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Sample records for 2d-josephson junction arrays

  1. Persistent current in a 2D Josephson junction array wrapped around a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, D. A.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    We study persistent currents in a Josephson junction array wrapped around a cylinder. The T = 0 quantum statistical mechanics of the array is equivalent to the statistical mechanics of a classical xy spin system in 2+1 dimensions at the effective temperature T*=\\sqrt{2JU} , with J being the Josephson energy of the junction and U being the charging energy of the superconducting island. It is investigated analytically and numerically on lattices containing over one million sites. For weak disorder and T*\\ll J the dependence of the persistent current on disorder and T* computed numerically agrees quantitatively with the analytical result derived within the spin-wave approximation. The high-T* and/or strong-disorder behavior is dominated by instantons corresponding to the vortex loops in 2 + 1 dimensions. The current becomes destroyed completely at the quantum phase transition into the Cooper-pair insulating phase.

  2. Shape waves in 2D Josephson junctions: exact solutions and time dilation.

    PubMed

    Gulevich, D R; Kusmartsev, F V; Savel'ev, Sergey; Yampol'skii, V A; Nori, Franco

    2008-09-19

    We predict a new class of excitations propagating along a Josephson vortex in two-dimensional Josephson junctions. These excitations are associated with the distortion of a Josephson vortex line and have an analogy with shear waves in solid mechanics. Their shapes can have an arbitrary profile, which is retained when propagating. We derive a universal analytical expression for the energy of arbitrary shape excitations, investigate their influence on the dynamics of a vortex line, and discuss conditions where such excitations can be created. Finally, we show that such excitations play the role of a clock for a relativistically moving Josephson vortex and suggest an experiment to measure a time dilation effect analogous to that in special relativity. PMID:18851404

  3. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  4. Synchronization in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, S. T. M.; Trees, B. R.

    2001-10-01

    There is considerable scientific and technological interest in the time-dependent behavior of arrays of non-identical Josephson junctions, whose voltages oscillate with individual bare frequencies that can be made, through interactions, to renormalize their frequencies to a common value. We have studied the degree of synchronization of a subset of overdamped junctions in a ladder geometry, in which the voltages across the ``rung'' junctions of the ladder oscillate with the same, renormalized frequency and a fixed phase difference. We measure the degree of synchronization of the junctions with an order parameter, r (0<= r<= 1), as a function of the nearest-neighbor junction coupling strength. We also determined that a time-averaged version of the resistively-shunted junction (RSJ) equations could be used as an accurate description of the dynamics of the junctions. The solutions to the averaged equations exhibit phase slips between pairs of junctions for certain ranges of the junction coupling strength and also demonstrated that the relationship between the array size N and the critical coupling strength for all junctions to oscillate with the same frequency scales as N^2. This research was partially funded by a grant to Ohio Wesleyan University from the McGregor Foundation to support student research.

  5. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  6. Synchronization in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trees, B. R.; Dissanayake, S. T. M.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of a ladder array of overdamped Josephson junctions with periodic boundary conditions. The junctions have critical current and resistive disorder, are current biased above the critical current, and their voltages oscillate with nonidentical bare frequencies. We have been interested in the onset of synchronization in the rung junctions of the ladder, in which nearest neighbor interactions of strength α renormalize the bare frequencies to a common value. The degree of synchronization of the array is measured by an order parameter, r (0<= r<= 1), as a function of α and the spread of bare frequencies. For a given frequency spread, a synchronization phase transition is clearly visible with an increase in α. We have also determined that a time-averaged version of the resistively-shunted junction equations can be used as an accurate description of the dynamics of the junctions. The solutions to the averaged equations exhibit phase slips between pairs of junctions for certain ranges of values of α and also demonstrate that the relationship between the array size, N, and the critical coupling strength for the onset of synchronization scales as N^2. This research was partially funded by a grant to Ohio Wesleyan University from the McGregor Foundation to support student research.

  7. Conditions for synchronization in Josephson-junction arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chernikov, A.A.; Schmidt, G.

    1995-12-31

    An effective perturbation theoretical method has been developed to study the dynamics of Josephson Junction series arrays. It is shown that the inclusion of Junction capacitances, often ignored, has a significant impact on synchronization. Comparison of analytic with computational results over a wide range of parameters shows excellent agreement.

  8. Parallel arrays of Josephson junctions for submillimeter local oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pance, Aleksandar; Wengler, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the influence of the DC biasing circuit on operation of parallel biased quasioptical Josephson junction oscillator arrays. Because of nonuniform distribution of the DC biasing current along the length of the bias lines, there is a nonuniform distribution of magnetic flux in superconducting loops connecting every two junctions of the array. These DC self-field effects determine the state of the array. We present analysis and time-domain numerical simulations of these states for four biasing configurations. We find conditions for the in-phase states with maximum power output. We compare arrays with small and large inductances and determine the low inductance limit for nearly-in-phase array operation. We show how arrays can be steered in H-plane using the externally applied DC magnetic field.

  9. Averaged equations for distributed Josephson junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Matthew; Wiesenfeld, Kurt

    2004-06-01

    We use an averaging method to study the dynamics of a transmission line studded by Josephson junctions. The averaged system is used as a springboard for studying experimental strategies which rely on spatial non-uniformity to achieve enhanced synchronization. A reduced model for the near resonant case elucidates in physical terms the key to achieving stable synchronized dynamics.

  10. Developing Josephson junction array chips for microvolt applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenhui, Cao; Jinjin, Li; Yuan, Zhong; Yuan, Gao; Honghui, Li; Zengmin, Wang; Qing, He

    2016-05-01

    Josephson junction array chips for microvolt applications have been designed and fabricated. A voltage step as small as 1 μV has been observed for a single junction in the array when it is driven by 483.59 MHz microwave. By selecting different parts of the array, it can output a voltage from 1 μV to 256 μV. The flat region of the voltage steps is over 200 μA. This kind of array is useful for potential microvolt applications. Project supported by the National Key Technology Research and Development Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2011BAK15B00), the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61401418), and the Basic Research Foundation of National Institute of Metrology of China (Grant No. 20-AKY1415).

  11. An array of SIN tunnel junctions as a sensitive thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulo, I. J.; Kuzmin, L.

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated and measured an array of superconductor-insulator-normal metal (SIN) tunnel junctions for the purpose of using it as a sensitive thermometer. An increase in the temperature responsivity of dV/dT~5 µV mK-1 for ten junctions is observed from dV/dT~1 µV mK-1 for a single junction. We then used such an array thermometer to measure the temperature stability of the Heliox AC-V cryogen-free refrigerator. We have been able to measure a temperature stability of ± 250 µK over a period of 8 h with a temperature resolution of ± 100 µK.

  12. Thermoelectric Transport Through Arrays Of Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuljanishvili, Irma; Choe, Jim; Chandrasekhar, Venkat; Shafraniuk, Serhii

    2011-03-01

    The work addresses the voltage-controlled thermal flow and electric current through the carbon nanotube (CNT) junction arrays. The CNT thermoelectric generation (TEG) promises a high efficiency for thermal and electric energy conversion in a variety of applications. The energy generation had been studied using advanced methods of the condensed matter physics and nanotechnology. We will outline our experimental findings based on CNTs - TEG devices. We will report on our results that involve TEG-CNTs devices in array and /or single CNTs junctions geometries. We will describe fabrications protocols for preferential CVD growth of CNTs and nanoscale precision patterning of the catalyst on predefined device architectures. Electronic transport and optical properties of the CNTs-TEG nanostructures will also be discussed. I.K. and S.S. acknowledge support from the U.S. Army CECOM Acquisition Center #W909MY-10-C-0032. I.K. acknowledge collaboration with NanoInk Inc.

  13. Small-number arrays of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurgens, A.; Torstensson, M.; You, L. X.; Bauch, T.; Winkler, D.; Kakeya, I.; Kadowaki, K.

    2008-04-01

    Arrays of nanometre-thick Bi2212-intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ's) are studied in various geometries. The samples with only a few IJJ's allow for the intrinsic-tunnelling spectroscopy with minimum of Joule heating. The reproducible low-voltage peaks of the spectra probably stem from a superconducting gap which is half the usual size. We estimate the internal temperature in the IJJ stacks and analyze the importance of the self-heating for the macroscopic-quantum-tunnelling experiments involving IJJ's.

  14. Arrays of Nano Tunnel Junctions as Infrared Image Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-Ah; Moon, Jeong S.; Prokopuk, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Infrared image sensors based on high density rectangular planar arrays of nano tunnel junctions have been proposed. These sensors would differ fundamentally from prior infrared sensors based, variously, on bolometry or conventional semiconductor photodetection. Infrared image sensors based on conventional semiconductor photodetection must typically be cooled to cryogenic temperatures to reduce noise to acceptably low levels. Some bolometer-type infrared sensors can be operated at room temperature, but they exhibit low detectivities and long response times, which limit their utility. The proposed infrared image sensors could be operated at room temperature without incurring excessive noise, and would exhibit high detectivities and short response times. Other advantages would include low power demand, high resolution, and tailorability of spectral response. Neither bolometers nor conventional semiconductor photodetectors, the basic detector units as proposed would partly resemble rectennas. Nanometer-scale tunnel junctions would be created by crossing of nanowires with quantum-mechanical-barrier layers in the form of thin layers of electrically insulating material between them (see figure). A microscopic dipole antenna sized and shaped to respond maximally in the infrared wavelength range that one seeks to detect would be formed integrally with the nanowires at each junction. An incident signal in that wavelength range would become coupled into the antenna and, through the antenna, to the junction. At the junction, the flow of electrons between the crossing wires would be dominated by quantum-mechanical tunneling rather than thermionic emission. Relative to thermionic emission, quantum mechanical tunneling is a fast process.

  15. Josephson junction arrays with positional disorder: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Martin G.

    1988-02-01

    The results of a study of Josephson junction arrays with positional disorder are presented, using both experiments and Monte Carlo simulations. We have fabricated 50 x 50 arrays of Pb/Cu proximity-effects junctions, with controlled positional disorder characterized by a parameter delta-star. The zero-field resistive transitions of these samples are well described by the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson vortex-unbinding theory. Measurements of resistance vs. magnetic field reveal rich structure, with pronounced minima at integer fields, as well as higher-order structure. In samples with disorders the principal oscillations are found to decay linearly with field, after accounting for the effect of the magnetic field on the critical currents of the individual junctions. We can quantify the destruction of phase-coherence on length-scales of order q times the lattice parameter by defining critical fields, fc(q) approx. 1/delta-star, by the disappearance of structures at fields fo= p/q, where fo is the average number of flux quanta per plaquette, and p and q are integers. Extrapolation to q=infinity yields an estimate of the critical field, f c, for the destruction of quasi-long-range phase coherence which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction of Granato and Kosterlitz. However, our experiments show no evidence for the predicted reentrant phase transition.

  16. Conical Gradient Junctions of Dendritic Viologen Arrays on Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kawauchi, Takehiro; Oguchi, Yuki; Nagai, Keiji; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional construction of arrays of functional molecules on an electrode surface, such as organic semiconductors and redox-active molecules, is a considerable challenge in the fabrication of sophisticated junctions for molecular devices. In particular, well-defined organic layers with precise molecular gradients are anticipated to function as novel metal/organic interfaces with specific electrical properties, such as a space charge layer at the metal/semiconductor interface. Here, we report a strategy for the construction of a three-dimensional molecular array with an electrical connection to a metal electrode by exploiting dendritic molecular architecture. Newly designed dendritic molecules consisting of viologens (1,1′-disubstituted-4,4′-bipyridilium salts) as the framework and mercapto groups as anchor units form unique self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a gold surface reflecting the molecular design. The dendritic molecules exhibit a conical shape and closely pack to form cone arrays on the substrate, whereas, in solution, they expand into more flexible conformations. Differences in the introduction position of the anchor units in the dendritic structure result in apical- and basal-type cone arrays in which the spatial concentration of the viologen units can be precisely configured in the cones. The concentration in apical-type SAMs increases away from the substrate, whereas the opposite is true in basal-type SAMs. PMID:26057120

  17. 2D SQIF arrays using 20 000 YBCO high R n Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. E.; Hannam, K. E.; Lazar, J.; Leslie, K. E.; Lewis, C. J.; Grancea, A.; Keenan, S. T.; Lam, S. K. H.; Foley, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIFs) have been created using two dimensional arrays of YBCO step-edge Josephson junctions connected together in series and parallel configurations via superconducting loops with a range of loop areas and loop inductances. A SQIF response, as evidenced by a single large anti-peak at zero applied flux, is reported at 77 K for step-edge junction arrays with the junction number N = 1 000 up to 20 000. The SQIF sensitivity (slope of peak) increased linearly with N up to a maximum of 1530 V T-1. Array parameters related to geometry and average junction characteristics are investigated in order to understand and improve the SQIF performance in high temperature superconducting arrays. Initial investigations also focus on the effect of the SQUID inductance factor on the SQIF sensitivity by varying both the mean critical current and the mean inductance of the loops in the array. The RF response to a 30 MHz signal is demonstrated.

  18. 2D SQIF arrays using 20 000 YBCO high R n Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. E.; Hannam, K. E.; Lazar, J.; Leslie, K. E.; Lewis, C. J.; Grancea, A.; Keenan, S. T.; Lam, S. K. H.; Foley, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIFs) have been created using two dimensional arrays of YBCO step-edge Josephson junctions connected together in series and parallel configurations via superconducting loops with a range of loop areas and loop inductances. A SQIF response, as evidenced by a single large anti-peak at zero applied flux, is reported at 77 K for step-edge junction arrays with the junction number N = 1 000 up to 20 000. The SQIF sensitivity (slope of peak) increased linearly with N up to a maximum of 1530 V T‑1. Array parameters related to geometry and average junction characteristics are investigated in order to understand and improve the SQIF performance in high temperature superconducting arrays. Initial investigations also focus on the effect of the SQUID inductance factor on the SQIF sensitivity by varying both the mean critical current and the mean inductance of the loops in the array. The RF response to a 30 MHz signal is demonstrated.

  19. dc properties of series-parallel arrays of Josephson junctions in an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, S.J. )

    1991-04-01

    A detailed dc theory of superconducting multijunction interferometers has previously been developed by several authors for the case of parallel junction arrays. The theory is now extended to cover the case of a loop containing several junctions connected in series. The problem is closely associated with high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors and their clusters of intrinsic Josephson junctions. These materials exhibit spontaneous interferometric effects, and there is no reason to assume that the intrinsic junctions form only parallel arrays. A simple formalism of phase states is developed in order to express the superconducting phase differences across the junctions forming a series array as functions of the phase difference across the weakest junction of the system, and to relate the differences in critical currents of the junctions to gaps in the allowed ranges of their phase functions. This formalism is used to investigate the energy states of the array, which in the case of different junctions are split and separated by energy barriers of height depending on the phase gaps. Modifications of the washboard model of a single junction are shown. Next a superconducting inductive loop containing a series array of two junctions is considered, and this model is used to demonstrate the transitions between phase states and the associated instabilities. Finally, the critical current of a parallel connection of two series arrays is analyzed and shown to be a multivalued function of the externally applied magnetic flux. The instabilities caused by the presence of intrinsic serial junctions in granular high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} materials are pointed out as a potential source of additional noise.

  20. Ultra-sensitive cryogenic thermometer based on an array of the SIN tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Leonid

    2008-02-01

    A novel concept of an ultra-sensitive thermometer based on a series array of superconductor-insulator-normal (SIN) tunnel junctions has been proposed. The array helps to improve matching with an amplifier proportionally to the number of junctions. There is no fundamental limit for total noise and the main limitation is electron-phonon noise of the normal island reverse proportional to volume of the normal metal.

  1. MADS+: discovery of differential splicing events from Affymetrix exon junction array data

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Warzecha, Claude C.; Carstens, Russ P.; Xing, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: The Affymetrix Human Exon Junction Array is a newly designed high-density exon-sensitive microarray for global analysis of alternative splicing. Contrary to the Affymetrix exon 1.0 array, which only contains four probes per exon and no probes for exon–exon junctions, this new junction array averages eight probes per probeset targeting all exons and exon–exon junctions observed in the human mRNA/EST transcripts, representing a significant increase in the probe density for alternative splicing events. Here, we present MADS+, a computational pipeline to detect differential splicing events from the Affymetrix exon junction array data. For each alternative splicing event, MADS+ evaluates the signals of probes targeting competing transcript isoforms to identify exons or splice sites with different levels of transcript inclusion between two sample groups. MADS+ is used routinely in our analysis of Affymetrix exon junction arrays and has a high accuracy in detecting differential splicing events. For example, in a study of the novel epithelial-specific splicing regulator ESRP1, MADS+ detects hundreds of exons whose inclusion levels are dependent on ESRP1, with a RT-PCR validation rate of 88.5% (153 validated out of 173 tested). Availability: MADS+ scripts, documentations and annotation files are available at http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/Labs/Xing/MADSplus/. Contact: yi-xing@uiowa.edu PMID:19933160

  2. Effective medium theory of the space-charge region electrostatics of arrays of nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurugubelli, Vijaya Kumar; Karmalkar, Shreepad

    2016-01-01

    We develop an Effective Medium Theory for the electrostatics of the Space-Charge Region (SCR) of Schottky and p-n junctions in arrays of nanofilms (NFs), nanowires (NWs), and nanotubes (NTs) in a dielectric ambient. The theory captures the effects of electric fields in both the semiconductor, i.e., NF/NW/NT, and the dielectric media of the array. It shows that the depletion width and the screening length characterizing the SCR tail in the array correspond to those in a bulk junction with an effective semiconductor medium, whose permittivity and doping are their weighted averages over the cross-sectional areas of the semiconductor and dielectric; the shapes of the cross-sections are immaterial. Further, the reverse bias 1 /C2 -V behavior of junctions in NF/NW/NT arrays is linear, as in bulk junctions, and is useful to extract from measurements the built-in potential, effective doping including the semiconductor-dielectric interface charge, and NF/NW/NT length. The theory is validated with numerical simulations, is useful for the experimentalist, and yields simple formulas for nano-device design which predict the following. In the limiting case of a single sheet-like NF, the junction depletion width variation with potential drop is linear rather than square-root (as in a bulk junction). In arrays of symmetric silicon p-n junctions in oxide dielectric where NF/NW thickness and separation are 5% and 100% of the bulk depletion width, respectively, the junction depletion width and the screening length are scaled up from their bulk values by the same factor of ˜2 for NF and ˜10 for NW array.

  3. Si Radial p-i-n Junction Photovoltaic Arrays with Built-In Light Concentrators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Campbell, Ian H; Dayeh, Shadi A; Schuele, Paul; Evans, David; Picraux, S Tom

    2015-05-26

    High-performance photovoltaic (PV) devices require strong light absorption, low reflection and efficient photogenerated carrier collection for high quantum efficiency. Previous optical studies of vertical wires arrays have revealed that extremely efficient light absorption in the visible wavelengths is achievable. Photovoltaic studies have further advanced the wire approach by employing radial p-n junction architectures to achieve more efficient carrier collection. While radial p-n junction formation and optimized light absorption have independently been considered, PV efficiencies have further opportunities for enhancement by exploiting the radial p-n junction fabrication procedures to form arrays that simultaneously enhance both light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Here we report a concept of morphology control to improve PV performance, light absorption and quantum efficiency of silicon radial p-i-n junction arrays. Surface energy minimization during vapor phase epitaxy is exploited to form match-head structures at the tips of the wires. The match-head structure acts as a built-in light concentrator and enhances optical absorptance and external quantum efficiencies by 30 to 40%, and PV efficiency under AM 1.5G illumination by 20% compared to cylindrical structures without match-heads. The design rules for these improvements with match-head arrays are systematically studied. This approach of process-enhanced control of three-dimensional Si morphologies provides a fab-compatible way to enhance the PV performance of Si radial p-n junction wire arrays. PMID:25961330

  4. Si Radial p-i-n Junction Photovoltaic Arrays with Built-In Light Concentrators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Campbell, Ian H; Dayeh, Shadi A; Schuele, Paul; Evans, David; Picraux, S Tom

    2015-05-26

    High-performance photovoltaic (PV) devices require strong light absorption, low reflection and efficient photogenerated carrier collection for high quantum efficiency. Previous optical studies of vertical wires arrays have revealed that extremely efficient light absorption in the visible wavelengths is achievable. Photovoltaic studies have further advanced the wire approach by employing radial p-n junction architectures to achieve more efficient carrier collection. While radial p-n junction formation and optimized light absorption have independently been considered, PV efficiencies have further opportunities for enhancement by exploiting the radial p-n junction fabrication procedures to form arrays that simultaneously enhance both light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Here we report a concept of morphology control to improve PV performance, light absorption and quantum efficiency of silicon radial p-i-n junction arrays. Surface energy minimization during vapor phase epitaxy is exploited to form match-head structures at the tips of the wires. The match-head structure acts as a built-in light concentrator and enhances optical absorptance and external quantum efficiencies by 30 to 40%, and PV efficiency under AM 1.5G illumination by 20% compared to cylindrical structures without match-heads. The design rules for these improvements with match-head arrays are systematically studied. This approach of process-enhanced control of three-dimensional Si morphologies provides a fab-compatible way to enhance the PV performance of Si radial p-n junction wire arrays.

  5. Discontinuous current-phase relations in small one-dimensional Josephson junction arrays.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jens; Le Hur, Karyn

    2008-08-29

    We study the Josephson effect in small one-dimensional (1D) Josephson junction arrays. For weak Josephson tunneling, topologically different regions in the charge-stability diagram generate distinct current-phase (I-phi) relationships. We present results for a three-junction system in the vicinity of charge-degeneracy lines and triple points. We explain the generalization to larger arrays, show that discontinuities of the I-phi relation at phase pi persist and that, at maximum degeneracy, the problem can be mapped to a tight-binding model providing analytical results for arbitrary system size.

  6. Series-Parallel Superconducting Quantum Interference Device Arrays Using High-TC Ion Damage Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Travis; Mukhanov, Oleg

    2015-03-01

    We have fabricated several designs of three junction series-parallel DC Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (BiSQUID) arrays in YBa2Cu3O7-x using 104 ion damage Josephson Junctions on a single 1 cm2 chip. A high aspect ratio ion implantation mask (30:1 ratio) with 30 nm slits was fabricated using electron beam lithography and low pressure reactive ion etching. Samples were irradiated with 60 keV helium ions to achieve a highly uniform damaged region throughout the thickness of the YBCO thin film as confirmed with Monte Carlo ion implantation simulations. Low frequency measurements of four different BiSQUID series-parallel SQUID array devices will be presented to investigate the effect of the BiSQUID design parameters on the linearity of the SQUID array in response to magnetic fields. BiSQUID arrays could provide a promising architecture for improved linearity transimpedance amplifiers with high linearity.

  7. Self-assembled and highly selective sensors based on air-bridge-structured nanowire junction arrays.

    PubMed

    Park, Won Jeong; Choi, Kyung Jin; Kim, Myung Hwa; Koo, Bon Hyeong; Lee, Jong-Lam; Baik, Jeong Min

    2013-08-14

    We describe a strategy for creating an air-bridge-structured nanowire junction array platform that capable of reliably discriminating between three gases (hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide) in air. Alternatively driven dual nanowire species of ZnO and CuO with the average diameter of ∼30 nm on a single substrate are used and decorated with metallic nanoparticles to form two-dimensional microarray, which do not need to consider the post fabrications. Each individual nanowires in the array form n-n, p-p, and p-n junctions at the micro/nanoscale on single substrate and the junctions act as electrical conducting path for carriers. The adsorption of gas molecules to the surface changes the potential barrier height formed at the junctions and the carrier transport inside the straight semiconductors, which provide the ability of a given sensor array to differentiate among the junctions. The sensors were tested for their ability to distinguish three gases (H2, CO, and NO2), which they were able to do unequivocally when the data was classified using linear discriminant analysis. PMID:23841667

  8. Bloch Oscillation in a One-Dimensional Array of Small Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Katori, Shunsuke; Gandrothula, Srinivas; Deguchi, Tomoaki; Mizugaki, Yoshinao

    2016-07-01

    A distinct Bloch nose was demonstrated in the current-voltage characteristics of a one-dimensional array of 20 small Josephson junctions. Arrays of direct-current superconducting quantum interference device (dc-SQUID) structures were used as leads to the array of junctions, and the environmental impedance was tuned with a magnetic field. The observed Bloch nose had a negative differential resistance of its magnitude of as large as 14.3 MΩ, a blockade voltage of 0.36 mV, and a decrease in voltage of 0.21 mV due to the Bloch oscillation, all of which are larger than those obtained in a single junction by more than one order. The observed Bloch oscillation was quantitatively described on the basis of the Bloch oscillation of each single junction in combination with the charge soliton model in a long array. Unexpected constant-current spikes, whose origin lay in the dc-SQUID in the leads, were also observed to be superposed on the current-voltage characteristics when the Coulomb blockade appeared.

  9. Arrays of high quality SAM-based junctions and their application in molecular diode based logic.

    PubMed

    Wan, Albert; Suchand Sangeeth, C S; Wang, Lejia; Yuan, Li; Jiang, Li; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2015-12-14

    This paper describes a method to fabricate a microfluidic top-electrode that can be utilized to generate arrays of self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions. The top-electrodes consist of a liquid-metal of GaOx/EGaIn mechanically stabilized in microchannels and through-holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); these top-electrodes form molecular junctions by directly placing them onto the SAM supported by template-stripped (TS) Ag or Au bottom-electrodes. Unlike conventional techniques to form multiple junctions, our method does not require lithography to pattern the bottom-electrode and is compatible with TS bottom-electrodes, which are ultra-flat with large grains, free from potential contamination of photoresist residues, and do not have electrode-edges where the molecules are unable to pack well. We formed tunneling junctions with n-alkanethiolate SAMs in yields of ∼80%, with good reproducibility and electrical stability. Temperature dependent J(V) measurements indicated that the mechanism of charge transport across the junction is coherent tunneling. To demonstrate the usefulness of these junctions, we formed molecular diodes based on SAMs with Fc head groups. These junctions rectify currents with a rectification ratio R of 45. These molecular diodes were incorporated in simple electronic circuitry to demonstrate molecular diode-based Boolean logic.

  10. Transport in arrays of submicron Josephson junctions over a ground plane

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Teressa Rae

    1997-12-01

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) arrays of Al islands linked by submicron Al/Al{sub x}O{sub y}/Al tunnel junctions were fabricated on an insulating layer grown on a ground plane. The arrays were cooled to temperatures as low as 20 mK where the Josephson coupling energy E{sub J} of each junction and the charging energy E{sub C} of each island were much greater than the thermal energy k{sub B}T. The capacitance C{sub g} between each island and the ground plane was much greater than the junction capacitance C. Two classes of arrays were studied. In the first class, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was much larger than the resistance quantum for single electrons, R{sub N}{much_gt} R{sub Q{sub e}}{identical_to} h/e{sup 2} {approx} 25.8 k{Omega}, and the islands were driven normal by an applied magnetic field such that E{sub J} = 0 and the array was in the Coulomb blockade regime. The arrays were made on degenerately-doped Si, thermally oxidized to a thickness of approximately 100 nm. The current-voltage (I - V) characteristics of a 1D and a 2D array were measured and found to display a threshold voltage V{sub T} below which little current flows. In the second class of arrays, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was close to the resistance quantum for Cooper pairs, R{sub N}{approx}R{sub Q}{equivalent_to}h/4e{sup 4}{approx}6.45k{Omega}, such that E{sub J}/E{sub C}{approx}1. The arrays were made on GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As heterostructures with a two-dimensional electron gas approximately 100 nm below the surface. One array displayed superconducting behavior at low temperature. Two arrays displayed insulating behavior at low temperature, and the size of the Coulomb gap increased with increasing R{sub g}.

  11. Simulations and characterization of arrays of Josephson junctions on the surface of a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemiller, Erik; Kurter, Cihan; Finck, Aaron; van Harlingen, Dale

    2014-03-01

    Topological insulators (TI) have drawn a great deal of interest due to their unique surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry and strong spin-orbit coupling. Josephson junctions made by proximity coupling of s-wave superconductors (S) through the surface states of 3D TI have been predicted to produce excitations of Majorana fermions, which modify the usual current-phase relationship (CPR). In this talk, we present simulations of arrays of superconducting islands connected by Josephson junctions with a CPR of the form of I1 sinφ +I2 sin φ / 2 . We calculate the energy of the metastable states of the array and the resistance in dynamical states as a function of external magnetic field, and junction critical current for different array sizes and geometries. The 4 π-periodic component of the CPR lifts the degeneracy to create additional metastable states and a modulation of the energy and resistance that depends on whether the number of vortices per cell is even or odd. We discuss experimental progress towards the fabrication of superconducting islands connected by S/TI/S junctions and their characterization by transport and imaging. Microsoft Station Q provided funding for this research.

  12. Tunable plasma edge in Josephson junction loaded wire array metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng; Koshelets, V. P.; Anlage, Steven

    It is desirable to have a tunable negative permittivity medium that operates in the microwave domain. The effective plasma frequency of a JJ-loaded wire array can be tuned as a function of dc current and temperature in the low current limit. To demonstrate this effect we observe a change in transmission through a single layer of 8 superconducting Nb wires that spans a rectangular waveguide. A simple model that treats the wires as an artificial dielectric with a tunable effective permittivity shows good agreement with measured results for tuning of the plasma edge. In addition we have observed interesting behavior at higher current and rf input power. The dynamics are very rich, highly hysteretic, and nonlinear. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE programs through Grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  13. Arrays of high quality SAM-based junctions and their application in molecular diode based logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Albert; Suchand Sangeeth, C. S.; Wang, Lejia; Yuan, Li; Jiang, Li; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes a method to fabricate a microfluidic top-electrode that can be utilized to generate arrays of self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions. The top-electrodes consist of a liquid-metal of GaOx/EGaIn mechanically stabilized in microchannels and through-holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); these top-electrodes form molecular junctions by directly placing them onto the SAM supported by template-stripped (TS) Ag or Au bottom-electrodes. Unlike conventional techniques to form multiple junctions, our method does not require lithography to pattern the bottom-electrode and is compatible with TS bottom-electrodes, which are ultra-flat with large grains, free from potential contamination of photoresist residues, and do not have electrode-edges where the molecules are unable to pack well. We formed tunneling junctions with n-alkanethiolate SAMs in yields of ~80%, with good reproducibility and electrical stability. Temperature dependent J(V) measurements indicated that the mechanism of charge transport across the junction is coherent tunneling. To demonstrate the usefulness of these junctions, we formed molecular diodes based on SAMs with Fc head groups. These junctions rectify currents with a rectification ratio R of 45. These molecular diodes were incorporated in simple electronic circuitry to demonstrate molecular diode-based Boolean logic.This paper describes a method to fabricate a microfluidic top-electrode that can be utilized to generate arrays of self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions. The top-electrodes consist of a liquid-metal of GaOx/EGaIn mechanically stabilized in microchannels and through-holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); these top-electrodes form molecular junctions by directly placing them onto the SAM supported by template-stripped (TS) Ag or Au bottom-electrodes. Unlike conventional techniques to form multiple junctions, our method does not require lithography to pattern the bottom-electrode and is compatible with TS

  14. The effects of annealing a 2-dimensional array of ion-irradiated Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, E. Y.; Kouperine, K.; Zhuo, Y.; Dynes, R. C.; Cybart, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have fabricated the two-dimensional arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) using YBa2Cu3O7-δ ion-irradiated Josephson junctions, and we have studied the effects of post-annealing the arrays at 100 ◦C in oxygen. The maximum voltage modulation, V B, in a magnetic field for DC biased arrays at 50 K is initially 1.2 mV, but increases to 3 mV after annealing. Furthermore, the temperature where the largest V B occurs increases from 45 K to 48.5 K after annealing. We present and simulate a model where annealing causes diffusion and recombination of the low-energy oxygen defects that narrows the barrier, resulting in an increase in the Josephson binding energy. We show that this process stabilizes after 40 minutes of annealing and leads to a significant improvement in the properties of the array.

  15. Vortex motion rectification in Josephson junction arrays with a ratchet potential.

    PubMed

    Shalóm, D E; Pastoriza, H

    2005-05-01

    By means of electrical transport measurements we have studied the rectified motion of vortices in ratchet potentials engineered on overdamped Josephson junction arrays. The rectified voltage as a function of the vortex density shows a maximum efficiency close a matching condition to the period of the ratchet potential indicating a collective vortex motion. Vortex current reversals were detected varying the driving force and vortex density revealing the influence of vortex-vortex interaction in the ratchet effect.

  16. Charge filling factors in clean and disordered arrays of tunnel junctions

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Kelly A.; Vogt, Nicolas; Cole, Jared H.

    2015-01-01

    We simulate one-dimensional arrays of tunnel junctions using the kinetic Monte Carlo method to study charge filling behaviour in the large charging energy limit. By applying a small fixed voltage bias and varying the offset voltage, we investigate this behaviour in clean and disordered arrays (both weak and strong disorder effects). The offset voltage dependent modulation of the current is highly sensitive to background charge disorder and exhibits substantial variation depending on the strength of the disorder. We show that while small fractional charge filling factors are likely to be washed out in experimental devices due to strong background charge disorder, larger factors may be observable. PMID:26627327

  17. Charge filling factors in clean and disordered arrays of tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kelly A; Vogt, Nicolas; Cole, Jared H

    2015-12-02

    We simulate one-dimensional arrays of tunnel junctions using the kinetic Monte Carlo method to study charge filling behaviour in the large charging energy limit. By applying a small fixed voltage bias and varying the offset voltage, we investigate this behaviour in clean and disordered arrays (both weak and strong disorder effects). The offset voltage dependent modulation of the current is highly sensitive to background charge disorder and exhibits substantial variation depending on the strength of the disorder. We show that while small fractional charge filling factors are likely to be washed out in experimental devices due to strong background charge disorder, larger factors may be observable.

  18. Constructing higher order DNA origami arrays using DNA junctions of anti-parallel/parallel double crossovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhipeng; Park, Seongsu; Yamashita, Naoki; Kawai, Kentaro; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    DNA origami provides a versatile method for the construction of nanostructures with defined shape, size and other properties; such nanostructures may enable a hierarchical assembly of large scale architecture for the placement of other nanomaterials with atomic precision. However, the effective use of these higher order structures as functional components depends on knowledge of their assembly behavior and mechanical properties. This paper demonstrates construction of higher order DNA origami arrays with controlled orientations based on the formation of two types of DNA junctions: anti-parallel and parallel double crossovers. A two-step assembly process, in which preformed rectangular DNA origami monomer structures themselves undergo further self-assembly to form numerically unlimited arrays, was investigated to reveal the influences of assembly parameters. AFM observations showed that when parallel double crossover DNA junctions are used, the assembly of DNA origami arrays occurs with fewer monomers than for structures formed using anti-parallel double crossovers, given the same assembly parameters, indicating that the configuration of parallel double crossovers is not energetically preferred. However, the direct measurement by AFM force-controlled mapping shows that both DNA junctions of anti-parallel and parallel double crossovers have homogeneous mechanical stability with any part of DNA origami.

  19. Dense nanoimprinted silicon nanowire arrays with passivated axial p-i-n junctions for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Pei; Siontas, Stylianos; Zaslavsky, A.; Pacifici, D.; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Krylyuk, S.; Davydov, A. V.

    2015-03-28

    We report on the fabrication and photovoltaic characteristics of vertical arrays of silicon axial p-i-n junction nanowire (NW) solar cells grown by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) epitaxy. NW surface passivation with silicon dioxide shell is shown to enhance carrier recombination time, open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}), and fill factor (FF). The photovoltaic performance of passivated individual NW and NW arrays was compared under 532 nm laser illumination with power density of ∼10 W/cm{sup 2}. Higher values of V{sub OC} and FF in the NW arrays are explained by enhanced light trapping. In order to verify the effect of NW density on light absorption and hence on the photovoltaic performance of NW arrays, dense Si NW arrays were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography to periodically arrange the gold seed particles prior to epitaxial growth. Compared to sparse NW arrays fabricated using VLS growth from randomly distributed gold seeds, the nanoimprinted NW array solar cells show a greatly increased peak external quantum efficiency of ∼8% and internal quantum efficiency of ∼90% in the visible spectral range. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations of Si NW periodic arrays with varying pitch (P) confirm the importance of high NW density. Specifically, due to diffractive scattering and light trapping, absorption efficiency close to 100% in the 400–650 nm spectral range is calculated for a Si NW array with P = 250 nm, significantly outperforming a blanket Si film of the same thickness.

  20. Width dependence of resistance and currents in series arrays of superconducting niobium/indium arsenide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Mason L.

    In the present research we have fabricated and measured arrays of Nb/InAs junctions with large electrode separations ({>}0.4mum). To couple the superconducting Nb over such distances requires ballistic electron transport in the InAs and barrier-free Nb/InAs interfaces. To guarantee the former, we use InAs/(Al,Ga)Sb quantum wells grown by MBE. InAs naturally lacks a Schottky barrier, so as long as the InAs surface is kept clean, the Nb/InAs interface will also be barrier-free. Under the above conditions, the superconducting Nb electrodes will be coupled by ballistic electron transport and Andreev reflections at the interfaces. The Nb/InAs junction arrays exhibit the Josephson effects due to phase coupling, but they also exhibit features due to the Andreev reflections. Multiple Andreev reflections between superconducting electrodes are manifested as a subharmonic gap structure in the current-voltage characteristics. In addition, there is an excess current that persists down to zero bias. At zero bias, the differential resistance is thermally activated. The activation energy may vary from sample to sample due to uncontrolled parameters, but there is also a reproducible variation of the activation energy with width. Wider arrays show a proportionally higher activation energy than narrower arrays and are thus fundamentally different from a parallel connection of narrow arrays. This behavior appears to be related to the excess current due to multiple Andreev reflections. A simple noise model (augmented by Andreev reflections) is proposed to explain these observations.

  1. Phase and vortex correlations in superconducting Josephson-junction arrays at irrational magnetic frustration.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo

    2008-07-11

    Phase coherence and vortex order in a Josephson-junction array at irrational frustration are studied by extensive Monte Carlo simulations using the parallel-tempering method. A scaling analysis of the correlation length of phase variables in the full equilibrated system shows that the critical temperature vanishes with a power-law divergent correlation length and critical exponent nuph, in agreement with recent results from resistivity scaling analysis. A similar scaling analysis for vortex variables reveals a different critical exponent nuv, suggesting that there are two distinct correlation lengths associated with a decoupled zero-temperature phase transition. PMID:18764218

  2. Unpaired Majorana modes in Josephson-Junction Arrays with gapless bulk excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, M.; Tsvelik, A.; Ioffe, L. B.

    2015-11-06

    In this study, the search for Majorana bound states in solid-state physics has been limited to materials that display a gap in their bulk spectrum. We show that such unpaired states appear in certain quasi-one-dimensional Josephson-junction arrays with gapless bulk excitations. The bulk modes mediate a coupling between Majorana bound states via the Ruderman-Kittel-Yosida-Kasuya mechanism. As a consequence, the lowest energy doublet acquires a finite energy difference. For a realistic set of parameters this energy splitting remains much smaller than the energy of the bulk eigenstates even for short chains of length L~10.

  3. Unpaired Majorana Modes in Josephson-Junction Arrays with Gapless Bulk Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, M.; Tsvelik, A. M.; Ioffe, L. B.

    2015-11-01

    The search for Majorana bound states in solid-state physics has been limited to materials that display a gap in their bulk spectrum. We show that such unpaired states appear in certain quasi-one-dimensional Josephson-junction arrays with gapless bulk excitations. The bulk modes mediate a coupling between Majorana bound states via the Ruderman-Kittel-Yosida-Kasuya mechanism. As a consequence, the lowest energy doublet acquires a finite energy difference. For a realistic set of parameters this energy splitting remains much smaller than the energy of the bulk eigenstates even for short chains of length L ˜10 .

  4. Phase and vortex correlations in superconducting Josephson-junction arrays at irrational magnetic frustration.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo

    2008-07-11

    Phase coherence and vortex order in a Josephson-junction array at irrational frustration are studied by extensive Monte Carlo simulations using the parallel-tempering method. A scaling analysis of the correlation length of phase variables in the full equilibrated system shows that the critical temperature vanishes with a power-law divergent correlation length and critical exponent nuph, in agreement with recent results from resistivity scaling analysis. A similar scaling analysis for vortex variables reveals a different critical exponent nuv, suggesting that there are two distinct correlation lengths associated with a decoupled zero-temperature phase transition.

  5. Electrostatic Discharge Test of Multi-Junction Solar Array Coupons After Combined Space Environmental Exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason; Hoang, Bao; Funderburk, Victor V.; Wong, Frankie; Gardiner, George

    2010-01-01

    A set of multi-junction GaAs/Ge solar array test coupons were subjected to a sequence of 5-year increments of combined environmental exposure tests. The test coupons capture an integrated design intended for use in a geosynchronous (GEO) space environment. A key component of this test campaign is conducting electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests in the inverted gradient mode. The protocol of the ESD tests is based on the ISO/CD 11221, the ISO standard for ESD testing on solar array panels. This standard is currently in its final review with expected approval in 2010. The test schematic in the ISO reference has been modified with Space System/Loral designed circuitry to better simulate the on-orbit operational conditions of its solar array design. Part of the modified circuitry is to simulate a solar array panel coverglass flashover discharge. All solar array coupons used in the test campaign consist of 4 cells. The ESD tests are performed at the beginning of life (BOL) and at each 5-year environment exposure point. The environmental exposure sequence consists of UV radiation, electron/proton particle radiation, thermal cycling, and ion thruster plume. This paper discusses the coverglass flashover simulation, ESD test setup, and the importance of the electrical test design in simulating the on-orbit operational conditions. Results from 5th-year testing are compared to the baseline ESD characteristics determined at the BOL condition.

