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Sample records for 2d-ir vibrational echo

  1. Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute-Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Junrong; Fayer, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Weak π hydrogen bonded solute-solvent complexes are studied with ultrafast two dimensional infrared (2D-IR) vibrational echo chemical exchange spectroscopy, temperature dependent IR absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Eight solute-solvent complexes composed of a number of phenol derivatives and various benzene derivatives are investigated. The complexes are formed between the phenol derivative (solute) in a mixed solvent of the benzene derivative and CCl4. The time dependence of the 2D-IR vibrational echo spectra of the phenol hydroxyl stretch is used to directly determine the dissociation and formation rates of the hydrogen bonded complexes. The dissociation rates of the weak hydrogen bonds are found to be strongly correlated with their formation enthalpies. The correlation can be described with an equation similar to the Arrhenius equation. The results are discussed in terms of transition state theory. PMID:17373792

  2. Water dynamics in salt solutions studied with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Michael D; Moilanen, David E; Wong, Daryl; Rosenfeld, Daniel E; Fenn, Emily E; Park, Sungnam

    2009-09-15

    Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species. Many of these species are charged. In the ocean, water interacts with dissolved salts. In biological systems, water interacts with dissolved salts as well as charged amino acids, the zwitterionic head groups of membranes, and other biological groups that carry charges. Water plays a central role in a vast number of chemical processes because of its dynamic hydrogen-bond network. A water molecule can form up to four hydrogen bonds in an approximately tetrahedral arrangement. These hydrogen bonds are continually being broken, and new bonds are being formed on a picosecond time scale. The ability of the hydrogen-bond network of water to rapidly reconfigure enables water to accommodate and facilitate chemical processes. Therefore, the influence of charged species on water hydrogen-bond dynamics is important. Recent advances in ultrafast coherent infrared spectroscopy have greatly expanded our understanding of water dynamics. Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is providing new observables that yield direct information on the fast dynamics of molecules in their ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions. The 2D IR vibrational echoes are akin to 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) but operate on time scales that are many orders of magnitude shorter. In a 2D IR vibrational echo experiment (see the Conspectus figure), three IR pulses are tuned to the vibrational frequency of interest, which in this case is the frequency of the hydroxyl stretching mode of water. The first two pulses "label" the initial molecular structures by their vibrational frequencies. The system evolves between pulses two and three, and the third pulse stimulates the emission of the vibrational echo pulse, which is the signal. The vibrational echo pulse is heterodyne, detected by combining it

  3. Time-dependent fifth-order bands in nominally third-order 2D IR vibrational echo spectra.

    PubMed

    Thielges, Megan C; Fayer, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    Progress in the field of 2D IR vibrational spectroscopy has been bolstered by the production of intense mid-IR laser pulses. As higher-energy pulses are employed, a concomitant increase occurs in the likelihood of fifth-order contributions to the 2D IR spectra. We report the appearance of fifth-order signals in 2D IR spectra of CO bound to the active site of the enzyme cytochrome P450(cam) with the substrate norcamphor. Two bands with novel time dependences, one on the diagonal and one off-diagonal, are not accounted for by normal third-order interactions. These bands are associated with a ν = 1-2 vibrational transition frequency. Both bands decay to 0 and then grow back in with opposite sign. The diagonal band is positive at short time, decays to 0, reappears with negative sign, before eventually decaying to 0. The off-diagonal band is negative at short time, decays to 0, reappears positive, and then decays to 0. The appearance and time dependence of these bands are characterized. Understanding these fifth-order bands is useful because they may be misidentified with time-dependent bands that arise from other processes, such as chemical exchange, vibrational coupling, or energy transfer. The presence and unusual time dependences of the fifth-order bands are reproduced with model calculations that account for the fact that vibrational relaxation from the ν = 2 to 1 level is approximately a factor of 2 faster than that from the ν = 1 to 0 level.

  4. Simulations of the infrared, Raman, and 2D-IR photon echo spectra of water in nanoscale silica pores

    DOE PAGES

    Burris, Paul C.; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-05-20

    Vibrational spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize nanoconfined liquids and probe the effect of the confining framework on the liquid structure and dynamics relative to the corresponding bulk fluid. However, it is still unclear what molecular-level information can be obtained from such measurements. In this Paper, we address this question by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reproduce the linear infrared (IR), Raman, and two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) photon echo spectra for water confined within hydrophilic (hydroxyl-terminated) silica mesopores. To simplify the spectra the OH stretching region of isotopically dilute HOD in D2O is considered. An empirical mapping approach is usedmore » to obtain the OH vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and transition polarizabilities from the MD simulations. The simulated linear IR and Raman spectra are in good general agreement with measured spectra of water in mesoporous silica reported in the literature. The key effect of confinement on the water spectrum is a vibrational blueshift for OH groups that are closest to the pore interface. The blueshift can be attributed to the weaker hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed between the OH groups and silica oxygen acceptors. Non-Condon effects greatly diminish the contribution of these OH moieties to the linear IR spectrum, but these weaker H-bonds are readily apparent in the Raman spectrum. The 2D-IR spectra have not yet been measured and thus the present results represent a prediction. Lastly, the simulated spectra indicate that it should be possible to probe the slower spectral diffusion of confined water compared to the bulk liquid by analysis of the 2D-IR spectra.« less

  5. Dye aggregation identified by vibrational coupling using 2D IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oudenhoven, Tracey A.; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Zanni, Martin T.; Joo, Yongho; Gopalan, Padma

    2015-06-07

    We report that a model dye, Re(CO){sub 3}(bypy)CO{sub 2}H, aggregates into clusters on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles regardless of our preparation conditions. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we have identified characteristic frequencies of monomers, dimers, and trimers. A comparison of 2D IR spectra in solution versus those deposited on TiO{sub 2} shows that the propensity to dimerize in solution leads to higher dimer formation on TiO{sub 2}, but that dimers are formed even if there are only monomers in solution. Aggregates cannot be washed off with standard protocols and are present even at submonolayer coverages. We observe cross peaks between aggregates of different sizes, primarily dimers and trimers, indicating that clusters consist of microdomains in close proximity. 2D IR spectroscopy is used to draw these conclusions from measurements of vibrational couplings, but if molecules are close enough to be vibrationally coupled, then they are also likely to be electronically coupled, which could alter charge transfer.

  6. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  7. Frequency distribution of the amide-I vibration sorted by residues in Amyloid fibrils revealed by 2D-IR measurements and simulations

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Cyril; Zhuang, Wei; Kim, Yung Sam; Axelsen, Paul H.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    The infrared optical response of Amyloid Fibrils Aβ1–40 is investigated. Simulations of two models corresponding to different protonation states are compared with experiment. The simulations reveal that vibrational frequency distributions inside the fibrils are dominated by sidechain fluctuations. We further confirm earlier suggestions based on 2D-IR measurements that water molecules can be trapped inside the fibrils. PMID:22338639

  8. 2D IR photon echo study of the anharmonic coupling in the OCN region of phenyl cyanate

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Matthew J.; Kim, Yung Sam; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2009-01-01

    The vibrations in the OCN stretching region of phenyl cyanate are examined by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. In water and THF, these spectra display three diagonal peaks having cross peaks characteristic of anharmonically coupled transitions. The pattern of the spectra is reproduced by coupling of two overtones with the OCN fundamental. PMID:20160952

  9. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO{sub 2} in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide’s point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J.; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A.; Krisher, Cullen S.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-06-07

    The CO{sub 2}ν{sub 3} asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO{sub 2} is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C{sub 4}C{sub 1}im][X], where [X]{sup −} is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF{sub 6}{sup −}), tetrafluoroborate (BF{sub 4}{sup −}), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf{sub 2}N{sup −}), triflate (TfO{sup −}), trifluoroacetate (TFA{sup −}), dicyanamide (DCA{sup −}), and thiocyanate (SCN{sup −})). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν{sub 3} center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO{sub 2} and from CO{sub 2} to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO{sub 2}, which in turn changes the ν{sub 3} frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν{sub 2} and ν{sub 3} normal modes of CO{sub 2}. Thermal fluctuations in the ν{sub 2} population stochastically modulate the ν{sub 3} frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO{sub 2}. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO{sub 2} are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations.

  10. Ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) of CO2 in ionic liquids: Carbon capture from carbon dioxide's point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinzer, Thomas; Berquist, Eric J.; Ren, Zhe; Dutta, Samrat; Johnson, Clinton A.; Krisher, Cullen S.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-06-01

    The CO2ν3 asymmetric stretching mode is established as a vibrational chromophore for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopic studies of local structure and dynamics in ionic liquids, which are of interest for carbon capture applications. CO2 is dissolved in a series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C4C1im][X], where [X]- is the anion from the series hexafluorophosphate (PF 6- ), tetrafluoroborate (BF 4- ), bis-(trifluoromethyl)sulfonylimide (Tf2N-), triflate (TfO-), trifluoroacetate (TFA-), dicyanamide (DCA-), and thiocyanate (SCN-)). In the ionic liquids studied, the ν3 center frequency is sensitive to the local solvation environment and reports on the timescales for local structural relaxation. Density functional theory calculations predict charge transfer from the anion to the CO2 and from CO2 to the cation. The charge transfer drives geometrical distortion of CO2, which in turn changes the ν3 frequency. The observed structural relaxation timescales vary by up to an order of magnitude between ionic liquids. Shoulders in the 2D-IR spectra arise from anharmonic coupling of the ν2 and ν3 normal modes of CO2. Thermal fluctuations in the ν2 population stochastically modulate the ν3 frequency and generate dynamic cross-peaks. These timescales are attributed to the breakup of ion cages that create a well-defined local environment for CO2. The results suggest that the picosecond dynamics of CO2 are gated by local diffusion of anions and cations.

  11. Parallel β-sheet vibrational couplings revealed by 2D IR spectroscopy of an isotopically labeled macrocycle: quantitative benchmark for the interpretation of amyloid and protein infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Woys, Ann Marie; Almeida, Aaron M; Wang, Lu; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; McGovern, Michael; de Pablo, Juan J; Skinner, James L; Gellman, Samuel H; Zanni, Martin T

    2012-11-21

    Infrared spectroscopy is playing an important role in the elucidation of amyloid fiber formation, but the coupling models that link spectra to structure are not well tested for parallel β-sheets. Using a synthetic macrocycle that enforces a two stranded parallel β-sheet conformation, we measured the lifetimes and frequency for six combinations of doubly (13)C═(18)O labeled amide I modes using 2D IR spectroscopy. The average vibrational lifetime of the isotope labeled residues was 550 fs. The frequencies of the labels ranged from 1585 to 1595 cm(-1), with the largest frequency shift occurring for in-register amino acids. The 2D IR spectra of the coupled isotope labels were calculated from molecular dynamics simulations of a series of macrocycle structures generated from replica exchange dynamics to fully sample the conformational distribution. The models used to simulate the spectra include through-space coupling, through-bond coupling, and local frequency shifts caused by environment electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. The calculated spectra predict the line widths and frequencies nearly quantitatively. Historically, the characteristic features of β-sheet infrared spectra have been attributed to through-space couplings such as transition dipole coupling. We find that frequency shifts of the local carbonyl groups due to nearest neighbor couplings and environmental factors are more important, while the through-space couplings dictate the spectral intensities. As a result, the characteristic absorption spectra empirically used for decades to assign parallel β-sheet secondary structure arises because of a redistribution of oscillator strength, but the through-space couplings do not themselves dramatically alter the frequency distribution of eigenstates much more than already exists in random coil structures. Moreover, solvent exposed residues have amide I bands with >20 cm(-1) line width. Narrower line widths indicate that the amide I backbone is solvent

  12. Vibrational Echo Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbury, John B.; Steinel, Tobias; Fayer, M. D.

    Multidimensional vibrational echo correlation spectroscopy with full phase resolution is used to measure hydrogen bond dynamics in water and methanol. The OD hydroxyl stretches of methanol-OD oligomers in CCl4 and HOD inH2O are studied using the shortest mid-IR pulses (< 45 fs, < 4 cycles of light) produced to date. The pulses have sufficient spectral bandwidth to span the very broad (> 400 cm-1) spectrum of the 0-1 and 1-2 vibrational transitions. Hydrogen bond population dynamics are extricated with exceptional detail in MeOD oligomers because the different hydrogen-bonded species are spectrally distinct. The experimental results along with detailed calculations indicate the strongest hydrogen bonds are selectively broken through a non-equilibrium relaxation pathway following vibrational relaxation of the hydroxyl stretch. Following hydrogen bond breaking, the broken MeOD oligomers retain a detailed structural memory of the prior intact hydrogen bond network. The correlation spectra are also a sensitive probe of the structural fluctuations in water and provide a stringent test of water models that are widely used in simulations of aqueous systems. The analysis of the 2D band shapes demonstrates that different hydrogen-bonded species are subject to distinct (wavelength-dependent) ultrafast (˜ 100 fs) local fluctuations and essentially identical slower (0.4 ps and ˜ 2 ps) structural rearrangements. Observation of wavelength-dependent dynamics demonstrates that standard theoretical approaches assuming Gaussian fluctuations cannot adequately describe water dynamics.

  13. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  14. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  15. Protein dynamics studied with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thielges, Megan C; Fayer, Michael D

    2012-11-20

    Proteins, enzymes, and other biological molecules undergo structural dynamics as an intrinsic part of their biological functions. While many biological processes occur on the millisecond, second, and even longer time scales, the fundamental structural dynamics that eventually give rise to such processes occur on much faster time scales. Many decades ago, chemical kineticists focused on the inverse of the reaction rate constant as the important time scale for a chemical reaction. However, through transition state theory and a vast amount of experimental evidence, we now know that the key events in a chemical reaction can involve structural fluctuations that take a system of reactants to its transition state, the crossing of a barrier, and the eventual relaxation to product states. Such dynamics occur on very fast time scales. Today researchers would like to investigate the fast structural fluctuations of biological molecules to gain an understanding of how biological processes proceed from simple structural changes in biomolecules to the final, complex biological function. The study of the fast structural dynamics of biological molecules requires experiments that operate on the appropriate time scales, and in this Account, we discuss the application of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy to the study of protein dynamics. The 2D IR vibrational echo experiment is akin to 2D NMR, but it operates on time scales many orders of magnitude faster. In the experiments, a particular vibrational oscillator serves as a vibrational dynamics probe. As the structure of the protein evolves in time, the structural changes are manifested as time-dependent changes in the frequency of the vibrational dynamics probe. The 2D IR vibrational echo experiments can track the vibrational frequency evolution, which we then relate to the time evolution of the protein structure. In particular, we measured protein substate interconversion for mutants of

  16. Transient 2D IR spectroscopy of charge injection in dye-sensitized nanocrystalline thin films.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E; Paoprasert, Peerasak; Franking, Ryan A; Hamers, Robert J; Gopalan, Padma; Zanni, Martin T

    2009-12-23

    We use nonlinear 2D IR spectroscopy to study TiO(2) nanocrystalline thin films sensitized with a Re dye. We find that the free electron signal, which often obscures the vibrational features in the transient absorption spectrum, is not observed in the 2D IR spectra. Its absence allows the vibrational features of the dye to be much better resolved than with the typical IR absorption probe. We observe multiple absorption bands but no cross peaks in the 2D IR spectra, which indicates that the dyes have at least three conformations. Furthermore, by using a pulse sequence in which we initiate electron transfer in the middle of the infrared pulse train, we are able to assign the excited state features by correlating them to the ground state vibrational modes and determine that the three conformations have different time scales and cross sections for electron injection. 2D IR spectroscopy is proving to be very useful in disentangling overlapping structural distributions in biological and chemical physics processes. These experiments demonstrate that nonlinear infrared probes are also a powerful new tool for studying charge transfer at interfaces.

  17. Ionic Liquid Dynamics Measured with 2D IR and IR Pump-Probe Experiments on a Linear Anion and the Influence of Potassium Cations.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    The room-temperature ionic liquid EmimNTf2 (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) was studied with two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) experiments using low-concentration selenocyanate (SeCN(-)) as the vibrational probe. SeCN(-) was added as EmimSeCN, which keeps the cation the same. KSeCN was also used, so K(+) was added. Two 2D IR polarization configurations were employed: ⟨XXXX⟩ (all pulses have the same polarization) and ⟨XXYY⟩ (the first two pulse polarizations are perpendicular to that of the third pulse and the echo). The spectral diffusion differs for the two configurations, demonstrating that reorientation-induced spectral diffusion, in addition to structural spectral diffusion (SSD), plays a role in the observed dynamics. The SSD was extracted from the 2D IR time-dependent data. The samples with EmimSeCN have dynamics on several fast time scales; however, when KSeCN is used, both the PPSP anisotropy decay and the 2D IR decays have low amplitude offsets (nondecaying values at long times). The size of the offsets increased with increased K(+) concentration. These results are explained in terms of a two-ensemble model. A small fraction of the SeCN(-) is located in the regions modified by the presence of K(+), causing a substantial slowing of the SeCN(-) orientational relaxation and spectral diffusion. Having a small ensemble of SeCN(-) that undergoes very slow dynamics is sufficient to explain the offsets. For the major ensemble, the dynamics with and without K(+) are the same. PMID:26872207

  18. Temperature echoes revisited to probe the vibrational behavior of dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Pedro M R

    2010-03-21

    Temperature quench echoes were induced in molecular dynamics simulations of dendrimers. This phenomenon was used to probe the vibrational behavior of these molecules by comparing simulation results with harmonic model predictions. The echo depth for short time intervals between temperature quenches is well described by the harmonic approximation and the fluctuations observed are related to the vibrational density of states. The echo depth for long time intervals decays progressively revealing dephasing due to anharmonic interactions. The density of states was calculated from the temperature fluctuations after the first quench and high-frequency modes were assigned by comparison with vibrational spectra of similar dendrimers.

  19. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  20. Hydrogen bonding and Raman, IR, and 2D-IR spectroscopy of dilute HOD in liquid D2O.

    PubMed

    Auer, B; Kumar, R; Schmidt, J R; Skinner, J L

    2007-09-01

    We present improvements on our previous approaches for calculating vibrational spectroscopy observables for the OH stretch region of dilute HOD in liquid D2O. These revised approaches are implemented to calculate IR and isotropic Raman spectra, using the SPC/E simulation model, and the results are in good agreement with experiment. We also calculate observables associated with three-pulse IR echoes: the peak shift and 2D-IR spectrum. The agreement with experiment for the former is improved over our previous calculations, but discrepancies between theory and experiment still exist. Using our proposed definition for hydrogen bonding in liquid water, we decompose the distribution of frequencies in the OH stretch region in terms of subensembles of HOD molecules with different local hydrogen-bonding environments. Such a decomposition allows us to make the connection with experiments and calculations on water clusters and more generally to understand the extent of the relationship between transition frequency and local structure in the liquid.

  1. Determining Transition State Geometries in Liquids Using 2D-IR

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Charles; Cahoon, James F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

    2007-12-11

    Many properties of chemical reactions are determined by the transition state connecting reactant and product, yet it is difficult to directly obtain any information about these short-lived structures in liquids. We show that two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy can provide direct information about transition states by tracking the transformation of vibrational modes as a molecule crossed a transition state. We successfully monitored a simple chemical reaction, the fluxional rearrangement of Fe(CO)5, in which the exchange of axial and equatorial CO ligands causes an exchange of vibrational energy between the normal modes of the molecule. This energy transfer provides direct evidence regarding the time scale, transition state, and mechanism of the reaction.

  2. Water dynamics in small reverse micelles in two solvents: Two-dimensional infrared vibrational echoes with two-dimensional background subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, Emily E.; Wong, Daryl B.; Fayer, M. D.

    2011-02-01

    Water dynamics as reflected by the spectral diffusion of the water hydroxyl stretch were measured in w0 = 2 (1.7 nm diameter) Aerosol-OT (AOT)/water reverse micelles in carbon tetrachloride and in isooctane solvents using ultrafast 2D IR vibrational echo spectroscopy. Orientational relaxation and population relaxation are observed for w0 = 2, 4, and 7.5 in both solvents using IR pump-probe measurements. It is found that the pump-probe observables are sensitive to w0, but not to the solvent. However, initial analysis of the vibrational echo data from the water nanopool in the reverse micelles in the isooctane solvent seems to yield different dynamics than the CCl4 system in spite of the fact that the spectra, vibrational lifetimes, and orientational relaxation are the same in the two systems. It is found that there are beat patterns in the interferograms with isooctane as the solvent. The beats are observed from a signal generated by the AOT/isooctane system even when there is no water in the system. A beat subtraction data processing procedure does a reasonable job of removing the distortions in the isooctane data, showing that the reverse micelle dynamics are the same within experimental error regardless of whether isooctane or carbon tetrachloride is used as the organic phase. Two time scales are observed in the vibrational echo data, ~1 and ~10 ps. The slower component contains a significant amount of the total inhomogeneous broadening. Physical arguments indicate that there is a much slower component of spectral diffusion that is too slow to observe within the experimental window, which is limited by the OD stretch vibrational lifetime.

  3. Water dynamics in small reverse micelles in two solvents: two-dimensional infrared vibrational echoes with two-dimensional background subtraction.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Emily E; Wong, Daryl B; Fayer, M D

    2011-02-01

    Water dynamics as reflected by the spectral diffusion of the water hydroxyl stretch were measured in w(0) = 2 (1.7 nm diameter) Aerosol-OT (AOT)/water reverse micelles in carbon tetrachloride and in isooctane solvents using ultrafast 2D IR vibrational echo spectroscopy. Orientational relaxation and population relaxation are observed for w(0) = 2, 4, and 7.5 in both solvents using IR pump-probe measurements. It is found that the pump-probe observables are sensitive to w(0), but not to the solvent. However, initial analysis of the vibrational echo data from the water nanopool in the reverse micelles in the isooctane solvent seems to yield different dynamics than the CCl(4) system in spite of the fact that the spectra, vibrational lifetimes, and orientational relaxation are the same in the two systems. It is found that there are beat patterns in the interferograms with isooctane as the solvent. The beats are observed from a signal generated by the AOT/isooctane system even when there is no water in the system. A beat subtraction data processing procedure does a reasonable job of removing the distortions in the isooctane data, showing that the reverse micelle dynamics are the same within experimental error regardless of whether isooctane or carbon tetrachloride is used as the organic phase. Two time scales are observed in the vibrational echo data, ~1 and ~10 ps. The slower component contains a significant amount of the total inhomogeneous broadening. Physical arguments indicate that there is a much slower component of spectral diffusion that is too slow to observe within the experimental window, which is limited by the OD stretch vibrational lifetime. PMID:21303143

  4. Isotope-Labeled Amyloids via Synthesis, Expression, and Chemical Ligation for Use in FTIR, 2D IR, and NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi O; Grechko, Maksim; Moran, Sean D; Zanni, Martin T

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides protocols for isotope-labeling the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) involved in type II diabetes and γD-crystallin involved in cataract formation. Because isotope labeling improves the structural resolution, these protocols are useful for experiments using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), and NMR spectroscopies. Our research group specializes in using 2D IR spectroscopy and isotope labeling. 2D IR spectroscopy provides structural information by measuring solvation from 2D diagonal lineshapes and vibrational couplings from cross peaks. Infrared spectroscopy can be used to study kinetics, membrane proteins, and aggregated proteins. Isotope labeling provides greater certainty in the spectral assignment, which enables new structural insights that are difficult to obtain with other methods. For amylin, we provide a protocol for (13)C/(18)O labeling backbone carbonyls at one or more desired amino acids in order to obtain residue-specific structural resolution. We also provide a protocol for expressing and purifying amylin from E. coli, which enables uniform (13)C or (13)C/(15)N labeling. Uniform labeling is useful for measuring the monomer infrared spectrum in an amyloid oligomer or fiber as well as amyloid protein bound to another polypeptide or protein, such as a chaperone or an inhibitor. In addition, our expression protocol results in 2-2.5 mg of amylin peptide per 1 L cell culture, which is a high enough yield to straightforwardly obtain the 2-10 mg needed for high resolution and solid-state NMR experiments. Finally, we provide a protocol to isotope-label either of the two domains of γD-crystallin using expressed protein ligation. Domain labeling makes it possible to resolve the structures of the two halves of the protein in FTIR and 2D IR spectra. With modifications, these strategies and protocols for isotope labeling can be applied to other amyloid polypeptides and proteins.

  5. Picosecond dynamics of a membrane protein revealed by 2D IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Kass, Itamar; Arkin, Isaiah T.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2006-03-01

    Fast protein dynamics can be missed with techniques that have relatively slow observation times. Using 2D IR spectroscopy and isotope labeling, we have probed the rapid, picosecond dynamics of a membrane protein in its native environment. By measuring the homogeneous and inhomogeneous IR linewidths of 11 amide I modes (backbone carbonyl stretch), we have captured the structural distributions and dynamics of the CD3 protein along its transmembrane segment that are lost with slower time-scale techniques. We find that the homogeneous lifetimes and population relaxation times are the same for almost all of the residues. In contrast, the inhomogeneous linewidths vary significantly with the largest inhomogeneous distribution occurring for residues near the N terminus and the narrowest near the center. This behavior is highly consistent with a recently reported experimental model of the protein and water accessibility as observed by molecular dynamics simulations. The data support the proposed CD3 peptide structure, and the simulations point to the structural disorder of water and lipid head-groups as the main source of inhomogeneous broadening. Taken together, this rigorous analysis of the vibrational dynamics of a membrane peptide provides experimental insight into a time regime of motions that has so far been largely unexplored. spectroscopy | ultrafast | vibrational

  6. Nonlinear 2D-IR spectroscopy as a tool to study peptide dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The structure of bio-macromolecules (peptides, proteins, enzymes and DNA) crucially defines their function and it is the enormous progress in structure-sensitive methods (NMR, x-ray) which has lead to an extremely detailed microscopic understanding of reactions in biological systems. Our knowledge on the dynamics of these structures, which presumably is as important for the function as the structure itself, is essentially based on computer simulations with essentially no or very indirect experimental feedback. Nonlinear 2D vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) on the amide I mode of small globular peptides has been demonstrated recently and a detailed relationship between the static 3D structure and the strength of cross peaks has been established (in analogy to COSY in 2D-NMR spectroscopy). An extension of this technique allows to observe equilibrium fluctuations of model helices by incorporating an additional population period (i.e. 'mixing time'), giving rise to spectral diffusion of the diagonal peaks and incoherent population transfer between excitonic states (the latter being equivalent to the nuclear Overhauser effect, NOESY). In contrast to spin transitions, however, the processes are not in the 'motional narrowing limit' (i. e. τ_c>=T_2) so that the timescales of protein fluctuation can be measured directly on a picosecond timescale and in a site specific manner.

  7. The structure of salt bridges between Arg(+) and Glu(-) in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu(-)) and arginine (Arg(+)) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu(-) and Arg(+), which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu(-)⋯Arg(+) salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  8. The structure of salt bridges between Arg+ and Glu- in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R.; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu-) and arginine (Arg+) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu- and Arg+, which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu-⋯Arg+ salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  9. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Lecture: 2D IR Spectroscopy of Peptide Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-02-01

    Descriptions of protein and peptide conformation are colored by the methods we use to study them. Protein x-ray and NMR structures often lead to impressions of rigid or well-defined conformations, even though these are dynamic molecules. The conformational fluctuations and disorder of proteins and peptides is more difficult to quantify. This presentation will describe an approach toward characterizing and quantifying structural heterogeneity and disorder in peptides using 2D IR spectroscopy. Using amide I vibrational spectroscopy, isotope labeling strategies, and computational modeling based on molecular dynamics simulations and Markov state models allows us to characterize distinct peptide conformers and conformational variation. The examples illustrated include the beta-hairpin tripzip2 and elastin-like peptides.

  10. Dynamics of water at the interface in reverse micelles: measurements of spectral diffusion with two-dimensional infrared vibrational echoes.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Emily E; Wong, Daryl B; Giammanco, Chiara H; Fayer, M D

    2011-10-13

    Water dynamics inside of reverse micelles made from the surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT) were investigated by observing spectral diffusion, orientational relaxation, and population relaxation using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy and pump-probe experiments. The water pool sizes of the reverse micelles studied ranged in size from 5.8 to 1.7 nm in diameter. It is found that spectral diffusion, characterized by the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF), significantly changes as the water pool size decreases. For the larger reverse micelles (diameter 4.6 nm and larger), the 2D IR signal is composed of two spectral components: a signal from bulk-like core water, and a signal from water at the headgroup interface. Each of these signals (core water and interfacial water) is associated with a distinct FFCF. The FFCF of the interfacial water layer can be obtained using a modified center line slope (CLS) method that has been recently developed. The interfacial FFCFs for large reverse micelles have a single exponential decay (∼1.6 ps) to an offset plus a fast homogeneous component and are nearly identical for all large sizes. The observed ∼1.6 ps interfacial decay component is approximately the same as that found for bulk water and may reflect hydrogen bond rearrangement of bulk-like water molecules hydrogen bonded to the interfacial water molecules. The long time offset arises from dynamics that are too slow to be measured on the accessible experimental time scale. The influence of the chemical nature of the interface on spectral diffusion was explored by comparing data for water inside reverse micelles (5.8 nm water pool diameter) made from the surfactants AOT and Igepal CO-520. AOT has charged, sulfonate head groups, while Igepal CO-520 has neutral, hydroxyl head groups. It is found that spectral diffusion on the observable time scales is not overly sensitive to the chemical makeup of the interface. An intermediate-sized AOT reverse

  11. Dynamics of water at the interface in reverse micelles: measurements of spectral diffusion with two-dimensional infrared vibrational echoes.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Emily E; Wong, Daryl B; Giammanco, Chiara H; Fayer, M D

    2011-10-13

    Water dynamics inside of reverse micelles made from the surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT) were investigated by observing spectral diffusion, orientational relaxation, and population relaxation using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy and pump-probe experiments. The water pool sizes of the reverse micelles studied ranged in size from 5.8 to 1.7 nm in diameter. It is found that spectral diffusion, characterized by the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF), significantly changes as the water pool size decreases. For the larger reverse micelles (diameter 4.6 nm and larger), the 2D IR signal is composed of two spectral components: a signal from bulk-like core water, and a signal from water at the headgroup interface. Each of these signals (core water and interfacial water) is associated with a distinct FFCF. The FFCF of the interfacial water layer can be obtained using a modified center line slope (CLS) method that has been recently developed. The interfacial FFCFs for large reverse micelles have a single exponential decay (∼1.6 ps) to an offset plus a fast homogeneous component and are nearly identical for all large sizes. The observed ∼1.6 ps interfacial decay component is approximately the same as that found for bulk water and may reflect hydrogen bond rearrangement of bulk-like water molecules hydrogen bonded to the interfacial water molecules. The long time offset arises from dynamics that are too slow to be measured on the accessible experimental time scale. The influence of the chemical nature of the interface on spectral diffusion was explored by comparing data for water inside reverse micelles (5.8 nm water pool diameter) made from the surfactants AOT and Igepal CO-520. AOT has charged, sulfonate head groups, while Igepal CO-520 has neutral, hydroxyl head groups. It is found that spectral diffusion on the observable time scales is not overly sensitive to the chemical makeup of the interface. An intermediate-sized AOT reverse

  12. Water of Hydration Dynamics in Minerals Gypsum and Bassanite: Ultrafast 2D IR Spectroscopy of Rocks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chang; Nishida, Jun; Yuan, Rongfeng; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Water of hydration plays an important role in minerals, determining their crystal structures and physical properties. Here ultrafast nonlinear infrared (IR) techniques, two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) spectroscopies, were used to measure the dynamics and disorder of water of hydration in two minerals, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O). 2D IR spectra revealed that water arrangement in freshly precipitated gypsum contained a small amount of inhomogeneity. Following annealing at 348 K, water molecules became highly ordered; the 2D IR spectrum became homogeneously broadened (motional narrowed). PSPP measurements observed only inertial orientational relaxation. In contrast, water in bassanite's tubular channels is dynamically disordered. 2D IR spectra showed a significant amount of inhomogeneous broadening caused by a range of water configurations. At 298 K, water dynamics cause spectral diffusion that sampled a portion of the inhomogeneous line width on the time scale of ∼30 ps, while the rest of inhomogeneity is static on the time scale of the measurements. At higher temperature, the dynamics become faster. Spectral diffusion accelerates, and a portion of the lower temperature spectral diffusion became motionally narrowed. At sufficiently high temperature, all of the dynamics that produced spectral diffusion at lower temperatures became motionally narrowed, and only homogeneous broadening and static inhomogeneity were observed. Water angular motions in bassanite exhibit temperature-dependent diffusive orientational relaxation in a restricted cone of angles. The experiments were made possible by eliminating the vast amount of scattered light produced by the granulated powder samples using phase cycling methods. PMID:27385320

  13. Polarization shaping in the mid-IR and polarization-based balanced heterodyne detection with application to 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Strasfeld, David B.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate amplitude, phase and polarization shaping of femtosecond mid-IR pulses using a germanium acousto-optical modulator by independently shaping the frequency-dependent amplitudes and phases of two orthogonally polarized pulses which are then collinearly overlapped using a wire-grid polarizer. We use a feedback loop to set and stabilize the relative phase of the orthogonal pulses. We have also used a wire-grid polarizer to implement polarization-based balanced heterodyne detection for improved signal-to-noise of 2D IR spectra collected in a pump-probe geometry. Applications include coherent control of molecular vibrations and improvements in multidimensional IR spectroscopy. PMID:19687931

  14. Simplified and economical 2D IR spectrometer design using a dual acousto-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Skoff, David R; Laaser, Jennifer E; Mukherjee, Sudipta S; Middleton, Chris T; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-08-30

    Over the last decade two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy has proven to be a very useful extension of infrared spectroscopy, yet the technique remains restricted to a small group of specialized researchers because of its experimental complexity and high equipment cost. We report on a spectrometer that is compact, mechanically robust, and is much less expensive than previous designs because it uses a single pixel MCT detector rather than an array detector. Moreover, each axis of the spectrum can be collected in either the time or frequency domain via computer programming. We discuss pulse sequences for scanning the probe axis, which were not previously possible. We present spectra on metal carbonyl compounds at 5 µm and a model peptide at 6 µm. Data collection with a single pixel MCT takes longer than using an array detector, but publishable quality data are still achieved with only a few minutes of averaging.

  15. Simplified and economical 2D IR spectrometer design using a dual acousto-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoff, David R.; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Middleton, Chris T.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2013-08-01

    Over the last decade two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy has proven to be a very useful extension of infrared spectroscopy, yet the technique remains restricted to a small group of specialized researchers because of its experimental complexity and high equipment cost. We report on a spectrometer that is compact, mechanically robust, and is much less expensive than previous designs because it uses a single pixel MCT detector rather than an array detector. Moreover, each axis of the spectrum can be collected in either the time or frequency domain via computer programming. We discuss pulse sequences for scanning the probe axis, which were not previously possible. We present spectra on metal carbonyl compounds at 5 μm and a model peptide at 6 μm. Data collection with a single pixel MCT takes longer than using an array detector, but publishable quality data are still achieved with only a few minutes of averaging.

  16. Synthesis, structure and temperature-depended 2D IR correlation spectroscopy of an organo-bismuth benzoate with 1,10-phenanthroline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan-Qiong; Zhong, Jie-Cen; Liu, Le-Hui; Qiu, Xing-Tai; Chen, Yi-Ping

    2016-11-01

    An organo-bismuth benzoate with phen as auxiliary ligand, [Bi(phen)(C6H5COO)(C6H4COO)] (1) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) has been hydrothermally synthesized from bismuth nitrate, 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid with phen as auxiliary ligand and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, PXRD, IR spectra, TG analyses, temperature-depended 2D-IR COS (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Interestingly, benzoate anions in 1 came from the desulfuration reaction of 2-mercaptonbenzoic acid under hydrothermal condition. Compound 1 is a discrete organo-bismuth compound with benzoate and phen ligands. The offset face-to-face π-π stacking interactions and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the isolate complex into a 3D supramolecular network. The temperature-depended 2D-IR COS indicates that the stretching vibrations of Cdbnd C/Cdbnd N of aromatic rings and Cdbnd O bonds are sensitive to the temperature change.

  17. Dynamics of Proteins Encapsulated in Silica Sol-gel Glasses Studied with IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Massari, Aaron M.; Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally-resolved infrared stimulated vibrational echo spectroscopy is used to measure the fast dynamics of heme-bound CO in carbonmonoxy-myoglobin (MbCO) and hemoglobin (HbCO) embedded in silica sol-gel glasses. On the time scale of ~100 fs to several ps, the vibrational dephasing of the heme-bound CO is measurably slower for both MbCO and HbCO relative to aqueous protein solutions. The fast structural dynamics of MbCO, as sensed by the heme-bound CO, are influenced more by the sol-gel environment than those of HbCO. Longer time scale structural dynamics (tens of ps), as measured by the extent of spectral diffusion, are the same for both proteins encapsulated in sol-gel glasses compared to aqueous solutions. A comparison of the sol-gel experimental results to viscosity dependent vibrational echo data taken on various mixtures of water and fructose shows that the sol-gel encapsulated MbCO exhibits dynamics that are the equivalent to the protein in a solution that is nearly 20 times more viscous than bulk water. In contrast, the HbCO dephasing in the sol-gel reflects only a 2-fold increase in viscosity. Attempts to alter the encapsulating pore size by varying the molar ratio of silane precursor to water (R-value) used to prepare the sol-gel glasses were found to have no effect on the fast or steady-state spectroscopic results. The vibrational echo data are discussed in the context of solvent confinement and protein-pore wall interactions to provide insights into the influence of a confined environment on the fast structural dynamics experienced by a biomolecule. PMID:16551107

  18. 2D IR spectra of cyanide in water investigated by molecular dynamics simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung Won; Carr, Joshua K.; Göllner, Michael; Hamm, Peter; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the 2D infrared (IR) spectroscopy of CN− solvated in D2O is investigated. Depending on the force field parametrizations, most of which are based on multipolar interactions for the CN− molecule, the frequency-frequency correlation function and observables computed from it differ. Most notably, models based on multipoles for CN− and TIP3P for water yield quantitatively correct results when compared with experiments. Furthermore, the recent finding that T 1 times are sensitive to the van der Waals ranges on the CN− is confirmed in the present study. For the linear IR spectrum, the best model reproduces the full widths at half maximum almost quantitatively (13.0 cm−1 vs. 14.9 cm−1) if the rotational contribution to the linewidth is included. Without the rotational contribution, the lines are too narrow by about a factor of two, which agrees with Raman and IR experiments. The computed and experimental tilt angles (or nodal slopes) α as a function of the 2D IR waiting time compare favorably with the measured ones and the frequency fluctuation correlation function is invariably found to contain three time scales: a sub-ps, 1 ps, and one on the 10-ps time scale. These time scales are discussed in terms of the structural dynamics of the surrounding solvent and it is found that the longest time scale (≈10 ps) most likely corresponds to solvent exchange between the first and second solvation shell, in agreement with interpretations from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements.

  19. Critical Slowing of Density Fluctuations Approaching the Isotropic-Nematic Transition in Liquid Crystals: 2D IR Measurements and Mode Coupling Theory.

    PubMed

    Sokolowsky, Kathleen P; Bailey, Heather E; Hoffman, David J; Andersen, Hans C; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) data are presented for a vibrational probe in three nematogens: 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 4-cyano-4'-octylbiphenyl, and 4-(trans-4-amylcyclohexyl)-benzonitrile. The spectral diffusion time constants in all three liquids in the isotropic phase are proportional to [T*/(T - T*)](1/2), where T* is 0.5-1 K below the isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature (TNI). Rescaling to a reduced temperature shows that the decays of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) for all three nematogens fall on the same curve, suggesting a universal dynamic behavior of nematogens above TNI. Spectral diffusion is complete before significant orientational relaxation in the liquid, as measured by optically heterodyne detected-optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) spectroscopy, and before any significant orientational randomization of the probe measured by polarization selective IR pump-probe experiments. To interpret the OHD-OKE and FFCF data, we constructed a mode coupling theory (MCT) schematic model for the relationships among three correlation functions: ϕ1, a correlator for large wave vector density fluctuations; ϕ2, the orientational correlation function whose time derivative is the observable in the OHD-OKE experiment; and ϕ3, the FFCF for the 2D IR experiment. The equations for ϕ1 and ϕ2 match those in the previous MCT schematic model for nematogens, and ϕ3 is coupled to the first two correlators in a straightforward manner. Resulting models fit the data very well. Across liquid crystals, the temperature dependences of the coupling constants show consistent, nonmonotonic behavior. A remarkable change in coupling occurs at ∼5 K above TNI, precisely where the rate of spectral diffusion in 5CB was observed to deviate from that of a similar nonmesogenic liquid.

  20. Critical Slowing of Density Fluctuations Approaching the Isotropic-Nematic Transition in Liquid Crystals: 2D IR Measurements and Mode Coupling Theory.

    PubMed

    Sokolowsky, Kathleen P; Bailey, Heather E; Hoffman, David J; Andersen, Hans C; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-21

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) data are presented for a vibrational probe in three nematogens: 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 4-cyano-4'-octylbiphenyl, and 4-(trans-4-amylcyclohexyl)-benzonitrile. The spectral diffusion time constants in all three liquids in the isotropic phase are proportional to [T*/(T - T*)](1/2), where T* is 0.5-1 K below the isotropic-nematic phase transition temperature (TNI). Rescaling to a reduced temperature shows that the decays of the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) for all three nematogens fall on the same curve, suggesting a universal dynamic behavior of nematogens above TNI. Spectral diffusion is complete before significant orientational relaxation in the liquid, as measured by optically heterodyne detected-optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) spectroscopy, and before any significant orientational randomization of the probe measured by polarization selective IR pump-probe experiments. To interpret the OHD-OKE and FFCF data, we constructed a mode coupling theory (MCT) schematic model for the relationships among three correlation functions: ϕ1, a correlator for large wave vector density fluctuations; ϕ2, the orientational correlation function whose time derivative is the observable in the OHD-OKE experiment; and ϕ3, the FFCF for the 2D IR experiment. The equations for ϕ1 and ϕ2 match those in the previous MCT schematic model for nematogens, and ϕ3 is coupled to the first two correlators in a straightforward manner. Resulting models fit the data very well. Across liquid crystals, the temperature dependences of the coupling constants show consistent, nonmonotonic behavior. A remarkable change in coupling occurs at ∼5 K above TNI, precisely where the rate of spectral diffusion in 5CB was observed to deviate from that of a similar nonmesogenic liquid. PMID:27363680

  1. How to turn your pump–probe instrument into a multidimensional spectrometer: 2D IR and Vis spectroscopies via pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Sang-Hee; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We have recently developed a new and simple way of collecting 2D infrared and visible spectra that utilizes a pulse shaper and a partly collinear beam geometry. 2D IR and Vis spectroscopies are powerful tools for studying molecular structures and their dynamics. They can be used to correlate vibrational or electronic eigenstates, measure energy transfer rates, and quantify the dynamics of lineshapes, for instance, all with femtosecond time-resolution. As a result, they are finding use in systems that exhibit fast dynamics, such as sub-millisecond chemical and biological dynamics, and in hard-to-study environments, such as in membranes. While powerful, these techniques have been difficult to implement because they require a series of femtosecond pulses to be spatially and temporally overlapped with precise time-resolution and interferometric phase stability. However, many of the difficulties associated with implementing 2D spectroscopies are eliminated by using a pulse shaper and a simple beam geometry, which substantially lowers the technical barriers required for researchers to enter this exciting field while simultaneously providing many new capabilities. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the methods for collecting 2D spectra so that an outsider considering using 2D spectroscopy in their own research can judge which approach would be most suitable for their research aims. This paper focuses primarily on 2D IR spectroscopy, but also includes our recent work on adapting this technology to collecting 2D Vis spectra. We review work that has already been published as well as cover several topics that we have not reported previously, including phase cycling methods to remove background signals, eliminate unwanted scatter, and shift data collection into the rotating frame. PMID:19290321

  2. 2D IR spectroscopy at 100 kHz utilizing a Mid-IR OPCPA laser source.

    PubMed

    Luther, Bradley M; Tracy, Kathryn M; Gerrity, Michael; Brown, Susannah; Krummel, Amber T

    2016-02-22

    We present a 100 kHz 2D IR spectrometer. The system utilizes a ytterbium all normal dispersion fiber oscillator as a common source for the pump and seed beams of a MgO:PPLN OPCPA. The 1030 nm OPCPA pump is generated by amplification of the oscillator in cryocooled Yb:YAG amplifiers, while the 1.68 μm seed is generated in a OPO pumped by the oscillator. The OPCPA outputs are used in a ZGP DFG stage to generate 4.65 μm pulses. A mid-IR pulse shaper delivers pulse pairs to a 2D IR spectrometer allowing for data collection at 100 kHz. PMID:26907062

  3. Computational Amide I 2D IR Spectroscopy as a Probe of Protein Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I vibrations is increasingly being used to study the structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides. Amide I, a primarily carbonyl stretching vibration of the protein backbone, provides information on secondary structures as a result of vibrational couplings and on hydrogen-bonding contacts when isotope labeling is used to isolate specific sites. In parallel with experiments, computational models of amide I spectra that use atomistic structures from molecular dynamics simulations have evolved to calculate experimental spectra. Mixed quantum-classical models use spectroscopic maps to translate the structural information into a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the spectroscopically observed vibrations. This allows one to model the spectroscopy of large proteins, disordered states, and protein conformational dynamics. With improvements in amide I models, quantitative modeling of time-dependent structural ensembles and of direct feedback between experiments and simulations is possible. We review the advances in developing these models, their theoretical basis, and current and future applications.

  4. Monitoring equilibrium reaction dynamics of a nearly barrierless molecular rotor using ultrafast vibrational echoes.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Ian A; Osborne, Derek G; White, Aaron M; Anna, Jessica M; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    Using rapidly acquired spectral diffusion, a recently developed variation of heterodyne detected infrared photon echo spectroscopy, we observe ∼3 ps solvent independent spectral diffusion of benzene chromium tricarbonyl (C6H6Cr(CO)3, BCT) in a series of nonpolar linear alkane solvents. The spectral dynamics is attributed to low-barrier internal torsional motion. This tripod complex has two stable minima corresponding to staggered and eclipsed conformations, which differ in energy by roughly half of kBT. The solvent independence is due to the relative size of the rotor compared with the solvent molecules, which create a solvent cage in which torsional motion occurs largely free from solvent damping. Since the one-dimensional transition state is computed to be only 0.03 kBT above the higher energy eclipsed conformation, this model system offers an unusual, nearly barrierless reaction, which nevertheless is characterized by torsional coordinate dependent vibrational frequencies. Hence, by studying the spectral diffusion of the tripod carbonyls, it is possible to gain insight into the fundamental dynamics of internal rotational motion, and we find some evidence for the importance of non-diffusive ballistic motion even in the room-temperature liquid environment. Using several different approaches to describe equilibrium kinetics, as well as the influence of reactive dynamics on spectroscopic observables, we provide evidence that the low-barrier torsional motion of BCT provides an excellent test case for detailed studies of the links between chemical exchange and linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy.

  5. Interplay of Ion-Water and Water-Water Interactions within the Hydration Shells of Nitrate and Carbonate Directly Probed with 2D IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Joseph A; Carpenter, William; De Marco, Luigi; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-08-01

    The long-range influence of ions in solution on the water hydrogen-bond (H-bond) network remains a topic of vigorous debate. Recent spectroscopic and theoretical studies have, for the most part, reached the consensus that weakly coordinating ions only affect water molecules in the first hydration shell. Here, we apply ultrafast broadband two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy to aqueous nitrate and carbonate in neat H2O to study the solvation structure and dynamics of ions on opposite ends of the Hofmeister series. By exciting both the water OH stretches and ion stretches and probing the associated cross-peaks between them, we are afforded a comprehensive view into the complex nature of ion hydration. We show in aqueous nitrate that weak ion-water H-bonding leads to water-water interactions in the ion solvation shells dominating the dynamics. In contrast, the carbonate CO stretches show significant mixing with the water OH stretches due to strong ion-water H-bonding such that the water and ion modes are intimately correlated. Further, the excitonic nature of vibrations in neat H2O, which spans multiple water molecules, is an important factor in describing ion hydration. We attribute these complex dynamics to the likely presence of intermediate-range effects influenced by waters beyond the first solvation shell. PMID:27404015

  6. Discrimination of five species of Fritillaria and its extracts by FT-IR and 2D-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Jin, Zhexiong; Zhou, Qun; Chen, Jianbo; Lei, Yu; Sun, Suqin

    2010-06-01

    Bulbus Fritillariae (in Chinese named Beimu), referred to the bulbs of several Fritillaria species ( Liliaceae), is a commonly used anti-tussive and expectorant herb in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 2000 years. The objective of this study is to discriminate five species of Beimu herbs and their total alkaloid extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared spectroscopy, and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) under thermal perturbation. The structural information of the samples indicated that, Beimu and their extract residues contain a large amount of starch, since some characteristic absorption peaks of the starch, such as 1158, 1080, 1015 and 987 cm -1 can be observed. Further more, the characteristic absorption peaks of the sulfate which arouse at 1120 ± 5 and 618 cm -1 in the IR spectra of Beimu aqueous extracts can be find. This validated that people used the sulfur fumigation method in the processing. The macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectra can not only provide the information of main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their different extracts, but also compare the components differences among the similar samples. In conclusion, the multi-steps IR macro-fingerprint method is rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research.

  7. 2D IR Spectroscopy using Four-Wave Mixing, Pulse Shaping, and IR Upconversion: A Quantitative Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rock, William; Li, Yun-Liang; Pagano, Philip; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to major changes in the apparatuses used to collect 2D IR spectra. Pulse shaping offers several advantages including rapid data collection, inherent phase stability, and phase cycling capabilities. Visible array detection via upconversion allows the use of visible detectors that are cheaper, faster, more sensitive, and less noisy than IR detectors. However, despite these advantages, many researchers are reluctant to implement these technologies. Here we present a quantitative study of the S/N of 2D IR spectra collected with a traditional four-wave mixing (FWM) apparatus, with a pulse shaping apparatus, and with visible detection via upconversion to address the question of whether or not weak chromophores at low concentrations are still accessible with such an apparatus. We find that the enhanced averaging capability of the pulse shaping apparatus enables the detection of small signals that would be challenging to measure even with the traditional FWM apparatus, and we demonstrate this ability on a sample of cyanylated dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). PMID:23687988

  8. Monitoring equilibrium reaction dynamics of a nearly barrierless molecular rotor using ultrafast vibrational echoes

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, Ian A.; Osborne, Derek G.; White, Aaron M.; Anna, Jessica M.; Kubarych, Kevin J.

    2014-10-07

    Using rapidly acquired spectral diffusion, a recently developed variation of heterodyne detected infrared photon echo spectroscopy, we observe ∼3 ps solvent independent spectral diffusion of benzene chromium tricarbonyl (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}Cr(CO){sub 3}, BCT) in a series of nonpolar linear alkane solvents. The spectral dynamics is attributed to low-barrier internal torsional motion. This tripod complex has two stable minima corresponding to staggered and eclipsed conformations, which differ in energy by roughly half of k{sub B}T. The solvent independence is due to the relative size of the rotor compared with the solvent molecules, which create a solvent cage in which torsional motion occurs largely free from solvent damping. Since the one-dimensional transition state is computed to be only 0.03 k{sub B}T above the higher energy eclipsed conformation, this model system offers an unusual, nearly barrierless reaction, which nevertheless is characterized by torsional coordinate dependent vibrational frequencies. Hence, by studying the spectral diffusion of the tripod carbonyls, it is possible to gain insight into the fundamental dynamics of internal rotational motion, and we find some evidence for the importance of non-diffusive ballistic motion even in the room-temperature liquid environment. Using several different approaches to describe equilibrium kinetics, as well as the influence of reactive dynamics on spectroscopic observables, we provide evidence that the low-barrier torsional motion of BCT provides an excellent test case for detailed studies of the links between chemical exchange and linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy.

