexico sampled by GLAD drifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, A. J.; Ryan, E. H.; Huntley, H. S.; Laurindo, L. C.; Coelho, E.; Griffa, A.; Özgökmen, T. M.; Berta, M.; Bogucki, D.; Chen, S. S.; Curcic, M.; Drouin, K. L.; Gough, M.; Haus, B. K.; Haza, A. C.; Hogan, P.; Iskandarani, M.; Jacobs, G.; Kirwan, A. D.; Laxague, N.; Lipphardt, B.; Magaldi, M. G.; Novelli, G.; Reniers, A.; Restrepo, J. M.; Smith, C.; Valle-Levinson, A.; Wei, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD) used multiscale sampling and GPS technology to observe time series of drifter positions with initial drifter separation of O(100 m) to O(10 km), and nominal 5 min sampling, during the summer and fall of 2012 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Histograms of the velocity field and its statistical parameters are non-Gaussian; most are multimodal. The dominant periods for the surface velocity field are 1-2 days due to inertial oscillations, tides, and the sea breeze; 5-6 days due to wind forcing and submesoscale eddies; 9-10 days and two weeks or longer periods due to wind forcing and mesoscale variability, including the period of eddy rotation. The temporal e-folding scales of a fitted drifter velocity autocorrelation function are bimodal with time scales, 0.25-0.50 days and 0.9-1.4 days, and are the same order as the temporal e-folding scales of observed winds from nearby moored National Data Buoy Center stations. The Lagrangian integral time scales increase from coastal values of 8 h to offshore values of approximately 2 days with peak values of 3-4 days. The velocity variance is large, O>(1>) m2/s2, the surface velocity statistics are more anisotropic, and increased dispersion is observed at flow bifurcations. Horizontal diffusivity estimates are O>(103>) m2/s in coastal regions with weaker flow to O>(105>) m2/s in flow bifurcations, a strong jet, and during the passage of Hurricane Isaac. The Gulf of Mexico surface velocity statistics sampled by the GLAD drifters are a strong function of the feature sampled, topography, and wind forcing.

  11. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  12. Dynamic Electric Field Maps of Point Charge Moving with Constant Velocity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg D.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic field maps and contour curves provide a new way of depicting and analyzing the electric field of uniformly moving point charges. Presents an alternative way of graphically representing the electricity field of a uniformly moving point charge. (CCM)

  13. Depression storage and infiltration effects on overland flow depth-velocity-friction at desert conditions: field plot results and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M. J.; Ares, J. O.

    2012-09-01

    Water infiltration and overland flow are relevant in considering water partition among plant life forms, the sustainability of vegetation and the design of sustainable hydrological models and management. In arid and semi-arid regions, these processes present characteristic trends imposed by the prevailing physical conditions of the upper soil as evolved under water-limited climate. A set of plot-scale field experiments at the semi-arid Patagonian Monte (Argentina) were performed in order to estimate the effect of depression storage areas and infiltration rates on depths, velocities and friction of overland flows. The micro-relief of undisturbed field plots was characterized at z-scale 1 mm through close-range stereo-photogrammetry and geo-statistical tools. The overland flow areas produced by controlled water inflows were video-recorded and the flow velocities were measured with image processing software. Antecedent and post-inflow moisture were measured, and texture, bulk density and physical properties of the upper soil were estimated based on soil core analyses. Field data were used to calibrate a physically-based, mass balanced, time explicit model of infiltration and overland flows. Modelling results reproduced the time series of observed flow areas, velocities and infiltration depths. Estimates of hydrodynamic parameters of overland flow (Reynolds-Froude numbers) are informed. To our knowledge, the study here presented is novel in combining several aspects that previous studies do not address simultaneously: (1) overland flow and infiltration parameters were obtained in undisturbed field conditions; (2) field measurements of overland flow movement were coupled to a detailed analysis of soil microtopography at 1 mm depth scale; (3) the effect of depression storage areas in infiltration rates and depth-velocity friction of overland flows is addressed. Relevance of the results to other similar desert areas is justified by the accompanying biogeography analysis

  14. Cosmological parameters from the comparison of peculiar velocities with predictions from the 2M++ density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Michael J.; Carrick, Jonathan; Turnbull, Stephen J.; Lavaux, Guilhem

    2016-10-01

    Using redshifts from the 2M++ redshift compilation, we reconstruct the density of galaxies within 200 h -1 Mpc, and compare the predicted peculiar velocities Tully-Fisher and SNe peculiar velocities. The comparison yields a best-fit value of β ≡ Ωm 0.55/b* = 0.431 +/- 0.021, suggesting Ωm 0.55σ8,lin = 0.401 +/- 0.024, in good agreement with other probes. The predicted peculiar velocity of the Local Group from sources within the 2M++ volume is 540 +/- 40 km s-1, towards l = 268° +/- 4°, b = 38° +/- 6°, which is misaligned by only 10° with the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole. To account for sources outside the 2M++ volume, we fit simultaneously for β* and an external bulk flow in our analysis. The external bulk flow has a velocity of 159 +/- 23 km s-1 towards l = 304° +/- 11°, b6° +/- 13°.

  15. Dissipated power and induced velocity fields data of a micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for active flow control.

    PubMed

    Pescini, E; Martínez, D S; De Giorgi, M G; Francioso, L; Ficarella, A

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators have gained great interest among all the active flow control devices typically employed in aerospace and turbomachinery applications [1,2]. Compared with the macro SDBDs, the micro single dielectric barrier discharge (MSDBD) actuators showed a higher efficiency in conversion of input electrical power to delivered mechanical power [3,4]. This article provides data regarding the performances of a MSDBD plasma actuator [5,6]. The power dissipation values [5] and the experimental and numerical induced velocity fields [6] are provided. The present data support and enrich the research article entitled "Optimization of micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator models based on experimental velocity and body force fields" by Pescini et al. [6]. PMID:26425667

  16. Dissipated power and induced velocity fields data of a micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for active flow control.

    PubMed

    Pescini, E; Martínez, D S; De Giorgi, M G; Francioso, L; Ficarella, A

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators have gained great interest among all the active flow control devices typically employed in aerospace and turbomachinery applications [1,2]. Compared with the macro SDBDs, the micro single dielectric barrier discharge (MSDBD) actuators showed a higher efficiency in conversion of input electrical power to delivered mechanical power [3,4]. This article provides data regarding the performances of a MSDBD plasma actuator [5,6]. The power dissipation values [5] and the experimental and numerical induced velocity fields [6] are provided. The present data support and enrich the research article entitled "Optimization of micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator models based on experimental velocity and body force fields" by Pescini et al. [6].