  6. Multidimensional washboard ratchet potentials for frustrated two-dimensional Josephson junctions arrays on square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, Rafael; Negruz, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we derive an analytical procedure that allows us to write the multidimensional washboard ratchet potential (MDWBP) U f for a two-dimensional Josephson junction array. The array has an applied perpendicular magnetic field. The magnetic field is given in units of the quantum flux per plaquette or frustration of the form {f}=\\frac{{M}}{{N}}[{{{Φ }}}0], where Φ0 is the flux quantum. The derivation is done under the assumption that the checkerboard pattern ground state or unit cell of a two-dimensional Josephson junction array is preserved under current biasing. The resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction model with a white noise term describes the dynamics for each junction in the array. The multidimensional potential is the unique expression of the collective effects that emerge from the array in contrast to the single junction. The first step in the procedure is to write the equation for the phases for the unit cell. In doing this, one takes into account the constraints imposed for the gauge invariant phases due to frustration. Second, and the key idea of the procedure, is to perform a variable transformation from the original systems of stochastic equations to a system of variables where the condition for the equality of mixed second partial happens. This is achieved via Poincaré's theorem for differential forms. In this way, we find to a nonlinear matrix equation (equation (9) in the text), that permits us to find the new coordinate variables x f where the potential exists. The transformation matrix also permits the correct transformation of the original white noise terms of each junction to the intensities in the x f variables. The commensurate symmetries of the ground state pinned vortex lattice leads to discrete symmetries to the part of the washboard potential that does not contain a tilt due to the external bias current (equation (11) in the text). In this work we apply the procedure for the important cases f=\\frac{1

  7. High density processing electronics for superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, W. K.; Harris, J. T.; Friedrich, S.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) are excellent soft x-ray (100-2000 eV) detectors, particularly for synchrotron applications, because of their ability to obtain energy resolutions below 10 eV at count rates approaching 10 kcps. In order to achieve useful solid detection angles with these very small detectors, they are typically deployed in large arrays - currently with 100+ elements, but with 1000 elements being contemplated. In this paper we review a 5-year effort to develop compact, computer controlled low-noise processing electronics for STJ detector arrays, focusing on the major issues encountered and our solutions to them. Of particular interest are our preamplifier design, which can set the STJ operating points under computer control and achieve 2.7 eV energy resolution; our low noise power supply, which produces only 2 nV/√Hz noise at the preamplifier's critical cascode node; our digital processing card that digitizes and digitally processes 32 channels; and an STJ I-V curve scanning algorithm that computes noise as a function of offset voltage, allowing an optimum operating point to be easily selected. With 32 preamplifiers laid out on a custom 3U EuroCard, and the 32 channel digital card in a 3U PXI card format, electronics for a 128 channel array occupy only two small chassis, each the size of a National Instruments 5-slot PXI crate, and allow full array control with simple extensions of existing beam line data collection packages.

  8. Fabrication of Tunnel Junctions For Direct Detector Arrays With Single-Electron Transistor Readout Using Electron-Beam Lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Rhee, K. W.; Teufel, J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will describe the fabrication of small aluminum tunnel junctions for applications in astronomy. Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junctions with integrated single-electron transistor readout have the potential for photon-counting sensitivity at sub-millimeter wavelengths. The junctions for the detector and single-electron transistor can be made with electron-beam lithography and a standard self-aligned double-angle deposition process. However, high yield and uniformity of the junctions is required for large-format detector arrays. This paper will describe how measurement and modification of the sensitivity ratio in the resist bilayer was used to greatly improve the reliability of forming devices with uniform, sub-micron size, low-leakage junctions.

  9. An array of 100 Al Al2O3 Cu SIN tunnel junctions in direct-write trilayer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Ernst; Tarasov, Mikhail; Pettersson, Gustav; Gustavsson, David; Kuzmin, Leonid

    2007-12-01

    We present superconductor-insulator-normal metal (SIN) tunnel junction thermometers made of arrays of 4-100 Al-Al2O3-Cu SIN tunnel junctions fabricated in direct-write technology. The technology is based on in situ evaporation of the superconductive electrode followed by the oxidation and the normal counter-electrode as a first step and deposition of normal metal absorber as a second one. This approach allows one to realize any geometry of the tunnel junctions and of the absorber with no limitation related to the size of the junctions or the absorber, which is not possible using the shadow evaporation technique. Measurements performed at 300 mK showed the high quality of the fabricated tunnel junctions, low leakage currents, and that an Rd/Rn ratio of 500 has been achieved at that temperature. The junctions were characterized as temperature sensors, and voltage versus temperature dependence measurements showed a dV/dT of 0.5 mV K-1 for each single junction, which is typical for this kind of tunnel junction. A temperature resolution of ± 5 µK has been achieved which is much better than the previously reported value of ± 30 µK for this type of thermometer.

  10. Aluminum oxide passivated radial junction sub-micrometre pillar array textured silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Elam, David; Ayon, Arturo A.

    2013-06-01

    We report radial, p-n junction, sub-micrometre, pillar array textured solar cells, fabricated on an n-type Czochralski silicon wafer. Relatively simple processing schemes such as metal-assisted chemical etching and spin on dopant techniques were employed for the fabrication of the proposed solar cells. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was employed as a surface passivation layer on the B-doped emitter surface. In spite of the fact that the sub-micrometre pillar array textured surface has a relatively high surface-to-volume ratio, we observed an open circuit voltage (VOC) and a short circuit current density (JSC) as high as 572 mV and 29.9 mA cm-2, respectively, which leads to a power conversion efficiency in excess of 11.30%, for the optimized structure of the solar cell described herein. Broadband omnidirectional antireflection effects along with the light trapping property of the sub-micrometre, pillar array textured surface and the excellent passivation quality of the ALD-grown Al2O3 on the B-doped emitter surface were responsible for the enhanced electrical performance of the proposed solar cells.

  11. Microwave characterization of Josephson junction arrays: implementing a low loss superinductance.

    PubMed

    Masluk, Nicholas A; Pop, Ioan M; Kamal, Archana; Minev, Zlatko K; Devoret, Michel H

    2012-09-28

    We have measured the plasma resonances of an array of Josephson junctions in the regime E(J)>E(C), up to the ninth harmonic by incorporating it as part of a resonator capacitively coupled to a coplanar waveguide. From the characteristics of the resonances, we infer the successful implementation of a superinductance, an electrical element with a nondissipative impedance greater than the resistance quantum [R(Q)=h/(2e)(2) is approximately equal to 6.5 kΩ] at microwave frequencies. Such an element is crucial for preserving the quantum coherence in circuits exploiting large fluctuations of the superconducting phase. Our results show internal losses less than 20 ppm, self-resonant frequencies greater than 10 GHz, and phase-slip rates less than 1 mHz, enabling direct application of such arrays for quantum information and metrology. Arrays with a loop geometry also demonstrate a new manifestation of flux quantization in a dispersive analog of the Little-Parks effect.

  12. Integrated multiple patch-clamp array chip via lateral cell trapping junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, J.; Ionescu-Zanetti, C.; Diamond, J.; Lal, R.; Lee, L. P.

    2004-03-01

    We present an integrated multiple patch-clamp array chip by utilizing lateral cell trapping junctions. The intersectional design of a microfluidic network provides multiple cell addressing and manipulation sites for efficient electrophysiological measurements at a number of patch sites. The patch pores consist of openings in the sidewall of a main fluidic channel, and a membrane patch is drawn into a smaller horizontal channel. This device geometry not only minimizes capacitive coupling between the cell reservoir and the patch channel, but also allows simultaneous optical and electrical measurements of ion channel proteins. Evidence of the hydrodynamic placement of mammalian cells at the patch sites as well as measurements of patch sealing resistance is presented. Device fabrication is based on micromolding of polydimethylsiloxane, thus allowing inexpensive mass production of disposable high-throughput biochips.

  13. InGaAs axial-junction nanowire-array solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Eiji; Chen, Muyi; Yoshimura, Masatoshi; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Fukui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Axial p-i-n junction nanowire (NW) solar cells (SCs) with a position-controlled GaAs-based NW array were fabricated by selective-area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (SA-MOVPE). The measured electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) signals showed the formation of an axial p-i-n junction, which confirms power generation under sunlight illumination. The series resistance of the NW SCs is much higher than that of conventional planar SCs based on Si or other III-V compound semiconductors. The main difficulty concerning the fabrication of these NW SCs is the degradation of series resistance between the GaAs-based NWs and the indium-tin oxide (ITO) deposited as a transparent electrode. The series resistance of the fabricated GaAs-based NW SCs was reduced by introducing a tin doping contact layer between the ITO and the NW array, which is formed by pulse doping. As a result of this improved structure, the fabricated SCs exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 0.544 V, a short-circuit current of 18.2 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 0.721 for an overall conversion efficiency of 7.14% under AM1.5G illumination. The series resistance of the SCs could be decreased to 0.132 Ω·cm2, which is one order of magnitude lower than that of the SC without a highly doped contact layer. This reduced series resistance indicates that nanostructure SCs with transparent electrodes and multijunction NW SCs with high efficiencies can be fabricated on a commercial basis in the near future.

  14. Microwave-induced constant-voltage steps at one volt from a series array of Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeyer, J.; Hinken, J.H.; Kautz, R.L.

    1984-08-15

    It is demonstrated that a series array of 1474 Josephson junctions can produce quantized voltages up to 1.2 V when driven by microwaves at 90 GHz in the absence of a dc bias. This result brings closer the possibility of a practical Josephson voltage standard at the 1-V level.

  15. Properties of linear arrays of Josephson junctions capacitively coupled to a diffusive metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobos, Alejandro; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Josephson junctions arrays (JJAs) are strongly-correlated quantum systems showing a rich and complex behavior at low-temperatures. Besides their potential uses in applications, JJAs allow to investigate (under controlled conditions) many aspects of low-dimensional superconductivity which remain to be understood. In this work we study the phase diagram and the low-energy properties of a one-dimensional (1D) JJA capacitively coupled to a diffusive two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) placed at a distance d , which provides dissipation. We derive an effective field-theoretical model for the 1D JJA coupled to the 2DEG, and predict a superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) at T = 0 , in agreement with former theoretical predictions. We discuss implications for transport experiments and for the observed SIT in 1DJJAs. Both in the superconducting and insulating phases, the coupling to the 2DEG produces deviations with respect to the resistivity as a function of T predicted for an isolated array. This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  16. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration of flight-type design that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four string currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-ESD functional testing showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. These test results point to a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  17. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micros to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  18. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems/Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  19. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Hoang, B.; Wong, F.

    2014-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 µs to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  20. Combined Space Environmental Exposure Tests of Multi-Junction GaAs/Ge Solar Array Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie; Corey, Ron; Gardiner, George; Funderburk, Victor V.; Gahart, Richard; Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2010-01-01

    A set of multi-junction GaAs/Ge solar array test coupons were subjected to a sequence of 5-year increments of combined environmental exposure tests. The purpose of this test program is to understand the changes and degradation of the solar array panel components, including its ESD mitigation design features in their integrated form, after multiple years (up to 15) of simulated geosynchronous space environment. These tests consist of: UV radiation, electrostatic discharge (ESD), electron/proton particle radiation, thermal cycling, and ion thruster plume exposures. The solar radiation was produced using a Mercury-Xenon lamp with wavelengths in the UV spectrum ranging from 230 to 400 nm. The ESD test was performed in the inverted-gradient mode using a low-energy electron (2.6 - 6 keV) beam exposure. The ESD test also included a simulated panel coverglass flashover for the primary arc event. The electron/proton radiation exposure included both 1.0 MeV and 100 keV electron beams simultaneous with a 40 keV proton beam. The thermal cycling included simulated transient earth eclipse for satellites in geosynchronous orbit. With the increasing use of ion thruster engines on many satellites, the combined environmental test also included ion thruster exposure to determine whether solar array surface erosion had any impact on its performance. Before and after each increment of environmental exposures, the coupons underwent visual inspection under high power magnification and electrical tests that included characterization by LAPSS, Dark I-V, and electroluminescence. This paper discusses the test objective, test methodologies, and preliminary results after 5 years of simulated exposure.

  1. Palladium nanoparticle array-mediated semiconductor bonding that enables high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Hidenori; Makita, Kikuo; Sugaya, Takeyoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Hozumi, Yasuo; Takato, Hidetaka; Matsubara, Koji

    2016-02-01

    A detailed study on the application of Pd nanoparticle arrays, produced by self-assembled block copolymer templates, in bonding of III-V-based solar cell materials was carried out. The Pd nanoparticle array-mediated bonding (mechanical stacking) of GaAs-based thin-films (cells) was readily performed on the surface of GaAs or InP-based substrates (cells) to form multi-junction device architectures. Using the optimized Pd NP array, a 30.4%-efficiency four-junction two-terminal cell, consisting of an InGaP/GaAs top cell and an InGaAsP/InGaAs bottom cell, was achieved owing to the excellent electrical and optical bonding properties (bonding resistance, 1.81 Ω cm2; optical loss, 2.9%). Together with the verification of the long-term reliability of the Pd nanoparticle array-mediated bonding, our approach would become practically attractive for producing high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells.

  2. Highly sensitive photodetection using a microwave-coupled BaPb0.7Bi0.3O3 Josephson junction array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Minoru; Enomoto, Youichi; Murakami, Toshiaki

    1983-08-01

    The BaPb0.7Bi0.3O3 sputtered film possesses tunnel Josephson junctions at boundary layers [boundary Josephson junction (BJJ)] normal to the film plane in a homogeneous junction array. The film has high efficiency for optical irradiation of the junctions because of the high optical transparency. The letter presents the optical effect on the current-voltage characteristics for this Josephson junction array locked to a microwave field. The microwave-induced hysteresis loop caused by voltage locking among junctions in a microwave field is highly sensitive to optical illumination with as low an incident power as a few nanowatts. This probably can be exploited in a future, highly sensitive photodetector.

  3. Expression of tight junction molecules in breast carcinomas analysed by array PCR and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tőkés, Anna-Mária; Szász, Attila Marcell; Juhász, Eva; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Harsányi, László; Molnár, István Arthur; Baranyai, Zsolt; Besznyák, István; Zaránd, Attila; Salamon, Ferenc; Kulka, Janina

    2012-07-01

    In the past few decades an enormous amount of data became known to clarify the molecular composition and architecture of tight junctions (TJs). Despite the efforts, the expression and function of several TJ genes and proteins in breast carcinoma are still not known and some of the data are contradictory. The expression of forty-four TJ associated genes was examined at mRNA level in eighteen invasive ductal breast carcinoma samples and corresponding normal breast tissues by using low density array PCR. Expressions of claudins (CLDNs) 5, 10, 16, 17, and 18, and ZO-1, ZO-2 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry as well. Using immunohistochemical phenotype as a surrogate for the genetic subtype, 11 luminal A, 3 luminal B, 3 triple negative and one HER2+ cases were included. Ten genes were significantly downregulated in tumors compared with normal breast tissues (CLDNs 5, 10, 16, 18, 19, CTNNAL1, JAM-B, ZO-1, ZO-2 and PARD3), whereas one gene (CLDN17) was significantly up-regulated in tumors when compared with normal breast. At protein level CLDNs 5, 10, 16, 18, ZO-1 and ZO-2 were downregulated in tumors as compared with normal breast tissue. CLDN17 showed variable expression in tumor tissues in comparison to normal breast. In the single HER2+ tumor when compared with the other subtypes CLDNs 5, 16, 17, 18, CTNNAL1, JAM-B, ZO-1, ZO-2 and PARD3 genes were found to be upregulated. We found altered TJ genes and proteins whose expression has not yet been associated with breast carcinoma. Our findings show a tendency of TJ genes and proteins to be downregulated in breast cancer. Further studies are necessary to examine whether the downregulation of the above mentioned TJ associated genes and proteins may contribute to the malignant progression of invasive ductal breast carcinomas.

  4. Regional changes of AQP0-dependent square array junction and gap junction associated with cortical cataract formation in the Emory mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sondip K; Brako, Lawrence; Gu, Sumin; Jiang, Jean X; Lo, Woo-Kuen

    2014-10-01

    The Emory mutant mouse has been widely used as an animal model for human senile cataract since it develops late-onset hereditary cataract. Here, we focus on the regional changes of aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins that are associated with the cortical cataract formation in the Emory mutant mice. Emory mutant and CFW wild-type mice at age 1-16 months were used in this study. By using an established photography system with dissecting microscopy, the opacities were first detected at the anterior or posterior lens center surface in Emory mice at age 7 months, and gradually extended toward the equator during the 16 months examined. Scanning EM verified that disorganized and fragmented fiber cells were associated with the areas of opacities within approximately 200 μm from the lens surface, indicating that Emory mouse cataracts belong to the cortical cataracts. Freeze-fracture TEM further confirmed that cortical cataracts exhibited extensive wavy square array junctions, small gap junctions and globules. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that in contrast to the high labeling intensity of AQP0-loop antibody, the labeling of AQP0 C-terminus antibody was decreased considerably in superficial fibers in Emory cataracts. Similarly, a significant decrease in the labeling of the antibody against Cx50 C-terminus, but not Cx46 C-terminus, occurred in superficial and outer cortical fibers in Emory cataracts. Western blotting further revealed that the C-termini of both AQP0 and Cx50 in Emory cataracts were decreased to over 50% to that of the wild-type. Thus, this systematic study concludes that the Emory mouse cataract belongs to the cortical cataract which is due to regional breakdown of superficial fibers associated with formation of AQP0-dependent wavy square array junctions, small gap junctions and globules. The marked decreases of the C-termini of both AQP0 and Cx50 in the superficial fibers may disturb the needed interaction between these two proteins during fiber cell

  5. A low power 10 V programmable array based on Nb x Si1-x Josephson junctions for metrology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipper, Richard; Anders, Solveig; Schubert, Marco; Peiselt, Katja; Scheller, Thomas; Franke, Dirk; Dellith, Jan; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2016-09-01

    Josephson junctions generate, when subjected to microwave irradiation, voltages with a very high precision and are used in metrology applications. So-called PJVS (programmable Josephson voltage-standards) are capable of generating both AC and DC voltages of up to 10 V. Our work addresses a full fabrication scenario for 10 V PJVS arrays driven at 70 GHz to be used in low microwave-power conditions as in, but not limited to GUNN diodes or cryocooler applications. Nb x Si1-x in its function as a barrier material was characterised with AFM, RBS and reflectometry in order to establish a reliable technological foundation. A 10 V PJVS array driven with microwave power below 50 mW is further presented, which was achieved by optimising the fabrication technology regarding the degree of homogeneity of the Josephson junctions composition and thickness. Control over these parameters is crucial in choosing a stable and well-suited characteristic voltage (I c R n product) and critical current density j c. With this, a low-power operation of a PJVS array is possible without the need for liquid helium cooling, which is currently limiting the availability of PJVS based metrology.

  6. An array of cold-electron bolometers with SIN tunnel junctions and JFET readout for cosmology instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, L.

    2008-02-01

    A novel concept of the parallel/series array of Cold-Electron Bolometers (CEB) with Superconductor-Insulator-Normal (SIN) Tunnel Junctions has been proposed. The concept was developed specially for matching the CEB with JFET amplifier at conditions of high optical power load. The CEB is a planar antenna-coupled superconducting detector with high sensitivity. For combination of effective HF operation and low noise properties the current-biased CEBs are connected in series for DC and in parallel for HF signal. A signal is concentrated from an antenna to the absorber through the capacitance of the tunnel junctions and through additional capacitance for coupling of superconducting islands. Using array of CEBs the applications can be considerably extended to higher power load by distributing the power between N CEBs and decreasing the electron temperature. Due to increased responsivity the noise matching is so effective that photon NEP could be easily achieved at 300 mK with a room temperature JFET for wide range of optical power loads. The concept of the CEB array has been developed for the BOOMERanG balloon telescope and other Cosmology instruments.

  7. Quantitative detection of DNA labeled with magnetic nanoparticles using arrays of MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weifeng; Schrag, Benaiah D.; Carter, Matthew J.; Xiao, Gang

    2008-07-01

    We have demonstrated the detection of 2.5μM target DNA labeled with 16nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) using arrays of magnetic tunnel junction sensors with (001)-oriented MgO barrier layers. A MTJ sensor bridge was designed to detect the presence of magnetic NPs bonded with target DNA. A raw signal of 72μV was obtained using complementary target DNA, as compared with a nonspecific bonding signal of 25μV from noncomplementary control DNA. Our results indicate that the current system's detection limit for analyte DNA is better than 100nM.

  8. Forward voltage short-pulse technique for measuring high power laser array junction temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron L. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Frazin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Baker, Nathaniel R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of measuring the temperature of the P-N junction within the light-emitting region of a quasi-continuous-wave or pulsed semiconductor laser diode device. A series of relatively short and low current monitor pulses are applied to the laser diode in the period between the main drive current pulses necessary to cause the semiconductor to lase. At the sufficiently low current level of the monitor pulses, the laser diode device does not lase and behaves similar to an electronic diode. The voltage across the laser diode resulting from each of these low current monitor pulses is measured with a high degree of precision. The junction temperature is then determined from the measured junction voltage using their known linear relationship.

  9. Temperature-sensitive junction transformations for mid-wavelength HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays by laser beam induced current microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Weicheng; Hu, Weida Lin, Tie; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei; Cheng, Xiang'ai Wang, Rui

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we report on the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect and the unusual temperature dependence of junction transformation for mid-wavelength, n-on-p HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays. The n-type region is formed by B{sup +} ion implantation on Hg-vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe. Junction transformations under different temperatures are visually captured by a laser beam induced current microscope. A physical model of temperature dependence on junction transformation is proposed and demonstrated by using numerical simulations. It is shown that Hg-interstitial diffusion and temperature activated defects jointly lead to the p-n junction transformation dependence on temperature, and the weaker mixed conduction compared with long-wavelength HgCdTe photodiode contributes to the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect in mid-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detector arrays.

  10. Utilization of a cryo-prober system for operation of a pulse-driven josephson junction array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, M.; Urano, C.; Kaneko, N.; Yamamori, H.; Shoji, A.; Maezawa, M.; Hashimoto, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Nagasawa, S.; Satoh, T.; Hidaka, M.; Kiryu, S.

    2010-06-01

    We demonstrated the operation of pulse-driven Josephson junction arrays (JJAs) for AC voltage standard using a wideband cryo-prober system with a 4-K Gifford-MacMahon (GM) cooler. This unique system was originally developed for high-speed network switch applications of rapid-single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) circuits and enables wideband data transmission at bit rates of higher than 10 Gbps between room-temperature and cryogenic environments. JJA chips were fabricated using NbN-based superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) junctions. A 5-mm chip was mounted on a 16-mm chip carrier using flip-chip bonding technology for probe contact. To obtain bipolar output voltages, we tried two types of testing based on the AC coupling technique proposed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A pulse pattern generator (PPG) with a large memory of 134 Mbit was used for covering a wide frequency range of output signals. As a result, we succeeded in bipolar operation of the JJA, generating waveforms at frequencies from 60 Hz to several tens of kilo hertz. The maximum rms voltage obtained for a single array was 12.7 mV. The observed spurious level was lower than -93 dBc at 16 kHz.

  11. Cross reactive arrays of three-way junction sensors for steroid determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stojanovic, Milan N. (Inventor); Landry, Donald (Inventor); Nikic, Dragan B. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention provides analyte sensitive oligonucleotide compositions for detecting and analyzing analytes in solution, including complex solutions using cross reactive arrays of analyte sensitive oligonucleotide compositions.

  12. Design of Logic Module Based on Magnetic-Tunnel-Junction Elements for Nonvolatile Field-Programmable Gate Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjoo; Kim, Sojeong; Lee, Seungyeon; Lee, Seungjun; Shin, Hyungsoon

    2009-04-01

    Magnetologic using a magnetic-tunnel-junction (MTJ) element is a very hopeful candidate for universal logic technology because it can be used to build both logic circuits and nonvolatile memories. A structure of single-layer (SL) MTJ with a novel current driver previously presented by the authors improved both functional flexibility and uniformity of magnetologic. In this paper, the design of a nonvolatile logic module using SL MTJ is presented, which can be used as a basic logic cell for nonvolatile field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The S-module is a basic logic cell for Act3 family of FPGAs by Actel, which can implement arbitrary five-input logic functions. We designed an S-module using SL MTJ elements such that it can work as a programmable logic module with nonvolatility. The functional verification has been carried out by HSPICE simulator on the basis of a macro-model of SL MTJ.

  13. Synthesis and enhanced photoelectrocatalytic activity of p-n junction Co3O4/TiO2 nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaopeng; Liu, Suqin; Liang, Ying; Luo, Tianxiong

    2013-01-01

    Co3O4/TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTs) were prepared by depositing Co3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) on the tube wall of the self-organized TiO2 NTs using an impregnating-deposition-decompostion method. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) activity is evaluated by degradation of methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution. The prepared Co3O4/TiO2 NTs exhibit much higher PEC activity than TiO2 NTs due to the p-n junction formed between Co3O4 and TiO2.

  14. A fully automated in vitro diagnostic system based on magnetic tunnel junction arrays and superparamagnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jie; Chen, Si; Qiu, Yuqin; Zhang, Suohui; Shi, Stone; Gao, Yunhua

    2012-04-01

    A fully automated in vitro diagnostic (IVD) system for diagnosing acute myocardial infarction was developed using high sensitivity MTJ array as sensors and nano-magnetic particles as tags. On the chip is an array of 12 × 106 MTJ devices integrated onto a 3 metal layer CMOS circuit. The array is divided into 48 detection areas, therefore 48 different types of bio targets can be analyzed simultaneously if needed. The chip is assembled with a micro-fluidic cartridge which contains all the reagents necessary for completing the assaying process. Integrated with electrical, mechanical and micro-fluidic pumping devices and with the reaction protocol programed in a microprocessor, the system only requires a simple one-step analyte application procedure to operate and yields results of the three major AMI bio-markers (cTnI, MYO, CK-MB) in 15 mins.

  15. Comparison of measurements and simulations of series-parallel incommensurate area superconducting quantum interference device arrays fabricated from YBa2Cu3O7-δ ion damage Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cybart, Shane A.; Dalichaouch, T. N.; Wu, S. M.; Anton, S. M.; Drisko, J. A.; Parker, J. M.; Harteneck, B. D.; Dynes, R. C.

    2012-09-01

    We have fabricated series-parallel (two-dimensional) arrays of incommensurate superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) using YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin film ion damage Josephson junctions. The arrays initially consisted of a grid of Josephson junctions with 28 junctions in parallel and 565 junctions in series, for a total of 15 255 SQUIDs. The 28 junctions in the parallel direction were sequentially decreased by removing them with photolithography and ion milling to allow comparisons of voltage-magnetic field (V-B) characteristics for different parallel dimensions and area distributions. Comparisons of measurements for these different configurations reveal that the maximum voltage modulation with magnetic field is significantly reduced by both the self inductances of the SQUIDs and the mutual inductances between them. Based on these results, we develop a computer simulation model from first principles which simultaneously solves the differential equations of the junctions in the array while considering the effects of self inductance, mutual inductance, and non-uniformity of junction critical currents. We find that our model can accurately predict V-B for all of the array geometries studied. A second experiment is performed where we use photolithography and ion milling to split another 28 × 565 junction array into 6 decoupled arrays to further investigate mutual interactions between adjacent SQUIDs. This work conclusively shows that the magnetic fields generated by self currents in an incommensurate array severely reduce its performance by reducing the maximum obtainable modulation voltage.

  16. Silicon nanowire arrays with passivated axial p-i-n junctions for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Pei; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Pacifici, Domenico; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Krylyuk, Sergiy; Davydov, Albert

    2014-03-01

    Metal catalyst-assisted vapor-liquid-solid mechanism can be used to grow large areas of nanowires (NWs) with compositional and doping control in either axial or core-shell geometries. Here, we report on vertical arrays of Si axial p- i- n oxide-passivated NWs that were 12 microns long with a 4 micron intrinsic section. The NW arrays were planarized using SU-8 photoresist, followed by reactive ion etching to expose the NW tips. Top n-contact was realized by sputter deposition of a 200 nm IZO layer. The p-contact was made by backside metallization of the p-Si substrate. Under AM 1.5 illumination, unpassivated NW arrays exhibited an open-circuit voltage, VOC of 170 mV, a short-circuit current density JSC >3.7 mA/cm2 (with uncertainty due to the unknown fraction of properly contacted NWs), and a fill factor of 28.9%. After the passivation, VOC, JSC and FF increased to 250 mV, >9.2 mA/cm2 and 35.7%, respectively. The measured normal reflectance was around 6% over the 400-1000 nm spectral range, whereas the diffuse reflectance was around 20% over the same range, indicating strong light scattering and absorption by the NWs. The photovoltaic performance of passivated single NWs and NW arrays were compared using a 532 nm laser with a power density of about 10 W/cm2. Higher values of VOC and FF obtained for the latter are explained by light trapping in the NW arrays.

  17. ITO@Cu2S tunnel junction nanowire arrays as efficient counter electrode for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Ge, Qian-Qing; Yu, Bin-Bin; Zou, Yu-Gang; Jiang, Wen-Jie; Song, Wei-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun; Hu, Jin-Song

    2014-01-01

    Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) has been considered as an alternative to new generation photovoltaics, but it still presents very low power conversion efficiency. Besides the continuous effort on improving photoanodes and electrolytes, the focused investigation on charge transfer at interfaces and the rational design for counter electrodes (CEs) are recently receiving much attention. Herein, core-shell nanowire arrays with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowire core and Cu2S nanocrystal shell (ITO@Cu2S) were dedicatedly designed and fabricated as new efficient CEs for QDSSCs in order to improve charge collection and transport and to avoid the intrinsic issue of copper dissolution in popular and most efficient Cu/Cu2S CEs. The high-quality tunnel junctions formed between n-type ITO nanowires and p-type Cu2S nanocrystals led to the considerable decrease in sheet resistance and charge transfer resistance and thus facilitated the electron transport during the operation of QDSSCs. The three-dimensional structure of nanowire arrays provided high surface area for more active catalytic sites and easy accessibility for an electrolyte. As a result, the power conversion efficiency of QDSSCs with the designed ITO@Cu2S CEs increased by 84.5 and 33.5% compared to that with planar Au and Cu2S CEs, respectively.

  18. Large voltage modulation in magnetic field sensors from two-dimensional arrays of Y-Ba-Cu-O nano Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane A. Dynes, R. C.; Cho, E. Y.; Wong, T. J.; Glyantsev, V. N.; Huh, J. U.; Yung, C. S.; Moeckly, B. H.; Beeman, J. W.; Ulin-Avila, E.; Wu, S. M.

    2014-02-10

    We have fabricated and tested two-dimensional arrays of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} superconducting quantum interference devices. The arrays contain over 36 000 nano Josephson junctions fabricated from ion irradiation of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} through narrow slits in a resist-mask that was patterned with electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Measurements of current-biased arrays in magnetic field exhibit large voltage modulations as high as 30 mV.

  19. Gate tunability and collapse of superconductivity in hybrid tin-graphene Josephson junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchiat, Vincent

    The accessible and surface-exposed 2D electron gas offered by graphene provides indeed an ideal platform on which to tune, via application of an electrostatic gate, the coupling between adsorbates deposited on its surface. We have experimentally studied the case of graphene transistors which channel is decorated with an array of superconducting tin nanoparticles. They induce via percolation of proximity effect a global 2D superconducting state which critical temperature Tc can be tuned by gate voltage. When the Graphene show strong disorder, it is possible to tune via the applied gate voltage the system towards an insulating state, demonstrating the possibility to trigger a superconducting to insulator transition, which features ressembles those found in granular superconductors. In this work, graphene monolayers are surface-conjugated to regular arrays of superconducting disk-shaped metal islands, whose inter-island distances were patterned to be in the quasi-ballistic limit of the underlying 2D electron gas. Arrays can be made on a large range of geometry and density, up to the highly diluted limit with less than 5% surface coverage and few micrometers in between islands. In the lower temperature limit (<100 mK) , despite of the long distance (2 microns) in between islands, a supercurrent was observed among the whole graphene sheet. Interestingly, the superconducting state vanishes exponentially in gate voltage and rests in a metallic state, caused by quantum fluctuations of phase is found for diluted and regular arrays. This peculiar behaviour provides evidence for recently developed theory, and may provide a hint to the understanding of long-standing issue of ``zero-temperature'' bosonic metallic state

  20. Bistable States of Quantum Dot Array Junctions for High-Density Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, David M.-T.; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2009-10-01

    We demonstrate that two-dimensional (2D) arrays of coupled quantum dots (QDs) with six-fold degenerate p orbitals (including spin degeneracy) can display bistable states, suitable for application in high-density memory device with low power consumption. Due to the inter-dot overlap of px,y orbitals in these QD arrays, two dimensional conduction bands can be formed in the x-y plane, while the pz orbitals remain localized in the x-y plane such that the coupling between pz orbitals located at different dots can be neglected. We model such systems by taking into account the on-site repulsive Coulomb interactions (U) between electrons in any of the three p orbitals, which also lead to a coupling between the localized pz orbitals with the 2D conduction bands formed by px/py orbitals. The Green's function method within an extended Anderson model is used to calculate the tunneling current through the QDs. We find that bistable tunneling current can exist for such systems due to the interplay of the on-site Coulomb interactions between the pz orbitals and the delocalized nature of conduction band states derived from the hybridization of px/py orbitals. This bistable current depends critically on the strength of U, the band width, and the ratio of the left and right tunneling rates. The behavior of the electrical bistability can be sustained when the 2D QD array reduces to a one-dimensional (1D) QD array, indicating the feasibility for high-density packing of these bistable nanoscale structures.

  1. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of chromosome 8q: evaluation of putative progression markers for gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    van Duin, M; van Marion, R; Vissers, K J; Hop, W C J; Dinjens, W N M; Tilanus, H W; Siersema, P D; van Dekken, H

    2007-01-01

    Amplification of 8q is frequently found in gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. It is usually detected in high-grade, high-stage GEJ adenocarcinomas. Moreover, it has been implicated in tumor progression in other cancer types. In this study, a detailed genomic analysis of 8q was performed on a series of GEJ adenocarcinomas, including 22 primary adenocarcinomas, 13 cell lines and two xenografts, by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with a whole chromosome 8q contig array. Of the 37 specimens, 21 originated from the esophagus and 16 were derived from the gastric cardia. Commonly overrepresented regions were identified at distal 8q, i.e. 124-125 Mb (8q24.13), at 127-128 Mb (8q24.21), and at 141-142 Mb (8q24.3). From these regions six genes were selected with putative relevance to cancer: ANXA13, MTSS1, FAM84B (alias NSE2), MYC, C8orf17 (alias MOST-1) and PTK2 (alias FAK). In addition, the gene EXT1 was selected since it was found in a specific amplification in cell line SK-GT-5. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of these seven genes was subsequently performed on a panel of 24 gastroesophageal samples, including 13 cell lines, two xenografts and nine normal stomach controls. Significant overexpression was found for MYC and EXT1 in GEJ adenocarcinoma cell lines and xenografts compared to normal controls. Expression of the genes MTSS1, FAM84B and C8orf17 was found to be significantly decreased in this set of cell lines and xenografts. We conclude that, firstly, there are other genes than MYC involved in the 8q amplification in GEJ cancer. Secondly, the differential expression of these genes contributes to unravel the biology of GEJ adenocarcinomas.

  2. Very Large Scale Integration of Nano-Patterned YBa2Cu3O7-delta Josephson Junctions in a Two-Dimensional Array

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane A; Anton, Steven; Wu, Stephen; Clarke, John; Dynes, Robert

    2009-09-01

    Very large scale integration of Josephson junctions in a two-dimensional series-parallel array has been achieved by ion irradiating a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} film through slits in a nano-fabricated mask created with electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The mask consisted of 15,820 high-aspect ratio (20:1), 35-nm wide slits that restricted the irradiation in the film below to form Josephson junctions. Characterizing each parallel segment k, containing 28 junctions, with a single critical current I{sub ck} we found a standard deviation in I{sub ck} of about 16%.

  3. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Electronics for Large Superconducting Tunnel Junction Detector Arrays for Synchrotron Soft X-ray Research

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, William K

    2009-03-06

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors offer a an approach to detecting soft x-rays with energy resolutions 4-5 times better and at rates 10 faster than traditions semiconductor detectors. To make such detectors feasible, however, then need to be deployed in large arrays of order 1000 detectors, which in turn implies that their processing electronics must be compact, fully computer controlled, and low cost per channel while still delivering ultra-low noise performance so as to not degrade the STJ's performance. We report on our progress in designing a compact, low cost preamplifier intended for this application. In particular, we were able to produce a prototype preamplifier of 2 sq-cm area and a parts cost of less than $30 that matched the energy resolution of the best conventional system to date and demonstrated its ability to acquire an STJ I-V curve under computer control, the critical step for determining and setting the detectors' operating points under software control.

  4. Progress Towards High-Sensitivity Arrays of Detectors of Sub-mm Radiation Using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with Integrated Radio Frequency Single-Electron Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Prober, D. E.; Rhee, K. W.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Teufel, J.; Wollack, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    For high resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the FIR and submillimeter, space observatories will demand sensitive, fast, compact, low-power detector arrays with 104 pixels and sensitivity less than 10(exp -20) W/Hz(sup 0.5). Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junctions with integrated rf single-electron transistor readout amplifiers have the potential for achieving this high level of sensitivity, and can take advantage of an rf multiplexing technique. The device consists of an antenna to couple radiation into a small superconducting volume and cause quasiparticle excitations, and a single-electron transistor to measure current through junctions contacting the absorber. We describe optimization of device parameters, and results on fabrication techniques for producing devices with high yield for detector arrays. We also present modeling of expected saturation power levels, antenna coupling, and rf multiplexing schemes.

  5. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models.

    PubMed

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer. PMID:27445657

  6. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models

    PubMed Central

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer. PMID:27445657

  7. Positive field-cooled dc susceptibility in granular superconductors interpreted through numerical simulations on a simple Josephson-junction-array model

    SciTech Connect

    Auletta, C.; Raiconi, G.; De Luca, R.; Pace, S.

    1995-05-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of a field-cooled dc susceptibility experiment carried out for granular superconductors by modeling these systems with a simple Josephson-junction array proposed by the authors. By this analysis the temperature dependence of the positive field-cooled susceptibility at very low values of the applied magnetic field, observed by Braunisch {ital et} {ital al}. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 1908 (1992)] for some ceramic superonductors, has been reproduced and interpreted.

  8. Progress Towards High-Sensitivity Arrays of Detectors of Sub-mm Radiation using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with Radio-Frequency Single-Electron Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Wollack, E. J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The science drivers for the SPIRIT/SPECS missions demand sensitive, fast, compact, low-power, large-format detector arrays for high resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the far infrared and submillimeter. Detector arrays with 10,000 pixels and sensitivity less than 10(exp 20)-20 W/Hz(exp 20)0.5 are needed. Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junction detectors with integrated rf single-electron transistor readout amplifiers have the potential for achieving this high level of sensitivity, and can take advantage of an rf multiplexing technique when forming arrays. The device consists of an antenna structure to couple radiation into a small superconducting volume and cause quasiparticle excitations, and a single-electron transistor to measure currents through tunnel junction contacts to the absorber volume. We will describe optimization of device parameters, and recent results on fabrication techniques for producing devices with high yield for detector arrays. We will also present modeling of expected saturation power levels, antenna coupling, and rf multiplexing schemes.

  9. A low power 10 V programmable array based on Nb x Si1‑x Josephson junctions for metrology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipper, Richard; Anders, Solveig; Schubert, Marco; Peiselt, Katja; Scheller, Thomas; Franke, Dirk; Dellith, Jan; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2016-09-01

    Josephson junctions generate, when subjected to microwave irradiation, voltages with a very high precision and are used in metrology applications. So-called PJVS (programmable Josephson voltage-standards) are capable of generating both AC and DC voltages of up to 10 V. Our work addresses a full fabrication scenario for 10 V PJVS arrays driven at 70 GHz to be used in low microwave-power conditions as in, but not limited to GUNN diodes or cryocooler applications. Nb x Si1‑x in its function as a barrier material was characterised with AFM, RBS and reflectometry in order to establish a reliable technological foundation. A 10 V PJVS array driven with microwave power below 50 mW is further presented, which was achieved by optimising the fabrication technology regarding the degree of homogeneity of the Josephson junctions composition and thickness. Control over these parameters is crucial in choosing a stable and well-suited characteristic voltage (I c R n product) and critical current density j c. With this, a low-power operation of a PJVS array is possible without the need for liquid helium cooling, which is currently limiting the availability of PJVS based metrology.

  10. Measuring earthquake source parameters in the Mendocino triple junction region using a dense OBS array: Implications for fault strength variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; McGuire, Jeffrey J.