  9. Rapid discrimination of extracts of Chinese propolis and poplar buds by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-Wen; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhao, Jing; Li, Yi; Zhou, Qun

    2008-07-01

    The extract of Chinese propolis (ECP) has recently been adulterated with that of poplar buds (EPB), because most of ECP is derived from the poplar plant, and ECP and EPB have almost identical chemical compositions. It is very difficult to differentiate them by using the chromatographic methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). Therefore, how to effectively discriminate these two mixtures is a problem to be solved urgently. In this paper, a rapid method for discriminating ECP and EPB was established by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra combined with the two-dimensional infrared correlation (2D IR) analysis. Forty-three ECP and five EPB samples collected from different areas of China were analyzed by the FT-IR spectroscopy. All the ECP and EPB samples tested show similar IR spectral profiles. The significant differences between ECP and EPB appear in the region of 3000-2800 cm -1 of the spectra. Based on such differences, the two species were successfully classified with the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) pattern recognition technique. Furthermore, these differences were well validated by a series of temperature-dependent dynamic FT-IR spectra and the corresponding 2D IR plots. The results indicate that the differences in these two natural products are caused by the amounts of long-chain alkyl compounds (including long-chain alkanes, long-chain alkyl esters and long chain alkyl alcohols) in them, rather than the flavonoid compounds, generally recognized as the bioactive substances of propolis. There are much more long-chain alkyl compounds in ECP than those in EPB, and the carbon atoms of the compounds in ECP remain in an order Z-shaped array, but those in EPB are disorder. It suggests that FT-IR and 2D IR spectroscopy can provide a valuable method for the rapid differentiation of similar natural products, ECP and EPB. The IR spectra could directly reflect the integrated chemical

  10. Residue-Specific Structural Kinetics of Proteins through the Union of Isotope Labeling, Mid-IR Pulse Shaping, and Coherent 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a methodology for studying protein kinetics using a rapid-scan technology for collecting 2D IR spectra. In conjunction with isotope labeling, 2D IR spectroscopy is able to probe the secondary structure and environment of individual residues in polypeptides and proteins. It is particularly useful for membrane and aggregate proteins. Our rapid-scan technology relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that computer generates the pulse shapes, much like in an NMR spectrometer. With this device, data collection is faster, easier, and more accurate. We describe our 2D IR spectrometer, as well as protocols for 13C=18O isotope labeling, and then illustrate the technique with an application to the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide form type 2 diabetes. PMID:20472067

  11. Structural modifications of Tilia cordata wood during heat treatment investigated by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Froidevaux, Julien; Navi, Parviz; Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela

    2013-02-01

    It is known that heat treatment of wood combined with a low percent of relative humidity causes transformations in the chemical composition of it. The modifications and/or degradation of wood components occur by hydrolysis, oxidation, and decarboxylation reactions. The aim of this study was to give better insights on wood chemical modifications during wood heat treatment under low temperature at about 140 °C and 10% percentage of relative humidity, by infrared, principal component analysis and two dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy. For this purpose, hardwood samples of lime (Tilia cordata) were investigated and analysed. The infrared spectra of treated samples were compared with the reference ones, the most important differences being observed in the "fingerprint" region. Due to the complexity of this region, which have contributions from all the wood constituents the chemical changes during hydro-thermal treatment were examined in detail using principal component analysis and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. By hydro-thermal treatment of wood results the formation of acetic acid, which catalyse the hydrolysis reactions of hemicelluloses and amorphous cellulose. The cleavage of the β-O-4 linkages and splitting of the aliphatic methoxyl chains from the aromatic lignin ring was also observed. For the first treatment interval, a higher extent of carbohydrates degradation was observed, then an increase of the extent of the lignin degradation also took place.

  12. Study on antibacterial alginate-stabilized copper nanoparticles by FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Visurraga, Judith; Daza, Carla; Pozo, Claudio; Becerra, Abraham; von Plessing, Carlos; García, Apolinaria

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to clarify the intermolecular interaction between antibacterial copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) and sodium alginate (NaAlg) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and to process the spectra applying two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) correlation analysis. To our knowledge, the addition of NaAlg as a stabilizer of copper nanoparticles has not been previously reported. It is expected that the obtained results will provide valuable additional information on: (1) the influence of reducing agent ratio on the formation of copper nanoparticles in order to design functional nanomaterials with increased antibacterial activity, and (2) structural changes related to the incorporation of Cu NPs into the polymer matrix. Methods Cu NPs were prepared by microwave heating using ascorbic acid as reducing agent and NaAlg as stabilizing agent. The characterization of synthesized Cu NPs by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and semiquantitative analysis of the weight percentage composition indicated that the average particle sizes of Cu NPs are about 3–10 nm, they are spherical in shape, and consist of zerovalent Cu and Cu2O. Also, crystallite size and relative particle size of stabilized Cu NPs were calculated by XRD using Scherrer’s formula and FT from the X-ray diffraction data. Thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), FT-IR, second-derivative spectra, and 2D-IR correlation analysis were applied to studying the stabilization mechanism of Cu NPs by NaAlg molecules. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of stabilized Cu NPs against five bacterial strains (Staphylococccus aureus ATCC 6538P, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and O157: H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 13311 and 14028) were evaluated with macrodilution

  13. Volatility-dependent 2D IR correlation analysis of traditional Chinese medicine ‘Red Flower Oil’ preparation from different manufacturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-Wen; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhou, Qun; Tao, Jia-Xun; Noda, Isao

    2008-06-01

    As a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), 'Red Flower Oil' preparation is widely used as a household remedy in China and Southeast Asia. Usually, the preparation is a mixture of several plant essential oils with different volatile features, such as wintergreen oil, turpentine oil and clove oil. The proportions of these plant essential oils in 'Red Flower Oil' vary from different manufacturers. Thus, it is important to develop a simple and rapid evaluation method for quality assurance of the preparations. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) was applied and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) based on the volatile characteristic of samples was used to enhance the resolution of FT-IR spectra. 2D IR technique could, not only easily provide the composition and their volatile sequences in 'Red flower Oil' preparations, but also rapidly discriminate the subtle differences in products from different manufacturers. Therefore, FT-IR combined with volatility-dependent 2D IR correlation analysis provides a very fast and effective method for the quality control of essential oil mixtures in TCM.

  14. Evaluation on intrinsic quality of licorice influenced by environmental factors by using FTIR combined with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying-qun; Yu, Hua; Zhang, Yan-ling; Sun, Su-qin; Chen, Shi-lin; Zhao, Run-huai; Zhou, Qun; Noda, Isao

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the intrinsic quality of licorice influenced by environmental factors, the spectral comparison of licorice from two typical ecological habitats was conducted by using FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy. There were differences in the peak intensities of 1155, 1076 and 1048 cm -1 of FTIR profiles. The difference was amplified by the second derivative spectrum for the peak intensities at 1370, 1365 and 1317 cm -1 and the peak shape in 958-920 cm -1 and 1050-988 cm -1. The synchronous 2D-IR spectra within the range of 860-1300 cm -1 were classified into type I and type II and their frequency in the two groups was noticeably different. Although the chemical compounds of licorice samples from two areas were generally similar, the contents of starch, calcium oxalate, and some chemical compounds containing alcohol hydroxyl group were different, indicating the influence of precipitation and temperature. This study demonstrates that the systematical analysis of FTIR, the second derivative spectrum and 2D-IR can effectively determine the differences in licorice samples from different ecological habitats.

  15. Separation of experimental 2D IR frequency-frequency correlation functions into structural and reorientation-induced contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Patrick L.; Nishida, Jun; Fayer, Michael D.

    2015-09-01

    A vibrational transition frequency can couple to its environment through a directional vector interaction. In such cases, reorientation of the vibrational transition dipole (molecular orientational relaxation) and its frequency fluctuations can be strongly coupled. It was recently shown [Kramer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 184505 (2015)] that differing frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) decays, due to reorientation-induced spectral diffusion (RISD), are observed with different two-dimensional infrared polarization configurations when such strong coupling is present. The FFC functional forms were derived for the situation in which all spectral diffusion is due to reorientational motion. We extend the previous theory to include vibrational frequency evolution (spectral diffusion) caused by structural fluctuations of the medium. Model systems with diffusive reorientation and several regimes of structural spectral diffusion rates are analyzed for first order Stark effect interactions. Additionally, the transition dipole reorientational motion in complex environments is frequently not completely diffusive. Several periods of restricted angular motion (wobbling-in-a-cone) may precede the final diffusive orientational randomization. The polarization-weighted FFCF decays are presented in this case of restricted transition dipole wobbling. With these extensions to the polarization-dependent FFCF expressions, the structural spectral diffusion dynamics of methanol in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate can be separated quantitatively from RISD using the experimental center line slope data. In addition, prior results on the spectral diffusion of water, methanol, and ethanol in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide are re-examined to elucidate the influence of reorientation on the data, which were interpreted in terms of structural fluctuations.

  16. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Gai, Feng E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin

    2014-06-21

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  17. Mid-infrared pulse shaping permits the pathway of amyloid aggregation to be determined with rapid-scan 2D IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanni, Martin

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a means for rapidly acquiring 2D IR spectra in a continuous fashion to monitoring protein kinetics. Our method relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that generates precise pulse trains for collecting 2D IR spectra. The phase, amplitude and now the polarization of the pulse trains can be automatically generated without optical alignment, which produces higher accuracy spectra in a much easier fashion than with standard 4-wave mixing. Using this new technology as well as site-specific isotope labeling, we have measured the development of secondary structures for six residues during the aggregation process of the 37-residue polypeptide associated with type 2 diabetes, the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), also called amylin. By monitoring the kinetics at six different labeled sites, we find that the peptides initially develop well ordered structures near the ordered loop of the fibrils, followed by formation of the two parallel β-sheets with the N-terminal β-sheet likely forming before the C-terminal sheet. This experimental approach provides residue-by-residue details on the aggregation pathway of hIAPP fibril formation as well as a general methodology for studying other amyloid forming proteins without the use of structure perturbing labels. Moreover, this approach is also applicable to membrane catalyzed amyloid formation, and experiments along these lines will be presented as well.

  18. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Wang, Jun; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin; DeGrado, William F.; Gai, Feng; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs. PMID:24952572

  19. Combination of transient 2D-IR experiments and ab initio computations sheds light on the formation of the charge-transfer state in photoexcited carbonyl carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Segado Centellas, Mireia; Lapini, Andrea; Lima, Manuela; Avila, Francisco; Santoro, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Chiara; Righini, Roberto

    2014-08-14

    The excited state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids is very complex because of the coupling of single- and doubly excited states and the possible involvement of intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) states. In this contribution we employ ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and theoretical computations to investigate the relaxation dynamics of trans-8'-apo-β-carotenal occurring on the picosecond time scale, after excitation in the S2 state. In a (slightly) polar solvent like chloroform, one-dimensional (T1D-IR) and two-dimensional (T2D-IR) transient infrared spectroscopy reveal spectral components with characteristic frequencies and lifetimes that are not observed in nonpolar solvents (cyclohexane). Combining experimental evidence with an analysis of CASPT2//CASSCF ground and excited state minima and energy profiles, complemented with TDDFT calculations in gas phase and in solvent, we propose a photochemical decay mechanism for this system where only the bright single-excited 1Bu(+) and the dark double-excited 2Ag(-) states are involved. Specifically, the initially populated 1Bu(+) relaxes toward 2Ag(-) in 200 fs. In a nonpolar solvent 2Ag(-) decays to the ground state (GS) in 25 ps. In polar solvents, distortions along twisting modes of the chain promote a repopulation of the 1Bu(+) state which then quickly relaxes to the GS (18 ps in chloroform). The 1Bu(+) state has a high electric dipole and is the main contributor to the charge-transfer state involved in the dynamics in polar solvents. The 2Ag(-) → 1Bu(+) population transfer is evidenced by a cross peak on the T2D-IR map revealing that the motions along the same stretching of the conjugated chain on the 2Ag(-) and 1Bu(+) states are coupled.

  20. Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide: Fermi resonance, conformational substates, or vibrational self-trapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, J.; Hamm, P.

    2003-08-01

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy is applied to investigate acetanilide, a molecular crystal consisting of quasi-one-dimensional hydrogen bonded peptide units. The amide-I band exhibits a double peak structure, which has been attributed to different mechanisms including vibrational self-trapping, a Fermi resonance, or the existence of two conformational substates. The 2D-IR spectrum of crystalline acetanilide is compared with that of two different molecular systems: (i) benzoylchloride, which exhibits a strong symmetric Fermi resonance and (ii) N-methylacetamide dissolved in methanol which occurs in two spectroscopically distinguishable conformations. Both 2D-IR spectra differ significantly from that of crystalline acetanilide, proving that these two alternative mechanisms cannot account for the anomalous spectroscopy of crystalline acetanilide. On the other hand, vibrational self-trapping of the amide-I band can naturally explain the 2D-IR response.

  1. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Feng; Chen, YiPing; You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)₃]₃[CoW₁₂O₄₀]·9H₂O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)₃]₂[FeW₁₂O₄₀]·H₃O·H₂O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)₃]²⁺ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm⁻¹, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  2. Dynamics of Functionalized Surface Molecular Monolayers Studied with Ultrafast Infrared Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Daniel E.; Nishida, Jun; Yan, Chang; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Smith, Brian J.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The structural dynamics of thin films consisting of tricarbonyl (1,10-phenanthroline)rhenium chloride (RePhen(CO)3Cl) linked to an alkyl silane monolayer through a triazole linker synthesized on silica-on-calcium-fluoride substrates are investigated using ultrafast infrared (IR) techniques. Ultrafast 2D IR vibrational echo experiments and polarization selective heterodyne detected transient grating (HDTG) measurements, as well as polarization dependent FT-IR and AFM experiments are employed to study the samples. The vibrational echo experiments measure spectral diffusion, while the HDTG experiments measure the vibrational excited state population relaxation and investigate the vibrational transition dipole orientational anisotropy decay. To investigate the anticipated impact of vibrational excitation transfer, which can be caused by the high concentration of RePhen(CO)3Cl in the monolayer, a concentration dependence of the spectral diffusion is measured. To generate a range of concentrations, mixed monolayers consisting of both hydrogen terminated and triazole/RePhen(CO)3Cl terminated alkyl silanes are synthesized. It is found that the measured rate of spectral diffusion is independent of concentration, with all samples showing spectral diffusion of 37 ± 6 ps. To definitively test for vibrational excitation transfer, polarization selective HDTG experiments are conducted. Excitation transfer will cause anisotropy decay. Polarization resolved heterodyne detected transient grating spectroscopy is sensitive to anisotropy decay (depolarization) caused by excitation transfer and molecular reorientation. The HDTG experiments show no evidence of anisotropy decay on the appropriate time scale, demonstrating the absence of excitation transfer the RePhen(CO)3Cl. Therefore the influence of excitation transfer on spectral diffusion is inconsequential in these samples, and the vibrational echo measurements of spectral diffusion report solely on structural dynamics. A small

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure of α-Keggin heteropolymolybdates with pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate based frameworks, and associated RhB photocatalytic degradation and 2D-IR COS tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-yi; Chen, Yi-ping; Xia, Ze-min; Hu, Heng-bin; Sun, Yan-qiong; Huang, Wei-yuan

    2012-09-01

    Three α-Keggin heteropolymolybdates with the formula [(C(5)H(4)NH)COOH](3)[PMo(12)O(40)] 1, {[Sm(H(2)O)(4)(pdc)](3)}{[Sm(H(2)O)(3)(pdc)]}[SiMo(12)O(40)]·3H(2)O 2 and {[La(H(2)O)(4)(pdc)](4)}[PMo(12)O(40)]F 3 (H(2)pdc = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate), have been synthesized under hydrothermal condition and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, elemental analyses, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), IR, thermal gravimetric analyses, thermal infrared spectrum analyses and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analyses. Single crystal X-ray diffraction indicates all three compounds comprise ball-shaped Keggin type [XMo(12)O(40)](n-) polyoxometalates (POMs) (n = 3, X = P; n = 4, X = Si, respectively) with different types of carboxylic ligands derived from H(2)pdc, and these cluster anions are isostructural. In order to explore structural characteristics, Rhodamine B photocatalytic (RhB) degradation and two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy (2D-IR COS) tests, are investigated for 1, 2 and 3. In RhB degradation, all compounds show good photocatalytic activity. For 1, the activity mainly comes from POMs. While in 2 and 3, POMs' photocatalytic activity is enhanced by the Ln(iii)-pdc metal-organic frameworks. Structural properties like POM's stability and magnetic sensitivity are discussed by 2D-IR COS under thermal/magnetic perturbations.

  4. Echo's Legacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Echo 1 Satellite is simply a very large balloon, the diameter of a 10 story building. Metallized Products, Inc. developed a special material for NASA used for the balloons's skin. For "bouncing signals," material had to be reflective, lightweight, and thin enough to be folded into a beach ball size canister for delivery into orbit, where it would automatically inflate. Material selected was mylar polyester, with a reflective layer of tiny aluminum particles so fine that Echo's skin had a thickness half that of cellophane on a cigarette package.

  5. A simple method for MR elastography: a gradient-echo type multi-echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Numano, Tomokazu; Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Hata, Junichi; Washio, Toshikatsu; Homma, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel MR elastography (MRE) technique based on a conventional gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence which does not need additional bipolar magnetic field gradients (motion encoding gradient: MEG), yet is sensitive to vibration. In a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence, several images are produced from each echo of the train with different echo times (TEs). If these echoes are synchronized with the vibration, each readout's gradient lobes achieve a MEG-like effect, and the later generated echo causes a greater MEG-like effect. The sequence was tested for the tissue-mimicking agarose gel phantoms and the psoas major muscles of healthy volunteers. It was confirmed that the readout gradient lobes caused an MEG-like effect and the later TE images had higher sensitivity to vibrations. The magnitude image of later generated echo suffered the T2 decay and the susceptibility artifacts, but the wave image and elastogram of later generated echo were unaffected by these effects. In in vivo experiments, this method was able to measure the mean shear modulus of the psoas major muscle. From the results of phantom experiments and volunteer studies, it was shown that this method has clinical application potential.

  6. Two-Dimensional Infrared Study of Vibrational Coupling between Azide and Nitrile Reporters in a RNA Nucleoside.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Andrew J; Hogle, David G; Gai, Xin Sonia; Fenlon, Edward E; Brewer, Scott H; Tucker, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    The vibrations in the azide, N3, asymmetric stretching region and nitrile, CN, symmetric stretching region of 2'-azido-5-cyano-2'-deoxyuridine (N3CNdU) are examined by two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy. At earlier waiting times, the 2D IR spectrum shows the presence of both vibrational transitions along the diagonal and off-diagonal cross peaks indicating vibrational coupling. The coupling strength is determined from the off-diagonal anharmonicity to be 66 cm(-1) for the intramolecular distance of ∼7.9 Å, based on a structural map generated for this model system. In addition, the frequency-frequency correlation decay is detected, monitoring the solvent dynamics around each individual probe position. Overall, these vibrational reporters can be utilized in tandem to simultaneously track global structural information and fast structural fluctuations. PMID:27510724

  7. Meteoric Head Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajduk, A.; Galád, A.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 3261 radar meteor head echoes observed during the Orionid and Lyrid periods by the high-power radar of the Springhill Meteor Observatory are given. Dependence of the occurence of head echoes on the geometrical factors and physical properties of the meteoroids has been studied. Increas of the head echo rates with the elevation of the shower radiant and with the velocity of meteoroids has been observed.

  8. Project Echo Task Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    'A technician assigned to the Project Echo Task Group separates the two hemispheres of the Echo 1 container for inspection. The charge that freed the balloon was placed inside of a ring encircling the canister at its equator.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 181.

  9. Multi-echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Posse, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development of fMRI was paralleled early on by the adaptation of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) methods to quantify water relaxation changes during brain activation. This review describes the evolution of multi-echo acquisition from high-speed MRSI to multi-echo EPI and beyond. It highlights milestones in the development of multi-echo acquisition methods, such as the discovery of considerable gains in fMRI sensitivity when combining echo images, advances in quantification of the BOLD effect using analytical biophysical modeling and interleaved multi-region shimming. The review conveys the insight gained from combining fMRI and MRSI methods and concludes with recent trends in ultra-fast fMRI, which will significantly increase temporal resolution of multi-echo acquisition. PMID:22056458

  10. Echoes from anharmonic normal modes in model glasses.

    PubMed

    Burton, Justin C; Nagel, Sidney R

    2016-03-01

    Glasses display a wide array of nonlinear acoustic phenomena at temperatures T ≲ 1 K. This behavior has traditionally been explained by an ensemble of weakly coupled, two-level tunneling states, a theory that is also used to describe the thermodynamic properties of glasses at low temperatures. One of the most striking acoustic signatures in this regime is the existence of phonon echoes, a feature that has been associated with two-level systems with the same formalism as spin echoes in NMR. Here we report the existence of a distinctly different type of acoustic echo in classical models of glassy materials. Our simulations consist of finite-ranged, repulsive spheres and also particles with attractive forces using Lennard-Jones interactions. We show that these echoes are due to anharmonic, weakly coupled vibrational modes and perhaps provide an alternative explanation for the phonon echoes observed in glasses at low temperatures. PMID:27078434

  11. Echoes from anharmonic normal modes in model glasses.

    PubMed

    Burton, Justin C; Nagel, Sidney R

    2016-03-01

    Glasses display a wide array of nonlinear acoustic phenomena at temperatures T ≲ 1 K. This behavior has traditionally been explained by an ensemble of weakly coupled, two-level tunneling states, a theory that is also used to describe the thermodynamic properties of glasses at low temperatures. One of the most striking acoustic signatures in this regime is the existence of phonon echoes, a feature that has been associated with two-level systems with the same formalism as spin echoes in NMR. Here we report the existence of a distinctly different type of acoustic echo in classical models of glassy materials. Our simulations consist of finite-ranged, repulsive spheres and also particles with attractive forces using Lennard-Jones interactions. We show that these echoes are due to anharmonic, weakly coupled vibrational modes and perhaps provide an alternative explanation for the phonon echoes observed in glasses at low temperatures.

  12. An accurate classical simulation of a two-dimensional vibrational spectrum: OD stretch spectrum of a hydrated HOD molecule.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jonggu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-07-17

    An accurate computational method for the classical simulation of the two-dimensional vibrational spectra is presented. The method refines our previous computational method for the third order vibrational response function in the classical limit, and it enables capturing the diagonal elongation and its waiting time (T) dependence widely observed in experimental two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of intramolecular modes. The improvement is achieved by a series of new developments including (i) a block algorithm for the stability matrix computation, (ii) new equations of motion for the position-perturbed molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory, and (iii) enhanced sampling efficiency by exploiting the time-reversal invariance of MD trajectories. The method is applied to the simulation of 2D IR spectra of the OD stretch mode in a hydrated HOD molecule, employing a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical force field. The simulated spectra exhibit diagonal elongation of the 2D IR signal at small T, reflecting the correlation of individual transitions among the inhomogeneously broadened ensemble. The slopes of the nodal lines of the elongated signals are found to decay with a time scale of 1.6 ps as T increases, in reasonable agreement with the frequency correlation decay time of 1.2 ps. The amplitudes of the positive and negative peaks also decay as T increases, due to vibrational population relaxation and molecular rotation. The peak positions tend to blue shift with increasing T, reflecting the different relaxation rates of the strongly and weakly solvated HOD species. These results indicate that the present method can reliably predict the waiting-time-dependent changes of 2D IR spectra of a single vibrational chromophore in solution. PMID:24601590

  13. Light echoes - Novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1988-01-01

    The sudden brilliance of a nova eruption will be reflected on surrounding dust grains to create a phantom nebula. Previous searches for these light echoes have used relatively short exposures with photograhic detectors. This paper reports on a search around eight recent novae with long exposures using a CCD camera. Despite an increase of sensitivity by over an order of magnitude, no light echoes were detected. It is found that the average grain density must be less than about 10 to the -9th per cu cm for distances from 0.1 pc to 1000 pc from the novae. The light echo around Nova Persei 1901 was caused by reflection off clouds with grain densities of several times 10 to the -9th per cu cm which are at distances between 0.1 pc and 10 pc. Echoes from dust in a circumstellar shell or ejected during a previous eruption will be effectively unobservable.

  14. Billiard-ball echo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, R.; Hartmann, S. R.; Friedberg, R.

    1982-05-01

    Photon echoes in gaseous media are explained with the use of a simple heuristic model in which the atoms behave like composite billiard balls. The laser providing the excitation pulses becomes an atom smasher which "splits" the atoms and then by judicious programming puts them back together again. The most general photon-echo reordering process is explained without recourse to formal analysis so that an intuitive feeling is obtained which works equally well for the ordinary two-pulse photon echo, the Raman echo, the trilevel echo, the grating echo, etc. A formal analysis of the billiard-ball echo model is presented in its support.

  15. ECHO Status for International Partners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Beth; Lubelczyk, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The EOS Clearinghouse (ECHO) is a clearinghouse of spatial and temporal metadata, inclusive of NASA's Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) data holdings, that enables the science community to more easily exchange NASA data and information. Currently, ECHO has metadata descriptors for over 55 million individual data granules and 13 million browse images. The majority of ECHO's holdings come directly from data held in the NASA DAACs. The science disciplines and domains represented in ECHO are diverse and include metadata for all of NASA's Science Focus Area data. As middleware for a service-oriented enterprise, ECHO offers access to its capabilities through a set of publicly available Application Program Interfaces (APIs). More information about ECHO is available at http://eos.nasa.gov.echo. The presentation will discuss the status of the ECHO Partners, holdings, and activities, including the transition from the EOS Data Gateway to the Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST)

  16. Echo Boom Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordai, Phillipe; Rizzo, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Like their baby-boomer parents, the echo-boom generation is reshaping the college and university landscape. At 80 million strong, this group of children and young adults born between 1980 and 1995 now is flooding the college and university system, spurring a college building boom. According to Campus Space Crunch, a Hillier Architecture survey of…

  17. Experimental observation of fractional echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Siour, G.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of fractional echoes in a double-pulse excited nonlinear system. Unlike standard echoes, which appear periodically at delays which are integer multiples of the delay between the two exciting pulses, the fractional echoes appear at rational fractions of this delay. We discuss the mechanism leading to this phenomenon, and provide experimental demonstration of fractional echoes by measuring third harmonic generation in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  18. Complex echo classification by echo-locating bats: a review.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Yossi; Franz, Matthias O; Stilz, Peter; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Echo-locating bats constantly emit ultrasonic pulses and analyze the returning echoes to detect, localize, and classify objects in their surroundings. Echo classification is essential for bats' everyday life; for instance, it enables bats to use acoustical landmarks for navigation and to recognize food sources from other objects. Most of the research of echo based object classification in echo-locating bats was done in the context of simple artificial objects. These objects might represent prey, flower, or fruit and are characterized by simple echoes with a single up to several reflectors. Bats, however, must also be able to use echoes that return from complex structures such as plants or other types of background. Such echoes are characterized by superpositions of many reflections that can only be described using a stochastic statistical approach. Scientists have only lately started to address the issue of complex echo classification by echo-locating bats. Some behavioral evidence showing that bats can classify complex echoes has been accumulated and several hypotheses have been suggested as to how they do so. Here, we present a first review of this data. We raise some hypotheses regarding possible interpretations of the data and point out necessary future directions that should be pursued. PMID:20848111

  19. Single Echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous nonlinear gradient research has focused on trajectories that reconstruct images with a minimum number of echoes. Here we describe sequences where the nonlinear gradients vary in time to acquire the image in a single readout. The readout is designed to be very smooth so that it can be compressed to minimal time without violating peripheral nerve stimulation limits, yielding an image from a single 4 ms echo. Theory and Methods This sequence was inspired by considering the code of each voxel, i.e. the phase accumulation that a voxel follows through the readout, an approach connected to traditional encoding theory. We present simulations for the initial sequence, a low slew rate analog, and higher resolution reconstructions. Results Extremely fast acquisitions are achievable, though as one would expect, SNR is reduced relative to the slower Cartesian sampling schemes because of the high gradient strengths. Conclusions The prospect that nonlinear gradients can acquire images in a single <10 ms echo makes this a novel and interesting approach to image encoding. PMID:24465837

  20. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements.

    PubMed

    Kepa, M W; Ridley, C J; Kamenev, K V; Huxley, A D

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2. PMID:27587156

  1. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, M. W.; Ridley, C. J.; Kamenev, K. V.; Huxley, A. D.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2.

  2. Spin Echo in Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.; /Brookhaven

    2006-12-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time {tau} between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference effect occurs when {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} is too small, or when {tau} is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings interfere with each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive patterns depending on the exact value of {tau}. Typically, the beam's energy spread is large and this interference effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time {tau} after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when {tau} is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an

  3. Gradient echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Copenhaver, B R.; Shin, J; Warach, S; Butman, J A.; Saver, J L.; Kidwell, C S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have demonstrated that gradient echo (GRE) MRI sequences are as accurate as CT for the detection of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the context of acute stroke. However, many physicians who currently read acute stroke imaging studies may be unfamiliar with interpretation of GRE images. Methods: An NIH Web-based training program was developed including a pretest, tutorial, and posttest. Physicians involved in the care of acute stroke patients were encouraged to participate. The tutorial covered acute, chronic, and mimic hemorrhages as they appear on CT, diffusion-weighted imaging, and GRE sequences. Ability of users to identify ICH presence, type, and age on GRE was compared from the pretest to posttest timepoint. Results: A total of 104 users completed the tutorial. Specialties represented included general radiology (42%), general neurology (16%), neuroradiology (15%), stroke neurology (14%), emergency medicine (1%), and other (12%). Median overall score improved pretest to posttest from 66.7% to 83.3%, p < 0.001. Improvement by category was as follows: acute ICH, 66.7%–100%, p < 0.001; chronic ICH, 33.3%–66.7%, p < 0.001; ICH negatives/mimics, 100%–100%, p = 0.787. Sensitivity for identification of acute hemorrhage improved from 68.2% to 96.4%. Conclusions: Physicians involved in acute stroke care achieved significant improvement in gradient echo (GRE) hemorrhage interpretation after completing the NIH GRE MRI tutorial. This indicates that a Web-based tutorial may be a viable option for the widespread education of physicians to achieve an acceptable level of diagnostic accuracy at reading GRE MRI, thus enabling confident acute stroke treatment decisions. GLOSSARY AHA/ASA = American Heart Association/American Stroke Association; CME = continuing medical education; DWI = diffusion-weighted imaging; GRE = gradient echo; ICH = intracerebral hemorrhage; tPA = tissue plasminogen activator. PMID:19414724

  4. Transverse Echo Measurements in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Wolfram

    2006-03-20

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular we examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  5. TRANSVERSE ECHO MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-09-18

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular they examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  6. Echo 1 container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Echo 1 container: The design of this container was one of the most difficult technical tasks. Hansen writes: 'After several weeks of examining potential solutions to this problem, the Langley engineers narrowed the field of ideas to five. They then built working models of these five container designs, and 12-foot-diameter models of the satellite for simulation studies. With help from Langley's Engineering Service and Mechanical Service divisions, the Echo group built a special 41-foot-diameter spherical vacuum chamber equipped with pressure-proof windows. There the dynamics of opening the container and inflating the satelloon could be studies as the satelloon fell to the bottom of the tank.' 'The container-opening mechanism that eventually resulted from these vacuum tests was surely one of the oddest explosive devices ever contrived. The container was a sphere that opened at its equator into top and bottom hemispheres. the top half fit on the bottom half much like a lid fits snugly atop a kitchen pot. The joint between the two hemispheres, therefore, formed a sliding valve. The halves had to move apart an inch or two before the canister was actually open. It was in this joint between the hemispheres that the charge was placed.' The whole whole system was laced together with fishing line which resulted in many disdainful comments from visiting scientists and engineers but the system worked. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 180.

  7. Dissecting a Light Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for audio animation

    This animation illustrates how a light echo works, and how an optical illusion of material moving outward is created.

    A light echo occurs when a star explodes, acting like a cosmic flashbulb. The light from this explosion zips through nearby dust clumps, illuminating and heating them up slightly. This brief period of warming causes them to glow in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one.

    The animation starts by showing the explosion of a star, which results in a flash of light that moves outward in all directions. The direction of our line of sight from Earth is indicated by the blue arrow.

    When the light flash reaches surrounding dust, shown here as three dark clouds, the dust is heated up, creating infrared light that begins to travel toward Earth (indicated by the red arrows). Dust closest to the explosion lights up first, while the explosion's shock wave takes longer to reach more distant material. This results in light from different parts of the cloud reaching Earth at different times, creating the illusion of motion over time.

    As the animation shows, the inclination of the cloud toward our line of sight can result in the material seeming to move both away from and toward the central star.

  8. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, James Francis

    2008-12-01

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO)3 and CpFe(CO)2 have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO)5[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO)5 have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  9. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  10. ENVISAT Radar Altimeter Individual Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanifé, O. Z.; Roca, M.; Rémy, F.; Legrèsy, B.; Chapron, B.; Laxon, S.; Pilar Milagro, M.; Benveniste, J.

    2006-07-01

    A unique feature of the ENVISAT RA-2 is to provide bursts of individual, unav eraged Ku band echo s ample data in phase (I) and quadrature (Q), at the full rate 1800 Hz. This data offers a unique possibility to assess the full capabilities of altimeter measurements. Both technically and scientifically, much can be expected fro m these bursts o f individual echoes, e.g., speckle characteristics over different altimeter scen es, o cean , ice, land, but also, potential blurring effects associat ed with range windo w changes during the 100 echoes on-board av eraging. Moreover, for the first time in altimetry fro m space, investigations can be carried on the direct use of phase information from backscatter signals. ENVISAT RA-2 also features a second frequency in S band. The co mbination bet ween absolutely calibrated Ku and S b and d ata can yield interesting improvement for wind speed, wav e period, g as exchang e estimates , etc. ESA has launched a study on this topic to seed the use of individual echoes by s cientists. This study is reaching completion and reconstructed echoes will be made available for the first time to the scientific community. Results fro m the technical and s cientific application of individual echoes will be pres ented.

  11. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  12. Rapid Gradient-Echo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Gradient echo sequences are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for numerous applications ranging from angiography to perfusion to functional MRI. Compared with spin-echo techniques, the very short repetition times of gradient-echo methods enable very rapid 2D and 3D imaging, but also lead to complicated “steady states.” Signal and contrast behavior can be described graphically and mathematically, and depends strongly on the type of spoiling: fully balanced (no spoiling), gradient spoiling, or RF-spoiling. These spoiling options trade off between high signal and pure T1 contrast while the flip angle also affects image contrast in all cases, both of which can be demonstrated theoretically and in image examples. As with spin-echo sequences, magnetization preparation can be added to gradient-echo sequences to alter image contrast. Gradient echo sequences are widely used for numerous applications such as 3D perfusion imaging, functional MRI, cardiac imaging and MR angiography. PMID:23097185

  13. A new technique for MR elastography of the supraspinatus muscle: A gradient-echo type multi-echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daiki; Numano, Tomokazu; Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Takamoto, Koichi; Onishi, Takaaki; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) can measure tissue stiffness quantitatively and noninvasively. Supraspinatus muscle injury is a significant problem among throwing athletes. The purpose of this study was to develop an MRE technique for application to the supraspinatus muscle by using a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRE acquisitions were performed with a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence at 100Hz pneumatic vibration. A custom-designed vibration pad was used as a pneumatic transducer in order to adapt to individual shoulder shapes. In a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence, without motion encoding gradient (MEG) that synchronizes with vibrations, bipolar readout gradient lobes achieved a similar function to MEG (MEG-like effect). In other words, a dedicated MRE sequence (built-in MEG) is not always necessary for MRE. In this study, 7 healthy volunteers underwent MRE. We investigated the effects of direction of the MEG-like effect and selected imaging planes on the patterns of wave propagation (wave image). The results indicated that wave images showed clear wave propagation on a condition that the direction of the MEG-like effect was nearly perpendicular to the long axis of the supraspinatus muscle, and that the imaging plane was superior to the proximal supraspinatus muscle. This limited condition might be ascribed to specific features of fibers in the supraspinatus muscle and wave reflection from the boundaries of the supraspinous fossa. The mean stiffness of the supraspinatus muscle was 10.6±3.17kPa. Our results demonstrated that using MRE, our method can be applied to the supraspinatus muscle by using conventional MRI. PMID:27374984

  14. A new technique for MR elastography of the supraspinatus muscle: A gradient-echo type multi-echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daiki; Numano, Tomokazu; Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Takamoto, Koichi; Onishi, Takaaki; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) can measure tissue stiffness quantitatively and noninvasively. Supraspinatus muscle injury is a significant problem among throwing athletes. The purpose of this study was to develop an MRE technique for application to the supraspinatus muscle by using a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRE acquisitions were performed with a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence at 100Hz pneumatic vibration. A custom-designed vibration pad was used as a pneumatic transducer in order to adapt to individual shoulder shapes. In a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence, without motion encoding gradient (MEG) that synchronizes with vibrations, bipolar readout gradient lobes achieved a similar function to MEG (MEG-like effect). In other words, a dedicated MRE sequence (built-in MEG) is not always necessary for MRE. In this study, 7 healthy volunteers underwent MRE. We investigated the effects of direction of the MEG-like effect and selected imaging planes on the patterns of wave propagation (wave image). The results indicated that wave images showed clear wave propagation on a condition that the direction of the MEG-like effect was nearly perpendicular to the long axis of the supraspinatus muscle, and that the imaging plane was superior to the proximal supraspinatus muscle. This limited condition might be ascribed to specific features of fibers in the supraspinatus muscle and wave reflection from the boundaries of the supraspinous fossa. The mean stiffness of the supraspinatus muscle was 10.6±3.17kPa. Our results demonstrated that using MRE, our method can be applied to the supraspinatus muscle by using conventional MRI.

  15. Echo particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    DeMarchi, Nicholas; White, Christopher

    2012-12-27

    The transport of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flows is ultimately determined by spatiotemporal distributions of the fluid velocity field.(1) Consequently, a prerequisite for understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid flows is the capability to measure the velocity field with adequate spatial and temporal resolution.(2) For velocity measurements in optically opaque fluids or through optically opaque geometries, echo particle image velocimetry (EPIV) is an attractive diagnostic technique to generate "instantaneous" two-dimensional fields of velocity.(3,4,5,6) In this paper, the operating protocol for an EPIV system built by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound machine(7) with a PC running commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) software(8) is described, and validation measurements in Hagen-Poiseuille (i.e., laminar pipe) flow are reported. For the EPIV measurements, a phased array probe connected to the medical ultrasound machine is used to generate a two-dimensional ultrasound image by pulsing the piezoelectric probe elements at different times. Each probe element transmits an ultrasound pulse into the fluid, and tracer particles in the fluid (either naturally occurring or seeded) reflect ultrasound echoes back to the probe where they are recorded. The amplitude of the reflected ultrasound waves and their time delay relative to transmission are used to create what is known as B-mode (brightness mode) two-dimensional ultrasound images. Specifically, the time delay is used to determine the position of the scatterer in the fluid and the amplitude is used to assign intensity to the scatterer. The time required to obtain a single B-mode image, t, is determined by the time it take to pulse all the elements of the phased array probe. For acquiring multiple B-mode images, the frame rate of the system in frames per second (fps) = 1/δt. (See 9 for a review of ultrasound imaging.) For a typical EPIV experiment, the frame rate is between 20-60 fps

  16. Commissioning the Echo-Seeding Experiment Echo-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.a E.Colby; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Woodley, M.; Xiang, D.; Pernet, P-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2011-06-02

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment is intended to test the EEHG principle at low electron beam energy, 120 MeV, and determine the sensitivities and limitations to understand the expected performance at the higher energy scales and harmonic numbers required for x-ray FELs. In this paper we present the experimental results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  17. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  18. Gradient moment nulling in fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Hinks, R S; Constable, R T

    1994-12-01

    The fast spin echo sequence combines data from many echo signals in a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train to form a single image. Much of the signal in the second and later echoes results from the coherent addition of stimulated echo signal components back to the spin echo signal. Because stimulated echoes experience no dephasing effects during the time that they are stored as Mz magnetization, they experience a different gradient first moment than does the spin echo. This leads to flow-related phase differences between different echo components and results in flow voids and ghosting, even when the first moment is nulled for the spin echo signal. A method of gradient moment nulling that correctly compensates both spin echo and stimulated echo components has been developed. The simplest solution involves nulling the first gradient moment at least at the RF pulses and preferably at both the RF pulses and the echoes. Phantom and volunteer studies demonstrate good suppression of flow-related artifacts.

  19. Distinguishing gramicidin D conformers through two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of vibrational excitons

    PubMed Central

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin D is a short peptide which dimerizes to form helical pores, adopting one of two conformations in the process. These conformations differ primarily in number of residues per turn and the hydrogen-bond registry between rungs of the helix. Using amide I 2D infrared (IR) and FTIR, we have demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish between the different conformers of gramicidin D in solution. We show that the spectra observed for this helical peptide bear no resemblance to the spectra of α- or 310-helices and that while the FTIR spectra appear similar to spectra of β-sheets, 2D IR reveals that the observed resonances arise from vibrational modes unlike those observed in β-sheets. We also present an idealized model which reproduces the experimental data with high fidelity. This model is able to explain the polarization-dependence of the experimental 2D IR data. Using this model, we show the coupling between the rungs of the helix dominates the spectra, and as a consequence of this, the number of residues per turn can greatly influence the amide I spectra of gramicidin D. PMID:26049444

  20. Distinguishing gramicidin D conformers through two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of vibrational excitons.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin D is a short peptide which dimerizes to form helical pores, adopting one of two conformations in the process. These conformations differ primarily in number of residues per turn and the hydrogen-bond registry between rungs of the helix. Using amide I 2D infrared (IR) and FTIR, we have demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish between the different conformers of gramicidin D in solution. We show that the spectra observed for this helical peptide bear no resemblance to the spectra of α- or 310-helices and that while the FTIR spectra appear similar to spectra of β-sheets, 2D IR reveals that the observed resonances arise from vibrational modes unlike those observed in β-sheets. We also present an idealized model which reproduces the experimental data with high fidelity. This model is able to explain the polarization-dependence of the experimental 2D IR data. Using this model, we show the coupling between the rungs of the helix dominates the spectra, and as a consequence of this, the number of residues per turn can greatly influence the amide I spectra of gramicidin D.

  1. Distinguishing gramicidin D conformers through two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of vibrational excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Paul; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin D is a short peptide which dimerizes to form helical pores, adopting one of two conformations in the process. These conformations differ primarily in number of residues per turn and the hydrogen-bond registry between rungs of the helix. Using amide I 2D infrared (IR) and FTIR, we have demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish between the different conformers of gramicidin D in solution. We show that the spectra observed for this helical peptide bear no resemblance to the spectra of α- or 310-helices and that while the FTIR spectra appear similar to spectra of β-sheets, 2D IR reveals that the observed resonances arise from vibrational modes unlike those observed in β-sheets. We also present an idealized model which reproduces the experimental data with high fidelity. This model is able to explain the polarization-dependence of the experimental 2D IR data. Using this model, we show the coupling between the rungs of the helix dominates the spectra, and as a consequence of this, the number of residues per turn can greatly influence the amide I spectra of gramicidin D.

  2. 15 K pulse tube design for ECHO mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, J. M.; Charles, I.; Chassaing, C.; Butterworth, J.; Aigouy, G.; Mullié, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is a proposed space telescope designed to characterize the atmospheres of nearby transiting exoplanets. Its detectors will operate in the 0.4 to 11 micromillimeter range. Two kinds of detectors are currently able to provide the desired sensitivity in this range. Depending on the technology used, cooling to either 6 K or about 30 K will be required. For the former solution, a JT cooler coupled to a pulse tube cooler could be used whereas for the latter, a pulse tube cooler would provide the cooling power. Pulse tube coolers are particularly well adapted for the cryogenics for such mission because of the low level of vibration required and of the temperature range. We developed multistage pulse tube coolers able to cool down to temperature as low as 6 K, with efficient operation from 10 K to 40 K. A design based on our tested prototypes is proposed to fulfill the need for the ECHO missions. This paper describes the experimental results measured with demonstrator models. In particular measured performances of efficient cooling power at 10 K are presented. Several possible configurations for the ECHO cooler will be discussed as well.

  3. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    A recently proposed concept of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two laser modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation in a relativistic beam. This seeding technique holds promise of a one-stage soft x-ray FEL that radiates not only transversely but also longitudinally coherent pulses. Currently, an experimental verification of the concept is being conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory aimed at the demonstration of the EEHG.

  4. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady

    2010-08-25

    A recently proposed concept of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two laser modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation in a relativistic beam. This seeding technique holds promise of a one-stage soft x-ray FEL that radiates not only transversely but also longitudinally coherent pulses. Currently, an experimental verification of the concept is being conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory aimed at the demonstration of the EEHG.

  5. Vibrational dynamics of azide-derivatized amino acids studied by nonlinear infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Masaki; Ohta, Kaoru; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2015-06-01

    Recently, biomolecules which are labeled by azide or thiocyanate groups in solutions and proteins have been studied to examine microscopic environment around a solute by nonlinear infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In this study, we have performed two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the vibrational frequency fluctuations of two different azide-derivatized amino acids, Ala (N3-Ala) and Pro (N3-Pro), and N3- in water. From the 2D-IR experiments, it was found that the frequency-frequency time correlation function (FFTCF) of solute can be modeled by a delta function plus an exponential function and constant. FFTCF for each probe molecule has a decay component of about 1 ps, and this result suggests that the stretching mode of the covalently bonded azide group is sensitive to the fluctuations of hydrogen bond network system, as found in previous studies of N3- in water. In contrast to FFTCF of N3-, FFTCF of the azide-derivatized amino acids contains static component. This static component may reflect dynamics of water affected by the solutes or the structural fluctuations of the solute itself. We also performed the IR pump-probe measurements for the probe molecules in water in order to investigate vibrational energy relaxation (VER) and reorientational relaxation. It was revealed that the charge fluctuations in the azide group are significant for the VER of this mode in water, reflecting that the VER rate of N3- is faster than those of the azide-derivatized amino acids. While the behaviors of the anisotropy decay of N3-Ala and N3- are similar to each other, the anisotropy decay of N3-Pro contains much slower decaying component. By considering the structural difference around the vibrational probe between N3-Ala and N3-Pro, it is suggested that the structural freedom of the probe molecules can affect the reorientational processes.

  6. Proposal for Blood-Flow Imaging by Contrast Echo Using Counter-Crossed Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eura, T.; Yoshida, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Takayasu, T.; Nakamura, K.; Akiyama, I.

    We propose a new contrast-echo method using counter-crossed beams of two ultrasonic frequencies as an ultrasound diagnostic for cancer. We call this the Counter-Cross Beam Contrast-Echo (C-CBCE) method. Sum and difference frequency components derived from nonlinear vibration of the contrast agents (microbubbles) driven by dual-frequency ultrasound are used in the C-CBCE method. In this study, we used Sonazoid microbubbles as we attempted to detect the sum frequency component generated by Sonazoid fixed in agar gel. We also measured the in-channel flow velocity of the Sonazoid.

  7. Dance of the Light Echoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This composite image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the remnant of a star that exploded, called Cassiopeia A (center) and its surrounding 'light echoes' -- dances of light through dusty clouds, created when stars blast apart. The light echoes are colored and the surrounding clouds of dust are gray.

    In figure 1, dramatic changes are highlighted in phenomena referred to as light echoes (colored areas) around the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (center). Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died.

    A light echo occurs when a star explodes, acting like a cosmic flashbulb. The light from this explosion zips through nearby dust clumps, illuminating and heating them up slightly. This brief period of warming causes them to glow in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The result is an optical illusion, in which the dust appears to be flying outward at the speed of light. In figure 1, this apparent motion can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps

    Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. This remnant is located 11,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia.

    This composite consists of six processed images taken over a time span of three years. Dust features that have not changed over time appear gray, while those that have changed are colored blue or orange. Bluer colors represent an earlier time and redder ones, a later time. The progression of the light echo through the dust can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps.

    This

  8. Echo characteristics of two salmon species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealson, Patrick A.; Horne, John K.; Burwen, Debby L.

    2005-04-01

    The Alaska Department of Fish and Game relies on split-beam hydroacoustic techniques to estimate Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returns to the Kenai River. Chinook counts are periodically confounded by large numbers of smaller sockeye salmon (O. nerka). Echo target-strength has been used to distinguish fish length classes, but was too variable to separate Kenai River chinook and sockeye distributions. To evaluate the efficacy of alternate echo metrics, controlled acoustic measurements of tethered chinook and sockeye salmon were collected at 200 kHz. Echo returns were digitally sampled at 48 kHz. A suite of descriptive metrics were collected from a series of 1,000 echoes per fish. Measurements of echo width were least variable at the -3 dB power point. Initial results show echo elongation and ping-to-ping variability in echo envelope width were significantly greater for chinook than for sockeye salmon. Chinook were also observed to return multiple discrete peaks from a single broadcast echo. These characteristics were attributed to the physical width of chinook exceeding half of the broadcast echo pulse width at certain orientations. Echo phase variability, correlation coefficient and fractal dimension distributions did not demonstrate significant discriminatory power between the two species. [Work supported by ADF&G, ONR.

  9. Investigating vibrational anharmonic couplings in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slenkamp, Karla M.; Lynch, Michael S.; Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Bannan, Caitlin C.; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Khalil, Munira

    2014-02-01

    Using polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we measure anharmonic couplings and angles between the transition dipole moments of the four cyanide stretching (νCN) vibrations found in [(NH3)5RuIIINCFeII(CN)5]- (FeRu) dissolved in D2O and formamide and [(NC)5FeIICNPtIV(NH3)4NCFeII(CN)5]4- (FePtFe) dissolved in D2O. These cyanide-bridged transition metal complexes serve as model systems for studying the role of high frequency vibrational modes in ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer reactions. Here, we focus on the spectroscopy of the νCN modes in the electronic ground state. The FTIR spectra of the νCN modes of the bimetallic and trimetallic systems are strikingly different in terms of frequencies, amplitudes, and lineshapes. The experimental 2D IR spectra of FeRu and FePtFe and their fits reveal a set of weakly coupled anharmonic νCN modes. The vibrational mode anharmonicities of the individual νCN modes range from 14 to 28 cm-1. The mixed-mode anharmonicities range from 2 to 14 cm-1. In general, the bridging νCN mode is most weakly coupled to the radial νCN mode, which involves the terminal CN ligands. Measurement of the relative transition dipole moments of the four νCN modes reveal that the FeRu molecule is almost linear in solution when dissolved in formamide, but it assumes a bent geometry when dissolved in D2O. The νCN modes are modelled as bilinearly coupled anharmonic oscillators with an average coupling constant of 6 cm-1. This study elucidates the role of the solvent in modulating the molecular geometry and the anharmonic vibrational couplings between the νCN modes in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes.

  10. The Echoes of Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) acquires, archives, and manages data from all of NASA s Earth science satellites, for the benefit of the Space Agency and for the benefit of others, including local governments, first responders, the commercial remote sensing industry, teachers, museums, and the general public. EOSDIS is currently handling an extraordinary amount of NASA scientific data. To give an idea of the volume of information it receives, NASA s Terra Earth-observing satellite, just one of many NASA satellites sending down data, sends it hundreds of gigabytes a day, almost as much data as the Hubble Space Telescope acquires in an entire year, or about equal to the amount of information that could be found in hundreds of pickup trucks filled with books. To make EOSDIS data completely accessible to the Earth science community, NASA teamed up with private industry in 2000 to develop an Earth science "marketplace" registry that lets public users quickly drill down to the exact information they need. It also enables them to publish their research and resources alongside of NASA s research and resources. This registry is known as the Earth Observing System ClearingHOuse, or ECHO. The charter for this project focused on having an infrastructure completely independent from EOSDIS that would allow for more contributors and open up additional data access options. Accordingly, it is only fitting that the term ECHO is more than just an acronym; it represents the functionality of the system in that it can echo out and create interoperability among other systems, all while maturing with time as industry technologies and standards change and improve.

  11. Loschmidt echo for quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrı, Tommaso; Smerzi, Augusto; Pezzè, Luca

    2016-07-01

    We propose a versatile Loschmidt echo protocol to detect and quantify multiparticle entanglement. It allows us to extract the quantum Fisher information for arbitrary pure states, and finds direct application in quantum metrology. In particular, the protocol applies to states that are generally difficult to characterize, as non-Gaussian states, and states that are not symmetric under particle exchange. We focus on atomic systems, including trapped ions, polar molecules, and Rydberg atoms, where entanglement is generated dynamically via long-range interaction, and show that the protocol is stable against experimental detection errors.

  12. Bunched beam echos in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kewisch, J.; Brennan, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    Beam echos have been measured at FNAL and CERN in coasting beams. A coherent oscillation introduced by a short RF burst decoheres quickly, but a coherent echo of this oscillation can be observed if the decohered oscillation is bounced off a second RF burst. In this report the authors describe first longitudinal echo measurements of bunched beam in the AGS accelerator. They applied a method proposed by Stupakov for transverse beam echos, where the initial oscillation is produced by a dipole kick and is bounced off a quadrupole kick. In the longitudinal case the dipole and quadrupole kicks are produced by cavities operating at a 90 and 0{degree} phase shift, respectively.

  13. Two-dimensional ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of azides in ionic liquids reveals solute-specific solvation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samrat; Ren, Zhe; Brinzer, Thomas; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2015-10-28

    The stereochemistry and the reaction rates of bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reactions involving azides in ionic liquids are governed by solute-solvent interactions. Two-dimensional ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) shows that the picosecond dynamics of inorganic azides are substantially slower than organic azides in a series of homologous imidazolium ionic liquids. In water, both organic and inorganic azides spectrally diffuse with a ∼2 ps time constant. In the aprotic solvent tetrahydrofuran, both kinds of azides spectrally diffuse on a timescale >5 ps. In ionic liquids, like 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]), organic azides spectrally diffuse with a 2-4 ps time constant, and inorganic azides spectrally diffuse with a >40 ps time constant. Such a striking difference suggests that neutral (organic) and charged (inorganic) azides are incorporated in the ionic liquids with different solvation structures.

  14. Light echoes - Type II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1987-01-01

    Type II supernovae (SNs) light curves show a remarkable range of shapes. Data have been collected for the 12 Type II SNs that have light curve information for more than four months past maximum. Contrary to previous reports, it is found that (1) the decay rate after 100 days past maximum varies by almost an order of magnitude and (2) the light curve shapes are not bimodally distributed, but actually form a continuum. In addition, it is found that the extinctions to the SNs are related to the light curve shapes. This implies that the absorbing dust is local to the SNs. The dust is likely to be part of a circumstellar shell emitted by the SN progenitor that Dwek (1983) has used to explain infrared echoes. The optical depth of the shell can get quite large. In such cases, it is found that the photons scattered and delayed by reflection off dust grains will dominate the light curve several months after peak brightness. This 'light echo' offers a straightforward explanation of the diversity of Type II SN light curves.

  15. Minimum complexity echo state network.

    PubMed

    Rodan, Ali; Tino, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Reservoir computing (RC) refers to a new class of state-space models with a fixed state transition structure (the reservoir) and an adaptable readout form the state space. The reservoir is supposed to be sufficiently complex so as to capture a large number of features of the input stream that can be exploited by the reservoir-to-output readout mapping. The field of RC has been growing rapidly with many successful applications. However, RC has been criticized for not being principled enough. Reservoir construction is largely driven by a series of randomized model-building stages, with both researchers and practitioners having to rely on a series of trials and errors. To initialize a systematic study of the field, we concentrate on one of the most popular classes of RC methods, namely echo state network, and ask: What is the minimal complexity of reservoir construction for obtaining competitive models and what is the memory capacity (MC) of such simplified reservoirs? On a number of widely used time series benchmarks of different origin and characteristics, as well as by conducting a theoretical analysis we show that a simple deterministically constructed cycle reservoir is comparable to the standard echo state network methodology. The (short-term) MC of linear cyclic reservoirs can be made arbitrarily close to the proved optimal value.

  16. Ultrasound Echoes as Biometric Navigators

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Benjamin M.; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method of using ultrasound data to achieve prospective motion compensation in MRI, especially for respiratory motion during interventional MRI procedures in moving organs such as the liver. The method relies on fingerprint-like biometrically distinct ultra-sound echo patterns produced by different locations in tissue, which are collated with geometrical information from MRI during a training stage to form a mapping table that relates ultrasound measurements to positions. During prospective correction, the system makes frequent ultrasound measurements and uses the map to determine the corresponding position. Results in motorized linear motion phantoms and freely breathing animals indicate that the system performs well. Apparent motion is reduced by up to 97.8%, and motion artifacts are reduced or eliminated in 2D Spoiled Gradient-Echo images. The motion compensation is sufficient to permit MRI thermometry of focused ultrasound heating during respiratory-like motion, with results similar to those obtained in the absence of motion. This new technique may have applications for MRI thermometry and other dynamic imaging in the abdomen during free breathing. PMID:22648783

  17. Vibrational rainbows

    SciTech Connect

    Drolshagen, G.; Mayne, H.R.; Toennies, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    We extend the theory of inelastic rainbows to include vibrationally inelastic scattering, showing how the existence of vibrational rainbows can be deduced from collinear classical scattering theory. Exact close-coupling calculations are carried out for a breathing sphere potential, and rainbow structures are, in fact, observed. The location of the rainbows generally agrees well with the classical prediction. In addition, the sensitivity of the location of the rainbow to changes in the vibrational coupling has been investigated. It is shown that vibrational rainbows persist in the presence of anisotropy. Experimental results (R. David, M. Faubel, and J. P. Toennies, Chem. Phys. Lett. 18, 87 (1973)) are examined for evidence of vibrational rainbow structure, and it is shown that vibrational rainbow theory is not inconsistent with these results.

  18. Solar Sail Model Validation from Echo Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Brickerhoff, Adam T.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion program has been engaged in a project to increase the technology readiness of solar sails. Recently, these efforts came to fruition in the form of several software tools to model solar sail guidance, navigation and control. Furthermore, solar sails are one of five technologies competing for the New Millennium Program Space Technology 9 flight demonstration mission. The historic Echo 1 and Echo 2 balloons were comprised of aluminized Mylar, which is the near-term material of choice for solar sails. Both spacecraft, but particularly Echo 2, were in low Earth orbits with characteristics similar to the proposed Space Technology 9 orbit. Therefore, the Echo balloons are excellent test cases for solar sail model validation. We present the results of studies of Echo trajectories that validate solar sail models of optics, solar radiation pressure, shape and low-thrust orbital dynamics.

  19. Theory of Quantum Loschmidt Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, T.; Seligman, T. H.; Žnidarič, M.

    In this paper we review our recent work on the theoretical approach to quantum Loschmidt echoes, i.e., various properties of the so-called echo dynamics -- the composition of forward and backward time evolutions generated by two slightly different Hamiltonians, such as the state autocorrelation function (fidelity) and the purity of a reduced density matrix traced over a subsystem (purity fidelity). Our main theoretical result is a linear response formalism, expressing the fidelity and purity fidelity in terms of integrated time autocorrelation function of the generator of the perturbation. Surprisingly, this relation predicts that the decay of fidelity is the slower the faster the decay of correlations. In particular for a static (time-independent) perturbation, and for non-ergodic and non-mixing dynamics where asymptotic decay of correlations is absent, a qualitatively different and faster decay of fidelity is predicted on a time scale ∝ 1/δ as opposed to mixing dynamics where the fidelity is found to decay exponentially on a time-scale ∝ 1/δ2, where δ is a strength of perturbation. A detailed discussion of a semi-classical regime of small effective values of Planck constant hbar is given where classical correlation functions can be used to predict quantum fidelity decay. Note that the correct and intuitively expected classical stability behavior is recovered in the classical limit hbarto 0, as the two limits δto 0 and hbarto 0 do not commute. The theoretical results are demonstrated numerically for two models, the quantized kicked top and the multi-level Jaynes Cummings model. Our method can for example be applied to the stability analysis of quantum computation and quantum information processing.

  20. Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    By homing in on the distribution patterns of electrons around an atom, a team of scientists team with Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry showed how certain vibrations from benzene thiol cause electrical charge to "slosh" onto a gold surface (left), while others do not (right). The vibrations that cause this "sloshing" behavior yield a stronger SERS signal.

  1. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  2. Diffusion weighted vertical gradient and spin echo.

    PubMed

    Engström, Mathias; Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    In this work, diffusion weighting and parallel imaging is combined with a vertical gradient and spin echo data readout. This sequence was implemented and evaluated on healthy volunteers using a 1.5 and a 3 T whole-body MR system. As the vertical gradient and spin echo trajectory enables a higher k-space velocity in the phase-encoding direction than single-shot echo planar imaging, the geometrical distortions are reduced. When combined with parallel imaging such as generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition, the geometric distortions are reduced even further, while also keeping the minimum echo time reasonably low. However, this combination of a diffusion preparation and multiple refocusing pulses during the vertical gradient and spin echo readout, generally violates the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill condition, which leads to interferences between echo pathways. To suppress the stimulated echo pathway, refocusing pulses with a sharper slice profiles and an odd/even crusher variation scheme were implemented and evaluated. Being a single-shot acquisition technique, the reconstructed images are robust to rigid-body head motion and spatially varying brain motion, both of which are common sources of artifacts in diffusion MRI.

  3. Stabilization of echo amplitudes in FSE sequences.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, P; Hinks, R S

    1993-08-01

    The classical CPMG sequence and its extension as an imaging sequence, fast spin echo (FSE, based on RARE), suffer from signal magnitude variations in the early echoes when the refocusing pulses are not set exactly to 180 degrees. It has been suggested that by varying the value of the nutation angle of each refocusing pulse the signal magnitude could be made constant. This article describes an algorithm permitting the generation of sequences of nutation angles yielding series of echoes with constant signal magnitudes. This result is then used to design selective pulses for the FSE imaging technique.

  4. Coronal plasma-frequency radio echoes

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, A.B.

    1986-06-01

    If the mechanism that Zaitsev and the author propose for generating the fundamental mode of type III solar radio bursts is correct, then coronal echo events can occur at the plasma frequency. Certain events recorded during the type IIIb-III storm of July 1974 are identifiable as echoes. Radio-wave reflection from moving solar-wind irregularities consistently shifts the echoes to shorter wavelengths than the primary burst, yielding an estimate of about 10 to the 7th cm/sec for the mean wind velocity 1-2 solar radii from the photosphere. 8 references.

  5. MEASUREMENT OF TRANSVERSE ECHOES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.; SATOGATA, T.; TOMAS. R.

    2005-05-16

    Beam echoes are a very sensitive method to measure diffusion, and longitudinal echo measurements were performed in a number of machines. In RHIC, for the first time, a transverse beam echo was observed after applying a dipole kick followed by a quadrupole .kick. After application of the dipole kick, the dipole moment decohered completely due to lattice nonlinearities. When a quadrupole kick is applied at time {tau} after the dipole kick, the beam re-cohered at time 2{tau} thus showing an echo response. We describe the experimental setup and measurement results. In the measurements the dipole and quadrupole kick amplitudes, amplitude dependent tune shift, and the time between dipole and quadrupole kick were varied. In addition, measurements were taken with gold bunches of different intensities. These should exhibit different transverse diffusion rates due to intra-beam scattering.

  6. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors.

  7. Data processing of records of meteoric echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinský, P.

    2016-01-01

    The data obtained in the period from 4 November 2014 to 31 July 2014 by our receiving and recording system was statistically processed. The system records meteoric echoes from the TV transmitter Lviv 49.739583 MHz (N49.8480° E24.0369°, Ukraine) using a 4-element Yagi antenna with horizontal polarization (elevation of 0° and azimuth of 60°), receiver ICOM R-75 in the CW mode, and a computer with a recording using HROFFT v1.0.0f. The main goal was to identify weak showers in these data. Mayor or strong showers are visible without processing (referred at IMC2015, Mistelbach). To find or to identify weaker showers is more difficult. Not all echoes are meteoric echoes, but also ionospheric echoes or lightning disturbances are present.

  8. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors. PMID:27193936

  9. Estimation of Characteristics of Echo Envelope Using RF Echo Signal from the Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Ikeda, Kazuki; Moriyasu, Norifumi

    2001-05-01

    To realize quantitative diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, we have been analyzing the probability density function (PDF) of echo amplitude using B-mode images. However, the B-mode image is affected by the various signal and image processing techniques used in the diagnosis equipment, so a detailed and quantitative analysis is very difficult. In this paper, we analyze the PDF of echo amplitude using RF echo signal and B-mode images of normal and cirrhotic livers, and compare both results to examine the validity of the RF echo signal.

  10. 2D attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy reveals ultrafast vibrational dynamics of organic monolayers at metal-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Lotti, Davide; Hamm, Peter

    2015-06-01

    We present two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of organic monolayers immobilized on thin metallic films at the solid liquid interface. The experiments are acquired under Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) conditions which allow a surface-sensitive measurement of spectral diffusion, sample inhomogeneity, and vibrational relaxation of the monolayers. Terminal azide functional groups are used as local probes of the environment and structural dynamics of the samples. Specifically, we investigate the influence of different alkyl chain-lengths on the ultrafast dynamics of the monolayer, revealing a smaller initial inhomogeneity and faster spectral diffusion with increasing chain-length. Furthermore, by varying the environment (i.e., in different solvents or as bare sample), we conclude that the most significant contribution to spectral diffusion stems from intra- and intermolecular dynamics within the monolayer. The obtained results demonstrate that 2D ATR IR spectroscopy is a versatile tool for measuring interfacial dynamics of adsorbed molecules.

  11. 2D attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy reveals ultrafast vibrational dynamics of organic monolayers at metal-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Lotti, Davide; Hamm, Peter

    2015-06-01

    We present two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of organic monolayers immobilized on thin metallic films at the solid liquid interface. The experiments are acquired under Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) conditions which allow a surface-sensitive measurement of spectral diffusion, sample inhomogeneity, and vibrational relaxation of the monolayers. Terminal azide functional groups are used as local probes of the environment and structural dynamics of the samples. Specifically, we investigate the influence of different alkyl chain-lengths on the ultrafast dynamics of the monolayer, revealing a smaller initial inhomogeneity and faster spectral diffusion with increasing chain-length. Furthermore, by varying the environment (i.e., in different solvents or as bare sample), we conclude that the most significant contribution to spectral diffusion stems from intra- and intermolecular dynamics within the monolayer. The obtained results demonstrate that 2D ATR IR spectroscopy is a versatile tool for measuring interfacial dynamics of adsorbed molecules.

  12. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  13. Electrostatic interactions in phospholipid membranes revealed by coherent 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, V. V.; Chelli, R.; Zhuang, W.; Nuti, F.; Takaoka, Y.; Papini, A. M.; Mukamel, S.; Righini, R.

    2007-01-01

    The inter- and intramolecular interactions of the carbonyl moieties at the polar interface of a phospholipid membrane are probed by using nonlinear femtosecond infrared spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR correlation spectra separate homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and show a distinct cross-peak pattern controlled by electrostatic interactions. The inter- and intramolecular electrostatic interactions determine the inhomogeneous character of the optical response. Using molecular dynamics simulation and the nonlinear exciton equations approach, we extract from the spectra short-range structural correlations between carbonyls at the interface. PMID:17881567

  14. 2D-IR investigation of the pH-dependent conformational change in cytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, David A.

    1998-06-01

    The reduced-minus-oxidized FTIR difference spectrum of cytochrome c was measured at a series of pH values between 6 and 11. The results obtained clearly document the increasing divergence in the conformations of reduced and oxidized cytochrome c with increasing pH. A parametric analysis of the data based on least squares fitting to a sum of Henderson-Hasselbalch functions showed that at least two pK values, 9.5 and 10.5, are required to describe the pH titration data. Simultaneously recorded spectral data in the visible region, by contrast, could be described with a single pK value of 9.5, in good agreement with the literature. The FTIR spectrum of the component titrating with a pK of 10.5 was strongly suggestive of a tyrosine deprotonation, while the spectrum of the pK 9.5 component was consistent with a carboxyl deprotonation. The pH dependency of the spectral data was also analyzed using the 2D correlation method. Two-dimensional correlation analysis of the FTIR data confirmed the presence of two components titrating at different pK values, and yielded spectra for these two components that were essential identical to those obtained by parametric least-squares fitting. Correlation analysis of the FTIR against the visible data was particularly useful in providing immediate access to the FTIR spectral component titrating at the same pK as the 695 nm band, without requiring any assumptions as to the total number of pH-dependent components present.

  15. Location Detection and Tracking of Moving Targets by a 2D IR-UWB Radar System

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van-Han; Pyun, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    In indoor environments, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and long-range tracking radar systems are not optimal, because of signal propagation limitations in the indoor environment. In recent years, the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) technology has become a possible solution for object detection, localization and tracking in indoor environments, because of its high range resolution, compact size and low cost. This paper presents improved target detection and tracking techniques for moving objects with impulse-radio UWB (IR-UWB) radar in a short-range indoor area. This is achieved through signal-processing steps, such as clutter reduction, target detection, target localization and tracking. In this paper, we introduce a new combination consisting of our proposed signal-processing procedures. In the clutter-reduction step, a filtering method that uses a Kalman filter (KF) is proposed. Then, in the target detection step, a modification of the conventional CLEAN algorithm which is used to estimate the impulse response from observation region is applied for the advanced elimination of false alarms. Then, the output is fed into the target localization and tracking step, in which the target location and trajectory are determined and tracked by using unscented KF in two-dimensional coordinates. In each step, the proposed methods are compared to conventional methods to demonstrate the differences in performance. The experiments are carried out using actual IR-UWB radar under different scenarios. The results verify that the proposed methods can improve the probability and efficiency of target detection and tracking. PMID:25808773

  16. Location detection and tracking of moving targets by a 2D IR-UWB radar system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Han; Pyun, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    In indoor environments, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and long-range tracking radar systems are not optimal, because of signal propagation limitations in the indoor environment. In recent years, the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) technology has become a possible solution for object detection, localization and tracking in indoor environments, because of its high range resolution, compact size and low cost. This paper presents improved target detection and tracking techniques for moving objects with impulse-radio UWB (IR-UWB) radar in a short-range indoor area. This is achieved through signal-processing steps, such as clutter reduction, target detection, target localization and tracking. In this paper, we introduce a new combination consisting of our proposed signal-processing procedures. In the clutter-reduction step, a filtering method that uses a Kalman filter (KF) is proposed. Then, in the target detection step, a modification of the conventional CLEAN algorithm which is used to estimate the impulse response from observation region is applied for the advanced elimination of false alarms. Then, the output is fed into the target localization and tracking step, in which the target location and trajectory are determined and tracked by using unscented KF in two-dimensional coordinates. In each step, the proposed methods are compared to conventional methods to demonstrate the differences in performance. The experiments are carried out using actual IR-UWB radar under different scenarios. The results verify that the proposed methods can improve the probability and efficiency of target detection and tracking. PMID:25808773

  17. Investigation on the overlapping bands of syndiotactic polystyrene by using 2D-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qianhong; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Chunbo; Yang, Jian; Wang, Dujin

    2016-11-01

    In this work, WAXD and FTIR spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the phase transition of syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) from amorphous phase to mesophase during the isothermal annealing process at 130 °C. Two dimensional (2D) correlation infrared spectroscopy was applied to reveal the sub-bands from the highly overlapping bands. The ∼900 cm-1 band is shown to be composed of two sub-bands. One band located around 906 cm-1 corresponds to the amorphous phase, another peak that occurs around 900 cm-1 is associated with mesophase. The trans-planar conformation band at 1223 cm-1 turns out to consist of two bands which might be related to trans-planar conformation with different sequence lengths.

  18. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Water.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Fivos; Marco, Luigi De; Shalit, Andrey; Tang, Fujie; Kann, Zachary R; Kühne, Thomas D; Torre, Renato; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2016-07-13

    We present an overview of recent static and time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic studies of liquid water from ambient conditions to the supercooled state, as well as of crystalline and amorphous ice forms. The structure and dynamics of the complex hydrogen-bond network formed by water molecules in the bulk and interphases are discussed, as well as the dissipation mechanism of vibrational energy throughout this network. A broad range of water investigations are addressed, from conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopy to femtosecond pump-probe, photon-echo, optical Kerr effect, sum-frequency generation, and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, such as two-dimensional sum-frequency generation, three-dimensional infrared, and two-dimensional Raman terahertz spectroscopy. By comparison of the complementary aspects probed by various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, a coherent picture of water dynamics and energetics emerges. Furthermore, we outline future perspectives of vibrational spectroscopy for water researches.

  19. Fast magnetospheric echoes of energetic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocketborne instrumentation have confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes have been observed in a pitch angle range from 9 to 110 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Out of this number, 95 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2-, 4-, or 8-keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher-energy electrons led the lower-energy ones by 50 to 70 ms. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. An alternative interpretation is briefly examined, and its relative merit in describing the observations is evaluated. The injection process is discussed in some detail as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection for both processes.

  20. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Matheson, Thomas; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Sinnott, Brendan; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Welch, Doug

    2013-02-01

    We propose to continue our search for the first light echoes (LEs) associated with historical Galactic supernovae and LBV outbursts: SN 1006, Kepler's SN, RCW 86, Crab Nebula, and P Cygni. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered light echoes of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of eta Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. We propose to continue our search for light echoes of the remaining historical events. With DECam, we have a 10-15 fold improvement in efficiency over the retired Mosaic camera, which allows us to cover the bigger search areas of most of the remaining targets. The study of scattered-light echoes from these Galactic supernovae and eruptions will give us the opportunity to directly compare the original outburst and its current remnant, and in favorable cases (like Eta Carinae), it provides a three-dimensional view of the event and/or a spectral time series.

  1. Transient Loschmidt echo in quenched Ising chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Carla; Schiró, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We study the response to sudden local perturbations of highly excited quantum Ising spin chains. The key quantity encoding this response is the overlap between time-dependent wave functions, which we write as a transient Loschmidt Echo. Its asymptotics at long time differences contain crucial information about the structure of the highly excited nonequilibrium environment induced by the quench. We compute the echo perturbatively for a weak local quench but for arbitrarily large global quench, using a cumulant expansion. Our perturbative results suggest that the echo decays exponentially, rather than power law as in the low-energy orthogonality catastrophe, a further example of quench-induced decoherence already found in the case of quenched Luttinger liquids. The emerging decoherence scale is set by the strength of the local potential and the bulk excitation energy.

  2. Coronal plasma-frequency radio echoes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, A. B.

    1986-06-01

    In the frame of the mechanism of generation of the fundamental mode of type III solar radio bursts suggested by Eremin and Zajtsev (1985) the formation of an echo event in the corona at plasma frequency is shown to be possible. Examples of events are given which were observed during the type IIIb-III radio storm in July, 1974 and may be identified as radio echos. A regular "violet" (in comparison with the primary burst) frequency shift of the echo burst has been detected that results from the radiation reflection from moving inhomogeneities of the solar wind. An estimate of the mean velocity of the solar wind of VSW ≅ 107cm/s at the distance R_sun; from the photosphere is obtained.

  3. Echo Mapping of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Horne, K.

    2004-01-01

    Echo mapping makes use of the intrinsic variability of the continuum source in active galactic nuclei to map out the distribution and kinematics of line-emitting gas from its light travel time-delayed response to continuum changes. Echo mapping experiments have yielded sizes for the broad line-emitting region in about three dozen AGNs. The dynamics of the line-emitting gas seem to be dominated by the gravity of the central black hole, enabling measurement of the black-hole masses in AGNs. We discuss requirements for future echo-mapping experiments that will yield the high quality velocity-delay maps of the broad-line region that are needed to determine its physical nature.

  4. Investigating vibrational relaxation in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed-valence complexes using two-dimensional infrared and infrared pump-probe spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Slenkamp, Karla M.; Lynch, Michael S.; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Bannan, Caitlin C.; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Khalil, Munira

    2016-01-01

    Using polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and infrared pump-probe spectroscopies, we study vibrational relaxation of the four cyanide stretching (νCN) vibrations found in [(NH3)5RuIIINCFeII(CN)5]− (FeRu) dissolved in D2O or formamide and [(NC)5FeIICNPtIV(NH3)4NCFeII(CN)5]4− (FePtFe) dissolved in D2O. These cyanide-bridged transition metal complexes serve as models for understanding the role high frequency vibrational modes play in metal-to-metal charge transfers over a bridging ligand. However, there is currently little information about vibrational relaxation and dephasing dynamics of the anharmonically coupled νCN modes in the electronic ground state of these complexes. IR pump-probe experiments reveal that the vibrational lifetimes of the νCN modes are ∼2 times faster when FeRu is dissolved in D2O versus formamide. They also reveal that the vibrational lifetimes of the νCN modes of FePtFe in D2O are almost four times as long as for FeRu in D2O. Combined with mode-specific relaxation dynamics measured from the 2D IR experiments, the IR pump-probe experiments also reveal that intramolecular vibrational relaxation is occurring in all three systems on ∼1 ps timescale. Center line slope dynamics, which have been shown to be a measure of the frequency-frequency correlation function, reveal that the radial, axial, and trans νCN modes exhibit a ∼3 ps timescale for frequency fluctuations. This timescale is attributed to the forming and breaking of hydrogen bonds between each mode and the solvent. The results presented here along with our previous work on FeRu and FePtFe reveal a picture of coupled anharmonic νCN modes where the spectral diffusion and vibrational relaxation dynamics depend on the spatial localization of the mode on the molecular complex and its specific interaction with the solvent. PMID:27158634

  5. Vibration analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to monitoring circuitry for the real time detection of vibrations of a predetermined frequency and which are greater than a predetermined magnitude. The circuitry produces an instability signal in response to such detection. The circuitry is particularly adapted for detecting instabilities in rocket thrusters, but may find application with other machines such as expensive rotating machinery, or turbines. The monitoring circuitry identifies when vibration signals are present having a predetermined frequency of a multi-frequency vibration signal which has an RMS energy level greater than a predetermined magnitude. It generates an instability signal only if such a vibration signal is identified. The circuitry includes a delay circuit which responds with an alarm signal only if the instability signal continues for a predetermined time period. When used with a rocket thruster, the alarm signal may be used to cut off the thruster if such thruster is being used in flight. If the circuitry is monitoring tests of the thruster, it generates signals to change the thruster operation, for example, from pulse mode to continuous firing to determine if the instability of the thruster is sustained once it is detected.

  6. How can dolphins recognize fish according to their echoes? A statistical analysis of fish echoes.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Yossi; Au, Whitlow W L

    2010-01-01

    Echo-based object classification is a fundamental task of animals that use a biosonar system. Dolphins and porpoises should be able to rely on echoes to discriminate a predator from a prey or to select a desired prey from an undesired object. Many studies have shown that dolphins and porpoises can discriminate between objects according to their echoes. All of these studies however, used unnatural objects that can be easily characterized in human terminologies (e.g., metallic spheres, disks, cylinders). In this work, we collected real fish echoes from many angles of acquisition using a sonar system that mimics the emission properties of dolphins and porpoises. We then tested two alternative statistical approaches in classifying these echoes. Our results suggest that fish species can be classified according to echoes returning from porpoise- and dolphin-like signals. These results suggest how dolphins and porpoises can classify fish based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification.

  7. Research of laser echo signal simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Shi, Rui; Wang, Xin; Li, Zhou

    2015-11-01

    Laser echo signal simulator is one of the most significant components of hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation systems for LADAR. System model and time series model of laser echo signal simulator are established. Some influential factors which could induce fixed error and random error on the simulated return signals are analyzed, and then these system insertion errors are analyzed quantitatively. Using this theoretical model, the simulation system is investigated experimentally. The results corrected by subtracting fixed error indicate that the range error of the simulated laser return signal is less than 0.25m, and the distance range that the system can simulate is from 50m to 20km.

  8. Evolution of entanglement under echo dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, Tomaž; Seligman, Thomas H.; Žnidarič, Marko

    2003-04-01

    Echo dynamics and fidelity are often used to discuss stability in quantum-information processing and quantum chaos. Yet fidelity yields no information about entanglement, the characteristic property of quantum mechanics. We study the evolution of entanglement in echo dynamics. We find qualitatively different behavior between integrable and chaotic systems on one hand and between random and coherent initial states for integrable systems on the other. For the latter the evolution of entanglement is given by a classical time scale. Analytic results are illustrated numerically in a Jaynes-Cummings model.

  9. Empirical results of using back-propagation neural networks to separate single echoes from multiple echoes.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Bosworth, B; Carter, G C

    1993-01-01

    Empirical results illustrate the pitfalls of applying an artificial neural network (ANN) to classification of underwater active sonar returns. During training, a back-propagation ANN classifier learns to recognize two classes of reflected active sonar waveforms: waveforms having two major sonar echoes or peaks and those having one major echo or peak. It is shown how the classifier learns to distinguish between the two classes. Testing the ANN classifier with different waveforms of each type generated unexpected results: the number of echo peaks was nor the feature used to separate classes.

  10. On the reliability of hook echoes as tornado indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    A study of radar echoes associated with the tornadoes of the 3 April 1974 outbreak was performed to evaluate the usefulness of echo shape as an indicator of tornadic thunderstorms. The hook shape was usually successful in characterizing an echo as tornadic, with a false alarm rate of 16%. Because hook echoes were relatively rare, however, a less restrictive shape called distinctive was more successful at detecting tornadic thunderstorms, identifying 65% of the tornadic echoes. An echo had a distinctive shape if it possessed a marked appendage on its right rear flank or was in the shape of a spiral, comma or line echo wave pattern (LEWP). Characteristics of the distinctive echo are given.

  11. Relationship between tornadoes and hook echoes on April 3, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Radar observations of tornado families occurring on April 3, 1974 are discussed. Of the 93 tornadoes included in the sample, 81% were associated with hook-like echoes with appendages at least 40 deg to the south of the echo movement. At least one tornado was associated with 62% of the hook-like echoes observed. All of the tornadoes with intensities of F 4 and F 5 were produced by hook-like echoes; the mean intensity of all tornadoes associated with this type of echo was F 3, while the mean intensity of the remaining tornadoes was F1. The tornadic hook-like echoes moved to the right of the non-tornadic echoes forming a tornado line in advance of the squall line. Some tornadoes were associated with 'spiral' echoes.

  12. Asymmetric radar echo patterns from insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radar echoes from insects, birds, and bats in the atmosphere exhibit both symmetry and asymmetry in polarimetric patterns. Symmetry refers to similar magnitudes of polarimetric variables at opposite azimuths, and asymmetry relegates to differences in these magnitudes. Asymmetry can be due to diffe...

  13. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Matheson, Thomas; Narayan, Gautham; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Suntzeff, Nick; Welch, Doug; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2014-02-01

    We propose to continue our search for the first light echoes (LEs) associated with historical Galactic supernovae and LBV outbursts: SN 1006, Kepler's SN, RCW 86, Crab Nebula, and P Cygni. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered LEs of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of η Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. We propose to continue our search for light echoes of the remaining historical events. With DECam, we have a 10-15 fold improvement in efficiency over the retired CTIO-Mosaic camera, which allows us to cover the bigger search areas of most of the remaining targets. With the KPNO 4-m, we will observe fields too far north for CTIO/DECam. The study of scattered-light echoes from these Galactic supernovae and eruptions will give us the opportunity to directly compare the original outburst and its current remnant, and in favorable cases (like Eta Carinae), it provides a three-dimensional view of the event and/or a spectral time series.

  14. AN ECHO OF SUPERNOVA 2008bk

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2013-08-01

    I have discovered a prominent light echo around the low-luminosity Type II-plateau supernova (SN) 2008bk in NGC 7793, seen in archival images obtained with the Wide Field Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The echo is a partial ring, brighter to the north and east than to the south and west. The analysis of the echo I present suggests that it is due to the SN light pulse scattered by a sheet, or sheets, of dust located Almost-Equal-To 15 pc from the SN. The composition of the dust is assumed to be of standard Galactic diffuse interstellar grains. The visual extinction of the dust responsible for the echo is A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 0.05 mag in addition to the extinction due to the Galactic foreground toward the host galaxy. That the SN experienced much less overall extinction implies that it is seen through a less dense portion of the interstellar medium in its environment. The late-time HST photometry of SN 2008bk also clearly demonstrates that the progenitor star has vanished.

  15. Good Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) sponsorship from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, assisted MetroLaser, of Irvine, California, in the development of a self-aligned laser vibrometer system. VibroMet, capable of measuring surface vibrations in a variety of industries, provides information on the structural integrity and acoustical characteristics of manufactured products. This low-cost, easy-to-use sensor performs vibration measurement from distances of up to three meters without the need for adjustment. The laser beam is simply pointed at the target and the system then uses a compact laser diode to illuminate the surface and to subsequently analyze the reflected light. The motion of the surface results in a Doppler shift that is measured with very high precision. VibroMet is considered one of the many behind-the-scenes tools that can be relied on to assure the quality, reliability and safety of everything from airplane panels to disk brakes

  16. Preliminary Results of the Echo-Seeding Experiment ECHO-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Ding, Y.; Dunning, M.; Frederico, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Corlett, J.; Qiang, J.; Penn, G.; Prestemon, S.; /LBL, Berkeley /LPHE, Lausanne

    2010-06-15

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment aims to generate coherent radiation at 318 nm and 227 nm, which are the 5th and 7th harmonic of the infrared seed laser. In this paper we present the preliminary results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  17. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1560 Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system is a device intended to project a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system....

  18. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1560 Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system is a device intended to project a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system....

  19. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. 892.1560... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1560 Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system is a device intended to project...

  20. Intensity-Corrected Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) for Improved Pediatric Brain Diffusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Matus; Iv, Michael; Moseley, Michael E.; Barnes, Patrick D.; Skare, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Here we investigate the utility of a dual-echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) approach to improve lesion conspicuity in pediatric imaging. This method delivers two ‘echo images’ for one diffusion-preparation period. We also demonstrate how the echoes can be utilized to remove transmit/receive coil-induced and static magnetic field intensity modulations on both echo images, which often mimic pathology and thereby pose diagnostic challenges. DE-EPI DWI data were acquired in 18 pediatric patients with abnormal diffusion lesions, and 46 pediatric patient controls at 3T. Echo1 [TE = 45ms] and Echo2 [TE = 86ms] were corrected for signal intensity variation across the images by exploiting the images equivalent coil-sensitivity and susceptibility-induced modulations. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed Echo1 and Echo2 and their intensity-corrected variants (cEcho1 and cEcho2) on a 7-point Likert scale, with grading on lesion conspicuity diagnostic confidence. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map from Echo1 was used to validate presence of true pathology. Echo2 was unanimously favored over Echo1 for its sensitivity for detecting acute brain injury, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.7/4.4 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.1/4.3 (p = 0.025). cEcho2 was rated higher than cEcho1, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.5/4.3 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.4/4.4 (p < 0.005). cEcho2 was favored over all echoes for its diagnostic reliability, particularly in regions close to the head coil. This work concludes that DE-EPI DWI is a useful alternative to conventional single-echo EPI DWI, whereby Echo2 and cEcho2 allows for improved lesion detection and overall higher diagnostic confidence. PMID:26069959

  1. Investigating vibrational anharmonic couplings in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Slenkamp, Karla M.; Lynch, Michael S.; Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Bannan, Caitlin C.; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Khalil, Munira

    2014-02-28

    Using polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we measure anharmonic couplings and angles between the transition dipole moments of the four cyanide stretching (ν{sub CN}) vibrations found in [(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Ru{sup III}NCFe{sup II}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −} (FeRu) dissolved in D{sub 2}O and formamide and [(NC){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNPt{sup IV}(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}NCFe{sup II}(CN){sub 5}]{sup 4−} (FePtFe) dissolved in D{sub 2}O. These cyanide-bridged transition metal complexes serve as model systems for studying the role of high frequency vibrational modes in ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer reactions. Here, we focus on the spectroscopy of the ν{sub CN} modes in the electronic ground state. The FTIR spectra of the ν{sub CN} modes of the bimetallic and trimetallic systems are strikingly different in terms of frequencies, amplitudes, and lineshapes. The experimental 2D IR spectra of FeRu and FePtFe and their fits reveal a set of weakly coupled anharmonic ν{sub CN} modes. The vibrational mode anharmonicities of the individual ν{sub CN} modes range from 14 to 28 cm{sup −1}. The mixed-mode anharmonicities range from 2 to 14 cm{sup −1}. In general, the bridging ν{sub CN} mode is most weakly coupled to the radial ν{sub CN} mode, which involves the terminal CN ligands. Measurement of the relative transition dipole moments of the four ν{sub CN} modes reveal that the FeRu molecule is almost linear in solution when dissolved in formamide, but it assumes a bent geometry when dissolved in D{sub 2}O. The ν{sub CN} modes are modelled as bilinearly coupled anharmonic oscillators with an average coupling constant of 6 cm{sup −1}. This study elucidates the role of the solvent in modulating the molecular geometry and the anharmonic vibrational couplings between the ν{sub CN} modes in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes.

  2. Spatial release from simultaneous echo masking in bat sonar.

    PubMed

    Warnecke, Michaela; Bates, Mary E; Flores, Victoria; Simmons, James A

    2014-05-01

    Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) use biosonar to navigate and locate objects in their surroundings. During natural foraging, they often encounter echoes returned by a target of interest located to the front while other, often stronger, clutter echoes are returned from objects, such as vegetation, located to the sides or above. Nevertheless, bats behave as if they do not suffer interference from this clutter. Using a two-choice delay discrimination procedure, bats were tested for the masking effectiveness of clutter echoes on target echoes when the target echoes were delivered from the bat's front while clutter echoes were delivered from 90° overhead, a direction of lowpass filtering by the external ears. When clutter echoes are presented from the front at the same delay as target echoes, detection performance declines and clutter masking occurs. When the clutter echoes are presented at the same delay but from overhead, discrimination performance is unaffected and no masking occurs. Thus there is masking release for simultaneous off-axis lowpass clutter compared to masking by simultaneous clutter from the front. The bat's performance for simultaneous target and clutter echoes indicates a new role for the mechanism that separates overlapping echoes by decomposing the bat's auditory time-frequency representation.

  3. The relationship between fireballs and HRO Long Echos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, E.; Amikura, S.

    Ham-band Radio Observation (HRO) is one of the major methods used to observe meteor activity in Japan. We receive certain types of meteor echoes. One of the types is the long-lasting echo called a ``Long Echo''. We have the impression that Long Echoes correspond to fireballs. The present research found this relation and tried to identify fireball data from visual observations with Long Echo data of the 2002 Leonids, Geminids, and Quadrantids. From these data, we found that the identification percentage tended to be higher for fainter magnitudes, but that the percentage is small, the percentages of each meteor stream being less than 30 %. From these results, this research found that we could not simply say that brighter meteors were received as Long Echoes. It depends on the geocentric velocity of the meteor stream, with a possibility that Long Echoes correspond to darker as well as brighter fireballs.

  4. Improved Sensitivity of Spin Echo and Parallel Acquisitions Using SENSE Compared to Gradient Echo Sequences in fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mrini, Sanaa; Hamri, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    This work aims to validate the performance of spin echo and parallel acquisition using "SENSitivity Encoding (SENSE)" by comparing it to different imaging techniques, including gradient echo-planar imaging using parallel acquisition and SENSE usually used and gradient echo sequences and that of the echo of echo-planar spin. It compares the performance of sequences and their sensitivity to motor activity reflected by activation within the motor part of the brain. Image analysis of volunteers were processed individually. Image analysis techniques, such as normalization and smoothing, were used. Analyses were carried out using `Statistical Parametric Mapping' operating under Matlab.

  5. Stark echo modulation for quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcangeli, A.; Ferrier, A.; Goldner, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum memories for optical and microwave photons provide key functionalities in quantum processing and communications. Here we propose a protocol well adapted to solid-state ensemble-based memories coupled to cavities. It is called Stark echo modulation memory (SEMM) and allows large storage bandwidths and low noise. This is achieved in an echo-like sequence combined with phase shifts induced by small electric fields through the linear Stark effect. We investigated the protocol for rare-earth nuclear spins and found a high suppression of unwanted collective emissions that is compatible with single-photon-level operation. Broadband storage together with high fidelity for the Stark retrieval process is also demonstrated. SEMM could be used to store optical or microwave photons in ions and/or spins. This includes nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond and rare-earth-doped crystals, which are among the most promising solid-state quantum memories.

  6. Light-echo spectroscopy of historic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Oliver

    Young Galactic supernova remnants are unique laboratories for supernova physics. Due to their proximity they provide us with the most detailed view of the outcome of a supernova. However, the exact spectroscopic types of their original explosions have been undetermined so far -hindering to link the wealth of multi-wavelength knowledge about their remnants with the diverse population of supernovae. Light echoes, reflektions of the brilliant supernova burst of light by interstellar dust, provide a unique opportunity to reobserve today -with powerful scientific instruments of the 21st century -historic supernova exlosions even after hundreds of years and to conclude on their nature. We report on optical light-echo spectroscopy of two famous Galactic supernovae: Tycho Brahe's SN 1572 and the supernova that created the Cassiopeia A remnant around the year 1680. These observations finally recovered the missing spectroscopic classifications and provide new constraints on explosion models for future studies.

  7. Statistical properties of bistatic clutter echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, William G.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    1994-03-01

    In this report we present statistical results of bistatic terrain reflectivity measurements. A new technique for estimating statistical properties from limited data sets was used to examine underlying temporal probability density functions (PDFs) and correlation properties of echoes from several clutter range resolution bins. The case of locally vertically incident-vertically received signal polarization is reported for a single bistatic geometry. The terrain in the experiment consisted primarily of early-development deciduous trees. 10-15 feet high and brush approximately 8 feet high. The measurement system was a high resolution instrumentation radar operating at 3.2 GHz. Results from the estimation algorithm showed that there were small groups of contiguous clutter cells where the members within the group could be described by the same family of PDFs. while other PDF families would best describe neighboring clutter cell groups. Algorithm results for all tested clutter cells showed that the high-resolution, bistatic echoes were non-Rayleigh distributed.

  8. Light Echo From Star V838 Monocerotis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This photo, captured by the NASA Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys, is Hubble's latest view of an expanding halo of light around the distant star V838 Monocerotis, or V Mon, caused by an unusual stellar outburst that occurred back in January 2002. A burst of light from the bizarre star is spreading into space and reflecting off of surrounding circumstellar dust. As different parts are sequentially illuminated, the appearance of the dust changes. This effect is referred to as a 'light echo'. Located about 20,000 light-years away in the winter constellation Monoceros (the Unicorn), the star brightened to more than 600,000 times our Sun's luminosity. The light echo gives the illusion of contracting, until it finally disappears by the end of the decade.

  9. Ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Michael S.; Hsu, David K.; Thompson, Donald O.; Wormley, Samuel J.

    1993-01-01

    An ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument uses active switches and a timing and drive circuitry to control electrical energy to a transducer, the discharging of the transducer, and the opening of an electrical pathway to the receiving circuitry for the returning echoes. The active switches utilize MOSFET devices along with decoupling circuitry to insure the preservation of the unipolar nature of the pulses, insure fast transition times, and maintain broad band width and time resolution. A housing contains the various circuitry and switches and allows connection to a power supply and a movable ultrasonic transducer. The circuitry maintains low impedance input to the transducer during transmitting cycles, and high impedance between the transducer and the receiving circuit during receive cycles to maintain the unipolar pulse shape. A unipolar pulse is valuable for nondestructive evaluation, a prime use for the present instrument.

  10. Ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, M.J.; Hsu, D.K.; Thompson, D.O.; Wormley, S.J.

    1993-04-06

    An ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument uses active switches and a timing and drive circuitry to control electrical energy to a transducer, the discharging of the transducer, and the opening of an electrical pathway to the receiving circuitry for the returning echoes. The active switches utilize MOSFET devices along with decoupling circuitry to insure the preservation of the unipolar nature of the pulses, insure fast transition times, and maintain broad band width and time resolution. A housing contains the various circuitry and switches and allows connection to a power supply and a movable ultrasonic transducer. The circuitry maintains low impedance input to the transducer during transmitting cycles, and high impedance between the transducer and the receiving circuit during receive cycles to maintain the unipolar pulse shape. A unipolar pulse is valuable for nondestructive evaluation, a prime use for the present instrument.

  11. The electron Echo 6 mechanical deployment systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, S. C.; Steffen, J. E.; Malcolm, P. R.; Winckler, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The Echo 6 sounding rocket payload was flown on a Terrier boosted Black Brant vehicle on March 30, 1983. The experiment requirements resulted in the new design of a rocket propelled Throw Away Detector System (TADS) with onboard Doppler radar, a free-flyer forward experiment designated the Plasma Diagnostic Package (PDP), and numerous other basic systems. The design, developmental testing, and flight preparations of the payload and the mechanical deployment systems are described.

  12. The Light Echoes around V838 Monocerotis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard

    2009-07-01

    V838 Monocerotis, which burst upon the astronomical scene in early 2002, is a completely unanticipated new object. It underwent a large-amplitude and very luminous outburst, during which its spectrum remained that of an extremely cool supergiant. A rapidly evolving set of light echoes around V838 Mon was discovered soon after the outburst, and quickly became the most spectacular display of the phenomenon yet seen. These light echoes provide the means to accomplish three unique types of measurements based on continued HST imaging during the event: {1} Study effects of MHD turbulence at high resolution and in 3 dimensions; {2} Construct the first unambiguous and fully 3-D map of a circumstellar dust envelope in the Milky Way; {3} Study dust physics in a unique setting where the spectrum and light curve of the illumination, and the scattering angle, are unambiguously known. We have also used our HST data to determine the distance to V838 Mon through a novel direct geometric technique. Because of the extreme rarity of light echoes, this is almost certainly the only opportunity to achieve such results during the lifetime of HST. We propose two visits during Cycle 17, using the repaired ACS {or WFC3} in order to continue the mapping of the circumstellar dust and to accomplish the other goals listed above.

  13. The Light Echoes around V838 Monocerotis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard

    2007-07-01

    V838 Monocerotis, which burst upon the astronomical scene in early 2002, is a completely unanticipated new object. It underwent a large-amplitude and very luminous outburst, during which its spectrum remained that of an extremely cool supergiant. A rapidly evolving set of light echoes around V838 Mon was discovered soon after the outburst, and quickly became the most spectacular display of the phenomenon ever seen. These light echoes provide the means to accomplish three unique types of measurements based on continued HST imaging during the event: {1} Study effects of MHD turbulence at high resolution and in 3 dimensions; {2} Construct the first unambiguous and fully 3-D map of a circumstellar dust envelope in the Milky Way; {3} Study dust physics in a unique setting where the spectrum and light curve of the illumination, and the scattering angle, are unambiguously known. We have also used our HST data to determine the distance to V838 Mon through direct geometric techniques. Because of the extreme rarity of light echoes, this is almost certainly the only opportunity to achieve such results during the lifetime of HST. We propose two visits during Cycle 16, in order to continue the mapping of the circumstellar dust and to accomplish the other goals listed above.

  14. The Light Echoes around V838 Monocerotis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard

    2010-09-01

    V838 Monocerotis, which burst upon the astronomical scene in early 2002, is a completely unanticipated new object. It underwent a large-amplitude and very luminous outburst, during which its spectrum remained that of an extremely cool supergiant. A rapidly evolving set of light echoes around V838 Mon was discovered soon after the outburst, and quickly became the most spectacular display of the phenomenon yet seen. These light echoes provide the means to accomplish three unique types of measurements based on continued HST imaging during the event: {1} Study effects of MHD turbulence at high resolution and in 3 dimensions; {2} Construct the first unambiguous and fully 3-D map of a circumstellar dust envelope in the Milky Way; {3} Study dust physics in a unique setting where the spectrum and light curve of the illumination, and the scattering angle, are unambiguously known. We have also used our HST data to determine the distance to V838 Mon through a novel direct geometric technique. Because of the extreme rarity of light echoes, this is almost certainly the only opportunity to achieve such results during the lifetime of HST. We propose one visit during Cycle 18, using ACS, in order to continue the mapping of the circumstellar dust and to accomplish the other goals listed above.

  15. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Kunder, Andrea; Matheson, Thomas; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Sinnott, Brendan; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Welch, Doug

    2013-08-01

    We propose to search for light echoes (LEs) from the historical brightening of the Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) P Cygni using the KPNO 4m Mosaic 1.1 imager. We also propose to conclude our search - so far unsuccessful - for LEs from the the Crab supernova SN 1054 by surveying one remaining region of the LE ellipsoid behind the plane of the supernova remnant on the sky. In addition, we continue to monitor the LEs from the Cas A and Tycho supernovae in order to identify suitable LE candidates for 3D-spectroscopy and spectral time series. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered light echoes of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of η Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. Our extension of LE techniques to LBV outbursts promises to extend our ability to record outburst activity hundreds of years into the past - a timescale which is likely a significant fraction of the brief final phases of these probable core- collapse supernova precursors.

  16. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Foley, Ryan; James, David; Matheson, Thomas; Narayan, Gautham; Olsen, Knut; Points, Sean; Prieto, Jose Luis; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Suntzeff, Nick; Welch, Doug; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2014-08-01

    We propose to search for light echoes (LEs) from the historical brightening of the Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) P Cygni using the KPNO 4m Mosaic 1.1 imager. We also propose to us DECam to continue our search for LEs from the the Crab supernova SN 1054. In addition, we continue to monitor the LEs from the Cas A and Tycho supernovae in order to identify suitable LE candidates for 3D-spectroscopy and spectral time series. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered light echoes of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of η Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. Our extension of LE techniques to LBV outbursts promises to extend our ability to record outburst activity hundreds of years into the past - a timescale which is likely a significant fraction of the brief final phases of these probable core- collapse supernova precursors.

  17. Echo amplitude sensitivity of bat auditory neurons improves with decreasing pulse-echo gap.

    PubMed

    Jen, Philip H-S; Wu, Chung Hsin

    2015-01-01

    During hunting, insectivorous bats systematically vary the parameters of emitted pulses and analyze the returning echoes to extract prey features. As such, the duration of the pulse (P) and echo (E), the P-E gap, and the P-E amplitude difference progressively decrease throughout the prey-approach sequence. Our previous studies have shown that most inferior collicular neurons of bats discharge maximally to a best duration, and they have the sharpest echo frequency and amplitude sensitivity when stimulated with P-E pairs with duration the same as the best duration. Furthermore, their echo duration and frequency sensitivity improves with decreasing P-E duration and P-E gap. The present study shows that this is also true in the amplitude domain. Thus, all these data indicate that bats can better extract multiple parameters of expected rather than unexpected echo after pulse emission. They also support the hypothesis that a bat's inferior collicular neurons improve the response sensitivity in multiple parametric domains as the prey is approached to increase the success of hunting. PMID:25426829

  18. Perception of echo delay is disrupted by small temporal misalignment of echo harmonics in bat sonar.

    PubMed

    Bates, Mary E; Simmons, James A

    2011-02-01

    Echolocating big brown bats emit ultrasonic frequency-modulated (FM) biosonar sounds containing two prominent downward-sweeping harmonics (FM1 and FM2) and perceive target distance from echo delay. In naturally occurring echoes, FM1 and FM2 are delayed by the same amount. Even though echoes from targets located off-axis or far away are lowpass filtered, which weakens FM2 relative to FM1, their delays remain the same. We show here that misalignment of FM2 with FM1 by only 2.6 μs is sufficient to significantly disrupt acuity, which then persists for larger misalignments up to 300 μs. However, when FM2 is eliminated entirely rather than just misaligned, acuity is effectively restored. For naturally occurring, lowpass-filtered echoes, neuronal responses to weakened FM2 are retarded relative to FM1 because of amplitude-latency trading, which misaligns the harmonics in the bat's internal auditory representations. Electronically delaying FM2 relative to FM1 mimics the retarded neuronal responses for FM2 relative to FM1 caused by amplitude-latency trading. Echoes with either electronically or physiologically misaligned harmonics are not perceived as having a clearly defined delay. This virtual collapse of delay acuity may suppress interference from off-axis or distant clutter through degradation of delay images for clutter in contrast to sharp images for nearer, frontal targets.