    2016-11-01

    Subduction zones produce earthquakes on a set of faults that operate under a wide variety of conditions resulting from considerable variations in depth, temperature, rock type, and fluid pressure. These variations likely lead to variation in the stress levels that drives particular earthquakes and that in turn effects the magnitude of seismic shaking they produce. In the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) region, intraplate faults within the mantle of the subducting plate fail regularly in energetic earthquakes while the adjacent thrust interface of the Cascadia subduction zone remains seismically quiet despite the likelihood that it operates at much lower levels of stress and strength. In 2012, as part of the Cascadia Initiative community experiment, an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) array was deployed in the MTJ area, providing unusually dense data covering both the inter- and intra-plate earthquakes. Combining these data with onshore networks, we detect and relocate 1137 earthquakes with a three dimensional velocity model. We perform detailed spectral and time domain analysis to study variations in earthquake source properties between the different types of faults. We observe a wide variability of stress drops and systematic lateral and depth variations in the earthquake source spectra resulting from the different types of tectonic fault systems in this region: intraplate faults within the subducted oceanic mantle, the Mendocino transform plate boundary fault, and the thrust interface of the Cascadia subduction zone. Some of the depth variability of source spectra can be explained by the expected increase in rupture velocity with depth. However, the overall variation in stress drop estimates is consistent with the highest stress drop earthquakes occurring in the depth range predicted by strength envelopes. Moreover, the earthquakes in the vicinity of the thrust interface, likely including some within the subducted oceanic crust, show clearly lower stress drops and

  11. Universal power-law decay of electron-electron interactions due to nonlinear screening in a Josephson junction array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Daniel; Rubbert, Sebastian; Ulrich, Jascha; Hassler, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Josephson junctions are the most prominent nondissipative and at the same time nonlinear elements in superconducting circuits allowing Cooper pairs to tunnel coherently between two superconductors separated by a tunneling barrier. Due to this, physical systems involving Josephson junctions show highly complex behavior and interesting novel phenomena. Here, we consider an infinite one-dimensional chain of superconducting islands where neighboring islands are coupled by capacitances. We study the effect of Josephson junctions shunting each island to a common ground superconductor. We treat the system in the regime where the Josephson energy exceeds the capacitive coupling between the islands. For the case of two offset charges on two distinct islands, we calculate the interaction energy of these charges mediated by quantum phase slips due to the Josephson nonlinearities. We treat the phase slips in an instanton approximation and map the problem onto a classical partition function of interacting particles. Using the Mayer cluster expansion, we find that the interaction potential of the offset charges decays with a universal inverse-square power-law behavior.

  12. Electro-Optical Characteristics of P+n In0.53Ga0.47As Hetero-Junction Photodiodes in Large Format Dense Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWames, R.; Littleton, R.; Witte, K.; Wichman, A.; Bellotti, E.; Pellegrino, J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper is concerned with focal plane array (FPA) data and use of analytical and three-dimensional numerical simulation methods to determine the physical effects and processes limiting performance. For shallow homojunction P+n designs the temperature dependence of dark current for T < 300 K depends on the intrinsic carrier concentration of the In0.53Ga0.47As material, implying that the dominant dark currents are generation and recombination (G-R) currents originating in the depletion regions of the double layer planar heterostructure (DLPH) photodiode. In the analytical model differences from bulk G-R behavior are modeled with a G-R like perimeter-dependent shunt current conjectured to originate at the InP/InGaAs interface. In this description the fitting property is the effective conductivity, σ eff( T), in mho cm-1. Variation in the data suggests σ eff (300 K) values of 1.2 × 10-11-4.6 × 10-11 mho cm-1). Substrate removal extends the quantum efficiency (QE) spectral band into the visible region. However, dead-layer effects limit the QE to 10% at a wavelength of 0.5 μm. For starlight-no moon illumination conditions, the signal-to-noise ratio is estimated to be 50 at an operating temperature of 300 K. A major result of the 3D numerical simulation of the device is the prediction of a perimeter G-R current not associated with the properties of the metallurgical interface. Another is the prediction that for a junction positioned in the larger band gap InP cap layer the QE is bias-dependent and that a relatively large reverse bias ≥0.9 V is needed for the QE to saturate to the shallow homojunction value. At this higher bias the dark current is larger than the shallow homojunction value. The 3D numerical model and the analytical model agree in predicting and explaining the measured radiatively limited diffusion current originating at the n-side of the junction. The calculations of the area-dependent G-R current for the condition studied are also in agreement

  13. The synthesis and electrical characterization of Cu2O/Al:ZnO radial p-n junction nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chien-Lin; Wang, Ruey-Chi; Huang, Jow-Lay; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Wang, Chun-Kai; Chang, Sheng-Po; Chu, Wen-Huei; Wang, Chao-Hung; Tu, Chia-Hao

    2009-09-01

    Vertically aligned large-area p-Cu(2)O/n-AZO (Al-doped ZnO) radial heterojunction nanowire arrays were synthesized on silicon without using catalysts in thermal chemical vapor deposition followed by e-beam evaporation. Scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy results show that poly-crystalline Cu(2)O nano-shells with thicknesses around 10 nm conformably formed on the entire periphery of pre-grown Al:ZnO single-crystalline nanowires. The Al doping concentration in the Al:ZnO nanowires with diameters around 50 nm were determined to be around 1.19 at.% by electron energy loss spectroscopy. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra show that the broad green bands of pristine ZnO nanowires were eliminated by capping with Cu(2)O nano-shells. The current-voltage (I-V) measurements show that the p-Cu(2)O/n-AZO nanodiodes have well-defined current rectifying behavior. This paper provides a simple method to fabricate superior p-n radial nanowire arrays for developing nano-pixel optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  14. Vertically p-n-junctioned GaN nano-wire array diode fabricated on Si(111) using MOCVD.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Hee; Kissinger, Suthan; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of n-GaN:Si/p-GaN:Mg nanowire arrays on (111) silicon substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method .The nanowires were grown by a newly developed two-step growth process. The diameter of as-grown nanowires ranges from 300-400 nm with a density of 6-7 × 10(7) cm(-2). The p- and n-type doping of the nanowires is achieved with Mg and Si dopant species. Structural characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) indicates that the nanowires are relatively defect-free. The room-temperature photoluminescence emission with a strong peak at 370 nm indicates that the n-GaN:Si/p-GaN:Mg nanowire arrays have potential application in light-emitting nanodevices. The cathodoluminscence (CL) spectrum clearly shows a distinct optical transition of GaN nanodiodes. The nano-n-GaN:Si/p-GaN:Mg diodes were further completed using a sputter coating approach to deposit Au/Ni metal contacts. The polysilazane filler has been etched by a wet chemical etching process. The n-GaN:Si/p-GaN:Mg nanowire diode was fabricated for different Mg source flow rates. The current-voltage (I-V) measurements reveal excellent rectifying properties with an obvious turn-on voltage at 1.6 V for a Mg flow rate of 5 sccm (standard cubic centimeters per minute).

  15. The synthesis and electrical characterization of Cu2O/Al:ZnO radial p-n junction nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chien-Lin; Wang, Ruey-Chi; Huang, Jow-Lay; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Wang, Chun-Kai; Chang, Sheng-Po; Chu, Wen-Huei; Wang, Chao-Hung; Tu, Chia-Hao

    2009-09-01

    Vertically aligned large-area p-Cu(2)O/n-AZO (Al-doped ZnO) radial heterojunction nanowire arrays were synthesized on silicon without using catalysts in thermal chemical vapor deposition followed by e-beam evaporation. Scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy results show that poly-crystalline Cu(2)O nano-shells with thicknesses around 10 nm conformably formed on the entire periphery of pre-grown Al:ZnO single-crystalline nanowires. The Al doping concentration in the Al:ZnO nanowires with diameters around 50 nm were determined to be around 1.19 at.% by electron energy loss spectroscopy. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra show that the broad green bands of pristine ZnO nanowires were eliminated by capping with Cu(2)O nano-shells. The current-voltage (I-V) measurements show that the p-Cu(2)O/n-AZO nanodiodes have well-defined current rectifying behavior. This paper provides a simple method to fabricate superior p-n radial nanowire arrays for developing nano-pixel optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:19687549

  16. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  17. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  18. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  19. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  20. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  1. Estimation of the average junction temperature of two phosphors-converted white LED array based on (B + Y + R)/B ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hong-Liang; Jing, Lei; Hao, Jian; Gao, Qun; Wang, Yao; Wang, Xiao-xun; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The method of non-contact measurement of the junction temperature (Tj) for phosphor-converted white LEDs based on W/B ratio, the ratio of the total radiant energy (W) to the radiant energy of blue emission (B), is verified firstly. It is shown that for two phosphors (Y3Al5O12:Ce and CaAlSiN3:Eu)-converted white LEDs, an significant uncertainty is introduced into the linearity between Tj and W/B ratio. Then a new approach is proposed which uses (B + Y + R)/B ratio, the ratio of the sum of radiant energies of blue emission (B), yellow emission (Y) and red emission (R) to the radiant energy of blue emission, to establish the correlation with Tj. Result shows that the proposed approach is of a satisfactory linearity between Tj and (B + Y + R)/B ratio, with R-square equal to 0.9906 and RMSE equal to 2.27 °C. It is also demonstrated that the proposed method is applicable to actual LED lighting system composed of large number of LEDs.

  2. The role of localized junction leakage in the temperature-dependent laser-beam-induced current spectra for HgCdTe infrared focal plane array photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, A. L.; Li, G. E-mail: xschen@mail.sitp.ac.cn; He, G.; Sun, Z. Q.; Hu, W. D.; Chen, X. S. E-mail: xschen@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Yin, F.; Zhang, B.; Lu, W.

    2013-11-07

    We have performed the study on the dependence of laser beam induced current (LBIC) spectra on the temperature for the vacancy-doped molecular beam epitaxy grown Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te (x = 0.31) photodiodes by both experiment and numerical simulations. It is found that the measured LBIC signal has different distributions for different temperature extents. The LBIC profile tends to be more asymmetric with increasing temperature below 170 K. But the LBIC profile becomes more symmetric with increasing temperature above 170 K. Based on a localized leakage model, it is indicated that the localized junction leakage can lead to asymmetric LBIC signal, in good agreement with the experimental data. The reason is that the trap-assisted tunneling current is the dominant leakage current at the cryogenic temperature below 170 K while the diffusion current component becomes dominant above the temperature of 170 K. The results are helpful for us to better clarify the mechanism of the dependence of LBIC spectra on temperature for the applications of HgCdTe infrared photodiodes.

  3. Self-Powered Solar-Blind Photodetector with Fast Response Based on Au/β-Ga2O3 Nanowires Array Film Schottky Junction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Liu, Kewei; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Wang, Chunrui; Li, Binghui; Zhao, Haifeng; Zhao, Dongxu; Shen, Dezhen

    2016-02-17

    Because of the direct band gap of 4.9 eV, β-Ga2O3 has been considered as an ideal material for solar-blind photodetection without any bandgap tuning. Practical applications of the photodetectors require fast response speed, high signal-to-noise ratio, low energy consumption and low fabrication cost. Unfortunately, most reported β-Ga2O3-based photodetectors usually possess a relatively long response time. In addition, the β-Ga2O3 photodetectors based on bulk, the individual 1D nanostructure, and the film often suffer from the high cost, the low repeatability, and the relatively large dark current, respectively. In this paper, a Au/β-Ga2O3 nanowires array film vertical Schottky photodiode is successfully fabricated by a simple thermal partial oxidation process. The device exhibits a very low dark current of 10 pA at -30 V with a sharp cutoff at 270 nm. More interestingly, the 90-10% decay time of our device is only around 64 μs, which is much quicker than any other previously reported β-Ga2O3-based photodetectors. Besides, the self-powering, the excellent stability and the good reproducibility of Au/β-Ga2O3 nanowires array film photodetector are helpful to its commercialization and practical applications.

  4. Terahertz Responses of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High T{sub C} Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. B.; Wu, P. H.; Yamashita, T.

    2001-09-03

    High frequency responses of intrinsic Josephson junctions up to 2.5THz, including the observation of Shapiro steps under various conditions, are reported and discussed in this Letter. The sample was an array of intrinsic Josephson junctions singled out from inside a high T{sub C} superconducting Bi{sub 2}Sr {sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} single crystal, with a bow-tie antenna integrated to it. The number of junctions in the array was controllable, the junctions were homogeneous, the distribution of applied irradiation among the junctions was even, and the junctions could synchronously respond to high frequency irradiation.

  5. Junction box wiring and connector durability issues in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalejs, Juris

    2014-10-01

    We report here on Photovoltaic (PV) module durability issues associated with junction boxes which are under study in Task 10 of the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT). A number of failure modes are being identified in junction boxes in PV arrays in the field which have less than 5 years outdoor operation. Observed failure modes include melted contacts and plastic walls in the junction boxes, separated external connectors and broken latches. Standard IEC and UL tests for modules are designed to expose early mortality failures due to materials selection and design in the assembled module and their impact on performance and safety. Test standards for individual junction box components, when not part of a PV module, are still in development. We will give an overview of the reported field failures associated with junction boxes, and examine standard development as it may impact on testing for durability of junction box connectors over a 25 year life.

  6. Photovoltaic cell array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  7. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  8. Primary thermometry with nanoscale tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvi, K.P.; Kauppinen, J.P.; Paalanen, M.A.; Pekola, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    We have found current-voltage (I-V) and conductance (dI/dV) characteristics of arrays of nanoscale tunnel junctions between normal metal electrodes to exhibit suitable features for primary thermometry. The current through a uniform array depends on the ratio of the thermal energy k{sub B}T and the electrostatic charging energy E{sub c} of the islands between the junctions and is completely blocked by Coulomb repulsion at T=0 and at small voltages eV/2 {<=} Ec. In the opposite limit, k{sub B}T {much_gt} E{sub c}, the width of the conductance minimum scales linearly and universally with T and N, the number of tunnel junctions, and qualifies as a primary thermometer. The zero bias drop in the conductance is proportional to T{sup -1} and can be used as a secondary thermometer. We will show with Monte Carlo simulations how background charge and nonuniformities of the array will affect the thermometer.

  9. A multilayered approach to superconducting tunnel junction x ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippert, E. D.; Song, S. N.; Ketterson, J. B.; Maglic, S. R.; Lomatch, S.; Thomas, C.; Cheida, M. A.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    'First generation' superconducting tunnel junction X-ray detectors (characterized by a single tunnel junction in direct contact with its substrate, with totally external amplification) remain more than an order of magnitude away from their theoretical energy resolutions which are in the order of eV's. The difficulties that first generation devices are encountering are being attacked by a 'second generation' of superconducting X-ray detector designs including quasiparticle trapping configurations and Josephson junction arrays. A second generation design concept, the multilayered superconducting tunnel junction X-ray detector, consisting of tens to hundreds of tunnel junctions stacked on top of one another (a superlattice), is presented. Some of the possibilities of this engineered materials approach include the tuning of phonon transmission characteristics of the material, suppression of parasitic quasiparticle trapping and intrinsic amplification.

  10. Bloch inductance in small-capacitance Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Zorin, A B

    2006-04-28

    We show that the electrical impedance of a small-capacitance Josephson junction also includes, in addition to the capacitive term -i/(omega)CB, an inductive term i(omega)LB. Similar to the known Bloch capacitance CB(q), the Bloch inductance LB(q) also depends periodically on the quasicharge, q, and its maximum value achieved at q=e(mod 2e) always exceeds the value of the Josephson inductance of this junction LJ(phi) at fixed phi=0. The effect of the Bloch inductance on the dynamics of a single junction and a one-dimensional array is described.

  11. Compact tunable sub-terahertz oscillators based on Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fengbin; Müller, Franz; Scheller, Thomas; Semenov, Alexei; He, Ming; Fang, Lan; Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm; Klushin, Alexander M.

    2011-04-01

    Essential applications of terahertz technology are urgently in need of compact, tunable solid-state continuous wave radiation sources. However, no satisfactory solution is yet available for the frequency range of up to approximately 1.0 THz. Here, we present coherent radiation from large series arrays of Josephson junctions between 0.1 and 0.25 THz with off-chip radiation power of 7 μW. Niobium junctions oscillate at 4.2 K and the detection has been done at room temperature. The well-known obstacle to impedance matching is overcome by utilizing the excited resonances in the junction substrates serving as dielectric resonator antennae.

  12. Three-junction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Ludowise, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

  13. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, J. V.; Cleland, J. W.; Westbrook, R. D.; Davis, H. L.; Wood, R. F.; Lindmayer, J.; Wakefield, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The economic production of silicon solar cell arrays circumvents p-n junction degradation by nuclear doping, in which the Si-30 transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron capture. Also considered are chemical purity specifications for improved silicon bulk states, surface induced states, and surface states.

  14. Electrodeposited, Transverse Nanowire Electroluminescent Junctions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaopeng; Xu, Qiang; Dutta, Rajen K; Le Thai, Mya; Li, Xiaowei; Penner, Reginald M

    2016-09-27

    The preparation by electrodeposition of transverse nanowire electroluminescent junctions (tn-ELJs) is described, and the electroluminescence (EL) properties of these devices are characterized. The lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition process is first used to prepare long (millimeters), linear, nanocrystalline CdSe nanowires on glass. The thickness of these nanowires along the emission axis is 60 nm, and the width, wCdSe, along the electrical axis is adjustable from 100 to 450 nm. Ten pairs of nickel-gold electrical contacts are then positioned along the axis of this nanowire using lithographically directed electrodeposition. The resulting linear array of nickel-CdSe-gold junctions produces EL with an external quantum efficiency, EQE, and threshold voltage, Vth, that depend sensitively on wCdSe. EQE increases with increasing electric field and also with increasing wCdSe, and Vth also increases with wCdSe and, therefore, the electrical resistance of the tn-ELJs. Vth down to 1.8(±0.2) V (for wCdSe ≈ 100 nm) and EQE of 5.5(±0.5) × 10(-5) (for wCdSe ≈ 450 nm) are obtained. tn-ELJs produce a broad EL emission envelope, spanning the wavelength range from 600 to 960 nm.

  15. Equivalent Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field dependences of critical current are numerically constructed for a long Josephson junction with a shunt-or resistor-type microscopic inhomogeneities and compared to the critical curve of a junction with exponentially varying width. The numerical results show that it is adequate to replace the distributed inhomogeneity of a long Josephson junction by an inhomogeneity localized at one of its ends, which has certain technological advantages. It is also shown that the critical curves of junctions with exponentially varying width and inhomogeneities localized at the ends are unaffected by the mixed fluxon-antifluxon distributions of the magnetic flow. This fact may explain the improvement of the spectra of microwave radiation noted in the literature.

  16. A modular LHC built on the DNA three-way junction.

    PubMed

    Probst, Markus; Langenegger, Simon M; Häner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A light-harvesting complex composed of a π-stacked multichromophoric array in a DNA three-way junction is described. The modular design allows for a ready exchange of non-covalently attached energy acceptors.

  17. Coupled heterocellular arrays in the brain.

    PubMed

    Fróes, M M; Menezes, J R L

    2002-11-01

    Gap junctions are transcellular pathways that enable a dynamic metabolic coupling and a selective exchange of biological signaling mediators. Throughout the course of the brain development these intercellular channels are assembled into regionally and temporally defined patterns. The present review summarizes the possibilities of heterocellular gap junctional pairing in the brain parenchyma, involving glial cells, neurons and neural precursors as well as it highlights on the meaningfulness of these coupled arrays to the concept of brain functional compartments.

  18. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  19. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  20. Four-junction superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J Q

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  1. Four-junction superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J Q

    2016-06-30

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  2. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, David L.; Kim, Won-jong; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  3. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  4. Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Günter; Schmalhorst, Jan; Thomas, Andre; Hütten, Andreas; Yuasa, Shinji

    In magnetoelectronic devices large opportunities are opened by the spin dependent tunneling resistance, where a strong dependence of the tunneling current on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the electrodes is found. Within a short time, the amplitude of the resistance change of the junctions increased dramatically. We will cover Al-O and MgO based junctions and present highly spin-polarized electrode materials such as Heusler alloys. Furthermore, we will give a short overview on applications such as read heads in hard disk drives, storage cells in MRAMs, field programmable logic circuits and biochips. Finally, we will discuss the currently growing field of current induced magnetization switching.

  5. The influence of microwave irradiation power on current voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Mans, M.; Scherbel, J.; Seidel, P.

    2007-02-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of a micrometre bridge of intrinsic Josephson junctions under microwave irradiation are studied. The collective switching of the group of four junctions splits up as the AC signal amplitude is gradually increased. The switching current of the remaining group of junctions is increased with increasing radiation power. We consider that microwave irradiation injects an additional quasiparticle current into the Josephson junction array. We use ideas of breakdown of quasineutrality and quasiparticle charge imbalance in the superconducting layers and explain the experimental results by the competition between the 'current effect' and the effect of suppression of the switching current by irradiation.

  6. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  7. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. PMID:26008742

  8. Kokkos Array

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards Daniel Sunderland, Harold Carter

    2012-09-12

    The Kokkos Array library implements shared-memory array data structures and parallel task dispatch interfaces for data-parallel computational kernels that are performance-portable to multicore-CPU and manycore-accelerator (e.g., GPGPU) devices.

  9. Systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.R.; McCabe, A.P.H.; Vrquhart, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Selected Contents of this book are: Efficient Systolic Arrays for the Solution of Toeplitz Systems, The Derivation and Utilization of Bit Level Systolic Array Architectures, an Efficient Systolic Array for Distance Computation Required in a Video-Codec Based Motion-Detection, On Realizations of Least-Squares Estimation and Kalman Filtering by Systolic Arrays, and Comparison of Systolic and SIMD Architectures for Computer Vision Computations.

  10. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2009-08-11

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  11. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2007-03-13

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  12. Quantum phases in intrinsic Josephson junctions: Quantum magnetism analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Keita; Koyama, Tomio

    2013-08-01

    We explore quantum phases in intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stacks, whose in-plane area is so small that the capacitive coupling has a dominant role in the superconducting phase dynamics. In such cases, the effective Hamiltonian for the superconducting phase can be mapped onto that of one-dimensional ferromagnetically-interacting spin model, whose spin length S depends on the magnitude of the on-site Coulomb repulsion. The ferromagnetic model for IJJ’s prefers synchronized quantum features in contrast to the antiferromagnetically-interacting model in the conventional Josephson junction arrays.

  13. DNA gridiron nanostructures based on four-arm junctions.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongran; Pal, Suchetan; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Shuoxing; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-03-22

    Engineering wireframe architectures and scaffolds of increasing complexity is one of the important challenges in nanotechnology. We present a design strategy to create gridiron-like DNA structures. A series of four-arm junctions are used as vertices within a network of double-helical DNA fragments. Deliberate distortion of the junctions from their most relaxed conformations ensures that a scaffold strand can traverse through individual vertices in multiple directions. DNA gridirons were assembled, ranging from two-dimensional arrays with reconfigurability to multilayer and three-dimensional structures and curved objects.

  14. In vivo assembly of tight junctions in fetal rat liver.

    PubMed

    Montesano, R; Friend, D S; Perrelet, A; Orci, L

    1975-11-01

    Examination of glutaraldehyde-fixed, freeze-fractured livers from 14-15-day rat fetuses provided the basis for the following observations. Membrane particles align in otherwise poorly particulated areas of the presumptive pericanalicular plasma membrane (A face), frequently forming a discontinuous "honey-comb" network joining small particle islands. Even at this early stage, contiguous B-fracture faces contain furrows, rather than rows of pits, distinguishing the linear particle aggregates on the A face as developing tight junctions rather than gap junctions. Short segments of these linear arrays merge with smooth ridges clearly identifiable as segments of discontinuous tight junctions. With the continuing confluence of particulate and smooth ridge segments, mature tight junctions become fully appreciable. We conclude that tight junctions form de novo by the alignment and fusion of separate particles into beaded ridges which, in turn, become confluent and are transformed into continuous smooth ones. At 21 days of fetal life, most of the images of assembly have disappeared, and the liver reveals well-formed bile canaliculi sealed by mature tight junctions. PMID:1194351

  15. Holliday Junction Resolvases

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Haley D.M.; West, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. PMID:25183833

  16. Two new septate junctions in the phylum Coelenterata.

    PubMed

    Green, C R; Flower, N E

    1980-04-01

    Freeze-fracture of fixed and unfixed tissue, lanthanum tracer and conventional thin-section studies have revealed 2 new types of septate junction in the class Anthozoa, phylum Coelenterata. These new junctions have the 15-18-nm intercellular spacing of all other described septate junctions and are found around the apical circumference of cells lining a lumen or outside edge. However, in freeze-fracture replicas and tangential views of lanthanum-impregnated tissue, they are seen to be quite different from other known septate junction types. One of the new junctions is found in endothelial tissue such as that lining the gut or the inside of the tentacles. In tangential view it is seen to consist of relatively short, straight, double septa, again with lateral projections. In feeeze-fracture of unfixed tissue, the junction consists of double rows of particles on the P face, the particles of one row being rounded, those of the other being elongated at right angles to the line of the septum. This dichotomy in particle size is unexpected, as the 2 halves of the septa as seen in tangential view are symmetrical. In freeze-fracture of fixed material the particle arrays remain on the P face and appear similar to those of unfixed material, but never as clear. In fixed tissue, some distortion had occurred and in extreme cases septa appear as a single broad jumbled row of particles. In this double septa junction, the rows of particles seen in freeze-fracture are occasionally seen to anastomose with a septum dividing into 2 and a third row of particles aligning with the 2 new septa to form their double particle rows. In both fixed and unfixed tissues, the E face of the junction consists of wide, shallow grooves. The second of the new junctions occurs in epithelial tissue, such as around the outer edge of sea-anemone tentacles, and consists of long wavy septa with lateral projections. In views where these projections appear longest, they arise predominantly from one side of the

  17. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion. PMID:17303718

  18. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  19. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  20. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  1. Towards large scale HTS Josephson detector arrays for THz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Hellicar, A. D.; Leslie, K. E.; Nikolic, N.; Hanham, S. M.; Macfarlane, J. C.; Foley, C. P.

    2013-11-01

    We present the design and implementation of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Josephson junction detector array for terahertz (THz) imaging. The array device is made of ten YBa2Cu3Ox-7 (YBCO) step-edge junctions coupled to gold thin-film ring-slot antennas on a MgO substrate. The design and characterization of the detector array in response to a 0.6 THz signal are presented. The development of multi-channel biasing and read-out electronics and the system integration with a commercial cryocooler are also described.

  2. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  3. Tight junctions and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Norimasa; Murata, Masaki; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Osanai, Makoto; Tobioka, Hirotoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Chiba, Hideki

    2003-09-01

    Tight junctions are intercellular junctions adjacent to the apical end of the lateral membrane surface. They have two functions, the barrier (or gate) function and the fence function. The barrier function of tight junctions regulates the passage of ions, water, and various macromolecules, even of cancer cells, through paracellular spaces. The barrier function is thus relevant to edema, jaundice, diarrhea, and blood-borne metastasis. On the other hand, the fence function maintains cell polarity. In other words, tight junctions work as a fence to prevent intermixing of molecules in the apical membrane with those in the lateral membrane. This function is deeply involved in cancer cell biology, in terms of loss of cell polarity. Of the proteins comprising tight junctions, integral membrane proteins occludin, claudins, and JAMs have been recently discovered. Of these molecules, claudins are exclusively responsible for the formation of tight-junction strands and are connected with the actin cytoskeleton mediated by ZO-1. Thus, both functions of tight junctions are dependent on the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton as well as ATP. Mutations in the claudin14 and the claudin16 genes result in hereditary deafness and hereditary hypomagnesemia, respectively. Some pathogenic bacteria and viruses target and affect the tight-junction function, leading to diseases. In this review, the relationship between tight junctions and human diseases is summarized.

  4. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  5. Cementoenamel junction: An insight.

    PubMed

    Vandana, Kharidi Laxman; Haneet, Ryana Kour

    2014-09-01

    The location and nature of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) are more than descriptive terms used simply to describe some aspects of tooth morphology; however, CEJ gains a lot of clinical significance due to various measurements dependent on it. It may be necessary to determine the location and pathological changes occurring at CEJ to make a diagnosis and treat diseases pertaining to epithelial attachment and gingival margin. However, the information related to CEJ is not discussed commonly. Hence, the present review paper provides an insight on CEJ in both primary and permanent dentition. PMID:25425813

  6. Cementoenamel junction: An insight

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, Kharidi Laxman; Haneet, Ryana Kour

    2014-01-01

    The location and nature of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) are more than descriptive terms used simply to describe some aspects of tooth morphology; however, CEJ gains a lot of clinical significance due to various measurements dependent on it. It may be necessary to determine the location and pathological changes occurring at CEJ to make a diagnosis and treat diseases pertaining to epithelial attachment and gingival margin. However, the information related to CEJ is not discussed commonly. Hence, the present review paper provides an insight on CEJ in both primary and permanent dentition. PMID:25425813

  7. Graphene/Carbon Nanotube Cross-Junction Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blees, Melina; Xu, Xiaodong; van der Zande, Arend; Zhong, Zhaohui; Gabor, Nathan; Pham, Phi; McEuen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    We have built crossed carbon nanotube/graphene junctions from CVD graphene and aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes. Large-area single-layer graphene was grown on a copper film and transferred to silicon oxide, then lithographically patterned and electrically contacted. Highly aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes were CVD-grown on quartz and transferred to complete the devices. We probed these new geometries using electrical measurements, studied their optoelectronic response with scanning photocurrent microscopy, and explored the temperature and gate dependence of the junctions. We found that graphene acts as a very good electrode for carbon nanotubes, pointing to the possibility of creating fully-integrated, transparent, flexible transistors purely from carbon nanomaterials.

  8. Controllable 0-π Josephson junctions containing a ferromagnetic spin valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingrich, E. C.; Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Glick, Joseph A.; Wang, Yixing; Miller, D. L.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2016-06-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are antagonistic forms of order, and rarely coexist. Many interesting new phenomena occur, however, in hybrid superconducting/ferromagnetic systems. For example, a Josephson junction containing a ferromagnetic material can exhibit an intrinsic phase shift of π in its ground state for certain thicknesses of the material. Such `π-junctions' were first realized experimentally in 2001 (refs ,), and have been proposed as circuit elements for both high-speed classical superconducting computing and for quantum computing. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the phase state of a Josephson junction containing two ferromagnetic layers can be toggled between 0 and π by changing the relative orientation of the two magnetizations. These controllable 0-π junctions have immediate applications in cryogenic memory, where they serve as a necessary component to an ultralow power superconducting computer. Such a fully superconducting computer is estimated to be orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than current semiconductor-based supercomputers. Phase-controllable junctions also open up new possibilities for superconducting circuit elements such as superconducting `programmable logic', where they could function in superconducting analogues to field-programmable gate arrays.

  9. Josephson oscillation linewidth of ion-irradiated YBa2Cu3O7 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiev, A.; Malnou, M.; Feuillet-Palma, C.; Ulysse, C.; Febvre, P.; Lesueur, J.; Bergeal, N.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the noise properties of ion-irradiated YBa2Cu3O7 Josephson junctions. This work aims at investigating the linewidth of the Josephson oscillation with a detector response experiment at ≃132 GHz. Experimental results are compared with a simple analytical model based on the Likharev-Semenov equation and the de Gennes dirty limit approximation. We show that the main source of low-frequency fluctuations in these junctions is the broadband Johnson noise and that the excess ≤ft(\\tfrac{1}{f}\\right) noise contribution does not prevail in the temperature range of interest, as reported in some other types of high-T c superconducting Josephson junctions. Finally, we discuss the interest of ion-irradiated junctions to implement frequency-tunable oscillators consisting of synchronized arrays of Josephson junctions.

  10. Josephson oscillation linewidth of ion-irradiated YBa2Cu3O7 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiev, A.; Malnou, M.; Feuillet-Palma, C.; Ulysse, C.; Febvre, P.; Lesueur, J.; Bergeal, N.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the noise properties of ion-irradiated YBa2Cu3O7 Josephson junctions. This work aims at investigating the linewidth of the Josephson oscillation with a detector response experiment at ≃132 GHz. Experimental results are compared with a simple analytical model based on the Likharev–Semenov equation and the de Gennes dirty limit approximation. We show that the main source of low-frequency fluctuations in these junctions is the broadband Johnson noise and that the excess ≤ft(\\tfrac{1}{f}\\right) noise contribution does not prevail in the temperature range of interest, as reported in some other types of high-T c superconducting Josephson junctions. Finally, we discuss the interest of ion-irradiated junctions to implement frequency-tunable oscillators consisting of synchronized arrays of Josephson junctions.

  11. Light propagation tuned by periodic junction-prisms within well-faceted ZnO fibers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lisheng; Pu, Lin; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Rong; Gu, Benxi; Du, Youwei; Zheng, Youdou

    2005-07-11

    Well-faceted ZnO fibers with periodic junction-prisms were synthesized using conventional chemical vapor deposition. The characterization of the fibers by optical and fluorescence microscopy showed that the outer facets of the crystalline fibers provide excellent mirror-like surfaces for guiding light propagation along the fiber stem as well as the periodic junction-prisms. The structure-related optical properties can be fully explained by a microstructural model. The proposed model explains as the decrease in luminance at the junction-prisms is caused by refraction and total or partial reflection of light. The model also explains the luminance enhancement at the junction-prisms is related to waveguiding of the green emission of the ZnO fibers. Further integration of the ZnO junction-prisms into microdevices should provide the microscale modulation for light with different wavelengths, and could be potentially used for enhanced light-illumination arrays.

  12. Modeling of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High Temperature Superconductors under External Radiation in the Breakpoint Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Plecenik, A.; Streltsova, O. I.; Zuev, M. I.; Ososkov, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The current-voltage (IV) characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation are calculated numerically in the parametric resonance region. We discuss a numerical method for calculation of the Shapiro step width on the amplitude of radiation. In order to accelerate computations we used parallelization by task parameter via Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) arrays and tested it in the case of a single junction. An analysis of the junction transitions between rotating and oscillating states in the branching region of IV-characteristics is presented.

  13. Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Laimer, Martin; Lanschuetzer, Christoph M; Diem, Anja; Bauer, Johann W

    2010-01-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa type Herlitz (JEB-H) is the autosomal recessively inherited, more severe variant of "lucidolytic" JEB. Characterized by generalized, extensive mucocutaneous blistering at birth and early lethality, this devastating condition is most often caused by homozygous null mutations in the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, each encoding for 1 of the 3 chains of the heterotrimer laminin-332. The JEB-H subtype usually presents as a severe and clinically diverse variant of the EB group of mechanobullous genodermatoses. This article outlines the epidemiology, presentation, and diagnosis of JEB-H. Morbidity and mortality are high, necessitating optimized protocols for early (including prenatal) diagnosis and palliative care. Gene therapy remains the most promising perspective. PMID:19945616

  14. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  15. Intrinsic Josephson Junctions with Intermediate Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Paul A.; Saleem, Sajid; Fenton, Jon C.; Speller, Susie; Grovenor, Chris R. M.

    2011-03-01

    In cuprate superconductors, adjacent cuprate double-planes are intrinsically Josephson-coupled. For bias currents perpendicular to the planes, the current-voltage characteristics correspond to those of an array of underdamped Josephson junctions. We will discuss our experiments on sub-micron Tl-2212 intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). The dynamics of the IJJs at the plasma frequency are moderately damped (Q ~ 8). This results in a number of counter-intuitive observations, including both a suppression of the effect of thermal fluctuations and a shift of the skewness of the switching current distributions from negative to positive as the temperature is increased. Simulations confirm that these phenomena result from repeated phase slips as the IJJ switches from the zero-voltage to the running state. We further show that increased dissipation counter-intuitively increases the maximum supercurrent in the intermediate damping regime (PRL vol. 103, art. no. 217002). We discuss the role of environmental dissipation on the dynamics and describe experiments with on-chip lumped-element passive components in order control the environment seen by the IJJs. Work supported by EPSRC.

  16. Quantification of gap junction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ek-Vitorín, Jose F; Burt, Janis M

    2005-12-01

    Gap junctions, which are essential for functional coordination and homeostasis within tissues, permit the direct intercellular exchange of small molecules. The abundance and diversity of this exchange depends on the number and selectivity of the comprising channels and on the transjunctional gradient for and chemical character of the permeant molecules. Limited knowledge of functionally significant permeants and poor detectability of those few that are known have made it difficult to define channel selectivity. Presented herein is a multifaceted approach to the quantification of gap junction selectivity that includes determination of the rate constant for intercellular diffusion of a fluorescent probe (k2-DYE) and junctional conductance (gj) for each junction studied, such that the selective permeability (k2-DYE/gj) for dyes with differing chemical characteristics or junctions with differing connexin (Cx) compositions (or treatment conditions) can be compared. In addition, selective permeability can be correlated using single-channel conductance when this parameter is also measured. Our measurement strategy is capable of detecting 1) rate constants and selective permeabilities that differ across three orders of magnitude and 2) acute changes in that rate constant. Using this strategy, we have shown that 1) the selective permeability of Cx43 junctions to a small cationic dye varied across two orders of magnitude, consistent with the hypothesis that the various channel configurations adopted by Cx43 display different selective permeabilities; and 2) the selective permeability of Cx37 vs. Cx43 junctions was consistently and significantly lower. PMID:16093281

  17. Multi-Junction Switching in Bi2Sr1.6La0.4CuO6+δ Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Shibata, Hajime; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Kambara, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Shiro; Kashiwaya, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    We study the dynamics of multi-junction switching (MJS): several intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) in an array switch to the finite voltage state simultaneously. The number of multi-switching junctions (N) was successfully tuned by changing the load resistance serially connected to an Bi2Sr1.6La0.4CuO6+δ IJJ array. The independence of the escape rates of N in the macroscopic quantum tunneling regime indicates that MJS is a successive switching process rather than a collective process. The origin of MJS is explained by the gradient of a load curve and the relative magnitudes of the switching currents of quasiparticle branches in the current-voltage plane.

  18. Thermopower measurements in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Rincón-García, Laura; Evangeli, Charalambos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of thermopower in molecular junctions offers complementary information to conductance measurements and is becoming essential for the understanding of transport processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the study of the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. After presenting the theoretical background for thermoelectricity at the nanoscale, we review the experimental techniques for measuring the thermopower in these systems and discuss the main results. Finally, we consider the challenges in the application of molecular junctions in viable thermoelectric devices. PMID:27277330

  19. Solar array development for the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Dawson, S.; Rapp, D.; Sharps, Paul; Aiken, D.; Spence, B. R.; White, S. F.; King, R. P.; Edmonson, K.

    2003-01-01

    JPL's missions to Mars have revealed factors that have an adverse impact on the performance of Mars Surface Solar Arrays. These factors included a spectrum shift toward the red wavelengths, atmospheric scattering and absorption and an accumulation of Mars surface dust on the arrays. All of these factors will reduce the power generated from state of the art triple junction solar cells used by earth orbiting satellites. This paper will report the results of JPL supported work conducted by US solar array manufacturers to increase the performance of solar arrays for future Mars surface missions. JPL awarded four vendors contracts to evaluate methods of improving power generation on the surface of Mars. These four contracts cover the redesign of the existing triple junction solar cell, modifying solar simulator output to match the Mars surface spectrum and techniques to control or remove dust from the surface of the arrays. The methodology and results of this evaluation will be presented in this paper.

  20. Development, characterization, and applications of high temperature superconductor nanobridge Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.R.; Tigges, C.P.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    A well-controlled, high-yield Josephson junction process in high temperature superconductors (HTS) is necessary for the demonstration of ultra-high-speed devices and circuits which exceed the capabilities of conventional electronics. The authors developed nanobridge Josephson junctions in high quality thin-film YBaCuO with dimensions below 100 nm fabricated using electron-beam nanolithography. They characterized this Josephson junction technology for process yield, junction parameter uniformity, and overall applicability for use in high-performance circuits. To facilitate the determination of junction parameters, they developed a measurement technique based on spectral analysis in the range of 90--160 GHz of phase-locked, oscillating arrays of up to 2,450 Josephson junctions. Because of the excellent yield and uniformity of the nanobridge junctions, they successfully applied the junction technology to a wide variety of circuits. These circuits included transmission-line pulse formers and 32 and 64-bit shift registers. The 32-bit shift register was shown to operate at clock speeds near 100 GHz and is believed to be one of the faster and more complex digital circuit demonstrated to date using high temperature superconductor technology.

  1. System design of submillimeter-wave imaging array SISCAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Hibi, Y.; Nagata, H.; Nakahashi, M.; Murakoshi, Y.; Arai, H.; Ariyoshi, S.; Otani, C.; Ikeda, H.; Fujiwara, M.

    2008-07-01

    Developments on large format array of superconducting tunnel junction detectors are discussed and recent activities in readout electronics developments and focal plane optics designs are presented. We have been working on submillimeter-wave SIS photon detectors at 650 GHz using niobium tunnel junctions, which have high sensitivity, large dynamic range and fast response. Here we discuss on an implementation plan of large format array with cryogenic readout electronics and compact focal plane optics design. GaAs-JFETs operate at less than 1 K with low noise, low power dissipation and fast response. We have demonstrated operation of cryogenic integrating amplifiers and digital electronics for SIS photon detectors with multiplexed readout. Combined with compact focal plane optics, we now have a conceptual design of large format array of SIS photon detectors in submillimeter-wave. Further development to realize higher sensitivity superconducting tunnel junction detectors with extremely low leakage current are foreseen.

  2. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  3. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  4. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  5. Tunable φ Josephson junction ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menditto, R.; Sickinger, H.; Weides, M.; Kohlstedt, H.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R.; Goldobin, E.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the operation of a deterministic Josephson ratchet with tunable asymmetry. The ratchet is based on a φ Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic barrier operating in the underdamped regime. The system is probed also under the action of an additional dc current, which acts as a counterforce trying to stop the ratchet. Under these conditions the ratchet works against the counterforce, thus producing a nonzero output power. Finally, we estimate the efficiency of the φ Josephson junction ratchet.