  19. The EChO science case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Drossart, Pierre; Eccleston, Paul; Hartogh, Paul; Isaak, Kate; Linder, Martin; Lovis, Christophe; Micela, Giusi; Ollivier, Marc; Puig, Ludovic; Ribas, Ignasi; Snellen, Ignas; Swinyard, Bruce; Allard, France; Barstow, Joanna; Cho, James; Coustenis, Athena; Cockell, Charles; Correia, Alexandre; Decin, Leen; de Kok, Remco; Deroo, Pieter; Encrenaz, Therese; Forget, Francois; Glasse, Alistair; Griffith, Caitlin; Guillot, Tristan; Koskinen, Tommi; Lammer, Helmut; Leconte, Jeremy; Maxted, Pierre; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Nelson, Richard; North, Chris; Pallé, Enric; Pagano, Isabella; Piccioni, Guseppe; Pinfield, David; Selsis, Franck; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Stixrude, Lars; Tennyson, Jonathan; Turrini, Diego; Zapatero-Osorio, Mariarosa; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Grodent, Denis; Guedel, Manuel; Luz, David; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Ray, Tom; Rickman, Hans; Selig, Avri; Swain, Mark; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Barlow, Mike; Bowles, Neil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; du Foresto, Vincent Coudé; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Gizon, Laurent; Hornstrup, Allan; Jarchow, Christopher; Kerschbaum, Franz; Kovacs, Géza; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Lim, Tanya; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Pace, Emanuele; Pascale, Enzo; Vandenbussche, Bart; Wright, Gillian; Ramos Zapata, Gonzalo; Adriani, Alberto; Azzollini, Ruymán; Balado, Ana; Bryson, Ian; Burston, Raymond; Colomé, Josep; Crook, Martin; Di Giorgio, Anna; Griffin, Matt; Hoogeveen, Ruud; Ottensamer, Roland; Irshad, Ranah; Middleton, Kevin; Morgante, Gianluca; Pinsard, Frederic; Rataj, Mirek; Reess, Jean-Michel; Savini, Giorgio; Schrader, Jan-Rutger; Stamper, Richard; Winter, Berend; Abe, L.; Abreu, M.; Achilleos, N.; Ade, P.; Adybekian, V.; Affer, L.; Agnor, C.; Agundez, M.; Alard, C.; Alcala, J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Alonso Floriano, F. J.; Altieri, F.; Alvarez Iglesias, C. A.; Amado, P.; Andersen, A.; Aylward, A.; Baffa, C.; Bakos, G.; Ballerini, P.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Barber, R. J.; Barrado, D.; Barton, E. J.; Batista, V.; Bellucci, G.; Belmonte Avilés, J. A.; Berry, D.; Bézard, B.; Biondi, D.; Błęcka, M.; Boisse, I.; Bonfond, B.; Bordé, P.; Börner, P.; Bouy, H.; Brown, L.; Buchhave, L.; Budaj, J.; Bulgarelli, A.; Burleigh, M.; Cabral, A.; Capria, M. T.; Cassan, A.; Cavarroc, C.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Cerulli, R.; Chadney, J.; Chamberlain, S.; Charnoz, S.; Christian Jessen, N.; Ciaravella, A.; Claret, A.; Claudi, R.; Coates, A.; Cole, R.; Collura, A.; Cordier, D.; Covino, E.; Danielski, C.; Damasso, M.; Deeg, H. J.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Del Vecchio, C.; Demangeon, O.; De Sio, A.; De Wit, J.; Dobrijévic, M.; Doel, P.; Dominic, C.; Dorfi, E.; Eales, S.; Eiroa, C.; Espinoza Contreras, M.; Esposito, M.; Eymet, V.; Fabrizio, N.; Fernández, M.; Femenía Castella, B.; Figueira, P.; Filacchione, G.; Fletcher, L.; Focardi, M.; Fossey, S.; Fouqué, P.; Frith, J.; Galand, M.; Gambicorti, L.; Gaulme, P.; García López, R. J.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Gear, W.; Gerard, J.-C.; Gesa, L.; Giani, E.; Gianotti, F.; Gillon, M.; Giro, E.; Giuranna, M.; Gomez, H.; Gomez-Leal, I.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J.; González Merino, B.; Graczyk, R.; Grassi, D.; Guardia, J.; Guio, P.; Gustin, J.; Hargrave, P.; Haigh, J.; Hébrard, E.; Heiter, U.; Heredero, R. L.; Herrero, E.; Hersant, F.; Heyrovsky, D.; Hollis, M.; Hubert, B.; Hueso, R.; Israelian, G.; Iro, N.; Irwin, P.; Jacquemoud, S.; Jones, G.; Jones, H.; Justtanont, K.; Kehoe, T.; Kerschbaum, F.; Kerins, E.; Kervella, P.; Kipping, D.; Koskinen, T.; Krupp, N.; Lahav, O.; Laken, B.; Lanza, N.; Lellouch, E.; Leto, G.; Licandro Goldaracena, J.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Liu, S. J.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lodieu, N.; Lognonné, P.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lundgaard Rasmussen, I.; Luntzer, A.; Machado, P.; MacTavish, C.; Maggio, A.; Maillard, J.-P.; Magnes, W.; Maldonado, J.; Mall, U.; Marquette, J.-B.; Mauskopf, P.; Massi, F.; Maurin, A.-S.; Medvedev, A.; Michaut, C.; Miles-Paez, P.; Montalto, M.; Montañés Rodríguez, P.; Monteiro, M.; Montes, D.; Morais, H.; Morales, J. C.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Morello, G.; Moro Martín, A.; Moses, J.; Moya Bedon, A.; Murgas Alcaino, F.; Oliva, E.; Orton, G.; Palla, F.; Pancrazzi, M.; Pantin, E.; Parmentier, V.; Parviainen, H.; Peña Ramírez, K. Y.; Peralta, J.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Petrov, R.; Pezzuto, S.; Pietrzak, R.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Piskunov, N.; Prinja, R.; Prisinzano, L.; Polichtchouk, I.; Poretti, E.; Radioti, A.; Ramos, A. A.; Rank-Lüftinger, T.; Read, P.; Readorn, K.; Rebolo López, R.; Rebordão, J.; Rengel, M.; Rezac, L.; Rocchetto, M.; Rodler, F.; Sánchez Béjar, V. J.; Sanchez Lavega, A.; Sanromá, E.; Santos, N.; Sanz Forcada, J.; Scandariato, G.; Schmider, F.-X.; Scholz, A.; Scuderi, S.; Sethenadh, J.; Shore, S.; Showman, A.; Sicardy, B.; Sitek, P.; Smith, A.; Soret, L.; Sousa, S.; Stiepen, A.; Stolarski, M.; Strazzulla, G.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tanga, P.; Tecsa, M.; Temple, J.; Terenzi, L.; Tessenyi, M.; Testi, L.; Thompson, S.; Thrastarson, H.; Tingley, B. W.; Trifoglio, M.; Martín Torres, J.; Tozzi, A.; Turrini, D.; Varley, R.; Vakili, F.; de Val-Borro, M.; Valdivieso, M. L.; Venot, O.; Villaver, E.; Vinatier, S.; Viti, S.; Waldmann, I.; Waltham, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Waters, R.; Watkins, C.; Watson, D.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszk, A.; White, G.; Widemann, T.; Winek, W.; Wiśniowski, T.; Yelle, R.; Yung, Y.; Yurchenko, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of almost two thousand exoplanets has revealed an unexpectedly diverse planet population. We see gas giants in few-day orbits, whole multi-planet systems within the orbit of Mercury, and new populations of planets with masses between that of the Earth and Neptune—all unknown in the Solar System. Observations to date have shown that our Solar System is certainly not representative of the general population of planets in our Milky Way. The key science questions that urgently need addressing are therefore: What are exoplanets made of? Why are planets as they are? How do planetary systems work and what causes the exceptional diversity observed as compared to the Solar System? The EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) space mission was conceived to take up the challenge to explain this diversity in terms of formation, evolution, internal structure and planet and atmospheric composition. This requires in-depth spectroscopic knowledge of the atmospheres of a large and well-defined planet sample for which precise physical, chemical and dynamical information can be obtained. In order to fulfil this ambitious scientific program, EChO was designed as a dedicated survey mission for transit and eclipse spectroscopy capable of observing a large, diverse and well-defined planet sample within its 4-year mission lifetime. The transit and eclipse spectroscopy method, whereby the signal from the star and planet are differentiated using knowledge of the planetary ephemerides, allows us to measure atmospheric signals from the planet at levels of at least 10-4 relative to the star. This can only be achieved in conjunction with a carefully designed stable payload and satellite platform. It is also necessary to provide broad instantaneous wavelength coverage to detect as many molecular species as possible, to probe the thermal structure of the planetary atmospheres and to correct for the contaminating effects of the stellar photosphere. This requires wavelength

  20. Detection of tissue harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force using pulse-echo ultrasound and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Shigao; Tan, Wei; Kinnick, Randall; Greenleaf, James F

    2007-02-01

    A method using pulse echo ultrasound and the Kalman filter is developed for detecting submicron harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force. The method estimates the amplitude and phase of the motion at desired locations within a tissue region with high sensitivity. The harmonic motion generated by the ultrasound radiation force is expressed as extremely small oscillatory Doppler frequency shifts in the fast time (A-line) of ultrasound echoes, which are difficult to estimate. In slow time (repetitive ultrasound echoes) of the echoes, the motion also is presented as oscillatory phase shifts, from which the amplitude and phase of the harmonic motion can be estimated with the least mean squared error by Kalman filter. This technique can be used to estimate the traveling speed of a harmonic shear wave by tracking its phase changes during propagation. The shear wave propagation speed can be used to solve for the elasticity and viscosity of tissue as reported in our earlier study. Validation and in vitro experiments indicate that the method provides excellent estimations for very small (submicron) harmonic vibrations and has potential for noninvasive and quantitative stiffness measurements of tissues such as artery.

  1. Stimulated Anti-Echo Selection in Spatially Localized NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian-Ming; Smith, Ian C. P.

    1999-01-01

    Spectral localization using the stimulated-echo acquisition mode (STEAM) is one of the most popular methods in volume-localizedin vivoNMR spectroscopy. The localized volume signal is generated via stimulated echoes from spins excited by three 90° RF pulses, and the conventional STEAM sequence detects the stimulated-echo signal. From an analysis of the STEAM pulse sequence using the coherence transfer pathway formalism, stimulated anti-echoes are also formed by the same pulse sequence, which constitute the other half of the localized signal in the STEAM experiment. A new scheme of pulsed field gradients for the selection of stimulated anti-echoes was proposed, and localized spectroscopy in the stimulated anti-echo selection mode was achieved on a phantom and fromin vivorat brain.

  2. Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, N. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An echo tracker/range finder or altimeter is described. The pulse repetition frequency (PFR) of a predetermined plurality of transmitted pulses is adjusted so that echo pulses received from a reflecting object are positioned between transmitted pulses and divided their interpulse time interval into two time intervals having a predetermined ratio with respect to each other. The invention described provides a means whereby the arrival time of a plurality of echo pulses is defined as the time at which a composite echo pulse formed of a sum of the individual echo pulses has the highest amplitude. The invention is applicable to radar systems, sonar systems, or any other kind of system in which pulses are transmitted and echoes received therefrom.

  3. The Light Echoes around V838 Monocerotis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard

    2011-10-01

    V838 Monocerotis, which burst upon the astronomical scene in early 2002, is a completely unanticipated new object. It underwent a large-amplitude and very luminous outburst, during which its spectrum remained that of an extremely cool supergiant. A rapidly evolving set of light echoes around V838 Mon was discovered soon after the outburst, and quickly became the most spectacular display of the phenomenon yet seen. These light echoes provide the means to accomplish three unique types of measurements based on continued HST imaging during the event: {1} Study effects of MHD turbulence at high resolution and in 3 dimensions; {2} Construct the first unambiguous and fully 3-D map of a circumstellar dust envelope in the Milky Way; {3} Study dust physics in a unique setting where the spectrum and light curve of the illumination, and the scattering angle, are unambiguously known. We have also used our HST data to determine the distance to V838 Mon through a novel direct geometric technique, and the results showed that V838 Mon had a maximum luminosity brighter than a classical nova.Because of the extreme rarity of light echoes, this is almost certainly the only opportunity to achieve such results during the lifetime of HST. Similar intermediate-luminosity red transients are now being discovered in nearby galaxies, and it has become important to understand the physics of their outbursts and the nature of their progenitors. We propose one visit during Cycle 19, using ACS, in order to continue the mapping of the circumstellar dust and to accomplish the other goals listed above.

  4. Project Echo: FM Demodulators with Negative Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthroff, Clyde L.

    1961-01-01

    The primary experimental objective of Project Echo was the transmission of radio communications between points on the earth by reflection from the balloon satellite. Owing to the large path losses from transmitter to receiver via the satellite, a wide-band frequency modulation technique was used in which bandwidth was traded for signal-to-noise ratio. This paper describes the FM receiving demodulators employed. Negative feedback applied to the local oscillator reduces the FM modulation index in the receiver IF amplifiers, resulting in threshold performance superior to that of conventional FM receivers.

  5. Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal aircraft skins scanned rapidly in vibration tests. Relatively simple combination of permanent magnets and electromagnet serves as noncontact vibration source for nondestructive testing of metal aircraft skins. In test, source excites vibrations, and vibration waveforms measured, then analyzed for changes in resonances signifying cracks and other flaws.

  6. Temporal signal processing of dolphin biosonar echoes from salmon prey.

    PubMed

    Au, Whitlow W L; Ou, Hui Helen

    2014-08-01

    Killer whales project short broadband biosonar clicks. The broadband nature of the clicks provides good temporal resolution of echo highlights and allows for the discriminations of salmon prey. The echoes contain many highlights as the signals reflect off different surfaces and parts of the fish body and swim bladder. The temporal characteristics of echoes from salmon are highly aspect dependent and six temporal parameters were used in a support vector machine to discriminate between species. Results suggest that killer whales can classify salmon based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification. PMID:25096148

  7. Temporal signal processing of dolphin biosonar echoes from salmon prey.

    PubMed

    Au, Whitlow W L; Ou, Hui Helen

    2014-08-01

    Killer whales project short broadband biosonar clicks. The broadband nature of the clicks provides good temporal resolution of echo highlights and allows for the discriminations of salmon prey. The echoes contain many highlights as the signals reflect off different surfaces and parts of the fish body and swim bladder. The temporal characteristics of echoes from salmon are highly aspect dependent and six temporal parameters were used in a support vector machine to discriminate between species. Results suggest that killer whales can classify salmon based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification.

  8. Extra echo spaces: ultrasonography and computerised tomography correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, T; Honda, M; Matsuyama, S

    1982-01-01

    Among the echocardiograms of 844 patients of the International Goodwill Hospital from January 1980 to April 1981, 700 showed clinically inexplicable extra echo spaces. Fifty of the 700 had computerised tomography of their hearts which showed the extra echo spaces to be caused either by anterior or posterior subepicardial fat. Six of the 50 cases had both fat and pericardial effusions, which are difficult to differentiate echocardiographically unless follow-up clinical observations are performed. Subepicardial fat deposits are reasonable explanations for the extra echo spaces frequently observed by echocardiography: they correlate well with clinical findings. Subepicardial fat should be recognised as the cause of such extra echo spaces. Images PMID:7073903

  9. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  10. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  11. Light Echoes of Transients and Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryTycho Brahe's observations of a supernova in 1572 challenged the contemporaneous European view of the cosmos that the celestial realm was unchanging. 439 years later we have once again seen the light that Tycho saw, as some of the light from the 1572 supernova is reflected off dust and is only now reaching Earth. These light echoes, as well as ones detected from other transients and variables, give us a very rare opportunity in astronomy: direct observation of the cause (the supernova explosion) and the effect (the supernova remnant) of the same astronomical event. Furthermore, in some cases we can compare light echoes at different angles around a supernova remnant, and thus investigate possible asymmetry in the supernova explosion. In addition, in cases where the scattering dust is favorably positioned, the geometric distance to the SN remnant can be determined using polarization measurements. These techniques have been successfully applied to various transients in the last decade, and the talk gave an overview of the scientific results and techniques, with a particular focus on the challenges we will face in the current and upcoming wide-field time-domain surveys.

  12. Light Echo From Star V838 Monocerotis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This series of photos, captured by the NASA Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys from May to December 2002, dramatically demonstrates the reverberation of light through space caused by an unusual stellar outburst in January 2002. A burst of light from the bizarre star is spreading into space and reflecting off of surrounding circumstellar dust. As different parts are sequentially illuminated, the appearance of the dust changes. This effect is referred to as a 'light echo'. The red star at the center of the eyeball like feature is the unusual erupting super giant called V838 Monocerotis, or V Mon, located about 20,000 light-years away in the winter constellation Monoceros (the Unicorn). During its outburst, the star brightened to more than 600,000 times our Sun's luminosity. The circular feature has now expanded to slightly larger than the angular size of Jupiter on the sky, and will continue to expand for several more years until the light from the back side of the nebula begins to arrive. The light echo will then give the illusion of contracting, until it finally disappears by the end of the decade.

  13. The Future of ECHO: Evaluating Open Source Possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilone, D.; Gilman, J.; Baynes, K.; Mitchell, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System ClearingHOuse (ECHO) is a format agnostic metadata repository supporting over 3000 collections and 100M science granules. ECHO exposes FTP and RESTful Data Ingest APIs in addition to both SOAP and RESTful search and order capabilities. Built on top of ECHO is a human facing search and order web application named Reverb. ECHO processes hundreds of orders, tens of thousands of searches, and 1-2M ingest actions each week. As ECHO's holdings, metadata format support, and visibility have increased, the ECHO team has received requests by non-NASA entities for copies of ECHO that can be run locally against their data holdings. ESDIS and the ECHO Team have begun investigations into various deployment and Open Sourcing models that can balance the real constraints faced by the ECHO project with the benefits of providing ECHO capabilities to a broader set of users and providers. This talk will discuss several release and Open Source models being investigated by the ECHO team along with the impacts those models are expected to have on the project. We discuss: - Addressing complex deployment or setup issues for potential users - Models of vetting code contributions - Balancing external (public) user requests versus our primary partners - Preparing project code for public release, including navigating licensing issues related to leveraged libraries - Dealing with non-free project dependencies such as commercial databases - Dealing with sensitive aspects of project code such as database passwords, authentication approaches, security through obscurity, etc. - Ongoing support for the released code including increased testing demands, bug fixes, security fixes, and new features.

  14. The EChO science case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Drossart, Pierre; Eccleston, Paul; Hartogh, Paul; Isaak, Kate; Linder, Martin; Lovis, Christophe; Micela, Giusi; Ollivier, Marc; Puig, Ludovic; Ribas, Ignasi; Snellen, Ignas; Swinyard, Bruce; Allard, France; Barstow, Joanna; Cho, James; Coustenis, Athena; Cockell, Charles; Correia, Alexandre; Decin, Leen; de Kok, Remco; Deroo, Pieter; Encrenaz, Therese; Forget, Francois; Glasse, Alistair; Griffith, Caitlin; Guillot, Tristan; Koskinen, Tommi; Lammer, Helmut; Leconte, Jeremy; Maxted, Pierre; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Nelson, Richard; North, Chris; Pallé, Enric; Pagano, Isabella; Piccioni, Guseppe; Pinfield, David; Selsis, Franck; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Stixrude, Lars; Tennyson, Jonathan; Turrini, Diego; Zapatero-Osorio, Mariarosa; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Grodent, Denis; Guedel, Manuel; Luz, David; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Ray, Tom; Rickman, Hans; Selig, Avri; Swain, Mark; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Barlow, Mike; Bowles, Neil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; du Foresto, Vincent Coudé; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Gizon, Laurent; Hornstrup, Allan; Jarchow, Christopher; Kerschbaum, Franz; Kovacs, Géza; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Lim, Tanya; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Pace, Emanuele; Pascale, Enzo; Vandenbussche, Bart; Wright, Gillian; Ramos Zapata, Gonzalo; Adriani, Alberto; Azzollini, Ruymán; Balado, Ana; Bryson, Ian; Burston, Raymond; Colomé, Josep; Crook, Martin; Di Giorgio, Anna; Griffin, Matt; Hoogeveen, Ruud; Ottensamer, Roland; Irshad, Ranah; Middleton, Kevin; Morgante, Gianluca; Pinsard, Frederic; Rataj, Mirek; Reess, Jean-Michel; Savini, Giorgio; Schrader, Jan-Rutger; Stamper, Richard; Winter, Berend; Abe, L.; Abreu, M.; Achilleos, N.; Ade, P.; Adybekian, V.; Affer, L.; Agnor, C.; Agundez, M.; Alard, C.; Alcala, J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Alonso Floriano, F. J.; Altieri, F.; Alvarez Iglesias, C. A.; Amado, P.; Andersen, A.; Aylward, A.; Baffa, C.; Bakos, G.; Ballerini, P.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Barber, R. J.; Barrado, D.; Barton, E. J.; Batista, V.; Bellucci, G.; Belmonte Avilés, J. A.; Berry, D.; Bézard, B.; Biondi, D.; Błęcka, M.; Boisse, I.; Bonfond, B.; Bordé, P.; Börner, P.; Bouy, H.; Brown, L.; Buchhave, L.; Budaj, J.; Bulgarelli, A.; Burleigh, M.; Cabral, A.; Capria, M. T.; Cassan, A.; Cavarroc, C.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Cerulli, R.; Chadney, J.; Chamberlain, S.; Charnoz, S.; Christian Jessen, N.; Ciaravella, A.; Claret, A.; Claudi, R.; Coates, A.; Cole, R.; Collura, A.; Cordier, D.; Covino, E.; Danielski, C.; Damasso, M.; Deeg, H. J.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Del Vecchio, C.; Demangeon, O.; De Sio, A.; De Wit, J.; Dobrijévic, M.; Doel, P.; Dominic, C.; Dorfi, E.; Eales, S.; Eiroa, C.; Espinoza Contreras, M.; Esposito, M.; Eymet, V.; Fabrizio, N.; Fernández, M.; Femenía Castella, B.; Figueira, P.; Filacchione, G.; Fletcher, L.; Focardi, M.; Fossey, S.; Fouqué, P.; Frith, J.; Galand, M.; Gambicorti, L.; Gaulme, P.; García López, R. J.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Gear, W.; Gerard, J.-C.; Gesa, L.; Giani, E.; Gianotti, F.; Gillon, M.; Giro, E.; Giuranna, M.; Gomez, H.; Gomez-Leal, I.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J.; González Merino, B.; Graczyk, R.; Grassi, D.; Guardia, J.; Guio, P.; Gustin, J.; Hargrave, P.; Haigh, J.; Hébrard, E.; Heiter, U.; Heredero, R. L.; Herrero, E.; Hersant, F.; Heyrovsky, D.; Hollis, M.; Hubert, B.; Hueso, R.; Israelian, G.; Iro, N.; Irwin, P.; Jacquemoud, S.; Jones, G.; Jones, H.; Justtanont, K.; Kehoe, T.; Kerschbaum, F.; Kerins, E.; Kervella, P.; Kipping, D.; Koskinen, T.; Krupp, N.; Lahav, O.; Laken, B.; Lanza, N.; Lellouch, E.; Leto, G.; Licandro Goldaracena, J.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Liu, S. J.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lodieu, N.; Lognonné, P.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lundgaard Rasmussen, I.; Luntzer, A.; Machado, P.; MacTavish, C.; Maggio, A.; Maillard, J.-P.; Magnes, W.; Maldonado, J.; Mall, U.; Marquette, J.-B.; Mauskopf, P.; Massi, F.; Maurin, A.-S.; Medvedev, A.; Michaut, C.; Miles-Paez, P.; Montalto, M.; Montañés Rodríguez, P.; Monteiro, M.; Montes, D.; Morais, H.; Morales, J. C.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Morello, G.; Moro Martín, A.; Moses, J.; Moya Bedon, A.; Murgas Alcaino, F.; Oliva, E.; Orton, G.; Palla, F.; Pancrazzi, M.; Pantin, E.; Parmentier, V.; Parviainen, H.; Peña Ramírez, K. Y.; Peralta, J.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Petrov, R.; Pezzuto, S.; Pietrzak, R.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Piskunov, N.; Prinja, R.; Prisinzano, L.; Polichtchouk, I.; Poretti, E.; Radioti, A.; Ramos, A. A.; Rank-Lüftinger, T.; Read, P.; Readorn, K.; Rebolo López, R.; Rebordão, J.; Rengel, M.; Rezac, L.; Rocchetto, M.; Rodler, F.; Sánchez Béjar, V. J.; Sanchez Lavega, A.; Sanromá, E.; Santos, N.; Sanz Forcada, J.; Scandariato, G.; Schmider, F.-X.; Scholz, A.; Scuderi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of almost two thousand exoplanets has revealed an unexpectedly diverse planet population. We see gas giants in few-day orbits, whole multi-planet systems within the orbit of Mercury, and new populations of planets with masses between that of the Earth and Neptune—all unknown in the Solar System. Observations to date have shown that our Solar System is certainly not representative of the general population of planets in our Milky Way. The key science questions that urgently need addressing are therefore: What are exoplanets made of? Why are planets as they are? How do planetary systems work and what causes the exceptional diversity observed as compared to the Solar System? The EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) space mission was conceived to take up the challenge to explain this diversity in terms of formation, evolution, internal structure and planet and atmospheric composition. This requires in-depth spectroscopic knowledge of the atmospheres of a large and well-defined planet sample for which precise physical, chemical and dynamical information can be obtained. In order to fulfil this ambitious scientific program, EChO was designed as a dedicated survey mission for transit and eclipse spectroscopy capable of observing a large, diverse and well-defined planet sample within its 4-year mission lifetime. The transit and eclipse spectroscopy method, whereby the signal from the star and planet are differentiated using knowledge of the planetary ephemerides, allows us to measure atmospheric signals from the planet at levels of at least 10-4 relative to the star. This can only be achieved in conjunction with a carefully designed stable payload and satellite platform. It is also necessary to provide broad instantaneous wavelength coverage to detect as many molecular species as possible, to probe the thermal structure of the planetary atmospheres and to correct for the contaminating effects of the stellar photosphere. This requires wavelength

  15. In vivo thermal ablation monitoring using ultrasound echo decorrelation imaging.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Rudich, Steven M; Alqadah, Amel; Karunakaran, Chandra Priya; Rao, Marepalli B; Mast, T Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Previous work indicated that ultrasound echo decorrelation imaging can track and quantify changes in echo signals to predict thermal damage during in vitro radiofrequency ablation (RFA). In the in vivo studies reported here, the feasibility of using echo decorrelation imaging as a treatment monitoring tool was assessed. RFA was performed on normal swine liver (N = 5), and ultrasound ablation using image-ablate arrays was performed on rabbit liver implanted with VX2 tumors (N = 2). Echo decorrelation and integrated backscatter were computed from Hilbert transformed pulse-echo data acquired during RFA and ultrasound ablation treatments. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were employed to assess the ability of echo decorrelation imaging and integrated backscatter to predict ablation. Area under the ROC curves (AUROC) was determined for RFA and ultrasound ablation using echo decorrelation imaging. Ablation was predicted more accurately using echo decorrelation imaging (AUROC = 0.832 and 0.776 for RFA and ultrasound ablation, respectively) than using integrated backscatter (AUROC = 0.734 and 0.494). PMID:24239361

  16. Psychoacoustic influences of the echoing environments of prehistoric art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Steven J.

    2002-11-01

    Cave paintings and ancient petroglyphs around the world are typically found in echo rich locations such as caves, canyons, and rocky cliff faces. Analysis of field data shows that echo decibel levels at a large number of prehistoric art sites are higher than those at nondecorated locations. The selection of these echoing environments by the artists appears not to be a mere coincidence. This paper considers the perception of an echoed sound as a psychoacoustic event that would have been inexplicable to ancient humans. A variety of ancient legends from cultures on several continents attribute the phenomenon of echoes to supernatural beings. These legends, together with the quantitative data, strongly implicate echoing as relevant to the artists of the past. The notion that the echoes were caused by spirits within the rock would explain not only the unusual locations of prehistoric art, but also the perplexing subject matter. For example, the common theme of hoofed animal imagery could have been inspired by echoes of percussion noises perceived as hoof beats. Further systematic acoustical studies of prehistoric art sites is warranted. Conservation of the natural acoustic properties of rock art environments--a previously unrecognized need--is urged.

  17. ECHOS: Early Childhood Hands-On Science Efficacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Judy A.; Greenfield, Daryl B.; Bell, Elizabeth; Juárez, Cheryl Lani; Myers, Ted; Nayfeld, Irena

    2013-01-01

    "ECHOS: Early Childhood Hands-On Science" was developed at the Miami Science Museum as a comprehensive set of science lessons sequenced to lead children toward a deeper understanding of science content and the use of science process skills. The purpose of the research is to determine whether use of the "ECHOS" model will…

  18. A Detection-Theoretic Model of Echo Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saberi, Kourosh; Petrosyan, Agavni

    2004-01-01

    A detection-theoretic analysis of the auditory localization of dual-impulse stimuli is described, and a model for the processing of spatial cues in the echo pulse is developed. Although for over 50 years "echo suppression" has been the topic of intense theoretical and empirical study within the hearing sciences, only a rudimentary understanding of…

  19. Target structure and echo spectral discrimination by echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A; Lavender, W A; Lavender, B A; Doroshow, C A; Kiefer, S W; Livingston, R; Scallet, A C; Crowley, D E

    1974-12-20

    Echolocating bats can use sonar to discriminate among targets which reflect echoes differing in spectral distribution of energy but not in overall intensity. They can detect differences smaller than 1 millimeter in fine target structure. Bats may be capable of classifying targets from echo spectral signatures and might thus be able to distinguish among flying insect prey by sonar.

  20. Neural coding of echo-envelope disparities in echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Borina, Frank; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2011-05-01

    The effective use of echolocation requires not only measuring the delay between the emitted call and returning echo to estimate the distance of an ensonified object. To locate an object in azimuth and elevation, the bat's auditory system must analyze the returning echoes in terms of their binaural properties, i.e., the echoes' interaural intensity and time differences (IIDs and ITDs). The effectiveness of IIDs for echolocation is undisputed, but when bats ensonify complex objects, the temporal structure of echoes may facilitate the analysis of the echo envelope in terms of envelope ITDs. Using extracellular recordings from the auditory midbrain of the bat, Phyllostomus discolor, we found a population of neurons that are sensitive to envelope ITDs of echoes of their sonar calls. Moreover, the envelope-ITD sensitivity improved with increasing temporal fluctuations in the echo envelopes, a sonar parameter related to the spatial statistics of complex natural reflectors like vegetation. The data show that in bats envelope ITDs may be used not only to locate external, prey-generated rustling sounds but also in the context of echolocation. Specifically, the temporal fluctuations in the echo envelope, which are created when the sonar emission is reflected from a complex natural target, support ITD-mediated echolocation.

  1. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. 892.1560 Section 892.1560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system is a device intended to project...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. 892.1560 Section 892.1560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system is a device intended to project...

  3. Diurnal variation of overdense meteor echo duration and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simek, Milos

    1992-01-01

    The diurnal variation of the median duration of overdense sporadic radar meteor echoes is examined. The meteors recorded in August, December, and January by the Ondrejov meteor radar during the period 1958-1990 were used for the analysis. A maximum median echo duration 1-3 hours after the time of local sunrise in the meteor region confirms the already known sunrise effect. Minimum echo duration occurring at the time of sunset seems to be the most important point of diurnal variation of the echo duration, when ozone is no longer dissociated by solar UV radiation. The effect of diurnal changes of the echo duration should be considered when the mass distribution of meteor showers is analyzed.

  4. Range gate dependence of specular echoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Some controversy has surrounded the interpretation of the enhancement of VHF radar echoes at vertical incidence (also known as partial reflections, specular reflections and Fresnel scattering) since they were reported by the Sunset and the SOUSY radars. There is little doubt as to the observational fact of this enhancement since it was observed by experimenters using at least eleven MST or ST radars. In addition to the Sunset and SOUSY radars, this result was obtained in the lower atmosphere at the Platteville, Poker Flat, Jicamarca Arecibo radars as well as the three radars of the ALPEX experiments. In the upper atmosphere, specular or partial reflections were observed. These vertical enhancements were associated with increases in the static stability of the atmosphere, with a temperature gradient in the stratosphere, were used to monitor the height of the tropopause, and were associated with the passage of fronts.

  5. Parallel electric fields detected via conjugate electron echoes during the Echo 7 sounding rocket flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Electron detectors on the Echo 7 active sounding rocket experiment measured 'conjugate echoes' resulting from artificial electron beam injections. Analysis of the drift motion of the electrons after a complete bounce leads to measurements of the magnetospheric convection electric field mapped to ionospheric altitudes. The magnetospheric field was highly variable, changing by tens of mV/m on time scales of as little as hundreds of millisec. While the smallest-scale magnetospheric field irregularities were mapped out by ionospheric conductivity, larger-scale features were enhanced by up to 50 mV/m in the ionosphere. The mismatch between magnetospheric and ionspheric convection fields indicates a violation of the equipotential field line condition. The parallel fields occurred in regions roughly 10 km across and probably supported a total potential drop of 10-100 V.

  6. Recent Results for the ECHo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassel, C.; Blaum, K.; Goodacre, T. Day; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Enss, C.; Filianin, P.; Fäßler, A.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Goncharov, M.; Hengstler, D.; Jochum, J.; Johnston, K.; Keller, M.; Kempf, S.; Kieck, T.; Köster, U.; Krantz, M.; Marsh, B.; Mokry, C.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Ranitzsch, P. C. O.; Rothe, S.; Rischka, A.; Runke, J.; Saenz, A.; Schneider, F.; Scholl, S.; Schüssler, R. X.; Simkovic, F.; Stora, T.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Türler, A.; Veinhard, M.; Wegner, M.; Wendt, K.; Zuber, K.

    2016-08-01

    The Electron Capture in ^{163}Ho experiment, ECHo, is designed to investigate the electron neutrino mass in the sub-eV range by means of the analysis of the calorimetrically measured spectrum following the electron capture (EC) in ^{163}Ho. Arrays of low-temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), read-out by microwave SQUID multiplexing, will be used in this experiment. With a first MMC prototype having the ^{163}Ho source ion-implanted into the absorber, we performed the first high energy resolution measurement of the EC spectrum, which demonstrated the feasibility of such an experiment. In addition to the technological challenges for the development of MMC arrays, which preserve the single pixel performance in terms of energy resolution and bandwidth, the success of the experiment relies on the availability of large ultra-pure ^{163}Ho samples, on the precise description of the expected spectrum, and on the identification and reduction of background. We present preliminary results obtained with standard MMCs developed for soft X-ray spectroscopy, maXs-20, where the ^{163}Ho ion-implantation was performed using a high-purity ^{163}Ho source produced by advanced chemical and mass separation. With these measurements, we aim at determining an upper limit for the background level due to source contamination and provide a refined description of the calorimetrically measured spectrum. We discuss the plan for a medium scale experiment, ECHo-1k, in which about 1000 mathrm {Bq} of high-purity ^{163}Ho will be ion-implanted into detector arrays. With one year of measuring time, we will be able to achieve a sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass below 20 eV/c^2 (90 % C.L.), improving the present limit by more than one order of magnitude. This experiment will guide the necessary developments to reach the sub-eV sensitivity.

  7. Fast T(2) relaxometry with an accelerated multi-echo spin-echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Sénégas, Julien; Liu, Wei; Dahnke, Hannes; Song, Hotaek; Jordan, E Kay; Frank, Joseph A

    2010-10-01

    A new method has been developed to reduce the number of phase-encoding steps in a multi-echo spin-echo imaging sequence allowing fast T(2) mapping without loss of spatial resolution. In the proposed approach, the k-space data at each echo time were undersampled and a reconstruction algorithm that exploited the temporal correlation of the MR signal in k-space was used to reconstruct alias-free images. A specific application of this algorithm with multiple-receiver acquisition, offering an alternative to existing parallel imaging methods, has also been introduced. The fast T(2) mapping method has been validated in human brain T(2) measurements in a group of nine volunteers with acceleration factors up to 3.4. The results demonstrated that the proposed method exhibited excellent linear correlation with the regular T(2) mapping with full sampling and achieved better image reconstruction and T(2) mapping with respect to SNR and reconstruction artifacts than the selected reference acceleration techniques. The new method has also been applied for quantitative tracking of injected magnetically labeled breast cancer cells in the rat brain with acceleration factors of 1.8 and 3.0. The proposed technique can provide an effective approach for accelerated T(2) quantification, especially for experiments with single-channel coil when parallel imaging is not applicable. PMID:20878973

  8. Control System Damps Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopf, E. H., Jr.; Brown, T. K.; Marsh, E. L.

    1983-01-01

    New control system damps vibrations in rotating equipment with help of phase-locked-loop techniques. Vibrational modes are controlled by applying suitable currents to drive motor. Control signals are derived from sensors mounted on equipment.

  9. Do triatomic molecules echo atomic periodicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hefferlin, R. Barrow, J.

    2015-03-30

    Demonstrations of periodicity among triatomic-molecular spectroscopic constants underscore the role of the periodic law as a foundation of chemistry. The objective of this work is to prepare for another test using vibration frequencies ν{sub 1} of free, ground-state, main-group triatomic molecules. Using data from four data bases and from computation, we have collected ν{sub 1} data for molecules formed from second period atoms.

  10. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Water.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Fivos; Marco, Luigi De; Shalit, Andrey; Tang, Fujie; Kann, Zachary R; Kühne, Thomas D; Torre, Renato; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2016-07-13

    We present an overview of recent static and time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic studies of liquid water from ambient conditions to the supercooled state, as well as of crystalline and amorphous ice forms. The structure and dynamics of the complex hydrogen-bond network formed by water molecules in the bulk and interphases are discussed, as well as the dissipation mechanism of vibrational energy throughout this network. A broad range of water investigations are addressed, from conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopy to femtosecond pump-probe, photon-echo, optical Kerr effect, sum-frequency generation, and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, such as two-dimensional sum-frequency generation, three-dimensional infrared, and two-dimensional Raman terahertz spectroscopy. By comparison of the complementary aspects probed by various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, a coherent picture of water dynamics and energetics emerges. Furthermore, we outline future perspectives of vibrational spectroscopy for water researches. PMID:27096701

  11. Prognostic for hydraulic pump based upon DCT-composite spectrum and the modified echo state network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Li, Hongru; Xu, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Prognostic is a key step of the condition-based maintenance (CBM). In order to improve the predicting performance, a novel method for prognostic for the hydraulic pump is proposed in this paper. Based on the improvement of the traditional composite spectrum, the DCT-composite spectrum (DCS) fusion algorithm is initially presented to make fusion of multi-channel vibration signals. The DCS composite spectrum entropy is extracted as the feature. Furthermore, the modified echo state networks (ESN) model is established for prognostic using the extracted feature. The reservoir is updated and the elements of the neighboring matrix are redefined for improving predicting accuracy. Analysis of the application in the hydraulic pump degradation experiment demonstrates that the proposed algorithm is feasible and is meaningful for CBM.

  12. Prognostic for hydraulic pump based upon DCT-composite spectrum and the modified echo state network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Li, Hongru; Xu, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Prognostic is a key step of the condition-based maintenance (CBM). In order to improve the predicting performance, a novel method for prognostic for the hydraulic pump is proposed in this paper. Based on the improvement of the traditional composite spectrum, the DCT-composite spectrum (DCS) fusion algorithm is initially presented to make fusion of multi-channel vibration signals. The DCS composite spectrum entropy is extracted as the feature. Furthermore, the modified echo state networks (ESN) model is established for prognostic using the extracted feature. The reservoir is updated and the elements of the neighboring matrix are redefined for improving predicting accuracy. Analysis of the application in the hydraulic pump degradation experiment demonstrates that the proposed algorithm is feasible and is meaningful for CBM. PMID:27547667

  13. Ultrasound Echo is Related to Stress, Strain in Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Duenwald, Sarah; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Frisch, Kayt; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of tendons has been well studied in vitro. A noninvasive method to acquire mechanical data would be highly beneficial. Elastography has been a promising method of gathering in vivo tissue mechanical behavior, but it has inherent limitations. This study presents acoustoelasticity as an alternative ultrasound-based method of measuring tendon stress and strain by reporting a relationship between ultrasonic echo intensity (B mode ultrasound image brightness) and mechanical behavior of tendon in vitro. Porcine digital flexor tendons were cyclically loaded in a mechanical testing system while ultrasonic echo response was recorded. We report that echo intensity closely follows the applied cyclic strain pattern in time with higher strain protocols resulting in larger echo intensity changes. We also report that echo intensity is related nonlinearly to stress and nearly linearly to strain. This indicates that ultrasonic echo intensity is related to the mechanical behavior in a loaded tissue by an acoustoelastic response, as previously described in homogeneous, nearly incompressible materials. Acoustoelasticity is therefore able to relate strain-dependent stiffness and stress to the reflected echo, even in the processed B-mode signals reflected from viscoelastic, inhomogeneous material such as tendon, and is a promising metric to acquire in vivo mechanical data noninvasively. PMID:21030024

  14. Ultrasound echo is related to stress and strain in tendon.

    PubMed

    Duenwald, Sarah; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Frisch, Kayt; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2011-02-01

    The mechanical behavior of tendons has been well studied in vitro. A noninvasive method to acquire mechanical data would be highly beneficial. Elastography has been a promising method of gathering in vivo tissue mechanical behavior, but it has inherent limitations. This study presents acoustoelasticity as an alternative ultrasound-based method of measuring tendon stress and strain by reporting a relationship between ultrasonic echo intensity (B-mode ultrasound image brightness) and mechanical behavior of tendon in vitro. Porcine digital flexor tendons were cyclically loaded in a mechanical testing system while an ultrasonic echo response was recorded. We report that echo intensity closely follows the applied cyclic strain pattern in time with higher strain protocols resulting in larger echo intensity changes. We also report that echo intensity is related nonlinearly to stress and nearly linearly to strain. This indicates that ultrasonic echo intensity is related to the mechanical behavior in a loaded tissue by an acoustoelastic response, as previously described in homogeneous, nearly incompressible materials. Acoustoelasticity is therefore able to relate strain-dependent stiffness and stress to the reflected echo, even in the processed B-mode signals reflected from viscoelastic and inhomogeneous material such as tendon, and is a promising metric to acquire in vivo mechanical data noninvasively.

  15. Kinematics of illumination patterns and light echoes from flashes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Flash-induced light echoes-the observation of light reflected from a burst-have been observed in astronomical settings for more than a century and have been observed in the laboratory recently. Because of the flight time of light, perceived light echoes are different from real light illumination patterns on a scattering plane, neglecting interreflections and non-opaque scattering effects. The shape and motion of real illumination patterns are studied from a spherical flash. Then, ellipsoids of constant time delay for a specifically chosen coordinate system are applied. Generally, perceived light echoes are elliptical annular rings and the center of a light echo will not start at the flash, which leads to light echoes moving angularly toward the flash instead of away from it, a phenomenon actually recorded by other groups. The brightness of perceived light echoes was studied, and maximum brightness occurred close to the flash's projective point on the scattering plane. Two specific examples are given and a magnification effect between perceived echoes and real illumination patterns is proposed. PMID:27607505

  16. Harmonic motion detection in a vibrating scattering medium.

    PubMed

    Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James

    2008-09-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality that seeks to map the spatial distribution of tissue stiffness. Ultrasound radiation force excitation and motion tracking using pulse-echo ultrasound have been used in numerous methods. Dynamic radiation force is used in vibrometry to cause an object or tissue to vibrate, and the vibration amplitude and phase can be measured with exceptional accuracy. This paper presents a model that simulates harmonic motion detection in a vibrating scattering medium incorporating 3-D beam shapes for radiation force excitation and motion tracking. A parameterized analysis using this model provides a platform to optimize motion detection for vibrometry applications in tissue. An experimental method that produces a multifrequency radiation force is also presented. Experimental harmonic motion detection of simultaneous multifrequency vibration is demonstrated using a single transducer. This method can accurately detect motion with displacement amplitude as low as 100 to 200 nm in bovine muscle. Vibration phase can be measured within 10 degrees or less. The experimental results validate the conclusions observed from the model and show multifrequency vibration induction and measurements can be performed simultaneously.

  17. Harmonic Motion Detection in a Vibrating Scattering Medium

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality that seeks to map the spatial distribution of tissue stiffness. Ultrasound radiation force excitation and motion tracking using pulse-echo ultrasound have been used in numerous methods. Dynamic radiation force is used in vibrometry to cause an object or tissue to vibrate, and the vibration amplitude and phase can be measured with exceptional accuracy. This paper presents a model that simulates harmonic motion detection in a vibrating scattering medium incorporating 3-D beam shapes for radiation force excitation and motion tracking. A parameterized analysis using this model provides a platform to optimize motion detection for vibrometry applications in tissue. An experimental method that produces a multifrequency radiation force is also presented. Experimental harmonic motion detection of simultaneous multifrequency vibration is demonstrated using a single transducer. This method can accurately detect motion with displacement amplitude as low as 100 to 200 nm in bovine muscle. Vibration phase can be measured within 10° or less. The experimental results validate the conclusions observed from the model and show multifrequency vibration induction and measurements can be performed simultaneously. PMID:18986892

  18. Hermetically sealed vibration damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, D. G.

    1969-01-01

    Simple fluidic vibration damper for installation at each pivotal mounting between gimbals isolates inertial measuring units from external vibration and other disruptive forces. Installation between each of the three gimbal axes can dampen vibration and shock in any direction while permitting free rotation of the gimbals.

  19. A comparison of dual gradient-echo and spin-echo fMRI of the inferior temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Halai, Ajay D; Welbourne, Stephen R; Embleton, Karl; Parkes, Laura M

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic susceptibility differences at tissue interfaces lead to signal loss in conventional gradient-echo (GE) EPI. This poses a problem for fMRI in language and memory paradigms, which activate the most affected regions. Two methods proposed to overcome this are spin-echo EPI and dual GE EPI, where two EPI read-outs are serially collected at a short and longer echo time. The spin-echo method applies a refocusing pulse to recover dephased MR signal due to static field inhomogeneities, but is known to have a relatively low blood oxygenation level dependant (BOLD) sensitivity. In comparison, GE has superior BOLD sensitivity, and by employing an additional shorter echo, in a dual GE sequence, it can reduce signal loss due to spin dephasing. We directly compared dual GE and spin-echo fMRI during a semantic categorization task, which has been shown to activate the inferior temporal region-a region known to be affected by magnetic susceptibility. A whole brain analysis showed that the dual GE resulted in significantly higher activation within the left inferior temporal fusiform (ITF) cortex, compared to spin-echo. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was activated for dual GE, but not spin-echo. Regions of interest analysis was carried out on the anterior and posterior ITF, left and right IFG, and part of the cerebellum. Dual GE outperformed spin-echo in the anterior and posterior ITF and bilateral IFG regions, whilst being equal in the cerebellum. Hence, dual GE should be the method of choice for fMRI studies of inferior temporal regions. PMID:24677506

  20. Vibration ride comfort criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study directed to derive equal vibration discomfort curves, to determine the influence of vibration masking in order to account for the total discomfort of any random vibration, and to develop a scale of total vibration discomfort in the case of human response to whole-body vertical vibration. Discomfort is referred to as a subjective discomfort associated with the acceleration level of a particular frequency band. It is shown that passenger discomfort to whole-body vibration increases linearly with acceleration level for each frequency. Empirical data provide a mechanism for determining the degree of masking (or summation) of the discomfort of multiple frequency vibration. A scale for the prediction of passenger discomfort is developed.

  1. Anti-vibration gloves?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered.

  2. First radar echoes from cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Charles A.; Miller, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    In attempting to use centimeter-wavelength radars to investigate the early stage of precipitation formation in clouds, 'mantle echoes' are rediscovered and shown to come mostly from scattering by small-scale variations in refractive index, a Bragg kind of scattering mechanism. This limits the usefulness of single-wavelength radar for studies of hydrometeor growth, according to data on summer cumulus clouds in North Dakota, Hawaii, and Florida, to values of reflectivity factor above about 10 dBZe with 10-cm radar, 0 dBZe with 5-cm radar, and -10 dBZe with 3-cm radar. These are limits at or above which the backscattered radar signal from the kinds of clouds observed can be assumed to be almost entirely from hydrometeors or (rarely) other particulate material such as insects. Dual-wavelength radar data can provide the desired information about hydrometeors at very low reflectivity levels if assumptions can be made about the inhomogeneities responsible for the Bragg scattering. The Bragg scattering signal itself probably will be a useful way to probe inhomogeneities one-half the radar wavelength in scale for studying cloud entrainment and mixing processes. However, this use is possible only before scattering from hydrometeors dominates the radar return.

  3. Quaternion-valued echo state networks.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yili; Jahanchahi, Cyrus; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-04-01

    Quaternion-valued echo state networks (QESNs) are introduced to cater for 3-D and 4-D processes, such as those observed in the context of renewable energy (3-D wind modeling) and human centered computing (3-D inertial body sensors). The introduction of QESNs is made possible by the recent emergence of quaternion nonlinear activation functions with local analytic properties, required by nonlinear gradient descent training algorithms. To make QENSs second-order optimal for the generality of quaternion signals (both circular and noncircular), we employ augmented quaternion statistics to introduce widely linear QESNs. To that end, the standard widely linear model is modified so as to suit the properties of dynamical reservoir, typically realized by recurrent neural networks. This allows for a full exploitation of second-order information in the data, contained both in the covariance and pseudocovariances, and a rigorous account of second-order noncircularity (improperness), and the corresponding power mismatch and coupling between the data components. Simulations in the prediction setting on both benchmark circular and noncircular signals and on noncircular real-world 3-D body motion data support the analysis.

  4. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Huber, Mark E.; Matheson, Thomas; McDonald, Brittany; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Sinnott, Brendan; Smith, Nathan; Welch, Doug

    2012-08-01

    We propose to search for light echoes (LEs) from the historical brightening of the Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) P Cygni using the KPNO 4m Mosaic 1.1 imager. We also propose to conclude our search - so far unsuccessful - for LEs from the the Crab supernova SN 1054 by surveying one remaining region of the LE ellipsoid behind the plane of the supernova remnant on the sky. In addition, we continue to monitor the LEs from the Cas A and Tycho supernovae in order to identify suitable LE candidates for 3D-spectroscopy and spectral time series. Recently, we discovered LEs of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of η Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than the reported LBV outburst spectral types (F-type or earlier) teRest12_eta. The application of the LE studies to LBVs promises to extend our ability to record outburst activity hundreds of years into the past - a timescale which is likely a significant fraction of the brief final phases of these probable core-collapse supernova precursors.

  5. Quaternion-valued echo state networks.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yili; Jahanchahi, Cyrus; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-04-01

    Quaternion-valued echo state networks (QESNs) are introduced to cater for 3-D and 4-D processes, such as those observed in the context of renewable energy (3-D wind modeling) and human centered computing (3-D inertial body sensors). The introduction of QESNs is made possible by the recent emergence of quaternion nonlinear activation functions with local analytic properties, required by nonlinear gradient descent training algorithms. To make QENSs second-order optimal for the generality of quaternion signals (both circular and noncircular), we employ augmented quaternion statistics to introduce widely linear QESNs. To that end, the standard widely linear model is modified so as to suit the properties of dynamical reservoir, typically realized by recurrent neural networks. This allows for a full exploitation of second-order information in the data, contained both in the covariance and pseudocovariances, and a rigorous account of second-order noncircularity (improperness), and the corresponding power mismatch and coupling between the data components. Simulations in the prediction setting on both benchmark circular and noncircular signals and on noncircular real-world 3-D body motion data support the analysis. PMID:25794374

  6. Decoupled echo state networks with lateral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yanbo; Yang, Le; Haykin, Simon

    2007-04-01

    Building on some prior work, in this paper we describe a novel structure termed the decoupled echo state network (DESN) involving the use of lateral inhibition. Two low-complexity implementation schemes, namely, the DESN with reservoir prediction (DESN + RP) and DESN with maximum available information (DESN + MaxInfo), are developed: (1) In the multiple superimposed oscillator (MSO) problem, DESN + MaxInfo exhibits three important attributes: lower generalization mean-square error (MSE), better robustness with respect to the random generation of reservoir weight matrix and feedback connections, and robustness to variations in the sparseness of reservoir weight matrix, compared to DESN + RP. (2) For a noiseless nonlinear prediction task, DESN + RP outperforms the DESN + MaxInfo and single reservoir-based ESN approach in terms of lower prediction MSE and better robustness to a change in the number of inputs and sparsity of the reservoir weight matrix. Finally, in a real-life prediction task using noisy sea clutter data, both schemes exhibit higher prediction accuracy and successful design ratio than a conventional ESN with a single reservoir.

  7. Beam Echo Effect for Generation of Short-Wavelength Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    The Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation starting with a relatively small initial energy modulation of the beam. After presenting the concept of the EEHG, we address several practically important issues, such as the effect of coherent and incoherent synchrotron radiation in the dispersion sections. Using a representative realistic set of beam parameters, we show how the EEHG scheme enhances the FEL performance and allows one to generate a fully (both longitudinally and transversely) coherent radiation. We then discuss application of the echo modulation for generation of attosecond pulses of radiation, and also using echo for generation of terahertz radiation. We present main parameters of a proof-of-principle experiment currently being planned at SLAC for demonstration of the echo modulation mechanism.

  8. Free-electron lasers: Echoes of photons past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Lawrence T.; McNeil, Brian W. J.

    2016-08-01

    High-harmonic generation is an established method to significantly upshift laser photon energies. Now, researchers at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have used echo concepts to generate coherent high-harmonic output from an electron-beam light source.

  9. Asynchronous and timing jitter insensitive data echo cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerschmitt, David G.

    1986-12-01

    An approach to the implementation of asynchronous and timing jitter insensitive data echo cancellation is described. This approach introduces a small amount of jitter in the transmitted data signal, or alternatively in the received signal sampling, and uses a simple digital phase-locked loop together with the storage of two sets of echo canceller coefficients. The effect of derived timing jitter on the echo cancellation accuracy is completely eliminated for a loop timed transceiver (as in a digital subscriber loop network termination transceiver), and is easily reduced to negligible levels for a nonloop timed transceiver (as in a digital subscriber loop line card transceiver or a voiceband data modem). In the case of a voiceband data modem, this approach is one method to achieve asynchronous echo cancellation without the need to recover and resample a continuous-time far-end data signal.

  10. Loschmidt echo and time reversal in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Jalabert, Rodolfo A; Pastawski, Horacio M; Wisniacki, Diego A

    2016-06-13

    Echoes are ubiquitous phenomena in several branches of physics, ranging from acoustics, optics, condensed matter and cold atoms to geophysics. They are at the base of a number of very useful experimental techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, photon echo and time-reversal mirrors. Particularly interesting physical effects are obtained when the echo studies are performed on complex systems, either classically chaotic, disordered or many-body. Consequently, the term Loschmidt echo has been coined to designate and quantify the revival occurring when an imperfect time-reversal procedure is applied to a complex quantum system, or equivalently to characterize the stability of quantum evolution in the presence of perturbations. Here, we present the articles which discuss the work that has shaped the field in the past few years. PMID:27140977

  11. Loschmidt echo and time reversal in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Jalabert, Rodolfo A; Pastawski, Horacio M; Wisniacki, Diego A

    2016-06-13

    Echoes are ubiquitous phenomena in several branches of physics, ranging from acoustics, optics, condensed matter and cold atoms to geophysics. They are at the base of a number of very useful experimental techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, photon echo and time-reversal mirrors. Particularly interesting physical effects are obtained when the echo studies are performed on complex systems, either classically chaotic, disordered or many-body. Consequently, the term Loschmidt echo has been coined to designate and quantify the revival occurring when an imperfect time-reversal procedure is applied to a complex quantum system, or equivalently to characterize the stability of quantum evolution in the presence of perturbations. Here, we present the articles which discuss the work that has shaped the field in the past few years.

  12. Light echoes and transient luminescence near SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crotts, Arlin P. S.; Kunkel, William E.; Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of two new light echoes from sheets of material behind supernova 1987A and present images of the progenitor's circumstellar shell are reported, indicating diffuse echoes from the star's red giant wind. The echo sheets' geometry explains well the behavior of SN 1987's 10-micron flux, but the circumstellar shell appears to be 70 percent larger than the prediction from the analysis of narrow UV emission lines. The sheets' recombination time show them relatively thin and dense. The data also constrain the existence of any fourth star in the Sanduleak -69 deg 202 system and show that the feature reported 8 arcsecs from the supernova is probably not an echo from a thin sheet in SN 1987A's foreground.

  13. Loschmidt echo and time reversal in complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Goussev, Arseni; Jalabert, Rodolfo A.; Pastawski, Horacio M.; Wisniacki, Diego A.

    2016-01-01

    Echoes are ubiquitous phenomena in several branches of physics, ranging from acoustics, optics, condensed matter and cold atoms to geophysics. They are at the base of a number of very useful experimental techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, photon echo and time-reversal mirrors. Particularly interesting physical effects are obtained when the echo studies are performed on complex systems, either classically chaotic, disordered or many-body. Consequently, the term Loschmidt echo has been coined to designate and quantify the revival occurring when an imperfect time-reversal procedure is applied to a complex quantum system, or equivalently to characterize the stability of quantum evolution in the presence of perturbations. Here, we present the articles which discuss the work that has shaped the field in the past few years. PMID:27140977

  14. A model for depolarized radar echoes from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Moore, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The depolarized radar echoes from Mars are modeled using a combination of remote-sensing observations. The model reproduces the variations of the total radar cross-sections with longitude observed by Goldstone (1986) along 7 S, yields larger magnitudes of total radar cross-sections along 22 N than those along 7 S, and produces depolarized echo spectra that broadly match those observed by the Arecibo radar in 1980 and 1982. The model indicates that volcanoes and lava plains of the Tharsis-Alba Patera, Elysium, and Amazonia regions have the strongest depolarized echoes from the entire planet. Rock populations for the moon and Mars are estimated assuming depolarized radar echoes result from rocks with radii between 1.3 and three times the wavelength.

  15. Spin Echo in Spinor Dipolar Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Yasunaga, Masashi; Tsubota, Makoto

    2008-11-28

    We theoretically propose and numerically realize spin echo in a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). We investigate the influence on the spin echo of phase separation of the condensate. The equation of motion of the spin density exhibits two relaxation times. We use two methods to separate the relaxation times and hence demonstrate a technique to reveal magnetic dipole-dipole interactions in spinor BECs.

  16. The architecture of dynamic reservoir in the echo state network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hongyan; Liu, Xiang; Li, Lixiang

    2012-09-01

    Echo state network (ESN) has recently attracted increasing interests because of its superior capability in modeling nonlinear dynamic systems. In the conventional echo state network model, its dynamic reservoir (DR) has a random and sparse topology, which is far from the real biological neural networks from both structural and functional perspectives. We hereby propose three novel types of echo state networks with new dynamic reservoir topologies based on complex network theory, i.e., with a small-world topology, a scale-free topology, and a mixture of small-world and scale-free topologies, respectively. We then analyze the relationship between the dynamic reservoir structure and its prediction capability. We utilize two commonly used time series to evaluate the prediction performance of the three proposed echo state networks and compare them to the conventional model. We also use independent and identically distributed time series to analyze the short-term memory and prediction precision of these echo state networks. Furthermore, we study the ratio of scale-free topology and the small-world topology in the mixed-topology network, and examine its influence on the performance of the echo state networks. Our simulation results show that the proposed echo state network models have better prediction capabilities, a wider spectral radius, but retain almost the same short-term memory capacity as compared to the conventional echo state network model. We also find that the smaller the ratio of the scale-free topology over the small-world topology, the better the memory capacities.

  17. A local Echo State Property through the largest Lyapunov exponent.

    PubMed

    Wainrib, Gilles; Galtier, Mathieu N

    2016-04-01

    Echo State Networks are efficient time-series predictors, which highly depend on the value of the spectral radius of the reservoir connectivity matrix. Based on recent results on the mean field theory of driven random recurrent neural networks, enabling the computation of the largest Lyapunov exponent of an ESN, we develop a cheap algorithm to establish a local and operational version of the Echo State Property.

  18. The architecture of dynamic reservoir in the echo state network.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongyan; Liu, Xiang; Li, Lixiang

    2012-09-01

    Echo state network (ESN) has recently attracted increasing interests because of its superior capability in modeling nonlinear dynamic systems. In the conventional echo state network model, its dynamic reservoir (DR) has a random and sparse topology, which is far from the real biological neural networks from both structural and functional perspectives. We hereby propose three novel types of echo state networks with new dynamic reservoir topologies based on complex network theory, i.e., with a small-world topology, a scale-free topology, and a mixture of small-world and scale-free topologies, respectively. We then analyze the relationship between the dynamic reservoir structure and its prediction capability. We utilize two commonly used time series to evaluate the prediction performance of the three proposed echo state networks and compare them to the conventional model. We also use independent and identically distributed time series to analyze the short-term memory and prediction precision of these echo state networks. Furthermore, we study the ratio of scale-free topology and the small-world topology in the mixed-topology network, and examine its influence on the performance of the echo state networks. Our simulation results show that the proposed echo state network models have better prediction capabilities, a wider spectral radius, but retain almost the same short-term memory capacity as compared to the conventional echo state network model. We also find that the smaller the ratio of the scale-free topology over the small-world topology, the better the memory capacities.

  19. The architecture of dynamic reservoir in the echo state network.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongyan; Liu, Xiang; Li, Lixiang

    2012-09-01

    Echo state network (ESN) has recently attracted increasing interests because of its superior capability in modeling nonlinear dynamic systems. In the conventional echo state network model, its dynamic reservoir (DR) has a random and sparse topology, which is far from the real biological neural networks from both structural and functional perspectives. We hereby propose three novel types of echo state networks with new dynamic reservoir topologies based on complex network theory, i.e., with a small-world topology, a scale-free topology, and a mixture of small-world and scale-free topologies, respectively. We then analyze the relationship between the dynamic reservoir structure and its prediction capability. We utilize two commonly used time series to evaluate the prediction performance of the three proposed echo state networks and compare them to the conventional model. We also use independent and identically distributed time series to analyze the short-term memory and prediction precision of these echo state networks. Furthermore, we study the ratio of scale-free topology and the small-world topology in the mixed-topology network, and examine its influence on the performance of the echo state networks. Our simulation results show that the proposed echo state network models have better prediction capabilities, a wider spectral radius, but retain almost the same short-term memory capacity as compared to the conventional echo state network model. We also find that the smaller the ratio of the scale-free topology over the small-world topology, the better the memory capacities. PMID:23020466

  20. Transforming echoes into pseudo-action potentials for classifying plants.

    PubMed

    Kuc, R

    2001-10-01

    Animals perceive their environment by converting sensory stimuli into action potentials, or temporal point processes, that are interpreted by the brain. This paper investigates the information content of point processes extracted from echoes from in situ plants in an effort to understand how bats recognize landmarks in the field. A mobile sonar converts echoes into biologically similar temporal point processes. termed pseudo-action potentials (PAPs), whose inter-PAP interval relates to echo amplitude. The sonar forms a sector scan of an object to produce a spatial-temporal PAP field. Classifier neurons apply delays and coincidence detection to the PAP field to identify three distinct echo types, glints, blobs, and fuzz, which characterize plant features. Glints are large amplitude echoes exhibiting coherence over successive echoes in the sector scan, typically produced by favorably oriented isolated specular reflectors. Blobs are large echoes lacking coherence, typically bordering glints or formed by collections of interfering reflectors. Fuzz represents weak echoes, typically produced by collection of weak scatterers or by reflectors on the beam periphery. A small mirror reflector models a flat leaf surface and motivates the glint criteria. Classifiers are applied to experimental data from two types of tree trunks, a glint-producing sycamore (Platanus occidenatalis) and a glint-absent Norway maple (Acer platanoides) and two plants, a glint-producing rhododendron (Rhododendron maximus) and a glint-absent yew (Taxus media). We speculate that our narrow-band sonar models the activity of a single frequency bin in the frequency-modulated (FM) sweep emitted by bats, and that one function of the frequency bins in the FM sweep is to form a sector scan of the environment.

  1. Preliminary results of the echo-seeding experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Ding, Y.; Dunning, M.; Frederico, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Corlett, J.; Qiang, J.; Penn, G.; Prestemon, S.; Schlueter, R.; Venturini, M.; Wan, W.; Pernet, P-L.

    2010-05-23

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment aims to generate coherent radiation at 318 nm and 227 nm, which are the 5th and 7th harmonic of the infrared seed laser. In this paper we present the preliminary results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  2. EChO: What are exoplanets made of?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, G.; Drossart, P.; Isaak, K.; Krause, O.; Lovis, C.; Micela, G.; Ollivier, M.; Ribas, I.; Snellen, I.; Swinyard, AB(B.

    2012-09-01

    The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, EChO, will be the first dedicated mission to investigate the physics and chemistry of exoplanetary atmospheres. EChO will expand the playground of planetary science beyond our solar system, by providing a representative sample of exoplanet spectra under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions. The observed chemical composition largely depends on the planet's thermal structure, which in turn depends on the planet's orbital distance and metallicity, and the host star's luminosity and stellar type. The planetary mass determines the planet's ability to retain an atmosphere. The range of planets and stellar environments explored by EChO extends from the very hot to the temperate zone and includes gas-giants, Neptunes and super-Earths. EChO has been selected in 2011 as one of the four ESA M3 mission candidates, and it is currently in assessment phase. Here we will focus on the science of EChO and present the results obtained by the EChO Science Study Team.

  3. Multi-Echo Acquisition of O-Space Data

    PubMed Central

    Galiana, Gigi; Peters, Dana; Tam, Leo; Constable, R. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nonlinear gradient encoding methods, such as O-Space imaging, have been shown to provide good images from very few echoes. Acquiring data in a train of spin or gradient echoes is a very flexible way to further speed acquisition time. However, combining these strategies presents significant challenges, both in terms of the contrast and artifacts. We present strategies in both pulse sequence design and image processing to mitigate these effects. Theory and Methods The three strategies include a new echo ordering that takes into account the unique way that O-Space samples the k-space of the image; a new post-processing filter that allows tuning of T2-weighting by emphasizing the contribution of low frequency spatial information at selectable points in space and time; and an offset between linear and nonlinear gradients that makes the central point of each echo unique. Results Simulations indicate that these strategies mitigate artifacts introduced by T2 (or T2*) decay and produce contrast that reflects relaxation at a given TE. Conclusion Turbo spin echo O-Space is theoretically feasible, and the greater undersampling should make it possible to use shorter echo trains for a given scan time. PMID:24459076

  4. Is Ionizing Radiation Harmful at any Exposure? An Echo That Continues to Vibrate.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Edouard I; Colangelo, Nicholas W; Domogauer, Jason D; Sharma, Neha; de Toledo, Sonia M

    2016-03-01

    The health risks to humans and non-human biota exposed to low dose ionizing radiation remain ambiguous and are the subject of intense debate. The need to establish risk assessment standards based on the mechanisms underlying low-level radiation exposure has been recognized by regulatory agencies as critical to adequately protect people and to make the most effective use of national resources. Here, the authors briefly review evidence showing that the molecular and biochemical changes induced by low doses of radiation differ from those induced by high doses. In particular, an array of redundant and inter-related mechanisms act in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes to restore DNA integrity following exposures to relatively low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. Furthermore, the radiation-induced protective mechanisms often overcompensate and minimize the mutagenic potential of the byproducts of normal oxidative metabolism. In contrast to adaptive protection observed at low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation, there is evidence that even a single nuclear traversal by a densely ionizing particle track can trigger harmful effects that spread beyond the traversed cell and induce damaging effects in the nearby bystander cells. In vivo studies examining whether exposure to low dose radiation at younger age modulates the latency of expression of age-related diseases such as cancer, together with studies on the role of genetic susceptibility, will further illuminate the magnitude of risk of exposure to low dose radiation. PMID:26808874

  5. LRS data processing methods for detection of lunar subsurface echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshigami, Shoko; Mochizuki, Kengo; Watanabe, Shiho; Watanabe, Toshiki; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Yamaji, Atsushi; Ono, Takayuki; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Hiromu; Kobayashi, Takao; Kasahara, Yoshiya

    Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) is an instrument for one of fifteen science missions of SE- LENE (KAGUYA). LRS is a ground-penetrating FM-CW radar system of HF-band. LRS detects echoes reflected from subsurface discontinuities where dielectric constants of the rocks change. The range resolution of LRS is 75 m in free space, whereas the sampling interval in the flight direction is about 75 m when the spacecraft altitude is 100 km. The primary objective of LRS is to investigate lunar subsurface structures. We plan to perform global soundings by LRS to contribute to studying the evolution of the Moon. In this presentation, we introduce the techniques to process LRS data to produce data products and to detect subsurface echoes. We have two standard data products of LRS under consideration. The time series data of ‘A-scope' which is a plot of signal power spectrum as a function of range derived from of the waveform data are called ‘B-scan'. Because LRS instruments change timing of data recording (measurement delay time) according to the predicted distance between KAGUYA spacecraft and lunar surface, observation range with respect to the spacecraft varies from pulse to pulse. In addition, flight altitude of KAGUYA changes in the range of several tens of kilometers. Therefore a trace of surface nadir echoes in unprocessed B-scan images does not correspond to actual lunar topography. We corrected variations of the measurement delay time and flight altitude of KAGUYA to produce a B-scan data product with the original spatial resolution (BScan high) and a reduced spatial resolution product (BScan low) both in the PDS format. The echo signals in A-scope data might be classified in the following categories; (1) a surface nadir echo, (2) surface off-nadir backscattering echoes, and (3) subsurface echoes. The most intense signal usually comes from the nadir point, when KAGUYA is flying over a level surface. The A-scope data also include various noises resulted from, for example

  6. Improved convection compensating pulsed field gradient spin-echo and stimulated-echo methods.

    PubMed

    Sørland, G H; Seland, J G; Krane, J; Anthonsen, H W

    2000-02-01

    The need for convection compensating methods in NMR has been manifested through an increasing number of publications related to the subject over the past few years (J. Magn. Reson. 125, 372 (1997); 132, 13 (1998); 131, 126 (1998); 118, 50 (1996); 133, 379 (1998)). When performing measurements at elevated temperature, small convection currents may give rise to erroneous values of the diffusion coefficient. In work with high resolution NMR spectroscopy, the application of magnetic field gradients also introduces an eddy-current magnetic field which may result in errors in phase and baseline in the FFT-spectra. The eddy current field has been greatly suppressed by the application of bipolar magnetic field gradients. However, when introducing bipolar magnetic field gradients, the pulse sequence is lengthened significantly. This has recently been pointed out as a major drawback because of the loss of coherence and of NMR-signal due to transverse relaxation processes. Here we present modified convection compensating pulsed field gradient double spin echo and double stimulated echo sequences which suppress the eddy-current magnetic field without increasing the duration of the pulse sequences.

  7. Comparison of Twice Refocused Spin Echo versus Stimulated Echo Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Tracking Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Andersen, Anders; Feiweier, Thorsten; Damon, Bruce; Hardy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the precision of measuring the pennation angle and fiber length in the Vastus Lateralis (VL) using two distinctly different diffusion tensor imaging sequences. Materials and Methods We imaged the thigh of ten normal subjects on a 3T MR imager with twice refocused spin echo (TRSE) and stimulated echo (STEAM) DTI-MRI techniques. Both techniques took the same total acquisition time, employed the same diffusion weighting and gradient directions. Using the diffusion tensor images produced by each sequence muscle fiber bundles were tracked from the aponeurosis by following the first eigenvector of the diffusion tensor. From these tracks we calculated the pennation angle and fiber length. Results The STEAM acquisition resulted in significantly higher SNR, lower ADC, higher FA values and longer fibers than the TRSE. Although no difference in the pennation angle between the two acquisitions was found, the TRSE sequence had a significantly greater within subject dispersion in the pennation angle of tracked fibers which may indicate a reduction in the coherence of fiber bundles. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging of muscle using a STEAM acquisition resulted in significant improvements in the SNR and FA, resulting in tracking a larger number of muscle fiber bundles over longer distances and with less within subject dispersion. PMID:24554376

  8. Echo detection and target-ranging neurons in the auditory system of the bat Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Feng, A S; Simmons, J A; Kick, S A

    1978-11-10

    Some of the neurons in the nucleus intercollicularis and auditory cortex of the echolocating bat Eptesicus fuscus respond selectively to sonar echoes occurring with specific echo delays or pulse-echo intervals. They do not respond for a wide range of other types of sounds or for sonar echoes at longer or shorter pulse-echo intervals; they may, therefore, be specialized for detection and ranging of sonar targets.

  9. Ultrasonic characterization of soft tissue vibrations based on the two-dimensional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Kim, Yongmin; Beach, Kirk W.

    2005-09-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that soft tissue vibrations in the body, traditionally associated with vascular bruits and cardiac murmurs, can potentially be used for the ultrasonic diagnosis of coronary artery disease and vascular trauma. In this paper, the ultrasonic spectrum of soft tissue vibrations is formulated using the two-dimensional Fourier transform, making full use of the information present in the backscattered ultrasound echoes from vibrating tissue. Parametric simulation studies show that vibrations with amplitude 1 μm may be detected even with tissue velocity of 20 cm/s and acceleration of 5 m/s2, e.g., during peak cardiac motion. Vibrations with amplitude as low as 0.1 μm may be detected when the tissue acceleration is negligible, e.g., during mid-diastole. Also, it was found that tissue vibrations in a direction transverse to the ultrasound beam can be detected. In vivo examples of cardiac wall vibrations in patients with coronary artery disease are presented. Tissue vibrations can provide improved sensitivity over conventional duplex ultrasound since the scattering strength from tissue is significantly higher than that from blood. In addition, detection of tissue vibrations has reduced angle dependency and does not require visualization of the vessel lumen, making the exam less dependent on operator skill.

  10. Exoplanetary Characterisation Observatory (EChO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Ingo; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2013-04-01

    The science of extrasolar planets is one of the most rapidly changing areas of astrophysics and since 1995 the number of planets known has increased by almost two orders of magnitude. A combination of ground-based surveys and dedicated space missions has resulted in 800-plus planets being detected, and over 2000 that await confirmation. NASA's Kepler mission has opened up the possibility of discovering Earth-like planets in the habitable zone around some of the 100,000 stars it is surveying during its 3 to 4-year lifetime. The new ESA's Gaia mission is expected to discover thousands of new planets around stars within 200 parsecs of the Sun. The key challenge now is moving on from discovery, important though that remains, to characterisation: what are these planets actually like, and why are they as they are? The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is a space mission dedicated to undertaking spectroscopy of transiting exoplanets over the widest range possible and is currently being studied by ESA in the context of a medium class mission within the Cosmic Vision programme for launch post 2020. The mission is based around a highly stable space platform with a 1.2 m class telescope at L2, hosting a suit of spectrographs providing continuous spectral coverage from 0.5 to 16 microns. Such a broad and simultaneous wavelength coverage allows the unique insight into the atmospheric make up of these foreign worlds and allows us to study their planetary and atmospheric compositions and evolutions.

  11. Cortical neurons of bats respond best to echoes from nearest targets when listening to natural biosonar multi-echo streams

    PubMed Central

    Beetz, M. Jerome; Hechavarría, Julio C.; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Bats orientate in darkness by listening to echoes from their biosonar calls, a behaviour known as echolocation. Recent studies showed that cortical neurons respond in a highly selective manner when stimulated with natural echolocation sequences that contain echoes from single targets. However, it remains unknown how cortical neurons process echolocation sequences containing echo information from multiple objects. In the present study, we used echolocation sequences containing echoes from three, two or one object separated in the space depth as stimuli to study neuronal activity in the bat auditory cortex. Neuronal activity was recorded with multi-electrode arrays placed in the dorsal auditory cortex, where neurons tuned to target-distance are found. Our results show that target-distance encoding neurons are mostly selective to echoes coming from the closest object, and that the representation of echo information from distant objects is selectively suppressed. This suppression extends over a large part of the dorsal auditory cortex and may override possible parallel processing of multiple objects. The presented data suggest that global cortical suppression might establish a cortical “default mode” that allows selectively focusing on close obstacle even without active attention from the animals. PMID:27786252

  12. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  13. Vibrating fuel grapple

    DOEpatents

    Chertock, deceased, Alan J.; Fox, Jack N.; Weissinger, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor refueling method utilizing a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core which incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head, enabling additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  14. Solvation of fluoro-acetonitrile in water by 2D-IR spectroscopy: A combined experimental-computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Cazade, Pierre-André; Das, Akshaya K.; Tran, Halina; Kläsi, Felix; Hamm, Peter; Bereau, Tristan; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-06-07

    The solvent dynamics around fluorinated acetonitrile is characterized by 2-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and atomistic simulations. The lineshape of the linear infrared spectrum is better captured by semiempirical (density functional tight binding) mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics simulations, whereas force field simulations with multipolar interactions yield lineshapes that are significantly too narrow. For the solvent dynamics, a relatively slow time scale of 2 ps is found from the experiments and supported by the mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics simulations. With multipolar force fields fitted to the available thermodynamical data, the time scale is considerably faster—on the 0.5 ps time scale. The simulations provide evidence for a well established CF–HOH hydrogen bond (population of 25%) which is found from the radial distribution function g(r) from both, force field and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

  15. LEGUS Discovery of a Light Echo Around Supernova 2012aw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Lee, Janice C.; Anderson, Jay; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Calzetti, Daniela; Bright, Stacey N.; Ubeda, Leonardo; Smith, Linda J.; Sabbi, Elena; Grebel, Eva K.; Herrero, Artemio; de Mink, Selma E.

    2015-06-01

    We have discovered a luminous light echo around the normal Type II-Plateau Supernova (SN) 2012aw in Messier 95 (M95; NGC 3351), detected in images obtained approximately two years after explosion with the Wide Field Channel 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope by the Legacy ExtraGalactic Ultraviolet Survey. The multi-band observations span from the near-ultraviolet through the optical (F275W, F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W). The apparent brightness of the echo at the time was ˜21-22 mag in all of these bands. The echo appears circular, although less obviously as a ring, with an inhomogeneous surface brightness, in particular, a prominent enhanced brightness to the southeast. The SN itself was still detectable, particularly in the redder bands. We are able to model the light echo as the time-integrated SN light scattered off of diffuse interstellar dust in the SN environment. We have assumed that this dust is analogous to that in the Milky Way with {R}V=3.1. The SN light curves that we consider also include models of the unobserved early burst of light from the SN shock breakout. Our analysis of the echo suggests that the distance from the SN to the scattering dust elements along the echo is ≈ 45 pc. The implied visual extinction for the echo-producing dust is consistent with estimates made previously from the SN itself. Finally, our estimate of the SN brightness in F814W is fainter than that measured for the red supergiant star at the precise SN location in pre-SN images, possibly indicating that the star has vanished and confirming it as the likely SN progenitor.

  16. Research on key technologies of LADAR echo signal simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Shi, Rui; Ye, Jiansen; Wang, Xin; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    LADAR echo signal simulator is one of the most significant components of hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation systems for LADAR, which is designed to simulate the LADAR return signal in laboratory conditions. The device can provide the laser echo signal of target and background for imaging LADAR systems to test whether it is of good performance. Some key technologies are investigated in this paper. Firstly, the 3D model of typical target is built, and transformed to the data of the target echo signal based on ranging equation and targets reflection characteristics. Then, system model and time series model of LADAR echo signal simulator are established. Some influential factors which could induce fixed delay error and random delay error on the simulated return signals are analyzed. In the simulation system, the signal propagating delay of circuits and the response time of pulsed lasers are belong to fixed delay error. The counting error of digital delay generator, the jitter of system clock and the desynchronized between trigger signal and clock signal are a part of random delay error. Furthermore, these system insertion delays are analyzed quantitatively, and the noisy data are obtained. The target echo signals are got by superimposing of the noisy data and the pure target echo signal. In order to overcome these disadvantageous factors, a method of adjusting the timing diagram of the simulation system is proposed. Finally, the simulated echo signals are processed by using a detection algorithm to complete the 3D model reconstruction of object. The simulation results reveal that the range resolution can be better than 8 cm.

  17. Suppression of artifacts in multiple-echo magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Gareth J.; Mareci, Thomas H.

    Many techniques in both magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy use two or more RF pulses to excite the spin system and detect the echo signals which form between or after the pulses. In general many different echoes form during each acquisition interval, only one of which carries the information required. The others lead to distortion of peak heights and lineshapes in MRS, and to ghost images and similar artifacts in MRI. The "coherence transfer pathway" formalism of Bodenhausen et al. allows the evolution of each echo to be studied and suggests methods of removing the unwanted signals. The general phase-cycling methods described by Bodenhausen et al. require a degree of flexibility in the control of RF pulses which is not available on all spectrometers, however, so simpler schemes requiring only 180° phase shifts have been investigated. With certain restrictions, these schemes give cancellation of the unwanted echoes during any particular acquisition interval, and in certain cases can be extended to cancel the unwanted echoes in all acquisition intervals of a multiple-echo sequence. All such schemes, however, require a large number of transients to be collected, so a second method has been investigated whereby the systematic application of magnetic field gradients can produce similar results within a single transient. Both of these approaches have been reported previously, but we introduce a novel formalism which allows the required pulse phases and gradient magnitudes to be systematically calculated, rather than empirically determined, for any pulse sequence. Examples of the application of each method to the spin-echo and TART imaging sequences are given, although both methods are equally applicable to many pulse sequences used in spectroscopy.

  18. REDUCTION OF ECHO DECORRELATION VIA COMPLEX PRINCIPAL COMPONENT FILTERING

    PubMed Central

    Mauldin, F. William; Viola, Francesco; Walker, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound motion estimation is a fundamental component of clinical and research techniques that include color flow Doppler, spectral Doppler, radiation force imaging and ultrasound-based elasticity estimation. In each of these applications, motion estimates are corrupted by signal decorrelation that originates from nonuniform target motion across the acoustic beam. In this article, complex principal component filtering (PCF) is demonstrated as a filtering technique for dramatically reducing echo decorrelation in blood flow estimation and radiation force imaging. We present simulation results from a wide range of imaging conditions that illustrate a dramatic improvement over simple bandpass filtering in terms of overall echo decorrelation (≤99.9% reduction), root mean square error (≤97.3% reduction) and the standard deviation of displacement estimates (≤97.4% reduction). A radiation force imaging technique, termed sonorheometry, was applied to fresh whole blood during coagulation, and complex PCF operated on the returning echoes. Sonorheometry was specifically chosen as an example radiation force imaging technique in which echo decorrelation corrupts motion estimation. At 2 min after initiation of blood coagulation, the average echo correlation for sonorheometry improved from 0.996 to 0.9999, which corresponded to a 41.0% reduction in motion estimation variance as predicted by the Cramer-Rao lower bound under reasonable imaging conditions. We also applied complex PCF to improve blood velocity estimates from the left carotid artery of a healthy 23-year-old male. At the location of peak blood velocity, complex PCF improved the correlation of consecutive echo signals from an average correlation of 0.94 to 0.998. The improved echo correlation for both sonorheometry and blood flow estimation yielded motion estimates that exhibited more consistent responses with less noise. Complex PCF reduces speckle decorrelation and improves the performance of ultrasonic motion

  19. A high success rate full-waveform lidar echo decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Duan; Li, Xiaolu

    2016-01-01

    A full-waveform Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) echo decomposition method is proposed in this paper. In this method, the peak points are used to detect the separated echo components, while the inflection points are combined with corresponding peak points to detect the overlapping echo components. The detected echo components are then sorted according to their energies in a descending order. The sorted echo components are one by one added into the decomposition model according to their orders. For each addition, the parameters of all echo components already added into the decomposition model are iteratively renewed. After renewing, the amplitudes and full width at half maximums of the echo components are compared with pre-set thresholds to determine and remove the false echo components. Both simulation and experiment were carried out to evaluate the proposed method. In simulation, 4000 full-waveform echoes with different numbers and parameters of echo components were generated and decomposed using the proposed and three other commonly used methods. Results show that the proposed method is of the highest success rate, 91.43%. In experiment, 9549 Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) echoes for Shennongjia forest district in south China were employed as test echoes. The test echoes were first decomposed using the four methods and the decomposition results were also compared with those provided by the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Comparison results show that the determination coefficient ({{R}2} ) of the proposed method is of the largest mean, 0.6838, and the smallest standard deviation, 0.3588, and the distribution of the number of the echo components decomposed from the GLAS echoes is the most satisfied with the situation of full-waveform echoes from the forest area, implying that the superposition of the echo components decomposed from a full-waveform echo by using the proposed method can best approximate the full-waveform echo.

  20. Measurement of cantilever vibration using impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masaki; Hamashima, Hiromitsu; Kondoh, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor was demonstrated to monitor the vibration frequency. Commercialized pressure sensors and a variable capacitor were chosen as external sensors, which were connected to a reflector on a SAW device. As the reflection coefficient of the reflector depended on the impedance, the echo amplitude was influenced by changes in the impedance of the external sensor. The vibration frequency of the cantilever was determined by monitoring the echo amplitude of the SAW device. Moreover, the attenuation constant of an envelope was estimated. The results of our feasibility study indicate that the impedance-loaded SAW sensor can be applied as a detector for structural health monitoring.

  1. Ultrafast Structural Fluctuations of Myoglobin-Bound Thiocyanate and Selenocyanate Ions Measured with Two-Dimensional Infrared Photon Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maj, Michał; Kwak, Kyungwon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-11-16

    Structural dynamics within the distal cavity of myoglobin protein is investigated using 2D-IR and IR pump-probe spectroscopy of the N≡C stretch modes of heme-bound thiocyanate and selenocyanate ions. Although myoglobin-bound thiocyanate group shows a doublet in its IR absorption spectrum, no cross peaks originating from chemical exchange between the two components are observed in the time-resolved 2D IR spectra within the experimental time window. Frequency-frequency correlation functions of the two studied anionic ligands are obtained by means of a few different analysis approaches; these functions were then used to elucidate the differences in structural fluctuation around ligand, ligand-protein interactions, and the degree of structural heterogeneity within the hydrophobic pocket of these myoglobin complexes.

  2. X-ray shout echoing through space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 3991 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in hours. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 2153 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays (Please choose "hi-res" version for animation) XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in seconds. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. This echo forms when the powerful radiation of a gamma-ray burst, coming from far away, crosses a slab of dust in our Galaxy and is scattered by it, like the beam of a lighthouse in clouds. Using the expanding rings to precisely pin-point the location of this dust, astronomers can identify places where new stars and planets are likely to form. On 3 December 2003 ESA's observatory, Integral, detected a burst of gamma rays, lasting about 30 seconds, from the direction of a distant galaxy. Within minutes of the detection, thanks to a sophisticated alert network, many

  3. Kemp Echo Lattices Incorporating Hair Cell Nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellami, Louiza

    In this thesis we develop a two-part model of the inner ear that can be used to simulate Kemp echoes, in their impulse response, and from which a characterization of the cochlea can be made. To accomplish this task, in the first part, we propose a linear digital scattering model of the cochlea, based on the well known unidimensional transmission line model into which we incorporate nonuniform and loss properties. The lattice structure of the digital scattering model is obtained by rephrasing the model equations in terms of incident and reflected waves. A spectral estimation method, which treats the system as an ARMA filter with a minimum phase transfer function of unknown degree, is used to estimate the transfer function of the cochlea. This method utilizes the theory of positive real and bounded real functions and Richard's theorem on the concept of degree reduction to determine both the degree and the predictor coefficients of the filter. The scattering model is then realized, using a new synthesis technique, from the overall transfer function and the zeros of transmission, as a cascade of real lossless lattice filters of degree two, closed on a load section. To change the nature of the sections from lossless to lossy, a new method, based on the properties of the proposed lattice structure and the damping parameter of the cochlea, was developed to distribute the load factor among the sections. Each lattice filter is described by a transfer scattering matrix whose entries are functions of the mechanical and geometrical parameters of the cochlea. The proposed synthesis method leads to a systematic estimation of the parameters of the cochlea. In the second part, we introduce a nonlinear bidirectional mechano-electrical model of a hair cell, estimate its components from experimental data, analyze its behavior, simulate it, and compare the results with experimental findings. We than propose a schematic procedure to realize a nonlinear model of the cochlea by

  4. Vibrational-translational relaxation in liquid chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Choi, P.-K.; Negishi, K.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic measurements were made in liquid chloroform over the frequency range from 3 MHz to 5 GHz by means of three experimental techniques, pulse-echo overlap, high-resolution Bragg reflection, and Brillouin scattering. The observed velocity dispersion revealed two relaxation processes, one at 650 MHz and the other at 5.1 GHz at 20 °C. They are interpreted in terms of vibrational-translational relaxation. Quantitative analysis of specific heat shows the lowest (261 cm-1) and the second lowest (366 cm-1) fundamental vibrational modes should have a common relaxation time at 50 ps and the group of all above the third mode (667 cm-1) at 290 ps. The present results are combined with recent data obtained by Laubereau et al. with the picosecond spectroscopy technique; a diagram illustrating V-T and V-V energy transfer is presented. A brief comment is given also on V-T and V-V processes in dichloromethane.

  5. Modeling of Field-Aligned Guided Echoes in the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Green, James L.

    2004-01-01

    The conditions under which high frequency (f>>f(sub uh)) long-range extraordinary-mode discrete field-aligned echoes observed by the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite in the plasmasphere are investigated by ray tracing modeling. Field-aligned discrete echoes are most commonly observed by RPI in the plasmasphere although they are also observed over the polar cap region. The plasmasphere field-aligned echoes appearing as multiple echo traces at different virtual ranges are attributed to signals reflected successively between conjugate hemispheres that propagate along or nearly along closed geomagnetic field lines. The ray tracing simulations show that field-aligned ducts with as little as 1% density perturbations (depletions) and less than 10 wavelengths wide can guide nearly field-aligned propagating high frequency X mode waves. Effective guidance of wave at a given frequency and wave normal angle (Psi) depends on the cross-field density scale of the duct, such that ducts with stronger density depletions need to be wider in order to maintain the same gradient of refractive index across the magnetic field. While signal guidance by field aligned density gradient without ducting is possible only over the polar region, conjugate field-aligned echoes that have traversed through the equatorial region are most likely guided by ducting.

  6. Self-motion facilitates echo-acoustic orientation in humans.

    PubMed

    Wallmeier, Ludwig; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2014-11-01

    The ability of blind humans to navigate complex environments through echolocation has received rapidly increasing scientific interest. However, technical limitations have precluded a formal quantification of the interplay between echolocation and self-motion. Here, we use a novel virtual echo-acoustic space technique to formally quantify the influence of self-motion on echo-acoustic orientation. We show that both the vestibular and proprioceptive components of self-motion contribute significantly to successful echo-acoustic orientation in humans: specifically, our results show that vestibular input induced by whole-body self-motion resolves orientation-dependent biases in echo-acoustic cues. Fast head motions, relative to the body, provide additional proprioceptive cues which allow subjects to effectively assess echo-acoustic space referenced against the body orientation. These psychophysical findings clearly demonstrate that human echolocation is well suited to drive precise locomotor adjustments. Our data shed new light on the sensory-motor interactions, and on possible optimization strategies underlying echolocation in humans. PMID:26064556

  7. Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy and detection of quantum fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Wen; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-04-15

    Central spin decoherence is useful for detecting many-body physics in environments and moreover, the spin echo control can remove the effects of static thermal fluctuations so that the quantum fluctuations are revealed. The central spin decoherence approach, however, is feasible only in some special configurations and often requires uniform coupling between the central spin and individual spins in the baths, which are very challenging in experiments. Here, by making analogue between central spin decoherence and depolarization of photons, we propose a scheme of Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy (FRES) for studying quantum fluctuations in interacting spin systems. The echo control of the photon polarization is realized by flipping the polarization with a birefringence crystal. The FRES, similar to spin echo in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, can suppress the effects of the static magnetic fluctuations and therefore reveal dynamical magnetic fluctuations. We apply the scheme to a rare-earth compound LiHoF4 and calculate the echo signal, which is related to the quantum fluctuations of the system. We observe enhanced signals at the phase boundary. The FRES should be useful for studying quantum fluctuations in a broad range of spin systems, including cold atoms, quantum dots, solid-state impurities, and transparent magnetic materials.

  8. Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy and detection of quantum fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Wen; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-01-01

    Central spin decoherence is useful for detecting many-body physics in environments and moreover, the spin echo control can remove the effects of static thermal fluctuations so that the quantum fluctuations are revealed. The central spin decoherence approach, however, is feasible only in some special configurations and often requires uniform coupling between the central spin and individual spins in the baths, which are very challenging in experiments. Here, by making analogue between central spin decoherence and depolarization of photons, we propose a scheme of Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy (FRES) for studying quantum fluctuations in interacting spin systems. The echo control of the photon polarization is realized by flipping the polarization with a birefringence crystal. The FRES, similar to spin echo in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, can suppress the effects of the static magnetic fluctuations and therefore reveal dynamical magnetic fluctuations. We apply the scheme to a rare-earth compound LiHoF4 and calculate the echo signal, which is related to the quantum fluctuations of the system. We observe enhanced signals at the phase boundary. The FRES should be useful for studying quantum fluctuations in a broad range of spin systems, including cold atoms, quantum dots, solid-state impurities, and transparent magnetic materials. PMID:24733086

  9. Spin echo versus stimulated echo diffusion tensor imaging of the in vivo human heart

    PubMed Central

    von Deuster, Constantin; Stoeck, Christian T.; Genet, Martin; Atkinson, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR) efficiency and diffusion tensor metrics of cardiac diffusion tensor mapping using acceleration‐compensated spin‐echo (SE) and stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) imaging. Methods Diffusion weighted SE and STEAM sequences were implemented on a clinical 1.5 Tesla MR system. The SNR efficiency of SE and STEAM was measured (b = 50–450 s/mm2) in isotropic agar, anisotropic diffusion phantoms and the in vivo human heart. Diffusion tensor analysis was performed on mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, helix and transverse angles. Results In the isotropic phantom, the ratio of SNR efficiency for SE versus STEAM, SNRt(SE/STEAM), was 2.84 ± 0.08 for all tested b‐values. In the anisotropic diffusion phantom the ratio decreased from 2.75 ± 0.05 to 2.20 ± 0.13 with increasing b‐value, similar to the in vivo decrease from 2.91 ± 0.43 to 2.30 ± 0.30. Diffusion tensor analysis revealed reduced deviation of helix angles from a linear transmural model and reduced transverse angle standard deviation for SE compared with STEAM. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were measured to be statistically different (P < 0.001) between SE and STEAM. Conclusion Cardiac DTI using motion‐compensated SE yields a 2.3–2.9× increase in SNR efficiency relative to STEAM and improved accuracy of tensor metrics. The SE method hence presents an attractive alternative to STEAM based approaches. Magn Reson Med 76:862–872, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26445426

  10. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  11. Vibrational Schroedinger Cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kis, Z.; Janszky, J.; Vinogradov, An. V.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The optical Schroedinger cat states are simple realizations of quantum states having nonclassical features. It is shown that vibrational analogues of such states can be realized in an experiment of double pulse excitation of vibrionic transitions. To track the evolution of the vibrational wave packet we derive a non-unitary time evolution operator so that calculations are made in a quasi Heisenberg picture.

  12. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOEpatents

    Cericola, Fred; Doggett, James W.; Ernest, Terry L.; Priddy, Tommy G.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  13. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cericola, F.; Doggett, J.W.; Ernest, T.L.

    1991-08-27

    An apparatus is discussed for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 {degrees} around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  14. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cericola, F.; Doggett, J.W.; Ernest, T.L.; Priddy, T.G.

    1990-03-21

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis. 1 fig.

  15. Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge.

    SciTech Connect

    Ziari, Fred

    2002-12-19

    This report discusses the findings of the Echo Meadows Project (BPA Project 2001-015-00). The main purpose of this project is to artificially recharge an alluvial aquifer, WITH water from Umatilla River during the winter high flow period. In turn, this recharged aquifer will discharge an increased flow of cool groundwater back to the river, thereby improving Umatilla River water quality and temperature. A considerable side benefit is that the Umatilla River should improve as a habitat for migration, spanning, and rearing of anadromous and resident fish. The scope of this project is to provide critical baseline information about the Echo Meadows and the associated reach of the Umatilla River. Key elements of information that has been gathered include: (1) Annual and seasonal groundwater levels in the aquifer with an emphasis on the irrigation season, (2) Groundwater hydraulic properties, particularly hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, and (3) Groundwater and Umatilla River water quality including temperature, nutrients and other indicator parameters. One of the major purposes of this data gathering was to develop input to a groundwater model of the area. The purpose of the model is to estimate our ability to recharge this aquifer using water that is only available outside of the irrigation season (December through the end of February) and to estimate the timing of groundwater return flow back to the river. We have found through the data collection and modeling efforts that this reach of the river had historically returned as much as 45 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water to the Umatilla River during the summer and early fall. However, this return flow was reduced to as low as 10 cfs primarily due to reduced quantities of irrigation application, gain in irrigation efficiencies and increased groundwater pumping. Our modeling indicated that it is possible to restore these critical return flows using applied water outside of the irrigation season. We further

  16. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Levin, Ira W.

    2011-07-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy, commonly associated with IR absorption and Raman scattering, has provided a powerful approach for investigating interactions between biomolecules that make up cellular membranes. Because the IR and Raman signals arise from the intrinsic properties of these molecules, vibrational spectroscopy probes the delicate interactions that regulate biomembranes with minimal perturbation. Numerous innovative measurements, including nonlinear optical processes and confined bilayer assemblies, have provided new insights into membrane behavior. In this review, we highlight the use of vibrational spectroscopy to study lipid-lipid interactions. We also examine recent work in which vibrational measurements have been used to investigate the incorporation of peptides and proteins into lipid bilayers, and we discuss the interactions of small molecules and drugs with membrane structures. Emerging techniques and measurements on intact cellular membranes provide a prospective on the future of vibrational spectroscopic studies of biomembranes.

  17. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  18. Echo-acoustic flow affects flight in bats.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Kathrin; Greiter, Wolfgang; Luksch, Harald; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-06-15

    Flying animals need to react fast to rapid changes in their environment. Visually guided animals use optic flow, generated by their movement through structured environments. Nocturnal bats cannot make use of optic flow, but rely mostly on echolocation. Here, we show that bats exploit echo-acoustic flow to negotiate flight through narrow passages. Specifically, bats' flight between lateral structures is significantly affected by the echo-acoustic salience of those structures, independent of their physical distance. This is true even though echolocation, unlike vision, provides explicit distance cues. Moreover, the bats reduced the echolocation sound levels in stronger flow, probably to compensate for the increased summary target strength of the lateral reflectors. However, bats did not reduce flight velocity under stronger echo-acoustic flow. Our results demonstrate that sensory flow is a ubiquitous principle for flight guidance, independent of the fundamentally different peripheral representation of flow across the senses of vision and echolocation.

  19. Loschmidt echo in one-dimensional interacting Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lelas, K.; Seva, T.; Buljan, H.

    2011-12-15

    We explore Loschmidt echo in two regimes of one-dimensional interacting Bose gases: the strongly interacting Tonks-Girardeau (TG) regime, and the weakly interacting mean-field regime. We find that the Loschmidt echo of a TG gas decays as a Gaussian when small (random and time independent) perturbations are added to the Hamiltonian. The exponent is proportional to the number of particles and the magnitude of a small perturbation squared. In the mean-field regime the Loschmidt echo shows richer behavior: it decays faster for larger nonlinearity, and the decay becomes more abrupt as the nonlinearity increases; it can be very sensitive to the particular realization of the noise potential, especially for relatively small nonlinearities.

  20. Echo-acoustic flow affects flight in bats.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Kathrin; Greiter, Wolfgang; Luksch, Harald; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-06-15

    Flying animals need to react fast to rapid changes in their environment. Visually guided animals use optic flow, generated by their movement through structured environments. Nocturnal bats cannot make use of optic flow, but rely mostly on echolocation. Here, we show that bats exploit echo-acoustic flow to negotiate flight through narrow passages. Specifically, bats' flight between lateral structures is significantly affected by the echo-acoustic salience of those structures, independent of their physical distance. This is true even though echolocation, unlike vision, provides explicit distance cues. Moreover, the bats reduced the echolocation sound levels in stronger flow, probably to compensate for the increased summary target strength of the lateral reflectors. However, bats did not reduce flight velocity under stronger echo-acoustic flow. Our results demonstrate that sensory flow is a ubiquitous principle for flight guidance, independent of the fundamentally different peripheral representation of flow across the senses of vision and echolocation. PMID:27045094

  1. Properties of echo spectra observed by MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakasugi, K.

    1983-01-01

    Turbulent scatter and Fresnel reflection are the fundamental echoing mechanisms to interpret the signals observed by Mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars. Turbulent scattered echoes provide information about the turbulence structure and mean flow of the atmosphere. Observational results with VHF MST radars, however, show the importance of Fresnel reflection due to the infinite gradient of reflectivity at the edges of a scattering layer. This condition is excluded for the weak fluctuation models but it is still possible to include the observed aspect sensitivity by assuming an anisotropic structure of fluctuations. Another explanation of the aspect sensitivity observed by MST radars is advanced. Spectral estimates by the widely used periodogram were related to a four-dimensional spectrum of atmospheric fluctuations with anisotropic structure. Effects of the radar system such as antenna beam width, beam direction and Fast Fourier Transformations (FFT) data length were discussed for the anisotropic turbulent atmosphere. Echo parameters were also estimated.

  2. Light echoes - supernovae 1987A and 1986G

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, B.E.

    1987-12-01

    The sudden brilliance of a supernova (SN) eruption will be reflected on surrounding dust grains to create a phantom nebula. The paper presents a series of calculations in which the apparent brightness of this light echo is predicted for a variety of situations where the dust is part of the interstellar medium (ISM). It is found that the supernova 1987 A will have a very bright echo off the ISM that may perhaps be visible with binoculars for many years. At a time of 400 days past maximum, the SN 1986G is found to be 2.7 mag brighter than would be predicted by an extrapolation of its light curve. This unique property has an easy explanation as a light echo off the dust in the dust lane of Cen A. 24 references.

  3. Echo-seeding options for LCLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    The success of LCLS has opened up a new era of x-ray sciences. An upgrade to LCLS is currently being planned to enhance its capabilities. In this paper we study the feasibility of using the echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) technique to generate narrow bandwidth soft x-ray radiation in the proposed LCLS-II soft x-ray beam line. We focus on the conceptual design, the technical implementation and the expected performances of the echo-seeding scheme. We will also show how the echo-seeding scheme allows one to generate two color x-ray pulses with the higher energy photons leading the lower energy ones as is favored in the x-ray pump-probe experiments.

  4. Ultrafast Optical Spin Echo for Electron Spins in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Susan M.; Fu, Kai-Mei C.; Zhang Qiang; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Stanley, Colin

    2009-06-19

    Spin-based quantum computing and magnetic resonance techniques rely on the ability to measure the coherence time T{sub 2} of a spin system. We report on the experimental implementation of all-optical spin echo to determine the T{sub 2} time of a semiconductor electron-spin system. We use three ultrafast optical pulses to rotate spins an arbitrary angle and measure an echo signal as the time between pulses is lengthened. Unlike previous spin-echo techniques using microwaves, ultrafast optical pulses allow clean T{sub 2} measurements of systems with dephasing times (T{sub 2}*) fast in comparison to the time scale for microwave control. This demonstration provides a step toward ultrafast optical dynamic decoupling of spin-based qubits.

  5. Auditory-tactile echo-reverberating stuttering speech corrector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniszyk-Jozkowiak, Wieslawa; Adamczyk, Bogdan

    1997-02-01

    The work presents the construction of a device, which transforms speech sounds into acoustical and tactile signals of echo and reverberation. Research has been done on the influence of the echo and reverberation, which are transmitted as acoustic and tactile stimuli, on speech fluency. Introducing the echo or reverberation into the auditory feedback circuit results in a reduction of stuttering. A bit less, but still significant corrective effects are observed while using the tactile channel for transmitting the signals. The use of joined auditory and tactile channels increases the effects of their corrective influence on the stutterers' speech. The results of the experiment justify the use of the tactile channel in the stutterers' therapy.

  6. Perception of echo phase information in bat sonar.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A

    1979-06-22

    Echolocating bats (Eptesicus fuscus) can detect changes as small as 500 nanoseconds in the arrival time of sonar echoes when these changes appear as jitter or alternations in arrival time from one echo to the next. The psychophysical function relating the bat's performance to the magnitude of the jitter corresponds to the half-wave rectified cross-correlation function between the emitted sonar signals and the echoes. The bat perceives the phase or period structure of the sounds, which cover the 25- to 100-kilohertz frequency range, as these are represented in the auditory system after peripheral transformation. The acoustic image of a sonar target is apparently derived from time-domain or periodicity information processing by the nervous system.

  7. Multi-echo imaging in highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Casanova, F; Perlo, J; Blümich, B; Kremer, K

    2004-01-01

    A new pulsed field gradient multi-echo imaging technique to encode position in the phase of every echo generated by a CPMG sequence in the presence of a strongly inhomogeneous static magnetic field is presented. It was applied to improve the sensitivity in an imaging experiment by adding the echo train acquired during the CPMG sequence and to spatially resolve relaxation times of inhomogeneous specimens using single-sided probes. The sequence was implemented in a new bar-magnet MOUSE equipped with a gradient coil system to apply a pulsed magnetic field with a constant gradient along one spatial coordinate. An important reduction by a factor larger than two orders of magnitude in the acquisition time was obtained compared to the previously published single-point imaging technique. PMID:14675822

  8. [Effect of vibration caused by time-varying magnetic fields on diffusion-weighted MRI].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Akio; Maeda, Fumie; Miyai, Akira; Hayashi, Kohji; Hongoh, Takaharu

    2006-04-20

    Diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) with high b-factor in the body are often used to detect and diagnose cancer at MRI. The echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence and high motion probing gradient pulse are used at diffusion weighted imaging, causing high table vibration. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the diffusion signal and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values are influenced by this vibration because of time-varying magnetic fields. Two DWIs were compared. In one, phantoms were fixed on the MRI unit's table transmitting the vibration. In the other, phantoms were supported in air, in the absence of vibration. The phantoms called "solution phantoms" were made from agarose of a particular density. The phantoms called "jelly phantoms" were made from agarose that was heated. The diffusion signal and ADC value of each image were compared. The results showed that the signal of DWI units using the solution phantom was not affected by vibration. However, the signal of DWI and ADC were increased in the low-density jelly phantom as a result of vibration, causing the jelly phantom to vibrate. The DWIs of vibrating regions such as the breast maybe be subject to error. A countermeasure seems to be to support the region adequately.