  6. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  7. Microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutley, Michael C.; Stevens, Richard F.; Daly, Daniel J.

    1992-04-01

    Microlenses have been with us for a long time as indeed the very word lens reminds us. Many early lenses,including those made by Hooke and Leeuwenhoek in the 17th century were small and resembled lentils. Many languages use the same word for both (French tilentillelt and German "Linse") and the connection is only obscure in English because we use the French word for the vegetable and the German for the optic. Many of the applications for arrays of inicrolenses are also well established. Lippmann's work on integral photography at the turn of the century required lens arrays and stimulated an interest that is very much alive today. At one stage, lens arrays played an important part in high speed photography and various schemes have been put forward to take advantage of the compact imaging properties of combinations of lens arrays. The fact that many of these ingenious schemes have not been developed to their full potential has to a large degree been due to the absence of lens arrays of a suitable quality and cost.

  8. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  9. Junction formation during desiccation cracking.

    PubMed

    Toga, K B; Alaca, B Erdem

    2006-08-01

    In order to provide a sound physical basis for the understanding of the formation of desiccation crack networks, an experimental study is presented addressing junction formation. Focusing on junctions, basic features of the network determining the final pattern, provides an elemental approach and imparts conceptual clarity to the rather complicated problem of the evolution of crack patterns. Using coffee-water mixtures a clear distinction between junction formation during nucleation and propagation is achieved. It is shown that for the same drying suspension, one can switch from the well-known symmetric triple junctions that are unique to the nucleation phase to propagation junctions that are purely dictated by the variations of the stress state. In the latter case, one can even manipulate the path of a propagating crack in a deterministic fashion by changing the stress state within the suspension. Clear microscopic evidence is provided for the formation of propagation junctions, and material inhomogeneity is observed to be reflected by a broad distribution of angles, in stark contrast to shrinkage cracks in homogeneous solid films.

  10. Quasiparticle current and phase locking of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, P.; Grib, A. N.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Scherbel, J.; Hübner, U.; Schmidl, F.

    2001-09-01

    On the base of our experiments on thin film Josephson junctions in mesa geometry we discuss the quasiparticle branches of the intrinsic arrays within a tunnelling model using d-wave superconductor density of states. We find temperature dependent current contributions and a zero bias anomaly. The coherent behaviour is studied for intrinsic arrays with an additional side-wall shunt. The existence of thresholds of phase locking at small as well as at large inductances is demonstrated. We discuss the problems with experimental realisation of the shunts as well as with an alternative concept to enhance phase locking in such arrays towards application as oscillators in the frequency range up to some THz.

  11. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  12. Modeling and theoretical efficiency of a silicon nanowire based thermoelectric junction with area enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, M.; Sadhu, J. S.; Ma, J.; Ghossoub, M. G.; Sinha, S.

    2012-06-01

    Recent experimental work suggests that individual silicon nanowires with rough surfaces possess a thermoelectric figure of merit as high as 0.6 near room temperature. This paper addresses the possibility of using an array of such nanowires in a thermoelectric junction for generation. Employing a model of frequency dependent phonon boundary scattering, we estimate the effective thermal conductivity of the array and investigate heat flow through the junction. We show that charge transport is largely unaffected by the roughness scales considered. Enhancing the area for heat exchange at an individual 200 μm × 200 μm p-n junction yields significant temperature differences across the junction leading to power >0.6 mW and efficiency >1.5% for a junction with effective thermal conductivity <5 W/mK, when the source and sink are at 450 K and 300 K, respectively. We show that relatively short nanowires of ˜50 μm length are sufficient for obtaining peak power and reasonable efficiency. This substantially reduces the challenge of engineering low resistivity electrical contacts that critically affect power and efficiency. This paper provides insight into how fundamental transport in relation to bulk heat transfer and charge transport, affects the performance of thermoelectric junctions based on nanostructured materials.

  13. Modeling and theoretical efficiency of a silicon nanowire based thermoelectric junction with area enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, M; Sadhu, JS; Ma, J; Ghossoub, MG; Sinha, S

    2012-06-15

    Recent experimental work suggests that individual silicon nanowires with rough surfaces possess a thermoelectric figure of merit as high as 0.6 near room temperature. This paper addresses the possibility of using an array of such nanowires in a thermoelectric junction for generation. Employing a model of frequency dependent phonon boundary scattering, we estimate the effective thermal conductivity of the array and investigate heat flow through the junction. We show that charge transport is largely unaffected by the roughness scales considered. Enhancing the area for heat exchange at an individual 200 mu m x 200 mu m p-n junction yields significant temperature differences across the junction leading to power >0.6 mW and efficiency >1.5% for a junction with effective thermal conductivity <5 W/mK, when the source and sink are at 450 K and 300 K, respectively. We show that relatively short nanowires of similar to 50 mu m length are sufficient for obtaining peak power and reasonable efficiency. This substantially reduces the challenge of engineering low resistivity electrical contacts that critically affect power and efficiency. This paper provides insight into how fundamental transport in relation to bulk heat transfer and charge transport, affects the performance of thermoelectric junctions based on nanostructured materials. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4728189

  14. An efficient method for evaluating RRAM crossbar array performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lin; Zhang, Jinyu; Chen, An; Wu, Huaqiang; Qian, He; Yu, Zhiping

    2016-06-01

    An efficient method is proposed in this paper to mitigate computational burden in resistive random access memory (RRAM) array simulation. In the worst case scenario, a 4 Mb RRAM array with line resistance is greatly reduced using this method. For 1S1R-RRAM array structures, static and statistical parameters in both reading and writing processes are simulated. Error analysis is performed to prove the reliability of the algorithm when line resistance is extremely small compared with the junction resistance. Results show that high precision is maintained even if the size of RRAM array is reduced by one thousand times, which indicates significant improvements in both computational efficiency and memory requirements.

  15. Global Arrays

    2006-02-23

    The Global Arrays (GA) toolkit provides an efficient and portable “shared-memory” programming interface for distributed-memory computers. Each process in a MIMD parallel program can asynchronously access logical blocks of physically distributed dense multi-dimensional arrays, without need for explicit cooperation by other processes. Unlike other shared-memory environments, the GA model exposes to the programmer the non-uniform memory access (NUMA) characteristics of the high performance computers and acknowledges that access to a remote portion of the sharedmore » data is slower than to the local portion. The locality information for the shared data is available, and a direct access to the local portions of shared data is provided. Global Arrays have been designed to complement rather than substitute for the message-passing programming model. The programmer is free to use both the shared-memory and message-passing paradigms in the same program, and to take advantage of existing message-passing software libraries. Global Arrays are compatible with the Message Passing Interface (MPI).« less

  16. Pacific Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, H.; Takeo, A.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Based on our recent results on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry (e.g., Suetsugu & Shiobara, 2014, Annual Review EPS), together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have now enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (both radial and azimuthal), with deployments of ~10-15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs) (namely "ocean-bottom broadband dispersion survey"; Takeo et al., 2013, JGR; Kawakatsu et al., 2013, AGU; Takeo, 2014, Ph.D. Thesis; Takeo et al., 2014, JpGU). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations might be sought.

  17. Robustness of the magnetoresistance of nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, V.; Bascones, E.

    2011-08-01

    Recent work has found that the interplay between spin accumulation and Coulomb blockade in nanoparticle arrays results in peaky I-V and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) curves and in huge values of the TMR. We analyze how these effects are influenced by a polarization asymmetry of the electrodes, the dimensionality of the array, the temperature, resistance, or charge disorder, and long-range interactions. We show that the magnitude and voltage dependence of the TMR do not change with the dimensionality of the array or the presence of junction resistance disorder. A different polarization in the electrodes modifies the peak shape in the I-V and TMR curves but not their order of magnitude. Increasing the temperature or length of the interaction reduces to some extent the size of the peaks, the reduction being due to long-range interactions that are smaller in longer arrays. Charge disorder should be avoided to observe large TMR values.

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigation on high-Tc superconducting intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grib, Alexander; Shukrinov, Yury; Schmidl, Frank; Seidel, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Within the last years many groups have realized and investigated different types of intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) arrays out of high-temperature superconducting single crystals or thin films. We tried to improve the synchronization between the junctions by external shunts. Mesa structures as well as microbridges on vicinal cut substrates showed multi-branch behaviour in their IV characteristics and random switching between branches. Theoretical modelling was done investigating phase dynamics and stability numerically as well as analytically. Branch structure in current voltage characteristics of IJJ is studied in the framework of different models, particularly, in capacitevely coupled Josephson junctions (CCJJ) model and CCJJ model with diffusion current. Results of modelling of return current in IV characteristics for stacks with different number of IJJ are presented. We discussed the possible mechanisms of synchronization and the ranges of stability. Conclusions with respect to application of such arrays such as radiation sources were given.

  19. Josephson junctions in SPICE3

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on SPICE3 which is the most recent version of the venerable circuit simulator SPICE from the University of California, Berkeley. Unlike its predecessors, SPICE3 is written in the C programming language, and is designed for interactive use under a modern multitasking operating system. SPICE3, being an interactive program, offers the user great control and flexibility in performing simulations, and provides a powerful graphics capability for viewing simulation results. A C-shell like control syntax is supported, as well as such features as plotting while simulating, parameter alteration during simulation, and simulation data controlled breakpoints. Unfortunately, the Berkeley distribution of SPICE3 lacks support for Josephson junctions. As a consequence, the author has developed a customize version of SPICE3b.1 which incorporates a Josephson junction model. The model supports control current modulation, as well as a fifth order polynomial description of the quasiparticle current suitable for NbN junctions.

  20. Triple junction distributions in polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.; Kumar, M.; Schwartz, A.J.

    1999-07-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that some material properties can be enhanced by grain boundary engineering, i.e., the systematic modifications in the topology of the microstructure through thermomechanical processing. Experimental observations have shown that the microstructural parameter likely responsible for improved properties is the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD). It has been suggested that improvements in the fractions of special boundaries as defined by the coincident site lattice model (1) are necessary, but not fully sufficient to cause property improvements. For example, it has been observed that cracks propagating along interconnected networks of random grain boundaries can be arrested (2) when intersecting a triple junction where the remaining two pathways are special boundaries. Therefore, it is of interest to characterize microstructures in terms of the distributions of triple junction types. A simple method to describe a triple junction is by the types of grain boundaries intersecting at that junction [special vs. random, as described by the coincident site lattice (CSL) model]. The distribution of 0-CSL, 1-CSL, 2-CSL and 3-CSL triple junctions in the microstructure can then be plotted as a function of the fraction of special boundaries. Such data has been collected using orientation-imaging microscopy (OIM) (3--5) for oxygen-free-electronic (ofe)-Cu and Inconel 600 over a range of special fraction of grain boundaries. These results have been compared with theoretical models considering isolated triple junctions and invoking the {Sigma}-product rule (6) where {Sigma} is the inverse density of coincident lattice sites (7).

  1. Superconducting tunnel junctions as detectors for UV astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeve, Peter; Peacock, Anthony J.; Martin, Didier D.; Rando, Nicola; Poelaert, Abel; den Hartog, Roland H.

    1999-11-01

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) have now reached a state of maturity where small arrays have for the first time been used in practical applications in ground based astronomy. Future generations of devices are now under construction to enhance the current capability. For example larger format arrays, higher readout speeds, and improved spectral resolution are all issues being addressed. In this paper we present specifically the performance at ultraviolet wavelengths from 100 - 500 nm of the current generation of STJ arrays based on tantalum. Recent results on such tantalum based photon counting superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) which are now suitable for use as broad-band low resolution spectrometers for ultraviolet astronomy are presented. These STJs, operated at a temperature of approximately 0.3 K, have demonstrated a limiting resolution of approximately 8 nm at 200 nm. These devices can be designed to be extremely linear in response with photon energy while measuring the individual photon wavelength and arrival time. The quantum efficiency for single photons is over approximately 50% at approximately 200 nm. Such an STJ has been packaged into a small prototype 6 X 6 array and shown to have good uniformity of response across all pixels. Larger arrays are under development which could contribute significantly to many fields of ultraviolet astronomy being able to provide efficiently and simultaneously the broad band spectrum and photon arrival time history of every single object in the field over a very wide dynamic range. With lower energy gap superconducting materials the resolution should become higher and possibly for hafnium based devices as high as approximately 1 nm at 200 nm. Is such devices can be developed then imaging spectrometers which can simultaneously record the image and spectra of objects in a large field and therefore provide an object's red-shift may become a reality.

  2. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  3. Precise Heater Controller with rf-Biased Josephson Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Colin J.; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; Duncan, R. V.

    2003-01-01

    Paramagnetic susceptibility thermometers used in fundamental physics experiments are capable of measuring temperature changes with a precision of a part in 2 x 10(exp 10). However, heater controllers are only able to control open-loop power dissipation to about a part in 10(exp 5). We used an array of rf-biased Josephson junctions to precisely control the electrical power dissipation in a heater resistor mounted on a thermally isolated cryogenic platform. Theoretically, this method is capable of controlling the electrical power dissipation to better than a part in 10(exp 12). However, this level has not yet been demonstrated experimentally. The experiment consists of a liquid helium cell that also functions as a high-resolution PdMn thermometer, with a heater resistor mounted on it. The cell is thermally connected to a temperature-controlled cooling stage via a weak thermal link. The heater resistor is electrically connected to the array of Josephson junctions using superconducting wire. An rf-biased array of capacitively shunted Josephson junctions drives the voltage across the heater. The quantized voltage across the resistor is Vn = nf(h/2e), where h is Planck's constant, f is the array biasing frequency, e is the charge of an electron, and n is the integer quantum state of the Josephson array. This results in an electrical power dissipation on the cell of Pn = (Vn)(sup 2/R), where R is the heater resistance. The change of the quantum state of the array changes the power dissipated in the heater, which in turn, results in the change of the cell temperature. This temperature change is compared to the expected values based on the known thermal standoff resistance of the cell from the cooling stage. We will present our initial experimental results and discuss future improvements. This work has been funded by the Fundamental Physics Discipline of the Microgravity Science Office of NASA, and supported by a no-cost equipment loan from Sandia National Laboratories.

  4. Microdischarge arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenhui

    Microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are DC or pulsed gas discharges between two electrodes, separated by a dielectric, and containing a concentric hole. The diameter of the hole, in this hollow cathode configuration, is in the hundred-micrometer range. MHCDs satisfy the two conditions necessary for an efficient excimer radiation sources: (1) high energy electrons which are required to provide a high concentration of excited or ionized rare gas atoms; (2) high pressure operation which favors excimer formation (a three-body process). Flat panel excimer sources require parallel operation of MHCDs. Based on the current-voltage characteristics of MHCD discharges, which have positive slopes in the low current (Townsend) mode and in the abnormal glow mode, stable arrays of MHCD discharges in argon and xenon could be generated in these current ranges without ballasting each MHCD separately. In the Townsend range, these arrays could be operated up to pressures of 400 Torr. In the abnormal glow mode, discharge arrays were found to be stable up to atmospheric pressure. By using semi-insulating silicon as the anode material, the stable operation of MHCD arrays could be extended to the current range with constant voltage (normal glow) and also that with negative differential conductance (hollow cathode discharge region). Experiments with a cathode geometry without microholes, i.e. excluding the hollow cathode phase, revealed that stable operation of discharges over an extended area were possible. The discharge structure in this configuration reduces to only the cathode fall and negative glow, with the negative glow plasma serving to conduct the discharge current radially to the circular anode. With decreasing current, a transition from homogenous plasma to self-organized plasma filaments is observed. Array formation was not only studied with discharges in parallel, but also with MHCD discharges in series. By using a sandwich electrode configuration, a tandem discharge was

  5. GLIAL ANKYRINS FACILITATE PARANODAL AXOGLIAL JUNCTION ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L.; Makara, Michael A.; Brophy, Peter J.; Cooper, Edward C.; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J.; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions, and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, are essential for rapid saltatory conduction, and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na+ channel clustering in neurons and important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here, we show that ankyrinB, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrinG, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing central nervous system. PMID:25362471

  6. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  7. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  8. Improved Solar-Cell Tunnel Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Kachare, A.

    1986-01-01

    Efficiency of multiple-junction silicon solar cells increased by inclusion of p+/n+ tunnel junctions of highly doped GaP between component cells. Relatively low recombination velocity at GaP junction principal reason for recommending this material. Relatively wide band gap also helps increase efficiency by reducing optical losses.

  9. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  10. Grounded Coplanar Waveguide Feeds Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G.E.; Lee, R. Q.; Simons, R. N.; Fernandez, N.S.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype electronically steerable K-band end-fire antenna includes phased array of four printed-circuit linear dipole elements fed by grounded coplanar waveguide (GCPW). Distribution-and-phasing network of antenna fed through single entering antenna split equally by three GCPW T junctions onto four GCPW transmission lines.

  11. Global Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2015-11-01

    Global Arrays (GA) is a distributed-memory programming model that allows for shared-memory-style programming combined with one-sided communication, to create a set of tools that combine high performance with ease-of-use. GA exposes a relatively straightforward programming abstraction, while supporting fully-distributed data structures, locality of reference, and high-performance communication. GA was originally formulated in the early 1990’s to provide a communication layer for the Northwest Chemistry (NWChem) suite of chemistry modeling codes that was being developed concurrently.

  12. Interactions between Josephson Junction Metamaterials and Evanescent Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Laura; Anlage, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Amplification of evanescent waves is an exciting, yet controversial application of negative index of refraction metamaterials in pursuit of creating a ``perfect lens''. We will describe evanescent wave amplification experiments using lossless metamaterials, i.e. arrays of Josephson junctions (JJ). The effects of input power, temperature, and dc magnetic field on JJ arrays below the cutoff frequency of a waveguide have been investigated. At low temperatures a pronounced, tunable microwave resonance emerges in transmission. This resonance has been systematically studied in terms of its transmission and reflection coefficients. In the regime between -45 and -25 dBm, we observe a non-hysteretic emission of microwave photons that reverberate at the same frequency. Amplification of these photons (parametric amplification) will also be described. This work was supported by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellowship program.

  13. Array Automated Assembly Task Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, S. S.; Jones, G. T.; Allison, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of solar cells and module process steps for low-cost solar arrays is reported. Specific topics covered include: (1) a system to automatically measure solar cell electrical performance parameters; (2) automation of wafer surface preparation, printing, and plating; (3) laser inspection of mechanical defects of solar cells; and (4) a silicon antireflection coating system. Two solar cell process steps, laser trimming and holing automation and spray-on dopant junction formation, are described.

  14. SIN tunnel junction as a temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, D.; Kuzmin, Leonid S.; Willander, Magnus

    1999-04-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of a superconductor-normal metal tunnel junction (SIN) is very sensitive to the temperature of the normal metal. Therefore SIN junction can be used as a thermometer which can be conveniently integrated into more complicated devices, for example bolometers. We estimate the effect of different types of noise on the sensitivity of such a thermometer. Shot noise of the tunnel junction, amplifier noise and the noise related to the fluctuations of the heat flow through the junction are considered. The performance of the bolometer with SIN junction as a temperature sensor is also discussed.

  15. Ferromagnetic Josephson Junctions for Cryogenic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Gingrich, Eric C.; Khasawneh, Mazin A.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, William P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2015-03-01

    Josephson junctions containing ferromagnetic materials are of interest for both scientific and technological purposes. In principle, either the amplitude of the critical current or superconducting phase shift across the junction can be controlled by the relative magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers in the junction. Our approach concentrates on phase control utilizing two junctions in a SQUID geometry. We will report on efforts to control the phase of junctions carrying either spin-singlet or spin-triplet supercurrent for cryogenic memory applications. Supported by Northorp Grumman Corporation and by IARPA under SPAWAR Contract N66001-12-C-2017.

  16. Fabrication of high quality ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weides, M.; Tillmann, K.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2006-05-01

    We present ferromagnetic Nb/Al2O3/Ni60Cu40/Nb Josephson junctions (SIFS) with an ultrathin Al2O3 tunnel barrier. The junction fabrication was optimized regarding junction insulation and homogeneity of current transport. Using ion-beam-etching and anodic oxidation we defined and insulated the junction mesas. The additional 2 nm thin Cu-layer below the ferromagnetic NiCu (SINFS) lowered interface roughness and ensured very homogeneous current transport. A high yield of junctional devices with jc spreads less than 2% was obtained.

  17. Graphene Josephson Junction Single Photon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Evan D.; Lee, Gil-Ho; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Heuck, Mikkel; Crossno, Jesse; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk; Fong, Kin Chung

    Single photon detectors (SPDs) have found use across a wide array of applications depending on the wavelength to which they are sensitive. Graphene, because of its linear, gapless dispersion near the Dirac point, has a flat, wide bandwidth absorption that can be enhanced to near 100 % through the use of resonant structures making it a promising candidate for broadband SPDs. Upon absorbing a photon in the optical to mid-infrared range, a small (~10 μm2) sheet of graphene at cryogenic temperatures can experience a significant increase in electronic temperature due to its extremely low heat capacity. At 1550 nm, for example, calculations show that the temperature could rise by as much as 500 %. This temperature increase could be detected with near perfect quantum efficiency by making the graphene the weak link in a Josephson junction (JJ). We present a theoretical model demonstrating that such a graphene JJ SPD could operate at the readily achievable temperature of 3 K with near zero dark count, sub-50 ps timing jitter, and sub-5 ns dead time and report on the progress toward experimentally realizing the device.

  18. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β. PMID:25871745

  19. Modulation of adrenal gap junction expression.

    PubMed

    Murray, S A; Shah, U S

    1998-01-01

    To increase our knowledge of the role of peptide hormone stimulation in gap junction protein expression and adrenal cortical cell function, primary rat adrenal cortical cells were treated with adrenocorticotropin, and gap junction proteins were measured. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis were used to detect and characterize gap junction type and distribution. The gap junction protein, connexin 43 (alpha 1), was detected. Analysis of six connexin protein types did not reveal gap junction species other than alpha 1. Cells of the inner adrenal cortical zones, zonae fasciculata and reticularis, were demonstrated to have the highest number of gap junctions per cell in the adrenal gland. Adrenal cell cultures enriched for the two inner cortical adrenal zones were established and demonstrated also to express alpha 1 gap junction protein. Adrenocorticotropin (40 mUnits/ml) and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (1 mM) treatments increased alpha 1 gap junction protein levels and decreased cell proliferation rates in the cell cultures. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that gap junction expression can be regulated by adrenocorticotropin acting through the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate. It can be suggested that gap junction expression in the adrenal gland may be under hormonal influence, and that gap junctions serve as passage for movement of molecules involved in control of cell proliferation. PMID:9694574

  20. The Electrostatic Breakdown on Metal-Dielectric Junction Immersed in a Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Lyons, Valerie J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New results are presented of an experimental study and theoretical analysis of arcing on metal-dielectric junctions immersed in low-density plasmas. Two samples of conventional solar arrays and four different metal-quartz junctions have been used to investigate the effects of arcing within a wide range of neutral gas pressures, ion currents, and electron number densities. The effect of surface conditioning (decrease of arc rate due to outgassing) was clearly demonstrated. Moreover, a considerable increase in arc rate due to absorption of molecules from atmospheric air has been confirmed. It has been proved that the are inception mechanism in plasma is different from one in vacuum.

  1. Parallel p-n junctions across nanowires by one-step ex situ doping.

    PubMed

    Hazut, Ori; Huang, Bo-Chao; Pantzer, Adi; Amit, Iddo; Rosenwaks, Yossi; Kohn, Amit; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chiu, Ya-Ping; Yerushalmi, Roie

    2014-08-26

    The bottom-up synthesis of nanoscale building blocks is a versatile approach for the formation of a vast array of materials with controlled structures and compositions. This approach is one of the main driving forces for the immense progress in materials science and nanotechnology witnessed over the past few decades. Despite the overwhelming advances in the bottom-up synthesis of nanoscale building blocks and the fine control of accessible compositions and structures, certain aspects are still lacking. In particular, the transformation of symmetric nanostructures to asymmetric nanostructures by highly controlled processes while preserving the modified structural orientation still poses a significant challenge. We present a one-step ex situ doping process for the transformation of undoped silicon nanowires (i-Si NWs) to p-type/n-type (p-n) parallel p-n junction configuration across NWs. The vertical p-n junctions were measured by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in concert with scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), termed STM/S, to obtain the spatial electronic properties of the junction formed across the NWs. Additionally, the parallel p-n junction configuration was characterized by off-axis electron holography in a transmission electron microscope to provide an independent verification of junction formation. The doping process was simulated to elucidate the doping mechanisms involved in the one-step p-i-n junction formation.

  2. Process For Direct Integration Of A Thin-Film Silicon P-N Junction Diode With A Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    DOEpatents

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2005-08-23

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  3. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2004-12-07

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  4. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  5. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  6. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. PMID:27073108

  7. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron–vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  8. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions. PMID:27420149

  9. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  10. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  11. Chaos induced by coupling between Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Azemtsa-Donfack, H.; Botha, A. E.

    2015-02-01

    It is found that, in a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions in layered high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation, the chaotic features are triggered by interjunction coupling, i.e., the coupling between different junctions in the stack. While the radiation is well known to produce chaotic effects in the single junction, the effect of interjunction coupling is fundamentally different and it can lead to the onset of chaos via a different route to that of the single junction. A precise numerical study of the phase dynamics of intrinsic Josephson junctions, as described by the CCJJ+DC model, is performed. We demonstrate the charging of superconducting layers, in a bias current interval corresponding to a Shapiro step subharmonic, due to the creation of a longitudinal plasma wave along the stack of junctions. With increase in radiation amplitude chaotic behavior sets in. The chaotic features of the coupled Josephson junctions are analyzed by calculations of the Lyapunov exponents. We compare results for a stack of junctions to the case of a single junction and prove that the observed chaos is induced by the coupling between the junctions. The use of Shapiro step subharmonics may allow longitudinal plasma waves to be excited at low radiation power.

  12. Thin-Film Photovoltaic Solar Array Parametric Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Jacobs, Mark K.; Ponnusamy, Deva

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes a study that had the objective to develop a model and parametrically determine the circumstances for which lightweight thin-film photovoltaic solar arrays would be more beneficial, in terms of mass and cost, than arrays using high-efficiency crystalline solar cells. Previous studies considering arrays with near-term thin-film technology for Earth orbiting applications are briefly reviewed. The present study uses a parametric approach that evaluated the performance of lightweight thin-film arrays with cell efficiencies ranging from 5 to 20 percent. The model developed for this study is described in some detail. Similar mass and cost trends for each array option were found across eight missions of various power levels in locations ranging from Venus to Jupiter. The results for one specific mission, a main belt asteroid tour, indicate that only moderate thin-film cell efficiency (approx. 12 percent) is necessary to match the mass of arrays using crystalline cells with much greater efficiency (35 percent multi-junction GaAs based and 20 percent thin-silicon). Regarding cost, a 12 percent efficient thin-film array is projected to cost about half is much as a 4-junction GaAs array. While efficiency improvements beyond 12 percent did not significantly further improve the mass and cost benefits for thin-film arrays, higher efficiency will be needed to mitigate the spacecraft-level impacts associated with large deployed array areas. A low-temperature approach to depositing thin-film cells on lightweight, flexible plastic substrates is briefly described. The paper concludes with the observation that with the characteristics assumed for this study, ultra-lightweight arrays using efficient, thin-film cells on flexible substrates may become a leading alternative for a wide variety of space missions.

  13. Realization of radial p-n junction silicon nanowire solar cell based on low-temperature and shallow phosphorus doping.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gangqiang; Liu, Fengzhen; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Hailong; Zhu, Meifang

    2013-01-01

    A radial p-n junction solar cell based on vertically free-standing silicon nanowire (SiNW) array is realized using a novel low-temperature and shallow phosphorus doping technique. The SiNW arrays with excellent light trapping property were fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching technique. The shallow phosphorus doping process was carried out in a hot wire chemical vapor disposition chamber with a low substrate temperature of 250°C and H2-diluted PH3 as the doping gas. Auger electron spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements prove the formation of a shallow p-n junction with P atom surface concentration of above 1020 cm-3 and a junction depth of less than 10 nm. A short circuit current density of 37.13 mA/cm2 is achieved for the radial p-n junction SiNW solar cell, which is enhanced by 7.75% compared with the axial p-n junction SiNW solar cell. The quantum efficiency spectra show that radial transport based on the shallow phosphorus doping of SiNW array improves the carrier collection property and then enhances the blue wavelength region response. The novel shallow doping technique provides great potential in the fabrication of high-efficiency SiNW solar cells.

  14. Realization of radial p-n junction silicon nanowire solar cell based on low-temperature and shallow phosphorus doping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A radial p-n junction solar cell based on vertically free-standing silicon nanowire (SiNW) array is realized using a novel low-temperature and shallow phosphorus doping technique. The SiNW arrays with excellent light trapping property were fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching technique. The shallow phosphorus doping process was carried out in a hot wire chemical vapor disposition chamber with a low substrate temperature of 250°C and H2-diluted PH3 as the doping gas. Auger electron spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements prove the formation of a shallow p-n junction with P atom surface concentration of above 1020 cm−3 and a junction depth of less than 10 nm. A short circuit current density of 37.13 mA/cm2 is achieved for the radial p-n junction SiNW solar cell, which is enhanced by 7.75% compared with the axial p-n junction SiNW solar cell. The quantum efficiency spectra show that radial transport based on the shallow phosphorus doping of SiNW array improves the carrier collection property and then enhances the blue wavelength region response. The novel shallow doping technique provides great potential in the fabrication of high-efficiency SiNW solar cells. PMID:24369781

  15. Physics and Applications of NIS Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ullom, J N

    2001-08-24

    This paper reviews the physics and applications of Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. The current-voltage properties of NIS junctions are diode-like with a strong temperature dependence. Hence, these structures can be used as sensitive thermometers at temperatures well below the energy gap, {Delta}, of the superconducting electrode. For junction voltages comparable to {Delta}/q, current flow removes energy from the normal electrode. This property has been exploited to build refrigerators capable of cooling thin-film circuits from 0.3 K to 0.1 K. Calorimeters and bolometers for the detection of X-rays and millimeter-wave radiation, respectively, have successfully been built from NIS junctions. NIS junctions have also been used to probe the superconducting state. Finally, recent ideas for the use of NIS junctions as simple circuit elements are described.

  16. String junction as a baryonic constituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Yu. S.; Nefediev, A. V.

    1996-02-01

    We extend the model for QCD string with quarks to consider the Mercedes Benz string configuration describing the three-quark baryon. Under the assumption of adiabatic separation of quark and string junction motion we formulate and solve the classical equation of motion for the junction. We dare to quantize the motion of the junction, and discuss the impact of these modes on the baryon spectra.

  17. Iron-copper metallization for flexible solar/cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavendel, H. W.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of a copper-base metallization for shallow-junction cells applied in flexible solar arrays in space is discussed. This type of metallization will reduce usage of precious metals (such as silver), increase case of bonding (by welding or by soldering) and eliminate heavy high Z interconnects (such as molybdenum). The main points of concern are stability against thermally induced diffusion of copper into silicon which causes degradation of shallow cell junctions, and low series resistance of the contact with semiconductor which promotes cell efficiency.

  18. nSQUID arrays as conveyers of quantum information

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Qiang; Averin, D. V.

    2014-12-15

    We have considered the quantum dynamics of an array of nSQUIDs—two-junction SQUIDs with negative mutual inductance between their two arms. Effective dual-rail structure of the array creates additional internal degree of freedom for the fluxons in the array, which can be used to encode and transport quantum information. Physically, this degree of freedom is represented by electromagnetic excitations localized on the fluxon. We have calculated the spatial profile and frequency spectrum of these excitations. Their dynamics can be reduced to two quantum states, so that each fluxon moving through the array carries with it a qubit of information. Coherence properties of such a propagating qubit in the nSQUID array are characterized by the dynamic suppression of the low-frequency decoherence due to the motion-induced spreading of the noise spectral density to a larger frequency interval.

  19. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions. PMID:19072125

  20. Multiterminal Coulomb-Majorana junction.

    PubMed

    Altland, Alexander; Egger, Reinhold

    2013-05-10

    We study multiple helical nanowires in proximity to a common mesoscopic superconducting island, where Majorana fermion bound states are formed. We show that a weak finite charging energy of the center island may dramatically affect the low-energy behavior of the system. While for strong charging interactions, the junction decouples the connecting wires, interactions lower than a nonuniversal threshold may trigger the flow towards an exotic Kondo fixed point. In either case, the ideally Andreev reflecting fixed point characteristic for infinite capacitance (grounded) devices gets destabilized by interactions.

  1. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  2. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  3. Experimental Study of Arcing on High-voltage Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris; Galofaro, Joel; Ferguson, Dale

    2005-01-01

    The main obstacle to the implementation of a high-voltage solar array in space is arcing on the conductor-dielectric junctions exposed to the surrounding plasma. One obvious solution to this problem would be the installation of fully encapsulated solar arrays which were not having exposed conductors at all. However, there are many technological difficulties that must be overcome before the employment of fully encapsulated arrays will turn into reality. An alternative solution to raise arc threshold by modifications of conventionally designed solar arrays looks more appealing, at least in the nearest future. A comprehensive study of arc inception mechanism [1-4] suggests that such modifications can be done in the following directions: i) to insulate conductor-dielectric junction from a plasma environment (wrapthrough interconnects); ii) to change a coverglass geometry (overhang); iii) to increase a coverglass thickness; iiii) to outgas areas of conductor-dielectric junctions. The operation of high-voltage array in LEO produces also the parasitic current power drain on the electrical system. Moreover, the current collected from space plasma by solar arrays determines the spacecraft floating potential that is very important for the design of spacecraft and its scientific apparatus. In order to verify the validity of suggested modifications and to measure current collection five different solar array samples have been tested in large vacuum chamber. Each sample (36 silicon based cells) consists of three strings containing 12 cells connected in series. Thus, arc rate and current collection can be measured on every string independently, or on a whole sample when strings are connected in parallel. The heater installed in the chamber provides the possibility to test samples under temperature as high as 80 C that simulates the LEO operational temperature. The experimental setup is described below.

  4. Experimental Study of Arcing on High-Voltage Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris; Galofaro, Joel; Ferguson, Dale

    2003-01-01

    The main obstacle to the implementation of a high-voltage solar array in space is arcing on the conductor-dielectric junctions exposed to the surrounding plasma. One obvious solution to this problem would be the installation of fully encapsulated solar arrays which were not having exposed conductors at all. However, there are many technological difficulties that must be overcome before the employment of fully encapsulated arrays will turn into reality. An alternative solution to raise arc threshold by modifications of conventionally designed solar arrays looks more appealing, at least in the nearest future. A comprehensive study of arc inception mechanism suggests that such modifications can be done in the following directions: 1) To insulate conductor-dielectric junction from a plasma environment (wrapthrough interconnects); 2) To change a coverglass geometry (overhang); 3) To increase a coverglass thickness; 4) To outgas areas of conductor-dielectric junctions. The operation of high-voltage array in LEO produces also the parasitic current power drain on the electrical system. Moreover, the current collected from space plasma by solar arrays determines the spacecraft floating potential that is very important for the design of spacecraft and its scientific apparatus. In order to verify the validity of suggested modifications and to measure current collection five different solar array samples have been tested in a large vacuum chamber. Each sample (36 silicon based cells) consists of three strings containing 12 cells connected in series. Thus, arc rate and current collection can be measured on every string independently, or on a whole sample when strings are connected in parallel. The heater installed in the chamber provides the possibility to test samples under temperature as high as 80 C that stimulates the LEO operational temperature. The experimental setup is described below.

  5. The Sinai triple junction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, Vincent; Armijo, Rolando; Tapponnier, Paul

    1987-09-01

    This paper is a summary of a more detailed analysis of the kinematics of the Sinai triple junction (Courtillot et al., 1987). Accurate kinematic data are lacking along the Red Sea and they can be supplemented by bathymetric, topographic and geological data pertaining to the three arms of the entirely continental Sinai triple junction. Motions across the northern Red Sea and along the Gulf of Elat are an order of magnitude larger than across the Gulf of Suez. The direction of motion there remains a major uncertainty. A possible kinematic model is highlighted, in which right-lateral strike-slip motion and small pull-apart basins occur along the Gulf of Suez, in agreement with recent field observations in Egypt. Early Miocene is marked by major geodynamical changes all along the northern boundaries of the African and Indian plates. We suggest that rifting in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea and Gulf of Suez was initiated at the end of the first phase of continental extrusion of Indochina, when the Tibetan plateau began to rise and spreading in the South China Sea came to a halt.

  6. Formation of in-situ CNT junction by direct lateral growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yun-Hi; Jang, Yoon-Taek; Choi, Chang-Hoon; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2003-03-01

    We present an approach to form a reliable integration of carbon nanotubes via direct parallel growth method. The method involves in-situ growth of carbon naotubes to bridge predefined junction electrodes of Nb/Co(or Ni), and furthermore, a high degree of ordering parallel suspended nanotubes can be obtained by applying DC bias during the growth. The arrays with robust contacts are unique system for explorations of collective behavior in coupled systems, and are useful for applications in nanoelectronics and NEMS.

  7. Detection of DNA labeled with magnetic nanoparticles using MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weifeng; Schrag, Benaiah D.; Carter, Matthew J.; Xie, Jin; Xu, Chenjie; Sun, Shouheng; Xiao, Gang

    2008-04-01

    We have demonstrated the detection of 2.5μM target DNA labeled with 16nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) and 50nm commercial MACS™ NPs using arrays of magnetic tunnel junction sensors with (001)-oriented MgO barrier layers. Signal-to-noise ratios of 25 and 12 were obtained with Fe3O4 and MACS™ NPs, respectively. These data show conclusively that MgO-based MTJ sensor arrays are very promising candidates for future applications involving the accurate detection and identification of biomolecules tagged with magnetic nanoparticles.

  8. Quality assurance of asymmetric jaw alignment using 2D diode array

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Mo; Yeung, Ivan W. T.; Moseley, Douglas J.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: A method using a 2D diode array is proposed to measure the junction gap (or overlap) and dose with high precision for routine quality assurance of the asymmetric jaw alignment.Methods: The central axis (CAX) of the radiation field was determined with a 15 × 15 cm{sup 2} photon field at four cardinal collimator angles so that the junction gap (or overlap) can be measured with respect to the CAX. Two abutting fields having a field size of 15 cm (length along the axis parallel to the junction) × 7.5 cm (width along the axis perpendicular to the junction) were used to irradiate the 2D diode array (MapCHECK2) with 100 MU delivered at the photon energy of 6 MV. The collimator was slightly rotated at 15° with respect to the beam central axis to increase the number of diodes effective on the measurement of junction gap. The junction gap and dose measured in high spatial resolution were compared to the conventional methods using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and radiochromic film, respectively. In addition, the reproducibility and sensitivity of the proposed method to the measurements of junction gap and dose were investigated.Results: The junction gap (or overlap) and dose measured by MapCHECK2 agreed well to those measured by the conventional methods of EPID and film (the differences ranged from −0.01 to 0 cm and from −1.34% to 0.6% for the gap and dose, respectively). No variation in the repeat measurements of the junction gap was found whereas the measurements of junction dose were found to vary in quite a small range over the days of measurement (0.21%–0.35%). While the sensitivity of the measured junction gap to the actual junction gap applied was the ideal value of 1 cm/cm as expected, the sensitivity of the junction dose to the actual junction gap increased as the junction gap (or overlap) decreased (maximum sensitivity: 201.7%/cm).Conclusions: The initial results suggest that the method is applicable for a comprehensive quality

  9. Wire Array Solar Cells: Fabrication and Photoelectrochemical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgeon, Joshua Michael

    Despite demand for clean energy to reduce our addiction to fossil fuels, the price of these technologies relative to oil and coal has prevented their widespread implementation. Solar energy has enormous potential as a carbon-free resource but is several times the cost of coal-produced electricity, largely because photovoltaics of practical efficiency require high-quality, pure semiconductor materials. To produce current in a planar junction solar cell, an electron or hole generated deep within the material must travel all the way to the junction without recombining. Radial junction, wire array solar cells, however, have the potential to decouple the directions of light absorption and charge-carrier collection so that a semiconductor with a minority-carrier diffusion length shorter than its absorption depth (i.e., a lower quality, potentially cheaper material) can effectively produce current. The axial dimension of the wires is long enough for sufficient optical absorption while the charge-carriers are collected along the shorter radial dimension in a massively parallel array. This thesis explores the wire array solar cell design by developing potentially low-cost fabrication methods and investigating the energy-conversion properties of the arrays in photoelectrochemical cells. The concept was initially investigated with Cd(Se, Te) rod arrays; however, Si was the primary focus of wire array research because its semiconductor properties make low-quality Si an ideal candidate for improvement in a radial geometry. Fabrication routes for Si wire arrays were explored, including the vapor-liquid-solid growth of wires using SiCl4. Uniform, vertically aligned Si wires were demonstrated in a process that permits control of the wire radius, length, and spacing. A technique was developed to transfer these wire arrays into a low-cost, flexible polymer film, and grow multiple subsequent arrays using a single Si(111) substrate. Photoelectrochemical measurements on Si wire array

  10. The expression of gingival epithelial junctions in response to subgingival biofilms.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kast, Jeannette I; Thurnheer, Thomas; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. It is caused by the formation of subgingival biofilms on the surface of the tooth. Characteristic bacteria associated with subgingival biofilms are the Gram-negative anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, collectively known as the "red complex" species. Inter-epithelial junctions ensure the barrier integrity of the gingival epithelium. This may however be disrupted by the biofilm challenge. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of subgingival biofilms on the expression of inter-epithelial junctions by gingival epithelia, and evaluate the relative role of the red complex. Multi-layered human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its variant without the red complex, for 3 h and 24 h. A low-density array microfluidic card platform was then used for analyzing the expression of 62 genes encoding for tight junctions, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Although there was a limited effect of the biofilms on the expression of tight, adherens and gap junctions, the expression of a number of desmosomal components was affected. In particular, Desmoglein-1 displayed a limited and transient up-regulation in response to the biofilm. In contrast, Desmocollin-2, Desmoplakin and Plakoglobin were down-regulated equally by both biofilm variants, after 24 h. In conclusion, this subgingival biofilm model may down-regulate selected desmosomal junctions in the gingival epithelium, irrespective of the presence of the "red complex." In turn, this could compromise the structural integrity of the gingival tissue, favoring bacterial invasion and chronic infection.

  11. Discovery and Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Novel Splice-junction Peptides Using RNA-Seq*

    PubMed Central

    Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Frey, Brian L.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-01-01

    Human proteomic databases required for MS peptide identification are frequently updated and carefully curated, yet are still incomplete because it has been challenging to acquire every protein sequence from the diverse assemblage of proteoforms expressed in every tissue and cell type. In particular, alternative splicing has been shown to be a major source of this cell-specific proteomic variation. Many new alternative splice forms have been detected at the transcript level using next generation sequencing methods, especially RNA-Seq, but it is not known how many of these transcripts are being translated. Leveraging the unprecedented capabilities of next generation sequencing methods, we collected RNA-Seq and proteomics data from the same cell population (Jurkat cells) and created a bioinformatics pipeline that builds customized databases for the discovery of novel splice-junction peptides. Eighty million paired-end Illumina reads and ∼500,000 tandem mass spectra were used to identify 12,873 transcripts (19,320 including isoforms) and 6810 proteins. We developed a bioinformatics workflow to retrieve high-confidence, novel splice junction sequences from the RNA data, translate these sequences into the analogous polypeptide sequence, and create a customized splice junction database for MS searching. Based on the RefSeq gene models, we detected 136,123 annotated and 144,818 unannotated transcript junctions. Of those, 24,834 unannotated junctions passed various quality filters (e.g. minimum read depth) and these entries were translated into 33,589 polypeptide sequences and used for database searching. We discovered 57 splice junction peptides not present in the Uniprot-Trembl proteomic database comprising an array of different splicing events, including skipped exons, alternative donors and acceptors, and noncanonical transcriptional start sites. To our knowledge this is the first example of using sample-specific RNA-Seq data to create a splice-junction database and

  12. The expression of gingival epithelial junctions in response to subgingival biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kast, Jeannette I; Thurnheer, Thomas; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. It is caused by the formation of subgingival biofilms on the surface of the tooth. Characteristic bacteria associated with subgingival biofilms are the Gram-negative anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, collectively known as the “red complex” species. Inter-epithelial junctions ensure the barrier integrity of the gingival epithelium. This may however be disrupted by the biofilm challenge. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of subgingival biofilms on the expression of inter-epithelial junctions by gingival epithelia, and evaluate the relative role of the red complex. Multi-layered human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its variant without the red complex, for 3 h and 24 h. A low-density array microfluidic card platform was then used for analyzing the expression of 62 genes encoding for tight junctions, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Although there was a limited effect of the biofilms on the expression of tight, adherens and gap junctions, the expression of a number of desmosomal components was affected. In particular, Desmoglein-1 displayed a limited and transient up-regulation in response to the biofilm. In contrast, Desmocollin-2, Desmoplakin and Plakoglobin were down-regulated equally by both biofilm variants, after 24 h. In conclusion, this subgingival biofilm model may down-regulate selected desmosomal junctions in the gingival epithelium, irrespective of the presence of the “red complex.” In turn, this could compromise the structural integrity of the gingival tissue, favoring bacterial invasion and chronic infection. PMID:26305580

  13. Synchronization of coupled rotators: Josephson junction ladders and the Kuramoto model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, B. C.; Trees, B. R.

    2002-10-01

    We show that the resistively shunted junction (RSJ) equations describing a ladder array of overdamped, critical-current disordered Josephson junctions that are current-biased along the rungs of the ladder can be mapped onto a Kuramoto model with nearest-neighbor, sinusoidal couplings. This result is obtained by an averaging method, in which the fast dynamics of the RSJ equations are integrated out, leaving the dynamics which describe the time scale over which neighboring junctions along the rungs of the ladder phase and frequency synchronize. We quantify the degree of frequency synchronization of the rung junctions by calculating the standard deviation of their time-averaged voltages, σ_ω, and the phase synchronization is quantified by calculating the time average of the modulus of the Kuramoto order parameter, < |r|>. We test the results of our averaging process by comparing the values of σ_ω and < |r|> for the original RSJ equations and our averaged equations. We find excellent agreement for DC bias currents of I_B/< I_c>agt 3, where < I_c> is the average critical current of the rung junctions, and critical current disorders of up to 10%. We also study the effects of thermal noise on the synchronization properties of the overdamped ladder. Finally, we find that including the effects of junction capacitance can lead to a discontinuous synchronization transition as the strength of the coupling between neighboring junctions is smoothly varied. This project was supported by the Ohio Wesleyan University Summer Research Program which was funded in part by the McGregor Fund.

  14. Solar Cells With Multiple Small Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Concept for improving efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells based on decreasing p/n junction area in relation to total surface area of cell. Because of reduced junction area, surface leakage drops and saturation current density decreases. Surface passivation helps to ensure short-circuit current remains at high value and response of cells to blue light increases.

  15. Analysis of Tight Junction Formation and Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Kerekes, Ryan A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Foster, Carmen M; Retterer, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study segmentation of tight junctions and analyze the formation and integrity of tight junctions in large-scale confocal image stacks, a challenging biological problem because of the low spatial resolution images and the presence of breaks in tight junction structure. We present an automated, three-step processing approach for tight junction analysis. In our approach, we first localize each individual nucleus in the image by using thresholding, morphological filters and active contours. By using each nucleus position as a seed point, we automatically segment the cell body based on the active contour. We then use an intensity-based skeletonization algorithm to generate the boundary regions for each cell, and features are extracted from tight junctions associated with each cell to assess tight junction continuity. Based on qualitative results and quantitative comparisons, we show that we are able to automatically segment tight junctions and compute relevant features that provide a quantitative measure of tight junction formation to which the permeability of the cell monolayer can ultimately be correlated.

  16. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  17. On the auxiliary lattices and dislocation reactions at triple junctions.

    PubMed

    Gertsman, V Y

    2002-03-01

    Coincidence site and displacement shift complete lattices of triple junctions are analysed. Dislocation reactions at triple junctions are considered. It is shown that in alpha=1 junctions no trapped residual triple-junction dislocation is geometrically necessary for dislocation transmission between adjoining grain boundaries. However, the situation is different for alpha (unequal) 1 triple junctions, where in some cases the residual dislocation cannot leave the triple junction for a grain boundary without generating a stacking-fault-like defect.

  18. Integrated infrared array technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Mccreight, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of integrated infrared (IR) array technology is presented. Although the array pixel formats are smaller, and the readout noise of IR arrays is larger, than the corresponding values achieved with optical charge-coupled-device silicon technology, substantial progress is being made in IR technology. Both existing IR arrays and those being developed are described. Examples of astronomical images are given which illustrate the potential of integrated IR arrays for scientific investigations.

  19. Solar array drive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkopec, F. D.; Sturman, J. C.; Stanhouse, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A solar array drive system consisting of a solar array drive mechanism and the corresponding solar array drive electronics is being developed. The principal feature of the solar array drive mechanism is its bidirectional capability which enables its use in mechanical redundancy. The solar array drive system is of a widely applicable design. This configuration will be tested to determine its acceptability for generic mission sets. Foremost of the testing to be performed is the testing for extended duration.

  20. Radial junction solar cells based on heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Haoting

    The radial junction wire array structure was previously proposed as a solar cell geometry to separate the direction of carrier collection from the direction of light absorption, thereby circumventing the need to use high quality but expensive single crystal silicon (c-Si) material that has long minority carrier diffusion lengths. The Si radial junction structure can be realized by forming radial p-n junctions on Si pillar/wire arrays that have a diameter comparable to the minority carrier diffusion length. With proper design, the Si pillar arrays are also able to enhance light trapping and thereby increase the light absorption. However, the larger junction area and surface area on the pillar arrays compared to traditional planar junction Si solar cells makes it challenging to fabricate high performance devices due an in increase in surface defects. Therefore, effective surface passivation strategies are essential for radial junction devices. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using a heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure has previously been demonstrated as a very effective surface passivation layer for planar c-Si solar cells. It is therefore of interest to use a-Si:H in a HIT layer structure for radial p-n junction c-Si pillar array solar cells. This poses several challenges, however, including the need to fabricate ultra-thin a-Si:H layers conformally on high aspect ratio Si pillars, control the crystallinity at the a-Si:H/c-Si interface to yield a low interface state density and optimize the layer thicknesses, doping and contacts to yield high performance devices. This research in this thesis was aimed at developing the processing technology required to apply the HIT structure to radial junction Si pillar array solar cell devices and to evaluate the device characteristics. Initial studies focused on understanding the effects of process conditions on the growth rate and

  1. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  2. InAs/Si Hetero-Junction Nanotube Tunnel Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Amir N.; Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Hetero-structure tunnel junctions in non-planar gate-all-around nanowire (GAA NW) tunnel FETs (TFETs) have shown significant enhancement in ‘ON’ state tunnel current over their all-silicon counterpart. Here we show the unique concept of nanotube TFET in a hetero-structure configuration that is capable of much higher drive current as opposed to that of GAA NW TFETs.Through the use of inner/outer core-shell gates, a single III-V hetero-structured nanotube TFET leverages physically larger tunneling area while achieving higher driver current (ION) and saving real estates by eliminating arraying requirement. Numerical simulations has shown that a 10 nm thin nanotube TFET with a 100 nm core gate has a 5×normalized output current compared to a 10 nm diameter GAA NW TFET. PMID:25923104

  3. Characterization of large two-dimensional YBa2Cu3O7-δ SQUID arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, B. J.; Berggren, S. A. E.; O'Brien, M. C.; deAndrade, M. C.; Higa, B. A.; Leese de Escobar, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    Large two-dimensional SQUID arrays were made using the step-edge Josephson junction process. The performance of the arrays is analyzed with respect to determining the conditions under which the optimal performance is achieved. We find that optimization of the field-voltage transfer function V B is reached at a specific temperature and device current bias point, and arrive at an empirical expression describing the dependence of V B on the critical current and dynamic resistance of the SQUID array and as a function of temperature. The empirical expression for V B of the SQUID arrays is similar to that given by well known theoretical models for a single SQUID.

  4. By-Pass Diode Temperature Tests of a Solar Array Coupon under Space Thermal Environment Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie; Wu, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    By-Pass diodes are a key design feature of solar arrays and system design must be robust against local heating, especially with implementation of larger solar cells. By-Pass diode testing was performed to aid thermal model development for use in future array designs that utilize larger cell sizes that result in higher string currents. Testing was performed on a 56-cell Advanced Triple Junction solar array coupon provided by SSL. Test conditions were vacuum with cold array backside using discrete by-pass diode current steps of 0.25 A ranging from 0 A to 2.0 A.

  5. Coordinate transformation in the model of long Josephson junctions: geometrically equivalent Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerdzhieva, E. G.; Boyadzhiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2005-10-01

    The transition from the model of a long Josephson junction of variable width to the model of a junction with a coordinate-dependent Josephson current amplitude is effected through a coordinate transformation. This establishes the correspondence between the classes of Josephson junctions of variable width and quasi-one-dimensional junctions with a variable thickness of the barrier layer. It is shown that for a junction of exponentially varying width the barrier layer of the equivalent quasi-one-dimensional junction has a distributed resistive inhomogeneity that acts as an attractor for magnetic flux vortices. The curve of the critical current versus magnetic field for a Josephson junction with a resistive microinhomogeneity is constructed with the aid of a numerical simulation, and a comparison is made with the critical curve of a junction of exponentially varying width. The possibility of replacing a distributed inhomogeneity in a Josephson junction by a local inhomogeneity at the end of the junction is thereby demonstrated; this can have certain advantages from a technological point of view.

  6. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions. PMID:25282046

  7. Downregulation of gap junctions in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Leithe, Edward; Sirnes, Solveig; Omori, Yasufumi; Rivedal, Edgar

    2006-12-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular plasma membrane domains enriched in channels that allow direct exchange of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells. Gap junction channels are composed of a family of transmembrane proteins called connexin. Connexins play important roles in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cancer cells usually have downregulated levels of gap junctions, and several lines of evidence suggest that loss of gap junctional intercellular communication is an important step in carcinogenesis. In support of this hypothesis are studies showing that reexpression of connexins in cancer cells causes normalization of cell growth control and reduced tumor growth. To gain a more detailed understanding of the role of connexins as tumor suppressors, a clearer picture of the mechanisms involved in loss of gap junctions in cancer cells is needed. Furthermore, defining the mechanisms involved in downregulation of connexins in carcinogenesis will be an important step toward utilizing the potential of connexins as targets in cancer prevention and therapy. Various mechanisms are involved in the loss of gap junctions in cancer cells, ranging from loss of connexin gene transcription to aberrant trafficking of connexin proteins. This review will discuss our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in the downregulation of gap junctions in cancer cells. PMID:17425504

  8. Orthogonal arrays in normal and injured respiratory airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R E

    1985-02-01

    Orthogonal arrays are found on plasma membranes of glial cells, in the central nervous system, on muscle plasma membranes at neuromuscular junctions, and on a variety of epithelial cells. These structures have been correlated with ion flux. With the aid of freeze fracture technique, orthogonal particle arrays were found on plasma membranes on airway epithelial cells of rats and hamsters. They have been found in abundance at the base of secretory cells throughout normal airway epithelium. These structures were found to increase in number during regeneration in response to injury and they were found in great numbers on plasma membranes of all airway cells in response to acute and chronic NO2 exposure. The lateral and basal plasma membranes of the respiratory epithelium are a new source for studying orthogonal arrays. The normal number and distribution of these arrays can be perturbed in response to mechanical and chemical injury. PMID:3968185

  9. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-15

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/{radical}(2), the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  10. Plasticity of single-atom Pb junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Salgado, C.; Néel, N.; Palacios, J. J.; Kröger, J.

    2016-06-01

    A low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was used to fabricate atomic contacts on Pb(111). Conductance characteristics of the junctions were simultaneously recorded with forming and subsequent breaking of the contacts. A pronounced hysteresis effect in conductance traces was observed from junctions comprising the clean Pb(111) surface. The hysteretic behavior was less profound in contacts to single Pb atoms adsorbed to Pb(111). Density-functional calculations reproduced the experimental results by performing a full ab initio modeling of plastic junction deformations. A comprehensive description of the experimental findings was achieved by considering different atomic tip apex geometries.

  11. New Phenomena in Josephson SINIS Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. F.

    1995-06-01

    We analyze the dc and ac Josephson effects in SaINISb junctions in which an additional bias current flows in the N layer. The case of low temperatures and voltages \\(eV, T<<Δ\\) is considered in the dirty limit. We show that the critical Josephson current may change sign, and the considered SINIS junction may become a π junction if the voltage drop across the N/Sa interface exceeds a certain value \\(eVN>Δ/2\\). The ac Josephson effect may arise even if the current flows only through the N/Sa interface, whereas the current through the Sb/N interface is absent.

  12. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  13. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  14. delta-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, J.; Koshelets, V. P.; Dmitriev, P.

    2010-02-01

    The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect the persistent currents circulating in a superconducting loop. Analytical and numerical results indicate that the presence of fractional vortices leads to remarkable differences from the conventional case of uniformly distributed dc bias current. The theoretical findings are supported by detailed measurements on a number of delta-biased samples having different electrical and geometrical parameters.

  15. Grand Junction Resource Area, Resource Management Plan, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    Implementation of a resource management plan is proposed for the 2.0-million-acre Grand Junction Planning Area, located in west-central Colorado. Under the preferred alternative, existing withdrawals from mineral location on 124,442 acres would continue and an additional 154,067 acres would be withdrawn. Approximately 14,100 acres would be identified as unsuitable for further coal leasing. Approximately 624,701 acres would be open to oil and gas leasing without stipulations; 685,603 acres would be open to oil and gas leasing with stipulations; and 149,087 acres would be closed to oil and gas leasing. Air quality enhancement, soil stabilization, and watershed protection would be emphasized. Habitats of major wildlife species and of threatened and endangered plants and animals would be actively managed, but no new livestock management actions would be implemented. The wild horse herd would be allowed to expand from 65 to 120 animals. Paleontological sites and 11,685 archaeological sites would be protected. Approximately 1319 acres of commercial forest land would be identified as suitable for management, and 2800 cords of fuel wood would be offered for sale annually. The three existing developed recreation sites would be maintained, and the Mud Springs site would be expanded to accommodate more group use.

  16. 40.8% Efficient Inverted Triple-Junction Solar Cell with Two Independently Metamorphic Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Ward, J. S.; Duda, A.; Olavarria, W. J.; Moriarty, T. E.; Kiehl, J. T.; Romero, M. J.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.

    2008-01-01

    A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 40.8% at 326 suns concentration is demonstrated in a monolithically grown, triple-junction III-V solar cell structure in which each active junction is composed of an alloy with a different lattice constant chosen to maximize the theoretical efficiency. The semiconductor structure was grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy in an inverted configuration with a 1.83 eV Ga{sub .51}In{sub .49}P top junction lattice-matched to the GaAs substrate, a metamorphic 1.34 eV In{sub .04}Ga{sub .96}As middle junction, and a metamorphic 0.89 eV In{sub .37}Ga{sub .63}As bottom junction. The two metamorphic junctions contained approximately 1 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -2} and 2-3 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} threading dislocations, respectively.

  17. Increasing gap junctional coupling: a tool for dissecting the role of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Haugan, Ketil; Stahlhut, Martin; Kjølbye, Anne-Louise; Hennan, James K; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2007-03-01

    Much of our current knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological role of gap junctions is based on experiments where coupling has been reduced by either chemical agents or genetic modification. This has brought evidence that gap junctions are important in many physiological processes. In a number of cases, gap junctions have been implicated in the initiation and progress of disease, and experimental uncoupling has been used to investigate the exact role of coupling. The inverse approach, i.e., to increase coupling, has become possible in recent years and represents a new way of testing the role of gap junctions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge obtained with agents that selectively increase gap junctional intercellular coupling. Two approaches will be reviewed: increasing coupling by the use of antiarrhythmic peptide and its synthetic analogs and by interfering with the gating of gap junctional channels.

  18. Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with Single-Electron Transistor Readout for Detection of Sub-mm Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Wollack, E. J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Teufel, J.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junction detectors have the potential for photon-counting sensitivity at sub-mm wavelengths. The device consists of an antenna structure to couple radiation into a small superconducting volume and cause quasiparticle excitations, and a single-electron transistor to measure currents through tunnel junction contacts to the absorber volume. We will describe optimization of device parameters, and recent results on fabrication techniques for producing devices with high yield for detector arrays. We will also present modeling of expected saturation power levels, antenna coupling, and rf multiplexing schemes.

  19. The Conductor-Dielectric Junctions in a Low Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris; Galofaro, Joel; Ferguson, Dale; deGroot, Wim; Thomson, Clint; Dennison, J. R.; Davies, Robert

    1999-01-01

    A conductor-dielectric junction exposed to the space environment is a frequent spacecraft design feature. Due to spacecraft charging and/or solar array operation, the conductor can acquire a high potential with respect to the surrounding plasma. If this potential is positive the insulators adjacent to exposed conductors can collect current as if they were conductors themselves. This phenomenon, called snapover, results in a substantial increase in current collection, and may even result in a glow discharge if the potential is high enough. If a conductor has a negative potential, arcing can occur at the site of a junction. Both of these phenomena negatively affect spacecraft operation. To prevent negative consequences, the physical mechanisms of snapover and arc inception require investigation. In this paper, results are presented of an experimental and theoretical study of snapover, glow discharge, and arc phenomena for different materials immersed in argon or xenon plasmas. The effect of snapover is investigated for several metal-dielectric junctions: copper-teflon, copper-Kapton, copper-glass, aluminum-teflon, aluminum-Kapton, steel-teflon, anodized aluminum with pinholes, and copper-ceramics. I-V curves are measured and snapover inception voltages, essential parameters (increase in current and collection area due to secondary electrons), and glow discharge inception thresholds are determined. Optical spectra are obtained for glow discharges in both argon and xenon plasmas. These spectra provide information regarding atomic species entrapped in the glow region. Some spectral lines can be used to estimate plasma parameters in the discharge area. A video-camera and linear array were used to confirm that snapover inception is accompanied by very low intensity visible light emission. This result seems to be important for the estimate of the light pollution around spacecraft. Optical spectra (wavelengths 380-650 nm) of arcs are also obtained on a negatively biased

  20. Ferromagnetic planar Josephson junction with transparent interfaces: a φ junction proposal.

    PubMed

    Heim, D M; Pugach, N G; Kupriyanov, M Yu; Goldobin, E; Koelle, D; Kleiner, R

    2013-05-29

    We calculate the current-phase relation of a planar Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic weak link located on top of a thin normal metal film. Following experimental observations we assume transparent superconductor-ferromagnet interfaces. This provides the best interlayer coupling and a low suppression of the superconducting correlations penetrating from the superconducting electrodes into the ferromagnetic layer. We show that this Josephson junction is a promising candidate for experimental φ junction realization. PMID:23636963

  1. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  2. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  3. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  4. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  5. Local Frame Junction Trees in SLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, Frank O.

    2005-11-01

    Junction trees (JT) is a general purpose tool for exact inference on graphical models. Many of the existing algorithms for building junction trees require a fixed static graphical model. The construction process is not unique, finding the one with the best computational structure (smallest clique size) is also a hard problem. For large scale inference problems, such as Geo-referencing using triangular geodetic networks or equivalent, the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem in robotics pose some challenges to junction tree applications. Incremental junction tree techniques for dynamic graphical models prescribe heuristic methods for growing the tree structure, and are applicable to large scale graphical models. Of concern are the proliferative widening of the tree, which makes message passing expensive. In the context of SLAM we present a new apporach that exploits the local frame dependence of novel observation variables.

  6. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  7. Random telegraph signals in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Jan; González, Maria Teresa; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2014-11-26

    We investigate conductance fluctuations in molecular junctions using a mechanically controllable break junction setup in a liquid environment. In contrast to conventional break junction measurements, time-dependent conductance signals were recorded while reducing the gap size between the two contact electrodes. Only small amplitude fluctuations of the conductance are observed when measuring in pure solvent. Conductance traces recorded in solutions containing alkanedithiols show significantly larger fluctuations which can take the form of random telegraph signals. Such signals emerge in a limited conductance range, which corresponds well to the known molecular conductance of the compounds investigated. These large-amplitude fluctuations are attributed to the formation and thermally driven breaking of bonds between a molecule and a metal electrode and provide a still poorly explored source of information on the dynamics of molecular junctions formation. The lifetimes of the high and low conductance states are found to vary between 0.1 ms and 0.1 s. PMID:25352489

  8. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  9. The Inherent Properties of DNA Four-way Junctions: Comparing the Crystal Structures of Holliday Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Eichman, Brandt F.; Ortiz-Lombardía, Miguel; Aymamí, Joan; Coll, Miquel; Ho, Pui Shing

    2015-01-01

    Holliday junctions are four-stranded DNA complexes that are formed during recombination and related DNA repair events. Much work has focused on the overall structure and properties of four-way junctions in solution, but we are just now beginning to understand these complexes at the atomic level. The crystal structures of two all-DNA Holliday junctions have been determined recently from the sequences d(CCGGGACCGG) and d(CCGGTACCGG). A detailed comparison of the two structures helps to distinguish distortions of the DNA conformation that are inherent to the cross-overs of the junctions in this crystal system from those that are consequences of the mismatched dG·dA base-pair in the d(CCGGGACCGG) structure. This analysis shows that the junction itself perturbs the sequence-dependent conformational features of the B-DNA duplexes and the associated patterns of hydration in the major and minor grooves only minimally. This supports the idea that a DNA four-way junction can be assembled at relatively low energetic cost. Both structures show a concerted rotation of the adjacent duplex arms relative to B-DNA, and this is discussed in terms of the conserved interactions between the duplexes at the junctions and further down the helical arms. The interactions distant from the strand cross-overs of the junction appear to be significant in defining its macroscopic properties, including the angle relating the stacked duplexes across the junction. PMID:12126623

  10. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  11. Two junction effects in dc SQUID phase qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, B. K.; Kwon, H.; Przybysz, A. J.; Budoyo, R.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2011-03-01

    The dc SQUID phase qubit was designed to allow one isolation junction to filter bias current noise from a second junction operating as a single junction phase qubit. As junctions shrink to minimize dielectric loss, the Josephson inductances of each junction approach the coupling loop inductance and this single junction picture appears inadequate. We consider a two-junction model of the dc SQUID phase qubit, where the qubit now corresponds to one of the normal oscillatory modes of the full SQUID. We discuss applications of this model to sweet spots in various control parameters and unusual behavior in the tunneling state measurement. Funded by DOD, CNAM and JQI.

  12. Bond resistances in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painelli, Anna

    2006-03-01

    The description of molecular contacts is one of the hardest problems in modeling molecular junctions. In common approaches macroscopic leads ensure a finite potential drop and hence a driving force for the current. Recently, a different strategy is emerging where a steady-state DC current is forced in the molecule, by making resort to Lagrange multipliers, or by drawing a magnetic flux through the molecule. The strategy is promising, but two main problems remain to be solved: (1) the calculation of the potential drop needed to sustain the current, and (2) the definition of the potential profile along the molecule. Here the Joule law is used to evaluate the potential drop from the electrical power spent on the molecule, and continuity constraints for steady-state DC current are implemented to get information on the potential profile. Borrowing powerful concepts from the field of molecular spectroscopy, emphasis is put on the molecule, while clamping information about contacts in the molecular relaxation matrix. The molecule is described in a real-space approach, leading to a suggestive analogy between the molecule and an electrical circuit where resistances are associated with chemical bonds.

  13. Heat dissipation in atomic-scale junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woochul; Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Zotti, Linda Angela; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Reddy, Pramod

    2013-06-13

    Atomic and single-molecule junctions represent the ultimate limit to the miniaturization of electrical circuits. They are also ideal platforms for testing quantum transport theories that are required to describe charge and energy transfer in novel functional nanometre-scale devices. Recent work has successfully probed electric and thermoelectric phenomena in atomic-scale junctions. However, heat dissipation and transport in atomic-scale devices remain poorly characterized owing to experimental challenges. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with integrated nanoscale thermocouples to investigate heat dissipation in the electrodes of single-molecule ('molecular') junctions. We find that if the junctions have transmission characteristics that are strongly energy dependent, this heat dissipation is asymmetric--that is, unequal between the electrodes--and also dependent on both the bias polarity and the identity of the majority charge carriers (electrons versus holes). In contrast, junctions consisting of only a few gold atoms ('atomic junctions') whose transmission characteristics show weak energy dependence do not exhibit appreciable asymmetry. Our results unambiguously relate the electronic transmission characteristics of atomic-scale junctions to their heat dissipation properties, establishing a framework for understanding heat dissipation in a range of mesoscopic systems where transport is elastic--that is, without exchange of energy in the contact region. We anticipate that the techniques established here will enable the study of Peltier effects at the atomic scale, a field that has been barely explored experimentally despite interesting theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the experimental advances described here are also expected to enable the study of heat transport in atomic and molecular junctions--an important and challenging scientific and technological goal that has remained elusive.

  14. Photovoltaic device having an extended PN junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Aiello, Robert Vincent (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A photovoltaic device having essentially only a body of semiconductor material having a first region of one conductivity type in contact with a second region of the opposite conductivity type, forming a portion of the device PN junction therebetween. A plurality of pocket regions of the same conductivity type as the first region extend into the second region thereby further defining a portion of the PN junction in the second region.

  15. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  16. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  17. Method of fabrication of Josephson tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Michikami, O.; Katoh, Y.; Takenaka, H.; Tanabe, K.; Yoshii, S.

    1983-11-01

    There is disclosed a method of fabrication of a Josephson tunnel junction device. A surface of a base electrode of Nb or Nb compound is subjected to sputter cleaning and then to plasma oxidation in an atmosphere of a diluent gas and oxygen to form thereon an oxide layer serving as a tunnel barrier. A counter electrode is then formed on the oxide layer to provide the Josephson tunnel junction.

  18. Large scale two-dimensional arrays of magnesium diboride superconducting quantum interference devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane A. Dynes, R. C.; Wong, T. J.; Cho, E. Y.; Beeman, J. W.; Yung, C. S.; Moeckly, B. H.

    2014-05-05

    Magnetic field sensors based on two-dimensional arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices were constructed from magnesium diboride thin films. Each array contained over 30 000 Josephson junctions fabricated by ion damage of 30 nm weak links through an implant mask defined by nano-lithography. Current-biased devices exhibited very large voltage modulation as a function of magnetic field, with amplitudes as high as 8 mV.

  19. An advanced space photovoltaic concentrator array using Fresnel lenses, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark J.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of a space concentrator array which uses refractive optics, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers to achieve excellent performance at a very low array mass is documented. The prismatically covered cells have established records for space cell performance (24.2 percent efficient at 100 AM0 suns and 25 C) and terrestrial single-junction cell performance (29.3 percent efficient at 200 AM1.5 suns and 25 C).

  20. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  1. Triple junction motion and grain microstructure evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gottstein, G. . E-mail: gottstein@imm.rwth-aachen.de; Ma, Y.; Shvindlerman, L.S.

    2005-03-01

    The classical concepts of grain growth in polycrystals are based on the dominant role of grain boundaries. This is reflected by the well known von Neumann-Mullins relation. According to this approach triple junctions do not affect grain boundary motion, and their role in grain growth is reduced to maintaining the thermodynamically prescribed equilibrium angles at the lines where boundaries meet. In the current study the experimental data of triple junction mobility are considered with respect to the process of grain growth in 2D systems, in particular with regard to the controlling kinetics. When boundary kinetics prevails grain growth in a polycrystal complies with the von Neumann-Mullins relation. When grain growth is governed by the mobility of triple junctions the kinetics change, and the von Neumann-Mullins relation does not hold anymore. This is the more pronounced the smaller the triple junction mobility. We present a generalized theory of 2D grain growth including a limited triple junction mobility. In this concept the criterion {lambda} plays a central role. It reflects the ratio of boundary to triple junction mobility but is proportional to the grain size as well. The generalized von Neumann-Mullins relation can be expressed in terms of {lambda}. For small values of {lambda}, conspicuous changes of microstructure evolution during grain growth and of microstructural stability are predicted. The theoretical predictions are compared to results of computer simulations by a virtual vertex model.

  2. Transport Fluctuations in Metal-Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malen, Jonathan; Baheti, Kanhayalal; Doak, Peter; Segalman, Rachel; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-03-01

    Thermopower of metal-molecule junctions is an alternative transport characteristic to conductance that can be experimentally measured. A scanning tunneling microscope break junction was used to measure the thermopower of such molecular junctions. Temperature bias applied between gold contacts across the bridging molecules generates a thermoelectric voltage. Hitherto, the statistical analysis of the data from both thermopower and conductance measurements has focused on the histogram peaks rather than the spread of the data. We find that the full width half maximums (FWHM) of the voltage histograms are finite at zero temperature bias and increase in proportion to the temperature bias. Johnson Noise is the most likely cause of the zero bias FWHM, and its magnitude is thereby related to the junction conductance. For 1,4,Benzenedithiol (BDT) the junction conductance associated with the zero bias FWHM is 0.02G0, in close agreement with prior conductance measurements of BDT. The dependence of FWHM on temperature bias may provide further insight to the origin of stochastic fluctuations in metal molecule junctions.

  3. Grain boundary hardening and triple junction hardening in polycrystalline molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Shigeaki . E-mail: skoba@ashitech.ac.jp; Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Watanabe, Tadao

    2005-02-01

    The grain boundary and triple junction hardenings in molybdenum with different carbon content were studied in connection with the character and the connectivity of grain boundaries at triple junctions by the micro-indentation test. The triple junction hardening is smaller at the junctions composed of low-angle and {sigma} boundaries than at the junctions composed of random boundaries. This difference in the hardening depending on the grain boundary connectivity becomes more significant with a decrease in carbon content in molybdenum.

  4. Thermophotovoltaic Array Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    SBurger; E Brown; K Rahner; L Danielson; J Openlander; J Vell; D Siganporia

    2004-07-29

    A systematic approach to thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array design and fabrication was used to optimize the performance of a 192-cell TPV array. The systematic approach began with cell selection criteria that ranked cells and then matched cell characteristics to maximize power output. Following cell selection, optimization continued with an array packaging design and fabrication techniques that introduced negligible electrical interconnect resistance and minimal parasitic losses while maintaining original cell electrical performance. This paper describes the cell selection and packaging aspects of array optimization as applied to fabrication of a 192-cell array.

  5. RIE-induced n-on-p junction HgCdTe photodiodes: effects of passivant technology on bake stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, John M.; Antoszewski, Jarek; White, J. K.; Pal, Ravindra; Nguyen, Thuyen; Musca, Charles A.; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2001-11-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) of HgCdTe using CH4:H2 is known to generate p- to n-type conversion in both intrinsically doped and extrinsically doped p-type HgCdTe. The use of RIE to form n-on-p junctions in planar diodes has a number of advantages including state of the art diode performance, high uniformity, passivation of the junction at the surface throughout processing, the possibility of the formation of deep junctions, and removal of any need for high temperature processing after junction formation. However, it has long been believed that H2 based plasma junction formation techniques will be long-term unstable. Initial results are presented indicating that surface passivation plays a major role in determining the stability of planar junctions formed using H2 based RIE. Comparisons of ZnS and CdTe passivation for n-on p-junctions formed on x approximately 0.3 Hg1-xCdxTe show dramatic differences in 2 to 3 hour, 80 degrees C bake stability tests. Diodes fabricated using either passivant initially exhibit R0A performance close to the theoretical limit, but are degraded after a 2 hour, 80 degrees C bake. Diodes with CdTe passivation have moderate performance as fabricated, but exhibit improvement rather than degradation after 3 hour, 80 degrees C bake. Such results indicate that planar junctions formed using H2 based RIE may offer a viable technology for low cost, highly uniform, large area IR detector arrays if passivation issues are satisfactorily resolved. Finally, a dual layer ZnS/CdTe passivation process is introduced which results in bake-stable devices after a 17 hour, 80 degrees C bake.

  6. Superconducting tunnel junction detectors for soft x-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeve, P.; Hijmering, R. A.; Martin, D. D. E.; Jerjen, I.; Peacock, A.; Venn, R.

    2006-06-01

    The requirement on energy resolution for detectors in future X-ray satelite missions such as XEUS (X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy mission) is <2eV in the soft x-ray range of 50-2000 eV, with a detection efficiency >80%. In addition, the requirements for field of view and angular resolution demand a detector array of typically 150x150 micron sized pixels in a 30x30 pixel format. DROIDs (Distributed Read Out Imaging Devices), consisting of a superconducting absorber strip with superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as read-out devices on either end, can fulfill these requirements. The amplitudes of the two signals from the STJs provide information on the absorption position and the energy of the incoming photon in the absorber. In this paper we present the development status of Ta/Al 1-D DROIDs, as well as the the short term development program that should result in a full size XEUS array.

  7. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Scheuring, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  8. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The solar cell module process development activities in the areas of surface preparation are presented. The process step development was carried out on texture etching including the evolution of a conceptual process model for the texturing process; plasma etching; and diffusion studies that focused on doped polymer diffusion sources. Cell processing was carried out to test process steps and a simplified diode solar cell process was developed. Cell processing was also run to fabricate square cells to populate sample minimodules. Module fabrication featured the demonstration of a porcelainized steel glass structure that should exceed the 20 year life goal of the low cost silicon array program. High efficiency cell development was carried out in the development of the tandem junction cell and a modification of the TJC called the front surface field cell. Cell efficiencies in excess of 16 percent at AM1 have been attained with only modest fill factors. The transistor-like model was proposed that fits the cell performance and provides a guideline for future improvements in cell performance.

  9. Novel microwave properties and "memory effect" in magnetic nanowire array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Xiaoming

    2011-12-01

    magnetic field pulses as high as a few hundred Oe without breaking down. In the proposed EMP detector, a magnetic field sensor is required to measure the surface field of the magnetic nanowire array. MgO based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is one type of magnetic field sensors. We investigated the evolution of the magnetic transport properties as a function of short annealing time in MgO based MTJ junctions. It is found that the desired sensor behavior appears in samples annealed for 17 minutes. The result can be well fitted by using the superparamagnetism theory, suggesting the formation of superparamagnetic particles in the free layer during the high temperature annealing. The control of MTJ properties with annealing time is desirable in magnetic field sensor productions.

  10. Controllable 0–π Josephson junctions containing a ferromagnetic spin valve

    DOE PAGES

    Gingrich, E. C.; Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Glick, Joseph A.; Wang, Yixing; Miller, D. L.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, Jr., W. P.; Birge, Norman O.

    2016-03-14

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are antagonistic forms of order, and rarely coexist. Many interesting new phenomena occur, however, in hybrid superconducting/ferromagnetic systems. For example, a Josephson junction containing a ferromagnetic material can exhibit an intrinsic phase shift of π in its ground state for certain thicknesses of the material. Such ‘π-junctions’ were first realized experimentally in 2001, and have been proposed as circuit elements for both high-speed classical superconducting computing and for quantum computing. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the phase state of a Josephson junction containing two ferromagnetic layers can be toggled between 0 and pi by changing the relativemore » orientation of the two magnetizations. These controllable 0–π junctions have immediate applications in cryogenic memory, where they serve as a necessary component to an ultralow power superconducting computer. Such a fully superconducting computer is estimated to be orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than current semiconductor-based supercomputers. Here, phase-controllable junctions also open up new possibilities for superconducting circuit elements such as superconducting ‘programmable logic’, where they could function in superconducting analogues to field-programmable gate arrays.« less

  11. Development and fabrication of a solar cell junction processing system. Quarterly report No. 2, July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Siesling, R.

    1980-07-01

    The basic objectives of the program are the following: (1) to design, develop, construct and deliver a junction processing system which will be capable of producing solar cell junctions by means of ion implantation followed by pulsed electron beam annealing; (2) to include in the system a wafer transport mechanism capable of transferring 4-inch-diameter wafers into and out of the vacuum chamber where the ion implantation and pulsed electron beam annealing processes take place; (3) to integrate, test and demonstrate the system prior to its delivery to JPL along with detailed operating and maintenance manuals; and (4) to estimate component lifetimes and costs, as necessary for the contract, for the performance of comprehensive analyses in accordance with the Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards (SAMICS). Under this contract the automated junction formation equipment to be developed involves a new system design incorporating a modified, government-owned, JPL-controlled ion implanter into a Spire-developed pulsed electron beam annealer and wafer transport system. When modified, the ion implanter will deliver a 16 mA beam of /sup 31/P/sup +/ ions with a fluence of 2.5 x 10/sup 15/ ions per square centimeter at an energy of 10 keV. The throughput design goal rate for the junction processor is 10/sup 7/ four-inch-diameter wafers per year.

  12. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support.

  13. Single electron tunneling in large scale nanojunction arrays with bisferrocene-nanoparticle hybrids.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Shilpi; Kumar, Susmit; Marzo, Pasquale; Primiceri, Elisabetta; Di Corato, Riccardo; Rinaldi, Ross; Cozzi, Pier Giorgio; Bramanti, Alessandro Paolo; Maruccio, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    We report on the fabrication and single electron tunneling behaviour of large scale arrays of nanogap electrodes bridged by bisferrocene-gold nanoparticle hybrids (BFc-AuNP). Coulomb staircase was observed in the low temperature current-voltage curves measured on the junctions with asymmetric tunnel barriers. On the other hand, junctions with symmetric tunneling barrier exhibited mere nonlinear current voltage characteristics without discrete staircase. The experimental results agreed well with simulations based on the orthodox theory. The junction resistance showed thermally activated conduction behaviour at higher temperature. The overall voltage and temperature dependent results show that the transport behaviour of the large arrays of single particle devices obtained by a facile optical lithography and chemical etching process corresponds with the behaviour of single particle devices fabricated by other techniques like e-beam lithography and mechanical breaking methods.