  9. Study of simulating dynamic polarization laser echo signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di; Liu, Qing; Zhan, Yong-hong; Zeng, Chang-e.

    2014-12-01

    In the test for the laser seeker in the hardware-in-loop simulation, acquiring the effect of polarization laser echo wave to optical stress polarization of the seeker and to the polarization guidance performance was not considered. A new method to generating the dynamic polarization laser echo signal was provided based on the scene model; furthermore, the method to adding the polarization characters to the energy scene was introduced. At last, the insufficient of the method to generating and simulating the dynamic polarization signal was analyzed.

  10. Code division in optical memory devices based on photon echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalachev, Alexey A.; Vlasova, Daria D.

    2006-03-01

    The theory of multi-channel optical memory based on photon echo is developed. It is shown that under long-lived photon echo regime the writing and reading of information with code division is possible using phase modulation of reference and reading pulses. A simple method for construction of a system of noise-like signals, which is based on the segmentation of Frank sequence is proposed. It is shown that in comparison to the system of random biphase signals this system leads to the efficient decreasing of mutual influence of channels and increasing of random/noise ratio under reading of information.

  11. On the VHF radar echoes in the region of midnight aurora: Signs of ground echoes modulated by the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, Alexander; Lester, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We present all-sky interferometric meteor radar (MR), VHF (36.9 MHz), observations from Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory and report on the unusual echoes, which were detected at low elevation on the northern horizon, typically during substorms. These echoes have a near-zero Doppler shift, relatively low power, but with a sharp rise to the power peak, short lifetime (less than 2 s), and nonexponential decay (NED). We suggest that such auroral NED echoes are in fact ground backscatter of the MR waves which have been refracted in the ionosphere, passing through the ionosphere in the substorm region, where pulsating aurora (at a frequency higher than 1.7 Hz) occurs and causes quasiperiodic modulation of the wave propagation conditions, which leads to corresponding modulation of the amplitude of return. The MR treats such oscillating signal as meteor trails.

  12. 1. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH SHOWING 130FOOT SPAN OF ECHO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH SHOWING 130-FOOT SPAN OF ECHO BRIDGE OVER THE CHARLES RIVER. - Sudbury River Aqueduct, Echo Bridge, Spanning Charles River at Upper Newton Falls, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  13. 32 CFR 199.5 - TRICARE Extended Care Health Option (ECHO).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Disabilities Education Act and defined at 34 CFR 300.26 and that is specifically designed to accommodate the... order for the ECHO beneficiary to receive authorized ECHO benefits. (ii) Equipment adaptation....

  14. Vibration Analysis and the Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever put your hand on an electric motor or motor-driven electric appliance and felt it vibrate? Ever wonder why it vibrates? What is there about the operation of the motor, or the object to which it is attached, that causes the vibrations? Is there anything "regular" about the vibrations, or are they the result of random causes? In this…

  15. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  16. Echo frequency selectivity of duration-tuned inferior collicular neurons of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, determined with pulse-echo pairs.

    PubMed

    Wu, C H; Jen, P H-S

    2008-10-28

    During hunting, insectivorous bats such as Eptesicus fuscus progressively vary the repetition rate, duration, frequency and amplitude of emitted pulses such that analysis of an echo parameter by bats would be inevitably affected by other co-varying echo parameters. The present study is to determine the variation of echo frequency selectivity of duration-tuned inferior collicular neurons during different phases of hunting using pulse-echo (P-E) pairs as stimuli. All collicular neurons discharge maximally to a tone at a particular frequency which is defined as the best frequency (BF). Most collicular neurons also discharge maximally to a BF pulse at a particular duration which is defined as the best duration (BD). A family of echo iso-level frequency tuning curves (iso-level FTC) of these duration-tuned collicular neurons is measured with the number of impulses in response to the echo pulse at selected frequencies when the P-E pairs are presented at varied P-E duration and gap. Our data show that these duration-tuned collicular neurons have narrower echo iso-level FTC when measured with BD than with non-BD echo pulses. Also, IC neurons with low BF and short BD have narrower echo iso-level FTC than IC neurons with high BF and long BD have. The bandwidth of echo iso-level FTC significantly decreases with shortening of P-E duration and P-E gap. These data suggest that duration-tuned collicular neurons not only can facilitate bat's echo recognition but also can enhance echo frequency selectivity for prey feature analysis throughout a target approaching sequence during hunting. These data also support previous behavior studies showing that bats prepare their auditory system to analyze expected returning echoes within a time window to extract target features after pulse emission.

  17. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  18. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  19. The first satellite laser echoes recorded on the streak camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel; Prochazka, Ivan; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the streak camera with the circular sweep for the satellite laser ranging is described. The Modular Streak Camera system employing the circular sweep option was integrated into the conventional Satellite Laser System. The experimental satellite tracking and ranging has been performed. The first satellite laser echo streak camera records are presented.

  20. Project Echo: Horn-Reflector Antenna for Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, A. B.; Hogg, D. C.; Hunt, L. E.

    1961-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical features of the horn- reflector antenna used for receiving signals reflected from the Project Echo balloon satellite, and presents in some detail the electrical characteristics (radiation patterns and gain) measured at a frequency of 2390 Mc. Theoretically derived characteristics which agree very well with the measurements are also presented; details of the calculations are given in the appendices.

  1. Participatory Culture at the Echo Park Film Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosales, Jennifer Ann

    2013-01-01

    The Echo Park Film Center, a Los Angeles nonprofit media education organization, teaches underprivileged youth how to comprehend and make media in order to empower them to speak and be heard. Due to the organization's nonmainstream media courses and its connection to its community, the Center is able to create a participatory and socially…

  2. Pulse-echo probe of rock permeability near oil wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimhan, K. Y.; Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1978-01-01

    Processing method involves sequential insonifications of borehole wall at number of different frequencies. Return signals are normalized in amplitude, and root-mean-square (rms) value of each signal is determined. Values can be processed to yield information on size and number density of microfractures at various depths in rock matrix by using averaging methods developed for pulse-echo technique.

  3. Scheduling the EChO survey with known exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, J. C.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Ollivier, M.; Castello, I. Ortega; Clédassou, R.; Jaubert, J.; Van-Troostenberghe, P.; Varley, R.; Waldmann, I. P.; Pascale, E.; Tessenyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Exoplanet Characterization Observatory ( EChO) is a concept of a dedicated space telescope optimized for low-resolution transit and occultation spectroscopy to study the exoplanet diversity through the composition of their atmospheres. The scope of this paper is to answer the following question: Can we schedule a nominal EChO mission, with targets known today (in mid 2013), given the science requirements, realistic performances and operational constraints? We examine this issue from the point of view of duration of the mission and the scheduling restrictions with a sample of exoplanet systems known nowadays. We choose different scheduling algorithms taking into account the science and operational constraints and we verified that it is fairly straightforward to schedule a mission scenario over the lifetime of EChO compliant with the science requirements. We identified agility as a critical constraint that reduces significantly the efficiency of the survey. We conclude that even with known targets today the EChO science objectives can be reached in the 4.5 years duration of the mission. We also show that it is possible to use gaps between exoplanet observations, to fit the required calibration observations, data downlinks and station keeping operations or even to observe more exoplanet targets to be discovered in the coming years.

  4. Tomographic reconstruction of the pulse-echo spatiotemporal impulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nghia Q.; Abbey, Craig K.; Yapp, Rebecca D.; Insana, Michael F.

    2010-03-01

    Virtually every area of ultrasonic imaging research requires accurate estimation of the spatiotemporal impulse response of the instrument, and yet accurate measurements are difficult to achieve. The impulse response can also be difficult to predict numerically for a specific device because small unknown perturbations in array properties can generate significant changes in predicted pulse-echo field patterns. A typical measurement for a 1-D array transducer employs a line scatterer oriented perpendicular to the scan plane. Echoes from line scatterers located throughout the field of view constitute estimates of shift-varying line response functions. We propose an inverse-problem approach to the reconstruction of point-spread functions from line-spread functions. A collection of echoes recorded for a range of line-scatterer rotation angles are treated as projections of sound pressure onto the transducer array surface. Although the reconstruction is mathematically equivalent to filtered backprojection, it provides significant advantages with respect to interpolation that confound straightforward implementations. Field II predictions used to model measurements made on commercial systems suggest the reconstruction accuracy is with 0.32% for noiseless echo data. Application of the method to data acquired from a commercial system are evaluated from the perspective of deconvolution.

  5. Larry Echo Hawk: A Rising Star from Idaho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisecarver, Charmaine

    1993-01-01

    Larry Echo Hawk, Idaho attorney general and former state legislator, discusses success factors in college and law school; early experiences as an Indian lawyer; first election campaign; and his views on tribal sovereignty, state-tribal relationship, gambling, and his dual responsibility to the general public and Native American issues. (SV)

  6. Echolocation in bats: signal processing of echoes for target range.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A

    1971-03-01

    Echolocating bats Eptesicus fuscus and Phyllostomus hastatus can discriminate between the nearer and farther of two targets. Their errors in discrimination are predicted accurately by the autocorrelation functions of their sonar cries. These bats behave as though they have an ideal sonar system which cross correlates the transmitted cry with the returning echo to extract targetrange information.

  7. Communication: Phase incremented echo train acquisition in NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltisberger, Jay H.; Walder, Brennan J.; Keeler, Eric G.; Kaseman, Derrick C.; Sanders, Kevin J.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2012-06-01

    We present an improved and general approach for implementing echo train acquisition (ETA) in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, particularly where the conventional approach of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) acquisition would produce numerous artifacts. Generally, adding ETA to any N-dimensional experiment creates an N + 1 dimensional experiment, with an additional dimension associated with the echo count, n, or an evolution time that is an integer multiple of the spacing between echo maxima. Here we present a modified approach, called phase incremented echo train acquisition (PIETA), where the phase of the mixing pulse and every other refocusing pulse, ϕP, is incremented as a single variable, creating an additional phase dimension in what becomes an N + 2 dimensional experiment. A Fourier transform with respect to the PIETA phase, ϕP, converts the ϕP dimension into a Δp dimension where desired signals can be easily separated from undesired coherence transfer pathway signals, thereby avoiding cumbersome or intractable phase cycling schemes where the receiver phase must follow a master equation. This simple modification eliminates numerous artifacts present in NMR experiments employing CPMG acquisition and allows "single-scan" measurements of transverse relaxation and J-couplings. Additionally, unlike CPMG, we show how PIETA can be appended to experiments with phase modulated signals after the mixing pulse.

  8. Echo thresholds for reflections from acoustically diffusive architectural surfaces.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip W; Walther, Andreas; Faller, Christof; Braasch, Jonas

    2013-10-01

    When sound reflects from an irregular architectural surface, it spreads spatially and temporally. Extensive research has been devoted to prediction and measurement of diffusion, but less has focused on its perceptual effects. This paper examines the effect of temporal diffusion on echo threshold. There are several notable differences between the waveform of a reflection identical to the direct sound and one from an architectural surface. The onset and offset are damped and the energy is spread in time; hence, the reflection response has a lower peak amplitude, and is decorrelated from the direct sound. The perceptual consequences of these differences are previously undocumented. Echo threshold tests are conducted with speech and music signals, using direct sound and a simulated reflection that is either identical to the direct sound or has various degrees of diffusion. Results indicate that for a speech signal, diffuse reflections are less easily detectable as a separate auditory event than specular reflections of the same total energy. For a music signal, no differences are observed between the echo thresholds for reflections with and without temporal diffusion. Additionally, echo thresholds are found to be shorter for speech than for music, and shorter for spatialized than for diotic presentation of signals.

  9. Focusing vibrating targets in frequency-modulation continuous-wave-synthetic aperture radar with Doppler keystone transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuxin; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Jinping; Lei, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Vibrating targets generally induce sinusoidal micro-Doppler modulation in high resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR). They could cause defocused and ghost results by conventional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes a method on vibrating target imaging in frequency-modulation continuous-wave (FMCW) SAR systems. The continuous motion of sensor platform during pulse time is considered in the signal model. Based on Bessel series expansion of the signal in the azimuth direction, the influence of platform motion on the azimuth frequency is eliminated after dechirp and deskew. In addition, the range walk is compensated in the two-dimensional frequency domain by Doppler keystone transform. Next, using range cell migration correction, the azimuth quadratic phase compensation and the range curvature correction are made in range-Doppler domain for the focus of paired echoes. The residual video phase of paired echoes is eliminated, and vibration parameters are estimated to compensate in the sinusoidal modulation phase. Then the deghosted image of vibrating targets can be obtained. The proposed method is applicable to multiple targets with various vibrating states due to no need of a priori knowledge of targets. Finally, simulations are carried out to validate the effectiveness of the method in FMCW-SAR imaging of vibrating targets.

  10. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  11. The Light Echoes around V838 Monocerotis: Cycle 16 DD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard

    2007-07-01

    This is a DD program in which we propose to obtain WFPC2 imaging of the light echo around V838 Mon in late 2008 or early 2009. We were awarded Cycle 17 time to image the echo with ACS at 2 epochs {3+4 orbits}. To obtain data of similar quality with WFPC2 requires 7 orbits at 2 different pointings. Because of the SM4 delay, we are therefore requesting a 14-orbit DD program for Cycle 16, leaving the Cycle 17 allocation unchanged for continued monitoring of the event in late 2009 and 2010.V838 Monocerotis, which burst upon the astronomical scene in early 2002, is a completely unanticipated new object. It underwent a large-amplitude and very luminous outburst, during which its spectrum remained that of an extremely cool supergiant. A rapidly evolving set of light echoes around V838 Mon was discovered soon after the outburst, quickly becoming the most spectacular display of the phenomenon yet seen. These light echoes provide the means to accomplish three unique types of measurements based on continued HST imaging: {1} study MHD turbulence at high resolution and in 3 dimensions; {2} construct the first unambiguous and fully 3-D map of a circumstellar dust envelope; {3} study dust physics in a unique setting where the spectrum and light curve of the illumination, and the scattering angle, are unambiguously known. We have also used our HST data to determine the distance to V838 Mon through a novel geometric technique. Because of the extreme rarity of light echoes, this program of regular monitoring provides the only opportunity to achieve such results during the HST lifetime. We propose WFPC2 imaging in late 2008/early 2009, in order to continue the mapping of the circumstellar dust and to accomplish the other goals listed above.

  12. A Year in the Life of an Infrared Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A One Year Apart

    These Spitzer Space Telescope images, taken one year apart, show the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (yellow ball) and surrounding clouds of dust (reddish orange). The pictures illustrate that a blast of light from Cassiopeia A is waltzing outward through the dusty skies. This dance, called an 'infrared echo,' began when the remnant erupted about 50 years ago.

    Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion 325 years ago. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. This remnant is located 10,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia.

    Infrared echoes are created when a star explodes or erupts, flashing light into surrounding clumps of dust. As the light zips through the dust clumps, it heats them up, causing them to glow successively in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The result is an optical illusion, in which the dust appears to be flying outward at the speed of light. Echoes are distinct from supernova shockwaves, which are made up material that is swept up and hurled outward by exploding stars.

    This infrared echo is the largest ever seen, stretching more than 50 light-years away from Cassiopeia A. If viewed from Earth, the entire movie frame would take up the same amount of space as two full moons.

    Hints of an older infrared echo from Cassiopeia A's supernova explosion hundreds of years ago can also be seen.

    The top Spitzer image was taken on November 30, 2003, and the bottom, on December 2, 2004.

  13. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.; Arnold, N. F.; Kirkwood, S.; Nishitani, N.; Lester, M.

    2003-04-01

    Peculiar near range echoes observed in summer with the SuperDARN HF radar in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant ranges of 105 250 km for about 100 min. Interferometer measurements indicate that the echoes are returned from 80 100 km altitudes with elevation angles of 20° 60

  14. Clutter interference and the integration time of echoes in the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A; Freedman, E G; Stevenson, S B; Chen, L; Wohlgenant, T J

    1989-10-01

    The ability of the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus, to detect a sonar target is affected by the presence of other targets along the same axis at slightly different ranges. If echoes from one target arrive at about the same delay as echoes from another target, clutter interference occurs and one set of echoes masks the other. Although the bat's sonar emissions and the echoes themselves are 2 to 5 ms long, echoes (of approximately equal sensation levels--around 15 dB SL) only interfere with each other if they arrive within 200 to 400 microseconds of the same arrival time. This figure is an estimate of the integration time of the bat's sonar receiver for echoes. The fine structure of the clutter-interference data reflects the reinforcement and cancellation of echoes according to their time separation. When clutter interference first occurs, the waveforms of test and cluttering echoes already overlap for much of their duration. The masking effect underlying clutter interference appears specifically due to overlap, not between raw echo waveforms, but between the patterns of mechanical excitation created when echoes pass through bandpass filters equivalent to auditory-nerve tuning curves. While the time scale of clutter interference is substantially shorter than the duration of echo waveforms, it still is much longer than the eventual width of a target's range-axis image expressed in terms of echo delay.

  15. Detection of a Light Echo from the Otherwise Normal SN 2007af

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, D.; Leising, M. D.; Milne, P. A.; Pearcy, J.; Riess, A. G.; Macri, L. M.; Bryngelson, G. L.; Garnavich, P. M.

    2015-05-01

    We present the discovery of a light echo from SN 2007af, a normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in NGC 5584. Hubble Space Telescope images taken three years post explosion reveal two separate echoes: an outer echo and an extended central region, which we propose to be an inner echo for which details are unresolved. Multiple images were obtained in the F160W, F350LP, F555W, and F814W using the Wide Field Camera 3. If the outer echo is produced by an interstellar dust sheet perpendicular to the line of sight, it is located ∼800 pc in front of the SN. The dust for the inner echo is 0.45 pc \\lt d\\lt 90 pc away from the SN. The inner echo color is consistent with typical interstellar dust wavelength-dependent scattering cross-sections, while the outer echo is redder than predicted. Both dust sheets, if in the foreground, are optically thin for scattering, and the outer echo sheet thickness is consistent with the inferred extinction from peak brightness. Whether the inner echo is from interstellar or circumstellar dust is ambiguous. Overall, the echo characteristics are quite similar to previously observed SN Ia echoes.

  16. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging with highly effective outer volume suppression using combined presaturation and spatially selective echo dephasing.

    PubMed

    Chu, Archie; Alger, Jeffry R; Moore, Gregory J; Posse, Stefan

    2003-05-01

    A highly effective outer volume suppression (OVS) technique, termed spatially selective echo dephasing (SSED), which employs gradient dephasing of spatially selective spin echoes, is introduced. SSED, which is relatively insensitive to T(1) dispersion among lipid signals and B(1) inhomogeneity, was integrated with very high spatial resolution 2D proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) to assess residual lipid bleeding into cortical regions in the human brain. The method was optimized to minimize signal refocusing of secondary spin-echoes in areas of overlapping suppression slices. A comparison of spatial presaturation with single or double SSED, and with combined presaturation and SSED shows that the latter method has superior performance with spatially uniform lipid suppression factors in excess of 70. Metabolite mapping (choline, creatine, and NAA) with a 64 x 64 spatial matrix and 0.3 cm(3) voxels in close proximity to peripheral lipid regions was demonstrated at 1.5 T with a scan time of 32 min using the standard head coil.

  17. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging with highly effective outer volume suppression using combined presaturation and spatially selective echo dephasing.

    PubMed

    Chu, Archie; Alger, Jeffry R; Moore, Gregory J; Posse, Stefan

    2003-05-01

    A highly effective outer volume suppression (OVS) technique, termed spatially selective echo dephasing (SSED), which employs gradient dephasing of spatially selective spin echoes, is introduced. SSED, which is relatively insensitive to T(1) dispersion among lipid signals and B(1) inhomogeneity, was integrated with very high spatial resolution 2D proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) to assess residual lipid bleeding into cortical regions in the human brain. The method was optimized to minimize signal refocusing of secondary spin-echoes in areas of overlapping suppression slices. A comparison of spatial presaturation with single or double SSED, and with combined presaturation and SSED shows that the latter method has superior performance with spatially uniform lipid suppression factors in excess of 70. Metabolite mapping (choline, creatine, and NAA) with a 64 x 64 spatial matrix and 0.3 cm(3) voxels in close proximity to peripheral lipid regions was demonstrated at 1.5 T with a scan time of 32 min using the standard head coil. PMID:12704763

  18. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  19. Parallel and Multivalued Logic by the Two-Dimensional Photon-Echo Response of a Rhodamine–DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Implementing parallel and multivalued logic operations at the molecular scale has the potential to improve the miniaturization and efficiency of a new generation of nanoscale computing devices. Two-dimensional photon-echo spectroscopy is capable of resolving dynamical pathways on electronic and vibrational molecular states. We experimentally demonstrate the implementation of molecular decision trees, logic operations where all possible values of inputs are processed in parallel and the outputs are read simultaneously, by probing the laser-induced dynamics of populations and coherences in a rhodamine dye mounted on a short DNA duplex. The inputs are provided by the bilinear interactions between the molecule and the laser pulses, and the output values are read from the two-dimensional molecular response at specific frequencies. Our results highlights how ultrafast dynamics between multiple molecular states induced by light–matter interactions can be used as an advantage for performing complex logic operations in parallel, operations that are faster than electrical switching. PMID:25984269

  20. Analysis and interpretation of Cassini Titan radar altimeter echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Gim, Yonggyu; Callahan, Philip; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Cassini Radar Team

    2009-03-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has acquired 25 radar altimeter elevation profiles along Titan's surface as of April 2008, and we have analyzed 18 of these for which there are currently reconstructed ephemeris data. Altimeter measurements were collected at spatial footprint sizes from 6-60 km along ground tracks of length 400-3600 km. The elevation profiles yield topographic information at this resolution with a statistical height accuracy of 35-50 m and kilometer-scale errors several times greater. The data exhibit significant variations in terrain, from flat regions with little topographic expression to very rugged Titanscapes. The bandwidth of the transmitted waveform admits vertical resolution of the terrain height to 35 m at each observed location on the surface. Variations in antenna pointing and changes in surface statistics cause the range-compressed radar echoes to exhibit strong systematic and time-variable biases of hundreds of meters in delay. It is necessary to correct the received echoes for these changes, and we have derived correction algorithms such that the derived echo profiles are accurate at the 100 m level for off-nadir pointing errors of 0.3° and 0.6°, for leading edge and echo centroid estimators, respectively. The leading edge of the echo yields the elevation of the highest points on the surface, which we take to be the peaks of any terrain variation. The mean value of the echo delay is more representative of the mean elevation, so that the difference of these values gives an estimate of any local mountain heights. Finding locations where these values diverge indicates higher-relief terrain. Elevation features are readily seen in the height profiles. Several of the passes show mountains of several hundred m altitude, spread over 10's or even 100's of km in spatial extent, so that slopes are very small. Large expanses of sub-100 m topography are commonplace on Titan, so it is rather smooth in many locations. Other areas exhibit more relief

  1. The vibrations of texture.

    PubMed

    BensmaIa, Sliman J; Hollins, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The Pacinian channel has been implicated in the perception of fine textures (Hollins et al., Somatosens Mot Res 18: 253-262, 2001a). In the present study, we investigate candidate codes for Pacinian-mediated roughness perception. We use a Hall effect transducer to record the vibrations elicited in the skin when a set of textured surfaces is passively presented to the index finger. The peak frequency of the vibrations is found to decrease systematically as spatial period increases. The power of the vibrations--weighted according to the spectral sensitivity of the Pacinian system--increases with spatial period for all but the coarsest surfaces. By varying the scanning velocity, we manipulate the temporal and intensive characteristics of the texture-induced vibrations and assess the effect of the manipulation on perceived roughness. We find that doubling the scanning velocity does not result in the substantial decrease in roughness predicted by a frequency theory of vibrotactile roughness perception. On the other hand, the effects of speed on roughness match those of speed on power. We propose that the roughness of a fine surface (spatial period<200 microm) is a function of the Pacinian-weighted power of the vibrations it elicits.

  2. The Physics of Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippard, A. B.

    1989-11-01

    The study of vibration in physical systems is an important part of almost all fields in physics and engineering. This work, originally published in two volumes, examines the classical aspects in Part I and the quantum oscillator in Part II. The classical linear vibrator is treated first and the underlying unity of all linear oscillations in electrical, mechanical and acoustic systems is emphasized. Following this the book turns to the treatment of nonlinear vibrations, a field with which engineers and physicists are generally less familiar. In Part II the emphasis turns to quantum systems, that is those systems which can only be adequately described by quantum mechanics. The treatment concentrates on vibrations in atoms and molecules and their interaction with electromagnetic radiation. The similarities of classical and quantum methods are stressed and the limits of the classical treatment are examined. Throughout the book, each phenomenon discussed is illustrated with many examples and theory and experiment are compared. Although the reader may find that the physics discussed is demanding and the concepts are subtle in places, all mathematics used is familiar to both engineers and experimental scientists. Although not a textbook this is a useful introduction to the more advanced mathematical treatment of vibrations as it bridges the gap between the basic principles and more specialized concepts. It will be of great interest to advanced undergraduates and postgraduates as well as applied mathematicians, physicists and engineers in university and industry.

  3. Discrimination of amplitude-modulated synthetic echo trains by an echolocating bottlenose dolphin.

    PubMed

    Dankiewicz, Lois A; Helweg, David A; Moore, Patrick W; Zafran, Justine M

    2002-10-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have an acute ability to use target echoes to judge attributes such as size, shape, and material composition. Most target recognition studies have focused on features associated with individual echoes as opposed to information conveyed across echo sequences (feature envelope of the multi-echo train). One feature of aspect-dependent targets is an amplitude modulation (AM) across the return echoes in the echo train created by relative movement of the target and dolphin. The current study examined whether dolphins could discriminate targets with different AM envelopes. "Electronic echoes" triggered by a dolphin's outgoing echolocation clicks were manipulated to create sinusoidal envelopes with varying AM rate and depth. Echo trains were equated for energy, requiring the dolphin to extract and retain information from multiple echoes in order to detect and report the presence of AM. The dolphin discriminated amplitude-modulated echo trains from those that were not modulated. AM depth thresholds were approximately 0.8 dB, similar to other published amplitude limens. Decreasing the rate of modulation from approximately 16 to 2 cycles per second did not affect the dolphin's AM depth sensitivity. The results support multiple-echo processing in bottlenose dolphin echolocation. This capability provides additional theoretical justification for exploring synthetic aperture sonar concepts in models of animal echolocation that potentially support theories postulating formation of images as an ultimate means for target identification.

  4. Bats use echo harmonic structure to distinguish their targets from background clutter.

    PubMed

    Bates, Mary E; Simmons, James A; Zorikov, Tengiz V

    2011-07-29

    When echolocating big brown bats fly in complex surroundings, echoes arriving from irrelevant objects (clutter) located to the sides of their sonar beam can mask perception of relevant objects located to the front (targets), causing "blind spots." Because the second harmonic is beamed more weakly to the sides than the first harmonic, these clutter echoes have a weaker second harmonic. In psychophysical experiments, we found that electronically misaligning first and second harmonics in echoes (to mimic the misalignment of corresponding neural responses to harmonics in clutter echoes) disrupts the bat's echo-delay perception but also prevents clutter masking. Electronically offsetting harmonics to realign their neural responses restores delay perception but also clutter interference. Thus, bats exploit harmonics to distinguish clutter echoes from target echoes, sacrificing delay acuity to suppress masking.

  5. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R.; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  6. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion.

    PubMed

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  7. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker; Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  8. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  9. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  10. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  11. Time reversal and charge echo in an electron gas.

    PubMed

    Creswick, Richard J

    2004-09-01

    Apart from subtle violations of CP symmetry by the weak interactions, the basic laws of physics are time-reversal invariant. Nevertheless, in the macroscopic world, time has a very definite direction, or arrow. Given that the dynamics of a closed system are time-reversal invariant, the arrow of time is introduced through boundary or initial conditions. In this Letter it is argued that if the Hamiltonian for a system, H, has the property THT(-1)=-H for a unitary transformation T, then the system can, in principle, be made to evolve backward in time. The prototype of this sort of behavior is the spin echo. Calculations for a single-band tight-binding model suggest that it may be possible to observe the electronic counterpart, or charge echo.

  12. Doppler radar echoes of lightning and precipitation at vertical incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zrnic, D. S.; Rust, W. D.; Taylor, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Digital time series data at 16 heights within two storms were collected at vertical incidence with a 10-cm Doppler radar. On several occasions during data collection, lightning echoes were observed as increased reflectivity on an oscilloscope display. Simultaneously, lightning signals from nearby electric field change antennas were recorded on an analog recorder together with the radar echoes. Reflectivity, mean velocity, and Doppler spectra were examined by means of time series analysis for times during and after lightning discharges. Spectra from locations where lightning occurred show peaks, due to the motion of the lightning channel at the air speed. These peaks are considerably narrower than the ones due to precipitation. Besides indicating the vertical air velocity that can then be used to estimate hydrometeor-size distribution, the lightning spectra provide a convenient means to estimate the radar cross section of the channel. Subsequent to one discharge, we deduce that a rapid change in the orientation of hydrometeors occurred within the resolution volume.

  13. Benefits of the Multiple Echo Technique for Ultrasonic Thickness Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.; Vandekamp, R.

    2011-02-10

    Much effort has been put into determining methods to make accurate thickness measurements, especially at elevated temperatures. An accuracy of +/- 0.001 inches is typically noted for commercial ultrasonic thickness gauges and ultrasonic thickness techniques. Codes and standards put limitations on many inspection factors including equipment, calibration tolerance and temperature variations. These factors are important and should be controlled, but unfortunately do not guarantee accurate and repeatable measurements in the field. Most technicians long for a single technique that is best for every situation, unfortunately, there are no 'silver bullets' when it comes to nondestructive testing. This paper will describe and discuss some of the major contributors to measurement error as well as some advantages and limitations of multiple echo techniques and why multiple echo techniques should be more widely utilized for ultrasonic thickness measurements.

  14. Revision of Spin Echoes in Pure Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriles, C. A.

    2001-04-01

    Goldman's spin-1/2 formalism has been used for describing the response of an I=3/2 spin system to a two-pulse sequence in a pure nuclear quadrupole resonance experiment. A detailed analysis of the polarization evolution and quadrupolar echo generation is carried out through the use of explicit expressions for secular homo- and heteronuclear dipolar interactions. In striking contrast with previous studies, it is predicted that Van Vleck's second moments governing a classical solid-echo or Hahn sequence differ from those obtained by equivalent means in magnetic resonance. In fact, it is shown that, although measured moments still complement each other, the combined use of standard sequences does not allow the separate determination of homo- and heteronuclear dipolar contributions to the linewidth, not even in an indirect manner. In this context, the importance and potential usefulness of a crossed coil probe are also briefly discussed.

  15. Infrared Echoes and the Structure of the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Kim, Yeunjin; Krause, Oliver

    2007-05-01

    We propose to continue a program to map the interstellar medium in three dimensions. Our technique uses infrared echoes from the supernova Cas A, which we discovered during In-Orbit Checkout. We have observed the echoes every six months since, observing the changes in the patterns of heated dust as the light pulse from the supernova propagates through the surrounding ISM. We have developed methods to invert this series of snapshots of planes in the ISM into three dimensional images. By the end of the Spitzer mission, our 3D images will have a depth of 1.5pc at a resolution of about 0.1 pc. This detailed information about the structure of the ISM will have important applications in understanding extinction in dense regions, the radiative transfer and heating of such regions, and in how the ISM fragments, for example to form stars.

  16. Modelling simultaneous echo waveform reconstruction and localization in bats.

    PubMed

    De Mey, F; Schillebeeckx, F; Vanderelst, D; Boen, A; Peremans, H

    2010-05-01

    Echolocating bats perceive the world through sound signals reflecting from the objects around them. In these signals, information is contained about reflector location and reflector identity. Bats are able to extract and separate the cues for location from those that carry identification information. We propose a model based on Wiener deconvolution that also performs this separation for a virtual system mimicking the echolocation system of the lesser spearnosed bat, Phyllostomus discolor. In particular, the model simultaneously reconstructs the reflected echo signal and localizes the reflector from which the echo originates. The proposed technique is based on a model that performs a similar task based on information from the frog's lateral line system. We show that direct application of the frog model to the bat sonar system is not feasible. However, we suggest a technique that does apply to the bat biosonar and indicate its performance in the presence of noise.

  17. Analysis on the characteristics of pulsed laser proximity fuze's echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Chen, Huimin

    2011-06-01

    With the rapid development of semiconductor technology and laser technology, a kind of proximity fuze named pulsed laser proximity fuze has been applied. Compared with other fuzes, pulsed laser proximity fuze has high ranging precision and strong resistance to artificial active interference. It is an important development tendency of proximity fuze. The paper analyze the characteristic of target echo of laser signal, and then make theoretical analysis and calculation on the laser signal transmission in the smog. Firstly, use the pulse width of 10ns semiconductor laser fuze to do typical targets experiment, to get the echo information of target distance is 5m; then to do smog interference experiment, by comparing the pulse width amplitude and backscattering signal amplitude of laser fuze in simulation and experiment, analyzing the effect of anti-clutter, providing the evidence for the subsequent of circuit of signal amplification and processing.

  18. Stochastic Maximum Likelihood (SML) parametric estimation of overlapped Doppler echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, E.; Petitdidier, M.; Larzabal, P.

    2004-11-01

    This paper investigates the area of overlapped echo data processing. In such cases, classical methods, such as Fourier-like techniques or pulse pair methods, fail to estimate the first three spectral moments of the echoes because of their lack of resolution. A promising method, based on a modelization of the covariance matrix of the time series and on a Stochastic Maximum Likelihood (SML) estimation of the parameters of interest, has been recently introduced in literature. This method has been tested on simulations and on few spectra from actual data but no exhaustive investigation of the SML algorithm has been conducted on actual data: this paper fills this gap. The radar data came from the thunderstorm campaign that took place at the National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center (NAIC) in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, in 1998.

  19. Demonstration of photon-echo rephasing of spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Beavan, Sarah E; Hedges, Morgan P; Sellars, Matthew J

    2012-08-31

    In this paper we report the first demonstration of "rephased amplified spontaneous emission" (RASE) with photon-counting detection. This protocol provides an all-in-one photon-pair source and quantum-memory that has applications as a quantum repeater node. The RASE protocol is temporally multimode, and in this demonstration the photon echo was generated in a way that is spatially multimode and includes intermediate storage between two potentially long-lived spin states. A correlation between spontaneous emission and its photon echo was observed, using an ensemble of Pr(3+) ions doped into a Y2SiO5 crystal. Alterations that would allow for the measurement of nonclassical correlations are identified. These should generally apply for future experiments in rare-earth ion crystals, which are promising systems for implementing highly-multiplexed quantum repeater operations.

  20. RESPECT: Neutron resonance spin-echo spectrometer for extreme studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgii, R.; Kindervater, J.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2016-11-01

    We propose the design of a REsonance SPin-echo spECtrometer for exTreme studies, RESPECT, that is ideally suited for the exploration of non-dispersive processes such as diffusion, crystallization, slow dynamics, tunneling processes, crystal electric field excitations, and spin fluctuations. It is a variant of the conventional neutron spin-echo technique (NSE) by (i) replacing the long precession coils by pairs of longitudinal neutron spin-echo coils combined with RF-spin flippers and (ii) by stabilizing the neutron polarization with small longitudinal guide fields that can in addition be used as field subtraction coils thus allowing to adjust the field integrals over a range of 8 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the dynamic range of RESPECT can in principle be varied over 8 orders of magnitude in time, if neutrons with the required energy are made available. Similarly as for existing NSE-spectrometers, spin echo times of up to approximately 1 μs can be reached if the divergence and the correction elements are properly adjusted. Thanks to the optional use of neutron guides and the fact that the currents for the correction coils are much smaller than in standard NSE, intensity gains of at least one order of magnitude are expected, making the concept of RESPECT also competitive for operation at medium flux neutron sources. RESPECT can also be operated in a MIEZE configuration allowing the investigation of relaxation processes in depolarizing environments as they occur when magnetic fields are applied at the sample position, i.e. for the investigation of the dynamics of flux lines in superconductors, magnetic fluctuations in ferromagnetic materials, and samples containing hydrogen.

  1. Breast tissue characterization using FARMA modeling of ultrasonic RF echo.

    PubMed

    Alacam, Burak; Yazici, Birsen; Bilgutay, Nihat; Forsberg, Flemming; Piccoli, Catherine

    2004-10-01

    A number of empirical and analytical studies demonstrated that the ultrasound RF echo reflected from tissue exhibits 1/f characteristics. In this paper, we propose to model 1/f characteristics of the ultrasonic RF echo by a novel parsimonious model, namely the fractional differencing auto regressive moving average (FARMA) process, and evaluated diagnostic value of model parameters for breast cancer malignancy differentiation. FARMA model captures the fractal and long term correlated nature of the backscattered speckle texture and facilitates robust efficient estimation of fractal parameters. In our study, in addition to the computer generated FARMA model parameters, we included patient age and radiologist's prebiopsy level of suspicion (LOS) as potential indicators of malignant and benign masses. We evaluated the performance of the proposed set of features using various classifiers and training methods using 120 in vivo breast images. Our study shows that the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of FARMA model parameters alone is superior to the area under the ROC curve of the radiologist's prebiopsy LOS. The area under the ROC curve of the three sets of features yields a value of 0.87, with a confidence interval of [0.85, 0.89], at a significance level of 0.05. Our results suggest that the proposed method of ultrasound RF echo model leads to parameters that can differentiate breast tumors with a relatively high precision. This set of RF echo features can be incorporated into a comprehensive computer-aided diagnostic system to aid physicians in breast cancer diagnosis.

  2. MISTY ECHO proof test of the GRMPY system

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, R.G.; Flicker, S.L.; Turner, W.J.; Watson, C.A. ); Khalsa, N.; Macy, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The GRMPY system that was fielded on the MISTY ECHO event demonstrated that a small cadre of people could perform all fielding tasks. This report describes each task in detail and outlines the components of the GRMPY system. Suggestions are made for system improvement. The data are presented that were obtained on eight of the nine GRMPY stations fielded. 2 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Loschmidt Echo in a System of Interacting Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Manfredi, G.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2006-11-10

    We study the Loschmidt echo for a system of electrons interacting through mean-field Coulomb forces. The electron gas is modeled by a self-consistent set of hydrodynamic equations. It is observed that the quantum fidelity drops abruptly after a time that is proportional to the logarithm of the perturbation amplitude. The fidelity drop is related to the breakdown of the symmetry properties of the wave function.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  5. Characteristics of lightning echoes observed with VHF ST radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RöTtger, J.; Liu, C. H.; Pan, C. J.; Su, S. Y.

    1995-07-01

    The development of tropospheric convection was observed with the Chung-Li VHF stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar in Taiwan, Republic of China. Deep convection evolved into thunderstorms during which radar echoes from lightning were recorded with a particular high time resolution program. These lightning echoes usually exist for only several tens to a few hundred milliseconds. To investigate the fine structure in the amplitude and phase of the lightning returns, the necessary time resolution has to be in the order of a few milliseconds. Such time resolutions are for the first time applied with VHF ST radar and the initial results are presented in this paper. Rapid jumps in the phase path were occurring together with sudden amplitude changes. This indicates that the scattering regions change their position, which could be on different branches of the lightning stroke. Large radial velocities of the lightning scattering regions up to several tens of meters per second were observed. Also, strong velocity shears were noticed in these lightning echo regions. Power peaks in Doppler spectra corresponding to velocities of about 300 m s-1 were occasionally detected. It is contemplated that these are caused by Bragg scattering from sound waves resulting from the lightning shock wave. Also a periodic velocity and amplitude modulation of a thin sheet of radar reflectivity was observed which one could attribute to infra-sound with a frequency of about 6-7 Hz. Preliminary conclusions are drawn finally to confirm that our observations are generally consistent with backscatter from lightning.

  6. Optimized 3D Ultrashort Echo Time Pulmonary MRI

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Fain, Sean B.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Nagle, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To optimize 3D radial ultrashort echo time MRI for high resolution whole-lung imaging. Methods 3D radial ultrashort echo time was implemented on a 3T scanner to investigate the effects of: (1) limited field-of-view excitation, (2) variable density readouts, and (3) radial oversampling. Improvements in noise performance and spatial resolution were assessed through simulation and phantom studies. Their effects on lung and airway visualization in five healthy male human subjects (mean age 32 years) were compared qualitatively through blinded ordinal scoring by two cardiothoracic radiologists using a nonparametric Friedman test (P < 0.05). Relative signal difference between endobronchial air and adjacent lung tissue, normalized to nearby vessel, was used as a surrogate for lung tissue signal. Quantitative measures were compared using the paired Student's t-test (P < 0.05). Finally, clinical feasibility was investigated in a patient with interstitial fibrosis. Results Simulation and phantom studies showed up to 67% improvement in SNR and reduced blurring for short T2* species using all three optimizations. In vivo images showed decreased artifacts and improved lung tissue and airway visualization both qualitatively and quantitatively. Conclusion The use of limited field-of-view excitation, variable readout gradients, and radial oversampling significantly improve the technical quality of 3D radial ultrashort echo time lung images. PMID:23213020

  7. Nonlinear system modeling with random matrices: echo state networks revisited.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bai; Miller, David J; Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Echo state networks (ESNs) are a novel form of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) that provide an efficient and powerful computational model approximating nonlinear dynamical systems. A unique feature of an ESN is that a large number of neurons (the "reservoir") are used, whose synaptic connections are generated randomly, with only the connections from the reservoir to the output modified by learning. Why a large randomly generated fixed RNN gives such excellent performance in approximating nonlinear systems is still not well understood. In this brief, we apply random matrix theory to examine the properties of random reservoirs in ESNs under different topologies (sparse or fully connected) and connection weights (Bernoulli or Gaussian). We quantify the asymptotic gap between the scaling factor bounds for the necessary and sufficient conditions previously proposed for the echo state property. We then show that the state transition mapping is contractive with high probability when only the necessary condition is satisfied, which corroborates and thus analytically explains the observation that in practice one obtains echo states when the spectral radius of the reservoir weight matrix is smaller than 1.

  8. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  9. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  10. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  11. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  12. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  13. High-Temperature Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Alan; Litwin, Joel; Krauss, Harold

    1987-01-01

    Device for damping vibrations functions at temperatures up to 400 degrees F. Dampens vibrational torque loads as high as 1,000 lb-in. but compact enough to be part of helicopter rotor hub. Rotary damper absorbs energy from vibrating rod, dissipating it in turbulent motion of viscous hydraulic fluid forced by moving vanes through small orifices.

  14. Vibration characteristics of ultrasonic complex vibration for hole machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2012-05-01

    Complex vibration sources that use diagonal slits as a longitudinal-torsional vibration converter have been applied to ultrasonic motors, ultrasonic rock drilling, and ultrasonic welding. However, there are few examples of the application of these sources to ultrasonic machining in combination with an abrasive. Accordingly, a new method has been developed for machining of holes in brittle materials by using the ultrasonic longitudinal and torsional vibration of a hollow-type stepped horn with a diagonal slit vibration converter. In this paper, we compared vibration of a uniform rod and a hollow-type stepped horn, both with diagonal slits, when the conditions of the diagonal slits are constant.

  15. What a plant sounds like: the statistics of vegetation echoes as received by echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Yossi; Stilz, Peter; Franz, Matthias O; Boonman, Arjan; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-07-01

    A critical step on the way to understanding a sensory system is the analysis of the input it receives. In this work we examine the statistics of natural complex echoes, focusing on vegetation echoes. Vegetation echoes constitute a major part of the sensory world of more than 800 species of echolocating bats and play an important role in several of their daily tasks. Our statistical analysis is based on a large collection of plant echoes acquired by a biomimetic sonar system. We explore the relation between the physical world (the structure of the plant) and the characteristics of its echo. Finally, we complete the story by analyzing the effect of the sensory processing of both the echolocation and the auditory systems on the echoes and interpret them in the light of information maximization. The echoes of all different plant species we examined share a surprisingly robust pattern that was also reproduced by a simple Poisson model of the spatial reflector arrangement. The fine differences observed between the echoes of different plant species can be explained by the spatial characteristics of the plants. The bat's emitted signal enhances the most informative spatial frequency range where the species-specific information is large. The auditory system filtering affects the echoes in a similar way, thus enhancing the most informative spatial frequency range even more. These findings suggest how the bat's sensory system could have evolved to deal with complex natural echoes.

  16. Apparatus and method for measuring relative phase of signals in a multiple-echo system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froggatt, Mark E. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the relative phase of echo signals in a multiple-echo system. A signal generator generates an exciting tone burst and subsequent tone bursts delayed in phase from the exciting tone burst. The exciting tone burst is gated into a transducer coupled to the multiple-echo system. Each subsequent tone burst is converted into a series of pulses. Each pulse triggers a sample/hold circuit to sample each echo signal. The samples of the echo signal are averaged and then compared to a reference value. The signal generator is controlled to vary the subsequent tone burst phase delay to determine for each echo signal a subsequent tone burst phase delay that causes the average of the samples of the echo signal to be substantially equal to the reference value wherein the determined subsequent tone burst phase delay is the phase delay of the echo signal with respect to the exciting tone burst. The control circuit then determines the difference in phase delay between echo signals to determine the relative phase delay of the echo signals.

  17. Variabilities of low latitude mesospheric and E region echoes: linked to common sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmalingam, Selvaraj; Patra, Amit; Sathishkumar, Sundararaman; Narayana Rao, D.

    2016-07-01

    Variability in dynamics of the mesospheric and E region echoes have been studied in isolation. Both echoing phenomena are directly or indirectly coupled with each other through neutral dynamics. This is especially so for the low-latitudes outside the equatorial electrojet belt, where E region plasma irregularities causing radar echoes are governed by neutral dynamics, such as tides and gravity waves. Although these regions are close to each other, no effort has been made yet to understand the dynamical coupling processes manifesting the observed variabilities in the two echoing phenomena. To investigate linkage between the two phenomena, if any, we conducted systematic observations of low latitude mesospheric and E region echoes during 2011-2012 using the Gadanki MST radar and used these in conjunction with SABER temperature, MF radar wind, and sporadic E observations. Both echoes are found to occur in the height regions where temperature observations show negative gradients. Mesospheric echoes are collocated with temperature gradient associated with mesospheric temperature inversion while the E region echoes are collocated with negative temperature gradient close to the mesopause. Observations have revealed a common signature of semi-annual variations in the occurrence of both mesospheric and ionospheric E-region - occurrences peak in the equinoxes. The E region echoes have an additional peak occurring in the summer and this occurrence is well correlated with the enhancement in the diurnal tidal amplitude. We surmise that the enhancement in the diurnal tidal amplitude is linked with non-migrating tide of tropospheric weather phenomena in summer. Intriguingly, mesospheric echoing layers display descending pattern quite similar to the E region echoes and sporadic E layer, which have been used to invoke tidal dynamics in manifesting similar morphology in both mesospheric and E region echoes. These results will be presented and the role of tidal dynamics on the

  18. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  19. Light Echoes and Late-Time Emissions of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Dina

    2016-05-01

    Type Ia supernovae have many applications in astronomy, yet with fundamental properties still not fully understood, new methods for investigating the environment of a supernova need to be developed. A light echo is produced from the scattering of light from a bright source and can be used to analyze the dust in the vicinity of the supernova and learn invaluable information about the source. These techniques can put constraints on explosion and progenitor models. Although light echo detections from Type Ia supernovae are rare, with only seven total extragalactic detections, this could be due to the lack of thorough late-epoch monitoring. Since key information is determined from even a single light echo detection, light echo searches should be undertaken in the future to supplement our understanding of supernovae. As part of our collaborative campaign for studying the emission of supernovae at late epochs, we have added two light echoes to a small sample size of Type Ia supernova light echo detections: SN 2009ig in NGC 1015 and a dual echo from SN 2007af in NGC 5584. Both echoes were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope and allow for the most detailed images of Type Ia supernova light echoes to date. Three filters (F555W, F814W, and F350LP) captured the echoes obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3, and since both host galaxies were imaged as part of the same observing program, these cases will be the best comparable light echo pairs. We also further investigate the light echoes from SN 2006X in NGC 4321 and SN 1998bu in NGC 3368 from Hubble Space Telescope archival images. Analyses performed on the images gives crucial insight into the dusty environment of the host galaxy and the surroundings of the supernova. The outer echo from SN 2007af was created from an interstellar dust sheet located ~800 pc in front of the supernova, while the inner echo could be from interstellar or circumstellar origin. A circumstellar light echo could imply a single degenerate

  20. Free vibrations of delaminated beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, M.-H. H.; Grady, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Free vibration of laminated composite beams is studied. The effect of interply delaminations on natural frequencies and mode shapes is evaluated both analytically and experimentally. A generalized vibrational principle is used to formulate the equation of motion and associated boundary conditions for the free vibration of a composite beam with a delamination of arbitrary size and location. The effect of coupling between longitudinal vibration and bending vibration is considered. This coupling effect is shown to significantly affect the calculated natural frequencies and mode shapes of the delaminated beam.

  1. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1987-07-07

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  2. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, B.A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure are disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  3. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Barna, Basil A.

    1989-04-25

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure is disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration.

  4. Animal Communications Through Seismic Vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Peggy

    2001-05-02

    Substrate vibration has been important to animals as a channel of communication for millions of years, but our literature on vibration in this context of biologically relevant information is only decades old. The jaw mechanism of the earliest land vertebrates allowed them to perceive substrate vibrations as their heads lay on the ground long before airborne sounds could be heard. Although the exact mechanism of vibration production and the precise nature of the wave produced are not always understood, recent development of affordable instrumentation to detect and measure vibrations has allowed researchers to answer increasingly sophisticated questions about how animals send and receive vibration signals. We now know that vibration provides information used in predator defense, prey detection, recruitment to food, mate choice, intrasexual competition, and maternal/brood social interactions in a variety of insect orders, spiders, crabs, scorpions, chameleons, frogs, golden moles, mole rats, kangaroos rats, wallabies, elephants and bison.

  5. Analysis of the temporal structure of fish echoes using the dolphin broadband sonar signal.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Imaizumi, Tomohito; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Furusawa, Masahiko; Nishimori, Yasushi

    2009-07-01

    Behavioral experiments indicate that dolphins detect and discriminate prey targets through echolocating broadband sonar signals. The fish echo contains components from multiple reflections, including those from the swim bladder and other organs, and can be used for the identification of fish species and the estimation of fish abundance. In this paper, temporal structures were extracted from fish echoes using the cross-correlation function and the lowpass filter. First, the echo was measured from an anesthetized fish in a water tank. The number, reflector intensity, and echo duration were shown to be dependent on the species, individual, and orientation of the fish. In particular, the echo duration provided useful information on the fish body height and for species identification. Second, the echo was measured from the live fish suspended by nylon monofilament lines in the open sea. It was shown that this duration could be estimated regardless of whether or not the fish were moving.

  6. Photon echo transients from an inhomogeneous ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltavtsev, S. V.; Salewski, M.; Kapitonov, Yu. V.; Yugova, I. A.; Akimov, I. A.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Kavokin, A. V.; Bayer, M.

    2016-03-01

    An ensemble of quantum dot excitons may be used for coherent information manipulation. Due to the ensemble inhomogeneity any optical information retrieval occurs in the form of a photon echo. We show that the inhomogeneity can lead to a significant deviation from the conventional echo timing sequence. Variation of the area of the initial rotation pulse, which generates excitons in a dot subensemble only, reveals this complex picture of photon echo formation. We observe a retarded echo for π /2 pulses, while for 3 π /2 the echo is advanced in time as evidenced through monitoring the Rabi oscillations in the time-resolved photon echo amplitude from (In,Ga)As/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot structures and confirmed by detailed calculations.

  7. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, J. W.; Bohnet, J. G.; Sawyer, B. C.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed-matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that slow (<1 Hz ) drift of the homogeneous magnetic-field limits control and measurement precision. We report on previously undocumented higher-frequency field noise (10-200 Hz) that limits the coherence time of Be+9 electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 -T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ˜6 ms for the Be+9 electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz , limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ˜50 ms.