  14. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  15. Junctional Adhesion Molecule A Promotes Epithelial Tight Junction Assembly to Augment Lung Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Ward, Christina; Kwon, Mike; Mitchell, Patrick O.; Quintero, David A.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.; Koval, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function is maintained by tight junction proteins that control paracellular fluid flux. Among these proteins is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), an Ig fold transmembrane protein. To assess JAM-A function in the lung, we depleted JAM-A in primary alveolar epithelial cells using shRNA. In cultured cells, loss of JAM-A caused an approximately 30% decrease in transepithelial resistance, decreased expression of the tight junction scaffold protein zonula occludens 1, and disrupted junctional localization of the structural transmembrane protein claudin-18. Consistent with findings in other organs, loss of JAM-A decreased β1 integrin expression and impaired filamentous actin formation. Using a model of mild systemic endoxotemia induced by i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide, we report that JAM-A−/− mice showed increased susceptibility to pulmonary edema. On injury, the enhanced susceptibility of JAM-A−/− mice to edema correlated with increased, transient disruption of claudin-18, zonula occludens 1, and zonula occludens 2 localization to lung tight junctions in situ along with a delay in up-regulation of claudin-4. In contrast, wild-type mice showed no change in lung tight junction morphologic features in response to mild systemic endotoxemia. These findings support a key role of JAM-A in promoting tight junction homeostasis and lung barrier function by coordinating interactions among claudins, the tight junction scaffold, and the cytoskeleton. PMID:25438062

  16. Esophagogastric junction distensibility in hiatus hernia.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, C; McMahon, B P; Ejstrud, P; Ostapiuk, M A; Funch-Jensen, P; Drewes, A M

    2016-07-01

    Hiatus hernia is known to be an important risk factor for developing gastroesophageal reflux disease. We aimed to use the endoscopic functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP) to evaluate the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. EndoFLIP assessments were made in 30 patients with hiatus hernia and Barrett's esophagus, and in 14 healthy controls. The EndoFLIP was placed straddling the esophagogastric junction and the bag distended stepwise to 50 mL. Cross-sectional areas of the bag and intra-bag pressures were recorded continuously. Measurements were made in the separate sphincter components and hiatus hernia cavity. EndoFLIP measured functional aspects such as sphincter distensibility and pressure of all esophagogastric junction components and visualized all hiatus hernia present at endoscopy. The lower esophageal sphincter in hiatus hernia patients had a lower pressure (e.g. 47.7 ± 13.0 vs. 61.4 ± 19.2 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the common esophagogastric junction in controls. In hiatus hernia patients, the crural diaphragm had a lower pressure (e.g. 29.6 ± 10.1 vs. 47.7 ± 13.0 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the lower esophageal sphincter. There was a significant association between symptom scores in patients and EndoFLIP assessment. Conclusively, EndoFLIP was a useful tool. To evaluate the presence of a hiatus hernia and to measure the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. Furthermore, EndoFLIP distinguished the separate esophagogastric junction components in hiatus hernia patients, and may help us understand the biomechanics of the esophagogastric junction and the mechanisms behind hiatal herniation. PMID:25789842

  17. Superconducting Bolometer Array Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Ed; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of far-infrared and submillimeter instruments require large arrays of detectors containing thousands of elements. These arrays will necessarily be multiplexed, and superconducting bolometer arrays are the most promising present prospect for these detectors. We discuss our current research into superconducting bolometer array technologies, which has recently resulted in the first multiplexed detections of submillimeter light and the first multiplexed astronomical observations. Prototype arrays containing 512 pixels are in production using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) architecture, which can be extended easily to 1000 pixel arrays. Planar arrays of close-packed bolometers are being developed for the GBT (Green Bank Telescope) and for future space missions. For certain applications, such as a slewed far-infrared sky survey, feedhorncoupling of a large sparsely-filled array of bolometers is desirable, and is being developed using photolithographic feedhorn arrays. Individual detectors have achieved a Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of -10(exp 17) W/square root of Hz at 300mK, but several orders of magnitude improvement are required and can be reached with existing technology. The testing of such ultralow-background detectors will prove difficult, as this requires optical loading of below IfW. Antenna-coupled bolometer designs have advantages for large format array designs at low powers due to their mode selectivity.

  18. Single electron tunneling in large scale nanojunction arrays with bisferrocene-nanoparticle hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Shilpi; Kumar, Susmit; Marzo, Pasquale; Primiceri, Elisabetta; di Corato, Riccardo; Rinaldi, Ross; Cozzi, Pier Giorgio; Bramanti, Alessandro Paolo; Maruccio, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and single electron tunneling behaviour of large scale arrays of nanogap electrodes bridged by bisferrocene-gold nanoparticle hybrids (BFc-AuNP). Coulomb staircase was observed in the low temperature current-voltage curves measured on the junctions with asymmetric tunnel barriers. On the other hand, junctions with symmetric tunneling barrier exhibited mere nonlinear current voltage characteristics without discrete staircase. The experimental results agreed well with simulations based on the orthodox theory. The junction resistance showed thermally activated conduction behaviour at higher temperature. The overall voltage and temperature dependent results show that the transport behaviour of the large arrays of single particle devices obtained by a facile optical lithography and chemical etching process corresponds with the behaviour of single particle devices fabricated by other techniques like e-beam lithography and mechanical breaking methods.We report on the fabrication and single electron tunneling behaviour of large scale arrays of nanogap electrodes bridged by bisferrocene-gold nanoparticle hybrids (BFc-AuNP). Coulomb staircase was observed in the low temperature current-voltage curves measured on the junctions with asymmetric tunnel barriers. On the other hand, junctions with symmetric tunneling barrier exhibited mere nonlinear current voltage characteristics without discrete staircase. The experimental results agreed well with simulations based on the orthodox theory. The junction resistance showed thermally activated conduction behaviour at higher temperature. The overall voltage and temperature dependent results show that the transport behaviour of the large arrays of single particle devices obtained by a facile optical lithography and chemical etching process corresponds with the behaviour of single particle devices fabricated by other techniques like e-beam lithography and mechanical breaking methods. Electronic supplementary

  19. Electronic Switch Arrays for Managing Microbattery Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Alahmad, Mahmoud; Sukumar, Vinesh; Zghoul, Fadi; Buck, Kevin; Hess, Herbert; Li, Harry; Cox, David

    2008-01-01

    Integrated circuits have been invented for managing the charging and discharging of such advanced miniature energy-storage devices as planar arrays of microscopic energy-storage elements [typically, microscopic electrochemical cells (microbatteries) or microcapacitors]. The architecture of these circuits enables implementation of the following energy-management options: dynamic configuration of the elements of an array into a series or parallel combination of banks (subarrarys), each array comprising a series of parallel combination of elements; direct addressing of individual banks for charging/or discharging; and, disconnection of defective elements and corresponding reconfiguration of the rest of the array to utilize the remaining functional elements to obtain the desited voltage and current performance. An integrated circuit according to the invention consists partly of a planar array of field-effect transistors that function as switches for routing electric power among the energy-storage elements, the power source, and the load. To connect the energy-storage elements to the power source for charging, a specific subset of switches is closed; to connect the energy-storage elements to the load for discharging, a different specific set of switches is closed. Also included in the integrated circuit is circuitry for monitoring and controlling charging and discharging. The control and monitoring circuitry, the switching transistors, and interconnecting metal lines are laid out on the integrated-circuit chip in a pattern that registers with the array of energy-storage elements. There is a design option to either (1) fabricate the energy-storage elements in the corresponding locations on, and as an integral part of, this integrated circuit; or (2) following a flip-chip approach, fabricate the array of energy-storage elements on a separate integrated-circuit chip and then align and bond the two chips together.

  20. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  1. A single-gradient junction technique to replace multiple-junction shifts for craniospinal irradiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Austin; Ding, George X.

    2014-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) requires abutting fields at the cervical spine. Junction shifts are conventionally used to prevent setup error–induced overdosage/underdosage from occurring at the same location. This study compared the dosimetric differences at the cranial-spinal junction between a single-gradient junction technique and conventional multiple-junction shifts and evaluated the effect of setup errors on the dose distributions between both techniques for a treatment course and single fraction. Conventionally, 2 lateral brain fields and a posterior spine field(s) are used for CSI with weekly 1-cm junction shifts. We retrospectively replanned 4 CSI patients using a single-gradient junction between the lateral brain fields and the posterior spine field. The fields were extended to allow a minimum 3-cm field overlap. The dose gradient at the junction was achieved using dose painting and intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The effect of positioning setup errors on the dose distributions for both techniques was simulated by applying shifts of ± 3 and 5 mm. The resulting cervical spine doses across the field junction for both techniques were calculated and compared. Dose profiles were obtained for both a single fraction and entire treatment course to include the effects of the conventional weekly junction shifts. Compared with the conventional technique, the gradient-dose technique resulted in higher dose uniformity and conformity to the target volumes, lower organ at risk (OAR) mean and maximum doses, and diminished hot spots from systematic positioning errors over the course of treatment. Single-fraction hot and cold spots were improved for the gradient-dose technique. The single-gradient junction technique provides improved conformity, dose uniformity, diminished hot spots, lower OAR mean and maximum dose, and one plan for the entire treatment course, which reduces the potential human error associated with conventional 4-shifted plans.

  2. A Low-noise Micromachined Millimeter-Wave Heterodyne Mixer using Nb Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLange, Gert; Jacobson, Brian R.; Hu, Qing

    1996-01-01

    A heterodyne mixer with a micromachined horn antenna and a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction as mixing element is tested in the W-band (75-115 GHz) frequency range. Micromachined integrated horn antennas consist of a dipole antenna suspended on a thin Si3N4 dielectric membrane inside a pyramidal cavity etched in silicon. The mixer performance is optimized by using a backing plane behind the dipole antenna to tune out the capacitance of the tunnel junction. The lowest receiver noise temperature of 30 +/- 3 K (without any correction) is measured at 106 GHz with a 3-dB bandwidth of 8 GHz. This sensitivity is comparable to the state-of-the-art waveguide and quasi-optical SIS receivers, showing the potential use of micromachined horn antennas in imaging arrays.

  3. Silicon-germanium nanowire tunnel-FETs with homo- and heterostructure tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, S.; Blaeser, S.; Knoll, L.; Trellenkamp, S.; Fox, A.; Schäfer, A.; Hartmann, J. M.; Zhao, Q. T.; Mantl, S.

    2014-08-01

    Experimental results on tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) based on strained SiGe on SOI nanowire arrays are presented. A heterostructure SiGe/Si TFET with a vertical tunnel junction consisting of an in situ doped SiGe source and a Si channel with a minimum inverse subthreshold slope of 90 mV/dec is demonstrated. An increase in tunneling area results in higher on-current. The in situ doped heterojunction TFET shows great improvement compared to a homojunction SiGe on SOI nanowire design with implanted junctions. Temperature dependent measurements and device simulations are performed in order to analyze the tunnel transport mechanism in the devices.

  4. The atrioventricular junctions in Ebstein malformation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, S; Goltz, D; McCarthy, K; Cook, A; Connell, M; Smith, A; Anderson, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To review the anatomical structure of the right atrioventricular junction, including the specialised atrioventricular conduction system, in hearts with Ebstein's malformation, to identify potential substrates for the abnormalities in conduction.
METHODS—Five heart specimens representing the morphological spectrum of Ebstein malformation were examined grossly and histologically.
RESULTS—On the endocardial surface, the atrioventricular junction was marked by a faint line in two hearts, and by a small ridge in the other three. Analysis of the right parietal junction in four hearts revealed only two accessory muscular atrioventricular connections. A plane of fibrofatty tissue separated atrial from ventricular myocardium in the right parietal junction in all hearts. The compact atrioventricular node was closer to the coronary sinus than usual. Accessory nodoventricular connections were present in four hearts, while accessory fasciculo-ventricular connections were found in one. The right bundle branch was hypoplastic or absent in four hearts.
CONCLUSIONS—In this small series, the parietal atrioventricular junction was better developed than previously thought. Structural abnormalities of the atrioventricular conduction system, however, were present. These may account for some of the conduction abnormalities frequently observed with the Ebstein malformation.


Keywords: Ebstein's anomaly; atrioventricular node; bundle branch block; Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome PMID:10722549

  5. Proximal Junctional Kyphosis: Diagnosis, Pathogenesis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaewon

    2016-01-01

    Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is a common radiographic finding after long spinal fusion. A number of studies on the causes, risk factors, prevention, and treatment of PJK have been conducted. However, no clear definition of PJK has been established. In this paper, we aimed to clarify the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of PJK by reviewing relevant papers that have been published to date. A literature search was conducted on PubMed using "proximal junctional", "proximal junctional kyphosis", and "proximal junctional failure" as search keywords. Only studies that were published in English were included in this study. The incidence of PJK ranges from 5% to 46%, and it has been reported that 66% of cases occur 3 months after surgery and approximately 80% occur within 18 months. A number of studies have reported that there is no significantly different clinical outcome between PJK patients and non-PJK patients. One study showed that PJK patients expressed more pain than non-PJK patients. However, recent studies focused on proximal junctional failure (PJF), which is accepted as a severe form of PJK. PJF showed significant adverse impact in clinical aspect such as pain, neurologic deficit, ambulatory difficulties, and social isolation. Numerous previous studies have identified various risk factors and reported on the treatment and prevention of PJK. Based on these studies, we determined the clinical significance and impact of PJK. In addition, it is important to find a strategic approach to the proper treatment of PJK. PMID:27340542

  6. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  7. Conductance bistability in metal oxide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhongkui; Patel, Vijay; Monge, Esteban; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Pottorf, Shawn; Lukens, James; Likharev, Konstantin

    2009-03-01

    We are exploring conductance bistability (memory) effects in junctions based on metal oxides, in the context of their possible applications in hybrid CMOS/nanoelectronic (e.g., CMOL [1]) circuits. So far, we have investigated CuOx, NbOx and TiOx formed by thermal and plasma oxidation, with or without rapid thermal post-annealing (at 200 to 800^oC for 30 to 300 seconds). Conductance switching effects have been observed for all these materials. Particularly high endurance (over 1000 switching cycles) has been obtained for TiOx junctions plasma oxidized in 15mTorr oxygen and then post-annealed at 700^oC. However, the ON/OFF conductance ratio for these junctions is only about 5, and the sample-to-sample reproducibility is much lower than required for integrated circuit applications. Our plans are to extend our studies to a-Si junctions with one Ag electrode, and multilayer TiOx junctions, with the main goal to improve device reproducibility. The work is supported in part by AFOSR. [3pt] [1] K. K. Likharev, ``Hybrid CMOS/Nanoelectronic Circuits,'' accepted for publication in J. Nanoelectronics and Optoelectronics, Nov. 2008.

  8. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  9. Designing linear systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.K.P.; Tsai, Y.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    The authors develop a simple mapping technique to design linear systolic arrays. The basic idea of the technique is to map the computations of a certain class of two-dimensional systolic arrays onto one-dimensional arrays. Using this technique, systolic algorithms are derived for problems such as matrix multiplication and transitive closure on linearly connected arrays of PEs with constant I/O bandwidth. Compared to known designs in the literature, the technique leads to modular systolic arrays with constant hardware in each PE, few control lines, lexicographic data input/output, and improved delay time. The unidirectional flow of control and data in this design assures implementation of the linear array in the known fault models of wafer scale integration.

  10. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  11. Pacific Array (Transportable Broadband Ocean Floor Array)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Ekstrom, Goran; Evans, Rob; Forsyth, Don; Gaherty, Jim; Kennett, Brian; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Based on recent developments on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry1, together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (azimuthal, and hopefully radial), with deployments of ~15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for a 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way or concurrently (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure beneath Pacific ocean, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations is essential: if three countries/institutions participate this endeavor together, Pacific Array may be accomplished within five-or-so years.

  12. Radial junction solar cells based on heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Haoting

    The radial junction wire array structure was previously proposed as a solar cell geometry to separate the direction of carrier collection from the direction of light absorption, thereby circumventing the need to use high quality but expensive single crystal silicon (c-Si) material that has long minority carrier diffusion lengths. The Si radial junction structure can be realized by forming radial p-n junctions on Si pillar/wire arrays that have a diameter comparable to the minority carrier diffusion length. With proper design, the Si pillar arrays are also able to enhance light trapping and thereby increase the light absorption. However, the larger junction area and surface area on the pillar arrays compared to traditional planar junction Si solar cells makes it challenging to fabricate high performance devices due an in increase in surface defects. Therefore, effective surface passivation strategies are essential for radial junction devices. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using a heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure has previously been demonstrated as a very effective surface passivation layer for planar c-Si solar cells. It is therefore of interest to use a-Si:H in a HIT layer structure for radial p-n junction c-Si pillar array solar cells. This poses several challenges, however, including the need to fabricate ultra-thin a-Si:H layers conformally on high aspect ratio Si pillars, control the crystallinity at the a-Si:H/c-Si interface to yield a low interface state density and optimize the layer thicknesses, doping and contacts to yield high performance devices. This research in this thesis was aimed at developing the processing technology required to apply the HIT structure to radial junction Si pillar array solar cell devices and to evaluate the device characteristics. Initial studies focused on understanding the effects of process conditions on the growth rate and

  13. Phased-array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  14. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  15. Created-by-current states in long Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Andreeva, O. Yu.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-08-01

    Critical curves "critical current-external magnetic field" of long Josephson junctions with inhomogeneity and variable width are studied. We demonstrate the existence of regions of magnetic field where some fluxon states are stable only if the external current through the junction is different from zero. Position and size of such regions depend on the length of the junction, its geometry, parameters of inhomogeneity and form of the junction. The noncentral (left and right) pure fluxon states appear in the inhomogeneous Josephson junction with the increase in the junction length. We demonstrate new bifurcation points with change in width of the inhomogeneity and amplitude of the Josephson current through the inhomogeneity.

  16. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  17. Recent Progress on the Stretched Lens Array (SLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Markl; McDanal, A. J.; Piszczor, Michael; George, Patrick; Eskenazi, Michael; Botke, Matthew; Edwards, David; Hoppe, David; Brandhorst, Henry

    2005-01-01

    At the last Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology Conference, SPRAT XVII, held during the fateful week of 9/11/01, our team presented a paper on the early developments related to the new Stretched Lens Array (SLA), including its evolution from the successful SCARLET array on the NASA/JPL Deep Space 1 spacecraft. Within the past two years, the SLA team has made significant progress in the SLA technology, including the successful fabrication and testing of a complete four-panel prototype solar array wing (Fig. 1). The prototype wing verified the mechanical and structural design of the rigid-panel SLA approach, including multiple successful demonstrations of automatic wing deployment. One panel in the prototype wing included four fully functional photovoltaic receivers, employing triple-junction solar cells.

  18. 3D-High Resolution Manometry of the Esophagogastric Junction

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Monika A.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is a complex structure that challenges accurate manometric recording. This study aimed to define EGJ pressure morphology relative to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) during respiration with 3D high-resolution manometry (3D-HRM). METHODS A 7.5 cm long 3D-HRM array with 96 independent solid-state pressure sensors (axial spacing 0.75 cm, radial spacing 45°) was used to record EGJ pressure in 15 normal subjects. Concurrent videofluoroscopy was used to localize the SCJ marked with an endoclip. Ex-vivo experiments were done on the effect of bending the probe to match that seen fluoroscopically. RESULTS 3D-HRM EGJ pressure recordings were dominated by an asymmetric pressure peak superimposed on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) attributable to the crural diaphragm (CD). Median peak CD pressure at expiration and inspiration (51 and 119 mmHg respectively) was much greater in 3D-HRM than evident in HRM with circumferential pressure averaging. EGJ length, defined as the zone of circumferential pressure exceeding that of adjacent esophagus or stomach was also substantially shorter (2.4 cm) than evident in conventional HRM. No consistent circumferential EGJ pressure was evident distal to the SCJ in 3D-HRM recordings and ex-vivo experiments suggested that the intrgastric pressure peak seen contralateral to the CD related to bending the assembly rather than the sphincter per se. CONCLUSION 3D-HRM demonstrated a profoundly asymmetric and vigorous CD component to EGJ pressure superimposed on the LES. EGJ length was shorter than evident with conventional HRM and the distal margin of the EGJ sphincteric zone closely correlated with the SCJ. PMID:21595803

  19. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Javedani, J B

    2006-10-25

    Triple junctions are often initiation points for insulator flashover in pulsed power devices. The two-dimensional finite-element TriComp [1] modeling software suite was utilized for its electrostatic field modeling package to investigate electric field behavior in the anode and cathode triple junctions of a high voltage vacuum-insulator interface. TriComp enables simple extraction of values from a macroscopic solution for use as boundary conditions in a subset solution. Electric fields computed with this zoom capability correlate with theoretical analysis of the anode and cathode triple junctions within submicron distances for nominal electrode spacing of 1.0 cm. This paper will discuss the iterative zoom process with TriComp finite-element software and the corresponding theoretical verification of the results.

  20. Thermionic refrigeration at CNT-CNT junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to study carrier energy relaxation following thermionic emission at the junction of two van der Waals bonded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). An energy-dependent transmission probability gives rise to energy filtering at the junction, which is predicted to increase the average electron transport energy by as much as 0.115 eV, leading to an effective Seebeck coefficient of 386 μV/K. MC results predict a long energy relaxation length (˜8 μm) for hot electrons crossing the junction into the barrier SWCNT. For SWCNTs of optimal length, an analytical transport model is used to show that thermionic cooling can outweigh parasitic heat conduction due to high SWCNT thermal conductivity, leading to a significant cooling capacity (2.4 × 106 W/cm2).

  1. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  2. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms. PMID:26217173

  3. Synchronized Switching in a Josephson Junction Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J.

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity.

  4. Synchronized switching in a josephson junction crystal.

    PubMed

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity. PMID:24949766

  5. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  6. Vortex structures in exponentially shaped Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Boyadjiev, T. L.

    2005-04-01

    We report the numerical calculations of the static vortex structure and critical curves in exponentially shaped long Josephson junctions for in-line and overlap geometries. Stability of the static solutions is investigated by checking the sign of the smallest eigenvalue of the associated Sturm-Liouville problem. The change in the junction width leads to the renormalization of the magnetic flux in comparison with the case of a linear one-dimensional model. We study the influence of the model's parameters, and particularly, the shape parameter on the stability of the states of the magnetic flux. We compare the vortex structure and critical curves for the in-line and overlap geometries. Our numerically constructed critical curve of the Josephson junction matches well with the experimental one.

  7. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  8. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    DOEpatents

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  9. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  10. Straw man trade between multi-junction, gallium arsenide, and silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Edward M.

    1995-01-01

    Multi-junction (MJ), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and silicon (Si) solar cells have respective test efficiencies of approximately 24%, 18.5% and 14.8%. Multi-junction and gallium arsenide solar cells weigh more than silicon solar cells and cost approximately five times as much per unit power at the cell level. A straw man trade is performed for the TRMM spacecraft to determine which of these cell types would have offered an overall performance and price advantage to the spacecraft. A straw man trade is also performed for the multi-junction cells under the assumption that they will cost over ten times that of silicon cells at the cell level. The trade shows that the TRMM project, less the cost of the instrument, ground systems and mission operations, would spend approximately $552 thousand dollars per kilogram to launch and service science in the case of the spacecraft equipped with silicon solar cells. If these cells are changed out for gallium arsenide solar cells, an additional 31 kilograms of science can be launched and serviced at a price of approximately $90 thousand per kilogram. The weight reduction is shown to derive from the smaller area of the array and hence reductions in the weight of the array substrate and supporting structure. If the silicon solar cells are changed out for multi-junction solar cells, an additional 45 kilograms of science above the silicon base line can be launched and serviced at a price of approximately $58 thousand per kilogram. The trade shows that even if the multi-junction arrays are priced over ten times that of silicon cells, a price that is much higher than projected, that the additional 45 kilograms of science are launched and serviced at $182 thousand per kilogram. This is still much less than original $552 thousand per kilogram to launch and service the science. Data and qualitative factors are presented to show that these figures are subject to a great deal of uncertainty. Nonetheless, the benefit of the higher efficiency

  11. Straw man trade between multi-junction, gallium arsenide, and silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gaddy, E.M.

    1995-10-01

    Multi-junction (MJ), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and silicon (Si) solar cells have respective test efficiencies of approximately 24%, 18.5% and 14.8%. Multi-junction and gallium arsenide solar cells weigh more than silicon solar cells and cost approximately five times as much per unit power at the cell level. A straw man trade is performed for the TRMM spacecraft to determine which of these cell types would have offered an overall performance and price advantage to the spacecraft. A straw man trade is also performed for the multi-junction cells under the assumption that they will cost over ten times that of silicon cells at the cell level. The trade shows that the TRMM project, less the cost of the instrument, ground systems and mission operations, would spend approximately $552 thousand dollars per kilogram to launch and service science in the case of the spacecraft equipped with silicon solar cells. If these cells are changed out for gallium arsenide solar cells, an additional 31 kilograms of science can be launched and serviced at a price of approximately $90 thousand per kilogram. The weight reduction is shown to derive from the smaller area of the array and hence reductions in the weight of the array substrate and supporting structure. If the silicon solar cells are changed out for multi-junction solar cells, an additional 45 kilograms of science above the silicon base line can be launched and serviced at a price of approximately $58 thousand per kilogram. The trade shows that even if the multi-junction arrays are priced over ten times that of silicon cells, a price that is much higher than projected, that the additional 45 kilograms of science are launched and serviced at $182 thousand per kilogram. This is still much less than original $552 thousand per kilogram to launch and service the science. Data and qualitative factors are presented to show that these figures are subject to a great deal of uncertainty.

  12. Development of a Two-Dimensional Micro-SQUID Array for Investigation of Magnetization Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Tomoya; Nago, Yusuke; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nomura, Shintaro; Kono, Kimitoshi; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    We developed a two-dimensional array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for investigation of fine spatial distribution of magnetization in superconducting Sr2RuO4. Micrometer-sized SQUIDs based on homogeneously formed Al/AlOx/Al tunnel-type Josephson junctions were fabricated using shadow evaporation technique. Unnecessary electrodes formed by the shadow evaporation were removed by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching, in order to realize a dense array of SQUIDs. We measured the magnetic modulation of the maximum Josephson current of each SQUID in the array and evaluated the interaction among the SQUIDs.

  13. A Robust Cooling Platform for NIS Junction Refrigeration and sub-Kelvin Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B.; Atlas, M.; Lowell, P.; Moyerman, S.; Stebor, N.; Ullom, J.; Keating, B.

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in Normal metal-insulator-superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions (Clark et al. Appl Phys Lett 86: 173508, 2005, Appl Phys Lett 84: 4, 2004) have proven these devices to be a viable technology for sub-Kelvin refrigeration. NIS junction coolers, coupled to a separate cold stage, provide a flexible platform for cooling a wide range of user-supplied payloads. Recently, a stage was cooled from 290 to 256 mK (Lowell et al. Appl Phys Lett 102: 082601 2013), but further mechanical and electrical improvements are necessary for the stage to reach its full potential. We have designed and built a new Kevlar suspended cooling platform for NIS junction refrigeration that is both lightweight and well thermally isolated; the calculated parasitic loading is pW from 300 to 100 mK. The platform is structurally rigid with a measured deflection of 25 m under a 2.5 kg load and has an integrated mechanical heat switch driven by a superconducting stepper motor with thermal conductivity G W/K at 300 mK. An integrated radiation shield limits thermal loading and a modular platform accommodates enough junctions to provide nanowatts of continuous cooling power. The compact stage size of 7.6 cm 8.6 cm 4.8 cm and overall radiation shield size of 8.9 cm 10.0 cm 7.0 cm along with minimal electrical power requirements allow easy integration into a range of cryostats. We present the design, construction, and performance of this cooling platform as well as projections for coupling to arrays of NIS junctions and other future applications.

  14. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  15. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  16. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  18. The multiple junction edge illuminated solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. I.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Riley, T. J.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The multiple junction edge illuminated solar cell was devised for high voltage low current applications. Devices to be flight tested in early 1974 with 96 series connected PNN+ junctions in a 2 cm X 2.3 cm size deliver 36 volts at 1 milliampere. Test data of M-J cells fabricated with resistivities of 10, 50, 100, 200, 450, and 1000 ohm cm silicon are presented and problem areas are discussed. An additional potential application of the M-J cell lies in ultilization of its high intensity performance that has been demonstrated at levels in excess of 100 AMO suns.

  19. Common features of a vortex structure in long exponentially shaped Josephson junctions and Josephson junctions with inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in three different models of the long Josephson junction: the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the Josephson junctions with the resistor and the shunt inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. For these three models the critical curves “critical current-magnetic field” are numerically constructed. We develop the idea of the equivalence of the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the rectangular junction with the distributed inhomogeneity and demonstrate that at some parameters of the shunt and the resistor inhomogeneities in the ends of the junction the corresponding critical curves are very close to the exponentially shaped one.

  20. Radiation of terahertz electromagnetic waves from build-in nano Josephson junctions of cuprate high-T(c) superconductors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hu, Xiao

    2011-04-01

    The nano-scale intrinsic Josephson junctions in highly anisotropic cuprate superconductors have potential for generation of terahertz electromagnetic waves. When the thickness of a superconductor sample is much smaller than the wavelength of electromagnetic waves in vacuum, the superconductor renders itself as a cavity. Unlike conventional lasers, the presence of the cavity does not guarantee a coherent emission because of the internal degree of freedom of the superconductivity phase in long junctions. We study the excitation of terahertz wave by solitons in a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions, especially for relatively short junctions. Coherent emission requires a rectangular configuration of solitons. However such a configuration is unstable against weak fluctuations, contrarily solitons favor a triangular lattice corresponding to an out-phase oscillation of electromagnetic waves. To utilize the cavity, we propose to use an array of stacks of short intrinsic Josephson junctions to generate powerful terahertz electromagnetic waves. The cavity synchronizes the plasma oscillation in different stacks and the emission intensity is predicted to be proportional to the number of stacks squared.

  1. Characterization of large two-dimensional YBa2Cu3O7–δ SQUID arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, B. J.; Berggren, S. A. E.; O’Brien, M. C.; deAndrade, M. C.; Higa, B. A.; Leese de Escobar, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    Large two-dimensional SQUID arrays were made using the step-edge Josephson junction process. The performance of the arrays is analyzed with respect to determining the conditions under which the optimal performance is achieved. We find that optimization of the field-voltage transfer function V B is reached at a specific temperature and device current bias point, and arrive at an empirical expression describing the dependence of V B on the critical current and dynamic resistance of the SQUID array and as a function of temperature. The empirical expression for V B of the SQUID arrays is similar to that given by well known theoretical models for a single SQUID.

  2. A miniature high voltage plasma interaction flight experiment - Project MINX. [for measuring solar cell array parasitic current drain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, T. J.; Triner, J. E.; Sater, B. L.; Cohen, D.; Somberg, H.

    1974-01-01

    A miniature high-voltage array was fabricated, incorporating the multi-junction edge illuminated (MJC) cell technique. The array consists of 32 2x2.2 cm MJCs, series connected, capable of 1600 V open circuit at 1 AMO and 1.2 mA short circuit. A solid state, high-voltage relay is connected across each 4-cell subgroup of the array. It was built to test plasma current drain on space systems using high voltage as might occur when a high-voltage solar array is operated from low to synchronous orbit.

  3. Periodically striped films produced from super-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Sun, Yinghui; Liu, Peng; Wang, Jiaping; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2009-08-19

    We report a novel way to draw films from super-aligned carbon nanotube arrays at large drawing angles. The obtained super-aligned carbon nanotube films have a periodically striped configuration with alternating thinner and thicker film sections, and the width of the stripes is equal to the height of the original arrays. Compared with ordinary uniform films, the striped films provide a better platform for understanding the mechanism of spinning films from arrays because carbon nanotube junctions are easily observed and identified at the boundary of the stripes. Further studies show that the carbon nanotube junctions are bottleneck positions for thermal conduction and mechanical strength of the film, but do not limit its electrical conduction. These films can be utilized as striped and high-degree polarized light emission sources. Our results will be valuable for new applications and future large-scale production of tunable super-aligned carbon nanotube films. PMID:19636102

  4. Solar array deployment mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  5. Solar array deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  6. Array for detecting microbes

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  7. ISS Solar Array Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  8. Atomic-scaled characterization of graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Wang, Dennis; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Pasupathy, Abhay N.

    Graphene p-n junctions are essential devices for studying relativistic Klein tunneling and the Veselago lensing effect in graphene. We have successfully fabricated graphene p-n junctions using both lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. We then use our 4-probe STM system to characterize the junctions. The ability to carry out scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in our STM instrument is essential for us to locate and measure the junction interface. We obtain both the topography and dI/dV spectra at the junction area, from which we track the shift of the graphene chemical potential with position across the junction interface. This allows us to directly measure the spatial width and roughness of the junction and its potential barrier height. We will compare the junction properties of devices fabricated by the aforementioned two methods and discuss their effects on the performance as a Veselago lens.

  9. Singular PP waves, Junction Conditions and BPS States

    SciTech Connect

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Vilasi, Gaetano

    2005-03-16

    A simple model to study the collision of PP waves via the Israel junction conditions is proposed. The junction conditions are interpreted as topological conservation laws, and the relation with BPS states is shortly described.

  10. Ballistic bipolar junctions in chemically gated graphene ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Baringhaus, Jens; Stöhr, Alexander; Forti, Stiven; Starke, Ulrich; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The realization of ballistic graphene pn-junctions is an essential task in order to study Klein tunneling phenomena. Here we show that intercalation of Ge under the buffer layer of pre-structured SiC-samples succeeds to make truly nano-scaled pn-junctions. By means of local tunneling spectroscopy the junction width is found to be as narrow as 5 nm which is a hundred times smaller compared to electrically gated structures. The ballistic transmission across the junction is directly proven by systematic transport measurements with a 4-tip STM. Various npn- and pnp-junctions are studied with respect to the barrier length. The pn-junctions are shown to act as polarizer and analyzer with the second junction becoming transparent in case of a fully ballistic barrier. This can be attributed to the almost full suppression of electron transmission through the junction away from normal incidence. PMID:25898259

  11. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  12. Micromachined electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  13. Photovoltaic array loss mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Charles

    1986-01-01

    Loss mechanisms which come into play when solar cell modules are mounted in arrays are identified. Losses can occur either from a reduction in the array electrical performance or with nonoptimal extraction of power from the array. Electrical performance degradation is caused by electrical mismatch, transmission losses from cell surface soiling and steep angle of reflectance, and electrical losses from field wiring resistance and the voltage drop across blocking diodes. The second type of loss, concerned with the operating points of the array, can involve nonoptimal load impedance and limiting the operating envelope of the array to specific ranges of voltage and current. Each of the loss mechanisms are discussed and average energy losses expected from soiling, steep reflectance angles and circuit losses are calculated.

  14. High density pixel array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener-Avnear, Eliezer (Inventor); McFall, James Earl (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pixel array device is fabricated by a laser micro-milling method under strict process control conditions. The device has an array of pixels bonded together with an adhesive filling the grooves between adjacent pixels. The array is fabricated by moving a substrate relative to a laser beam of predetermined intensity at a controlled, constant velocity along a predetermined path defining a set of grooves between adjacent pixels so that a predetermined laser flux per unit area is applied to the material, and repeating the movement for a plurality of passes of the laser beam until the grooves are ablated to a desired depth. The substrate is of an ultrasonic transducer material in one example for fabrication of a 2D ultrasonic phase array transducer. A substrate of phosphor material is used to fabricate an X-ray focal plane array detector.

  15. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  16. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  17. Electric Field Effect in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.

    The electric field effect in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks (IJJ's) is investigated on the basis of the capacitively-coupled IJJ model. We clarify the current-voltage characteristics of the IJJ's in the presence of an external electric field. It is predicted that the IJJ's show a dynamical transition to the voltage state as the external electric field is increased.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Intrinsic Josephson junctions: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurgens, A. A.

    2000-08-01

    Some recent developments in the fabrication of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) and their application for studying high-temperature superconductors are discussed. The major advantages of IJJ and unsolved problems are outlined. The feasibility of three-terminal devices based on the stacked IJJ is briefly evaluated.

  19. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  20. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  1. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency.

  2. Isolation and purification of gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, K A; Kumar, N M; Gilula, N B; Unwin, N

    1991-10-01

    This paper reports methods we have developed to solubilize gap junction channels, or connexons, from isolated gap junctions and to purify them in milligram quantities. Two sources of material are used: rat liver gap junctions and gap junctions produced by infecting insect cells with a baculovirus containing the cDNA for human liver beta 1 protein (connexin 32). Complete solubilization is obtained with long chain detergents (lauryl dimethyl amineoxide, dodecyl maltoside) and requires high ionic strength and high pH as well as reducing conditions. The purification involves chromatography on hydroxylapatite and gel filtration on Superose 6. A homogeneous product is indicated by a single band on a silver-stained gel and a homogeneous population of doughnut-shaped particles under the electron microscope. These particles have hexameric symmetry. The purified connexons have a tendency to form aggregates: filaments and sheets. The filaments grow by end-to-end association of connexons and are nonpolar, suggesting that the connexons are paired as in the cell-to-cell channel. The sheets grow by lateral association of the filaments.

  3. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  4. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction

    PubMed Central

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency. PMID:26830754

  5. Radiation comb generation with extended Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-09-21

    We propose the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on an extended Josephson junction subject to a time dependent magnetic field. The junction critical current shows known diffraction patterns and determines the position of the critical nodes when it vanishes. When the magnetic flux passes through one of such critical nodes, the superconducting phase must undergo a π-jump to minimize the Josephson energy. Correspondingly, a voltage pulse is generated at the extremes of the junction. Under periodic driving, this allows us to produce a comb-like voltage pulses sequence. In the frequency domain, it is possible to generate up to hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental driving frequency, thus mimicking the frequency comb used in optics and metrology. We discuss several implementations through a rectangular, cylindrical, and annular junction geometries, allowing us to generate different radiation spectra and to produce an output power up to 10 pW at 50 GHz for a driving frequency of 100 MHz.

  6. Superfluid density through 2D superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyoungdo; Shih, Chih-Kang

    As S. Qin et al. reported, two monolayer (2 ML) lead film on a silicon (111) substrate has one of two different atomic structures on the silicon substrate: the unstrained 1x1 and the psedumorphically strained √3x √3 (i.e. the same lattice constant as the Si √3x √3 lattice). Most interestingly, although these two different regions show the same quantum well state features, they have different Tc's (5 K and 4 K). These two different regions of 2 ML film naturally form superconductor-superconductor (SS or SS') junctions along silicon step edges. Physical connection of the junction is only 1 ML thickness because of the step height difference of substrate. We will present this study of SS (or SS') junction system using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and in-situ double-coil mutual inductance measurement. The transition of superconducting gaps across either SS or SS' junctions should show how to locally affect each other. Double coil measurement show a global Tc close to the lower Tc region with sizable superfluid density. We will discuss the phase rigidity and its relationship to the superfluid density in this ultra-thin Pb film that is only 2 ML thick.

  7. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  8. PECAM-1: regulator of endothelial junctional integrity.

    PubMed

    Privratsky, Jamie R; Newman, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    PECAM-1 (also known as CD31) is a cellular adhesion and signaling receptor comprising six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like homology domains, a short transmembrane domain and a 118 amino acid cytoplasmic domain that becomes serine and tyrosine phosphorylated upon cellular activation. PECAM-1 expression is restricted to blood and vascular cells. In circulating platelets and leukocytes, PECAM-1 functions largely as an inhibitory receptor that, via regulated sequential phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain, limits cellular activation responses. PECAM-1 is also highly expressed at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions as a mechanosensor, as a regulator of leukocyte trafficking and in the maintenance of endothelial cell junctional integrity. In this review, we will describe (1) the functional domains of PECAM-1 and how they contribute to its barrier-enhancing properties, (2) how the physical properties of PECAM-1 influence its subcellular localization and its ability to influence endothelial cell barrier function, (3) various stimuli that initiate PECAM-1 signaling and/or function at the endothelial junction and (4) cross-talk of PECAM-1 with other junctional molecules, which can influence endothelial cell function. PMID:24435645

  9. Local trap spectroscopy in superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kozorezov, A. G.; Wigmore, J. K.; Peacock, A.; Poelaert, A.; Verhoeve, P.; den Hartog, R.; Brammertz, G.

    2001-06-04

    We show that thermal activation of quasiparticles from local traps is responsible for the temperature variation of responsivity observed for some superconducting tunneling junction photon detectors. With this model, the depth of the local traps in two different proximized Ta structures was found to be the same, 0.20{+-}0.02 meV. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Limiting process in shallow junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.; Rittner, E.

    1979-01-01

    In extending the violet and nonreflective cell technology to lower resistivities, several processes limiting output power were encountered. The most important was the dark diffusion current due to recombination at the front grid contacts. After removal of this problem by reduction of the silicon metal contact area (to 0.14 percent of the total area), the electric field enhanced junction recombination current J sub r was the main limitation. Alteration of the diffusion profile to reduce the junction field is shown to be an effective means of influencing J sub r. The remaining problems are the bulk recombination in the n+ layer and the surface recombination at the oxide-silicon interface; both of these problems are aggravated by band-narrowing resulting from heavy doping in the diffused layer. Experimental evidence for the main limitations is shown, where increased diffusion temperature is seen to reduce both the influence of the front grid contacts and the junction electric field by increasing the junction depth. The potential for further significant improvement in efficiency appears to be high.

  11. Progress on millimeter wave Josephson junction mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taur, Y.; Kerr, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Preset, recyclable Nb point contacts are tested as low-noise Josephson mixers at a signal frequency of 115 GHz. The best result achieved is a mixer noise temperature (single sideband) of 120 K with unity conversion efficiency (SSB) for a junction at 6 K. Variation of mixer properties with temperature and other parameters is presented.

  12. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Erik O.; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices. PMID:25553192

  13. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices. PMID:25553192

  14. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164 Section 9.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  15. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164 Section 9.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  16. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164 Section 9.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  17. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164 Section 9.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  18. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164 Section 9.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  19. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  20. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  1. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  2. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  3. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  4. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  5. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  6. Engineering the hot spots in squared arrays of gold nanoparticles on a silver film.

    PubMed

    Li, Anran; Srivastava, Sachin K; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Li, Shuzhou

    2016-08-25

    Density of nanoparticle (NP) arrays affects the hot spots distribution and strength in NP-metal film (NP-MF) geometry. In-depth understanding of the variation of electromagnetic (EM) field enhancement with NPs density is essential for wide applications of the NP-MF geometry such as surface-enhanced spectroscopies and enhanced efficiency of optoelectronic devices. Here, we show that the field distribution in the NP array on the metal film is greatly enhanced and confined at the NP-NP junctions for very small horizontal gap (g) between neighboring NPs, whereas the fields at the NP-MF junction are extremely small. When gradually increasing g, the field enhancement at the NP-NP junction decreases, along with the gradually enhanced fields at the NP-MF junction. We show that there is an optimal value of horizontal gap (∼75 nm for 80 nm Au NP array on Ag film with 532 nm normal incidence), indicating that the average field enhancement in NP-MF geometry can be optimized by adjusting the horizontal gap. More importantly, it is found that the EM field enhancement is greatly decreased when g fulfills the requirement to couple the 532 nm incident light into SPPs, because of the interference between the LSPR and the SPPs, which leads to a Fano dip at the incident wavelength of 532 nm. PMID:27515538

  7. Engineering the hot spots in squared arrays of gold nanoparticles on a silver film.

    PubMed

    Li, Anran; Srivastava, Sachin K; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Li, Shuzhou

    2016-08-25

    Density of nanoparticle (NP) arrays affects the hot spots distribution and strength in NP-metal film (NP-MF) geometry. In-depth understanding of the variation of electromagnetic (EM) field enhancement with NPs density is essential for wide applications of the NP-MF geometry such as surface-enhanced spectroscopies and enhanced efficiency of optoelectronic devices. Here, we show that the field distribution in the NP array on the metal film is greatly enhanced and confined at the NP-NP junctions for very small horizontal gap (g) between neighboring NPs, whereas the fields at the NP-MF junction are extremely small. When gradually increasing g, the field enhancement at the NP-NP junction decreases, along with the gradually enhanced fields at the NP-MF junction. We show that there is an optimal value of horizontal gap (∼75 nm for 80 nm Au NP array on Ag film with 532 nm normal incidence), indicating that the average field enhancement in NP-MF geometry can be optimized by adjusting the horizontal gap. More importantly, it is found that the EM field enhancement is greatly decreased when g fulfills the requirement to couple the 532 nm incident light into SPPs, because of the interference between the LSPR and the SPPs, which leads to a Fano dip at the incident wavelength of 532 nm.

  8. Ultrafast Nonlinear Optics in the Tunneling Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarotski, Dmitry

    2014-03-01

    Coupling of the electromagnetic radiation to the tip-sample junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) offers exciting opportunities in molecular adsorbate identification, high-resolution dopant profiling, studies of the molecular motion and detection of dynamic changes in the electronic structure of the materials. Microwave spectral region is of particular interest because it encompasses rotational, magnetic and other resonances of molecular and solid state systems. However, previous works have either used external microwave sources or generated microwave radiation by a nonlinear mixing of the outputs from two continuous-wave lasers in a tunneling junction. In both cases, the usable spectrum was limited to a single or few frequencies. On the other hand, the regular train of pulses from a mode-locked ultrafast laser has a spectrum which represents an optical frequency comb, with a series of narrow lines (modes) spaced by the pulse repetition frequency. Here, we will show that the nonlinear response of the tunneling junction of an STM to the field of ultrashort laser pulses results in an intermode mixing that produces microwave frequency comb (MFC) with harmonics up to n = 200 (14.85 GHz) on both semiconducting and metallic surfaces. The observed dependence of the microwave power on the harmonic number reveals adverse effects of the tunneling gap capacitance but also shows that the roll-off at higher microwave frequencies should be negligible within the tunneling junction itself leading to intrinsic MFC spread up to THz region. We also demonstrate that MFC generation on semiconductor surface might have the same origin as THz generation in a surface depletion field. Generation of the broadband microwave signals within the tunneling junction should reduce the extraneous effects and provide significantly higher coupling efficiency. With improved frequency response, the described MFC-STM may find broad range of applications in nanoscale characterization of

  9. Inverted Three-Junction Tandem Thermophotovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An InGaAs-based three-junction (3J) tandem thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell has been investigated to utilize more of the blackbody spectrum (from a 1,100 C general purpose heat source GPHS) efficiently. The tandem consists of three vertically stacked subcells, a 0.74-eV InGaAs cell, a 0.6- eV InGaAs cell, and a 0.55-eV InGaAs cell, as well as two interconnecting tunnel junctions. A greater than 20% TPV system efficiency was achieved by another group with a 1,040 C blackbody using a single-bandgap 0.6- eV InGaAs cell MIM (monolithic interconnected module) (30 lateral junctions) that delivered about 12 V/30 or 0.4 V/junction. It is expected that a three-bandgap tandem MIM will eventually have about 3 this voltage (1.15 V) and about half the current. A 4 A/cm2 would be generated by a single-bandgap 0.6-V InGaAs MIM, as opposed to the 2 A/cm2 available from the same spectrum when split among the three series-connected junctions in the tandem stack. This would then be about a 50% increase (3xVoc, 0.5xIsc) in output power if the proposed tandem replaced the single- bandgap MIM. The advantage of the innovation, if successful, would be a 50% increase in power conversion efficiency from radioisotope heat sources using existing thermophotovoltaics. Up to 50% more power would be generated for radioisotope GPHS deep space missions. This type of InGaAs multijunction stack could be used with terrestrial concentrator solar cells to increase efficiency from 41 to 45% or more.

  10. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  11. Thermopower measurements of atomic and molecular junctions using microheater-embedded mechanically-controllable break junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2015-03-01

    There has been growing interest in developing high-performance thermoelectric materials for realizing thermoelectric power generation. Quantum confinement effects in low-dimensional structures are expected to provide high electronic density of states for enhanced thermopower, and thus considered as a promising approach for achieving a high figure of merit (M. S. Dresselhaus et al., Adv. Mat. 19 (2007) 1043-1053). From this respect, it is interesting to study thermoelectric properties of atomic and molecular junctions and evaluate their potential as a thermoelectric material. Recently, we have developed a heater-embedded micro-fabricated mechanically-controllable break junction (MCBJ) for investigating the thermoelectric transport in single-atom and -molecule junctions. Using the MCBJ devices, we could repeatedly form stable junctions at room temperatures via a self-breaking mechanism with one side being heated by the adjacent microheater. In my presentation, I will show the results of simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and the electrical conductance of atom-sized Au junctions and Au-benzenedithiol-Au junctions and discuss on the geometrical dependence of thermoelectric transport.

  12. Myosin-dependent remodeling of adherens junctions protects junctions from Snail-dependent disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Although Snail is essential for disassembly of adherens junctions during epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), loss of adherens junctions in Drosophila melanogaster gastrula is delayed until mesoderm is internalized, despite the early expression of Snail in that primordium. By combining live imaging and quantitative image analysis, we track the behavior of E-cadherin–rich junction clusters, demonstrating that in the early stages of gastrulation most subapical clusters in mesoderm not only persist, but move apically and enhance in density and total intensity. All three phenomena depend on myosin II and are temporally correlated with the pulses of actomyosin accumulation that drive initial cell shape changes during gastrulation. When contractile myosin is absent, the normal Snail expression in mesoderm, or ectopic Snail expression in ectoderm, is sufficient to drive early disassembly of junctions. In both cases, junctional disassembly can be blocked by simultaneous induction of myosin contractility. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for mechanosensitivity of cell–cell junctions and imply that myosin-mediated tension can prevent Snail-driven EMT. PMID:26754645

  13. Multiple Resonators as a Multi-Channel Bus for Coupling Josephson Junction Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrailkill, Zechariah; Lambert, Joseph; Ramos, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Josephson junction-based qubits have been shown to be promising components for a future quantum computer. A network of these superconducting qubits will require quantum information to be stored in and transferred among them. Resonators made of superconducting metal strips are useful elements for this purpose because they have long coherence times and can dispersively couple qubits. We explore the use of multiple resonators with different resonant frequencies to couple qubits. We find that an array of resonators with different frequencies can be individually addressed to store and retrieve information, while coupling qubits dispersively. We show that a control qubit can be used to effectively isolate an active qubit from an array of resonators so that it can function within the same frequency range used by the resonators.

  14. Towards on-chip time-resolved thermal mapping with micro-/nanosensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haixiao; Sun, Weiqiang; Xiang, An; Shi, Tuanwei; Chen, Qing; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-08-29

    In recent years, thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) array emerged as a versatile candidate in micro-/nanoscale local temperature sensing for its high resolution, passive working mode, and easy fabrication. However, some key issues need to be taken into consideration before real instrumentation and industrial applications of TFTC array. In this work, we will demonstrate that TFTC array can be highly scalable from micrometers to nanometers and that there are potential applications of TFTC array in integrated circuits, including time-resolvable two-dimensional thermal mapping and tracing the heat source of a device. Some potential problems and relevant solutions from a view of industrial applications will be discussed in terms of material selection, multiplexer reading, pattern designing, and cold-junction compensation. We show that the TFTC array is a powerful tool for research fields such as chip thermal management, lab-on-a-chip, and other novel electrical, optical, or thermal devices.

  15. Towards on-chip time-resolved thermal mapping with micro-/nanosensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haixiao; Sun, Weiqiang; Xiang, An; Shi, Tuanwei; Chen, Qing; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) array emerged as a versatile candidate in micro-/nanoscale local temperature sensing for its high resolution, passive working mode, and easy fabrication. However, some key issues need to be taken into consideration before real instrumentation and industrial applications of TFTC array. In this work, we will demonstrate that TFTC array can be highly scalable from micrometers to nanometers and that there are potential applications of TFTC array in integrated circuits, including time-resolvable two-dimensional thermal mapping and tracing the heat source of a device. Some potential problems and relevant solutions from a view of industrial applications will be discussed in terms of material selection, multiplexer reading, pattern designing, and cold-junction compensation. We show that the TFTC array is a powerful tool for research fields such as chip thermal management, lab-on-a-chip, and other novel electrical, optical, or thermal devices.

  16. Indentation Tests Reveal Geometry-Regulated Stiffening of Nanotube Junctions.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Yang, Yang; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Asif, Syed; Penev, Evgeni S; Yakobson, Boris I; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-01-13

    Here we report a unique method to locally determine the mechanical response of individual covalent junctions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in various configurations such as "X", "Y", and "Λ"-like. The setup is based on in situ indentation using a picoindenter integrated within a scanning electron microscope. This allows for precise mapping between junction geometry and mechanical behavior and uncovers geometry-regulated junction stiffening. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the dominant contribution to the nanoindentation response is due to the CNT walls stretching at the junction. Targeted synthesis of desired junction geometries can therefore provide a "structural alphabet" for construction of macroscopic CNT networks with tunable mechanical response. PMID:26618517

  17. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  18. Multi Sensor Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the Multi Sensor Array. The topics include: 1) MSA Algorithm; 2) Types of Sensors for the MSA; 3) How to test the MSA; 4) Monte Carlo Simulation; and 5) Accelerated Life Tests.

  19. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  20. Glory Solar Array Deployment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Glory spacecraft uses Orbital Sciences Corporation Space Systems Group's LEOStar-1 bus design, with deployable, four-panel solar arrays. This conceptual animation reveals Glory's unique solar a...

  1. Radial junction amorphous silicon solar cells on PECVD-grown silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linwei; O'Donnell, Benedict; Foldyna, Martin; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2012-05-17

    Constructing radial junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells on top of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) represents a promising approach towards high performance and cost-effective thin film photovoltaics. We here develop an all-in situ strategy to grow SiNWs, via a vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism on top of ZnO-coated glass substrate, in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) reactor. Controlling the distribution of indium catalyst drops allows us to tailor the as-grown SiNW arrays into suitable size and density, which in turn results in both a sufficient light trapping effect and a suitable arrangement allowing for conformal coverage of SiNWs by subsequent a-Si:H layers. We then demonstrate the fabrication of radial junction solar cells and carry on a parametric study designed to shed light on the absorption and quantum efficiency response, as functions of the intrinsic a-Si:H layer thickness and the density of SiNWs. These results lay a solid foundation for future structural optimization and performance ramp-up of the radial junction thin film a-Si:H photovoltaics.

  2. Cadherin flexibility provides a key difference between desmosomes and adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Humera; Bella, Jordi; Jowitt, Thomas A; Holmes, David F; Rouhi, Mansour; Nie, Zhuxiang; Baldock, Clair; Garrod, David; Tabernero, Lydia

    2015-04-28

    Desmosomes and adherens junctions are intercellular adhesive structures essential for the development and integrity of vertebrate tissue, including the epidermis and heart. Their cell adhesion molecules are cadherins: type 1 cadherins in adherens junctions and desmosomal cadherins in desmosomes. A fundamental difference is that desmosomes have a highly ordered structure in their extracellular region and exhibit calcium-independent hyperadhesion, whereas adherens junctions appear to lack such ordered arrays, and their adhesion is always calcium-dependent. We present here the structure of the entire ectodomain of desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 2 (Dsg2), using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering, electron microscopy, and solution-based biophysical techniques. This structure reveals that the ectodomain of Dsg2 is flexible even in the calcium-bound state and, on average, is shorter than the type 1 cadherin crystal structures. The Dsg2 structure has an excellent fit with the electron tomography reconstructions of human desmosomes. This fit suggests an arrangement in which desmosomal cadherins form trans interactions but are too far apart to interact in cis, in agreement with previously reported observations. Cadherin flexibility may be key to explaining the plasticity of desmosomes that maintain tissue integrity in their hyperadhesive form, but can adopt a weaker, calcium-dependent adhesion during wound healing and early development. PMID:25855637

  3. Cadherin flexibility provides a key difference between desmosomes and adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Humera; Bella, Jordi; Jowitt, Thomas A; Holmes, David F; Rouhi, Mansour; Nie, Zhuxiang; Baldock, Clair; Garrod, David; Tabernero, Lydia

    2015-04-28

    Desmosomes and adherens junctions are intercellular adhesive structures essential for the development and integrity of vertebrate tissue, including the epidermis and heart. Their cell adhesion molecules are cadherins: type 1 cadherins in adherens junctions and desmosomal cadherins in desmosomes. A fundamental difference is that desmosomes have a highly ordered structure in their extracellular region and exhibit calcium-independent hyperadhesion, whereas adherens junctions appear to lack such ordered arrays, and their adhesion is always calcium-dependent. We present here the structure of the entire ectodomain of desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 2 (Dsg2), using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering, electron microscopy, and solution-based biophysical techniques. This structure reveals that the ectodomain of Dsg2 is flexible even in the calcium-bound state and, on average, is shorter than the type 1 cadherin crystal structures. The Dsg2 structure has an excellent fit with the electron tomography reconstructions of human desmosomes. This fit suggests an arrangement in which desmosomal cadherins form trans interactions but are too far apart to interact in cis, in agreement with previously reported observations. Cadherin flexibility may be key to explaining the plasticity of desmosomes that maintain tissue integrity in their hyperadhesive form, but can adopt a weaker, calcium-dependent adhesion during wound healing and early development.

  4. Effect of Alignment on Transport Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Metallic Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Namkung, Min; Smits, Jan; Williams, Phillip; Harvey, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Ballistic and spin coherent transport in single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are predicted to enable high sensitivity single-nanotube devices for strain and magnetic field sensing. Based upon these phenomena, electron beam lithography procedures have been developed to study the transport properties of purified HiPCO single walled carbon nanotubes for development into sensory materials for nondestructive evaluation. Purified nanotubes are dispersed in solvent suspension and then deposited on the device substrate before metallic contacts are defined and deposited through electron beam lithography. This procedure produces randomly dispersed ropes, typically 2 - 20 nm in diameter, of single walled carbon nanotubes. Transport and scanning probe microscopy studies have shown a good correlation between the junction resistance and tube density, alignment, and contact quality. In order to improve transport properties of the junctions a technique has been developed to align and concentrate nanotubes at specific locations on the substrate surface. Lithographic techniques are used to define local areas where high frequency electric fields are to be concentrated. Application of the fields while the substrate is exposed to nanotube-containing solution results in nanotube arrays aligned with the electric field lines. A second electron beam lithography layer is then used to deposit metallic contacts across the aligned tubes. Experimental measurements are presented showing the increased tube alignment and improvement in the transport properties of the junctions.

  5. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  6. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  7. Cost Trade Between Multi-Junction, Gallium Arsenide, and Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Edward M.

    1995-01-01

    Multi-junction (MJ), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and silicon (Si) solar cells have respective test efficiencies of approximately 24%, 18.5% and 14.8%. Multi-junction and gallium arsenide solar cells weigh more than silicon solar 2 cells and cost approximately five times as much per unit power at the cell level. A trade is performed for the TRMM spacecraft to determine which of these cell types would have offered an overall performance and price advantage to the spacecraft. A trade is also performed for the multi-junction cells under the assumption that they will cost over ten times that of silicon cells at the cell level. The trade shows that the TRMM project, less the cost of the instrument, ground systems and mission operations, would spend approximately $552,000 dollars per kilogram to launch and suppon3science in the case of the spacecraft equipped with silicon solar cells. If these cells are changed out for gallium arsenide solar cells, an additional 31 kilograms of science can be launched and serviced at a price of approximately $90 thousand per kilogram. The weight reduction is shown to derive from the smaller area of the array and hence reductions in the weight of the array substrate and supporting structure. ff the silicon solar cells are changed out for multi-junction solar cells, an additional 45 kilograms of science above the silicon base line can be launched and supported at a price of approximately $58,000 per kilogram. The trade shows that even if the multi-junction cells are priced over ten times that of silicon cells, a price that is much higher than projected, that the additional 45 kilograms of science are launched and serviced at $180,000 per kilogram. This is still much less than the original $552,000 per kilogram to launch and service the science. Data and qualitative factors are presented to show that these figures are subject to a great deal of uncertainty. Nonetheless, the benefit of the higher efficiency solar cells for TRMM is far greater

  8. The Zinc Finger Protein Zfr1p Is Localized Specifically to Conjugation Junction and Required for Sexual Development in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Tian, Huaru; Wang, Wei; Liang, Aihua

    2012-01-01

    Conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila involves a developmental program consisting of three prezygotic nuclear divisions, pronuclear exchange and fusion, and postzygotic and exconjugant stages. The conjugation junction structure appears during the initiation of conjugation development, and disappears during the exconjugant stage. Many structural and functional proteins are involved in the establishment and maintenance of the junction structure in T. thermophila. In the present study, a zinc finger protein-encoding gene ZFR1 was found to be expressed specifically during conjugation and to localize specifically to the conjugation junction region. Truncated Zfr1p localized at the plasma membrane in ordered arrays and decorated Golgi apparatus located adjacent to basal body. The N-terminal zinc finger and C-terminal hydrophobic domains of Zfr1p were found to be required for its specific conjugation junction localization. Conjugation development of ZFR1 somatic knockout cells was aborted at the pronuclear exchange and fusion conjugation stages. Furthermore, Zfr1p was found to be important for conjugation junction stability during the prezygotic nuclear division stage. Taken together, our data reveal that Zfr1p is required for the stability and integrity of the conjugation junction structure and essential for the sexual life cycle of the Tetrahymena cell. PMID:23251712

  9. Radial microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshini, Bindu; Das, Mukul Kumar; Sen, Mrinal; Kumar, Subindu

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a theoretical model for radial p-n junction microwire array solar cell with pyramidal structures in the space between microwires has been developed. Incorporation of pyramidal structures results in reflection of light, which would otherwise be unused, and illuminates side walls of the microwires. This additional illumination enhances absorption and, hence, efficiency of the whole structure. Efficiency enhancement is analyzed by varying different device parameters e.g., radius and length of each microwire and packing fraction of the structure. Results show that the maximum fractional efficiency enhancement can be obtained as 30% by suitable choice of these parameters.

  10. Superconducting Quantum Arrays for Wideband Antennas and Low Noise Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhanov, O.; Prokopemko, G.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Iinetference Filters (SQIF) consist of a two-dimensional array of niobium Josephson Junctions formed into N loops of incommensurate area. This structure forms a magnetic field (B) to voltage transducer with an impulse like response at B0. In principle, the signal-to-noise ratio scales as the square root of N and the noise can be made arbitrarily small (i.e. The SQIF chips are expected to exhibit quantum limited noise performance). A gain of about 20 dB was recently demonstrated at 10 GHz.

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the dissipative granular array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Munehisa; Troyer, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    We develop a new cluster algorithm for the dissipative granular arrays and apply it to the one-dimensional (1D) array. The problem in the simulation of the dissipative granular array arises from the competition between the phase difference terms and the on-site charging energy terms in the action. We divide these two kinds of terms into on-site terms and inter-site terms. A cluster update for the latter is combined with the Metropolis method for the former, being in the same spirit as was done for the resistively-shunted Josephson-junction array [1]. The on-site charging energy is calculated for the 1D array and its dependence on the strength of dissipation is discussed in comparison to several theoretical predictions [2]. [1] P. Werner and M. Troyer: Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 (2005) 060201. [2] K. B. Efetov and A. Tschersich: Europhys. Lett. 59 (2002) 114; A. Altland, L.I. Glazman, A. Kamenev: Phys. Rev. Lett 92 (2004) 026801.

  12. Boson Josephson Junction with Trapped Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S. R.

    We consider coherent atomic tunneling between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates at T=0 in a double-well trap. The condensate dynamics of the macroscopic amplitudes in the two wells is modeled by two Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPE) coupled by a tunneling matrix element. Analytic elliptic function solutions are obtained for the time evolution of the inter-well fractional population imbalance z(t) (related to the condensate phase difference) of the Boson Josephson junction (BJJ). Surprisingly, the neutral-atom BJJ shows (non-sinusoidal generalizations of) effects seen in charged-electron superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ). The BJJ elliptic-function behavior has a singular dependence on a GPE parameter ratio Λ at a critical ratio Λ=Λc, beyond which a novel 'macroscopic quantum self-trapping' effect sets in with a non-zero time-averaged imbalance ≠0.

  13. Magnetoamplification in a bipolar magnetic junction transistor.

    PubMed

    Rangaraju, N; Peters, J A; Wessels, B W

    2010-09-10

    We have demonstrated the first bipolar magnetic junction transistor using a dilute magnetic semiconductor. For an InMnAs p-n-p transistor magnetoamplification is observed at room temperature. The observed magnetoamplification is attributed to the magnetoresistance of the magnetic semiconductor InMnAs heterojunction. The magnetic field dependence of the transistor characteristics confirm that the magnetoamplification results from the junction magnetoresistance. To describe the experimentally observed transistor characteristics, we propose a modified Ebers-Moll model that includes a series magnetoresistance attributed to spin-selective conduction. The capability of magnetic field control of the amplification in an all-semiconductor transistor at room temperature potentially enables the creation of new computer logic architecture where the spin of the carriers is utilized.

  14. Laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; Has, Cristina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Laminin 332 is an essential component of the dermal-epidermal junction, a highly specialized basement membrane zone that attaches the epidermis to the dermis and thereby provides skin integrity and resistance to external mechanical forces. Mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes that encode the three constituent polypeptide chains, α3, β3 and γ2, abrogate or perturb the functions of laminin 332. The phenotypic consequences are diminished dermal-epidermal adhesion and, as clinical symptoms, skin fragility and mechanically induced blistering. The disorder is designated as junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). This article delineates the signs and symptoms of the different forms of JEB, the mutational spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlations as well as perspectives for future molecular therapies. PMID:23076207

  15. Dissipation and traversal time in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Ranfagni, Anedio; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The various ways of evaluating dissipative effects in macroscopic quantum tunneling are re-examined. The results obtained by using functional integration, while confirming those of previously given treatments, enable a comparison with available experimental results relative to Josephson junctions. A criterion based on the shortening of the semiclassical traversal time tau of the barrier with regard to dissipation can be established, according to which DELTAtau/tau > or approx. N/Q, where Q is the quality factor of the junction and N is a numerical constant of order unity. The best agreement with the experiments is obtained for N=1.11, as it results from a semiempirical analysis based on an increase in the potential barrier caused by dissipative effects.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dennis; Zhou, Xiaodong; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark; Ross, Frances; Pasupathy, Abhay

    Theoretical predictions of relativistic Klein tunneling and Veselago lensing in graphene have inspired efforts to fabricate graphene p-n junctions where such phenomena could be realized and studied via electronic transport or scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Here we will discuss the interplay between device geometry and our measurements in a 4-probe STM, which allows for simultaneous back gating, biasing, and scanning of a micromechanically exfoliated graphene sample. A sharp p-n junction is essential to the manifestation of these aforementioned effects, and we examine the benefits and drawbacks of several routes toward this goal from a fabrication standpoint. These methods include lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. Finally, we will describe our subsequent characterization results for each, including information about topography and spatial mapping of the density of states. This work is supported by NSF IGERT (DGE-1069240).

  17. Spontaneous Supercurrent Induced by Ferromagnetic π Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Bentner, J.; Aprili, M.; della Rocca, M. L.; Reinwald, M.; Wegscheider, W.; Strunk, C.

    2004-05-01

    We present magnetization measurements of mesoscopic superconducting niobium loops containing a ferromagnetic (PdNi) π junction. The loops are prepared on top of the active area of a micro-Hall sensor based on high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. We observe asymmetric switching of the loop between different magnetization states when reversing the sweep direction of the magnetic field. This provides evidence for a spontaneous current induced by the intrinsic phase shift of the π junction. In addition, the presence of the spontaneous current near zero applied field is directly revealed by an increase of the magnetic moment with decreasing temperature, which results in half integer flux quantization in the loop at low temperatures.

  18. Junction between surfaces of two topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Diptiman; Deb, Oindrila

    2012-02-01

    We study scattering from a line junction which separates the surfaces of two three-dimensional topological insulators; some aspects of this problem were recently studied in Takahashi and Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 166805 (2011). The velocities of the Dirac electrons on the two surfaces may be unequal and may even have opposite signs; in the latter case, we find that the electrons must, in general, go into the two-dimensional interface separating the two topological insulators. We also study what happens if the two surfaces are at an angle φ with respect to each other. We find in this case that there are bound states which propagate along the line junction with a velocity and direction of spin which depend on the bending angle φ.

  19. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  20. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules. PMID:27215814

  1. Interface composition in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, R.; Mayen, K.; McCord, J.; Allen, D.; Yang, D.; Tondra, M.; Wang, D.

    2001-06-01

    The magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions critically depends on the exact composition at the interfaces. As such the completeness of the oxidation process of the Al layer (used to produce Al2O3-based tunnel junctions) plays an essential role in the magnetoresistance. We studied the chemical properties of ferromagnet/Al2O3 interfaces as a function of original Al layer thickness. We have studied the concentrations of elementary and oxidized Al, Co, Ni, and Fe for varying roughness of the ferromagnetic layer. The oxidation process critically depends on the roughness of the underlying ferromagnetic (FM) layer. Al layers grown onto smooth FM layers oxidize homogeneously whereas Al layers grown on rough FM layers show a complicated oxidation behavior. Within the sensitivity of the analysis technique, we did not observe oxidation of the ferromagnetic layers, even for the overoxidized part of the samples.

  2. Spin Valves and Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iversen, Kurt; Pufall, Matthew; Heindl, Ranko

    2011-10-01

    This is a presentation of research conducted through the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship program. A spintronic device is one that uses the electron's magnetic moment (its spin) as well as its charge to perform operations, such as data storage or logic. Many of today's spintronic devices are based on the ``tunneling magnetoresistance'' effect of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB tunnel junctions. The MgO barrier in devices must be highly uniform and only 1-2 nm thick. Relevant background, including electron spin and tunneling, is supplied. The fabrication, operation, and behavior of spin-valves and magnetic tunnel junctions are described, and applications in Hard Disk Drives, Magnetic Random Access Memory, Magnetic Field Sensors, and Spin-Torque Oscillators are discussed.

  3. Refoldable Peptide Barrel -- Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Alexey; Wang, Boyang; Kral, Petr

    2008-03-01

    We design hybrid bio-nano-junctions formed by cylindrical peptide structures covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The cylinders are composed of 5 pairs of antiparallel peptide strands that are ``one-to-one'' matched and covalently bonded through ester and amide bonds to the terminal C atoms in two (20,0) carbon nanotubes. The remaining terminal carbons in the CNTs are replaced by nitrogens, forming embedded quinoline-like structures. The used peptide strands are composed of charged amino acids that form cylindrical patterns with preferred stable configurations. By applying a torque to the nanotubes, we can reversibly fold and control the overall structure of the peptide barrels. The junctions might allow the collection and delivery of drugs and activation of biological molecules attached to them.

  4. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  5. Cusps on cosmic superstrings with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Rajamanoharan, Senthooran; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: william.nelson@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The existence of cusps on non-periodic strings ending on D-branes is demonstrated and the conditions for which such cusps are generic are derived. The dynamics of F-strings, D-strings and FD-string junctions are investigated. It is shown that pairs of FD-string junctions, such as would form after intercommutations of F-strings and D-strings, generically contain cusps. This new feature of cosmic superstrings opens up the possibility of extra channels of energy loss from a string network. The phenomenology of cusps on such cosmic superstring networks is compared to that of cusps formed on networks of their field theory analogues, the standard cosmic strings.

  6. Lycopene oxidation product enhances gap junctional communication.

    PubMed

    Aust, O; Ale-Agha, N; Zhang, L; Wollersen, H; Sies, H; Stahl, W

    2003-10-01

    Carotenoids as well as their metabolites and oxidation products stimulate gap junctional communication (GJC) between cells, which is thought to be one of the protective mechanisms related to cancer-preventive activities of these compounds. Increased intake of lycopene by consumption of tomatoes or tomato products has been epidemiologically associated with a diminished risk of prostate cancer. Here, we report a stimulatory effect of a lycopene oxidation product on GJC in rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells. The active compound was obtained by complete in vitro oxidation of lycopene with hydrogen peroxide/osmium tetroxide. For structural analysis high performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, ultraviolet/visible-, and infrared spectrophotometry were applied. The biologically active oxidation product was identified as 2,7,11-trimethyl-tetradecahexaene-1,14-dial. The present data indicate a potential role of lycopene degradation products in cell signaling enhancing cell-to-cell communication via gap junctions. PMID:12909274

  7. Crustal shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes in the Hengill triple junction, southwest Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Foulger, G.R.; Julian, B.R.; Miller, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Hengill region in SW Iceland is an unstable ridge-ridge-transform triple junction between an active and a waning segment of the mid-Atlantic spreading center and a transform that is transgressing southward. The triple junction contains active and extinct spreading segments and a widespread geothermal area. We evaluated shear-wave birefringence for locally recorded upper-crustal earthquakes using an array of 30 three-component digital seismographs. Fast-polarization directions, ??, are mostly NE to NNE, subparallel to the spreading axis and probably caused by fissures and microcracks related to spreading. However, there is significant variability in ?? throughout the array. The lag from fast to slow S is not proportional to earthquake depth (ray length), being scattered at all depths. The average wave-speed difference between qS1 and qS2 in the upper 2-5 km of the crust is 2-5%. Our results suggest considerable heterogeneity or strong S scattering.

  8. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  9. Quantum dynamics in the bosonic Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Chuchem, Maya; Cohen, Doron; Smith-Mannschott, Katrina; Hiller, Moritz; Kottos, Tsampikos; Vardi, Amichay

    2010-11-15

    We employ a semiclassical picture to study dynamics in a bosonic Josephson junction with various initial conditions. Phase diffusion of coherent preparations in the Josephson regime is shown to depend on the initial relative phase between the two condensates. For initially incoherent condensates, we find a universal value for the buildup of coherence in the Josephson regime. In addition, we contrast two seemingly similar on-separatrix coherent preparations, finding striking differences in their convergence to classicality as the number of particles increases.

  10. Josephson Junctions Help Measure Resonance And Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid H. S.; Mcgrath, William R.; Bumble, Bruce; Leduc, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of superconducting microstrip transmission lines measured at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Submicron Josephson (super-conductor/insulator/superconductor) junctions used as both voltage-controlled oscillators and detectors to measure frequencies (in range of hundreds of gigahertz) of high-order resonant electromagnetic modes of superconducting microstrip transmission-line resonators. This oscillator/detector approach similar to vacuum-tube grid dip meters and transistor dip meters used to probe resonances at much lower frequencies.

  11. Semiconductor junction formation by directed heat

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Robert B.

    1988-03-24

    The process of the invention includes applying precursors 6 with N- and P-type dopants therein to a silicon web 2, with the web 2 then being baked in an oven 10 to drive off excessive solvents, and the web 2 is then heated using a pulsed high intensity light in a mechanism 12 at 1100.degree.-1150.degree. C. for about 10 seconds to simultaneously form semiconductor junctions in both faces of the web.

  12. Ferromagnetic resonance with a magnetic Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, S. E.; Aprili, M.; Petković, I.; Maekawa, S.

    2011-02-01

    We show experimentally and theoretically that there is a coupling via the Aharonov-Bohm phase between the order parameter of a ferromagnet and a singlet, s-wave, Josephson super-current. We have investigated the possibility of measuring the dispersion of such spin-waves by varying the magnetic field applied in the plane of the junction and demonstrated the electromagnetic nature of the coupling by the observation of magnetic resonance side-bands to microwave induced Shapiro steps.

  13. Solar-Cell-Junction Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, S. N.; Armini, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    System under development reduces equipment costs. Processing system will produce solar-cell junctions on 4 in. (10.2 cm) round silicon wafers at rate of 10 to seventh power per year. System includes non-mass-analyzed ion implanter, microcomputer-controlled, pulsed-electron-beam annealer, and wafertransport system with vacuum interlock. These features eliminate large, expensive magnet and plates, circuitry, and power source otherwise needed for scanning.

  14. Electron irradiation of tandem junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.; Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical behavior of 100 micron thick tandem junction solar cells manufactured by Texas Instruments was studied as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence, photon irradiation, and 60 C annealing. These cells are found to degrade rapidly with radiation, the most serious loss occurring in the blue end of the cell's spectral response. No photon degradation was found to occur, but the cells did anneal a small amount at 60 C.

  15. Single-molecule junctions beyond electronic transport.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-06-01

    The idea of using individual molecules as active electronic components provided the impetus to develop a variety of experimental platforms to probe their electronic transport properties. Among these, single-molecule junctions in a metal-molecule-metal motif have contributed significantly to our fundamental understanding of the principles required to realize molecular-scale electronic components from resistive wires to reversible switches. The success of these techniques and the growing interest of other disciplines in single-molecule-level characterization are prompting new approaches to investigate metal-molecule-metal junctions with multiple probes. Going beyond electronic transport characterization, these new studies are highlighting both the fundamental and applied aspects of mechanical, optical and thermoelectric properties at the atomic and molecular scales. Furthermore, experimental demonstrations of quantum interference and manipulation of electronic and nuclear spins in single-molecule circuits are heralding new device concepts with no classical analogues. In this Review, we present the emerging methods being used to interrogate multiple properties in single molecule-based devices, detail how these measurements have advanced our understanding of the structure-function relationships in molecular junctions, and discuss the potential for future research and applications.

  16. STUDIES ON AN EPITHELIAL (GLAND) CELL JUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Loewenstein, Werner R.; Kanno, Yoshinobu

    1964-01-01

    Membrane permeability of an epithelial cell junction (Drosophila salivary gland) was examined with intracellular microelectrodes and with fluorescent tracers. In contrast to the non-junctional cell membrane surface, which has a low permeability to ions (10-4 mho/cm2), the junctional membrane surface is highly permeable. In fact, it introduces no substantial restriction to ion flow beyond that in the cytoplasm; the resistance through a chain of cells (150 Ω cm) is only slightly greater than in extruded cytoplasm (100 Ω cm). The diffusion resistance along the intercellular space to the exterior, on the other hand, is very high. Here, there exists an ion barrier of, at least, 104Ω cm2. As a result, small ions and fluorescein move rather freely from one cell to the next, but do not leak appreciably through the intercellular space to the exterior. The organ here, rather than the single cell, appears to be the unit of ion environment. The possible underlying structural aspects are discussed. PMID:14206423

  17. Josephson Effect in SFNS Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karminskaya, T. Yu.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Sidorenko, A. S.

    The critical current, I C, of Josephson junctions both in ramp-type (S-FN-S) and in overlap (SNF-FN-FNS, SN-FN-NS, SNF-N-FNS) geometries has been calculated in the frame of linearized Usadel equations (S-superconductor, F-ferromagnetic, N-normal metal). For the ramp-type structures, in which S electrodes contact directly the end walls of FN bilayer, it is shown that I C may exhibit damping oscillations as a function of both the distance L between superconductors and thicknesses d F,N of ferromagnetic and normal layers. The conditions have been determined under which the decay length and period of oscillation of I C(L) at fixed d F are of the order of decay length of superconducting correlations in the N metal, ξN, that is much larger than in F film. In overlap configurations, in which S films are placed on the top of NF bilayer, the studied junctions have complex SNF or SN electrodes (N or NF bilayer are situated under a superconductor). We demonstrate that in these geometries the critical current can exceed that in ramp-type junctions. Based on these results, the choice of the most practically applicable geometry is discussed.

  18. Josephson junction in a thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V. G.; Dobrovitski, V. V.; Clem, J. R.; Mawatari, Yasunori; Mints, R. G.

    2001-04-01

    The phase difference {phi}(y) for a vortex at a line Josephson junction in a thin film attenuates at large distances as a power law, unlike the case of a bulk junction where it approaches exponentially the constant values at infinities. The field of a Josephson vortex is a superposition of fields of standard Pearl vortices distributed along the junction with the line density {phi}'(y)/2{pi}. We study the integral equation for {phi}(y) and show that the phase is sensitive to the ratio l/{Lambda}, where l={lambda}{sub J}{sup 2}/{lambda}{sub L}, {Lambda}=2{lambda}{sub L}{sup 2}/d, {lambda}{sub L}, and {lambda}{sub J} are the London and Josephson penetration depths, and d is the film thickness. For l<<{Lambda}, the vortex ''core'' of the size l is nearly temperature independent, while the phase ''tail'' scales as l{Lambda}/y{sup 2}={lambda}{sub J}2{lambda}{sub L}/d/y{sup 2}; i.e., it diverges as T{yields}T{sub c}. For l>>{Lambda}, both the core and the tail have nearly the same characteristic length l{Lambda}.

  19. Sampled Longest Common Prefix Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirén, Jouni

    When augmented with the longest common prefix (LCP) array and some other structures, the suffix array can solve many string processing problems in optimal time and space. A compressed representation of the LCP array is also one of the main building blocks in many compressed suffix tree proposals. In this paper, we describe a new compressed LCP representation: the sampled LCP array. We show that when used with a compressed suffix array (CSA), the sampled LCP array often offers better time/space trade-offs than the existing alternatives. We also show how to construct the compressed representations of the LCP array directly from a CSA.

  20. Microbial Cell Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elad, Tal; Lee, Jin Hyung; Gu, Man Bock; Belkin, Shimshon

    The coming of age of whole-cell biosensors, combined with the continuing advances in array technologies, has prepared the ground for the next step in the evolution of both disciplines - the whole cell array. In the present chapter, we highlight the state-of-the-art in the different disciplines essential for a functional bacterial array. These include the genetic engineering of the biological components, their immobilization in different polymers, technologies for live cell deposition and patterning on different types of solid surfaces, and cellular viability maintenance. Also reviewed are the types of signals emitted by the reporter cell arrays, some of the transduction methodologies for reading these signals, and the mathematical approaches proposed for their analysis. Finally, we review some of the potential applications for bacterial cell arrays, and list the future needs for their maturation: a richer arsenal of high-performance reporter strains, better methodologies for their incorporation into hardware platforms, design of appropriate detection circuits, the continuing development of dedicated algorithms for multiplex signal analysis, and - most importantly - enhanced long term maintenance of viability and activity on the fabricated biochips.

  1. Magnetically actuated microshutter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, David B.; Aslam, Shahid; Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Fettig, Rainer K.; Franz, David E.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Li, Mary J.; Monroy, Carlos J.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Schwinger, David S.

    2001-10-01

    Two-dimensional microshutter arrays are being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) for use in the near-infrared region. Functioning as focal plane object selection devices, the microshutter arrays are 2-D programmable masks with high efficiency and high contrast. The NGST environment requires cryogenic operation at 45 K. Arrays are close-packed silicon nitride membranes with a unit cell size of 100x100 micrometer. Individual shutters are patterned with a torsion flexure permitting shutters to open 90 degrees with minimized mechanical stress concentration. The mechanical shutter arrays are fabricated with MEMS technologies. The processing includes a RIE front-etch to form shutters out of the nitride membrane, an anisotropic back-etch for wafer thinning, and a deep RIE (DRIE) back-etch down to the nitride shutter membrane to form frames and to relieve the shutters from the silicon substrate. A layer of magnetic material is deposited onto each shutter. Onto the side-wall of the support structure a metal layer is deposited that acts as a vertical hold electrode. Shutters are rotated into the support structure by means of an external magnet that is swept across the shutter array for opening. Addressing is performed through a scheme using row and column address lines on each chip and external addressing electronics.

  2. Folding of Nucleosome Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Andresen, Kurt; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2014-03-01

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics is central to gene functions including packaging, regulation, and repair. At the molecular level, the basic building block of chromatin is a nucleosome core particle (NCP) made of 147 base pairs (bp) of dsDNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. These NCPs are connected by short 10-90 bps of linker DNA as beads on a string. Key factors determining the packaging of NCP arrays to form chromatin include ionic condition, linker DNA length, and epigenetic modifications, especially of the histone tails. We have investigated how the conformations of model tetra-NCP arrays are modulated by these factors using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Here we present recent studies of the effects of ion (KCl and MgCl2), linker length, and histone modification (tail deletions) on NCP arrays. Our SAXS measurement makes it possible to learn about both the global compaction of NCP arrays and local inter-NCP spatial correlations within the same array.