  8. Discrete echo signal modeling of ultrasound imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Zhang, Cishen

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, a discrete model representing the pulse-tissue interaction in the medical ultrasound scanning and imaging process is developed. The model is based on discretizing the acoustical wave equation and is in terms of convolution between the input ultrasound pulses and the tissue mass density variation. Such a model can provide a useful means for ultrasound echo signal processing and imaging. Most existing models used for ultrasound imaging are based on frequency domain transform. A disadvantage of the frequency domain transform is that it is only applicable to shift-invariant models. Thus it has ignored the shift-variant nature of the original acoustic wave equation where the tissue compressibility and mass density distributions are spatial-variant factors. The discretized frequency domain model also obscures the compressibility and mass density representations of the tissue, which may mislead the physical understanding and interpretation of the image obtained. Moreover, only the classical frequency domain filtering methods have been applied to the frequency domain model for acquiring some tissue information from the scattered echo signals. These methods are non-parametric and require a prior knowledge of frequency spectra of the transmitted pulses. Our proposed model technique will lead to discrete, multidimensional, shift-variant and parametric difference or convolution equations with the transmitted pulse pressure as the input, the measurement data of the echo signals as the output, and functions of the tissue compressibility and mass density distributions as shift-variant parameters that can be readily identified from input-output measurements. The proposed model represents the entire multiple scattering process, and hence overcomes the key limitation in the current ultrasound imaging methods.

  9. Molecular vibrational energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruebele, M.; Bigwood, R.

    This article reviews some recent work in molecular vibrational energy flow (IVR), with emphasis on our own computational and experimental studies. We consider the problem in various representations, and use these to develop a family of simple models which combine specific molecular properties (e.g. size, vibrational frequencies) with statistical properties of the potential energy surface and wavefunctions. This marriage of molecular detail and statistical simplification captures trends of IVR mechanisms and survival probabilities beyond the abilities of purely statistical models or the computational limitations of full ab initio approaches. Of particular interest is IVR in the intermediate time regime, where heavy-atom skeletal modes take over the IVR process from hydrogenic motions even upon X H bond excitation. Experiments and calculations on prototype heavy-atom systems show that intermediate time IVR differs in many aspects from the early stages of hydrogenic mode IVR. As a result, IVR can be coherently frozen, with potential applications to selective chemistry.

  10. [Capillaroscopy in vibration disease].

    PubMed

    Vayssairat, M; Patri, B; Guilmot, J L; Housset, E; Dubrisay, J

    1982-10-23

    The results of nailfold capillary microscopy were compared in 107 lumberers who had been using a chain saw for more than 3 years and 115 manual workers who had never used vibrating tools. The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon was 61.7% in lumberers and 5.2% in the control group. The mean time of exposure to risk before the condition developed was 7.86 years. The syndrome was usually mild, but the patients had an abnormally high incidence of accidents at work, including wounds and cut off fingers. The number of capillary loops was significantly reduced. The lumberers affected showed an abnormal spasm of the digital artery in response to cold; the predictive value of this test was 88%. It is suggested that nailfold capillary microscopy should be systematically used in industrial medicine for monitoring workers using a vibrating tool.

  11. Thermoelastic vibration test techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, Michael W.; Snyder, H. Todd

    1991-01-01

    The structural integrity of proposed high speed aircraft can be seriously affected by the extremely high surface temperatures and large temperature gradients throughout the vehicle's structure. Variations in the structure's elastic characteristics as a result of thermal effects can be observed by changes in vibration frequency, damping, and mode shape. Analysis codes that predict these changes must be correlated and verified with experimental data. The experimental modal test techniques and procedures used to conduct uniform, nonuniform, and transient thermoelastic vibration tests are presented. Experimental setup and elevated temperature instrumentation considerations are also discussed. Modal data for a 12 by 50 inch aluminum plate heated to a temperature of 475 F are presented. These data show the effect of heat on the plate's modal characteristics. The results indicated that frequency decreased, damping increased, and mode shape remained unchanged as the temperature of the plate was increased.

  12. Connection between decoherence and fidelity decay in echo dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorin, T.; Prosen, T.; Seligman, T. H.; Strunz, W. T.

    2004-10-01

    Entanglement between a quantum system and its environment leads to loss of coherence in the former. In general, the temporal fate of coherences is complicated. Here, we establish the connection between decoherence of a central system and fidelity decay in the environment for a variety of situations, including both energy conserving and dissipative couplings. We show how properties of unitary time evolution of the environment can be inferred from the nonunitary evolution of coherences in the central system. This opens up promising ways for measuring Loschmidt echoes in a variety of situations.

  13. First Experimental Evidence for Quantum Echoes in Scattering Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembowski, C.; Dietz, B.; Friedrich, T.; Gräf, H.-D.; Heine, A.; Mejía-Monasterio, C.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.; Seligman, T. H.

    2004-09-01

    A self-pulsing effect termed quantum echoes has been observed in experiments with an open superconducting and a normal conducting microwave billiard whose geometry provides soft chaos, i.e., a mixed phase space portrait with a large stable island. For such systems a periodic response to an incoming pulse has been predicted. Its period has been associated with the degree of development of a horseshoe describing the topology of the classical dynamics. The experiments confirm this picture and reveal the topological information.

  14. Correlation between cosmic noise absorption and VHF coherent echo intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevitch, R. A.; Honary, F.

    2005-07-01

    We present examples and statistical analysis of the events with statistically significant correlation between the cosmic noise absorption (CNA) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the VHF coherent echo intensity in the area monitored simultaneously by an imaging riometer and two oblique-sounding coherent VHF radars in Northern Scandinavia. By only considering the observations from the narrow riometer beams comparable (in terms of the intersection with the ionosphere) with the VHF radar cells, we identify ~200 one-hour high correlation periods (HCPs) for 2 years near the solar cycle maximum, 2000 2001. The HCP occurrence is maximized in the afternoon (12:00 17:00 UT, MLT≅UT+3), with the secondary peak near the midnight (21:00 02:00 UT). Relative to the VHF echo occurrence, HCPs occur more frequently from 11:00 to 20:00 UT. The diurnal variation of HCP occurrence is similar to that of the 1-h intervals with the lowest mean absorption A<0.25dB.

    The HCPs are observed more frequently during the winter months, which, combined with the fact that VHF echoes observed during HCPs exhibit features typical for field-aligned E-region irregularities, makes their association with the polar mesospheric echoes (for which some positive CNA/SNR correlation has been reported in the past) very unlikely. Instead, we attribute the high positive CNA/SNR correlation to the synchronous, to a first approximation, variation of the particle fluxes for two different but close sets of energies.

    By considering the dependence of the CNA/SNR correlation coefficients for both VHF radars (CA1 and CA2) upon the correlation between SNRs for two radars (C12), we show that both coefficients, CA1 and CA2, and the agreement between them decrease drastically with a C12 decrease, which we interpreted through the progressively increasing role of the spatial inhomogeneity of the processes leading to the enhanced CNA and SNR. In this situation

  15. The wide-angle neutron spin echo spectrometer project WASP

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes design and optimization for the wide angle spin-echo spectrometer (WASP) presently being planned at the ILL. The spectrometer will be a replacement for the high intensity spectrometer IN11 and will enhance its signal by more than one order of magnitude while maintaining the resolution of the present spectrometer. The paper outlines the magnetic field calculations and the considerations about possible limitations. The projected performance has been verified carefully by Monte Carlo raytracing and Biot-Savart magnetic field calculations. The maximum momentum transfer of the new spectrometer is to be extended to 4 angstroms {sup -1}.

  16. Echo scintillation Index affected by cat-eye target's caliber with Cassegrain lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Cong-miao; Sun, Hua-yan; Zhao, Yan-zhong; Zheng, Yong-hui

    2015-10-01

    The optical aperture of cat-eye target has the aperture averaging effect to the active detecting laser of active laser detection system, which can be used to identify optical targets. The echo scintillation characteristics of the transmission-type lens target have been studied in previous work. Discussing the differences of the echo scintillation characteristics between the transmission-type lens target and Cassegrain lens target can be helpful to targets classified. In this paper, the echo scintillation characteristics of Cat-eye target's caliber with Cassegrain lens has been discussed . By using the flashing theory of spherical wave in the weak atmospheric turbulence, the annular aperture filter function and the Kolmogorov power spectrum, the analytic expression of the scintillation index of the cat-eye target echo of the horizontal path two-way transmission was given when the light is normal incidence. Then the impact of turbulence inner and outer scale to the echo scintillation index and the analytic expression of the echo scintillation index at the receiving aperture were presented using the modified Hill spectrum and the modified Von Karman spectrum. Echo scintillation index shows the tendency of decreasing with the target aperture increases and different ratios of the inner and outer aperture diameter show the different echo scintillation index curves. This conclusion has a certain significance for target recognition in the active laser detection system that can largely determine the target type by largely determining the scope of the cat-eye target which depending on echo scintillation index.

  17. The design and implementation of a multi-waveform radar echo simulator.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yinghui; Gao, Xiaoxiao; Li, Yachao; Xing, Mengdao

    2015-10-01

    Radar simulator is an effective tool for performance assessment of radar systems by accurately reproducing echo signals from complicated environment. This paper presents a design of fast multi-waveform radar echo generation based on deconvolution method. First, scene information is retrieved from outfield data based on improved conjugate gradient algorithm. Then, the new radar echoes are generated through convolution of new transmitted signal and restored scene information. A fast and area-efficient field programmable gate array realization is provided to meet the real-time requirement of radar echo simulation. Finally, a series of experiments are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed radar simulation instrument.

  18. Improved time efficiency and accuracy in diffusion tensor microimaging with multiple-echo acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulani, Vikas; Weber, Thomas; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2005-12-01

    In high-field NMR microscopy rapid single-shot imaging methods, for example, echo planar imaging, cannot be used for determination of the apparent diffusion tensor (ADT) due to large magnetic susceptibility effects. We propose a pulse sequence in which a diffusion-weighted spin-echo is followed by multiple gradient-echoes with additional diffusion weighting. These additional echoes can be used to calculate the ADT and T2∗ maps. We show here that this results in modest but consistent improvements in the accuracy of ADT determination within a given total data acquisition time. The method is tested on excised, chemically fixed rat spinal cords.

  19. The design and implementation of a multi-waveform radar echo simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yinghui; Gao, Xiaoxiao; Li, Yachao; Xing, Mengdao

    2015-10-01

    Radar simulator is an effective tool for performance assessment of radar systems by accurately reproducing echo signals from complicated environment. This paper presents a design of fast multi-waveform radar echo generation based on deconvolution method. First, scene information is retrieved from outfield data based on improved conjugate gradient algorithm. Then, the new radar echoes are generated through convolution of new transmitted signal and restored scene information. A fast and area-efficient field programmable gate array realization is provided to meet the real-time requirement of radar echo simulation. Finally, a series of experiments are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed radar simulation instrument.

  20. Examining the robustness of automated aural classification of active sonar echoes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stefan M; Hines, Paul C

    2014-02-01

    Active sonar systems are used to detect underwater man-made objects of interest (targets) that are too quiet to be reliably detected with passive sonar. Performance of active sonar can be degraded by false alarms caused by echoes returned from geological seabed structures (clutter) in shallow regions. To reduce false alarms, a method of distinguishing target echoes from clutter echoes is required. Research has demonstrated that perceptual-based signal features similar to those employed in the human auditory system can be used to automatically discriminate between target and clutter echoes, thereby reducing the number of false alarms and improving sonar performance. An active sonar experiment on the Malta Plateau in the Mediterranean Sea was conducted during the Clutter07 sea trial and repeated during the Clutter09 sea trial. The dataset consists of more than 95,000 pulse-compressed echoes returned from two targets and many geological clutter objects. These echoes were processed using an automatic classifier that quantifies the timbre of each echo using a number of perceptual signal features. Using echoes from 2007, the aural classifier was trained to establish a boundary between targets and clutter in the feature space. Temporal robustness was then investigated by testing the classifier on echoes from the 2009 experiment.

  1. Vibrational stability of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangfan; Wang, Biao

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical stability of graphene as temperature rises is analyzed based on three different self-consistent phonon (SCP) models. Compared with three-dimensional (3-D) materials, the critical temperature Ti at which instability occurs for graphene is much closer to its melting temperature Tm obtained from Monte Carlo simulation (Ti ≃ 2Tm, K. V. Zakharchenko, A. Fasolino, J. H. Los, and M. I. Katsnelson, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 23, 202202). This suggests that thermal vibration plays a significant role in melting of graphene while melting for 3-D materials is often dominated by topologic defects. This peculiar property of graphene derives from its high structural anisotropy, which is characterized by the vibrational anisotropic coefficient (VAC), defined upon its Lindermann ratios in different directions. For any carbon based material with a graphene-like structure, the VAC value must be smaller than 5.4 to maintain its stability. It is also found that the high VAC value of graphene is responsible for its negative thermal expansion coefficient at low temperature range. We believe that the VAC can be regarded as a new criterion concerning the vibrational stability of any low-dimensional (low-D) materials.

  2. Vibrational Dynamics of Tricyanomethanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidinger, Daniel; Houchins, Cassidy; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    2011-06-01

    Time-resolved and steady-state IR spectroscopy have been used to characterize vibrational spectra and energy relaxation dynamics of the CN stretching band of the tricyanomethanide (TCM, C(CN)3-) anion near 2170 Cm-1 in solutions of water, heavy water, methanol, formamide, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and the ionic liquid 1-butyl methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]). The band intensity is strong (˜1500 M-1Cm-1) and the vibrational energy relaxation times are relatively long (˜5 ps in water, 12 ps in heavy water, and ˜30 ps in DMSO and [BMIM][BF4]). They are longer than those previously reported for dicyanamide in the same solvents. Although the static TCM frequency generally shifts to higher frequency with more strongly interacting solvents, the shift does not follow the same trend as the vibrational dynamics. The results for the experimental frequencies and intensities agree well with results from ab initio calculations. Proton and electron affinities for TCM are also calculated because they are relevant to potential applications of this anion in low viscosity ionic liquids.

  3. Estimate exchanger vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, C.D.; Zengyan, H.

    1986-04-01

    Based on the classical beam theory, a simple method for calculating the natural frequency of unequally spanned tubes is presented. The method is suitable for various boundary conditions. Accuracy of the calculations is sufficient for practical applications. This method will help designers and operators estimate the vibration of tubular exchangers. In general, there are three reasons why a tube vibrates in cross flow: vortex shedding, fluid elasticity and turbulent buffeting. No matter which is the cause, the basic reason is that the frequency of exciting force is approximately the same as or equal to the natural frequency of the tube. To prevent the heat exchanger from vibrating, it is necessary to select correctly the shell-side fluid velocity so that the frequency of exciting force is different from the natural frequency of the tube, or to vary the natural frequency of the heat exchanger tube. So precisely determining the natural frequency of the heat exchanger, especially its foundational frequency under various supporting conditions, is of significance.

  4. Water dynamics in divalent and monovalent concentrated salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Chiara H; Wong, Daryl B; Fayer, Michael D

    2012-11-26

    Water hydrogen bond dynamics in concentrated salt solutions are studied using polarization-selective IR pump-probe spectroscopy and 2D IR vibrational echo spectroscopy performed on the OD hydroxyl stretching mode of dilute HOD in H(2)O/salt solutions. The OD stretch is studied to eliminate vibrational excitation transfer, which interferes with the dynamical measurements. Though previous research suggested that only the anion affected dynamics in solution, here it is shown that the cation plays a role as well. From FT-IR spectra of the OD stretch, it is seen that replacing either ion of the salt pair causes a shift in absorption frequency relative to that of the OD stretch absorption in bulk pure water. This shift becomes pronounced with larger, more polarizable anions or smaller, high charge-density cations. The vibrational lifetime of the OD hydroxyl stretch in these solutions is a local property and is primarily dependent on the nature of the anion and whether the OD is hydrogen bonded to the anion or to the oxygen of another water molecule. However, the cation still has a small effect. Time dependent anisotropy measurements show that reorientation dynamics in these concentrated solutions is a highly concerted process. While the lifetime, a local probe, displays an ion-associated and a bulk-like component in concentrated solutions, the orientational relaxation does not have two subensemble dynamics, as demonstrated by the lack of a wavelength dependence. The orientational relaxation of the single ensemble is dependent on the identity of both the cation and anion. The 2D IR vibrational echo experiments measure spectral diffusion that is caused by structural evolution of the system. The vibrational echo measurements yield the frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF). The results also show that the structural dynamics are dependent on the cation as well as the anion. PMID:23113682

  5. An energetic stellar outburst accompanied by circumstellar light echoes.

    PubMed

    Bond, Howard E; Henden, Arne; Levay, Zoltan G; Panagia, Nino; Sparks, William B; Starrfield, Sumner; Wagner, R Mark; Corradi, R L M; Munari, U

    2003-03-27

    Some classes of stars, including novae and supernovae, undergo explosive outbursts that eject stellar material into space. In 2002, the previously unknown variable star V838 Monocerotis brightened suddenly by a factor of approximately 10(4). Unlike a supernova or nova, it did not explosively eject its outer layers; rather, it simply expanded to become a cool supergiant with a moderate-velocity stellar wind. Superluminal light echoes were discovered as light from the outburst propagated into the surrounding, pre-existing circumstellar dust. Here we report high-resolution imaging and polarimetry of those light echoes, which allow us to set direct geometric distance limits to the object. At a distance of >6 kpc, V838 Mon at its maximum brightness was temporarily the brightest star in the Milky Way. The presence of the circumstellar dust implies that previous eruptions have occurred, and spectra show it to be a binary system. When combined with the high luminosity and unusual outburst behaviour, these characteristics indicate that V838 Mon represents a hitherto unknown type of stellar outburst, for which we have no completely satisfactory physical explanation. PMID:12660776

  6. Emergence of metapopulations and echo chambers in mobile agents

    PubMed Central

    Starnini, Michele; Frasca, Mattia; Baronchelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Multi-agent models often describe populations segregated either in the physical space, i.e. subdivided in metapopulations, or in the ecology of opinions, i.e. partitioned in echo chambers. Here we show how both kinds of segregation can emerge from the interplay between homophily and social influence in a simple model of mobile agents endowed with a continuous opinion variable. In the model, physical proximity determines a progressive convergence of opinions but differing opinions result in agents moving away from each others. This feedback between mobility and social dynamics determines the onset of a stable dynamical metapopulation scenario where physically separated groups of like-minded individuals interact with each other through the exchange of agents. The further introduction of confirmation bias in social interactions, defined as the tendency of an individual to favor opinions that match his own, leads to the emergence of echo chambers where different opinions coexist also within the same group. We believe that the model may be of interest to researchers investigating the origin of segregation in the offline and online world. PMID:27572928

  7. Emergence of metapopulations and echo chambers in mobile agents.

    PubMed

    Starnini, Michele; Frasca, Mattia; Baronchelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Multi-agent models often describe populations segregated either in the physical space, i.e. subdivided in metapopulations, or in the ecology of opinions, i.e. partitioned in echo chambers. Here we show how both kinds of segregation can emerge from the interplay between homophily and social influence in a simple model of mobile agents endowed with a continuous opinion variable. In the model, physical proximity determines a progressive convergence of opinions but differing opinions result in agents moving away from each others. This feedback between mobility and social dynamics determines the onset of a stable dynamical metapopulation scenario where physically separated groups of like-minded individuals interact with each other through the exchange of agents. The further introduction of confirmation bias in social interactions, defined as the tendency of an individual to favor opinions that match his own, leads to the emergence of echo chambers where different opinions coexist also within the same group. We believe that the model may be of interest to researchers investigating the origin of segregation in the offline and online world. PMID:27572928

  8. Motion and distortion correction of skeletal muscle echo planar images.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew D; Noseworthy, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines two artifacts facing researchers who use gradient echo (GRE) echo planar imaging (EPI) for time series studies of skeletal muscles in limbs. The first is through-plane blood flow during the acquisition, causing a vessel motion artifact that inhibits proper motion correction of the data. The second is distortion of EPI images caused by B0 field inhomogeneities. Though software tools are available for correcting these artifacts in brain EPI images, the tools do not perform well on muscle images. The severity of the two artifacts was described using image similarity measures, and the data was processed with both a conventional motion correction program and custom written tools. The conventional program did not perform well on the limb images, in fact significantly degrading image quality in some trials. Data is presented which proves that arterial pulsatile signal caused the impairment in motion correction. The new tools were shown to perform much better, achieving substantial motion correction and distortion correction of the muscle EPI images. PMID:26972774

  9. Quantum and classical correlations in electron-nuclear spin echo

    SciTech Connect

    Zobov, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    The quantum properties of dynamic correlations in a system of an electron spin surrounded by nuclear spins under the conditions of free induction decay and electron spin echo have been studied. Analytical results for the time evolution of mutual information, classical part of correlations, and quantum part characterized by quantum discord have been obtained within the central-spin model in the high-temperature approximation. The same formulas describe discord in both free induction decay and spin echo although the time and magnetic field dependences are different because of difference in the parameters entering into the formulas. Changes in discord in the presence of the nuclear polarization β{sub I} in addition to the electron polarization β{sub S} have been calculated. It has been shown that the method of reduction of the density matrix to a two-spin electron-nuclear system provides a qualitatively correct description of pair correlations playing the main role at β{sub S} ≈ β{sub I} and small times. At large times, such correlations decay and multispin correlations ensuring nonzero mutual information and zero quantum discord become dominant.

  10. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation for Seeded FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2011-05-19

    In the x-ray wavelengths, the two leading FEL concepts are the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) configuration and the high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) scheme. While the radiation from a SASE FEL is coherent transversely, it typically has rather limited temporal coherence. Alternatively, the HGHG scheme allows generation of fully coherent radiation by up-converting the frequency of a high-power seed laser. However, due to the relatively low up-frequency conversion efficiency, multiple stages of HGHG FEL are needed in order to generate x-rays from a UV laser. The up-frequency conversion efficiency can be greatly improved with the recently proposed echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) technique. In this work we will present the concept of EEHG, and address some practically important issues that affect the performance of the seeding. We show how the EEHG can be incorporated in the FEL scheme and what is the expected performance of the EEHG seeded FEL. We will then briefly describe the first proof-of-principle EEHG experiment carried out at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. We will also discuss latest advances in the echo-scheme approach, and refer to subsequent modifications of the original concept.

  11. Actively Shielded Gradient Coils and Echo-Planar MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elekes, Almos A.

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI), which produces images in 25-100 msec, is the fastest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. Its implementation is hampered by the demands it places on the scanner components. It requires strong magnetic gradient fields, produced by rapidly switched gradient coils; therefore the coils must have low inductance. They also have to be accommodated without inducing eddy currents in the magnet's metallic structure, otherwise the images would be degraded. All the major technical problems of echo-planar imaging are solved. Two transverse, actively shielded gradient coils were designed, built and tested. The coils were designed by the combined application of the minimum inductance and target field methods. The gradient strengths are 10 and 13 G/cm, unusually high for EPI, but well suited for microimaging, MR spectroscopy and petrochemical core analysis. The gradient time constants are short, so high resolution images are possible under 50 ms. The research was carried out at on a 4.5T/30cm superconducting, superferric shielded magnet located at the Texas Accelerator Center. The results of EPI and microimaging are presented.

  12. Magnetization transfer prepared gradient echo MRI for CEST imaging.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhuozhi; Ji, Jim; Xiao, Gang; Yan, Gen; Li, Shengkai; Zhang, Guishan; Lin, Yan; Shen, Zhiwei; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an emerging MRI contrast mechanism that is capable of noninvasively imaging dilute CEST agents and local properties such as pH and temperature, augmenting the routine MRI methods. However, the routine CEST MRI includes a long RF saturation pulse followed by fast image readout, which is associated with high specific absorption rate and limited spatial resolution. In addition, echo planar imaging (EPI)-based fast image readout is prone to image distortion, particularly severe at high field. To address these limitations, we evaluated magnetization transfer (MT) prepared gradient echo (GRE) MRI for CEST imaging. We proved the feasibility using numerical simulations and experiments in vitro and in vivo. Then we optimized the sequence by serially evaluating the effects of the number of saturation steps, MT saturation power (B1), GRE readout flip angle (FA), and repetition time (TR) upon the CEST MRI, and further demonstrated the endogenous amide proton CEST imaging in rats brains (n = 5) that underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. The CEST images can identify ischemic lesions in the first 3 hours after occlusion. In summary, our study demonstrated that the readily available MT-prepared GRE MRI, if optimized, is CEST-sensitive and remains promising for translational CEST imaging. PMID:25384020

  13. Volumetric Echocardiographic Particle Image Velocimetry (V-Echo-PIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of 3D flow field inside the cardiac chambers has proven to be a challenging task. Current laser-based 3D PIV methods estimate the third component of the velocity rather than directly measuring it and also cannot be used to image the opaque heart chambers. Modern echocardiography systems are equipped with 3D probes that enable imaging the entire 3D opaque field. However, this feature has not yet been employed for 3D vector characterization of blood flow. For the first time, we introduce a method that generates velocity vector field in 4D based on volumetric echocardiographic images. By assuming the conservation of brightness in 3D, blood speckles are tracked. A hierarchical 3D PIV method is used to account for large particle displacement. The discretized brightness transport equation is solved in a least square sense in interrogation windows of size 163 voxels. We successfully validate the method in analytical and experimental cases. Volumetric echo data of a left ventricle is then processed in the systolic phase. The expected velocity fields were successfully predicted by V-Echo-PIV. In this work, we showed a method to image blood flow in 3D based on volumetric images of human heart using no contrast agent.

  14. Relaxation of AB Spin Systems in Stimulated-Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straubinger, Klaus; Schick, Fritz; Lutz, Otto

    1995-12-01

    The behavior of the strongly coupled AB spin system during the STEAM (stimulated echo acquisition mode) sequence was calculated analytically. Relaxation during the TM interval, in which longitudinal magnetization and zero-quantum coherences (ZQCs) occur, was accounted for by following the course of the different density-matrix terms. The result allows one to determine sequence timings to provide high signal intensities or signals resulting from certain coherences. Theoretically calculated spectra can be generated, using an analytical function. Series of proton spectra were recorded from a 0.1maqueous solution of citrate on a 1.5 T whole-body imager at 22°C. Spectra series with constant echo time TE were used to evaluate the longitudinal relaxation timeT1as well as the zero-quantum relaxation timeTZQby fitting the theoretically predicted curve to the experimental data. The evaluated proton relaxation timesT1andTZQin citrate differ strongly:T1= 770 ms,TZQ= 1300 ms.

  15. Plasma Density and Radio Echoes in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1995-01-01

    This project provided a opportunity to study a variety of interesting topics related to radio sounding in the magnetosphere. The results of this study are reported in two papers which have been submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research and Radio Science, and various aspects of this study were also reported at meetings of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) at Baltimore, Maryland and the International Scientific Radio Union (URSI) at Boulder, Colorado. The major results of this study were also summarized during a one-day symposium on this topic sponsored by Marshall Space Flight Center in December 1994. The purpose of the study was to examine the density structure of the plasmasphere and determine the relevant mechanisms for producing radio echoes which can be detected by a radio sounder in the magnetosphere. Under this study we have examined density irregularities, biteouts, and outliers of the plasmasphere, studied focusing, specular reflection, ducting, and scattering by the density structures expected to occur in the magnetosphere, and predicted the echoes which can be detected by a magnetospheric radio sounder.

  16. EChO fine guidance sensor design and architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottensamer, Roland; Rataj, Miroslaw; Schrader, Jan-Rutger; Ferstl, Roman; Güdel, Manuel; Kerschbaum, Franz; Luntzer, Armin

    2014-08-01

    EChO, the Exoplanet Characterization Observatory, is an M-class candidate in the ESA Comic Vision programme. It will provide high resolution, multi-wavelength spectroscopic observations of exoplanets, measure their atmospheric composition, temperature and albedo. The scientific payload is a spectrometer covering the 0.4-11 micron waveband. High photometric stability over a time scale of about 10 hours is one of the most stringent requirements of the EChO mission. As a result, fine pointing stability relative to the host star is mandatory. This will be achieved through a Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), a separate photometric channel that uses a fraction of the target star signal from the optical channel. The main task of the FGS is to ensure the centering, focusing and guiding of the satellite, but it will also provide supplemental high-precision astrometry and photometry of the target to ground for de-trending the spectra and complementary science. In this paper we give an overview of the current architectural design of the FGS subsystem and discuss related requirements as well as the expected performance.

  17. An energetic stellar outburst accompanied by circumstellar light echoes.

    PubMed

    Bond, Howard E; Henden, Arne; Levay, Zoltan G; Panagia, Nino; Sparks, William B; Starrfield, Sumner; Wagner, R Mark; Corradi, R L M; Munari, U

    2003-03-27

    Some classes of stars, including novae and supernovae, undergo explosive outbursts that eject stellar material into space. In 2002, the previously unknown variable star V838 Monocerotis brightened suddenly by a factor of approximately 10(4). Unlike a supernova or nova, it did not explosively eject its outer layers; rather, it simply expanded to become a cool supergiant with a moderate-velocity stellar wind. Superluminal light echoes were discovered as light from the outburst propagated into the surrounding, pre-existing circumstellar dust. Here we report high-resolution imaging and polarimetry of those light echoes, which allow us to set direct geometric distance limits to the object. At a distance of >6 kpc, V838 Mon at its maximum brightness was temporarily the brightest star in the Milky Way. The presence of the circumstellar dust implies that previous eruptions have occurred, and spectra show it to be a binary system. When combined with the high luminosity and unusual outburst behaviour, these characteristics indicate that V838 Mon represents a hitherto unknown type of stellar outburst, for which we have no completely satisfactory physical explanation.

  18. Echoes of Historical Supernovae in the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Badenes, Carles; Blondin, Stephane; Challis, Peter; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Filippenko, Alex; Foley, Ryan; Huber, Mark E.; Matheson, Thomas; Mazzali, Paolo; Olsen, Knut; Sauer, Daniel; Sinnott, Brendan; Smith, R. Chris; Suntzeff, Nicholas; Welch, Doug; Bergmann, Marcel

    2010-08-01

    We propose to discover the first light echoes (LEs) associated with the historical Galactic supernovae SN 1181 (3C 58) and SN 1054 (Crab), and to locate additional LE complexes from SN 1680 (Cas A) and SN 1572 (Tycho). Using other facilities, we will obtain spectra of the LEs to determine the nature and properties of these important events. This is a continuation of a previously approved NOAO program to obtain images of regions of significant dust concentration near these Galactic supernova remnants. With data from previous semesters, we found LEs from the Cas A and Tycho supernovae teRest08b. We then used the rich set of LEs from Cas A to examine the Cas A SN from different viewing angles teRest10_casaspec, Rest10_leprofile, finding that in one direction the He I (lambda) 5876 and H(alpha) features are blue-shifted by an additional about 4000 km/s relative to the other directions teRest10_casaspec, which is direct evidence that the SN was asymmetric. The study of scattered-light echoes from Galactic supernovae provides a host of newly-recognized observational benefits which have only just begun to be exploited including (1) a direct comparison of a supernova and its remnant, (2) a three-dimensional view of a supernova, and (3) a Galactic network of absolute distance differences.

  19. Echo Park controversy and the American conservation movement

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, M.W.T.

    1986-01-01

    During the twentieth century, a few conservation battles have pitted in as classic a fashion the foes of preservation and development as that waged during the 1950s over Dinosaur National Monument. The issue was whether to build the proposed Echo Park Dam within Dinosaur National Monument. The Monument spans the Utah-Colorado border, and comprises the confluence of the Green and Yampa Rivers. Echo Park, a lovely, peaceful meadow flanked by massive sandstone walls at the rivers' confluence, became the storm-center of controversy when the Bureau of Reclamation made plans to dam the Green River just two miles to the south. The dam would have flooded a hundred miles of this canyon country, and the proposal startled the nation's major conservation organizations and occupied their attention for several years. Their effort to prevent the dam ultimately succeeded, and their story is critical in tracing the roots of contemporary conservation. In the end, pressure from conservation groups helped to delete the dam from the legislation, and Dinosaur's river canyons were preserved.

  20. Emergence of metapopulations and echo chambers in mobile agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starnini, Michele; Frasca, Mattia; Baronchelli, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Multi-agent models often describe populations segregated either in the physical space, i.e. subdivided in metapopulations, or in the ecology of opinions, i.e. partitioned in echo chambers. Here we show how both kinds of segregation can emerge from the interplay between homophily and social influence in a simple model of mobile agents endowed with a continuous opinion variable. In the model, physical proximity determines a progressive convergence of opinions but differing opinions result in agents moving away from each others. This feedback between mobility and social dynamics determines the onset of a stable dynamical metapopulation scenario where physically separated groups of like-minded individuals interact with each other through the exchange of agents. The further introduction of confirmation bias in social interactions, defined as the tendency of an individual to favor opinions that match his own, leads to the emergence of echo chambers where different opinions coexist also within the same group. We believe that the model may be of interest to researchers investigating the origin of segregation in the offline and online world.

  1. Meteoroid mass determination using head echoes detected at multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Sigrid; Oppenheim, Meers; Hunt, Stephen; McKeen, Fred; Coster, Anthea

    2002-11-01

    Meteor data collected at the Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) during the peak of the 1998 Leonid storm comprise the only simultaneous data collection of meteor head echoes and trails using seven frequencies (VHF, UHF, L-, S-, C-, Ka- and W-band). The primary sensor was the ALTAIR radar operating at 160 MHz with 30-m range resolution and 422 MHz with 7.5-m range resolution, which has both interferometric and polarization capabilities. This paper presents an alaysis of these high-resolution data in support of the following ideas: First, head echo scattering appears to arise from an ionized region with a density sufficiently high that its plasma frequency exceeds the radar frequency (overdense reflection). Second, the Radar-cross-section (RCS) values, which decrease with decreasing wavelength, peak near 105 km altitude at the point where the meteoroid gives up the most kinetic energy during its descent. Third, these RCS measurements were used to compute electron line densities, which provide estimates of a meteoroid's mass. By combining these data and simple ablation models, we can constrain meteoroid mass as it loses material during its passage through the atmosphere.

  2. Sum-frequency generation echo and grating from interface

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-14

    The work addresses spectroscopy of fourth-order Sum Frequency Generation Echo and Grating responses as an experimental tool to study structure and dynamics at interfaces. First, it addresses experimental geometry to extract background-free fourth-order Echo and Grating responses. Further, the article provides the analytical expressions of the response functions for these nonlinearities. The derived expressions are used to model the χ{sup (4)} two-dimensional spectral responses of a hydrated methyl acetate, which resembles a hydrated carbonyl moiety at the polar outer side of a phospholipid membrane. Orientation, transition dipole moments, and Raman tensors are obtained from the results of classical and quantum calculations, respectively. The numerical studies for the nonlinear responses under different polarization schemes and timings suggest the possibility of securely factoring of spectral contributions of χ{sub YYYZX} and χ{sub YYYZY} macroscopic susceptibilities. As such, the nonlinearities provide an experimental perspective on orientation of a generic (low-symmetry) molecular system at interfaces. Besides, the spectral properties of the tensors may reflect correlations of the in-plane and out-of-plane field components specific to the interface. For the case of a phospholipid membrane, the experiment would address in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy of hydrogen bonding and related dynamics.

  3. Communication: Uncovering correlated vibrational cooling and electron transfer dynamics with multidimensional spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhenkun; Giokas, Paul G.; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Williams, Olivia F.; Dirkes, David J.; You, Wei; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    Analogues of 2D photon echo methods in which two population times are sampled have recently been used to expose heterogeneity in chemical kinetics. In this work, the two population times sampled for a transition metal complex are transformed into a 2D rate spectrum using the maximum entropy method. The 2D rate spectrum suggests heterogeneity in the vibrational cooling (VC) rate within the ensemble. In addition, a cross peak associated with VC and back electron transfer (BET) dynamics reveals correlation between the two processes. We hypothesize that an increase in the strength of solute-solvent interactions, which accelerates VC, drives the system toward the activationless regime of BET.

  4. Communication: Uncovering correlated vibrational cooling and electron transfer dynamics with multidimensional spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenkun; Giokas, Paul G; Cheshire, Thomas P; Williams, Olivia F; Dirkes, David J; You, Wei; Moran, Andrew M

    2016-09-14

    Analogues of 2D photon echo methods in which two population times are sampled have recently been used to expose heterogeneity in chemical kinetics. In this work, the two population times sampled for a transition metal complex are transformed into a 2D rate spectrum using the maximum entropy method. The 2D rate spectrum suggests heterogeneity in the vibrational cooling (VC) rate within the ensemble. In addition, a cross peak associated with VC and back electron transfer (BET) dynamics reveals correlation between the two processes. We hypothesize that an increase in the strength of solute-solvent interactions, which accelerates VC, drives the system toward the activationless regime of BET. PMID:27634244

  5. Vibrational averages along thermal lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of vibrational quantum and thermal expectation values of physical properties from first principles. Thermal lines are introduced: these are lines in configuration space parametrized by temperature, such that the value of any physical property along them is approximately equal to the vibrational average of that property. The number of sampling points needed to explore the vibrational phase space is reduced by up to an order of magnitude when the full vibrational density is replaced by thermal lines. Calculations of the vibrational averages of several properties and systems are reported, namely, the internal energy and the electronic band gap of diamond and silicon, and the chemical shielding tensor of L-alanine. Thermal lines pave the way for complex calculations of vibrational averages, including large systems and methods beyond semilocal density functional theory.

  6. Flow-induced vibrations-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles--Part 1. Physical nature of the phenomenon; Theoretical and experimental studies on heat exchanger U-bend tube bundle vibration characteristics; Experimental model analysis of metallic pipeline conveying fluid; Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint; and A study on the vibrations of pipelines caused by internal pulsating flows.

  7. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  8. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, James M.; Barney, Patrick S.; Parker, Gordon G.; Smith, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof.

  9. Measuring Vibrations With Nonvibration Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    Information about vibrations of structure and/or of nonvibration sensor attached to structure extracted from output of sensor. Sensor operated in usual way except, output fed to power-spectral-density analyzer. Vibrational components easily distinguishable in analyzer output because they have frequencies much higher than those of more-slowly-varying temperature, pressure, or other normally desired components. Spectral-analysis technique applied successfully to high-frequency resistance changes in output of platinum-wire resistance thermometer: vibrational peaks in resistance frequency spectrum confirmed by spectrum from accelerometer. Technique also showed predicted 17-kHz vibrational resonance in strain-guage-supporting beam in pressure sensor.

  10. Computer analysis of railcar vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlaminck, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Computer models and techniques for calculating railcar vibrations are discussed along with criteria for vehicle ride optimization. The effect on vibration of car body structural dynamics, suspension system parameters, vehicle geometry, and wheel and rail excitation are presented. Ride quality vibration data collected on the state-of-the-art car and standard light rail vehicle is compared to computer predictions. The results show that computer analysis of the vehicle can be performed for relatively low cost in short periods of time. The analysis permits optimization of the design as it progresses and minimizes the possibility of excessive vibration on production vehicles.

  11. Electronic damping of mechanical vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilyev, P.; Navitskas, A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions required for measuring and recording the patterns of vibration of a process are discussed. It is stated that the frequency of the process being investigated must be an order of magnitude lower than the natural frequency of the sensitive receiving element for sufficient accuracy. The elastic element must damp so the frequency range of the vibrational patterns being investigated can be expanded. This is especially true of the tensile stresses of a moving signal carrier. A method is proposed for damping mechanical vibrations of elastic sensitive elements with semiconductor strain gages, based on electronic compensation of the natural vibrations. A schematic diagram is provided to show the conditions.

  12. Resonance vibrations of aircraft propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebers, Fritz

    1932-01-01

    On the basis of the consideration of various possible kinds of propeller vibrations, the resonance vibrations caused by unequal impacts of the propeller blades appear to be the most important. Their theoretical investigation is made by separate analysis of torsional and bending vibrations. This method is justified by the very great difference in the two natural frequencies of aircraft propeller blades. The calculated data are illustrated by practical examples. Thereby the observed vibration phenomenon in the given examples is explained by a bending resonance, for which the bending frequency of the propeller is equal to twice the revolution speed.

  13. A Comparison Study of Single-Echo Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Combined Multi-Echo Susceptibility Weighted Imaging in Visualizing Asymmetric Medullary Veins in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Qiu, Tiantian; Song, Ruirui; Jiaerken, Yerfan; Yang, Linglin; Wang, Shaoze

    2016-01-01

    Background Asymmetric medullary veins (AMV) are frequently observed in stroke patients and single-echo susceptibility weighted imaging (SWIs) is the main technique in detecting AMV. Our study aimed to investigate which echo time (TE) on single-echo susceptibility is the optimal echo for visualizing AMV and to compare the ability in detecting AMV in stroke patients between SWIs and multi-echo susceptibility weighted imaging (SWIc). Materials and Methods Twenty patients with middle cerebral artery stroke were included. SWI was acquired by using a multi-echo gradient-echo sequence with six echoes ranging from 5 ms to 35.240 ms. Three different echoes of SWIs including SWIs1 (TE = 23.144 ms), SWIs2 (TE = 29.192 ms) and SWIs3 (TE = 35.240 ms) were reconstructed. SWIc was averaged using the three echoes of SWIs. Image quality and venous contrast of medullary veins were compared between SWIs and SWIc using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), mean opinion score (MOS), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The presence of AMV was evaluated in each SWIs (1–3) and SWIc. Results SWIs2 had the highest PSNR, MOS and CNR and SWIs1 had the highest SNR among three different echoes of SWIs. No significant difference was found in SNR between SWIs1 and SWIs2. PSNR, MOS and CNR in SWIc were significantly increased by 27.9%, 28.2% and 17.2% compared with SWIs2 and SNR in SWIc was significantly increased by 32.4% compared with SWIs1. 55% of patients with AMV were detected in SWIs2, SWIs3 and SWIc, while 50% AMV were found in SWIs1. Conclusions SWIs using TE around 29ms was optimal in visualizing AMV. SWIc could improve image quality and venous contrast, but was equal to SWIs using a relative long TE in evaluating AMV. These results provide the technique basis for further research of AMV in stroke. PMID:27494171

  14. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  15. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Charles C.; Pytanowski, Gregory P.; Vendituoli, Jonathan S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  16. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J.; Leontini, J. S.; Lo Jacono, D.

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  17. Comparison of Multi-Echo Dixon Methods with Volume Interpolated Breath-Hold Gradient Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Fat-Signal Fraction Quantification of Paravertebral Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Kim, Hak-Sun; Lee, Young Han; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Paek, Mun Young; Yoo, Hanna; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Chung, Tae-Sub; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether multi-echo Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with simultaneous T2* estimation and correction yields more accurate fat-signal fraction (FF) measurement of the lumbar paravertebral muscles, in comparison with non-T2*-corrected two-echo Dixon or T2*-corrected three-echo Dixon, using the FF measurements from single-voxel MR spectroscopy as the reference standard. Materials and Methods Sixty patients with low back pain underwent MR imaging with a 1.5T scanner. FF mapping images automatically obtained using T2*-corrected Dixon technique with two (non-T2*-corrected), three, and six echoes, were compared with images from single-voxel MR spectroscopy at the paravertebral muscles on levels L4 through L5. FFs were measured directly by two radiologists, who independently drew the region of interest on the mapping images from the three sequences. Results A total of 117 spectroscopic measurements were performed either bilaterally (57 of 60 subjects) or unilaterally (3 of 60 subjects). The mean spectroscopic FF was 14.3 ± 11.7% (range, 1.9-63.7%). Interobserver agreement was excellent between the two radiologists. Lin's concordance correlation between the spectroscopic findings and all the imaging-based FFs were statistically significant (p < 0.001). FFs obtained from the T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequences showed a significantly better concordance with the spectroscopic data, with its concordance correlation coefficient being 0.99 and 0.98 (p < 0.001), as compared with two- or three-echo methods. Conclusion T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequence would be a better option than two- or three-echo methods for noninvasive quantification of lumbar muscle fat quantification. PMID:26357503

  18. Localization of the cortical motor area by functional magnetic resonance imaging with gradient echo and echo-planar methods, using clinical 1.5 Tesla MR imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K

    1997-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gradient echo and echo-planar sequences was applied to healthy volunteers and neurological patients to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and localizing the motor cortex. Time course of the change in signal intensity by an alternate repetition of motor task (squeezing hand) and rest periods was also examined. The motor cortex was localized as the area of signal increase in 88.9% of 45 healthy volunteers by gradient echo method, which mainly reflected the cortical vein, and 83.3% of 30 healthy volunteers by echo-planar method, which mainly reflected the cerebral gyrus. Among 21 volunteers who participated in the both studies, success rate in the localization for the motor cortex was 90.5% (21 volunteers) by gradient echo method and 81% (17 volunteers) by echo-planar method. It was also shown from the time course of the change in signal intensity that signal increase in the most significantly activated area generally corresponded with the periods of the motor task, and the latency between the onset of signal increase and the onset of motor task was usually about 4 seconds. In four of 6 patients with brain tumor, the motor cortex was localized, although activated areas were displaced or distorted. The results indicate that fMRI, either with gradient echo or echo-planar sequence, is a useful method for localizing the primary motor area activated during the motor task and clinically available for noninvasive evaluation of the anatomical relation between brain tumors and the motor area before surgical therapy.

  19. Enhancement of BOLD-contrast sensitivity by single-shot multi-echo functional MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Posse, S; Wiese, S; Gembris, D; Mathiak, K; Kessler, C; Grosse-Ruyken, M L; Elghahwagi, B; Richards, T; Dager, S R; Kiselev, V G

    1999-07-01

    Improved data acquisition and processing strategies for blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD)-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which enhance the functional contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by sampling multiple echo times in a single shot, are described. The dependence of the CNR on T2*, the image encoding time, and the number of sampled echo times are investigated for exponential fitting, echo summation, weighted echo summation, and averaging of correlation maps obtained at different echo times. The method is validated in vivo using visual stimulation and turbo proton echoplanar spectroscopic imaging (turbo-PEPSI), a new single-shot multi-slice MR spectroscopic imaging technique, which acquires up to 12 consecutive echoplanar images with echo times ranging from 12 to 213 msec. Quantitative T2*-mapping significantly increases the measured extent of activation and the mean correlation coefficient compared with conventional echoplanar imaging. The sensitivity gain with echo summation, which is computationally efficient provides similar sensitivity as fitting. For all data processing methods sensitivity is optimum when echo times up to 3.2 T2* are sampled. This methodology has implications for comparing functional sensitivity at different magnetic field strengths and between brain regions with different magnetic field inhomogeneities.

  20. The elimination of a class of pseudo echoes by an improved T/R switch technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Ecklund, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    An annoying class of pseudo echoes are described that evidently occur occasionally in a number of ST (stratosphere troposphere) radars. The origin of these signals are located in the output circuitry of the radar transmitter. Two methods for the elimination of the radar echoes are suggested and briefly desscrib.

  1. Time-domain Fresnel-to-Fraunhofer diffraction with photon echoes.

    PubMed

    Ménager, L; Lorgeré, I; Gouët, J L; Mohan, R K; Kröll, S

    1999-07-15

    A photon echo experiment in Tm(3+):YAG is reported that shows, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, the time-domain equivalent of the transition from near- to far-field diffraction, including Talbot self-imaging effects. The experiment demonstrates the huge dispersion capability of photon echoes and opens the way to further exploration of space-time duality.

  2. Echo-level compensation and delay tuning in the auditory cortex of the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Macías, Silvio; Mora, Emanuel C; Hechavarría, Julio C; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    During echolocation, bats continuously perform audio-motor adjustments to optimize detection efficiency. It has been demonstrated that bats adjust the amplitude of their biosonar vocalizations (known as 'pulses') to stabilize the amplitude of the returning echo. Here, we investigated this echo-level compensation behaviour by swinging mustached bats on a pendulum towards a reflective surface. In such a situation, the bats lower the amplitude of their emitted pulses to maintain the amplitude of incoming echoes at a constant level as they approach a target. We report that cortical auditory neurons that encode target distance have receptive fields that are optimized for dealing with echo-level compensation. In most cortical delay-tuned neurons, the echo amplitude eliciting the maximum response matches the echo amplitudes measured from the bats' biosonar vocalizations while they are swung in a pendulum. In addition, neurons tuned to short target distances are maximally responsive to low pulse amplitudes while neurons tuned to long target distances respond maximally to high pulse amplitudes. Our results suggest that bats dynamically adjust biosonar pulse amplitude to match the encoding of target range and to keep the amplitude of the returning echo within the bounds of the cortical map of echo delays. PMID:27037932

  3. Enhancement of BOLD-contrast sensitivity by single-shot multi-echo functional MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Posse, S; Wiese, S; Gembris, D; Mathiak, K; Kessler, C; Grosse-Ruyken, M L; Elghahwagi, B; Richards, T; Dager, S R; Kiselev, V G

    1999-07-01

    Improved data acquisition and processing strategies for blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD)-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which enhance the functional contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by sampling multiple echo times in a single shot, are described. The dependence of the CNR on T2*, the image encoding time, and the number of sampled echo times are investigated for exponential fitting, echo summation, weighted echo summation, and averaging of correlation maps obtained at different echo times. The method is validated in vivo using visual stimulation and turbo proton echoplanar spectroscopic imaging (turbo-PEPSI), a new single-shot multi-slice MR spectroscopic imaging technique, which acquires up to 12 consecutive echoplanar images with echo times ranging from 12 to 213 msec. Quantitative T2*-mapping significantly increases the measured extent of activation and the mean correlation coefficient compared with conventional echoplanar imaging. The sensitivity gain with echo summation, which is computationally efficient provides similar sensitivity as fitting. For all data processing methods sensitivity is optimum when echo times up to 3.2 T2* are sampled. This methodology has implications for comparing functional sensitivity at different magnetic field strengths and between brain regions with different magnetic field inhomogeneities. PMID:10398954

  4. Analysis of tissue changes, measurement system effects, and motion artifacts in echo decorrelation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Nagle, Anna; Subramanian, Swetha; Douglas Mast, T

    2015-02-01

    Echo decorrelation imaging, a method for mapping ablation-induced ultrasound echo changes, is analyzed. Local echo decorrelation is shown to approximate the decoherence spectrum of tissue reflectivity. Effects of the ultrasound measurement system, echo signal windowing, electronic noise, and tissue motion on echo decorrelation images are determined theoretically, leading to a method for reduction of motion and noise artifacts. Theoretical analysis is validated by simulations and experiments. Simulated decoherence of the scattering medium was recovered with root-mean-square error less than 10% with accuracy dependent on the correlation window size. Motion-induced decorrelation measured in an ex vivo pubovisceral muscle model showed similar trends to theoretical motion-induced decorrelation for a 2.1 MHz curvilinear array with decorrelation approaching unity for 3-4 mm elevational displacement or 1-1.6 mm range displacement. For in vivo imaging of porcine liver by a 7 MHz linear array, theoretical decorrelation computed using image-based motion estimates correlated significantly with measured decorrelation (r = 0.931, N = 10). Echo decorrelation artifacts incurred during in vivo radiofrequency ablation in the same porcine liver were effectively compensated based on the theoretical echo decorrelation model and measured pre-treatment decorrelation. These results demonstrate the potential of echo decorrelation imaging for quantification of heat-induced changes to the scattering tissue medium during thermal ablation.

  5. Echo strength and density structure of Hawaiian mesopelagic boundary community patches.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Au, Whitlow W L

    2003-10-01

    A broadband sonar system and digital camera with strobe lights were mounted on a vertically profiling frame with a depth sensor. The echo strengths and densities of animals within individual mesopelagic boundary community patches were investigated as a function of depth. Time and distance from shore were also investigated. Simultaneous surface echosounder surveys permitted comparison of density estimates from two techniques. Echo strength values suggest nearshore boundary community animals are primarily myctophid fishes, which was confirmed by preliminary photographic evidence. Echo strength varied significantly as a function of distance from the shoreline and time. These measures of echo strength are important for estimating density from a surface echosounder. Density estimates from these revised echo strengths compare well with those made with echo highlight counting, which is independent of echo strength. These density measures suggest that previous density estimates were too low but do not change the conclusions of these studies. Vertical microstructure in density was apparent but animal size and compositional structure was not evident within a patch. Patch edges were abrupt, with no differences in the density or echo strength from patch interiors. These edges were generally straight, with a sharp drop in density to the background density of zero. Estimates of animal size as a function of time provide information about the diel migration patterns of these mesopelagic animals.