  3. Solar array flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Emerging satellite designs require increasing amounts of electrical power to operate spacecraft instruments and to provide environments suitable for human habitation. In the past, electrical power was generated by covering rigid honeycomb panels with solar cells. This technology results in unacceptable weight and volume penalties when large amounts of power are required. To fill the need for large-area, lightweight solar arrays, a fabrication technique in which solar cells are attached to a copper printed circuit laminated to a plastic sheet was developed. The result is a flexible solar array with one-tenth the stowed volume and one-third the weight of comparably sized rigid arrays. An automated welding process developed to attack the cells to the printed circuit guarantees repeatable welds that are more tolerant of severe environments than conventional soldered connections. To demonstrate the flight readiness of this technology, the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) was developed and flown on the space shuttle Discovery in September 1984. The tests showed the modes and frequencies of the array to be very close to preflight predictions. Structural damping, however, was higher than anticipated. Electrical performance of the active solar panel was also tested. The flight performance and postflight data evaluation are described.

  4. Microfluidic application-specific integrated device for monitoring direct cell-cell communication via gap junctions between individual cell pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Philip J.; Hung, Paul J.; Shaw, Robin; Jan, Lily; Lee, Luke P.

    2005-05-01

    Direct cell-cell communication between adjacent cells is vital for the development and regulation of functional tissues. However, current biological techniques are difficult to scale up for high-throughput screening of cell-cell communication in an array format. In order to provide an effective biophysical tool for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of gap junctions that underlie intercellular communication, we have developed a microfluidic device for selective trapping of cell-pairs and simultaneous optical characterizations. Two different cell populations can be brought into membrane contact using an array of trapping channels with a 2μm by 2μm cross section. Device operation was verified by observation of dye transfer between mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) placed in membrane contact. Integration with lab-on-a-chip technologies offers promising applications for cell-based analytical tools such as drug screening, clinical diagnostics, and soft-state biophysical devices for the study of gap junction protein channels in cellular communications. Understanding electrical transport mechanisms via gap junctions in soft membranes will impact quantitative biomedical sciences as well as clinical applications.

  5. Stochastic Resonance Magnetic Force Microscopy imaging of Josephson Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naibert, Tyler; Polshyn, Hryhoriy; Wolin, Brian; Durkin, Malcolm; Garrido Menacho, Rita; Mondragon Shem, Ian; Chua, Victor; Hughes, Taylor; Mason, Nadya; Budakian, Raffi

    Vortex interactions are key to explaining the behavior of many two dimensional superconducting systems. We report on the development of a technique to locally probe vortex interactions in a 2D array of Josephson junctions. Scanning a magnetic tip attached to an ultra-soft cantilever over the array produces changes in the frequency of the cantilever along certain lines, forming geometric patterns in the scans. Different tip-surface separations and external magnetic fields produce a number of different patterns. These patterns correspond to tip locations in which two configurations of vortices in the lattice have degenerate energies. By imaging the locations of these degeneracies, information on the local vortex interactions may be obtained.

  6. Water Cooled TJ Dense Array Modules for Parabolic Dishes

    SciTech Connect

    Loeckenhoff, Ruediger; Kubera, Tim; Rasch, Klaus Dieter

    2010-10-14

    AZUR SPACE Solar Power GmbH has developed a novel type of dense array module for use in parabolic dishes. Such dishes never produce a perfectly homogeneous, rectangular light spot but an inhomogeneous light distribution. A regular module would use this light distribution very inefficiently. Therefore AZUR SPACE developed a dense array module concept which can be adapted to inhomogeneous light spots. It is populated with state of the art triple junction solar cells.The modules are designed for light intensities in the range of 50-100 W/cm{sup 2} and are actively water cooled. Prototypes are installed in 11 m{sup 2} parabolic dishes produced by Zenith Solar. A peak output of 2.3 kW electrical and 5.5 kW thermal power could be demonstrated. The thermal power may be used for solar heating, solar cooling or warm water.

  7. Resonant plasmonic terahertz detection in graphene split-gate field-effect transistors with lateral p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhii, V.; Ryzhii, M.; Shur, M. S.; Mitin, V.; Satou, A.; Otsuji, T.

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the proposed resonant terahertz (THz) detectors on the basis of field-effect transistors (FETs) with split gates, electrically induced lateral p-n junctions, uniform graphene layer (GL) or perforated (in the p-n junction depletion region) graphene layer (PGL) channel. The perforated depletion region forms an array of the nanoconstions or nanoribbons creating the barriers for the holes and electrons. The operation of the GL-FET- and PGL-FET-detectors is associated with the rectification of the ac current across the lateral p-n junction enhanced by the excitation of bound plasmonic oscillations in the p- and n-sections of the channel. Using the developed device model, we find the GL-FET- and PGL-FET-detector characteristics. These detectors can exhibit very high voltage responsivity at the THz radiation frequencies close to the frequencies of the plasmonic resonances. These frequencies can be effectively voltage tuned. We show that in PL-FET-detectors the dominant mechanism of the current rectification is due to the tunneling nonlinearity, whereas in the PGL-FET-detector the current rectification is primarily associated with the thermionic processes. Due to much lower p-n junction conductance in the PGL-FET-detectors, their resonant response can be substantially more pronounced than in the GL-FET-detectors corresponding to fairly high detector responsivity.

  8. Resonant plasmonic terahertz detection in graphene split-gate field-effect transistors with lateral p–n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhii, V.; Ryzhii, M.; Shur, M. S.; Mitin, V.; Satou, A.; Otsuji, T.

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the proposed resonant terahertz (THz) detectors on the basis of field-effect transistors (FETs) with split gates, electrically induced lateral p–n junctions, uniform graphene layer (GL) or perforated (in the p–n junction depletion region) graphene layer (PGL) channel. The perforated depletion region forms an array of the nanoconstions or nanoribbons creating the barriers for the holes and electrons. The operation of the GL-FET- and PGL-FET-detectors is associated with the rectification of the ac current across the lateral p–n junction enhanced by the excitation of bound plasmonic oscillations in the p- and n-sections of the channel. Using the developed device model, we find the GL-FET- and PGL-FET-detector characteristics. These detectors can exhibit very high voltage responsivity at the THz radiation frequencies close to the frequencies of the plasmonic resonances. These frequencies can be effectively voltage tuned. We show that in PL-FET-detectors the dominant mechanism of the current rectification is due to the tunneling nonlinearity, whereas in the PGL-FET-detector the current rectification is primarily associated with the thermionic processes. Due to much lower p–n junction conductance in the PGL-FET-detectors, their resonant response can be substantially more pronounced than in the GL-FET-detectors corresponding to fairly high detector responsivity.

  9. Synchronizing large systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.L.; Kung, H.T.

    1982-04-01

    Parallel computing structures consist of many processors operating simultaneously. If a concurrent structure is regular, as in the case of systolic array, it may be convenient to think of all processors as operating in lock step. Totally synchronized systems controlled by central clocks are difficult to implement because of the inevitable problem of clock skews and delays. An alternate means of enforcing necessary synchronization is the use of self-timed, asynchronous schemes, at the cost of increased design complexity and hardware cost. Realizing that different circumstances call for different synchronization methods, this paper provides a spectrum of synchronization models; based on the assumptions made for each model, theoretical lower bounds on clock skew are derived, and appropriate or best-possible synchronization schemes for systolic arrays are proposed. This paper represents a first step towards a systematic study of synchronization problems for large systolic arrays.

  10. The junctions that don't fit the scheme: special symmetrical cell-cell junctions of their own kind.

    PubMed

    Franke, Werner W; Rickelt, Steffen; Barth, Mareike; Pieperhoff, Sebastian

    2009-10-01

    Immunocytochemical, electron-, and immunoelectron-microscopical studies have revealed that, in addition to the four major "textbook categories" of cell-cell junctions (gap junctions, tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes), a broad range of other junctions exists, such as the tiny puncta adhaerentia minima, the taproot junctions (manubria adhaerentia), the plakophilin-2-containing adherens junctions of mesenchymal or mesenchymally derived cell types including malignantly transformed cells, the composite junctions (areae compositae) of the mature mammalian myocardium, the cortex adhaerens of the eye lens, the interdesmosomal "sandwich" or "stud" junctions in the subapical layers of stratified epithelia and the tumors derived therefrom, and the complexus adhaerentes of the endothelial and virgultar cells of the lymph node sinus. On the basis of their sizes and shapes, other morphological criteria, and their specific molecular ensembles, these junctions and the genes that encode them cannot be subsumed under one of the major categories mentioned above but represent special structures in their own right, appear to serve special functions, and can give rise to specific pathological disorders. PMID:19680692

  11. Solar array subsystems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, P. W.; Miller, F. Q.; Badgley, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    The effects on life cycle costs of a number of technology areas are examined for a LEO, 500 kW solar array. A baseline system conceptual design is developed and the life cycle costs estimated in detail. The baseline system requirements and design technologies are then varied and their relationships to life cycle costs quantified. For example, the thermal characteristics of the baseline design are determined by the array materials and masses. The thermal characteristics in turn determine configuration, performance and hence life cycle cost.

  12. Automated array assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. F.

    1976-01-01

    Manufacturing techniques are evaluated using expenses based on experience and studying basic cost factors for each step to evaluate expenses from a first-principles point of view. A formal cost accounting procedure is developed which is used throughout the study for cost comparisons. The first test of this procedure is a comparison of its predicted costs for array module manufacturing with costs from a study which is based on experience factors. A manufacturing cost estimate for array modules of $10/W is based on present-day manufacturing techniques, expenses, and materials costs.

  13. Soldered solar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, H. C.

    1982-06-01

    The ability of soldered interconnects to withstand a combination of long life and severe environmental conditions was investigated. Improvements in joint life from the use of solder mixes appropriate to low temperature conditons were studied. Solder samples were placed in a 150 C oven for 5 weeks (= 12 yr at 80 C, or 24 at 70 C according to Arrhenius's rule). Conventional and high solder melting point array samples underwent 1000 thermal cycles between -186 and 100 C. Results show that conventional and lead rich soldered arrays can survive 10 yr geostationary orbit missions.

  14. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  15. Array signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Haykin, S.; Justice, J.H.; Owsley, N.L.; Yen, J.L.; Kak, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    This is the first book to be devoted completely to array signal processing, a subject that has become increasingly important in recent years. The book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1, which is introductory, reviews some basic concepts in wave propagation. The remaining five chapters deal with the theory and applications of array signal processing in (a) exploration seismology, (b) passive sonar, (c) radar, (d) radio astronomy, and (e) tomographic imaging. The various chapters of the book are self-contained. The book is written by a team of five active researchers, who are specialists in the individual fields covered by the pertinent chapters.

  16. Aberrant expression and function of gap junctions during carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, H

    1991-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication plays a key role in the maintenance of homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Reflecting deranged homeostasis in cancer cells, most transformed or cancerous cells show aberrant gap junctional intercellular communication; they have decreased junctional communication between each other and/or with surrounding normal cells. Studies with in vitro cell transformation and animal carcinogenesis models suggest an involvement of blocked intercellular communication in later stages of carcinogenesis. Analysis of expression of gap junction proteins (connexins) and corresponding mRNA indicates that a number of regulation sites are involved in aberrant function of gap junctions during carcinogenesis. Suppression of transformed phenotypes is often seen when transformed cells are physically in contact with their normal counterparts. Some studies suggest that gap junctional intercellular communication is involved in such tumor suppression. PMID:1663449

  17. Coherent diffraction of thermal currents in long Josephson tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Giazotto, Francesco; Solinas, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We discuss heat transport in thermally-biased long Josephson tunnel junctions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. In full analogy with the Josephson critical current, the phase-dependent component of the heat current through the junction displays coherent diffraction. Thermal transport is analyzed as a function of both the length and the damping of the junction, highlighting deviations from the standard "Fraunhofer" pattern characteristic of short junctions. The heat current diffraction patterns show features strongly related to the formation and penetration of Josephson vortices, i.e., solitons. We show that a dynamical treatment of the system is crucial for the realistic description of the Josephson junction, and it leads to peculiar results. In fact, hysteretic behaviors in the diffraction patterns when the field is swept up and down are observed, corresponding to the trapping of vortices in the junction.

  18. Electron optics with p-n junctions in ballistic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaowen; Han, Zheng; Elahi, Mirza M.; Habib, K. M. Masum; Wang, Lei; Wen, Bo; Gao, Yuanda; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Ghosh, Avik W.; Dean, Cory R.

    2016-09-01

    Electrons transmitted across a ballistic semiconductor junction are expected to undergo refraction, analogous to light rays across an optical boundary. In graphene, the linear dispersion and zero-gap band structure admit highly transparent p-n junctions by simple electrostatic gating. Here, we employ transverse magnetic focusing to probe the propagation of carriers across an electrostatically defined graphene junction. We find agreement with the predicted Snell’s law for electrons, including the observation of both positive and negative refraction. Resonant transmission across the p-n junction provides a direct measurement of the angle-dependent transmission coefficient. Comparing experimental data with simulations reveals the crucial role played by the effective junction width, providing guidance for future device design. Our results pave the way for realizing electron optics based on graphene p-n junctions.

  19. Sub-micrometer epitaxial Josephson junctions for quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Jeffrey S.; Vissers, Michael R.; da Silva, Fabio C. S.; Wisbey, David S.; Weides, Martin; Weir, Terence J.; Turek, Benjamin; Braje, Danielle A.; Oliver, William D.; Shalibo, Yoni; Katz, Nadav; Johnson, Blake R.; Ohki, Thomas A.; Pappas, David P.

    2012-02-01

    We present a fabrication scheme and testing results for epitaxial sub-micrometer Josephson junctions. The junctions are made using a high-temperature (1170 K) ‘via process’ yielding junctions as small as 0.8 µm in diameter by use of optical lithography. Sapphire (Al2O3) tunnel-barriers are grown on an epitaxial Re/Ti multilayer base-electrode. We have fabricated devices with both Re and Al top-electrodes. While room temperature (295 K) resistance versus area data are favorable for both types of top-electrodes, the low-temperature (50 mK) data show that junctions with the Al top-electrode have a much higher subgap resistance. The microwave loss properties of the junctions have been measured by use of superconducting Josephson junction qubits. The results show that high subgap resistance correlates with improved qubit performance.

  20. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2012-03-06

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  1. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  2. Deep diode arrays for X-ray detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemel, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Temperature gradient zone melting process was used to form p-n junctions in bulk of high purity silicon wafers. These diodes were patterned to form arrays for X-ray spectrometers. The whole fabrication processes for these X-ray detectors are reviewed in detail. The p-n junctions were evaluated by (1) the dark diode I-V measurements, (2) the diode C sub I - V measurements, and (3) the MOS C-V measurements. The results showed that these junctions were linearly graded in charge distribution with low reverse bias leakage current flowing through them (few nA at -10 volts). The X-ray detection experiments showed that an FWHM of 500 eV was obtained from these diodes with a small bias of just -5 volts (for X-ray source Fe55). A theoretical model was proposed to explain the extra peaks found in the energy spectra and a very interesting point - cross talk effect was pointed out. This might be a solution to the problem of making really high resolution X-ray spectrometers.

  3. Complex Critical Exponents for Percolation Transitions in Josephson-Junction Arrays, Antiferromagnets, and Interacting Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rafael M.; Schmalian, Jörg

    2011-02-01

    We show that the critical behavior of the XY quantum-rotor model undergoing a percolation transition is dramatically affected by its topological Berry phase 2πρ. In particular, for irrational ρ, its low-energy excitations emerge as spinless fermions with fractal spectrum. As a result, critical properties not captured by the usual Ginzburg-Landau-Wilson description of phase transitions arise, such as complex critical exponents, log-periodic oscillations and dynamically broken scale invariance.

  4. Macroscopic quantum effects in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Machida, M.

    2008-09-01

    A macroscopic quantum theory for the capacitively-coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ’s) is constructed. We clarify the multi-junction effect for the macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) to the first resistive branch. It is shown that the escape rate is greatly enhanced by the capacitive coupling between junctions. We also discuss the origin of the N2-enhancement in the escape rate observed in the uniformly switching in Bi-2212 IJJ’s.

  5. Geometrical theory of triple junctions of CSL boundaries.

    PubMed

    Gertsman, V Y

    2001-07-01

    When three grain boundaries having misorientations generating coincidence site lattices (CSLs) meet at a triple junction, a common (triple-junction) CSL is formed. A theory is developed as a set of theorems establishing the relationships between the geometrical parameters of the grain-boundary and triple-junction CSLs. Application of the theory is demonstrated in detail for the case of the cubic crystal system. It is also shown how the theory can be extended to an arbitrary crystal lattice.

  6. Definitive Evidence for the existence of tight junctions in invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lane, NJ; Chandler, HJ

    1980-01-01

    Extensive and unequivocal tight junctions are here reported between the lateral borders of the cellular layer that circumscribes the arachnid (spider) central nervous system. This account details the features of these structures, which form a beltlike reticulum that is more complex than the simple linear tight junctions hitherto found in invertebrate tissues and which bear many of the characteristics of vertebrate zonulae occludentes. We also provide evidence that these junctions form the basis of a permeability barrier to exogenous compounds. In thin sections, the tight junctions are identifiable as punctate points of membrane apposition; they are seen to exclude the stain and appear as election- lucent moniliform strands along the lines of membrane fusion in en face views of uranyl-calcium-treated tissues. In freeze-fracture replicas, the regions of close membrane apposition exhibit P-face (PF) ridges and complementary E-face (EF) furrows that are coincident across face transitions, although slightly offset with respect to one another. The free inward diffusion of both ionic and colloidal lanthanum is inhibited by these punctate tight junctions so that they appear to form the basis of a circumferential blood-brain barrier. These results support the contention that tight junctions exist in the tissues of the invertebrata in spite of earlier suggestions that (a) they are unique to vertebrates and (b) septate junctions are the equivalent invertebrate occluding structure. The component tight junctional 8- to 10-nm-particulate PF ridges are intimately intercalated with, but clearly distinct from, inverted gap junctions possessing the 13-nm EF particles typical of arthropods. Hence, no confusion can occur as to which particles belong to each of the two junctional types, as commonly happens with vertebrate tissues, especially in the analysis of developing junctions. Indeed, their coexistance in this way supports the idea, over which there has been some controversy, that

  7. Design of mode-sorting asymmetric Y-junctions.

    PubMed

    Riesen, Nicolas; Love, John D

    2012-05-20

    The theory of mode-sorting in bimodal asymmetric Y-junctions is extended to multimode asymmetric Y-junctions with multiple output arms. This theory allows for the optimization of these mode-sorting planar structures. Asymmetric Y-junctions provide unique opportunities for spatial mode division multiplexing (MDM) of optical fiber. Spatial MDM is considered paramount to overcoming the bandwidth limitations of single-mode fiber. The design criteria presented in this paper facilitate their design.

  8. Classical phase diffusion in small hysteretic Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinis, J.M.; Kautz, R.L. )

    1989-10-02

    The existence of classical phase diffusion in hysteretic junctions is demonstrated by quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated {ital I}-{ital V} curves. The simulations are based on a circuit that accurately models both the junction and its external shunting impedance at microwave frequencies. We show that the bias current at which the junction switches from the phase diffusion state to the voltage state is sensitive to dissipation at microwave frequencies.

  9. Noise characteristics and instabilities of long Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.S.; Lee, B.; Symko, O.G.; Yeh, W.J.; Zheng, D.J.

    1989-03-01

    In a magnetic field, current biased long Josephson junctions exhibit the dynamics of fluxon motion which are affected by fluctuations. These consist of telegraph noise at voltage steps and instabilities due to chaotic behavior. Results on long junctions with McCumber number ..beta../sub c/ ranging from 10 to 100 show such behavior. The telegraph noise is driven by thermal fluctuations. Modeling of our junctions using a perturbed sine-Gordon equation shows the chaotic regions and the periodic ones.

  10. Gap Junctions between Photoreceptor Cells in the Vertebrate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Raviola, Elio; Gilula, Norton B.

    1973-01-01

    In the outer plexiform layer of the retina the synaptic endings of cone cells make specialized junctions with each other and with the endings of rod cells. The ultrastructure of these interreceptor junctions is described in retinas of monkeys, rabbits, and turtles, in thin sections of embedded specimens and by the freeze-fracturing technique. Cone-to-rod junctions are ribbon-like areas of close membrane approximation. On either side of the narrowing of the intercellular space, the junctional membranes contain a row of particles located on the fracture face A (cytoplasmic leaflet), while the complementary element, a row of single depressions, is located on fracture face B. The particle rows are surrounded by a membrane region that is devoid of particulate inclusions and bears an adherent layer of dense cytoplasmic material. Cone-to-cone junctions in some places are identical to cone-to-rod junctions, while in other places they closely resemble typical gap junctions (nexus). Interreceptor junctions, therefore, represent a morphological variant of the gap junction, and probably mediate electrotonic coupling between neighboring photoreceptor cells. Images PMID:4198274

  11. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  12. Direct experimental determination of voltage across high-low junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    High-low (HL) junctions form a part of many semiconductor devices, including back surface field solar cells. A first experimental determination and interpretation of the voltage across the HL junction under low- and high-injection conditions is presented as a function of the voltage across a nearby p/n junction. Theoretical analysis from first principles is shown to bear well on the experimental results. In addition, a test structure is proposed for measurement of the effective surface recombination velocity at the HL junctions.

  13. Josephson junction through a disordered topological insulator with helical magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Alexander; Alidoust, Mohammad; Loss, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We study supercurrent and proximity vortices in a Josephson junction made of disordered surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator with a proximity induced in-plane helical magnetization. In a regime where the rotation period of helical magnetization is larger than the junction width, we find supercurrent 0 -π crossovers as a function of junction thickness, magnetization strength, and parameters inherent to the helical modulation and surface states. The supercurrent reversals are associated with proximity induced vortices, nucleated along the junction width, where the number of vortices and their locations can be manipulated by means of the superconducting phase difference and the parameters mentioned above.

  14. Craniovertebral Junction Instability: A Review of Facts about Facets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction surgery involves an appropriate philosophical, biomechanical and anatomical understanding apart from high degree of technical skill and ability of controlling venous and arterial bleeding. The author presents his 30-year experience with treating complex craniovertebral junction instability related surgical issues. The facets of atlas and axis form the primary site of movements at the craniovertebral junction. All craniovertebral junction instability is essentially localized to the atlantoaxial facet joint. Direct manipulation and fixation of the facets forms the basis of treatment for instability. PMID:26240728

  15. Interfacial mixing during annealing of zinc oxide nanoparticle junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming; Giapis, Konstantinos P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2011-05-01

    The process of forming a junction between crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles during pulsed thermal annealing in liquid tetradecane is studied using molecular dynamics simulation. Pairs of equal and unequal size particles are considered with emphasis on neck growth and atom mixing. The contact area and interface width of the junction are found to increase with heat pulse power albeit at different rates. The results suggest that it is possible to increase the junction area without significant mixing of atoms across the junction interface by tailoring the heat pulse power.

  16. Specialized membrane junctions between neurons in the vertebrate cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, C; Llinás, R

    1972-05-01

    "Gap" junctions, the morphological correlate for low-resistance junctions, are demonstrated between some mossy fiber terminals and granule cell dendrites in some lower vertebrate cerebella (gymnotid and frog). Most of the gap junctions (GJs) seen in the gymnotid-fish cerebellum exhibit an asymmetrical configuration, the electron-opaque cytoplasmic material underlying the junction being more extensive in the dendritic than in the axonal side. In the frog cerebellum, the GJs have a symmetrical distribution of such electron-opaque material. In both species the GJs are encountered at the same synaptic interface as the conventional synaptic zone (CSZ), constituting "mixed synapses" in a morphological sense. The axonal surface covered by CSZs is larger than that covered by GJs. In mammalian cerebellum, GJs are observed only in the molecular layer, between perikarya, dendrites, or perikarya and dendrites of the inhibitory interneurons. These GJs are intermixed with attachment plates and intermediary junctions interpreted as simply adhesive. In the mammalian cerebellum, a new type of junction which resembles the septate junctions (SJs) of invertebrate epithelia is observed between axonal branches forming the tip of the brush of basket fibers around the initial segment of the Purkinje cell axon. It is suggested that such junctions may be modified forms of septate junctions. The physiological implications of the possible existence of high-resistance cross-bridges between basket cell terminals, which may compartmentalize the extracellular space and thus regulate extracellular current flow, must be considered.

  17. Tight junctions and the regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2009-04-01

    Cell adhesion is a key regulator of cell differentiation. Cell interactions with neighboring cells and the extracellular matrix regulate gene expression, cell proliferation, polarity and apoptosis. Apical cell-cell junctions participate in these processes using different types of proteins, some of them exhibit nuclear and junctional localization and are called NACos for Nuclear Adhesion Complexes. Tight junctions are one type of such cell-cell junctions and several signaling complexes have been identified to associate with them. In general, expression of tight junction components suppresses proliferation to allow differentiation in a coordinated manner with adherens junctions and extracellular matrix adhesion. These tight junction components have been shown to affect several signaling and transcriptional pathways, and changes in the expression of tight junction proteins are associated with several disease conditions, such as cancer. Here, we will review how tight junction proteins participate in the regulation of gene expression and cell proliferation, as well as how they are regulated themselves by different mechanisms involved in gene expression and cell differentiation.

  18. Magic-T Junction using Microstrip/Slotline Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.; Doiron, Terence

    2008-01-01

    An improved broadband planar magic-T junction that incorporates microstrip/slotline transitions has been developed. In comparison with a prior broadband magic-T junction incorporating microstrip/slotline transitions, this junction offers superior broadband performance. In addition, because this junction is geometrically simpler and its performance is less affected by fabrication tolerances, the benefits of the improved design can be realized at lower fabrication cost. There are potential uses for junctions like this one in commercial microwave communication receivers, radar and polarimeter systems, and industrial microwave instrumentation. A magic-T junction is a four-port waveguide junction consisting of a combination of an H-type and an E-type junction. An E-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm that extends from a main waveguide in the same direction as that of the electric (E) field in the waveguide. An H-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm parallel to the magnetic (H) field in a main waveguide. A magic-T junction includes two input ports (here labeled 1 and 2, respectively) and two output ports (here labeled E and H, respectively). In an ideal case, (1) a magic-T junction is lossless, (2) the input signals add (that is, they combine in phase with each other) at port H, and (3) the input signals subtract (that is, they combine in opposite phase) at port E. The prior junction over which the present junction is an improvement affords in-phase-combining characterized by a broadband frequency response, and features a small slotline area to minimize in-band loss. However, with respect to isolation between ports 1 and 2 and return loss at port E, it exhibits narrowband frequency responses. In addition, its performance is sensitive to misalignment of microstrip and slotline components: this sensitivity is attributable to a limited number of quarter-wavelength (lambda/4) transmission-line sections for matching impedances

  19. Automated array assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    A general technology assessment and manufacturing cost analysis was presented. A near-term (1982) factory design is described, and the results of an experimental production study for the large-scale production of flat-panel silicon and solar-cell arrays are detailed.

  20. Array processors in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The field of attached scientific processors (''array processors'') is surveyed, and an attempt is made to indicate their present and possible future use in computational chemistry. The current commercial products from Floating Point Systems, Inc., Datawest Corporation, and CSP, Inc. are discussed.

  1. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  2. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua Joshua

    2008-11-11

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  3. Thermo-electric charge-to-voltage converter with superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction for bolometer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Leonid

    2010-11-01

    A novel type of the zero-biased thermo-electric bolometer (TEB) is proposed. The bolometer is based on a charge-to-voltage converter (CVC) with a superconductor-insulator-normal (SIN) tunnel junction and a superconducting absorber. The absorption of photons in the absorber leads to excitation of quasiparticles with some fraction of charge imbalance, tunneling through the SIN junction in zero-biased mode and generation of voltage. The thermoelectric voltage is determined by accumulation of tunneling charge in an external capacitance. Conversion efficiency is very high and voltage values comparable with a superconducting gap are easily achieved. The zero-biased CVC-TEB can be effectively used for creation of an array of bolometers and multi-pixel detection systems.

  4. Differences between liver gap junction protein and lens MIP 26 from rat: implications for tissue specificity of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B J; Takemoto, L J; Hunkapiller, M W; Hood, L E; Revel, J P

    1983-03-01

    Liver gap junctions and gap-junction-like structures from eye lenses are each comprised of a single major protein (Mr 28,000 and 26,000, respectively). These proteins display different two-dimensional peptide fingerprints, distinct amino acid compositions, nonhomologous N-terminal amino acid sequences and different sensitivities to proteases when part of the intact junction. However, the junctional protein of each tissue is well conserved between species, as demonstrated previously for lens and now for liver in several mammalian species. The possiblity of tissue-specific gap junction proteins is discussed in the light of data suggesting that rat heart gap junctions are comprised of yet a third protein. PMID:6299583

  5. Pseudospin dynamics in multimode polaritonic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, G.; Malpuech, G.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    Using Keldysh-Green function formalism we theoretically analyzed the dynamics of multimode exciton-polariton Josephson junctions. We took into account the spinor nature of polaritons and considered in detail the role of coupling of the fundamental modes with excited states. We demonstrate that the coupling to the reservoir results in a change of the oscillation pattern. In particular, it can lead to renormalization of the oscillation frequency, appearance of higher order harmonics, and induce transition between the regimes of free Josephson oscillations and macroscopic quantum self-trapping.

  6. Nonintrusive Measurement Of Temperature Of LED Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Powers, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Temperature inferred from spectrum of emitted light. Method of determining temperature of junction based on two relevant characteristics of LED. Gap between valence and conduction electron-energy bands in LED material decreases with increasing temperature, causing wavelength of emitted photon to increase with temperature. Other, as temperature increases, non-radiative processes dissipate more of input electrical energy as heat and less as photons in band-gap wavelenth region; optical and quantum efficiencies decrease with increasing temperature. In principal, either characteristic alone used to determine temperature. However, desirable to use both to obtain indication of uncertainty.

  7. Elasticity of a soap film junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, F.; Janiaud, E.; Bacri, J.-C.; Andreotti, B.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the elasticity of an isolated, threefold junction of soap films (Plateau border), which displays static undulations when liquid rapidly flows into it. By analyzing the shape of the Plateau border (thickness R and transverse displacement) as a function of the liquid flow rate Q, we show experimentally and theoretically that the elasticity of the Plateau border is dominated by the bending of the soap films pulling on the Plateau border. In this asymptotic regime, the undulation wavelength obeys the scaling law ˜Q2 R-2 and the decay length ˜Q2 R-4.

  8. Plasmon Enhanced Hetero-Junction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Ching, Levine; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Xu, Huizhong

    2015-03-01

    Here we report a systematic study of plasmon-enhanced hetero-junction solar cells made of colloidal quantum dots (PbS) and nanowires (ZnO), with/without metal nanoparticles (Au). The structure of solar cell devices was characterized by AFM, SEM and profilometer, etc. The power conversion efficiencies of solar cell devices were characterized by solar simulator (OAI TriSOL, AM1.5G Class AAA). The enhancement in the photocurrent due to introduction of metal nanoparticles was obvious. We believe this is due to the plasmonic effect from the metal nanoparticles. The correlation between surface roughness, film uniformity and device performance was also studied.

  9. On-chip Josephson junction microwave switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, O.; Abutaleb, M. O.; Kirby, C.; Rennie, M.

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on the design and measurement of a reflective single-pole single-throw microwave switch with no internal power dissipation, based on a superconducting circuit containing a single Josephson junction. The data demonstrate the switch operation with 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth centered at 10 GHz, low insertion loss, and better than 20 dB on/off ratio. The switch's measured performance agrees well with simulations for input powers up to -100 dBm. An extension of the demonstrated circuit to implement a single-pole double-throw switch is shown in simulation.

  10. On Chip Josephson Junction Microwave Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, Ofer; Abutaleb, Mohamed; Kirby, Chris; Rennie, Michael

    We report on the design and measurement of a reflective single-pole single-throw microwave switch based on a superconducting circuit containing a single Josephson junction. The device has no internal power dissipation, minimal insertion loss, and is controlled by Φ0-level base-band signals. The data demonstrates the device operation with 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth centered at 10 GHz and better than 20 dB on/off ratio for input powers up to -100 dBm.

  11. Phonon interference effects in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Markussen, Troels

    2013-12-28

    We study coherent phonon transport through organic, π-conjugated molecules. Using first principles calculations and Green's function methods, we find that the phonon transmission function in cross-conjugated molecules, like meta-connected benzene, exhibits destructive quantum interference features very analogous to those observed theoretically and experimentally for electron transport in similar molecules. The destructive interference features observed in four different cross-conjugated molecules significantly reduce the thermal conductance with respect to linear conjugated analogues. Such control of the thermal conductance by chemical modifications could be important for thermoelectric applications of molecular junctions.

  12. Idiopathic Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis in the Craniocervical Junction

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Eo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP) is a rare disease, and it is characterized by chronic progressive inflammatory fibrosis and thickening of the dura mater with resultant compression of the spinal cord or neural structure without any identifiable cause. It can occur in the intracranial or spinal dura mater alone or as a craniospinal form. The spinal form is rarer than the cranial form and the craniospinal form is extremely rare. We report a rare case of IHP in the craniocervical junction involving both the cranial and spinal dura mater and discuss the diagnosis and management of the disease. PMID:26512276

  13. Junctional angle of a bihanded helix.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wolgemuth, Charles W; Huber, Greg

    2014-10-01

    Helical filaments having sections of reversed chirality are common phenomena in the biological realm. The apparent angle between the two sections of opposite handedness provides information about the geometry and elasticity of the junctional region. In this paper, the governing differential equations for the local helical axis are developed, and asymptotic solutions of the governing equations are solved by perturbation theory. The asymptotic solutions are compared with the corresponding numerical solutions, and the relative error at second order is found to be less than 1.5% over a range of biologically relevant curvature and torsion values from 0 to 1/2 in dimensionless units.

  14. Collisions of strings with Y junctions.

    PubMed

    Copeland, E J; Kibble, T W B; Steer, D A

    2006-07-14

    We study the dynamics of Nambu-Goto strings with junctions at which three strings meet. In particular, we exhibit one simple exact solution and examine the process of intercommuting of two straight strings in which they exchange partners but become joined by a third string. We show that there are important kinematical constraints on this process. The exchange cannot occur if the strings meet with very large relative velocity. This may have important implications for the evolution of cosmic superstring networks and non-Abelian string networks. PMID:16907431

  15. Direct-write programming of nanoscale demultiplexer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. R.; Gibson, G.; Jung, G. Y.; Wu, W.; Straznicky, J.; Tong, W.; Li, Z.; Williams, R. Stanley

    2007-10-01

    We report a direct-write method to form vertical metal-metal connections between crossing metal wires at a 60 nm pitch. Patterned connections within crossed wire arrays enable construction of nanoscale-to-microscale demultiplexer circuits which are required elements in any integrated nanowire memory, logic or sensing system. However, fabricating dense nano-micro connections below a pitch of ~80 nm exceeds standard electron-beam (e-beam) lithography capabilities, and usually requires more than 10 yield-reducing process steps including two critical pitch overlay alignments. We describe direct-write programming that requires only two high-yield process steps and micron-scale overlay accuracy, and appears to be extendable to sub-30 nm pitch. Electron-beam irradiation was used to modify the electrical conductivity of a 23 nm insulating polymer film separating metal nanowires and microwires of a demultiplexer crossbar array. Junction conductivities were programmed over five orders of magnitude from G<10-11 to G>10-6 Ω-1. Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering assist optimization of structural design, electron energy and dose. The time, voltage and temperature dependences of programmed junctions indicate that the insulating polymer is graphitized into conductive fragments that show percolation-limited electronic transport.

  16. Analysis of atrioventricular junction, ventricular mass, and ventriculoarterial junction in 43 specimens with atrial isomerism.

    PubMed

    De Tommasi, S; Daliento, L; Ho, S Y; Macartney, F J; Anderson, R H

    1981-03-01

    We have analysed the atrioventricular junction, ventricular mass, and ventriculoarterial junction in 43 hearts with isomeric atrial chambers. Of the hearts, 32 had atrial chambers of bilateral right morphology while 11 had atrial chambers with bilateral left atrial characteristics. Among the hearts with right atrial isomerism, there were 13 biventricular hearts, all with ambiguous atrioventricular connection. Eight had a common valve and five had two atrioventricular valves. In the other 19 hearts, the atrial chambers were connected to only one ventricular chamber, 18 having double inlet ventricle through a common valve and the other having absence of the left atrioventricular connection. In these univentricular hearts, all possible types of ventricular morphology were found. The ventriculoarterial junction among these hearts with right isomerism showed great variation. In the hearts with left atrial isomerism, nine hearts had two ventricles and two were univentricular. The biventricular hearts all had ambiguous atrioventricular connection, six via a common valve and three via two valves. The two univentricular hearts both had double inlet via a common valve, one to a chamber of right ventricular type and the other to a chamber of left ventricular type. Both had rudimentary chambers of complementary pattern. The ventriculoarterial junction again showed much variation. Statistical analysis showed that pulmonary obstruction and a univentricular heart were both significantly more frequent in association with right compared with left isomerism. Significant differences were also noted in the two groups in terms of ventriculoarterial connections and infundibular morphology.

  17. Grades 1-8, Apache Junction Unified School District 43, Apache Junction, Arizona. PLATO Evaluation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, David W.; Quinn, Nancy W.

    Apache Junction Unified School District, Arizona, has embarked on a 5-year program of instructional improvement using technology. PLATO Elementary reading and mathematics products were installed in the district's elementary and middle schools at the beginning of the 1999-2000 school year. This evaluation studied the use and preliminary student…

  18. Deviations from mean-field behavior in disordered nanoscale superconductor normal-metal superconductor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Taejoon; Valles, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    We have fabricated quasi-two-dimensional disordered arrays of nanoscale Pb grains coupled by an overlayer of Ag grains. Their temperature-dependent resistive transitions follow predictions for an array of mesoscopic superconductor normal-metal superconductor junctions. The decrease of their transition temperatures with Ag overlayer thickness systematically deviates from the Cooper limit theory of the proximity effect as the Pb grain size decreases. The deviations occur when the estimated number of Cooper pairs per grain is <1 and suggest the approach to a superconductor-to-metal transition.

  19. The Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; Welch, William J.; Dreher, John; Tarter, Jill; Blitz, Leo; Davis, Michael; Fleming, Matt; Bock, Douglas; Bower, Geoffrey; Lugten, John; Girmay-Keleta, G.; D'Addario, Larry R.; Harp, Gerry R.; Ackermann, Rob; Weinreb, Sander; Engargiola, Greg; Thornton, Doug; Wadefalk, Niklas

    2004-10-01

    The Allen Telescope Array, originally called the One Hectare Telescope (1hT) [1] will be a large array radio telescope whose novel characteristics will be a wide field of view (3.5 deg-GHz HPBW), continuous frequency coverage of 0.5 - 11 GHz, four dual-linear polarization output bands of 100 MHz each, four beams in each band, two 100 MHz spectral correlators for two of the bands, and hardware for RFI mitigation built in. Its scientific motivation is for deep SETI searches and, at the same time, a variety of other radio astronomy projects, including transient (e.g. pulsar) studies, HI mapping of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, Zeeman studies of the galactic magnetic field in a number of transitions, mapping of long chain molecules in molecular clouds, mapping of the decrement in the cosmic background radiation toward galaxy clusters, and observation of HI absorption toward quasars at redshifts up to z=2. The array is planned for 350 6.1-meter dishes giving a physical collecting area of about 10,000 square meters. The large number of components reduces the price with economies of scale. The front end receiver is a single cryogenically cooled MIMIC Low Noise Amplifier covering the whole band. The feed is a wide-band log periodic feed of novel design, and the reflector system is an offset Gregorian for minimum sidelobes and spillover. All preliminary and critical design reviews have been completed. Three complete antennas with feeds and receivers are under test, and an array of 33 antennas is under construction at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory for the end of 2004. The present plan is to have a total of about 200 antennas completed by the summer of 2006 and the balance of the array finished before the end of the decade.

  20. The Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Allen Telescope Array Team

    2010-01-01

    The ATA is a 42-element centimeter wavelength array located in Hat Creek, California and jointly operated by UC Berkeley Radio Astronomy Laboratory and the SETI Institute. Since the ATA dedication in Fall 2007, activities have been focused on commissioning the array, retrofitting a handful of components including the feed, developing an operations model, creation of pipeline processing for correlator imaging data, early science observations, and launching of the major surveys for which the telescope was built. The retrofit of the feed improves feed mechanical robustness as well as high frequency performance. Science programs launched include imaging radio transient and static sky surveys (ATATS and PiGSS), commensal SETI and transient surveys of the Galactic Center, targeted SETI observations of nearby stars, the Fly's Eye transient survey, broadband spectra of nearby star-forming galaxies, polarimetric observations of bright radio sources, observations of hydrogen in nearby galaxies and galaxy groups, molecular line observations in the Galaxy, and observations of Jupiter and the Moon. The baseline Square Kilometer Array (SKA) design, a large-N-small-diameter (LNSD) array with wide-band single-pixel feeds and an offset Gregorian antenna, bears a strong resemblance to the ATA. Additional ATA contributions to the SKA include configuration studies for LNSD arrays, the use of fiber optics for broadband data transmission, the use of flexible FPGA-based digital electronics, passive cooling of antennas, and implementation of commensal observing modes. The ATA is currently used for exploration of calibration and imaging algorithms necessary for the SKA. I will summarize current technical status and performance, the results from early science and surveys, and ATA contributions to SKA development.