  6. Analysis of tissue changes, measurement system effects, and motion artifacts in echo decorrelation imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Nagle, Anna; Subramanian, Swetha; Douglas Mast, T.

    2015-01-01

    Echo decorrelation imaging, a method for mapping ablation-induced ultrasound echo changes, is analyzed. Local echo decorrelation is shown to approximate the decoherence spectrum of tissue reflectivity. Effects of the ultrasound measurement system, echo signal windowing, electronic noise, and tissue motion on echo decorrelation images are determined theoretically, leading to a method for reduction of motion and noise artifacts. Theoretical analysis is validated by simulations and experiments. Simulated decoherence of the scattering medium was recovered with root-mean-square error less than 10% with accuracy dependent on the correlation window size. Motion-induced decorrelation measured in an ex vivo pubovisceral muscle model showed similar trends to theoretical motion-induced decorrelation for a 2.1 MHz curvilinear array with decorrelation approaching unity for 3–4 mm elevational displacement or 1–1.6 mm range displacement. For in vivo imaging of porcine liver by a 7 MHz linear array, theoretical decorrelation computed using image-based motion estimates correlated significantly with measured decorrelation (r = 0.931, N = 10). Echo decorrelation artifacts incurred during in vivo radiofrequency ablation in the same porcine liver were effectively compensated based on the theoretical echo decorrelation model and measured pre-treatment decorrelation. These results demonstrate the potential of echo decorrelation imaging for quantification of heat-induced changes to the scattering tissue medium during thermal ablation. PMID:25697993

  7. Sonar gain control and echo detection thresholds in the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A; Moffat, A J; Masters, W M

    1992-02-01

    The echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus, detects sonar echoes with a sensitivity that changes according to the time elapsed between broadcasting of each sonar signal and reception of echoes. When tested in an electronic target simulator on a two-choice echo-detection task, the bat's threshold improved by 11.5 dB as echo delay changed from 2.3 to 4.6 ms (target ranges of 40 and 80 cm). Earlier experiments measured the change in detection threshold for delays from 1 to 6.4 ms (target ranges from about 17 to 110 cm) and obtained about 11 dB of improvement per doubling of delay. The new experiments used electronic delay lines to simulate echo delay, thus avoiding movement of loudspeakers to different distances and the possible creation of delay-dependent backward masking between stimulus echoes and cluttering echoes from the loudspeaker surfaces. The slope of the threshold shift defines an echo gain control that keeps echoes from point targets at a fixed sensation level--reducing sensitivity by 11 to 12 dB as echo amplitude increases by 12 dB per halving of range during the bat's approach to the target. A recent experiment using loudness discrimination of echoes at 70 to 80 dB SPL (roughly 50 dB above threshold) found a slope of about 6 dB per halving of range, so the gain-control effect may be level dependent. The observed effect is operationally equivalent to forward masking of echoes by the transmission, but any events correlated with vocalization which impair hearing sensitivity for a short interval following transmissions could cause a decline in sensitivity to echoes. Contractions of the bat's middle-ear muscles synchronized to transmissions may account for the observed threshold shift, at least for a span of echo delays associated with the most critical portion of the approach stage of pursuit. Forward masking by the sonar transmissions may contribute to the threshold shift, too, but middle-ear muscle contractions do occur and must be a significant part of the

  8. Echo-acoustic flow dynamically modifies the cortical map of target range in bats.

    PubMed

    Bartenstein, Sophia K; Gerstenberg, Nadine; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating bats use the delay between their sonar emissions and the reflected echoes to measure target range, a crucial parameter for avoiding collisions or capturing prey. In many bat species, target range is represented as an orderly organized map of echo delay in the auditory cortex. Here we show that the map of target range in bats is dynamically modified by the continuously changing flow of acoustic information perceived during flight ('echo-acoustic flow'). Combining dynamic acoustic stimulation in virtual space with extracellular recordings, we found that neurons in the auditory cortex of the bat Phyllostomus discolor encode echo-acoustic flow information on the geometric relation between targets and the bat's flight trajectory, rather than echo delay per se. Specifically, the cortical representation of close-range targets is enlarged when the lateral passing distance of the target decreases. This flow-dependent enlargement of target representation may trigger adaptive behaviours such as vocal control or flight manoeuvres. PMID:25131175

  9. Surveying for Historical Supernovae Light Echoes in the Milky Way Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, D. L.

    2014-05-01

    Very luminous, transient events can produce detectable "light echoes" - light scattered by interstellar dust which can arrive much later than the direct light from an outburst. In the last 1000 years, there have been half a dozen supernovae in the Milky Way which are capable of producing detectable light echoes. Light echo systems have already been found for Tycho (SN 1572) and Cas A. The three-dimensional distribution of light echoes provides one of the few means for an astronomical source to be inspected from more than one viewpoint. Indications of the degree of asymmetry of supernovae are extremely valuable for understanding the details of the event itself. Amateurs are well-equipped to find the brighter light echoes and in this work I will provide practical guidance on how such surveys may be accomplished and the various science opportunities they provide.

  10. Echo-acoustic flow dynamically modifies the cortical map of target range in bats.

    PubMed

    Bartenstein, Sophia K; Gerstenberg, Nadine; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating bats use the delay between their sonar emissions and the reflected echoes to measure target range, a crucial parameter for avoiding collisions or capturing prey. In many bat species, target range is represented as an orderly organized map of echo delay in the auditory cortex. Here we show that the map of target range in bats is dynamically modified by the continuously changing flow of acoustic information perceived during flight ('echo-acoustic flow'). Combining dynamic acoustic stimulation in virtual space with extracellular recordings, we found that neurons in the auditory cortex of the bat Phyllostomus discolor encode echo-acoustic flow information on the geometric relation between targets and the bat's flight trajectory, rather than echo delay per se. Specifically, the cortical representation of close-range targets is enlarged when the lateral passing distance of the target decreases. This flow-dependent enlargement of target representation may trigger adaptive behaviours such as vocal control or flight manoeuvres.

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced 'visual echoes' are generated in early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jolij, Jacob; Lamme, Victor A F

    2010-11-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the early visual areas can trigger perception of a flash of light, a so-called phosphene. Here we show that a very brief presentation of a stimulus can modulate features of a subsequent TMS-induced phosphene, to a level that participants mistake phosphenes for real stimuli, inducing 'visual echoes' of a previously seen stimulus. These 'echoes' are modulated by visual context at the moment of magnetic stimulation, showing that they are generated in early visual areas, and that the brain processes these 'echoes' as if they are factually presented stimuli. This shows that TMS can re-activate weak visual representations in early visual areas. Based on the pattern of contextual modulation of visual echoes, we theorize that perception of these echoes is not a passive reactivation of residual activity in early visual cortex, but an active interpretation of the combined activity of TMS-induced neural noise and cortical state. PMID:20732388

  12. Multi-echo processing by a bottlenose dolphin operating in "packet" transmission mode at long range.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Schroth-Miller, Maddie; Borror, Nancy; Tormey, Megan; Brewer, Arial; Black, Amy; Bakhtiari, Kimberly; Goya, Gavin

    2014-11-01

    Bottlenose dolphins performing echolocation tasks at long ranges may utilize a transmission mode where bursts, or "packets," of echolocation clicks are emitted rather than single clicks. The clicks within each packet are separated by time intervals well below the two-way travel time, while the packets themselves are emitted at intervals greater than the two-way travel time. Packet use has been shown to increase with range; however, the exact function of packets and the advantages gained by their utilization remain unknown. In this study, the capability for dolphins to utilize multi-echo processing within packets of echoes was investigated by manipulating the number of available echoes within each packet as a dolphin performed a long-range echolocation task. The results showed an improvement in detectability with an increase in the number of echoes in each packet and suggest that packet use is an adaptation to allow multi-echo processing at long ranges without introducing range ambiguity.

  13. Operator independent left ventricular function monitoring during pharmacological stress echo with the new peak transcutaneous acceleration signal

    PubMed Central

    Bombardini, T; Marcelli, E; Picano, E; Borghi, B; Fedriga, P; Garberoglio, B; Gaggini, G; Plicchi, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—As the myocardium contracts isometrically, it generates vibrations that can be measured with an accelerometer. The vibration peak, peak endocardial acceleration (PEA), is an index of contractility.
OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the feasibility of PEA measured by the cutaneous precordial application of the accelerometer sensor; and to assess the usefulness of PEA monitoring during pharmacological stress echocardiography.
DESIGN—Feasibility study.
SETTING—Stress echo laboratory.
PATIENTS—34 consecutive patients underwent pharmacological stress (26 with dipyridamole; 8 with dobutamine) and PEA monitoring simultaneously.
INTERVENTIONS—A microaccelerometer was positioned in the precordial region and PEA was recorded. Dipyridamole was infused up to 0.84 mg/kg in 10 minutes, and dobutamine up to 40 µg/kg/min in 15 minutes.
RESULTS—A consistent PEA signal was obtained in all patients. Overall mean (SD) baseline PEA was 0.26 (0.15) g (g = 9.8 m/s2), increasing to 0.5 (0.36) g at peak stress (+0.24 g, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14 to 0.34 g; p < 0.01). PEA increased from 0.26 (0.16) to 0.37 (0.25) g in the dipyridamole group (+0.11 g, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.16 g; p < 0.01), and from 0.29 (0.1) to 0.93 (0.37) g in the dobutamine group (+0.64 g, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.91 g; p < 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—Using precordial leads this method offers potential for diagnostic application in the short term monitoring of myocardial function. PEA monitoring is feasible during pharmacological stress and documents left ventricular inotropic response quantitatively in a non-invasive and operator independent fashion.


Keywords: ventricular function; contractility; peak endocardial acceleration; stress echo PMID:11179267

  14. Evidence for perception of fine echo delay and phase by the FM bat, Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A

    1993-05-01

    The big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, can perceive small changes in the delay of FM sonar echoes and shifts in echo phase, which interact with delay. Using spectral cues caused by interference, Eptesicus also can perceive the individual delays of two overlapping FM echoes at small delay separations. These results have been criticized as due to spectral artifacts caused by overlap between stimulus echoes and extraneous sounds (Pollak 1993). However, no amplitude or spectral variations larger than 0.05 dB accompany delay or phase changes produced by the electronic apparatus. No reverberation falls in the narrow span of delays required to produce the bat's performance curve from echo interference cues. Consistent differences in the durations of sonar sounds for 6 bats that perform the same in the experiments demonstrate that overlap between stimulus echoes and extraneous echoes is not necessary, and changes in the amount of echo overlap have no effect on performance. Noise-induced random variations in echo spectra outweigh putative spectral artifacts, and deliberately-introduced spectral "artifacts" do not improve performance overall but instead yield new time-frequency images. Amplitude-latency trading of perceived delay, proposed as a demonstration that the latency of neural discharges encodes delay (Pollak et al. 1977), confirms that the bat's fine delay and phase perception depends on a temporal neural code. The perceived delays depend on stimulus delays, not the delays of extraneous sounds. The rejected criticisms are based on physiological results with random-phase FM stimuli which are irrelevant to neural coding of fine echo delay and phase.

  15. EChO payload electronics architecture and SW design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Farina, M.; Pancrazzi, M.; Ottensamer, R.; Lim, T. L.; Pezzuto, S.; Micela, G.; Pace, E.

    2015-12-01

    EChO is a three-modules (VNIR, SWIR, MWIR), highly integrated spectrometer, covering the wavelength range from 0.55 μ m to 11.0 μ m. The baseline design includes the goal wavelength extension to 0.4 μ m while an optional LWIR module extends the range to the goal wavelength of 16.0 μ m. An Instrument Control Unit (ICU) is foreseen as the main electronic subsystem interfacing the spacecraft and collecting data from all the payload spectrometers modules. ICU is in charge of two main tasks: the overall payload control ( Instrument Control Function) and the housekeepings and scientific data digital processing ( Data Processing Function), including the lossless compression prior to store the science data to the Solid State Mass Memory of the Spacecraft. These two main tasks are accomplished thanks to the Payload On Board Software (P-OBSW) running on the ICU CPUs.

  16. Loschmidt echoes in two-body random matrix ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Prosen, Tomaž; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2007-07-01

    Fidelity decay is studied for quantum many-body systems with a dominant independent particle Hamiltonian resulting, e.g., from a mean field theory with a weak two-body interaction. The diagonal terms of the interaction are included in the unperturbed Hamiltonian, while the off-diagonal terms constitute the perturbation that distorts the echo. We give the linear response solution for this problem in a random matrix framework. While the ensemble average shows no surprising behavior, we find that the typical ensemble member as represented by the median displays a very slow fidelity decay known as “freeze.” Numerical calculations confirm this result and show that the ground state even on average displays the freeze. This may contribute to explanation of the “unreasonable” success of mean field theories.

  17. Precision requirements for spin-echo-based quantum memories

    SciTech Connect

    Heshami, Khabat; Simon, Christoph; Sangouard, Nicolas; Minar, Jiri; Riedmatten, Hugues de

    2011-03-15

    Spin-echo techniques are essential for achieving long coherence times in solid-state quantum memories for light because of inhomogeneous broadening of the spin transitions. It has been suggested that unrealistic levels of precision for the radio-frequency control pulses would be necessary for successful decoherence control at the quantum level. Here we study the effects of pulse imperfections in detail, using both a semiclassical and a fully quantum-mechanical approach. Our results show that high efficiencies and low noise-to-signal ratios can be achieved for the quantum memories in the single-photon regime for realistic levels of control pulse precision. We also analyze errors due to imperfect initial-state preparation (optical pumping), showing that they are likely to be more important than control pulse errors in many practical circumstances. These results are crucial for future developments of solid-state quantum memories.

  18. DENSE: Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes in Cardiac Functional MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ding, Shujun; Balaban, Robert S.; Wen, Han

    1999-03-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) was developed for high-resolution myocardial displacement mapping. Pixel phase is modulated by myocardial displacement and data spatial resolution is limited only by pixel size. 2D displacement vector maps were generated for the systolic action in canines with 0.94 × 1.9 mm nominal in-plane resolution and 2.3 mm/π displacement encoding. A radial strain of 0.208 was measured across the free left ventricular wall over 105 ms during systole. DENSE displacement maps require small first-order gradient moments for encoding. DENSE magnitude images exhibit black-blood contrast which allows for better myocardial definition and reduced motion-related artifacts.

  19. Null Result in gamma-ray burst lensed echo search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemiroff, R. J.; Wickramasinghe, W. A. D. T.; Norris, J. P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Horack, J.

    1994-01-01

    We have searched for gravitational-lens-induced echoes between gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) data. The search was conducted in two phases. In the first phase we compared all GRBs in a brightness-complete sample of the first 260 GRBs with recorded angular positions having at least a 5% chance of being coincident from their combined positional error. In the second phase, we compared all GRB light curves of the first 611 GRBs with recorded angular positions having at least a 55% chance of being coincident from their combined positional error. No unambiguous gravitational lens candidate pairs were found in either phase, although a 'library of close calls' was accumulated for future reference. This result neither excludes nor significantly constrains a cosmological origin for GRBs.

  20. Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    In this paper, we systematically study the echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) free electron laser (FEL). The EEHG FEL uses two modulators in combination with two dispersion sections that allow to generate in the beam a high harmonic density modulation starting with a relatively small initial energy modulation of the beam. After presenting analytical theory of the phenomenon, we address several practically important issues, such as the effect of incoherent synchrotron radiation in the dispersion sections, and the beam transverse size effect in the modulator. Using a representative realistic set of beam parameters, we show how the EEHG scheme enhances the FEL performance and allows to generate a fully (both longitudinally and transversely) coherent radiation. As an example, we demonstrate that 5 nm coherent soft x-rays with GW peak power can be generated directly from the 240 nm seeding laser using the proposed EEHG scheme.

  1. Recurrent kernel machines: computing with infinite echo state networks.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Michiel; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Echo state networks (ESNs) are large, random recurrent neural networks with a single trained linear readout layer. Despite the untrained nature of the recurrent weights, they are capable of performing universal computations on temporal input data, which makes them interesting for both theoretical research and practical applications. The key to their success lies in the fact that the network computes a broad set of nonlinear, spatiotemporal mappings of the input data, on which linear regression or classification can easily be performed. One could consider the reservoir as a spatiotemporal kernel, in which the mapping to a high-dimensional space is computed explicitly. In this letter, we build on this idea and extend the concept of ESNs to infinite-sized recurrent neural networks, which can be considered recursive kernels that subsequently can be used to create recursive support vector machines. We present the theoretical framework, provide several practical examples of recursive kernels, and apply them to typical temporal tasks.

  2. Echo Tomography of Reprocessing Sites in X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Haswell, Carole

    1998-01-01

    We discovered correlated rapid variability between the optical/UV and X-ray emission for the first time in a soft X-ray transient, GRO J1655-40. Hubble Space Telescope light curves show features similar to those seen by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, but with a mean delay of up to 10 - 20 s. We interpret the correlation as the result of reprocessing of X-rays into optical and UV emission, with a delay owing to finite light travel time; this assumption enables us to perform echo mapping of the system. The time-delay distribution has a mean of 14.6 +/-1.4 s and a dispersion of 10.5+/-1.9 s at binary phase 0.4. This establishes that the reprocessing region is the accretion disk around the compact star, rather than the mass-donating secondary. These results have been published.

  3. Heavy ion collision evolution modeling with ECHO-QGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolando, V.; Inghirami, G.; Beraudo, A.; Del Zanna, L.; Becattini, F.; Chandra, V.; De Pace, A.; Nardi, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present a numerical code modeling the evolution of the medium formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions, ECHO-QGP. The code solves relativistic hydrodynamics in (3 + 1)D, with dissipative terms included within the framework of Israel-Stewart theory; it can work both in Minkowskian and in Bjorken coordinates. Initial conditions are provided through an implementation of the Glauber model (both Optical and Monte Carlo), while freezeout and particle generation are based on the Cooper-Frye prescription. The code is validated against several test problems and shows remarkable stability and accuracy with the combination of a conservative (shock-capturing) approach and the high-order methods employed. In particular it beautifully agrees with the semi-analytic solution known as Gubser flow, both in the ideal and in the viscous Israel-Stewart case, up to very large times and without any ad hoc tuning of the algorithm.

  4. Quench echo and work statistics in integrable quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Pálmai, T; Sotiriadis, S

    2014-11-01

    We propose a boundary thermodynamic Bethe ansatz calculation technique to obtain the Loschmidt echo and the statistics of the work done when a global quantum quench is performed on an integrable quantum field theory. We derive an analytic expression for the lowest edge of the probability density function and find that it exhibits universal features, in the sense that its scaling form depends only on the statistics of excitations. We perform numerical calculations on the sinh-Gordon model, a deformation of the free boson theory, and we obtain that by turning on the interaction the density function develops fermionic properties. The calculations are facilitated by a previously unnoticed property of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz construction.

  5. REDOR with a relative full-echo reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Anil K.; Cegelski, Lynette; O'Connor, Robert D.; Schaefer, Jacob

    2003-07-01

    REDOR and REDOR-like 13C{ 19F} and 2H{ 19F} NMR experiments have been performed on lyophilized whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus. The bacteria were grown to maturity on media containing L-[ 13C3]alanine or L-[methyl- d3]alanine, and then complexed with the 4-fluorobiphenyl derivative of chloroeremomycin, an analogue of the widely used antibiotic, vancomycin. The position of the 19F of the drug bound in the bacterial cell wall was determined relative to L-alanine 13C and 2H labels in the peptidoglycan peptide stem that was closest to the fluorinated biphenyl moiety of the drug. These determinations were made by dipolar recoupling methods that do not require an absolute measurement of the REDOR full echo (the signal observed without rotor-synchronized dephasing pulses) of the labels in the peptide stem.

  6. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... engine to excessive vibration stresses. This must be shown by a vibration investigation. (c) No part of the rotor drive system may be subjected to excessive vibration stresses. Rotor Drive System...

  7. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... engine to excessive vibration stresses. This must be shown by a vibration investigation. (c) No part of the rotor drive system may be subjected to excessive vibration stresses. Rotor Drive System...

  8. 14 CFR 27.907 - Engine vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... engine to excessive vibration stresses. This must be shown by a vibration investigation. (c) No part of the rotor drive system may be subjected to excessive vibration stresses. Rotor Drive System...

  9. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide Stretch and Bend Vibrations Reveals Thermal Population Dynamics in an Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Chiara H; Kramer, Patrick L; Yamada, Steven A; Nishida, Jun; Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-01-28

    The population relaxation of carbon dioxide dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EmimNTf2) was investigated using polarization-selective ultrafast infrared pump-probe spectroscopy and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy. Due to the coupling of the bend with the asymmetric stretch, excitation of the asymmetric stretch of a molecule with a thermally populated bend leads to an additional peak, a hot band, which is red-shifted from the main asymmetric absorption band by the combination band shift. This hot band peak exchanges population with the main peak through the gain and loss of bend excitation quanta. The isotropic pump-probe signal originating from the unexcited bend state displays a fast, relatively small amplitude, initial growth followed by a longer time scale exponential decay. The signal is analyzed over its full time range using a kinetic model to determine both the vibrational lifetime (the final decay) and rate constant for the loss of the bend energy. This bend relaxation manifests as the fast initial growth of the stretch/no bend signal because the hot band (stretch with bend) is "over pumped" relative to the ground state equilibrium. The nonequilibrium pumping occurs because the hot band has a larger transition dipole moment than the stretch/no bend peak. The system is then prepared, utilizing an acousto-optic mid-infrared pulse shaper to cut a hole in the excitation pulse spectrum, such that the hot band is not pumped. The isotropic pump-probe signal from the stretch/no bend state is altered because the initial excited state population ratio has changed. Instead of a growth due to relaxation of bend quanta, a fast initial decay is observed because of thermal excitation of the bend. Fitting this curve gives the rate constant for thermal excitation of the bend and the lifetime, which agree with those determined in the pump-probe experiments without frequency

  10. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide Stretch and Bend Vibrations Reveals Thermal Population Dynamics in an Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Chiara H; Kramer, Patrick L; Yamada, Steven A; Nishida, Jun; Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-01-28

    The population relaxation of carbon dioxide dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EmimNTf2) was investigated using polarization-selective ultrafast infrared pump-probe spectroscopy and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy. Due to the coupling of the bend with the asymmetric stretch, excitation of the asymmetric stretch of a molecule with a thermally populated bend leads to an additional peak, a hot band, which is red-shifted from the main asymmetric absorption band by the combination band shift. This hot band peak exchanges population with the main peak through the gain and loss of bend excitation quanta. The isotropic pump-probe signal originating from the unexcited bend state displays a fast, relatively small amplitude, initial growth followed by a longer time scale exponential decay. The signal is analyzed over its full time range using a kinetic model to determine both the vibrational lifetime (the final decay) and rate constant for the loss of the bend energy. This bend relaxation manifests as the fast initial growth of the stretch/no bend signal because the hot band (stretch with bend) is "over pumped" relative to the ground state equilibrium. The nonequilibrium pumping occurs because the hot band has a larger transition dipole moment than the stretch/no bend peak. The system is then prepared, utilizing an acousto-optic mid-infrared pulse shaper to cut a hole in the excitation pulse spectrum, such that the hot band is not pumped. The isotropic pump-probe signal from the stretch/no bend state is altered because the initial excited state population ratio has changed. Instead of a growth due to relaxation of bend quanta, a fast initial decay is observed because of thermal excitation of the bend. Fitting this curve gives the rate constant for thermal excitation of the bend and the lifetime, which agree with those determined in the pump-probe experiments without frequency

  11. The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) payload electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, M.; Pancrazzi, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pezzuto, S.; Micela, G.; Pace, E.

    2012-09-01

    The EChO Payload is an integrated spectrometer designed to cover the 0.55-16 μm (11 to 16 μm as a goal) wavelength band, subdivided into 5 channels from visible to thermal IR with a common set of optics spectrally dividing the field of view by means of dichroics and a unique electronics interface to the spacecraft, the Data Control Unit (DCU). DCU is mainly a digital unit with processing capabilities based on a rad-hard space qualified processor running the main Application SW (the scientific SW) and some programmable logics. DCU will host the detector’s warm front-end electronics (FEEs) and its main tasks are to implement the payload instruments commanding, the science and housekeeping (HK) data acquisition, conversion and packetisation, the onboard spectra pre-processing, and, finally, to provide finely regulated voltage levels to FEEs. Detector’s proximity cold electronics send analog data and HKs to DCU for digital conversion by sharing a redundant ADC aboard DCU. Analog HKs are previously multiplexed, elaborated and converted to digital format before sending them to the satellite platform, via the SpaceWire (SpW) links. DCU controls the FEEs syncronization (interpreting and routing sync signals and time stamps sent by OBC by means of SpW Time Codes) and runs the main logics to perform all the required tasks and memory management. The EChO DCU electronics basically focuses on the data and command flows, the clock/synchronization and power distribution network and on an overall architecture for a trade-off solution removing or reducing any electronics single-point failure.

  12. Trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect

    PubMed Central

    Zsebok, Sandor; Kroll, Ferdinand; Heinrich, Melina; Genzel, Daria; Siemers, Björn M.; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    A water surface acts not only as an optic mirror but also as an acoustic mirror. Echolocation calls emitted by bats at low heights above water are reflected away from the bat, and hence the background clutter is reduced. Moreover, targets on the surface create an enhanced echo. Here, we formally quantified the effect of the surface and target height on both target detection and -discrimination in a combined laboratory and field approach with Myotis daubentonii. In a two-alternative, forced-choice paradigm, the bats had to detect a mealworm and discriminate it from an inedible dummy (20 mm PVC disc). Psychophysical performance was measured as a function of height above either smooth surfaces (water or PVC) or above a clutter surface (artificial grass). At low heights above the clutter surface (10, 20, or 35 cm), the bats' detection performance was worse than above a smooth surface. At a height of 50 cm, the surface structure had no influence on target detection. Above the clutter surface, also target discrimination was significantly impaired with decreasing target height. A detailed analysis of the bats' echolocation calls during target approach shows that above the clutter surface, the bats produce calls with significantly higher peak frequency. Flight-path reconstruction revealed that the bats attacked an target from below over water but from above over a clutter surface. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect, in terms of a spatio-temporal integration of direct reflections with indirect reflections from the water surface, to optimize prey detection and -discrimination not only for prey on the water but also for some range above. PMID:23576990

  13. Artificial intelligence for the EChO mission planning tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Piquer, Alvaro; Ribas, Ignasi; Colomé, Josep

    2015-12-01

    The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) has as its main goal the measurement of atmospheres of transiting planets. This requires the observation of two types of events: primary and secondary eclipses. In order to yield measurements of sufficient Signal-to-Noise Ratio to fulfil the mission objectives, the events of each exoplanet have to be observed several times. In addition, several criteria have to be considered to carry out each observation, such as the exoplanet visibility, its event duration, and no overlapping with other tasks. It is expected that a suitable mission plan increases the efficiency of telescope operation, which will represent an important benefit in terms of scientific return and operational costs. Nevertheless, to obtain a long term mission plan becomes unaffordable for human planners due to the complexity of computing the huge number of possible combinations for finding an optimum solution. In this contribution we present a long term mission planning tool based on Genetic Algorithms, which are focused on solving optimization problems such as the planning of several tasks. Specifically, the proposed tool finds a solution that highly optimizes the defined objectives, which are based on the maximization of the time spent on scientific observations and the scientific return (e.g., the coverage of the mission survey). The results obtained on the large experimental set up support that the proposed scheduler technology is robust and can function in a variety of scenarios, offering a competitive performance which does not depend on the collection of exoplanets to be observed. Specifically, the results show that, with the proposed tool, EChO uses 94% of the available time of the mission, so the amount of downtime is small, and it completes 98% of the targets.

  14. Spearhead echo and downburst near the approach end of a John F. Kennedy Airport runway, New York City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1976-01-01

    Radar echoes of a storm at John F. Kennedy International Airport are examined. Results regarding the phenomena presented suggest the existence of downburst cells. These cells are characterized by spearhead echoes. About 2% of the echoes in the New York area were spearhead echoes. The detection and identification of downburst cells, their potential hazard to approaching and landing aircraft, and communication of this information to the pilots of those aircraft are discussed.

  15. Longitudinally-vibrating surgical microelectrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D.; Kawabus, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Microelectrode attached to cone of loudspeaker imparting longitudinal vibrations, penetrates relatively tough tissue of arterial walls easier and with more precise depth control because dimpling is eliminated. Vibrating microelectrode has been successfully used to make accurate oxygen-content measurements in arterial walls.

  16. Vibration Response of Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Gelalles, A G

    1935-01-01

    This report presents test results of experiments on the vibration-response characteristics of airplane structures on the ground and in flight. It also gives details regarding the construction and operation of vibration instruments developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  17. The origins of vibration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimarogonas, A. D.

    1990-07-01

    The Ionian School of natural philosophy introduced the scientific method of dealing with natural phenomena and the rigorous proofs for abstract propositions. Vibration theory was initiated by the Pythagoreans in the fifth century BC, in association with the theory of music and the theory of acoustics. They observed the natural frequency of vibrating systems and proved that it is a system property and that it does not depend on the excitation. Pythagoreans determined the fundamental natural frequencies of several simple systems, such as vibrating strings, pipes, vessels and circular plates. Aristoteles and the Peripatetic School founded mechanics and developed a fundamental understanding of statics and dynamics. In Alexandrian times there were substantial engineering developments in the field of vibration. The pendulum as a vibration, and probably time, measuring device was known in antiquity, and was further developed by the end of the first millennium AD.

  18. Low Cost Digital Vibration Meter

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W. Vance; Geist, Jon

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the development of a low cost, digital Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) vibration meter that reports an approximation to the RMS acceleration of the vibration to which the vibration meter is subjected. The major mechanical element of this vibration meter is a cantilever beam, which is on the order of 500 µm in length, with a piezoresistor deposited at its base. Vibration of the device in the plane perpendicular to the cantilever beam causes it to bend, which produces a measurable change in the resistance of a piezoresistor. These changes in resistance along with a unique signal-processing scheme are used to determine an approximation to the RMS acceleration sensed by the device. PMID:27110459

  19. Coherent vibrational climbing in carboxyhemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ventalon, Cathie; Fraser, James M; Vos, Marten H; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Martin, Jean-Louis; Joffre, Manuel

    2004-09-01

    We demonstrate vibrational climbing in the CO stretch of carboxyhemoglobin pumped by midinfrared chirped ultrashort pulses. By use of spectrally resolved pump-probe measurements, we directly observed the induced absorption lines caused by excited vibrational populations up to v = 6. In some cases, we also observed stimulated emission, providing direct evidence of vibrational population inversion. This study provides important spectroscopic parameters on the CO stretch in the strong-field regime, such as transition frequencies and dephasing times up to the v = 6 to v = 7 vibrational transition. We measured equally spaced vibrational transitions, in agreement with the energy levels of a Morse potential up to v = 6. It is interesting that the integral of the differential absorption spectra was observed to deviate far from zero, in contrast to what one would expect from a simple one-dimensional Morse model assuming a linear dependence of dipole moment with bond length.

  20. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  1. Vibration analysis using digital correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Lehner, David L.; Dudderar, T. Dixon; Matthys, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of a computer-based optical method for locating the positions of nodes and antinodes in vibrating members. Structured light patterns are projected at an angle onto the vibrating surface using a 35 mm slide projector. The vibrating surface and the projected images are captured in a time averaged photograph which is subsequently digitized. The inherent fringe patterns are filtered to determine amplitudes of vibration, and computer programs are used to compare the time averaged images to images recorded prior to excitation to locate nodes and antinodes. Some of the influences of pattern regularity on digital correlation are demonstrated, and a speckle-based method for determining the mode shapes and the amplitudes of vibration with variable sensitivity is suggested.

  2. Harmonic pulsed excitation and motion detection of a vibrating reflective target.

    PubMed

    Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2008-01-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality. Methods involving acoustic radiation force excitation and pulse-echo ultrasound motion detection have been investigated to assess the mechanical response of tissue. In this work new methods for dynamic radiation force excitation and motion detection are presented. The theory and model for harmonic motion detection of a vibrating reflective target are presented. The model incorporates processing of radio frequency data acquired using pulse-echo ultrasound to measure harmonic motion with amplitudes ranging from 100 to 10,000 nm. A numerical study was performed to assess the effects of different parameters on the accuracy and precision of displacement amplitude and phase estimation and showed how estimation errors could be minimized. Harmonic pulsed excitation is introduced as a multifrequency radiation force excitation method that utilizes ultrasound tonebursts repeated at a rate f(r). The radiation force, consisting of frequency components at multiples of f(r), is generated using 3.0 MHz ultrasound, and motion detection is performed simultaneously with 9.0 MHz pulse-echo ultrasound. A parameterized experimental analysis showed that displacement can be measured with small errors for motion with amplitudes as low as 100 nm. The parameterized numerical and experimental analyses provide insight into how to optimize acquisition parameters to minimize measurement errors.

  3. Violin bow vibrations.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2012-05-01

    The modal frequencies and bending mode shapes of a freely supported tapered violin bow are investigated by finite element analysis and direct measurement, with and without tensioned bow hair. Such computations are used with analytic models to model the admittance presented to the stretched bow hairs at the ends of the bow and to the string at the point of contact with the bow. Finite element computations are also used to demonstrate the influence of the lowest stick mode vibrations on the low frequency bouncing modes, when the hand-held bow is pressed against the string. The possible influence of the dynamic stick modes on the sound of the bowed instrument is briefly discussed. PMID:22559386

  4. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  5. Violin bow vibrations.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2012-05-01

    The modal frequencies and bending mode shapes of a freely supported tapered violin bow are investigated by finite element analysis and direct measurement, with and without tensioned bow hair. Such computations are used with analytic models to model the admittance presented to the stretched bow hairs at the ends of the bow and to the string at the point of contact with the bow. Finite element computations are also used to demonstrate the influence of the lowest stick mode vibrations on the low frequency bouncing modes, when the hand-held bow is pressed against the string. The possible influence of the dynamic stick modes on the sound of the bowed instrument is briefly discussed.

  6. Sensitization of a stray-field NMR to vibrations: a potential for MR elastometry with a portable NMR sensor.

    PubMed

    Mastikhin, Igor; Barnhill, Marie

    2014-11-01

    An NMR signal from a sample in a constant stray field of a portable NMR sensor is sensitized to vibrations. The CPMG sequence is synchronized to vibrations so that the constant gradient becomes an "effective" square-wave gradient, leading to the vibration-induced phase accumulation. The integrating nature of the spot measurement, combined with the phase distribution due to a non-uniform gradient and/or a wave field, leads to a destructive interference, the drop in the signal intensity and changes in the echo train shape. Vibrations with amplitudes as small as 140 nm were reliably detected with the permanent gradient of 12.4 T/m. The signal intensity depends on the phase offset between the vibrations and the pulse sequence. This approach opens the way for performing elastometry and micro-rheology measurements with portable NMR devices beyond the walls of a laboratory. Even without synchronization, if a vibration frequency is comparable to 1/2TE of the CPMG sequence, the signal can be severely affected, making it important for potential industrial applications of stray-field NMR.

  7. A Method for Unwrapping Highly Wrapped Multi-echo Phase Images at Very High Field: UMPIRE

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Simon; Schödl, Horst; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a method of unwrapping phase images from multi-echo scans that works even where there are several wraps between echoes, and which generates unwrapped phase images in addition to phase difference (PD) images. Theory The difference between the echo spacings in an acquisition with three unevenly spaced echoes (an imposed delay) can be selected such that the phase evolution in that time is in the range −π to +π in all voxels of interest. Under this condition, an image of the difference between the phase evolutions in the two inter-echo periods, an estimate of ΔB0, is free of wraps. This ΔB0 estimate can be used to identify and remove receiver phase offsets and wraps in phase images. Methods The approach was tested on simulated data and high-resolution in vivo brain data acquired from six subjects at 7 Tesla. Results The method generated wrap-free phase images. It was able to remove more wraps than is possible with PD imaging and was faster and more reliable than spatial unwrapping. Conclusion Unwrapping Multi-echo Phase Images with iRregular Echo spacings (UMPIRE) is conceptually simple, fast, reliable, and requires no fitting, thresholds, or operator intervention. PMID:23901001

  8. 3D hyperpolarized He-3 MRI of ventilation using a multi-echo projection acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, James H.; O’Halloran, Rafael L.; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Jung, Youngkyoo; Block, Walter F.; Fain, Sean B.

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented for high resolution 3D imaging of the whole lung using inhaled hyperpolarized (HP) He-3 MR with multiple half-echo radial trajectories that can accelerate imaging through undersampling. A multiple half-echo radial trajectory can be used to reduce the level of artifact for undersampled 3D projection reconstruction (PR) imaging by increasing the amount of data acquired per unit time for HP He-3 lung imaging. The point spread functions (PSFs) for breath-held He-3 MRI using multiple half-echo trajectories were evaluated using simulations to predict the effects of T2* and gas diffusion on image quality. Results from PSF simulations were consistent with imaging results in volunteer studies showing improved image quality with increasing number of echoes using up to 8 half-echoes. The 8 half-echo acquisition is shown to accommodate lost breath-holds as short as 6 s using a retrospective reconstruction at reduced resolution as well as to allow reduced breath-hold time compared to an equivalent Cartesian trajectory. Furthermore, preliminary results from a 3D dynamic inhalation-exhalation maneuver are demonstrated using the 8 half-echo trajectory. Results demonstrate the first high resolution 3D PR imaging of ventilation and respiratory dynamics in humans using HP He-3 MR. PMID:18429034

  9. Evaluation of ECHO PS Positioning System in a Porcine Model of Simulated Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Erin M; Voeller, Guy R; Roth, J Scott; Scott, Jeffrey R; Gagne, Darcy H; Iannitti, David A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Operative efficiency improvements for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) have focused on reducing operative time while maintaining overall repair efficacy. Our objective was to evaluate procedure time and positioning accuracy of an inflatable mesh positioning device (Echo PS Positioning System), as compared to a standard transfascial suture technique, using a porcine model of simulated LVHR. Methods. The study population consisted of seventeen general surgeons (n = 17) that performed simulated LVHR on seventeen (n = 17) female Yorkshire pigs using two implantation techniques: (1) Ventralight ST Mesh + Echo PS Positioning System (Echo PS) and (2) Ventralight ST Mesh + transfascial sutures (TSs). Procedure time and mesh centering accuracy overtop of a simulated surgical defect were evaluated. Results. Echo PS demonstrated a 38.9% reduction in the overall procedure time, as compared to TS. During mesh preparation and positioning, Echo PS demonstrated a 60.5% reduction in procedure time (P < 0.0001). Although a trend toward improved centering accuracy was observed for Echo PS (16.2%), this was not significantly different than TS. Conclusions. Echo PS demonstrated a significant reduction in overall simulated LVHR procedure time, particularly during mesh preparation/positioning. These operative time savings may translate into reduced operating room costs and improved surgeon/operating room efficiency.

  10. Perception-based automatic classification of impulsive-source active sonar echoes.

    PubMed

    Young, Victor W; Hines, Paul C

    2007-09-01

    Impulsive-source active sonar systems are often plagued by false alarm echoes resulting from the presence of naturally occurring clutter objects in the environment. Sonar performance could be improved by a technique for discriminating between echoes from true targets and echoes from clutter. Motivated by anecdotal evidence that target echoes sound very different than clutter echoes when auditioned by a human operator, this paper describes the implementation of an automatic classifier for impulsive-source active sonar echoes that is based on perceptual signal features that have been previously identified in the musical acoustics literature as underlying timbre. Perceptual signal features found in this paper to be particularly useful to the problem of active sonar classification include: the centroid and peak value of the perceptual loudness function, as well as several features based on subband attack and decay times. This paper uses subsets of these perceptual signal features to train and test an automatic classifier capable of discriminating between target and clutter echoes with an equal error rate of roughly 10%; the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve corresponding to this classifier is found to be 0.975.

  11. Evaluation of ECHO PS Positioning System in a Porcine Model of Simulated Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Erin M.; Voeller, Guy R.; Roth, J. Scott; Scott, Jeffrey R.; Gagne, Darcy H.; Iannitti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Operative efficiency improvements for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) have focused on reducing operative time while maintaining overall repair efficacy. Our objective was to evaluate procedure time and positioning accuracy of an inflatable mesh positioning device (Echo PS Positioning System), as compared to a standard transfascial suture technique, using a porcine model of simulated LVHR. Methods. The study population consisted of seventeen general surgeons (n = 17) that performed simulated LVHR on seventeen (n = 17) female Yorkshire pigs using two implantation techniques: (1) Ventralight ST Mesh + Echo PS Positioning System (Echo PS) and (2) Ventralight ST Mesh + transfascial sutures (TSs). Procedure time and mesh centering accuracy overtop of a simulated surgical defect were evaluated. Results. Echo PS demonstrated a 38.9% reduction in the overall procedure time, as compared to TS. During mesh preparation and positioning, Echo PS demonstrated a 60.5% reduction in procedure time (P < 0.0001). Although a trend toward improved centering accuracy was observed for Echo PS (16.2%), this was not significantly different than TS. Conclusions. Echo PS demonstrated a significant reduction in overall simulated LVHR procedure time, particularly during mesh preparation/positioning. These operative time savings may translate into reduced operating room costs and improved surgeon/operating room efficiency. PMID:23762628

  12. FM echolocating bats shift frequencies to avoid broadcast-echo ambiguity in clutter.

    PubMed

    Hiryu, Shizuko; Bates, Mary E; Simmons, James A; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2010-04-13

    Sonar broadcasts are followed by echoes at different delays from objects at different distances. When broadcasts are emitted rapidly in cluttered surroundings, echo streams from successive broadcasts overlap and cause ambiguity in matching echoes to corresponding broadcasts. To identify reactions to ambiguity in clutter, echolocating bats that emit multiple-harmonic FM sounds were trained to fly into a dense, extended array of obstacles (multiple rows of vertically hanging chains) while the sonar sounds the bat emitted were recorded with a miniature radio microphone carried by the bat. Flight paths were reconstructed from thermal-infrared video recordings. Successive rows of chains extended more than 6 m in depth, so each broadcast was followed by a series of echoes from multiple rows of chains that lasted up to 40 ms. Bats emitted sounds in pairs ("strobe groups") at short (20-40 ms) interpulse intervals (IPIs) alternating with longer IPIs (>50 ms). For many short IPIs, the stream of echoes from the first broadcast was still arriving when the second broadcast was emitted. This overlap caused ambiguity about matching echoes with broadcasts. Bats shifted frequencies of the first sound in each strobe group upward and the second sound downward by 3-6 kHz. When overlap and ambiguity ceased, frequency shifts ceased also. Frequency differences were small compared with the total broadcast band, which was 75-80 kHz wide, but the harmonic structure of echoes enhances the differences in spectrograms. Bats could use time-frequency comparisons of echoes with broadcasts to assign echoes to the corresponding broadcasts and thus avoid ambiguity.

  13. Echo SPL influences the ranging performance of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Denzinger, A; Schnitzler, H U

    1994-11-01

    Four bats of the species Eptesicus fuscus were trained in a two-alternative forced-choice procedure to discriminate between two phantom targets that differed in range. The rewarded stimulus was located at a distance of 52.7 cm, while the other unrewarded stimulus was further away. Only one target was presented at a time. In the first experiment we measured the range discrimination performance at an echo SPL of -28 dB relative to the bat's sonar transmission. A 75% correct performance level was arbitrarily defined as threshold and was obtained at a delay difference of 80 microseconds, corresponding to a range difference of 13.8 mm. In the second experiment the delay difference was fixed at 150 microseconds and the echo SPL varied between -8 and -48 dB relative to sonar emissions. The performance of the bats depended on the relative echo SPL. AT -28 dB the bats showed the best performance. It deteriorated at an increase of the relative echo SPL to -18 dB and -8 dB. The performance also deteriorated when the relative echo SPL was reduced to -38 dB and -48 dB. Only at low relative echo SPLs did the bats partially compensate for the reduction in echo SPL and increased the SPL of their emitted signals by a few dB. Our results support the hypothesis that neurons exhibiting paradoxical latency shift may be involved in encoding target range. This hypothesis predicts a decrease in performance at high echo SPLs as we found it in our experiments. The observed reduction in performance at very low echo SPLs may be due to a decrease in S/N ratio.

  14. FM echolocating bats shift frequencies to avoid broadcast–echo ambiguity in clutter

    PubMed Central

    Hiryu, Shizuko; Bates, Mary E.; Simmons, James A.; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Sonar broadcasts are followed by echoes at different delays from objects at different distances. When broadcasts are emitted rapidly in cluttered surroundings, echo streams from successive broadcasts overlap and cause ambiguity in matching echoes to corresponding broadcasts. To identify reactions to ambiguity in clutter, echolocating bats that emit multiple-harmonic FM sounds were trained to fly into a dense, extended array of obstacles (multiple rows of vertically hanging chains) while the sonar sounds the bat emitted were recorded with a miniature radio microphone carried by the bat. Flight paths were reconstructed from thermal-infrared video recordings. Successive rows of chains extended more than 6 m in depth, so each broadcast was followed by a series of echoes from multiple rows of chains that lasted up to 40 ms. Bats emitted sounds in pairs (“strobe groups”) at short (20–40 ms) interpulse intervals (IPIs) alternating with longer IPIs (>50 ms). For many short IPIs, the stream of echoes from the first broadcast was still arriving when the second broadcast was emitted. This overlap caused ambiguity about matching echoes with broadcasts. Bats shifted frequencies of the first sound in each strobe group upward and the second sound downward by 3–6 kHz. When overlap and ambiguity ceased, frequency shifts ceased also. Frequency differences were small compared with the total broadcast band, which was 75–80 kHz wide, but the harmonic structure of echoes enhances the differences in spectrograms. Bats could use time–frequency comparisons of echoes with broadcasts to assign echoes to the corresponding broadcasts and thus avoid ambiguity. PMID:20351291

  15. Vibration budget for observatory equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Thompson, Hugh

    2015-07-01

    Vibration from equipment mounted on the telescope and in summit support buildings has been a source of performance degradation at existing astronomical observatories, particularly for adaptive optics performance. Rather than relying only on best practices to minimize vibration, we present here a vibration budget that specifies allowable force levels from each source of vibration in the observatory (e.g., pumps, chillers, cryocoolers, etc.). This design tool helps ensure that the total optical performance degradation due to vibration is less than the corresponding error budget allocation and is also useful in design trade-offs, specifying isolation requirements for equipment, and tightening or widening individual equipment vibration specifications as necessary. The vibration budget relies on model-based analysis of the optical consequences that result from forces applied at different locations and frequencies, including both image jitter and primary mirror segment motion. We develop this tool here for the Thirty Meter Telescope but hope that this approach will be broadly useful to other observatories, not only in the design phase, but for verification and operations as well.

  16. Tissue vibration in prolonged running.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Stirling, Lisa M; Federolf, Peter; Nigg, Benno M

    2011-01-01

    The impact force in heel-toe running initiates vibrations of soft-tissue compartments of the leg that are heavily dampened by muscle activity. This study investigated if the damping and frequency of these soft-tissue vibrations are affected by fatigue, which was categorized by the time into an exhaustive exercise. The hypotheses were tested that (H1) the vibration intensity of the triceps surae increases with increasing fatigue and (H2) the vibration frequency of the triceps surae decreases with increasing fatigue. Tissue vibrations of the triceps surae were measured with tri-axial accelerometers in 10 subjects during a run towards exhaustion. The frequency content was quantified with power spectra and wavelet analysis. Maxima of local vibration intensities were compared between the non-fatigued and fatigued states of all subjects. In axial (i.e. parallel to the tibia) and medio-lateral direction, most local maxima increased with fatigue (supporting the first hypothesis). In anterior-posterior direction no systematic changes were found. Vibration frequency was minimally affected by fatigue and frequency changes did not occur systematically, which requires the rejection of the second hypothesis. Relative to heel-strike, the maximum vibration intensity occurred significantly later in the fatigued condition in all three directions. With fatigue, the soft tissue of the triceps surae oscillated for an extended duration at increased vibration magnitudes, possibly due to the effects of fatigue on type II muscle fibers. Thus, the protective mechanism of muscle tuning seems to be reduced in a fatigued muscle and the risk of potential harm to the tissue may increase. PMID:20846656

  17. Middle ear muscle contractions and their relation to pulse and echo evoked potentials in the bat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henson, O. W., Jr.; Henson, M. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is made of pulse and echo orientation cries of the Mustache Bat. That bat's cries are characterized by a long, 60 to 30 msec, pure tone component and brief beginning and terminal FM sweeps. In addition to obvious echo overlap and middle ear muscle contractions, the following are examined: (1) characteristics of pulse- and echo-evoked potential under various conditions, (2) evidence of changes in hearing sensitivity during and after pulse emission, and (3) the role of the middle ear muscles in bringing about these changes.

  18. 29Si NMR spin-echo decay in YbRh2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, S.; Sakai, H.; Tokunaga, Y.; Hattori, T.; Lapertot, G.; Matsuda, T. D.; Knebel, G.; Flouquet, J.; Walstedt, R. E.

    2016-02-01

    29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been measured in a 29Si-enriched single crystal sample of YbRh2Si2. The spin-echo decay for applied field H ∥, ⊥ the c-axes has been measured at 100 K. A clear spin-echo decay oscillation is observed for both cases, possibly reflecting the Ruderman-Kittel (RK) interaction. Since the observed oscillation frequency depends on the direction of applied magnetic field, anisotropic RK coupling and pseudo-dipolar (PD) interactions may not be negligible in this compound. The origin of spin-echo decay oscillations is discussed.

  19. Floral acoustics: conspicuous echoes of a dish-shaped leaf attract bat pollinators.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ralph; Holderied, Marc W; Koch, Corinna U; von Helversen, Otto

    2011-07-29

    The visual splendor of many diurnal flowers serves to attract visually guided pollinators such as bees and birds, but it remains to be seen whether bat-pollinated flowers have evolved analogous echo-acoustic signals to lure their echolocating pollinators. Here, we demonstrate how an unusual dish-shaped leaf displayed above the inflorescences of the vine Marcgravia evenia attracts bat pollinators. Specifically, this leaf's echoes fulfilled requirements for an effective beacon, that is, they were strong, multidirectional, and had a recognizable invariant echo signature. In behavioral experiments, presence of the leaves halved foraging time for flower-visiting bats.

  20. Examination of the Spatial Correlation of Statistics Information in the Ultrasonic Echo from Diseased Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2002-05-01

    To realize a quantitative diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, we have been analyzing the characteristics of echo amplitude in B-mode images. Realizing the distinction between liver diseases such as liver cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis is required in the field of medical ultrasonics. In this study, we examine the spatial correlation, with the coefficient of correlation between the frames and the amplitude characteristics of each frame, using the volumetric data of RF echo signals from normal and diseased liver. It is found that there is a relationship between the tissue structure of liver and the spatial correlation of echo information.

  1. Pulse-echo interaction in free-flying horseshoe bats, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum nippon.

    PubMed

    Shiori, Yu; Hiryu, Shizuko; Watanabe, Yu; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2009-09-01

    Because horseshoe bats emit a long-duration pulse, the returning echo temporally overlaps with the emitted pulse during echolocation. Here, the pulse-echo interaction that horseshoe bats actually experience during flight was examined using onboard telemetry sound recordings. Doppler-shifted returning echoes produced beats in the amplitude patterns of constant-frequency components. Bats shortened the pulse duration with target distance, but the overlap duration was at least 8 ms within the approach phase. The computations suggest that the phase difference in slowly amplitude-modulated sound (the beat signal) provides a useful cue for target localization.

  2. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOEpatents

    Obermeyer, Franklin D.; Middlebrooks, Willis B.; DeMario, Edmund E.

    1994-01-01

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube.

  3. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOEpatents

    Obermeyer, F.D.; Middlebrooks, W.B.; DeMario, E.E.

    1994-10-18

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels is disclosed. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube. 14 figs.

  4. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  5. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  6. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  7. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Testing of IBCs § 178.819 Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the... vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample IBC, selected at random, must be filled and closed as...

  8. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  9. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  10. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  11. 14 CFR 33.83 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.83 Section 33.83... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.83 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo vibration surveys to establish that the vibration characteristics of those components...

  12. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  13. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  14. 14 CFR 33.33 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration. 33.33 Section 33.33 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.33 Vibration. The... vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  15. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  16. 14 CFR 33.83 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.83 Section 33.83... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.83 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo vibration surveys to establish that the vibration characteristics of those components...

  17. 14 CFR 33.63 - Vibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vibration. 33.63 Section 33.63 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.63 Vibration. Each engine... because of vibration and without imparting excessive vibration forces to the aircraft structure....

  18. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  19. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  20. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...